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Sample records for acinar cell pancreatic

  1. Papillocystic Variant of Acinar Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Radhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell pancreatic carcinoma is a rare solid malignant neoplasm. Recent review of the literature showed occasional cases with papillary or papillocystic growth patterns, ranging from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. We report a large 10 cm pancreatic tumor with papillocystic pathology features involving the pancreatic head. The growth pattern of these tumors could be mistaken for intraductal papillary mucinous tumors or other pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  2. Numb regulates acinar cell dedifferentiation and survival during pancreatic damage and acinar-to-ductal metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Renee L; Staley, Binnaz K; Liou, Angela; Hebrok, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a leading cause of cancer-related death. Through the process of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), pancreatic acinar cells give rise to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), the most common precursor of PDA. However, even when Kras is activated in a majority of acinar cells, ADM and subsequent development of PanINs is inefficient in the absence of additional stresses. Numb regulates cell junctions, integrins, and the activity of embryonic signaling pathways; therefore, we investigated its effects on acinar cell dedifferentiation, regeneration, and metaplasia. We used mouse models of pancreatic regeneration and PDA as well as mice with loss-of-function alleles of Numb (p48Cre/p48Cre(ER);Numb(f/f) and p48Cre/p48Cre(ER);Kras(G12D);Numb(f/f) mice) to study the roles of Numb in pancreatic regeneration and ADM. Loss of Numb resulted in premature dedifferentiation of acinar cells in response to injury due to administration of the cholecystokinin analogue cerulein and interfered with acinar cell regeneration. Numb was found to regulate multiple signaling pathways in acinar cells during cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Disruption of Numb accelerated and destabilized ADM in the context of oncogenic Kras (in p48Cre;Kras(G12D);Numb(f/f) and p48Cre(ER);Kras(G12D);Numb(f/f) mice). Numb is an important regulator of acinar cell differentiation and viability during metaplasia. In mice with pancreatitis or pancreatic injury, elimination of Numb causes dedifferentiated acinar cells to undergo apoptosis, and this is not mitigated by oncogenic Kras. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Loss of acinar cell IKKα triggers spontaneous pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Wu, Xuefeng; Holzer, Ryan G; Lee, Jun-Hee; Todoric, Jelena; Park, Eek-Joong; Ogata, Hisanobu; Gukovskaya, Anna S; Gukovsky, Ilya; Pizzo, Donald P; VandenBerg, Scott; Tarin, David; Atay, Ciǧdem; Arkan, Melek C; Deerinck, Thomas J; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria; Dawson, David; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Karin, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that causes progressive destruction of pancreatic acinar cells and, ultimately, loss of pancreatic function. We investigated the role of IκB kinase α (IKKα) in pancreatic homeostasis. Pancreas-specific ablation of IKKα (Ikkα(Δpan)) caused spontaneous and progressive acinar cell vacuolization and death, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, and circulatory release of pancreatic enzymes, clinical signs resembling those of human chronic pancreatitis. Loss of pancreatic IKKα causes defective autophagic protein degradation, leading to accumulation of p62-mediated protein aggregates and enhanced oxidative and ER stress in acinar cells, but none of these effects is related to NF-κB. Pancreas-specific p62 ablation prevented ER and oxidative stresses and attenuated pancreatitis in Ikkα(Δpan) mice, suggesting that cellular stress induced by p62 aggregates promotes development of pancreatitis. Importantly, downregulation of IKKα and accumulation of p62 aggregates were also observed in chronic human pancreatitis. Our studies demonstrate that IKKα, which may control autophagic protein degradation through its interaction with ATG16L2, plays a critical role in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis, whose dysregulation promotes pancreatitis through p62 aggregate accumulation.

  4. PD2/Paf1 depletion in pancreatic acinar cells promotes acinar-to-ductal metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Parama; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Vaz, Arokia P; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Batra, Surinder K

    2014-06-30

    Pancreatic differentiation 2 (PD2), a PAF (RNA Polymerase II Associated Factor) complex subunit, is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells and has demonstrated potential oncogenic property. Here, we report that PD2/Paf1 expression was restricted to acinar cells in the normal murine pancreas, but its expression increased in the ductal cells of KrasG12D/Pdx1Cre (KC) mouse model of pancreatic cancer with increasing age, showing highest expression in neoplastic ductal cells of 50 weeks old mice. PD2/Paf1 was specifically expressed in amylase and CK19 double positive metaplastic ducts, representing intermediate structures during pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM). Similar PD2/Paf1 expression was observed in murine pancreas that exhibited ADM-like histology upon cerulein challenge. In normal mice, cerulein-mediated inflammation induced a decrease in PD2/Paf1 expression, which was later restored upon recovery of the pancreatic parenchyma. In KC mice, however, PD2/Paf1 mRNA level continued to decrease with progressive dysplasia and subsequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, knockdown of PD2/Paf1 in pancreatic acinar cells resulted in the abrogation of Amylase, Elastase and Lipase (acinar marker) mRNA levels with simultaneous increase in CK19 and CAII (ductal marker) transcripts. In conclusion, our studies indicate loss of PD2/Paf1 expression during acinar transdifferentiation in pancreatic cancer initiation and PD2/Paf1 mediated regulation of lineage specific markers.

  5. Ca2+ signaling in pancreatic acinar cells: physiology and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H. Petersen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic acinar cell is a classical model for studies of secretion and signal transduction mechanisms. Because of the extensive endoplasmic reticulum and the large granular compartment, it has been possible - by direct measurements - to obtain considerable insights into intracellular Ca2+ handling under both normal and pathological conditions. Recent studies have also revealed important characteristics of stimulus-secretion coupling mechanisms in isolated human pancreatic acinar cells. The acinar cells are potentially dangerous because of the high intra-granular concentration of proteases, which become inappropriately activated in the human disease acute pancreatitis. This disease is due to toxic Ca2+ signals generated by excessive liberation of Ca2+ from both the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory granules.

  6. File list: Pol.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: ALL.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Oth.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: His.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Unc.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Oth.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. NFATc4 Regulates Sox9 Gene Expression in Acinar Cell Plasticity and Pancreatic Cancer Initiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hessmann, Elisabeth; Zhang, Jin-San; Chen, Nai-Ming; Hasselluhn, Marie; Liou, Geou-Yarh; Storz, Peter; Ellenrieder, Volker; Billadeau, Daniel D; Koenig, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Acinar transdifferentiation toward a duct-like phenotype constitutes the defining response of acinar cells to external stress signals and is considered to be the initial step in pancreatic carcinogenesis...

  16. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ge [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wan, Rong [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Hu, Yanling [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Ni, Jianbo [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Tang, Maochun [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Congying [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wang, Xingpeng, E-mail: wangxingpeng@hotmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  17. Proteoglycans support proper granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroso, Miguel; Agricola, Brigitte; Hacker, Christian; Schrader, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Zymogen granules (ZG) are specialized organelles in the exocrine pancreas which allow digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion. The molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and the sorting of zymogens are still incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of proteoglycans in granule formation and secretion of zymogens in pancreatic AR42J cells, an acinar model system. Cupromeronic Blue cytochemistry and biochemical studies revealed an association of proteoglycans primarily with the granule membrane. Removal of proteoglycans by carbonate treatment led to a loss of membrane curvature indicating a supportive role in the maintenance of membrane shape and stability. Chemical inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis impaired the formation of normal electron-dense granules in AR42J cells and resulted in the formation of unusually small granule structures. These structures still contained the zymogen carboxypeptidase, a cargo molecule of secretory granules, but migrated to lighter fractions after density gradient centrifugation. Furthermore, the basal secretion of amylase was increased in AR42J cells after inhibitor treatment. In addition, irregular-shaped granules appeared in pancreatic lobules. We conclude that the assembly of a proteoglycan scaffold at the ZG membrane is supporting efficient packaging of zymogens and the proper formation of stimulus-competent storage granules in acinar cells of the pancreas.

  18. File list: NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: InP.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: NoD.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: InP.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells mm9 Input control Pancreas Pancreatic acin...ar cells SRX327162,SRX327163 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katharina J; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Steiger, Katja; Regel, Ivonne; Gewies, Andreas; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta) receptor 1 (Ifnar1) partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas.

  4. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina J Miller

    Full Text Available Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta receptor 1 (Ifnar1 partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (Ccl2, a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas.

  5. Cholinergic intrapancreatic neurons induce Ca²+ signaling and early-response gene expression in pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D J; cowles, R A; Segura, B J; Romanchuk, G; Barnhart, D C; Mulholland, M W

    2000-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine function has been demonstrated to be under neuronal regulation. The pathways responsible for this effect, and the long-term consequences of such interactions, are incompletely described. The effects of neuronal depolarization on pancreatic acinar cells were studied to determine whether calcium signaling and c-fos expression were activated. In pancreatic lobules, which contain both neurons and acinar cells, agonists that selectively stimulated neurons increased intracellular calcium in acinar cells. Depolarization also led to the expression of c-fos protein in 24% +/- 4% of the acinar cells. In AR42J pancreatic acinar cells, cholinergic stimulation demonstrated an average increase of 398 +/- 19 nmol/L in intracellular calcium levels, and induced c-fos expression that was time and dose dependent. The data indicate that intrapancreatic neurons induce Ca²+ signaling and early-response gene expression in pancreatic acinar cells.

  6. Protein kinase D1 drives pancreatic acinar cell reprogramming and progression to intraepithelial neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Geou-Yarh; Döppler, Heike; Braun, Ursula B.; Panayiotou, Richard; Scotti Buzhardt, Michele; Radisky, Derek C.; Crawford, Howard C.; Fields, Alan P.; Murray, Nicole R.; Wang, Q. Jane; Leitges, Michael; Storz, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The transdifferentiation of pancreatic acinar cells to a ductal phenotype (acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, ADM) occurs after injury or inflammation of the pancreas and is a reversible process. However, in the presence of activating Kras mutations or persistent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) signalling, cells that underwent ADM can progress to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually pancreatic cancer. In transgenic animal models, ADM and PanINs are initiated by high-affinity ligands for EGF-R or activating Kras mutations, but the underlying signalling mechanisms are not well understood. Here, using a conditional knockout approach, we show that protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is sufficient to drive the reprogramming process to a ductal phenotype and progression to PanINs. Moreover, using 3D explant culture of primary pancreatic acinar cells, we show that PKD1 acts downstream of TGFα and Kras, to mediate formation of ductal structures through activation of the Notch pathway.

  7. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Pancreatic Reg I and Acinar Cell Differentiation: Influence On Cellular Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Didier; Mueller, Catherine; Zenilman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic reg I has been implicated in cellular differentiation. Acinar cells can transdifferentiate into other pancreatic-derived cells, and we postulated that changes in intracellular levels of reg I would affect the state of differentiation. Methods We transfected AR42J cells with a plasmid containing the entire coding sequence of reg I, and isolated clones with cDNA in sense (SS) or antisense (AS) orientation. Levels of mRNA and protein expression were examined by Western blotting and Real Time-PCR. Results Expression of reg I was confirmed in sense or antisense clones. AR42J transfected with SS demonstrated more acinar-like phenotype while those transfected with AS showed a less differentiated state. Specifically, amylase mRNA and protein levels increased in SS cells while AS cells showed increased PDX-1 and insulin mRNAs and cytokeratin protein. Conversely, cytokeratin and PDX-1 were depressed in SS cells. Conclusions These data demonstrate that in acinar cells, reg I over-expression is linked to acinar cell differentiation, while inhibition of reg I leads to beta-cell and possibly ductal phenotype. Reg I expression in acinar cells is important in maintaining pancreatic cell lineage, and when decreased, cells can de-differentiate and move towards becoming other pancreatic cells. PMID:19557902

  9. Protons released during pancreatic acinar cell secretion acidify the lumen and contribute to pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendorff, Natasha; Floetenmeyer, Matthias; Schwiening, Christof; Thorn, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Secretory granules are acidic; cell secretion will therefore lead to extracellular acidification. We propose that during secretion, protons co-released with proteins from secretory granules of pancreatic acinar cells acidify the restricted extracellular space of the pancreatic lumen to regulate normal physiological and pathophysiological functions in this organ Extracellular changes in pH were quantified in real time using 2-photon microscopy analysis of pancreatic tissue fragments from mouse models of acute pancreatitis (mice given physiological concentrations [10 -20 pM] of cholecystokinin or high concentrations of [100 nM] cerulein). The effects of extracellular changes in pH on cell behavior and structures were measured. With physiological stimulation, secretory granule fusion (exocytosis) caused acidification of the pancreatic lumen. Acidifications specifically affected intracellular calcium responses and accelerated the rate of recovery from agonist-evoked calcium signals. Protons therefore appear to function as negative-feedback, extracellular messengers during coupling of cell stimuli with secretion. At high concentrations of cerulein, large increases in secretory activity were associated with extreme, prolonged acidification of the luminal space. These pathological changes in pH led to disruption of intercellular junctional coupling, measured by movement of occludin and E-cadherin. By measuring changes in extracellular pH in pancreas of mice, we observed that luminal acidification resulted from exocytosis of zymogen granules from acinar cells. This process is part of normal organ function but could contribute to the tissue damage in cases of acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Murine Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma Growth Kinetics Are Independent of Dietary Vitamin D Deficiency or Supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    James Dooley; Vasiliki Lagou; Nathalie Heirman; Tom Dresselaers; Uwe Himmelreich; Adrian Liston

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy in pancreatic cancer, yet evidence for an effect of dietary vitamin D on pancreatic cancer is ambiguous, with conflicting data from human epidemiological and intervention studies. Here, we tested the role of dietary vitamin D in the in vivo context of the well-characterized Ela1-TAg transgenic mouse model of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma. Through longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging of mice under conditions of either dietary vitamin ...

  11. [Pancreatic acinar neoplasms : Comparative molecular characterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, F

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas are biologically aggressive neoplasms for which treatment options are very limited. The molecular mechanisms of tumor initiation and progression are largely not understood and precursor lesions have not yet been identified. In this study, pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas were cytogenetically characterized as well as by molecular and immunohistochemical analyses. Corresponding investigations were carried out on pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms augmented by functional analyses. We show that pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas display a microsatellite stable, chromosomal unstable genotype, characterized by recurrent chromosomal imbalances that clearly discriminate them from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and neuroendocrine neoplasms. Based on findings obtained from comparative genomic hybridization, candidate genes could be identified, such as deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and c-MYC. Furthermore, several therapeutic targets were identified in acinar cell carcinomas and other pancreatic neoplasms, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). Moreover, L1CAM was shown to play a significant role in the tumorigenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Functional analyses in cell lines derived from pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms revealed promising anti-tumorigenic effects using EGFR and HSP90 inhibitors affecting the cell cycle and in the case of HSP90, regulating several other oncogenes. Finally, based on mutational analyses of mitochondrial DNA, molecular evidence is provided that acinar cell cystadenomas (or better cystic acinar transformation) represent non-clonal lesions, suggesting an inflammatory reactive non-neoplastic nature.

  12. Primary retroperitoneal acinar cell cystadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesci, Anna; Castelli, Paola; Facci, Enrico; Romano, Luigi; Zamboni, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    In this report, we describe a case of hitherto unreported primary retroperitoneal acinar cell cystadenoma that morphologically and immunophenotypically resembled pancreatic acinar cell cystadenoma. Pancreatic acinar cell cystadenoma is a very uncommon benign lesion characterized by acinar cell differentiation, the evidence of pancreatic exocrine enzyme production, and the absence of cellular atypia. Our case occurred in a 55-year-old woman presenting a 10-cm multilocular cystic lesion in the retroperitoneum thought to be a mucinous cystic neoplasm. At laparotomy, the cystic mass, which showed no connection with any organ, was completely resected with a clinical diagnosis of cystic lymphangioma. The diagnosis of retroperitoneal acinar cell cystadenoma was based on the recognition of morphological acinar differentiation, the immunohistochemical demonstration of the acinar marker trypsin, and the absence of cellular atypia. These peculiar features can be used in the differential diagnosis with all the other cystic lesions of the retroperitoneum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. NFATc4 Regulates Sox9 Gene Expression in Acinar Cell Plasticity and Pancreatic Cancer Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Hessmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar transdifferentiation toward a duct-like phenotype constitutes the defining response of acinar cells to external stress signals and is considered to be the initial step in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite the requirement for oncogenic Kras in pancreatic cancer (PDAC development, oncogenic Kras is not sufficient to drive pancreatic carcinogenesis beyond the level of premalignancy. Instead, secondary events, such as inflammation-induced signaling activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGFR or induction of Sox9 expression, are required for tumor formation. Herein, we aimed to dissect the mechanism that links EGFR signaling to Sox9 gene expression during acinar-to-ductal metaplasia in pancreatic tissue adaptation and PDAC initiation. We show that the inflammatory transcription factor NFATc4 is highly induced and localizes in the nucleus in response to inflammation-induced EGFR signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that NFATc4 drives acinar-to-ductal conversion and PDAC initiation through direct transcriptional induction of Sox9. Therefore, strategies designed to disrupt NFATc4 induction might be beneficial in the prevention or therapy of PDAC.

  14. Murine Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma Growth Kinetics Are Independent of Dietary Vitamin D Deficiency or Supplementation

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    James Dooley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy in pancreatic cancer, yet evidence for an effect of dietary vitamin D on pancreatic cancer is ambiguous, with conflicting data from human epidemiological and intervention studies. Here, we tested the role of dietary vitamin D in the in vivo context of the well-characterized Ela1-TAg transgenic mouse model of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma. Through longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging of mice under conditions of either dietary vitamin D deficiency (<5 IU/kg vitamin D or excess (76,500 IU/kg vitamin D, compared to control diet (1,500 IU/kg vitamin D, we measured the effect of variation of dietary vitamin D on tumor kinetics. No measurable impact of dietary vitamin D was found on pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma development, growth or mortality, casting further doubt on the already equivocal data supporting potential therapeutic use in humans. The lack of any detectable effect of vitamin D, within the physiological range of dietary deficiency or supplementation, in this model further erodes confidence in vitamin D as an effective antitumor therapeutic in pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma.

  15. Acinar cell apoptosis in Serpini2-deficient mice models pancreatic insufficiency.

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    Stacie K Loftus

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic insufficiency (PI when left untreated results in a state of malnutrition due to an inability to absorb nutrients. Frequently, PI is diagnosed as part of a larger clinical presentation in cystic fibrosis or Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. In this study, a mouse model for isolated exocrine PI was identified in a mouse line generated by a transgene insertion. The trait is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and homozygous animals are growth retarded, have abnormal immunity, and have reduced life span. Mice with the disease locus, named pequeño (pq, exhibit progressive apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells with severe exocrine acinar cell loss by 8 wk of age, while the islets and ductal tissue persist. The mutation in pq/pq mice results from a random transgene insertion. Molecular characterization of the transgene insertion site by fluorescent in situ hybridization and genomic deletion mapping identified an approximately 210-kb deletion on Chromosome 3, deleting two genes. One of these genes, Serpini2, encodes a protein that is a member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. Reintroduction of only the Serpini2 gene by bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic complementation corrected the acinar cell defect as well as body weight and immune phenotypes, showing that deletion of Serpini2 causes the pequeño phenotype. Dietary supplementation of pancreatic enzymes also corrected body size, body weight, and immunodeficiency, and increased the life span of Serpini2-deficient mice, despite continued acinar cell loss. To our knowledge, this study describes the first characterized genetic animal model for isolated PI. Genetic complementation of the transgene insertion mutant demonstrates that Serpini2 deficiency directly results in the acinar cell apoptosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition observed in pq/pq mice. The rescue of growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and mortality by either Serpini2 bacterial artificial chromosome

  16. Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with intracranial metastasis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Chieh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lin, Yung-Chang; Liu, Cheng-I; Wong, Min-Liang

    2007-01-01

    This report concerns a case of pancreatic carcinoma with widespread metastases to many organs including intracranial metastasis. An eleven-year-old, male, mixed-breed dog showed emaciation, ataxia, and multiple visible tumors within the neck. A MRI examination of the patient was conducted because of ataxia, and it was found that the intracranial invasive growth had resulted in compression of the brain stem. Necropsy was performed after the patient died. Based on gross and microscopic examination, the primary tumor cells were located in the left lobe of the pancreas and widespread metastasis was found into various organs, including the brain, lungs, liver, kidneys, tonsils, serosal surface of the esophagus, and submandibular, pulmonary hilar, mediastinal, and mesenteric lymph nodes. This case indicates that pancreatic adenocarcinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis list when cervical neck masses are detected.

  17. The novel cytokine interleukin-33 activates acinar cell proinflammatory pathways and induces acute pancreatic inflammation in mice.

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    Duraisamy Kempuraj

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is potentially fatal but treatment options are limited as disease pathogenesis is poorly understood. IL-33, a novel IL-1 cytokine family member, plays a role in various inflammatory conditions but its role in acute pancreatitis is not well understood. Specifically, whether pancreatic acinar cells produce IL-33 when stressed or respond to IL-33 stimulation, and whether IL-33 exacerbates acute pancreatic inflammation is unknown.In duct ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice and rats, we found that (a IL-33 concentration was increased in the pancreas; (b mast cells, which secrete and also respond to IL-33, showed degranulation in the pancreas and lung; (c plasma histamine and pancreatic substance P concentrations were increased; and (d pancreatic and pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine concentrations were increased. In isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells, TNF-α stimulation increased IL-33 release while IL-33 stimulation increased proinflammatory cytokine release, both involving the ERK MAP kinase pathway; the flavonoid luteolin inhibited IL-33-stimulated IL-6 and CCL2/MCP-1 release. In mice without duct ligation, exogenous IL-33 administration induced pancreatic inflammation without mast cell degranulation or jejunal inflammation; pancreatic changes included multifocal edema and perivascular infiltration by neutrophils and some macrophages. ERK MAP kinase (but not p38 or JNK and NF-kB subunit p65 were activated in the pancreas of mice receiving exogenous IL-33, and acinar cells isolated from the pancreas of these mice showed increased spontaneous cytokine release (IL-6, CXCL2/MIP-2α. Also, IL-33 activated ERK in human pancreatic tissue.As exogenous IL-33 does not induce jejunal inflammation in the same mice in which it induces pancreatic inflammation, we have discovered a potential role for an IL-33/acinar cell axis in the recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages and the exacerbation of acute pancreatic inflammation

  18. Molecular Ghrelin System in the Pancreatic Acinar Cells: The Role of the Polypeptide, Caerulein and Sensory Nerves.

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    Bonior, Joanna; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Gajdosz, Ryszard; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Pierzchalski, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Kot, Michalina; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Nawrot-Porąbka, Katarzyna; Link-Lenczowski, Paweł; Olszanecki, Rafał; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Jaworek, Jolanta

    2017-05-02

    Ghrelin (GHRL) is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Experimental studies showed that GHRL protects the stomach and pancreas against acute damage, but the effect of GHRL on pancreatic acinar cells was still undetermined. To investigate the effect of GHRL and caerulein on the functional ghrelin system in pancreatic acinar cells taking into account the role of sensory nerves (SN). Experiments were carried out on isolated pancreatic acinar cells and AR42J cells. Before acinar cells isolation, GHRL was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 50 µg/kg to rats with intact SN or with capsaicin deactivation of SN (CDSN). After isolation, pancreatic acinar cells were incubated in caerulein-free or caerulein containing solution. AR42J cells were incubated under basal conditions and stimulated with caerulein, GHRL or a combination of the above. Incubation of isolated acinar cells with caerulein inhibited GHS-R and GHRL expression at the level of mRNA and protein in those cells. Either in rats with intact SN or with CDSN, administration of GHRL before isolation of acinar cells increased expression of GHRL and GHS-R in those cells and reversed the caerulein-induced reduction in expression of those parameters. Similar upregulation of GHS-R and GHRL was observed after administration of GHRL in AR42J cells. GHRL stimulates its own expression and expression of its receptor in isolated pancreatic acinar cells and AR42J cells on the positive feedback pathway. This mechanism seems to participate in the pancreatoprotective effect of GHRL in the course of acute pancreatitis.

  19. Sirtuin-1 regulates acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and supports cancer cell viability in pancreatic cancer.

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    Wauters, Elke; Sanchez-Arévalo Lobo, Victor J; Pinho, Andreia V; Mawson, Amanda; Herranz, Daniel; Wu, Jianmin; Cowley, Mark J; Colvin, Emily K; Njicop, Erna Ngwayi; Sutherland, Rob L; Liu, Tao; Serrano, Manuel; Bouwens, Luc; Real, Francisco X; Biankin, Andrew V; Rooman, Ilse

    2013-04-01

    The exocrine pancreas can undergo acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), as in the case of pancreatitis where precursor lesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) can arise. The NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) has been implicated in carcinogenesis with dual roles depending on its subcellular localization. In this study, we examined the expression and the role of Sirt1 in different stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis, i.e. ADM models and established PDAC. In addition, we analyzed the expression of KIAA1967, a key mediator of Sirt1 function, along with potential Sirt1 downstream targets. Sirt1 was co-expressed with KIAA1967 in the nuclei of normal pancreatic acinar cells. In ADM, Sirt1 underwent a transient nuclear-to-cytoplasmic shuttling. Experiments where during ADM, we enforced repression of Sirt1 shuttling, inhibition of Sirt1 activity or modulation of its expression, all underscore that the temporary decrease of nuclear and increase of cytoplasmic Sirt1 stimulate ADM. Our results further underscore that important transcriptional regulators of acinar differentiation, that is, Pancreatic transcription factor-1a and β-catenin can be deacetylated by Sirt1. Inhibition of Sirt1 is effective in suppression of ADM and in reducing cell viability in established PDAC tumors. KIAA1967 expression is differentially downregulated in PDAC and impacts on the sensitivity of PDAC cells to the Sirt1/2 inhibitor Tenovin-6. In PDAC, acetylation of β-catenin is not affected, unlike p53, a well-characterized Sirt1-regulated protein in tumor cells. Our results reveal that Sirt1 is an important regulator and potential therapeutic target in pancreatic carcinogenesis. ©2012 AACR.

  20. The role of Ca2+ influx in endocytic vacuole formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Svetlana; Collier, David; Chvanov, Michael; Middlehurst, Ben; Beckett, Alison J; Prior, Ian A; Criddle, David N; Begg, Malcolm; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2015-02-01

    The inducers of acute pancreatitis trigger a prolonged increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c), which is responsible for the damage to and eventual death of pancreatic acinar cells. Vacuolization is an important indicator of pancreatic acinar cell damage. Furthermore, activation of trypsinogen occurs in the endocytic vacuoles; therefore the vacuoles can be considered as 'initiating' organelles in the development of the cell injury. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the formation of endocytic vacuoles and Ca(2+) influx developed in response to the inducers of acute pancreatitis [bile acid taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLC-S) and supramaximal concentration of cholecystokinin-8 (CCK)]. We found that the inhibitor of STIM (stromal interaction molecule)/Orai channels, GSK-7975A, effectively suppressed both the Ca(2+) influx (stimulated by inducers of pancreatitis) and the formation of endocytic vacuoles. Cell death induced by TLC-S or CCK was also inhibited by GSK-7975A. We documented the formation of endocytic vacuoles in response to store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) induced by thapsigargin [TG; inhibitor of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) pumps] and observed strong inhibition of TG-induced vacuole formation by GSK-7975A. Finally, we found that structurally-unrelated inhibitors of calpain suppress formation of endocytic vacuoles, suggesting that this Ca2+-dependent protease is a mediator between Ca(2+) elevation and endocytic vacuole formation.

  1. Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) mediates ethanol-induced sensitization of secretagogue signaling in pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Ok; Ives, Kirk L; Wang, Xiaofu; Davey, Robert A; Chao, Celia; Hellmich, Mark R

    2012-09-28

    Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with most cases of chronic pancreatitis, a progressive necrotizing inflammatory disease that can result in pancreatic insufficiency due to acinar atrophy and fibrosis and an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. At a cellular level acute alcohol exposure can sensitize pancreatic acinar cells to secretagogue stimulation, resulting in dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and premature digestive enzyme activation; however, the molecular mechanisms by which ethanol exerts these toxic effects have remained undefined. In this study we identify Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein as an essential mediator of ethanol-induced sensitization of cholecystokinin- and carbachol-regulated Ca(2+) signaling in pancreatic acinar cells. We show that exposure of rodent acinar cells to ethanol induces protein kinase C-dependent Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein phosphorylation, sensitization of cholecystokinin-stimulated Ca(2+) signaling, and potentiation of both basal and cholecystokinin-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Furthermore, we show that either suppression of Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein expression using short hairpin RNA or gene ablation prevented the sensitizing effects of ethanol on cholecystokinin- and carbachol-stimulated Ca(2+) signaling and intracellular chymotrypsin activation in pancreatic acinar cells, suggesting that the modulation of Raf-1 inhibitory protein expression may have future therapeutic utility in the prevention or treatment of alcohol-associated pancreatitis.

  2. A novel 2-step culture model for long-term in vitro maintenance of human pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläuer, Merja; Sand, Juhani; Nordback, Isto; Laukkarinen, Johanna

    2014-07-01

    Because of rapid loss of functional differentiation that regularly occurs in vitro, culture systems permitting long-term studies on pancreatic acinar cells pose a major technical challenge. We recently described a method for long-term cultivation of mouse acinar cells. Here, we introduce a novel 2-step culture system for human pancreatic acinar cells. The system involves 2 successive culture phases, which are as follows: primary organotypic culture of isolated acinar clusters under soft Matrigel (BD Biosciences, Bedford, Mass; range, 2-3 days) followed by dissociation and secondary monolayer culture of acinar cells (4 days). Basal and agonist-induced amylase secretion was used to assess the secretory capability. Acinar clusters showed excellent morphology and stable basal amylase secretion throughout primary culture. Carbachol (0.1 mM/L) increased amylase secretion 1.4-fold (P = 0.021) versus basal in 3 independent 4-day secondary cultures. Despite the controversy about the presence and roles of cholecystokinin receptors in human acinar cells, one of them also responded to 0.1 and 10 nM/L concentrations of caerulein with 1.9- and 1.4-fold increases in the rate of amylase secretion, respectively. Our technique allows cultured human acinar cells to maintain secretory differentiation for a minimum of 7 days. The technique provides novel prospects for in vitro modeling of the human exocrine pancreas.

  3. Activating transcription factor 3 promotes loss of the acinar cell phenotype in response to cerulein-induced pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Elena N; Young, Claire C; Toma, Jelena; Levy, Michael; Berger, Kurt R; Johnson, Charis L; Mehmood, Rashid; Swan, Patrick; Chu, Alphonse; Cregan, Sean P; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Howlett, Christopher J; Pin, Christopher L

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a debilitating disease of the exocrine pancreas that, under chronic conditions, is a major susceptibility factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Although down-regulation of genes that promote the mature acinar cell fate is required to reduce injury associated with pancreatitis, the factors that promote this repression are unknown. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a key mediator of the unfolded protein response, a pathway rapidly activated during pancreatic insult. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing, we show that ATF3 is bound to the transcriptional regulatory regions of >30% of differentially expressed genes during the initiation of pancreatitis. Of importance, ATF3-dependent regulation of these genes was observed only upon induction of pancreatitis, with pathways involved in inflammation, acinar cell differentiation, and cell junctions being specifically targeted. Characterizing expression of transcription factors that affect acinar cell differentiation suggested that acinar cells lacking ATF3 maintain a mature cell phenotype during pancreatitis, a finding supported by maintenance of junctional proteins and polarity markers. As a result, Atf3-/- pancreatic tissue displayed increased tissue damage and inflammatory cell infiltration at early time points during injury but, at later time points, showed reduced acinar-to-duct cell metaplasia. Thus our results reveal a critical role for ATF3 as a key regulator of the acinar cell transcriptional response during injury and may provide a link between chronic pancreatitis and PDAC. © 2017 Fazio et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Fine structural analyses of pancreatic acinar cell nuclei from mice fed on genetically modified soybean

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    M Malatesta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We carried out ultrastructural morphometrical and immunocytochemical analyses on pancreatic acinar cell nuclei from mice fed on genetically modified (GM soybean, in order to investigate possible structural and molecular modifications of nucleoplasmic and nucleolar constituents.We found a significant lowering of nucleoplasmic and nucleolar splicing factors as well as a perichromatin granule accumulation in GM-fed mice, suggestive of reduced post-transcriptional hnRNA processing and/or nuclear export. This is in accordance to already described zymogen synthesis and processing modifications in the same animals.

  5. Effect of glucagon on digestive enzyme synthesis, transport and secretion in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M

    1980-09-01

    1. Effect of glucagon on amylase secretion and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release from functionally intact dissociated pancreatic acinar cells and acini was studied. 2. In dissociated rat pancreatic acinar cells, the rate of amylase secretion was increased by 70% with bethanechol (maximally effective concentration, 10(-4) M) and 125% with A23187 (10(-5) M), but the response to cholecystokinin-pancreozymin (CCK-PZ) was inconsistent. In dissociated cells from mouse pancreas, the increases amounted to 78% with bethanechol (10(-4) M), 134% with A23187 (10(-5) M) and 82% with CCK-PZ (maximally effective concentration, 0 . 01 u. ml.-1). Glucagon in concentrations ranging from 10(-7) to 10(-4) M increased amylase secretion by 3, 26, 67 and 80%, whereas secretin (10(-8)--10(-5) M) increased amylase secretion by 8, 39, 88 and 138%. LDH release was increased with A23187 in concentrations greater than 10(-6) M. 3. CCK-PZ, bethanechol and A23187 used in maximal concentrations potentiated the effect of a submaximal dose of glucagon whereas secretin did not have an additive or a potentiating effect. 4. Pancreatic acini were approximately 3 times more responsive to secretagogues than cells. The dose--response curves to bethanechol, glucagon and CCK-PZ for increase in amylase secretion were similar. LDH release was not increased by these agents. Cytochalasin B (5 microgram ml.-1) which is known to disrupt the integrity of luminal membrane inhibited the amylase secretion stimulated by glucagon, bethanechol and CCK-PZ. 5. Glucagon inhibited incorporation of a mixture of fifteen 14C-labelled amino acids (algal profile, Schwarz Mann) into perchloric acid precipitable proteins in dissociated mouse pancreatic acini within 30 min. 6. In 'pulse-chase' experiments, glucagon decreased the specific activity of zymogen granules isolated by differential centrifugation, from pancreatic lobules (120 min) and increased the specific activity of radiolabelled proteins in the medium (60 and 120 min

  6. Effects of Baicalin on inflammatory mediators and pancreatic acinar cell apoptosis in rats with sever acute pancreatitis

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    zhang xiping

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: To investigate the effects of Baicalin and Octreotide on inflammatory mediators and pancreatic acinar cells apoptosis of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP.
    • METHODS: SD rats were randomly divided into sham operated group (I group, model control group (II group, Baicalin treated group (III group and Octreotide treated group (IV group. Each group was also divided into subgroup of 3, 6 and 12 h (n = 15. The mortality rate, ascites/body weight ratio as well as the level of endotoxin, NO and ET-1 in blood were measured. The pathological severity score of pancreas, apoptotic indexes, and expression levels of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins in each group were investigated.
    • RESULTS: The survival rate of III and IV group has a significant difference compared with II group (P12 h < 0.05. The ascites volume, contents of inflammatory mediators in blood and pathological severity score of pancreas of III and IV group declined at different degrees compared to II group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 or P < 0.001. Apoptotic index in III group was significantly higher than that in II group at 3 and 6 h (P3, 6 h < 0.05. Apoptotic index in IV group was significantly higher than that in II group at pancreatic tail at 6 h (P6 h < 0.05. Expression level of Bax in III group was significantly higher than that in II group (pancreatic head P3 h,6 h < 0.01, pancreatic tail P3 h < 0.001.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Compared with Octreotide in the treatment of SAP, the protective mechanisms of Baicalin include reducing the excessive inflammatory mediators’ release, inducing the pancreatic acinar cells apoptosis.
    • KEY WORDS: Severe acute pancreatitis, baicalin, octreotide, inflammatory mediators, apoptosis, tissue microarrays.

  7. Growth Factor Independence-1 (Gfi1) Is Required for Pancreatic Acinar Unit Formation and Centroacinar Cell Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaoling; Nyeng, Pia; Xiao, Fan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The genetic specification of the compartmentalized pancreatic acinar/centroacinar unit is poorly understood. Growth factor independence-1 (Gfi1) is a zinc finger transcriptional repressor that regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, pre-T-cell differentiation, formation...... of pancreatic acinar cells as well as the centroacinar cells (CACs) in Gfi1(-/-) mice when compared with wild-type littermates. Pancreatic endocrine differentiation, islet architecture, and function were unaffected. Organ domain patterning and the formation of ductal cells occurred normally during the murine...... of granulocytes, inner ear hair cells, and the development of secretory cell types in the intestine. As GFI1/Gfi1 is expressed in human and rodent pancreas, we characterized the potential function of Gfi1 in mouse pancreatic development. METHODS: Gfi1 knockout mice were analyzed at histological and molecular...

  8. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  9. Polycomb repressor complex 1 promotes gene silencing through H2AK119 mono-ubiquitination in acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitz, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Reinhard, Tobias; Popp, Anna; Schäffer, Isabell; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Kleeff, Jörg

    2016-03-08

    Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) occurring in cerulein-mediated pancreatitis or in oncogenic Kras-driven pancreatic cancer development is accompanied by extensive changes in the transcriptional program. In this process, acinar cells shut down the expression of acinar specific differentiation genes and re-express genes usually found in embryonic pancreatic progenitor cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that a loss of acinar-specific transcription factors sensitizes the cells towards oncogenic transformation, ultimately resulting in cancer development. However, the mechanism behind the transcriptional silencing of acinar cell fate genes in ADM and pancreatic cancer is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed whether elevated levels of the polycomb repressor complex 1 (PRC1) components Bmi1 and Ring1b and their catalyzed histone modification H2AK119ub in ADMs and tumor cells, are responsible for the mediation of acinar gene silencing. Therefore, we performed chromatin-immunoprecipitation in in vitro generated ADMs and isolated murine tumor cells against the repressive histone modifications H3K27me3 and H2AK119ub. We established that the acinar transcription factor complex Ptf1-L is epigenetically silenced in ADMs as well as in pancreatic tumor cells. For the first time, this work presents a possible mechanism of acinar gene silencing, which is an important prerequisite in the initiation and maintenance of a dedifferentiated cell state in ADMs and tumor cells.

  10. Inhibitors of ORAI1 Prevent Cytosolic Calcium-Associated Injury of Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Acute Pancreatitis in 3 Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Voronina, Svetlana; Javed, Muhammad A; Awais, Muhammad; Szatmary, Peter; Latawiec, Diane; Chvanov, Michael; Collier, David; Huang, Wei; Barrett, John; Begg, Malcolm; Stauderman, Ken; Roos, Jack; Grigoryev, Sergey; Ramos, Stephanie; Rogers, Evan; Whitten, Jeff; Velicelebi, Gonul; Dunn, Michael; Tepikin, Alexei V; Criddle, David N; Sutton, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Sustained activation of the cytosolic calcium concentration induces injury to pancreatic acinar cells and necrosis. The calcium release-activated calcium modulator ORAI1 is the most abundant Ca(2+) entry channel in pancreatic acinar cells; it sustains calcium overload in mice exposed to toxins that induce pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of ORAI1 in pancreatic acinar cell injury and the development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Mouse and human acinar cells, as well as HEK 293 cells transfected to express human ORAI1 with human stromal interaction molecule 1, were hyperstimulated or incubated with human bile acid, thapsigargin, or cyclopiazonic acid to induce calcium entry. GSK-7975A or CM_128 were added to some cells, which were analyzed by confocal and video microscopy and patch clamp recordings. Acute pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by ductal injection of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate or intravenous' administration of cerulein or ethanol and palmitoleic acid. Some mice then were given GSK-7975A or CM_128, which inhibit ORAI1, at different time points to assess local and systemic effects. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each separately inhibited toxin-induced activation of ORAI1 and/or activation of Ca(2+) currents after Ca(2+) release, in a concentration-dependent manner, in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells (inhibition >90% of the levels observed in control cells). The ORAI1 inhibitors also prevented activation of the necrotic cell death pathway in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each inhibited all local and systemic features of acute pancreatitis in all 3 models, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The agents were significantly more effective, in a range of parameters, when given at 1 vs 6 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Cytosolic calcium overload, mediated via ORAI1, contributes to the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. ORAI1 inhibitors might be developed for the treatment of patients with pancreatitis

  11. Chronic alcohol exposure inhibits biotin uptake by pancreatic acinar cells: possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Kapadia, Rubina; Biswas, Arundhati; Said, Hamid M

    2014-11-01

    Chronic exposure to alcohol affects different physiological aspects of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC), but its effect on the uptake process of biotin is not known. We addressed this issue using mouse-derived pancreatic acinar 266-6 cells chronically exposed to alcohol and wild-type and transgenic mice (carrying the human SLC5A6 5'-promoter) fed alcohol chronically. First we established that biotin uptake by PAC is Na(+) dependent and carrier mediated and involves sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT). Chronic exposure of 266-6 cells to alcohol led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake, expression of SMVT protein, and mRNA as well as in the activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC5A6 promoter led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake by PAC, as well as in the expression of SMVT protein and mRNA and the activity of the SLC5A6 promoters expressed in the transgenic mice. We also found that chronic alcohol feeding of mice is associated with a significant increase in the methylation status of CpG islands predicted to be in the mouse Slc5a6 promoters and a decrease in the level of expression of transcription factor KLF-4, which plays an important role in regulating SLC5A6 promoter activity. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts biotin uptake in PAC and that this effect is exerted (at least in part) at the level of transcription of the SLC5A6 gene and may involve epigenetic/molecular mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Mutant KRas-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Acinar Cells Upregulates EGFR Signaling to Drive Formation of Pancreatic Precancerous Lesions

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    Geou-Yarh Liou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of pancreatic cancer requires the acquisition of oncogenic KRas mutations and upregulation of growth factor signaling, but the relationship between these is not well established. Here, we show that mutant KRas alters mitochondrial metabolism in pancreatic acinar cells, resulting in increased generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS. Mitochondrial ROS then drives the dedifferentiation of acinar cells to a duct-like progenitor phenotype and progression to PanIN. This is mediated via the ROS-receptive kinase protein kinase D1 and the transcription factors NF-κB1 and NF-κB2, which upregulate expression of the epidermal growth factor, its ligands, and their sheddase ADAM17. In vivo, interception of KRas-mediated generation of mROS reduced the formation of pre-neoplastic lesions. Hence, our data provide insight into how oncogenic KRas interacts with growth factor signaling to induce the formation of pancreatic cancer.

  13. Let-7b and miR-495 stimulate differentiation and prevent metaplasia of pancreatic acinar cells by repressing HNF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévot, Pierre-Paul; Augereau, Cécile; Simion, Alexandru; Van den Steen, Géraldine; Dauguet, Nicolas; Lemaigre, Frédéric P; Jacquemin, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    Diseases of the exocrine pancreas are often associated with perturbed differentiation of acinar cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate pancreas development, yet little is known about their contribution to acinar cell differentiation. We aimed to identify miRNAs that promote and control the maintenance of acinar differentiation. We studied mice with pancreas- or acinar-specific inactivation of Dicer (Foxa3-Cre/Dicer(loxP/-) mice), combined (or not) with inactivation of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 6 (Foxa3-Cre/Dicer(loxP/-)/Hnf6-/- mice). The role of specific miRNAs in acinar differentiation was investigated by transfecting cultured cells with miRNA mimics or inhibitors. Pancreatitis-induced metaplasia was investigated in mice after administration of cerulein. Inhibition of miRNA synthesis in acini by inactivation of Dicer and pancreatitis-induced metaplasia were associated with repression of acinar differentiation and with induction of HNF6 and hepatic genes. The phenotype of Dicer-deficient acini depends on the induction of HNF6; overexpression of this factor in developing acinar cells is sufficient to repress acinar differentiation and to induce hepatic genes. Let-7b and miR-495 repress HNF6 and are expressed in developing acini. Their expression is inhibited in Dicer-deficient acini, as well as in pancreatitis-induced metaplasia. In addition, inhibiting let-7b and miR-495 in acinar cells results in similar effects to those found in Dicer-deficient acini and metaplastic cells, namely induction of HNF6 and hepatic genes and repression of acinar differentiation. Let-7b, miR-495, and their targets constitute a gene network that is required to establish and maintain pancreatic acinar cell differentiation. Additional studies of this network will increase our understanding of pancreatic diseases. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits IL-6 expression via PPARγ-mediated expression of catalase in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eun Ah; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-07-01

    Cerulein pancreatitis mirrors human acute pancreatitis. In pancreatic acinar cells exposed to cerulein, reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate inflammatory signaling by Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, and cytokine induction. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) acts as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), which mediates the expression of some antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesized that DHA may induce PPARγ-target catalase expression and reduce ROS levels, leading to the inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 activation and IL-6 expression in cerulein-stimulated acinar cells. Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were treated with DHA in the presence or absence of the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, or treated with the PPARγ agonist troglitazone, and then stimulated with cerulein. Expression of IL-6 and catalase, ROS levels, JAK2/STAT3 activation, and nuclear translocation of PPARγ were assessed. DHA suppressed the increase in ROS, JAK2/STAT3 activation, and IL-6 expression induced nuclear translocation of PPARγ and catalase expression in cerulein-stimulated AR42J cells. Troglitazone inhibited the cerulein-induced increase in ROS and IL-6 expression, but induced catalase expression similar to DHA in AR42J cells. GW9662 abolished the inhibitory effect of DHA on cerulein-induced increase in ROS and IL-6 expression in AR42J cells. DHA-induced expression of catalase was suppressed by GW9662 in cerulein-stimulated AR42J cells. Thus, DHA induces PPARγ activation and catalase expression, which inhibits ROS-mediated activation of JAK2/STAT3 and IL-6 expression in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Phosphopeptide mapping of cholecystokinin receptors on agonist-stimulated native pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelebi, F; Miller, L J

    1995-02-17

    The cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor on the rat pancreatic acinar cell is a G protein-coupled receptor that is phosphorylated in response to homologous and heterologous agonist stimulation. In this work we have studied the stoichiometry of receptor phosphorylation and have utilized one-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping after cyanogen bromide cleavage to demonstrate that the third intracellular loop is the predominant domain of phosphorylation of this receptor in response to these treatments. Of the average 5 mol of phosphate/mol of receptor, greater than 95% was on the third loop, with the remainder residing on the carboxyl-terminal tail. Serine residues were the site of greater than 95% of phosphorylation, with threonine representing the remainder, and no phosphotyrosine was detected. Further, we have utilized two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping after subtilisin cleavage to identify differing sites of CCK receptor phosphorylation which are dependent on the agonist utilized to stimulate this cell. Both qualitative and quantitative differences in phosphorylation sites were observed after acinar cell stimulation with different protein kinase C agonists. Further, distinct phosphopeptides on the map were identified as representing substrate(s) of a staurosporine-insensitive kinase activity stimulated only by receptor occupation with native CCK and were felt to represent site(s) of action of a member of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase family. This represents a sensitive and powerful approach that is applicable to sparse receptors residing in their native cellular environment to assess possible differences in patterns of phosphorylation which may be important in agonist-specific receptor regulation.

  16. The Combination of Alcohol and Cigarette Smoke Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Cell Death in Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugea, Aurelia; Gerloff, Andreas; Su, Hsin-Yuan; Xu, Zhihong; Go, Ariel; Hu, Cheng; French, Samuel W; Wilson, Jeremy S; Apte, Minoti V; Waldron, Richard T; Pandol, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Smoking, an independent risk factor for pancreatitis, accelerates the development of alcoholic pancreatitis. Alcohol feeding of mice induces up-regulation of spliced X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1s), which regulates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response and promotes cell survival upon ER stress. We examined whether smoking affects the adaptive mechanisms induced by alcohol and accelerates disorders of the ER in pancreatic acinar cells. We studied the combined effects of ethanol (EtOH) and cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on ER stress and cell death responses in mouse and human primary acini and the acinar cell line AR42J. Cells were incubated with EtOH (50 mmol/L), CSE (20-40 μg/mL), or both (CSE+EtOH), and analyzed by immunoblotting, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and cell death assays. Some cells were incubated with MKC-3946, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus signaling 1 (ERN1, also called IRE1) that blocks XBP1s formation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed isocaloric amounts of an EtOH-containing (Lieber-DeCarli) or control diet for 11 weeks and exposed to cigarette smoke or room air in an exposure chamber for 2 hours each day. During the last 3 weeks, a subset of rats received intravenous injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 3 mg/kg per week) to induce pancreatitis or saline (control). Pancreatic tissues were collected and analyzed by histology and immunostaining techniques. In AR42J and primary acini, CSE+EtOH induced cell death (necrosis and apoptosis), but neither agent alone had this effect. Cell death was associated with a significant decrease in expression of XBP1s. CSE+EtOH, but neither agent alone, slightly decreased adenosine triphosphate levels in AR42J cells, but induced oxidative stress and sustained activation (phosphorylation) of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 3 (EIF2AK3, also called PERK) and increased protein levels of DNA damage inducible transcript 3 (DDIT

  17. Altered distribution of metaplastic Paneth, gastrin and pancreatic acinar cells in atrophic gastritic mucosa with endocrine cell lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveci, M Salih; Deveci, Güzin

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of progression from gastric endocrine cell hyperplasias (ECHs) to carcinoid tumor (GCT) is still unknown. In these lesions, the distribution of metaplastic Paneth, gastrin and pancreatic acinar cells developing due to consequences of corporal mucosal atrophy has not been investigated in detail. In this study, 33 gastric endoscopic biopsies with endocrine cell lesions were examined. In all cases except 6 with solitary GCT, complete-type (small intestine) intestinal metaplasia (IM) with Paneth cells was observed. The density of lysozyme-positive Paneth cells in IMs in cases with GCTs was less than those in ECH alone. The density of gastrin-positive cells in IMs and average number of micronodules of ECHs were similar. Pancreatic acinar metaplasia (PAM) was observed in 6 cases of GCTs with ECH. The size of GCTs with ECH was smaller than those without ECH. By image analysis, the percentage of Ki67 (MIB-1, proliferation marker) expressing cells of GCTs with ECH was 5.1+/-0.6%, and GCT without ECH 7.8+/-1%. Our results indicate that few Paneth cells and many PAMs in atrophic corporal mucosa are seen more frequently in cases of GCTs with ECH, compared to those in ECH alone. Gastrin-positive cells in the corporal IM may stimulate enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells, which may induce hyperplasia, dysplasia or neoplasia by augmenting the effects of hypergastrinemia through a paracrine mechanism on local gastrin-sensitive cells.

  18. Calcium signaling induced by angiotensin II in the pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, D C; Sarosi, G A; Romanchuk, G; Mulholland, M W

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the nature and mechanisms of angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling in AR42J cells. Cytosolic calcium concentrations were determined using fura-2-based microfluorimetry. Angiotensin II causes elevations in free cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in the rat pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J. The mechanisms of angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling were examined using fura-2-based fluorescent digital microscopy. Angiotensin II caused dose-dependent increments in [Ca2+]i over a concentration range of 0.1-1,000 nM, with an average increment of 243 +/- 16 nM at an angiotensin II concentration of 1,000 nM. Dup753, an AT1-specific antagonist, inhibited angiotensin II-evoked signaling, whereas the AT2 antagonist PD123,319 had no effect. Preincubation with the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 reduced the response in [Ca2+]i to 25% of that of the control. Thapsigargin abolished angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonist heparin introduced by radiofrequency electroporation inhibited responses to 46 +/- 6% of controls. Angiotensin II-evoked signals were reduced in magnitude and duration by elimination of Ca2+ from the extracellular buffer. Preincubation with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) had no effect. Angiotensin II did not stimulate cyclic AMP or suppress vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulated cyclic AMP production over the concentration range that caused Ca2+ signaling.

  19. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated

  20. Uptake of ascorbic acid by pancreatic acinar cells is negatively impacted by chronic alcohol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Said, Hamid M

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbic acid, AA) is indispensable for normal metabolism of all mammalian cells including pancreatic acinar cells (PACs). PACs obtain AA from their surroundings via transport across the cell membrane. Chronic alcohol exposure negatively affects body AA homeostasis; it also inhibits uptake of other micronutrients into PACs, but its effect on AA uptake is not clear. We examined this issue using both in vitro (266-6 cells) and in vivo (mice) models of chronic alcohol exposure. First, we determined the relative expression of the AA transporters 1 and 2 [i.e., sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter-1 (SVCT-1) and SVCT-2] in mouse and human PACs and found SVCT-2 to be the predominant transporter. Chronic exposure of 266-6 cells to alcohol significantly inhibited AA uptake and caused a marked reduction in SVCT-2 expression at the protein, mRNA, and heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) levels. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of mice significantly inhibited AA uptake and caused a marked reduction in level of expression of the SVCT-2 protein, mRNA, and hnRNA. These findings suggest possible involvement of transcriptional mechanism(s) in mediating chronic alcohol effect on AA uptake by PACs. We also observed significant epigenetic changes (histone modifications) in the Slc23a2 gene (reduction in H3K4me3 level and an increase in H3K27me3 level) in the alcohol-exposed 266-6 cells. These findings show that chronic alcohol exposure inhibits PAC AA uptake and that the effect is mediated, in part, at the level of transcription of the Slc23a2 gene and may involve epigenetic mechanism(s).

  1. Early to Late Endosome Trafficking Controls Secretion and Zymogen Activation in Rodent and Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott W; Thomas, Diana Dh; Cooley, Michelle M; Jones, Elaina K; Falkowski, Michelle A; August, Benjamin K; Fernandez, Luis A; Gorelick, Fred S; Groblewski, Guy E

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells have an expanded apical endosomal system, the physiological and pathophysiological significance of which is still emerging. Phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P 2 ) is an essential phospholipid generated by PIKfyve, which phosphorylates phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P). PI(3,5)P 2 is necessary for maturation of early endosomes (EE) to late endosomes (LE). Inhibition of EE to LE trafficking enhances anterograde endosomal trafficking and secretion at the plasma membrane by default through a recycling endosome (RE) intermediate. We assessed the effects of modulating PIKfyve activity on apical trafficking and pancreatitis responses in pancreatic acinar cells. Inhibition of EE to LE trafficking was achieved using pharmacological inhibitors of PIKfyve, expression of dominant negative PIKfyve K1877E, or constitutively active Rab5-GTP Q79L. Anterograde endosomal trafficking was manipulated by expression of constitutively active and dominant negative Rab11a mutants. The effects of these agents on secretion, endolysosomal exocytosis of lysosome associated membrane protein (LAMP1), and trypsinogen activation in response to high-dose CCK-8, bile acids and cigarette toxin was determined. PIKfyve inhibition increased basal and stimulated secretion. Adenoviral overexpression of PIKfyve decreased secretion leading to cellular death. Expression of Rab5-GTP Q79L or Rab11a-GTP Q70L enhanced secretion. Conversely, dominant-negative Rab11a-GDP S25N reduced secretion. High-dose CCK inhibited endolysosomal exocytosis that was reversed by PIKfyve inhibition. PIKfyve inhibition blocked intracellular trypsin accumulation and cellular damage responses to high CCK-8, tobacco toxin, and bile salts in both rodent and human acini. These data demonstrate that EE-LE trafficking acutely controls acinar secretion and the intracellular activation of zymogens leading to the pathogenicity of acute pancreatitis.

  2. Reciprocal stimulation of pancreatic acinar and stellate cells in a novel long-term in vitro co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläuer, Merja; Laaninen, Matias; Sand, Juhani; Laukkarinen, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key fibrogenic cells in the pancreas. Acinar cell injury is known to trigger PSC activation. To facilitate the experimental analysis of the crosstalk between acinar cells and PSCs, an in vitro system for their long-term co-cultivation was developed. PSCs and acinar cells capable of retaining their secretory phenotype in long-term in vitro culture were obtained from mouse pancreata. A dual-chamber co-culture model was built in 24-well format with acinar cells seeded in the wells and PSCs in tissue culture inserts. Acinar cell-3T3 fibroblast co-cultures served as controls. After 4-day maintenance, the acinar compartment was analyzed for cell morphology, secretory capability, necrosis (HMGB1), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammation (NFκB). PSCs were analyzed for migratory activity and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein expression. The results were compared to parallel monocultures. Acinar cells in monoculture and in co-culture with fibroblasts exhibited a healthy monolayer arrangement and an ability to respond to 0.1 nM caerulein stimulus by increased amylase release. Co-culture with PSCs caused marked changes in acinar cell morphology and rendered them insensitive to secretagogue stimulus. Activation of NFκB and necrotic changes, but not apoptosis, were identified in co-cultured acinar cells. Co-culture increased the migratory activity and ECM protein expression of PSCs. Humoral interactions between acinar and PSCs in co-culture were shown to reciprocally affect their cellular functions. With its two separable cell compartments the co-culture system provides a versatile culture setting that allows independent manipulation and analysis of both cell types. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Qingbing Wang,1,2 Xiaolin Wang,1,2 Rongfang Guo,2,3 Guoping Li1,2 1Department of Interventional Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 2Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, 3Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14 of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14 had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14 and 7.1% (1/14, respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation. Keywords: acinar cell carcinoma, computed tomography, pancreatic ductal carcinoma, pancreas

  4. Pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion: challenge of the acinar acid load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eHegyi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Acinar and ductal cells of the exocrine pancreas form a close functional unit. Although most studies contain data either on acinar or ductal cells, an increasing number of evidence highlights the importance of the pancreatic acinar-ductal functional unit. One of the best examples for this functional unit is the regulation of luminal pH by both cell types. Protons co-released during exocytosis from acini cause significant acidosis, whereas, bicarbonate secreted by ductal cells cause alkalization in the lumen. This suggests that the first and probably one of the most important role of bicarbonate secretion by pancreatic ductal cells is not only to neutralize the acid chyme entering into the duodenum from the stomach, but to neutralize acidic content secreted by acinar cells. To accomplish this role, it is more than likely that ductal cells have physiological sensing mechanisms which would allow them to regulate luminal pH. To date, four different classes of acid-sensing ion channels have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract (transient receptor potential ion channels, two-pore domain potassium channel, ionotropic purinoceptor and acid-sensing ion channel, however, none of these have been studied in pancreatic ductal cells. In this mini-review, we summarize our current knowledge of these channels and urge scientists to characterize ductal acid-sensing mechanisms and also to investigate the challenge of the acinar acid load on ductal cells.

  5. Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas presenting as diffuse pancreatic enlargement: Two case reports and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yaping; Hu, Guilan; Ma, Yanru; Guo, Ning; Li, Fang

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant tumor of exocrine pancreas. It is typically a well-marginated large solid mass arising in a certain aspect of the pancreas. Diffuse involvement of ACC in the pancreas is very rare, and may simulate pancreatitis in radiological findings. We report 2 cases of ACC presenting as diffuse enlargement of the pancreas due to tumor involvement without formation of a distinct mass. The patients consisted of a 41-year-old man with weight loss and a 77-year-old man who was asymptomatic. Computed tomography (CT) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT showed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas forming a sausage-like shape with homogenously increased FDG activity. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of the pancreatic lesion was performed. Histopathology results from the pancreas confirmed the diagnosis of pancreatic ACC. Because diffuse enlargement of the pancreas is a common imaging feature of pancreatitis, recognition of this rare morphologic pattern of ACC is important for radiological diagnosis of this tumor.

  6. Pancreatic Fat Accumulation, Fibrosis, and Acinar Cell Injury in the Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rat Fed a Chronic High-Fat Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Akiko; Makino, Naohiko; Tozawa, Tomohiro; Shirahata, Nakao; Honda, Teiichiro; Ikeda, Yushi; Sato, Hideyuki; Ito, Miho; Kakizaki, Yasuharu; Akamatsu, Manabu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kawata, Sumio

    2014-01-01

    Objective The histological alteration of the exocrine pancreas in obesity has not been clarified. In the present study, we investigated biochemical and histological changes in the exocrine pancreas of obese model rats. Methods Zucker lean rats were fed a standard diet, and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats were divided into 2 groups fed a standard diet and a high-fat diet, respectively. These experimental groups were fed each of the diets from 6 weeks until 12, 18, 24 weeks of age. We performed blood biochemical assays and histological analysis of the pancreas. Results In the ZDF rats fed a high-fat diet, the ratio of accumulated pancreatic fat area relative to exocrine gland area was increased significantly at 18 weeks of age in comparison with the other 2 groups (P fat diet, fat accumulates in pancreatic acinar cells, and this fatty change seems to be related to subsequent pancreatic fibrosis and acinar cell injury. PMID:24717823

  7. Pancreatic fat accumulation, fibrosis, and acinar cell injury in the Zucker diabetic fatty rat fed a chronic high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Akiko; Makino, Naohiko; Tozawa, Tomohiro; Shirahata, Nakao; Honda, Teiichiro; Ikeda, Yushi; Sato, Hideyuki; Ito, Miho; Kakizaki, Yasuharu; Akamatsu, Manabu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kawata, Sumio

    2014-07-01

    The histological alteration of the exocrine pancreas in obesity has not been clarified. In the present study, we investigated biochemical and histological changes in the exocrine pancreas of obese model rats. Zucker lean rats were fed a standard diet, and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats were divided into 2 groups fed a standard diet and a high-fat diet, respectively. These experimental groups were fed each of the diets from 6 weeks until 12, 18, 24 weeks of age. We performed blood biochemical assays and histological analysis of the pancreas. In the ZDF rats fed a high-fat diet, the ratio of accumulated pancreatic fat area relative to exocrine gland area was increased significantly at 18 weeks of age in comparison with the other 2 groups (P fat diet, fat accumulates in pancreatic acinar cells, and this fatty change seems to be related to subsequent pancreatic fibrosis and acinar cell injury.

  8. Knockdown of GRP78 promotes apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells and attenuates the severity of cerulein and LPS induced pancreatic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potentially lethal disease characterized by inflammation and parenchymal cell death; also, the severity of AP correlates directly with necrosis and inversely with apoptosis. However, mechanisms of regulating cell death in AP remain unclear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperone protein GRP78 has anti-apoptotic properties, in addition to modulating ER stress responses. This study used RNA interference (RNAi approach to investigate the potential role of GRP78 in regulating apoptosis during AP. In vitro models of AP were successfully developed by treating AR42J cells with cerulein or cerulein plus lipoplysaccharide (LPS. There was more pancreatic inflammation and less apoptosis with the cerulein plus LPS treatment. Furthermore, knockdown of GRP78 expression markedly promoted apoptosis and reduced necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells. This was accomplished by enhancing the activation of caspases and inhibiting the activity of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, as well as a receptor interacting protein kinase-1(RIPK1, which is a key mediator of necrosis. This attenuated the severity of pancreatic inflammation, especially after cerulein plus LPS treatment. In conclusion, these findings indicate that GRP78 plays an anti-apoptotic role in regulating the cell death response during AP. Therefore, GRP78 is a potential therapeutic target for AP.

  9. Nicotine promotes initiation and progression of KRAS-induced pancreatic cancer via Gata6-dependent dedifferentiation of acinar cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Patrick C; Sancho, Patricia; Cañamero, Marta; Martinelli, Paola; Madriles, Francesc; Michl, Patrick; Gress, Thomas; de Pascual, Ricardo; Gandia, Luis; Guerra, Carmen; Barbacid, Mariano; Wagner, Martin; Vieira, Catarina R; Aicher, Alexandra; Real, Francisco X; Sainz, Bruno; Heeschen, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    Although smoking is a leading risk factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), little is known about the mechanisms by which smoking promotes initiation or progression of PDAC. We studied the effects of nicotine administration on pancreatic cancer development in Kras(+/LSLG12Vgeo);Elas-tTA/tetO-Cre (Ela-KRAS) mice, Kras(+/LSLG12D);Trp53+/LSLR172H;Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice (which express constitutively active forms of KRAS), and C57/B6 mice. Mice were given nicotine for up to 86 weeks to produce blood levels comparable with those of intermediate smokers. Pancreatic tissues were collected and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction; cells were isolated and assayed for colony and sphere formation and gene expression. The effects of nicotine were also evaluated in primary pancreatic acinar cells isolated from wild-type, nAChR7a(-/-), Trp53(-/-), and Gata6(-/-);Trp53(-/-) mice. We also analyzed primary PDAC cells that overexpressed GATA6 from lentiviral expression vectors. Administration of nicotine accelerated transformation of pancreatic cells and tumor formation in Ela-KRAS and KPC mice. Nicotine induced dedifferentiation of acinar cells by activating AKT-ERK-MYC signaling; this led to inhibition of Gata6 promoter activity, loss of GATA6 protein, and subsequent loss of acinar differentiation and hyperactivation of oncogenic KRAS. Nicotine also promoted aggressiveness of established tumors as well as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, increasing numbers of circulating cancer cells and their dissemination to the liver, compared with mice not exposed to nicotine. Nicotine induced pancreatic cells to acquire gene expression patterns and functional characteristics of cancer stem cells. These effects were markedly attenuated in K-Ras(+/LSL-G12D);Trp53(+/LSLR172H);Pdx-1-Cre mice given metformin. Metformin prevented nicotine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis and tumor growth by up-regulating GATA6 and promoting

  10. Acinar Cell Cystadenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Aoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell cystadenocarcinoma is a rare malignant epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas with a diffusely cystic, gross architecture in which the cysts are lined with neoplastic epithelial cells that demonstrate evidence of pancreatic exocrine enzyme production. This is the 10th case that has been reported in the literature. A 77-year-old male complaining of left hypochondrial pain was referred to our hospital for treatment of a pancreatic tumor. A huge, honeycomb-structured tumor was detected in the pancreatic tail. Distal pancreatectomy with total resection of the residual stomach and partial resection of the transverse colon were performed. Microscopically, there were variably sized cystic lesions in the tumor. Immunohistochemical examinations revealed that tumor cells were positive for alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and alpha 1-trypsin, showing that tumor cells had features of pancreatic acinar cells. Thus, the tumor was diagnosed as acinar cell cystadenocarcinoma. Herein, we report a rare case with acinar cell cystadenocarcinoma, which is the 10th case reported in the literature based on a PubMed search. We managed to resect the tumor completely by distal pancreatectomy with total resection of the residual stomach and partial resection of the transverse colon. The patient is still alive 26 months after surgery without any recurrence after 1 year of adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1.

  11. Metastatic pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma in a younger male with marked AFP production: A potential pitfall on fine needle aspiration biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Kari; Yacoub, George; Cappellari, James O; Parks, Graham

    2017-02-01

    A 30-year-old male presented to his doctor with complaints of abdominal pain and was found to have retroperitoneal as well as multiple hepatic masses. A serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level was significantly elevated (17,373 ng mL(-1) ), raising suspicions for a metastatic germ cell tumor. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreatic lesion revealed atypical epithelioid cells with round nuclei, large prominent nucleoli, and granular cytoplasm. The morphologic differential diagnosis included pancreatic neoplasm, metastatic germ cell tumor, other metastatic carcinoma, and melanoma. An extensive panel of immunohistochemical stains confirmed the diagnosis of acinar cell carcinoma. The diagnosis of acinar cell carcinoma could be confounded by the markedly increased AFP level, particularly in the setting of a retroperitoneal mass in a younger male. The increased AFP level in the setting of an acinar cell tumor is a potential pitfall to correct diagnosis by cytology. As the treatment for these two entities differs considerably, acute awareness of the phenomenon is important. We present a case of pancreatic ACC with an increased AFP level diagnosed on a cytology specimen. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:133-136. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Restoration of CFTR Activity in Ducts Rescues Acinar Cell Function and Reduces Inflammation in Pancreatic and Salivary Glands of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mei; Szymczak, Mitchell; Ahuja, Malini; Zheng, Changyu; Yin, Hongen; Swaim, William; Chiorini, John A; Bridges, Robert J; Muallem, Shmuel

    2017-10-01

    Sjögren's syndrome and autoimmune pancreatitis are disorders with decreased function of salivary, lacrimal glands, and the exocrine pancreas. Nonobese diabetic/ShiLTJ mice and mice transduced with the cytokine BMP6 develop Sjögren's syndrome and chronic pancreatitis and MRL/Mp mice are models of autoimmune pancreatitis. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a ductal Cl- channel essential for ductal fluid and HCO3- secretion. We used these models to ask the following questions: is CFTR expression altered in these diseases, does correction of CFTR correct gland function, and most notably, does correcting ductal function correct acinar function? We treated the mice models with the CFTR corrector C18 and the potentiator VX770. Glandular, ductal, and acinar cells damage, infiltration, immune cells and function were measured in vivo and in isolated duct/acini. In the disease models, CFTR expression is markedly reduced. The salivary glands and pancreas are inflamed with increased fibrosis and tissue damage. Treatment with VX770 and, in particular, C18 restored salivation, rescued CFTR expression and localization, and nearly eliminated the inflammation and tissue damage. Transgenic overexpression of CFTR exclusively in the duct had similar effects. Most notably, the markedly reduced acinar cell Ca2+ signaling, Orai1, inositol triphosphate receptors, Aquaporin 5 expression, and fluid secretion were restored by rescuing ductal CFTR. Our findings reveal that correcting ductal function is sufficient to rescue acinar cell function and suggests that CFTR correctors are strong candidates for the treatment of Sjögren's syndrome and pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acinar Cell Cyst adenoma (Acinar Cystic Transformation) of the Pancreas: the Radiologic-Pathologic Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumus, Mehmet; Algin, Oktay; Gundogdu, Haldun [Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Ugras, Serdar [Selcuk University, Selcuklu Medical Faculty, Konya (Turkmenistan)

    2011-02-15

    Acinar cystic transformation of the pancreas is also known as acinar cell cystadenoma (ACC), and this is an extremely rare benign lesion that was first described in April 2002. We report here on a case of a previously asymptomatic patient with pancreatic ACC and this was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report concerning the CT or MRI features of ACC in the medical literature. We present here the CT, MRI and pathological findings of pancreatic ACC

  14. Acinar cell cystadenoma (acinar cystic transformation) of the pancreas: the radiologic-pathologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Mehmet; Ugras, Serdar; Algin, Oktay; Gundogdu, Haldun

    2011-01-01

    Acinar cystic transformation of the pancreas is also known as acinar cell cystadenoma (ACC), and this is an extremely rare benign lesion that was first described in April 2002. We report here on a case of a previously asymptomatic patient with pancreatic ACC and this was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report concerning the CT or MRI features of ACC in the medical literature. We present here the CT, MRI and pathological findings of pancreatic ACC.

  15. Maintenance of acinar cell organization is critical to preventing Kras-induced acinar-ductal metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, G; DiRenzo, D; Qu, C; Barney, D; Miley, D; Konieczny, S F

    2013-04-11

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers owing to a number of characteristics including difficulty in establishing early diagnosis and the absence of effective therapeutic regimens. A large number of genetic alterations have been ascribed to PDAC with mutations in the KRAS2 proto-oncogene thought to be an early event in the progression of disease. Recent lineage-tracing studies have shown that acinar cells expressing mutant Kras(G12D) are induced to transdifferentiate, generating duct-like cells through a process known as acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM). ADM lesions then convert to precancerous pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) that progresses to PDAC over time. Thus, understanding the earliest events involved in ADM/PanIN formation would provide much needed information on the molecular pathways that are instrumental in initiating this disease. As studying the transition of acinar cells to metaplastic ductal cells in vivo is complicated by analysis of the entire organ, an in vitro three dimensional (3D) culture system was used to model ADM outside the animal. Kras(G12D)-expressing acinar cells rapidly underwent ADM in 3D culture, forming ductal cysts that silenced acinar genes and activated duct genes, characteristics associated with in vivo ADM/PanIN lesions. Analysis of downstream KRAS signaling events established a critical importance for the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in ADM induction. In addition, forced expression of the acinar-restricted transcription factor Mist1, which is critical to acinar cell organization, significantly attenuated Kras(G12D)-induced ADM/PanIN formation. These results suggest that maintaining MIST1 activity in Kras(G12D)-expressing acinar cells can partially mitigate the transformation activity of oncogenic KRAS. Future therapeutics that target both the MAPK pathway and Mist1 transcriptional networks may show promising efficacy in combating this deadly disease.

  16. 915-MHz continuous wave electromagnetic radiation alters the kinetics of zymogen processing by pancreatic acinar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    Two aspects of the secretory process were examined: (1) exocytosis, as measured by amylase release, and (2) the kinetics of the intracellular transport and packaging of secretory proteins, as assessed by electron microscopic autoradiographic analysis of the intracellular distribution of pulse-labelled secretory proteins. The exocytotic response was evaluated by measuring the discharge of amylase from pancreatic tissue slices. Under nonstimulated conditions, there was no difference in the kinetics of amylase discharge from tissue slices kinetically heated to 37/sup 0/C or 40/sup 0/C, indicating that a thermally induced increase in the metabolic rate of the tissue does not significantly alter the basal rate of exocytosis. Analysis of the release of both pulse-labelled secretory proteins and amylase from CC-stimulated tissue indicated that irradiation in a 25 mW/cm/sup 2/ field altered the kinetics of intracellular transport of newly synthesized secretory proteins in a manner not duplicated by kinetic heating. Electron microscopic autoradiography and morphometric analysis failed to elucidate the mechanism by which protein processing was altered.

  17. Quantitative characterization of the protein contents of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell by soft x-ray microscopy and advanced digital imaging methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, Jr., Billy W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The study of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell has been central to the development of models of many cellular processes, especially of protein transport and secretion. Traditional methods used to examine this system have provided a wealth of qualitative information from which mechanistic models have been inferred. However they have lacked the ability to make quantitative measurements, particularly of the distribution of protein in the cell, information critical for grounding of models in terms of magnitude and relative significance. This dissertation describes the development and application of new tools that were used to measure the protein content of the major intracellular compartments in the acinar cell, particularly the zymogen granule. Soft x-ray microscopy permits image formation with high resolution and contrast determined by the underlying protein content of tissue rather than staining avidity. A sample preparation method compatible with x-ray microscopy was developed and its properties evaluated. Automatic computerized methods were developed to acquire, calibrate, and analyze large volumes of x-ray microscopic images of exocrine pancreatic tissue sections. Statistics were compiled on the protein density of several organelles, and on the protein density, size, and spatial distribution of tens of thousands of zymogen granules. The results of these measurements, and how they compare to predictions of different models of protein transport, are discussed.

  18. Acinar injury and early cytokine response in human acute biliary pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakkampudi, Aparna; Jangala, Ramaiah; Reddy, Ratnakar; Mitnala, Sasikala; Rao, G Venkat; Pradeep, Rebala; Reddy, D Nageshwar; Talukdar, Rupjyoti

    2017-11-10

    Clinical acute pancreatitis (AP) is marked by an early phase of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) with multiorgan dysfunction (MODS), and a late phase characterized by sepsis with MODS. However, the mechanisms of acinar injury in human AP and the associated systemic inflammation are not clearly understood. This study, for the first time, evaluated the early interactions of bile acid induced human pancreatic acinar injury and the resulting cytokine response. We exposed freshly procured resected human pancreata to taurolithocolic acid (TLCS) and evaluated for acinar injury, cytokine release and interaction with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We observed autophagy in acinar cells in response to TLCS exposure. There was also time-dependent release of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α from the injured acini that resulted in activation of PBMCs. We also observed that cytokines secreted by activated PBMCs resulted in acinar cell apoptosis and further cytokine release from them. Our data suggests that the earliest immune response in human AP originates within the acinar cell itself, which subsequently activates circulating PBMCs leading to SIRS. These findings need further detailed evaluation so that specific therapeutic targets to curb SIRS and resulting early adverse outcomes could be identified and tested.

  19. Src Dependent Pancreatic Acinar Injury Can Be Initiated Independent of an Increase in Cytosolic Calcium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Mishra

    Full Text Available Several deleterious intra-acinar phenomena are simultaneously triggered on initiating acute pancreatitis. These culminate in acinar injury or inflammatory mediator generation in vitro and parenchymal damage in vivo. Supraphysiologic caerulein is one such initiator which simultaneously activates numerous signaling pathways including non-receptor tyrosine kinases such as of the Src family. It also causes a sustained increase in cytosolic calcium- a player thought to be crucial in regulating deleterious phenomena. We have shown Src to be involved in caerulein induced actin remodeling, and caerulein induced changes in the Golgi and post-Golgi trafficking to be involved in trypsinogen activation, which initiates acinar cell injury. However, it remains unclear whether an increase in cytosolic calcium is necessary to initiate acinar injury or if injury can be initiated at basal cytosolic calcium levels by an alternate pathway. To study the interplay between tyrosine kinase signaling and calcium, we treated mouse pancreatic acinar cells with the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate. We studied the effect of the clinically used Src inhibitor Dasatinib (BMS-354825 on pervanadate or caerulein induced changes in Src activation, trypsinogen activation, cell injury, upstream cytosolic calcium, actin and Golgi morphology. Pervanadate, like supraphysiologic caerulein, induced Src activation, redistribution of the F-actin from its normal location in the sub-apical area to the basolateral areas, and caused antegrade fragmentation of the Golgi. These changes, like those induced by supraphysiologic caerulein, were associated with trypsinogen activation and acinar injury, all of which were prevented by Dasatinib. Interestingly, however, pervanadate did not cause an increase in cytosolic calcium, and the caerulein induced increase in cytosolic calcium was not affected by Dasatinib. These findings suggest that intra-acinar deleterious phenomena may be initiated

  20. Nelfinavir/ritonavir reduces acinar injury but not inflammation during mouse caerulein pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay P.; Bren, Gary D.; Algeciras-Schimnich, Alicia; Schnepple, David; Navina, Sarah; Rizza, Stacey A.; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.; Chari, Suresh T.; Vege, Santhi S.; Badley, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    There is no clinical treatment that reduces acinar injury during pancreatitis. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PI), including nelfinavir (NFV) and ritonavir (RTV), may reduce the rate of pancreatitis in HIV-infected patients. Since permeability transition pore (PTPC)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction occurs during pancreatitis, and we have shown that PI prevents PTPC opening, we studied its effects in a model of pancreatitis. The effect of NFV plus RTV (NFV/RTV) or vehicle on caerulein-induced pancreatitis in mice was compared by measuring changes in mitochondrial membrane potential in vitro and cytochrome c leakage in vivo. Histological and inflammatory makers were also compared. NFV/RTV improved DiOC6 retention in acini exposed to caerulein in vitro. In vivo NFV prevented cytosolic leakage of cytochrome c and reduced pancreatic acinar injury, active caspase-3 staining, TUNEL-positive acinar cells, and serum amylase (P cell death in experimental mouse caerulein-induced pancreatitis but does not impact inflammation. PMID:19282375

  1. Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia accompanies c-myc-induced exocrine pancreatic cancer progression in transgenic rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, Paul J; Sandgren, Eric P

    2012-09-01

    Several important characteristics of exocrine pancreatic tumor pathogenesis remain incompletely defined, including identification of the cell of origin. Most human pancreatic neoplasms are ductal adenocarcinomas. However, acinar cells have been proposed as the source of some ductal neoplasms through a process of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. The oncogenic transcription factor c-myc is associated with human pancreatic neoplasms. Transgenic mice overexpressing c-myc under control of acinar cell-specific elastase (Ela) gene regulatory elements not only develop acinar cell carcinomas but also mixed neoplasms that display both acinar-like neoplastic cells and duct-like neoplastic cells. In this report, we demonstrate that, first, c-myc is sufficient to induce acinar hyperplasia, though neoplastic lesions develop focally. Second, cell proliferation remains elevated in the neoplastic duct cell compartment of mixed neoplasms. Third, the proliferation/apoptosis ratio in cells from all lesion types remains constant, suggesting that differential regulation of these processes is not a feature of cancer progression in this model. Fourth, before the development of mixed neoplasms, there is transcriptional activation of the duct cell-specific cytokeratin-19 gene promoter in multicellular foci of amylase-positive acinar neoplasms. This observation provides direct evidence for metaplasia as the mechanism underlying development of ductal neoplastic cells within the context of an acinar neoplasm and suggests that the stimulus for this transformation acts over a multicellular domain or field within a neoplasm. Finally, focal ductal elements develop in some acinar cell carcinomas in Ela-c-myc transgenic rats, indicating that myc-associated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia is not restricted to the mouse. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling in acinar cells causes growth dependent release of pancreatic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Bremholm, l

    2016-01-01

    -like peptide 1 (GLP-1) on the exocrine pancreas. Here, we identify GLP-1 receptors on pancreatic acini and analyze the impact of receptor activation in humans, rodents, isolated acini, and cell lines from the exocrine pancreas. GLP-1 did not directly stimulate amylase or lipase release. However, we saw...... that GLP-1 induces phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and activation of Foxo1, resulting in cell growth with concomitant enzyme release. Our work uncovers GLP-1-induced signaling pathways in the exocrine pancreas and suggests that increases in amylase and lipase levels in subjects...

  3. Transcriptional Maintenance of Pancreatic Acinar Identity, Differentiation, and Homeostasis by PTF1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Chinh Q; Hale, Michael A; Azevedo-Pouly, Ana C; Elsässer, Hans P; Deering, Tye G; Willet, Spencer G; Pan, Fong C; Magnuson, Mark A; Wright, Christopher V E; Swift, Galvin H; MacDonald, Raymond J

    2016-12-15

    Maintenance of cell type identity is crucial for health, yet little is known of the regulation that sustains the long-term stability of differentiated phenotypes. To investigate the roles that key transcriptional regulators play in adult differentiated cells, we examined the effects of depletion of the developmental master regulator PTF1A on the specialized phenotype of the adult pancreatic acinar cell in vivo Transcriptome sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing results showed that PTF1A maintains the expression of genes for all cellular processes dedicated to the production of the secretory digestive enzymes, a highly attuned surveillance of unfolded proteins, and a heightened unfolded protein response (UPR). Control by PTF1A is direct on target genes and indirect through a ten-member transcription factor network. Depletion of PTF1A causes an imbalance that overwhelms the UPR, induces cellular injury, and provokes acinar metaplasia. Compromised cellular identity occurs by derepression of characteristic stomach genes, some of which are also associated with pancreatic ductal cells. The loss of acinar cell homeostasis, differentiation, and identity is directly relevant to the pathologies of pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Novel lipophilic probe for detecting near-membrane reactive oxygen species responses and its application for studies of pancreatic acinar cells: effects of pyocyanin and L-ornithine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvanov, Michael; Huang, Wei; Jin, Tao; Wen, Li; Armstrong, Jane; Elliot, Vicky; Alston, Ben; Burdyga, Alex; Criddle, David N; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2015-02-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a fluorescent reactive oxygen species (ROS) probe, which is preferentially localized in cellular membranes and displays a strong change in fluorescence upon oxidation. We also aimed to test the performance of this probe for detecting pathophysiologically relevant ROS responses in isolated cells. We introduced a novel lipophilic ROS probe dihydrorhodamine B octadecyl ester (H2RB-C18). We then applied the new probe to characterize the ROS changes triggered by inducers of acute pancreatitis in pancreatic acinar cells. We resolved ROS changes produced by L-ornithine, L-arginine, cholecystokinin-8, acetylcholine, taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate, palmitoleic acid ethyl ester, and the bacterial toxin pyocyanin. Particularly prominent ROS responses were induced by pyocyanin and L-ornithine. These ROS responses were accompanied by changes in cytosolic Ca(2+)concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), and NAD(P)H concentration. The study describes a novel sensitive lipophilic ROS probe. The probe is particularly suitable for detecting ROS in near-membrane regions and therefore for reporting the ROS environment of plasma membrane channels and pumps. In our experimental conditions, the novel probe was more sensitive than 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (CM-H2DCF) and dihydrorhodamine123 (H2R123) and allowed us to resolve ROS responses to secretagogues, pyocyanin, and L-ornithine. Changes in the fluorescence of the new probe were particularly prominent in the peripheral plasma membrane-associated regions. Our findings suggest that the new probe will be a useful tool in studies of the contribution of ROS to the pathophysiology of exocrine pancreas and other organs/tissues.

  5. Multimodal Treatment of Hepatic Metastasis in the Form of a Bile Duct Tumor Thrombus from Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma: Case Report of Successful Resection after Chemoradiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotada Kittaka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC is a rare tumor, and its pathophysiology has not been well understood. Treatment strategies for hepatic metastasis originating from ACC remain controversial. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman who had undergone total pancreatectomy from ACC 7 years prior to clinical presentation. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging revealed a tumorous lesion measuring 7 cm in length and 1 cm in diameter and extending along the intrahepatic bile duct (B6, which showed mild enhancement in the early phase and modest washout in the late phase. This lesion was diagnosed as hepatic metastasis primarily in the form of a bile duct tumor thrombus originating from the prior ACC by the pathological evaluation of the fine needle biopsy specimen. The patient underwent preoperative gemcitabine-based chemoradiation therapy followed by subsequent surgical resection, which included subsegmentectomy (S6 of the liver and complete removal of the bile duct tumor thrombus. The patient has had no recurrence during the past 8 months since her last surgery. Multimodal treatment including preoperative chemoradiation therapy might be beneficial especially for marginally resectable cases of ACC.

  6. FDG PET imaging of Ela1-myc mice reveals major biological differences between pancreatic acinar and ductal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abasolo, Ibane [Institut Municipal d' Investigacio Medica-Hospital del Mar, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Departament de Ciencies Experimentals i de la Salut, Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' Alta Tecnologia - CRC, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Pujal, Judit; Navarro, Pilar [Institut Municipal d' Investigacio Medica-Hospital del Mar, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Rabanal, Rosa M.; Serafin, Anna [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Departament de Medicina i Cirurgia Animals, Barcelona (Spain); Millan, Olga [Institut d' Alta Tecnologia - CRC, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Real, Francisco X. [Institut Municipal d' Investigacio Medica-Hospital del Mar, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Departament de Ciencies Experimentals i de la Salut, Barcelona (Spain); Programa de Patologia Molecular, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    The aim was to evaluate FDG PET imaging in Ela1-myc mice, a pancreatic cancer model resulting in the development of tumours with either acinar or mixed acinar-ductal phenotype. Transversal and longitudinal FDG PET studies were conducted; selected tissue samples were subjected to autoradiography and ex vivo organ counting. Glucose transporter and hexokinase mRNA expression was analysed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); Glut2 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Transversal studies showed that mixed acinar-ductal tumours could be identified by FDG PET several weeks before they could be detected by hand palpation. Longitudinal studies revealed that ductal - but not acinar - tumours could be detected by FDG PET. Autoradiographic analysis confirmed that tumour areas with ductal differentiation incorporated more FDG than areas displaying acinar differentiation. Ex vivo radioactivity measurements showed that tumours of solely acinar phenotype incorporated more FDG than pancreata of non-transgenic littermates despite the fact that they did not yield positive PET images. To gain insight into the biological basis of the differential FDG uptake, glucose transporter and hexokinase transcript expression was studied in microdissected tumour areas enriched for acinar or ductal cells and validated using cell-specific markers. Glut2 and hexokinase I and II mRNA levels were up to 20-fold higher in ductal than in acinar tumours. Besides, Glut2 protein overexpression was found in ductal neoplastic cells but not in the surrounding stroma. In Ela1-myc mice, ductal tumours incorporate significantly more FDG than acinar tumours. This difference likely results from differential expression of Glut2 and hexokinases. These findings reveal previously unreported biological differences between acinar and ductal pancreatic tumours. (orig.)

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin (1-7)-Mas axis prevents pancreatic acinar cell inflammatory response via inhibition of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaozheng; Cui, Lijian; Hou, Fei; Liu, Xiaoya; Wang, Yan; Wen, Yan; Chi, Cheng; Li, Chunyun; Liu, Ruixia; Yin, Chenghong

    2017-11-13

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)2-angiotensin‑(Ang)-(1-7)-Mas axis in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and the association between this axis and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK)/nuclear factor (NF-κB) signaling pathway in pancreatic acinar cells. Mouse pancreatic acinar cancer (MPC-83) cells were stimulated with 10 nM caerulein (CAE) to create an in vitro model of acute pancreatitis, and collected for analysis at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h post stimulation. In addition, cells were pretreated with different concentrations of Ang‑(1‑7), Ang‑(1‑7) antagonist A779, p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 or ACE2 inhibitor DX600 for 30 min, and then stimulated with CAE for 24 h. The ACE2, Mas receptor, p38 MAPK, phosphorylated (p)-p38 MAPK and NF-κB expression levels were evaluated using western blotting and immunofluorescence. p38 MAPK, NF-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8 and IL-10 mRNA expression levels were assessed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that ACE2 and p38 MAPK were present mainly in the cytoplasm, while the Mas receptor was located mainly in the cell membrane. ACE2, p38 MAPK and p-p38 MAPK protein levels were significantly increased (PMas receptor protein levels were significantly upregulated (PMas axis significantly inhibits pancreatitis by inhibition of the p38 MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  8. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β ablation limits pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Liou, Geou-Yarh; Schmitt, Daniel M; Storz, Peter; Zhang, Jin-San; Billadeau, Daniel D

    2017-09-01

    Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a reversible epithelial transdifferentiation process that occurs in the pancreas in response to acute inflammation. ADM can rapidly progress towards pre-malignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions in the presence of mutant KRas and ultimately pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In the present work, we elucidate the role and related mechanism of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3β) in ADM development using in vitro 3D cultures and genetically engineered mouse models. We show that GSK-3β promotes TGF-α-induced ADM in 3D cultured primary acinar cells, whereas deletion of GSK-3β attenuates caerulein-induced ADM formation and PanIN progression in KrasG12D transgenic mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that GSK-3β ablation influences ADM formation and PanIN progression by suppressing oncogenic KRas-driven cell proliferation. Mechanistically, we show that GSK-3β regulates proliferation by increasing the activation of S6 kinase. Taken together, these results indicate that GSK-3β participates in early pancreatitis-induced ADM and thus could be a target for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis and the prevention of PDAC progression. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Role of the ductal transcription factors HNF6 and Sox9 in pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévot, Pierre-Paul; Simion, Alexandru; Grimont, Adrien; Colletti, Marta; Khalaileh, Abed; Van den Steen, Géraldine; Sempoux, Christine; Xu, Xiaobo; Roelants, Véronique; Hald, Jacob; Bertrand, Luc; Heimberg, Harry; Konieczny, Stephen F.; Dor, Yuval; Lemaigre, Frédéric P.; Jacquemin, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Objective Growing evidence suggests that a phenotypic switch converting pancreatic acinar cells to duct-like cells can lead to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually to invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Histologically, the onset of this switch is characterised by the co-expression of acinar and ductal markers in acini, a lesion called acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM). Transcriptional regulators required to initiate ADM still remain unknown, yet need to be identified to characterise the regulatory networks that drive ADM. Here we investigate the role of the ductal transcription factors Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 (HNF6, also known as Onecut1)and SRY-related HMG box factor 9 (Sox9) in ADM. Design Expression of HNF6 and Sox9 is measured by immunostaining in normal and diseased human pancreas. The function of the factors is tested in cultured cells and in mouse models of ADM by a combination of gain- and loss-of-function experiments. Results Expression of HNF6 and Sox9 is ectopically induced in acinar cells in human ADM, as well as in mouse models of ADM. We show that these factors are required for repression of acinar genes, for modulation of ADM-associated changes in cell polarity, and for activation of ductal genes in metaplastic acinar cells. Conclusions HNF6 and Sox9 are new biomarkers of ADM and constitute candidate targets for preventive therapy in cases when ADM may lead to cancer. Our work also highlights that ectopic activation of transcription factors may underlie metaplastic processes occurring in other organs. PMID:22271799

  10. Genetic ablation of Smoothened in pancreatic fibroblasts increases acinar-ductal metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Pitarresi, Jason R; Cuitiño, Maria C; Kladney, Raleigh D; Woelke, Sarah A; Sizemore, Gina M; Nayak, Sunayana G; Egriboz, Onur; Schweickert, Patrick G; Yu, Lianbo; Trela, Stefan; Schilling, Daniel J; Halloran, Shannon K; Li, Maokun; Dutta, Shourik; Fernandez, Soledad A; Rosol, Thomas J; Lesinski, Gregory B; Shakya, Reena; Ludwig, Thomas; Konieczny, Stephen F; Leone, Gustavo; Wu, Jinghai; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    The contribution of the microenvironment to pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a preneoplastic transition in oncogenic Kras-driven pancreatic cancer progression, is currently unclear. Here we show that disruption of paracrine Hedgehog signaling via genetic ablation of Smoothened (Smo) in stromal fibroblasts in a Kras(G12D) mouse model increased ADM. Smo-deleted fibroblasts had higher expression of transforming growth factor-α (Tgfa) mRNA and secreted higher levels of TGFα, leading to activation of EGFR signaling in acinar cells and increased ADM. The mechanism involved activation of AKT and noncanonical activation of the GLI family transcription factor GLI2. GLI2 was phosphorylated at Ser230 in an AKT-dependent fashion and directly regulated Tgfa expression in fibroblasts lacking Smo Additionally, Smo-deleted fibroblasts stimulated the growth of Kras(G12D)/Tp53(R172H) pancreatic tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. These results define a non-cell-autonomous mechanism modulating Kras(G12D)-driven ADM that is balanced by cross-talk between Hedgehog/SMO and AKT/GLI2 pathways in stromal fibroblasts. © 2016 Liu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Duct- and Acinar-Derived Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas Show Distinct Tumor Progression and Marker Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute M.M. Ferreira

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The cell of origin of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC has been controversial. Here, we show that identical oncogenic drivers trigger PDAC originating from both ductal and acinar cells with similar histology but with distinct pathophysiology and marker expression dependent on cell of origin. Whereas acinar-derived tumors exhibited low AGR2 expression and were preceded by pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs, duct-derived tumors displayed high AGR2 and developed independently of a PanIN stage via non-mucinous lesions. Using orthotopic transplantation and chimera experiments, we demonstrate that PanIN-like lesions can be induced by PDAC as bystanders in adjacent healthy tissues, explaining the co-existence of mucinous and non-mucinous lesions and highlighting the need to distinguish between true precursor PanINs and PanIN-like bystander lesions. Our results suggest AGR2 as a tool to stratify PDAC according to cell of origin, highlight that not all PanIN-like lesions are precursors of PDAC, and add an alternative progression route to the current model of PDAC development.

  12. Nelfinavir/ritonavir reduces acinar injury but not inflammation during mouse caerulein pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Vijay P.; Bren, Gary D; Algeciras-Schimnich, Alicia; Schnepple, David; Navina, Sarah; Rizza, Stacey A; DAWRA, RAJINDER K.; Saluja, Ashok K.; Chari, Suresh T.; Vege, Santhi S.; Badley, Andrew D

    2009-01-01

    There is no clinical treatment that reduces acinar injury during pancreatitis. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PI), including nelfinavir (NFV) and ritonavir (RTV), may reduce the rate of pancreatitis in HIV-infected patients. Since permeability transition pore (PTPC)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction occurs during pancreatitis, and we have shown that PI prevents PTPC opening, we studied its effects in a model of pancreatitis. The effect of NFV plus RTV (NFV/RTV) or ve...

  13. Inheritance of pancreatic acinar atrophy in German Shepherd Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, E Michael; Steiner, Jörg M; Clark, Leigh Anne; Murphy, Keith E; Famula, Thomas R; Williams, David A; Stankovics, Mary E; Vose, Amy S

    2002-10-01

    To assess the heritability of pancreatic acinar atrophy (PAA) in German Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) in the United States. 135 GSDs belonging to 2 multigenerational pedigrees. Two multigenerational pedigrees of GSDs with family members with PAA were identified. The clinical history of each GSD enrolled in the study was recorded, and serum samples for canine trypsin-like immunoreactivity (cTLI) analysis were collected from 102 dogs. Dogs with a serum cTLI concentration Pedigree I consisted of 59 dogs and pedigree II of 76 dogs. Serum cTLI concentrations were measured in 48 dogs from pedigree I and 54 dogs from pedigree II. A total of 19 dogs (14.1%) were determined to have EPI, 9 in pedigree I (15.3%) and 10 in pedigree II (13.6%). Of the 19 dogs with EPI, 8 were male and 11 were female. Evaluation of data by complex segregation analysis is strongly suggestive of an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for EPI in GSDs in the United States.

  14. No Functional Role for microRNA-342 in a Mouse Model of Pancreatic Acinar Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Dooley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The intronic microRNA (miR-342 has been proposed as a potent tumor-suppressor gene. miR-342 is found to be downregulated or epigenetically silenced in multiple different tumor sites, and this loss of expression permits the upregulation of several key oncogenic pathways. In several different cell lines, lower miR-342 expression results in enhanced proliferation and metastasis potential, both in vitro and in xenogenic transplant conditions. Here, we sought to determine the function of miR-342 in an in vivo spontaneous cancer model, using the Ela1-TAg transgenic model of pancreatic acinar carcinoma. Through longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging monitoring of Ela1-TAg transgenic mice, either wild-type or knockout for miR-342, we found no role for miR-342 in the development, growth rate, or pathogenicity of pancreatic acinar carcinoma. These results indicate the importance of assessing miR function in the complex physiology of in vivo model systems and indicate that further functional testing of miR-342 is required before concluding it is a bona fide tumor-suppressor-miR.

  15. MIST1 and PTF1 Collaborate in Feed-forward Regulatory Loops that Maintain the Pancreatic Acinar Phenotype in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei; Azevedo-Pouly, Ana; Deering, Tye G; Hoang, Chinh Q; DiRenzo, Daniel; Hess, David A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Swift, Galvin H; MacDonald, Raymond J

    2016-09-19

    Much remains unknown regarding the regulatory networks formed by transcription factors in mature, differentiated mammalian cells in vivo, despite many studies of individual DNA-binding transcription factors. We report a constellation of feed-forward loops formed by the pancreatic transcription factors MIST1 and PTF1 that govern the differentiated phenotype of the adult pancreatic acinar cell. PTF1 is an atypical basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor complex of pancreatic acinar cells and critical to acinar cell fate specification and differentiation. MIST1, also a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, enhances the formation and maintenance of the specialized phenotype of professional secretory cells. The MIST1 and PTF1 collaboration controls a wide range of specialized cellular processes, including secretory protein synthesis and processing, exocytosis, and homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum. PTF1 drives Mist1 transcription, and MIST1 and PTF1 bind and drive the transcription of over a hundred downstream acinar genes. PTF1 binds two canonical bipartite sites within a 0.7-kb transcriptional enhancer upstream of Mist1 that are essential for the activity of the enhancer in vivo MIST1 and PTF1 co-regulate target genes synergistically or additively, depending on the target transcriptional enhancer. The frequent close binding proximity of PTF1 and MIST1 in pancreatic acinar cell chromatin implies extensive collaboration, although the collaboration is not dependent on a stable physical interaction. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Metabolic profile of pancreatic acinar and islet tissue in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszynski, T M; Mueller, K R; Gruessner, A C; Papas, K K

    2014-01-01

    The amount and condition of exocrine impurities may affect the quality of islet preparations, especially during culture. In this study, the objective was to determine the oxygen demand and viability of islet and acinar tissue post-isolation and whether they change disproportionately while in culture. We compared the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) normalized to DNA (OCR/DNA, a measure of fractional viability in units of nmol/min/mg DNA), and the percent change in OCR and DNA recoveries between adult porcine islet and acinar tissue from the same preparation (paired) over 6-9 days of standard culture. Paired comparisons were done to quantify differences in OCR/DNA between islet and acinar tissue from the same preparation, at specified time points during culture. The mean (±SE) OCR/DNA was 74.0 ± 11.7 units higher for acinar (vs islet) tissue on the day of isolation (n = 16, P culture. DNA and OCR recoveries decreased at different rates for acinar versus islet tissue over 6-9 days in culture (n = 6). DNA recovery decreased to 24 ± 7% for acinar and 75 ± 8% for islets (P = .002). Similarly, OCR recovery decreased to 16 ± 3% for acinar and remained virtually constant for islets (P = .005). Differences in the metabolic profile of acinar and islet tissue should be considered when culturing impure islet preparations. OCR-based measurements may help optimize pre-islet transplantation culture protocols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Yegutkin, G.G.; Novak, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, ou...

  18. Paracrine Secretion of Transforming Growth Factor β by Ductal Cells Promotes Acinar-to-Ductal Metaplasia in Cultured Human Exocrine Pancreas Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Jun; Liou, Geou-Yarh; Yin, Xue; Bejar, Kaitlyn R; Liu, Chengyang; Sun, Lu-Zhe; Storz, Peter; Wang, Pei

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the contribution of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) to the accumulation of cells with a ductal phenotype in cultured human exocrine pancreatic tissues and reveal the underlying mechanism. We sorted and cultured viable cell populations in human exocrine pancreatic tissues with a flow cytometry-based lineage tracing method to evaluate possible mechanisms of ADM. Cell surface markers, gene expression pattern, and sphere formation assay were used to examine ADM. A large proportion of acinar cells gained CD133 expression during the 2-dimensional culture and showed down-regulation of acinar markers and up-regulation of ductal markers, assuming an ADM phenotype. In a serum-free culture condition, ADM induction was mainly dependent on transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secreted from cultured ductal cells. Human acinar cells when cultured alone for a week in a serum-free condition do not undergo ADM. However, serum may contain other factors besides TGF-β to induce ADM in human acinar cells. In addition, we found that TGF-β cannot induce ADM of murine acinar cells. Ductal cells are the major source of TGF-β that induces ADM in cultured human exocrine pancreatic tissues. This culture system might be a useful model to investigate the mechanism of ADM in human cells.

  19. Nitric oxide-induced signalling in rat lacrimal acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia Karen; Tritsaris, K.; Dissing, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological role of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating secretory processes in rat lacrimal acinar cells. In addition, we wanted to determine whether the acinar cells possess endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity by measuring NO productio...... using the fluorescent NO indicator 4,5-diaminofluorescein (DAF-2). We initiated investigations by adding NO from an external source by means of the NO-donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP). Cellular concentrations of cyclic guanosine 5'-phosphate (cGMP) ([cGMP]) were measured...... by radioimmunoassay (RIA), and we found that SNAP induced a fast increase in the [cGMP], amounting to 350% of the [cGMP] in resting cells. Moreover, addition of SNAP and elevating [cGMP] in fura-2 loaded lacrimal acinar cells, resulted in a cGMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated release of Ca2+ from intracellular...

  20. Adrenoceptor-activated nitric oxide synthesis in salivary acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia; Dissing, Steen; Tritsaris, Katerina

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the cellular regulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in isolated acinar cells from rat parotid and human labial salivary glands, using the newly developed fluorescent nitric oxide (NO) indicator, DAF-2. We found that sympathetic stimulation with norepinephrine (NE) caused...

  1. Acinar-to-Ductal Metaplasia Induced by Transforming Growth Factor Beta Facilitates KRASG12D-driven Pancreatic TumorigenesisSummary

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    Nicolas Chuvin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ acts either as a tumor suppressor or as an oncogene, depending on the cellular context and time of activation. TGFβ activates the canonical SMAD pathway through its interaction with the serine/threonine kinase type I and II heterotetrameric receptors. Previous studies investigating TGFβ-mediated signaling in the pancreas relied either on loss-of-function approaches or on ligand overexpression, and its effects on acinar cells have so far remained elusive. Methods: We developed a transgenic mouse model allowing tamoxifen-inducible and Cre-mediated conditional activation of a constitutively active type I TGFβ receptor (TβRICA in the pancreatic acinar compartment. Results: We observed that TβRICA expression induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM reprogramming, eventually facilitating the onset of KRASG12D-induced pre-cancerous pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. This phenotype was characterized by the cellular activation of apoptosis and dedifferentiation, two hallmarks of ADM, whereas at the molecular level, we evidenced a modulation in the expression of transcription factors such as Hnf1β, Sox9, and Hes1. Conclusions: We demonstrate that TGFβ pathway activation plays a crucial role in pancreatic tumor initiation through its capacity to induce ADM, providing a favorable environment for KRASG12D-dependent carcinogenesis. Such findings are highly relevant for the development of early detection markers and of potentially novel treatments for pancreatic cancer patients. Keywords: Pancreas, Cancer, TGFβ, Acinar-to-Ductal Metaplasia, KRASG12D

  2. High Volume Washing of the Abdomen in Increasing Survival After Surgery in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-25

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Ampulla of Vater Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Duodenal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Pancreatobiliary-Type; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

  3. Protein kinase D regulates cell death pathways in experimental pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhen eYuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and acinar cell necrosis are two major pathological responses of acute pancreatitis, a serious disorder with no current therapies directed to its molecular pathogenesis. Serine/threonine protein kinase D family, which includes PKD/PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3, has been increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple physiological and pathophysiological effects. We recently reported that PKD/PKD1, the predominant PKD isoform expressed in rat pancreatic acinar cells, mediates early events of pancreatitis including NF-kappaB activation and inappropriate intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In current studies, we investigated the role and mechanisms of PKD/PKD1 in the regulation of necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells by using two novel small molecule PKD inhibitors CID755673 and CRT0066101 and molecular approaches in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of acute pancreatitis. Our results demonstrated that both CID755673 and CRT0066101 are PKD-specific inhibitors and that PKD/PKD1 inhibition by either the chemical inhibitors or specific PKD/PKD1 siRNAs attenuated necrosis while promoting apoptosis induced by pathological doses of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK in pancreatic acinar cells. Conversely, upregulation of PKD expression in pancreatic acinar cells increased necrosis and decreased apoptosis. We further showed that PKD/PKD1 regulated several key cell death signals including inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs, caspases, receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1 to promote necrosis. PKD/PKD1 inhibition by CID755673 significantly ameliorated necrosis and severity of pancreatitis in an in vivo experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Thus, our studies indicate that PKD/PKD1 is a key mediator of necrosis in acute pancreatitis and that PKD/PKD1 may represent a potential therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis.

  4. Acinar cell cystadenoma of the pancreas: a benign neoplasm or non-neoplastic ballooning of acinar and ductal epithelium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Aatur D; Norwood, Stephanie; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Sharma, Rajni; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Schulick, Richard D; Zeh, Herbert J; Hruban, Ralph H

    2013-09-01

    Acinar cell cystadenoma (ACA) of the pancreas was initially described as a non-neoplastic cyst of the pancreas and, at that time, referred to as "acinar cystic transformation." In subsequent studies, these lesions were given the designation of "-oma," despite the relative lack of evidence supporting a neoplastic process. To characterize these lesions further, we examined the clinical, pathologic, and immunohistochemical features of 8 ACAs. The majority of patients were female (7 of 8, 88%) and ranged in age from 18 to 57 years (mean, 43 y). Grossly, the cysts involved the head (n=5), body (n=1), or the entire pancreas (n=2). ACAs were either multilocular (n=4) or unilocular (n=4) and ranged in size from 1.8 to 15 cm (mean, 6.8 cm). Histologically, multilocular ACAs were lined by patches of acinar and ductal epithelium. Immunolabeling, including double-labeling for cytokeratin 19 and chymotrypsin, highlighted the patchy pattern of the ductal and acinar cells lining the cysts. In some areas, the cysts with patches of acinar and ductal differentiation formed larger locules with incomplete septa as they appeared to fuse with other cysts. In contrast, the unilocular cases were lined by 1 to 2 cell layers of acinar cells with little intervening ductal epithelium. Nuclear atypia, mitotic figures, necrosis, infiltrative growth, and associated invasive carcinoma were absent in all cases. In addition, we assessed the clonal versus polyclonal nature of ACAs, occurring in women, using X-chromosome inactivation analysis of the human androgen receptor (AR) gene. Five of 7 cases were informative and demonstrated a random X-chromosome inactivation pattern. Clinical follow-up information was available for all patients, and follow-up ranged from 10 months to 7.8 years (mean, 3.6 y), with no evidence of recurrence or malignant transformation. We hypothesize that early lesions are marked by acinar dilatation that expands into and incorporates smaller ductules and later larger ducts

  5. Somatostatin receptor-effector system in rat pancreatic acinar membranes after subtotal enterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro-Alonso, I; Colás, B; Esteve, J P; Susini, C; Arilla, E

    1995-02-01

    In the present study we found that exocrine pancreatic hyperplasia observed after proximal small bowel resection is accompanied by an increase in pancreatic somatostatin (SS) content at 1 mo and an increase in the number of SS receptors at 2 wk and 1 mo after intestinal surgery. At 6 mo after small bowel resection SS content and SS receptors had returned to control values. However, the original increase in SS receptor number was accompanied by a decrease in the ability of SS to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. In addition, the ability of 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (a nonhydrolyzable GTP analogue) to inhibit SS receptor binding was decreased in pancreatic acinar membranes from enterectomized rats at 2 wk and 1 mo after jejunoileal resection. These data suggest that there is an abnormality in the integrity of SS receptor binding site-G protein interactions and would explain the decreased inactivation of AC by SS at 2 wk and 1 mo after proximal small bowel resection.

  6. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived acinar/ductal organoids generate human pancreas upon orthotopic transplantation and allow disease modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohwieler, Meike; Illing, Anett; Hermann, Patrick C; Mayer, Tobias; Stockmann, Marianne; Perkhofer, Lukas; Eiseler, Tim; Antony, Justin S; Müller, Martin; Renz, Susanne; Kuo, Chao-Chung; Lin, Qiong; Sendler, Matthias; Breunig, Markus; Kleiderman, Susanne M; Lechel, André; Zenker, Martin; Leichsenring, Michael; Rosendahl, Jonas; Zenke, Martin; Sainz, Bruno; Mayerle, Julia; Costa, Ivan G; Seufferlein, Thomas; Kormann, Michael; Wagner, Martin; Liebau, Stefan; Kleger, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    The generation of acinar and ductal cells from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is a poorly studied process, although various diseases arise from this compartment. We designed a straightforward approach to direct human PSCs towards pancreatic organoids resembling acinar and ductal progeny. Extensive phenotyping of the organoids not only shows the appropriate marker profile but also ultrastructural, global gene expression and functional hallmarks of the human pancreas in the dish. Upon orthotopic transplantation into immunodeficient mice, these organoids form normal pancreatic ducts and acinar tissue resembling fetal human pancreas without evidence of tumour formation or transformation. Finally, we implemented this unique phenotyping tool as a model to study the pancreatic facets of cystic fibrosis (CF). For the first time, we provide evidence that in vitro , but also in our xenograft transplantation assay, pancreatic commitment occurs generally unhindered in CF. Importantly, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) activation in mutated pancreatic organoids not only mirrors the CF phenotype in functional assays but also at a global expression level. We also conducted a scalable proof-of-concept screen in CF pancreatic organoids using a set of CFTR correctors and activators, and established an mRNA-mediated gene therapy approach in CF organoids. Taken together, our platform provides novel opportunities to model pancreatic disease and development, screen for disease-rescuing agents and to test therapeutic procedures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Effects of Benzodiazepines on Acinar and Myoepithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Tatiana M F; Alanis, Luciana R A; Sapelli, Silvana da Silva; de Lima, Antonio A S; de Noronha, Lucia; Rosa, Edvaldo A R; Althobaiti, Yusuf S; Almalki, Atiah H; Sari, Youssef; Ignacio, Sergio A; Johann, Aline C B R; Gregio, Ana M T

    2016-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs), the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs with anxiolytic action, may cause hyposalivation. It has been previously shown that BZDs can cause hypertrophy and decrease the acini cell number. In this study, we investigated the effects of BZDs and pilocarpine on rat parotid glands, specifically on acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cells. Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into nine groups. Control groups received a saline solution for 30 days (C30) and 60 days (C60), and pilocarpine (PILO) for 60 days. Experimental groups received lorazepam (L30) and midazolam (M30) for 30 days. Another group (LS60 or MS60) received lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and saline for additional 30 days. Finally, other groups (LP60 or MP60) received either lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and pilocarpine for additional 30 days. The expression of calponin in myoepithelial cells and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in acinar and ductal cells were evaluated. Animals treated with lorazepam showed an increase in the number of positive staining cells for calponin as compared to control animals (p glands.

  8. Silencing of the Fibroblast growth factor 21 gene is an underlying cause of acinar cell injury in mice lacking MIST1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Charis L; Mehmood, Rashid; Laing, Scott W; Stepniak, Camilla V; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Pin, Christopher L

    2014-04-15

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a key regulator of metabolism under conditions of stress such as starvation, obesity, and hypothermia. Rapid induction of FGF21 is also observed in experimental models of pancreatitis, and FGF21 reduces tissue damage observed in these models, suggesting a nonmetabolic function. Pancreatitis is a debilitating disease with significant morbidity that greatly increases the risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The goals of this study were to examine the regulation and function of FGF21 in acinar cell injury, specifically in a mouse model of pancreatic injury (Mist1(-/-)). Mist1(-/-) mice exhibit acinar cell disorganization, decreased acinar cell communication and exocytosis, and increased sensitivity to cerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP). Examination of Fgf21 expression in Mist1(-/-) mice by qRT-PCR, Northern blot, and Western blot analyses showed a marked decrease in pancreatic Fgf21 expression before and after induction of CIP compared with C57Bl/6 mice. To determine whether the loss of FGF21 accounted for the Mist1(-/-) phenotypes, we generated Mist1(-/-) mice overexpressing human FGF21 from the ApoE promoter (Mist1(-/-)ApoE-FGF21). Reexpression of FGF21 partially mitigated pancreatic damage in Mist1(-/-) tissue based on reduced intrapancreatic enzyme activation, reduced expression of genes involved in fibrosis, and restored cell-cell junctions. Interestingly, alteration of Fgf21 expression in Mist1(-/-) tissue was not simply due to a loss of direct transcriptional regulation by MIST1. Chromatin immunopreciptation indicated that the loss of Fgf21 in the Mist1(-/-) pancreas is due, in part, to epigenetic silencing. Thus, our studies identify a new role for FGF21 in reducing acinar cell injury and uncover a novel mechanism for regulating Fgf21 gene expression.

  9. Stromal ETS2 Regulates Chemokine Production and Immune Cell Recruitment during Acinar-to-Ductal Metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitarresi, Jason R; Liu, Xin; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Cuitiño, Maria C; Kladney, Raleigh D; Mace, Thomas A; Donohue, Sydney; Nayak, Sunayana G; Qu, Chunjing; Lee, James; Woelke, Sarah A; Trela, Stefan; LaPak, Kyle; Yu, Lianbo; McElroy, Joseph; Rosol, Thomas J; Shakya, Reena; Ludwig, Thomas; Lesinski, Gregory B; Fernandez, Soledad A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Leone, Gustavo; Wu, Jinghai; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical studies have suggested that the pancreatic tumor microenvironment both inhibits and promotes tumor development and growth. Here we establish the role of stromal fibroblasts during acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), an initiating event in pancreatic cancer formation. The transcription factor V-Ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) was elevated in smooth muscle actin-positive fibroblasts in the stroma of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patient tissue samples relative to normal pancreatic controls. LSL-Kras(G12D/+); LSL-Trp53(R172H/+); Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice showed that ETS2 expression initially increased in fibroblasts during ADM and remained elevated through progression to PDAC. Conditional ablation of Ets-2 in pancreatic fibroblasts in a Kras(G12D)-driven mouse ADM model decreased the amount of ADM events. ADMs from fibroblast Ets-2-deleted animals had reduced epithelial cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Surprisingly, fibroblast Ets-2 deletion significantly altered immune cell infiltration into the stroma, with an increased CD8+ T-cell population, and decreased presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and mature macrophages. The mechanism involved ETS2-dependent chemokine ligand production in fibroblasts. ETS2 directly bound to regulatory sequences for Ccl3, Ccl4, Cxcl4, Cxcl5, and Cxcl10, a group of chemokines that act as potent mediators of immune cell recruitment. These results suggest an unappreciated role for ETS2 in fibroblasts in establishing an immune-suppressive microenvironment in response to oncogenic Kras(G12D) signaling during the initial stages of tumor development. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acinar cell cystadenoma of the pancreas in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, H; Matsuda, Y; Kawamoto, Y; Michishita, M; Ohkusu-Tsukada, K; Takahashi, K; Naito, Z; Ishiwata, T

    2013-01-01

    Cystic tumours of the pancreas are heterogeneous lesions with a spectrum of morphology and biological behaviour in people. These are poorly characterized in animals. A multicystic tumour of the pancreas was identified in an 11-year-old, female, mixed breed cat. The tumour was 5.5 cm in diameter and the largest cysts were 1.5 cm in diameter. Microscopically, the cysts were lined by single layered or pseudostratified, flat, cuboidal or columnar epithelial cells that occasionally formed papillary structures with a thin fibrous core. The tumour cells had eosinophilic granules in the apical cytoplasm, similar to zymogen granules, and the nuclei were uniform in size and shape. Mitotic figures were not observed. Immunohistochemically, the tumour cells expressed trypsin, but not cytokeratin 7. A diagnosis of acinar cell cystadenoma of the pancreas was made and this is the first report of this tumour in a cat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fine needle aspiration cytology of acinar cell cystadenoma of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yergiyev, Oleksandr; Krishnamurti, Uma; Mohanty, Alok; Thakkar, Shyam; Gurram, Krishna; Silverman, Jan F

    2014-01-01

    Acinar cell cystadenoma (ACC) is a recently recognized cystic lesion of the pancreas that demonstrates acinar differentiation and is currently believed to behave in a benign fashion. ACC enters the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions alongside better recognized entities such as mucinous cystic and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. Although uncommon, patients with ACC can undergo fine needle aspiration (FNA) of the lesion. However, the diagnosis is rarely made on cytologic examination due to sparse cellularity. Furthermore, the eosinophilic amorphous material in the cyst lumen may be mistaken for mucin, resulting in an incorrect diagnosis of a mucinous cyst. To date, there is a paucity of literature on the cytomorphology of ACC, both in peer-reviewed publications and cytopathology texts. To our knowledge, we present the first detailed case report of FNA of ACC in a 22-year-old asymptomatic female. The FNA cytology specimen was hypocellular, and the presence of amorphous secretions led to the initial diagnosis of a mucinous-type neoplasm. Following surgical resection, the cytology specimen was reviewed. We discuss the cytomorphologic features of ACC along with the potential pitfalls and diagnostic implications. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Acinar cell cystadenoma of the pancreas: report of three cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrea M; Shirley, L Andrew; Winter, Jordan M; Prestipino, Anthony J; Palazzo, Juan P; Yeo, Charles J; Lavu, Harish

    2013-07-01

    Acinar cell cystadenoma (ACC) of the pancreas was first described as a distinct pancreatic cystic neoplasm in 2002. We have encountered three cases of ACC at our institution in addition to the 15 cases reported to date in the world literature. The gender distribution in the total cohort of patients with ACC slightly favored females (61 % female), and the median age was 49.5 years. Almost half (53 %) of the cases were identified incidentally, while the remainder presented with abdominal pain. The median tumor diameter was 5 cm in size, and no patients have had documented disease recurrence or progression, even in the setting of an incomplete resection. These findings suggest a relatively indolent biology, and that complete resections are curative. As we will show, surgical resection is warranted to treat symptoms and prevent local extension or malignant transformation.

  13. Lacrimal gland primary acinar cell culture: the role of insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Tannus Malki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The goal of the present study was to establish a protocol for primary culture of lacrimal gland acinar cells (LGACs and to assess the effect of adding insulin to the culture media. Methods: LGACs were isolated and cultured from lacrimal glands of Wistar male rats. The study outcomes included cell number, viability, and peroxidase release over time and in response to three concentrations of insulin (0.5, 5.0, and 50.0 μg/mL. Results: In LGAC primary culture, cells started to form clusters by day 3. There was a time-response pattern of peroxidase release, which rose by day 6, in response to carbachol. Culture viability lasted for 12 days. An insulin concentration of 5.0 μg/mL in the culture medium resulted in higher viability and secretory capacity. Conclusions: The present method simplifies the isolation and culture of LGACs. The data confirmed the relevance of adding insulin to maintain LGACs in culture.

  14. Successful Salvage Chemotherapy with FOLFIRINOX for Recurrent Mixed Acinar Cell Carcinoma and Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas in an Adolescent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Pfrommer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic tumors are rare in children and adolescents. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a mixed acinar cell carcinoma/ductal adenocarcinoma with blastomatous components. He received multimodal treatment including various chemotherapy regimens and multistep surgery including liver transplantation. Introduction of FOLFIRINOX after relapse repeatedly achieved a durable metabolic and clinical response with good quality of life.

  15. Identification of miRNAs Involved in Reprogramming Acinar Cells into Insulin Producing Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Teichenne

    Full Text Available Reprogramming acinar cells into insulin producing cells using adenoviral (Ad-mediated delivery of Pdx1, Ngn3 and MafA (PNM is an innovative approach for the treatment of diabetes. Here, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in this process and in particular, the role of microRNAs. To this end, we performed a comparative study of acinar-to-β cell reprogramming efficiency in the rat acinar cell line AR42J and its subclone B13 after transduction with Ad-PNM. B13 cells were more efficiently reprogrammed than AR42J cells, which was demonstrated by a strong activation of β cell markers (Ins1, Ins2, IAPP, NeuroD1 and Pax4. miRNome panels were used to analyze differentially expressed miRNAs in acinar cells under four experimental conditions (i non-transduced AR42J cells, (ii non-transduced B13 cells, (iii B13 cells transduced with Ad-GFP vectors and (iv B13 cells transduced with Ad-PNM vectors. A total of 59 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between non-transduced AR42J and B13 cells. Specifically, the miR-200 family was completely repressed in B13 cells, suggesting that these cells exist in a less differentiated state than AR42J cells and as a consequence they present a greater plasticity. Adenoviral transduction per se induced dedifferentiation of acinar cells and 11 miRNAs were putatively involved in this process, whereas 8 miRNAs were found to be associated with PNM expression. Of note, Ad-PNM reprogrammed B13 cells presented the same levels of miR-137-3p, miR-135a-5p, miR-204-5p and miR-210-3p of those detected in islets, highlighting their role in the process. In conclusion, this study led to the identification of miRNAs that might be of compelling importance to improve acinar-to-β cell conversion for the future treatment of diabetes.

  16. Effects of a diet high in fish oil (MaxEPA) on the formation of micronucleated erythrocytes in blood and on the number of atypical acinar cell foci induced in rat pancreas by Azaserine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appel, M.J.; Woutersen, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the influence of fish oil on the genotoxic effects of azaserine, using the formation of micronucleated erythrocytes as a measure for the degree of initiating potency and the number and size of putative preneoplastic pancreatic atypical acinar cell foci

  17. No Effect of Dietary Aspartame or Stevia on Pancreatic Acinar Carcinoma Development, Growth, or Induced Mortality in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James; Lagou, Vasiliki; Dresselaers, Tom; van Dongen, Katinka A; Himmelreich, Uwe; Liston, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis, largely due to a poor record for early detection. Known risk factors for pancreatic cancer include obesity, diet, and diabetes, implicating glucose consumption and regulation as a key player. The role of artificial sweeteners may therefore be pertinent to disease kinetics. The oncogenic impact of artificial sweeteners is a highly controversial area. Aspartame, one of the most studied food additives, is widely recognized as being generally safe, although there are still specific areas where research is incomplete due to study limitations. Stevia, by contrast, has been the subject of relatively few studies, and the potential health benefits are based on extrapolation rather than direct testing. Here, we used longitudinal tracking of pancreatic acinar carcinoma development, growth, and lethality in a sensitized mouse model. Despite exposure to aspartame and stevia from the in utero stage onward, we found no disease modification activity, in either direction. These results contribute to the data on aspartame and stevia safety, while also reducing confidence in several of the purported health benefits.

  18. No Effect of Dietary Aspartame or Stevia on Pancreatic Acinar Carcinoma Development, Growth, or Induced Mortality in a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James; Lagou, Vasiliki; Dresselaers, Tom; van Dongen, Katinka A.; Himmelreich, Uwe; Liston, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis, largely due to a poor record for early detection. Known risk factors for pancreatic cancer include obesity, diet, and diabetes, implicating glucose consumption and regulation as a key player. The role of artificial sweeteners may therefore be pertinent to disease kinetics. The oncogenic impact of artificial sweeteners is a highly controversial area. Aspartame, one of the most studied food additives, is widely recognized as being generally safe, although there are still specific areas where research is incomplete due to study limitations. Stevia, by contrast, has been the subject of relatively few studies, and the potential health benefits are based on extrapolation rather than direct testing. Here, we used longitudinal tracking of pancreatic acinar carcinoma development, growth, and lethality in a sensitized mouse model. Despite exposure to aspartame and stevia from the in utero stage onward, we found no disease modification activity, in either direction. These results contribute to the data on aspartame and stevia safety, while also reducing confidence in several of the purported health benefits. PMID:28232906

  19. The risk for immediate postoperative complications after pancreaticoduodenectomy is increased by high frequency of acinar cells and decreased by prevalent fibrosis of the cut edge of pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaninen, Matias; Bläuer, Merja; Vasama, Kaija; Jin, Haitao; Räty, Sari; Sand, Juhani; Nordback, Isto; Laukkarinen, Johanna

    2012-08-01

    Soft pancreas is considered as a factor for pancreatitis after pancreaticoduodenectomy, which in turn constitutes a high risk for local complications. The aim was to analyze the proportion of different cell types in the cut edge of pancreas (CEP) in relation to postoperative pancreatitis and other complications after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Data from postoperative follow-up was collected on 40 patients who had undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy. Positive urine trypsinogen-2, an early detector of pancreatitis, was checked on days 1 to 6 after operation. Drain amylase was measured on postoperative day 3. Anastomotic leakages, delayed gastric emptying, and other complications were registered. The areas of different cell types were calculated from the entire hematoxylin-eosin-stained section of CEP. High frequency of acinar cells in the CEP significantly increased positive urine trypsinogen-2 days, drain amylase values, and delayed gastric emptying. In a subgroup of patients with more than 40% acini in the CEP, there were significantly more postoperative complications. Increased fibrosis correlated with a small number of positive urine trypsinogen-2 days and postoperative complications. A large number of acinar cells in the CEP increases, whereas extensive fibrosis in the CEP decreases, the risk for postoperative complications after pancreaticoduodenectomy. These results emphasize the importance of acini in the development of postoperative complications.

  20. Role of Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 in exocytosis of amylase from parotid acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takuma, T; Ichida, T

    1997-06-01

    We evaluated the role of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in the exocytosis of amylase from parotid acinar cells. The exocytosis stimulated by isoproterenol was dose-dependently inhibited by bromoenol lactone (BEL), a potent suicide inhibitor of Ca2+-independent cytosolic PLA2. The IC50 value of BEL was approximately 7 microM. AACOCF3, a selective inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent cytosolic PLA2, did not inhibit the exocytosis at least up to 30 microM. BEL also inhibited amylase release evoked by forskolin and membrane-permeable cAMP, but it did not inhibit cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity. PLA2 activity in parotid acinar cells was found to be predominantly Ca2+-independent, and was strongly inhibited by BEL, whose IC50 value was approximately 2 microM when it was applied to intact acini. Although isoproterenol scarcely enhanced [3H]arachidonic acid release from intact acinar cells, BEL dose-dependently decreased the basal arachidonic acid release to approximately one half of the control value. These results suggest that the cytosolic Ca2+-independent PLA2 activity plays a role in the membrane fusion process of exocytosis in parotid acinar cells.

  1. [Changes in serous acinar cells of the tracheal gland in diabetic rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, T

    1993-08-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural changes in tracheal glands of rats with artificially induced diabetes were studied. The diabetic condition was induced by streptozotocin. The tracheal gland is composed of a duct and secretory units, mucus tubules and serous acini in diabetic as well as normal rats. In normal rats, the serous acinar cells contained only neutral polysaccharides. In diabetic rats, on the other hand, the serous acinar cells contained not only neutral but also moderate amounts of what appeared to be sialic acid containing compounds. On the ultrastructural level, two kinds of serous cells were observed in diabetic rats, one of which contained homogeneous granules while the other containing heterogeneous granules. The ratio between the number of cells containing heterogeneous granules and cells with homogeneous granules increased with the duration of the diabetic condition in the rat. Changes within the serous cells of diabetic rats might depress tracheal host defense mechanisms and could explain why airway infections are common in patients suffering from diabetes.

  2. Functional differences in the acinar cells of the murine major salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y; Nakamoto, T; Jaramillo, Y; Choi, S; Catalan, M A; Melvin, J E

    2015-05-01

    In humans, approximately 90% of saliva is secreted by the 3 major salivary glands: the parotid (PG), the submandibular (SMG), and the sublingual glands (SLG). Even though it is known that all 3 major salivary glands secrete saliva by a Cl(-)-dependent mechanism, salivary secretion rates differ greatly among these glands. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the properties of the ion-transporting pathways in acinar cells that might account for the differences among the major salivary glands. Pilocarpine-induced saliva was simultaneously collected in vivo from the 3 major salivary glands of mice. When normalized by gland weight, the amount of saliva secreted by the PG was more than 2-fold larger than that obtained from the SMG and SLG. At the cellular level, carbachol induced an increase in the intracellular [Ca(2+)] that was more than 2-fold larger in PG and SMG than in SLG acinar cells. Carbachol-stimulated Cl(-) efflux and the protein levels of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel TMEM16A, the major apical Cl(-) efflux pathway in salivary acinar cells, were significantly greater in PG compared with SMG and SLG. In addition, we evaluated the transporter activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporters (NKCC1) and anion exchangers (AE), the 2 primary basolateral Cl(-) uptake mechanisms in acinar cells. The SMG NKCC1 activity was about twice that of the PG and more than 12-fold greater than that of the SLG. AE activity was similar in PG and SLG, and both PG and SLG AE activity was about 2-fold larger than that of SMG. In summary, the salivation kinetics of the 3 major glands are distinct, and these differences can be explained by the unique functional properties of each gland related to Cl(-) movement, including the transporter activities of the Cl(-) uptake and efflux pathways, and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  3. Encapsulation of primary salivary gland cells in enzymatically degradable poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels promotes acinar cell characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, Andrew D; Felong, Timothy J; Schutrum, Brittany E; Joe, Debria S L; Ovitt, Catherine E; Benoit, Danielle S W

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers leads to permanent xerostomia due to the loss of secretory acinar cells in the salivary glands. Regenerative treatments utilizing primary submandibular gland (SMG) cells show modest improvements in salivary secretory function, but there is limited evidence of salivary gland regeneration. We have recently shown that poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels can support the survival and proliferation of SMG cells as multicellular spheres in vitro. To further develop this approach for cell-based salivary gland regeneration, we have investigated how different modes of PEG hydrogel degradation affect the proliferation, cell-specific gene expression, and epithelial morphology within encapsulated salivary gland spheres. Comparison of non-degradable, hydrolytically-degradable, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-degradable, and mixed mode-degradable hydrogels showed that hydrogel degradation by any mechanism is required for significant proliferation of encapsulated cells. The expression of acinar phenotypic markers Aqp5 and Nkcc1 was increased in hydrogels that are MMP-degradable compared with other hydrogel compositions. However, expression of secretory acinar proteins Mist1 and Pip was not maintained to the same extent as phenotypic markers, suggesting changes in cell function upon encapsulation. Nevertheless, MMP- and mixed mode-degradability promoted organization of polarized cell types forming tight junctions and expression of the basement membrane proteins laminin and collagen IV within encapsulated SMG spheres. This work demonstrates that cellularly remodeled hydrogels can promote proliferation and gland-like organization by encapsulated salivary gland cells as well as maintenance of acinar cell characteristics required for regenerative approaches. Investigation is required to identify approaches to further enhance acinar secretory properties. Regenerative strategies to replace damaged salivary glands require the function and

  4. Apoptosis of acinar cells in pancreas allograft rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, J. G.; Wever, P. C.; Laterveer, J. C.; Bruijn, J. A.; van der Woude, F. J.; ten Berge, I. J.; Daha, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently it has been recognized that apoptosis of target cells may occur during liver and kidney allograft rejection and is probably induced by infiltrating cells. Pancreas rejection is also characterized by a cellular infiltrate, however, the occurrence of apoptosis has not been

  5. CT and MR imaging of multilocular acinar cell cystadenoma: comparison with branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMNs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delavaud, Christophe; Assignies, Gaspard d' ; Vilgrain, Valerie; Vullierme, Marie-Pierre [Hopital Beaujon, Service de Radiologie, Clichy (France); Cros, Jerome [Hopital Beaujon, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Clichy (France); Ruszniewski, Philippe; Hammel, Pascal; Levy, Philippe [Hopital Beaujon, Service de Pancreato-Gastro-Enterologie, Clichy (France); Couvelard, Anne [Hopital Bichat, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Paris (France); Sauvanet, Alain; Dokmak, Safi [Hopital Beaujon, Service de Chirurgie Hepato-Pancreato-Biliaire, Clichy (France)

    2014-09-15

    To describe CT and MR imaging findings of acinar cell cystadenoma (ACC) of the pancreas and to compare them with those of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (BD-IPMN) to identify distinctive elements. Five patients with ACC and the 20 consecutive patients with histologically proven BD-IPMN were retrospectively included. Clinical and biological information was collected and histological data reviewed. CT and MR findings were analysed blinded to pathological diagnosis in order to identify imaging diagnostic criteria of ACC. Patients with ACC were symptomatic in all but one case and were younger than those with BD-IPMN (p = 0.006). Four radiological criteria allowed for differentiating ACC from IPMN: five or more cysts, clustered peripheral small cysts, presence of cyst calcifications and absence of communication with the main pancreatic duct (p < 0.05). Presence of at least two or three of these imaging criteria had a strong diagnostic value for ACC with a sensitivity of 100 % and 80 % and a specificity of 85 % and 100 %, respectively. Preoperative differential diagnosis between ACC and BD-IPMN can be achieved using a combination of four CT and/or MR imaging criteria. Recognition of ACC patients could change patient management and lead to more conservative treatment. (orig.)

  6. Salivary gland acinar cells regenerate functional glandular structures in modified hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Swati

    Xerostomia, a condition resulting from irradiation of the head and neck, affects over 40,000 cancer patients each year in the United States. Direct radiation damage of the acinar cells that secrete fluid and protein results in salivary gland hypofunction. Present medical management for xerostomia for patients treated for upper respiratory cancer is largely ineffective. Patients who have survived their terminal diagnosis are often left with a diminished quality of life and are unable to enjoy the simple pleasures of eating and drinking. This project aims to ultimately reduce human suffering by developing a functional implantable artificial salivary gland. The goal was to create an extracellular matrix (ECM) modified hyaluronic acid (HA) based hydrogel culture system that allows for the growth and differentiation of salivary acinar cells into functional acini-like structures capable of secreting large amounts of protein and fluid unidirectionally and to ultimately engineer a functional artificial salivary gland that can be implanted into an animal model. A tissue collection protocol was established and salivary gland tissue was obtained from patients undergoing head and neck surgery. The tissue specimen was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry to establish the phenotype of normal salivary gland cells including the native basement membranes. Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed normal glandular tissue structures including intercalated ducts, striated ducts and acini. alpha-Amylase and periodic acid schiff stain, used for structures with a high proportion of carbohydrate macromolecules, preferentially stained acinar cells in the tissue. Intercalated and striated duct structures were identified using cytokeratins 19 and 7 staining. Myoepithelial cells positive for cytokeratin 14 were found wrapped around the serous and mucous acini. Tight junction components including ZO-1 and E-cadherin were present between both ductal and acinar cells. Ductal and acinar

  7. Total pancreatectomy for metachronous mixed acinar-ductal carcinoma in a remnant pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonaka, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Mitsuhiro; Akabane, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Naoyuki; Shomura, Hiroki; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Oikawa, Kensuke; Nakano, Shiro

    2014-09-07

    In October 2009, a 71-year-old female was diagnosed with a cystic tumor in the tail of the pancreas with an irregular dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body and tail of the pancreas. A distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, and partial resection of the duodenum, jejunum and transverse colon was performed. In March 2011, a follow-up computed tomography scan showed a low density mass at the head of the remnant pancreas. We diagnosed it as a recurrence of the tumor and performed a total pancreatectomy for the remnant pancreas. In the histological evaluation of the resected specimen of the distal pancreas, the neoplastic cells formed an acinar and papillary structure that extended into the main pancreatic duct. Mucin5AC, α1-antitrypsin (α-AT) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were detected in the tumor cells by immunohistochemistry. In the resected head of the pancreas, the tumor was composed of both acinar and ductal elements with a mottled pattern. The proportions of each element were approximately 40% and 60%, respectively. Strongly positive α-AT cells were detected in the acinar element. Some tumor cells were also CEA positive. However, the staining for synaptophysin and chromogranin A was negative in the tumor cells. Ultimately, we diagnosed the tumor as a recurrence of mixed acinar-ductal carcinoma in the remnant pancreas. In conclusion, we report here a rare case of repeated pancreatic resection for multicentric lesions of mixed acinar-ductal carcinoma of the pancreas.

  8. Role of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Chemoresistance in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eMcCarroll

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumour volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumour microenvironment following activation of pancreatic stellate cells, tumour progression and chemoresistance is enhanced. This review will discuss how PSCs contribute to chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer.

  9. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljona Gaiko-Shcherbak

    Full Text Available The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function.

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 disrupts mammary acinar architecture and initiates malignant transformation of mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Jessica L F; Shah, Raj; La Cava, Stephanie; Dolfi, Sonia C; Mehta, Madhura S; Kongara, Sameera; Price, Sandy; Ganesan, Shridar; Reuhl, Kenneth R; Hirshfield, Kim M; Karantza, Vassiliki; Chen, Suzie

    2015-05-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1/Grm1) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, which was once thought to only participate in synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability, but has more recently been implicated in non-neuronal tissue functions. We previously described the oncogenic properties of Grm1 in cultured melanocytes in vitro and in spontaneous melanoma development with 100 % penetrance in vivo. Aberrant mGluR1 expression was detected in 60-80 % of human melanoma cell lines and biopsy samples. As most human cancers are of epithelial origin, we utilized immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) as a model system to study the transformative properties of Grm1. We introduced Grm1 into iMMECs and isolated several stable mGluR1-expressing clones. Phenotypic alterations in mammary acinar architecture were assessed using three-dimensional morphogenesis assays. We found that mGluR1-expressing iMMECs exhibited delayed lumen formation in association with decreased central acinar cell death, disrupted cell polarity, and a dramatic increase in the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Orthotopic implantation of mGluR1-expressing iMMEC clones into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient nude mice resulted in mammary tumor formation in vivo. Persistent mGluR1 expression was required for the maintenance of the tumorigenic phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, as demonstrated by an inducible Grm1-silencing RNA system. Furthermore, mGluR1 was found be expressed in human breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor biopsies. Elevated levels of extracellular glutamate were observed in mGluR1-expressing breast cancer cell lines and concurrent treatment of MCF7 xenografts with glutamate release inhibitor, riluzole, and an AKT inhibitor led to suppression of tumor progression. Our results are likely relevant to human breast cancer, highlighting a putative role of mGluR1 in the pathophysiology of breast cancer and the potential

  11. Pancreatic stellate cells and CX3CR1: occurrence in normal pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis and effect of their activation by a CX3CR1 agonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masahiko; Ito, Tetsuhide; Nakamura, Taichi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Oono, Takamasa; Kato, Masaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Koichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Jensen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous studies suggest important roles of the chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1) in acute/chronic pancreatitis, however the possible mechanisms of the effects are unclear. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can play important roles in pancreatitis, secreting inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, as well as proliferation. Therefore, we investigated CX3CL1 receptor (CX3CR1) occurrence in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues, and the effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs. Methods CX3CR1 expression/localization in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues were evaluated with immunohistochemical analysis. CX3CR1 expression and effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs were examined with realtime-PCR, BrdU assays and Western Blotting. Results In normal pancreas, acinar cells expressed CX3CR1 within granule-like-formations in the cytoplasm, whereas in acute/chronic pancreatitis, acinar, ductal and activated-PSCs expressed CX3CR1 on cell membranes. With activation of normal PSCs, CX3CR1 is increased. CX3CL1 activated multiple signaling cascades in PSCs. CX3CL1, did not induce inflammatory-genes expression in activated-PSCs, but induced proliferation. Conclusions CX3CR1s are expressed in normal pancreas. Expression is increased in acute/chronic pancreatitis and the CX3CR1s are activated. CX3CL1 induces proliferation of activated-PSCs without increasing release of inflammatory-mediators. These results suggest that CX3CR1 activation of PSCs could be important in their effects in pancreatitis, especially to PSCs proliferation in pancreatitis where CX3CL1 levels are elevated. PMID:24681877

  12. Long-Term Culture of Self-renewing Pancreatic Progenitors Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Trott

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells have been proposed as an unlimited source of pancreatic β cells for studying and treating diabetes. However, the long, multi-step differentiation protocols used to generate functional β cells inevitably exhibit considerable variability, particularly when applied to pluripotent cells from diverse genetic backgrounds. We have developed culture conditions that support long-term self-renewal of human multipotent pancreatic progenitors, which are developmentally more proximal to the specialized cells of the adult pancreas. These cultured pancreatic progenitor (cPP cells express key pancreatic transcription factors, including PDX1 and SOX9, and exhibit transcriptomes closely related to their in vivo counterparts. Upon exposure to differentiation cues, cPP cells give rise to pancreatic endocrine, acinar, and ductal lineages, indicating multilineage potency. Furthermore, cPP cells generate insulin+ β-like cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that they offer a convenient alternative to pluripotent cells as a source of adult cell types for modeling pancreatic development and diabetes.

  13. Targeting of the P2X7 receptor in pancreatic cancer and stellate cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannuzzo, Andrea; Saccomano, Mara; Napp, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-gated receptor P2X7 (P2X7R) is involved in regulation of cell survival and has been of interest in cancer field. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a deadly cancer and new markers and therapeutic targets are needed. PDAC is characterized by a complex tumour microenvironment, which...... includes cancer and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), and potentially high nucleotide/side turnover. Our aim was to determine P2X7R expression and function in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro as well as to perform in vivo efficacy study applying P2X7R inhibitor in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model...... into nude mice and tumour growth was followed noninvasively by bioluminescence imaging. AZ10606120-treated mice showed reduced bioluminescence compared to saline-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed P2X7R expression in cancer and PSC cells, and in metaplastic/neoplastic acinar and duct...

  14. Three dimensional cultures: a tool to study normal acinar architecture vs. malignant transformation of breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Anupama; Kleer, Celina G

    2014-04-25

    Invasive breast carcinomas are a group of malignant epithelial tumors characterized by the invasion of adjacent tissues and propensity to metastasize. The interplay of signals between cancer cells and their microenvironment exerts a powerful influence on breast cancer growth and biological behavior(1). However, most of these signals from the extracellular matrix are lost or their relevance is understudied when cells are grown in two dimensional culture (2D) as a monolayer. In recent years, three dimensional (3D) culture on a reconstituted basement membrane has emerged as a method of choice to recapitulate the tissue architecture of benign and malignant breast cells. Cells grown in 3D retain the important cues from the extracellular matrix and provide a physiologically relevant ex vivo system(2,3). Of note, there is growing evidence suggesting that cells behave differently when grown in 3D as compared to 2D(4). 3D culture can be effectively used as a means to differentiate the malignant phenotype from the benign breast phenotype and for underpinning the cellular and molecular signaling involved(3). One of the distinguishing characteristics of benign epithelial cells is that they are polarized so that the apical cytoplasm is towards the lumen and the basal cytoplasm rests on the basement membrane. This apico-basal polarity is lost in invasive breast carcinomas, which are characterized by cellular disorganization and formation of anastomosing and branching tubules that haphazardly infiltrates the surrounding stroma. These histopathological differences between benign gland and invasive carcinoma can be reproduced in 3D(6,7). Using the appropriate read-outs like the quantitation of single round acinar structures, or differential expression of validated molecular markers for cell proliferation, polarity and apoptosis in combination with other molecular and cell biology techniques, 3D culture can provide an important tool to better understand the cellular changes during

  15. Organellar Dysfunction in the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandol, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Significance Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of exocrine pancreas that carries considerable morbidity and mortality; its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. During the past decade, new insights have been gained into signaling pathways and molecules that mediate the inflammatory response of pancreatitis and death of acinar cells (the main exocrine pancreas cell type). By contrast, much less is known about the acinar cell organellar damage in pancreatitis and how it contributes to the disease pathogenesis. Recent Advances This review summarizes recent findings from our group, obtained on experimental in vivo and ex vivo models, which reveal disordering of key cellular organelles, namely, mitochondria, autophagosomes, and lysosomes, in pancreatitis. Our results indicate a critical role for mitochondrial permeabilization in determining the balance between apoptosis and necrosis in pancreatitis, and thus the disease severity. We further investigate how the mitochondrial dysfunction (and hence acinar cell death) is regulated by Ca2+, reactive oxygen species, and Bcl-xL, in relation to specific properties of pancreatic mitochondria. Our results also reveal that autophagy, the principal cellular degradative, lysosome-driven pathway, is impaired in pancreatitis due to inefficient lysosomal function, and that impaired autophagy mediates two key pathological responses of pancreatitis—accumulation of vacuoles in acinar cells and the abnormal, intra-acinar activation of digestive enzymes such as trypsinogen. Critical Issues and Future Directions The findings discussed in this review indicate critical roles for mitochondrial and autophagic/lysosomal dysfunctions in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and delineate directions for detailed investigations into the molecular events that underlie acinar cell organellar damage. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2699–2710. PMID:21834686

  16. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we review important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of pancreatitis. Recent Findings The relative contribution of intra-pancreatic trypsinogen activation and NFκB activation, the two major early independent cellular events in the etiology of pancreatitis, have been investigated using novel genetic models. Trypsinogen activation has traditionally held the spotlight for many decades as it is believed to be the central pathogenic event of pancreatitis However, recent experimental evidence points to the role of trypsin activation in early acinar cell damage but not in the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis through NFκB activation. Further, chronic pancreatitis in the caerulein model develops independently of typsinogen activation. Sustained activation of the NFκB pathway, but not persistent intra-acinar expression of active trypsin, was shown to result in chronic pancreatitis. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling was shown to mediate downstream effects of pathologic rise in intracellular calcium. IL-6 was identified as a key cytokine mediating pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Summary Recent advances challenge the long-believed trypsin-centered understanding of pancreatitis. It is becoming increasingly clear that activation of intense inflammatory signaling mechanisms in acinar cells is crucial to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, which may explain the strong systemic inflammatory response in pancreatitis. PMID:23892538

  17. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Feick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  18. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

  19. Acinar cell cystadenoma of the pancreas: A retrospective analysis of ten-year experience from a single academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Ji, Liang; Qu, Feng-Zhi; Li, Le; Cao, Cheng-Liang; Li, Zong-Bei; Zhu, Hong; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acinar cell cystadenoma (ACA), also referred to as "acinar cystic transformation", is a rare and newly recognized cystic lesion of the pancreas displaying apparent acinar cell differentiation with benign outcomes. We summarized our experience with the diagnosis, clinicopathologic feature, treatment and prognosis of ACA to provide a reference for the disposal of this uncommon condition. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data from eight patients with ACA treated in our hospital between March, 2005 and January, 2015. Among eight patients, five of whom were female and the age at diagnosis ranged from 33 to 67 years (mean, 49.8 y). The most commonly clinical symptom was abdominal pain. Eight lesions were unifocal and either unilocular (n = 5) or multilocular (n = 3) with average size of 10.5 cm (range, 5.1-19.7 cm). All the patients were treated surgically and a definite diagnosis of ACA was obtained by the histopathological, histochemical and immunohistochemical tests. The length of stay range was from 11 to 17 days and there were no perioperative deaths. At a median follow-up of 57.3 months, all the patients were alive and there was no evidence of recurrence, distant metastasis or malignant transformation. Appropriately preoperative differential diagnosis of ACA remains challenging and the final result is usually gained by the histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Although the origin of ACA is still contradictory, surgery is actively advocated as the most effective method for relieving the symptoms and preventing the tumor from local extension or malignant transformation so as to obtain an optimal long-term survival. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. PKD signaling and pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J

    2016-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder.

  1. Mechanisms of disease: chronic inflammation and cancer in the pancreas--a potential role for pancreatic stellate cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algül, Hana; Treiber, Matthias; Lesina, Marina; Schmid, Roland M

    2007-08-01

    Late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic options mean that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most lethal forms of human cancer. The identification of genetic alterations facilitated the launch of the Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasm nomenclature, a standardized classification system for pancreatic duct lesions, but the factors that contribute to the development of such lesions and their progression to high-grade neoplasia remain obscure. Age, smoking, obesity and diabetes confer increased risk of PDA, and the presence of chronic pancreatitis is a consistent risk factor for pancreatic cancer. It is hypothesized that chronic inflammation generates a microenvironment that contributes to malignant transformation in the pancreas, as is known to occur in other organs. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the main mediator of fibrogenesis during chronic pancreatitis, but their contribution to the development of PDA has not been elucidated. Data now suggest that PSCs might assume a linking role in inflammation-associated carcinogenesis through their ability to communicate with inflammatory cells, acinar cells, and pancreatic cancer cells in a complicated network of interactions. In this Review, the role of PSCs in the process of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis is discussed and new potential treatment options evaluated.

  2. The Presence of Interleukin-13 at Pancreatic ADM/PanIN Lesions Alters Macrophage Populations and Mediates Pancreatic Tumorigenesis

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    Geou-Yarh Liou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The contributions of the innate immune system to the development of pancreatic cancer are still ill defined. Inflammatory macrophages can initiate metaplasia of pancreatic acinar cells to a duct-like phenotype (acinar-to-ductal metaplasia [ADM], which then gives rise to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN when oncogenic KRas is present. However, it remains unclear when and how this inflammatory macrophage population is replaced by tumor-promoting macrophages. Here, we demonstrate the presence of interleukin-13 (IL-13, which can convert inflammatory into Ym1+ alternatively activated macrophages, at ADM/PanIN lesions. We further show that Ym1+ macrophages release factors, such as IL-1ra and CCL2, to drive pancreatic fibrogenesis and tumorigenesis. Treatment of mice expressing oncogenic KRas under an acinar cell-specific promoter with a neutralizing antibody for IL-13 significantly decreased the accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages at these lesions, resulting in decreased fibrosis and lesion growth.

  3. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

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    Hamada, Shin [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Hamada, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan); Kobune, Masayoshi [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  4. Recent developments in the treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Tatsuhiro; Kawaratani, Hideto; Yoshiji, Hitoshi; Uemura, Masahito; Fukui, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory condition characterized by repeated attacks of abdominal pain, and the destruction and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma which causes to reduced exocrine and endocrine functions. Alcohol is the most common cause of chronic pancreatitis. Although abstinence is usually considered a prerequisite for successful treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, we often encounter patients who have repeated attacks from the compensated stage through the transitional stage. In alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, continued alcohol consumption causes changes in the digestive hormones and vagal nerve function that induce the pancreatic acinar cells to oversecrete protein, increasing the protein concentration and viscosity of the pancreatic juice. This induces protein sedimentation from the pancreatic juice and formation of protein plugs within the pancreatic duct, triggering repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis. The treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis includes alleviation of symptoms, particularly abdominal pain, elimination of trigger factors, prevention of recurrence and disease progression, adjuvant therapies for pancreatic exocrine and endocrine failure. Recently, the main constituent proteins in these protein plugs have been identified, enabling trials of several therapies, such as the administration of secretin formulations and endoscopic removal. Bromhexine hydrochloride, a bronchial mucolytic, has an affinity for the pancreatic acinar cells, inducing them to secrete pancreatic juice of low viscosity. In this review, we summarize the most recent thoughts about alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, and the new treatments, and in particular, we present our findings concerning the efficacy of bromhexine hydrochloride in the treatment of this disease.

  5. Pancreatic stellate cells and CX3CR1: occurrence in normal pancreas and acute and chronic pancreatitis and effect of their activation by a CX3CR1 agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masahiko; Ito, Tetsuhide; Nakamura, Taichi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Oono, Takamasa; Kato, Masaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Koichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Jensen, Robert T

    2014-07-01

    Numerous studies suggest important roles of the chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1), in acute/chronic pancreatitis; however, the possible mechanisms of the effects are unclear. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can play important roles in pancreatitis, secreting inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, as well as proliferation. Therefore, we investigated CX3CL1 receptor (CX3CR1) occurrence in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues and the effects of CX3CL1 on activated PSCs. CX3CR1 expression/localization in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues was evaluated with immunohistochemical analysis. CX3CR1 expression and effects of CX3CL1 on activated PSCs were examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction, BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) assays, and Western blotting. In normal pancreas, acinar cells expressed CX3CR1 within granule-like formations in the cytoplasm, whereas in acute/chronic pancreatitis, acinar, ductal, and activated PSCs expressed CX3CR1 on cell membranes. With activation of normal PSCs, CX3CR1 is increased. CX3CL1 activated multiple signaling cascades in PSCs. CX3CL1 did not induce inflammatory genes expression in activated PSCs, but induced proliferation. CX3CR1s are expressed in normal pancreas. Expression is increased in acute/chronic pancreatitis, and the CX3CR1s are activated. CX3CL1 induces proliferation of activated PSCs without increasing release of inflammatory mediators. These results suggest that CX3CR1 activation of PSCs could be important in their effects in pancreatitis, especially to PSC proliferation in pancreatitis where CX3CL1 levels are elevated.

  6. Silencing Mist1 Gene Expression Is Essential for Recovery from Acute Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Karki

    Full Text Available Acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas are tasked with synthesizing, packaging and secreting vast quantities of pro-digestive enzymes to maintain proper metabolic homeostasis for the organism. Because the synthesis of high levels of hydrolases is potentially dangerous, the pancreas is prone to acute pancreatitis (AP, a disease that targets acinar cells, leading to acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM, inflammation and fibrosis-events that can transition into the earliest stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Despite a wealth of information concerning the broad phenotype associated with pancreatitis, little is understood regarding specific transcriptional regulatory networks that are susceptible to AP and the role these networks play in acinar cell and exocrine pancreas responses. In this study, we examined the importance of the acinar-specific maturation transcription factor MIST1 to AP damage and organ recovery. Analysis of wild-type and Mist1 conditional null mice revealed that Mist1 gene transcription and protein accumulation were dramatically reduced as acinar cells underwent ADM alterations during AP episodes. To test if loss of MIST1 function was primarily responsible for the damaged status of the organ, mice harboring a Cre-inducible Mist1 transgene (iMist1 were utilized to determine if sustained MIST1 activity could alleviate AP damage responses. Unexpectedly, constitutive iMist1 expression during AP led to a dramatic increase in organ damage followed by acinar cell death. We conclude that the transient silencing of Mist1 expression is critical for acinar cells to survive an AP episode, providing cells an opportunity to suppress their secretory function and regenerate damaged cells. The importance of MIST1 to these events suggests that modulating key pancreas transcription networks could ease clinical symptoms in patients diagnosed with pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  7. New insights into alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Minoti; Pirola, Romano; Wilson, Jeremy

    2009-10-01

    Pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer represent two major diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Pancreatitis exhibits both acute and chronic manifestations. The commonest causes of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and alcohol abuse; the latter is also the predominant cause of chronic pancreatitis. Recent evidence indicates that endotoxinemia, which occurs in alcoholics due to increased gut permeability, may trigger overt necroinflammation of the pancreas in alcoholics and one that may also play a critical role in progression to chronic pancreatitis (acinar atrophy and fibrosis) via activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Chronic pancreatitis is a major risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer, which is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in humans. Increasing attention has been paid in recent years to the role of the stroma in pancreatic cancer progression. It is now well established that PSCs play a key role in the production of cancer stroma and that they interact closely with cancer cells to create a tumor facilitatory environment that stimulates local tumor growth and distant metastasis. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, with particular reference to the central role played by PSCs in both diseases. An improved knowledge of PSC biology has the potential to provide an insight into pathways that may be therapeutically targeted to inhibit PSC activation, thereby inhibiting the development of fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis and interrupting stellate cell-cancer cell interactions so as to retard cancer progression.

  8. New saliva secretion model based on the expression of Na+-K+ pump and K+ channels in the apical membrane of parotid acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almássy, János; Siguenza, Elias; Skaliczki, Marianna; Matesz, Klara; Sneyd, James; Yule, David I; Nánási, Péter P

    2018-01-17

    The plasma membrane of parotid acinar cells is functionally divided into apical and basolateral regions. According to the current model, fluid secretion is driven by transepithelial ion gradient, which facilitates water movement by osmosis into the acinar lumen from the interstitium. The osmotic gradient is created by the apical Cl- efflux and the subsequent paracellular Na+ transport. In this model, the Na+-K+ pump is located exclusively in the basolateral membrane and has essential role in salivary secretion, since the driving force for Cl- transport via basolateral Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransport is generated by the Na+-K+ pump. In addition, the continuous electrochemical gradient for Cl- flow during acinar cell stimulation is maintained by the basolateral K+ efflux. However, using a combination of single-cell electrophysiology and Ca2+-imaging, we demonstrate that photolysis of Ca2+ close to the apical membrane of parotid acinar cells triggered significant K+ current, indicating that a substantial amount of K+ is secreted into the lumen during stimulation. Nevertheless, the K+ content of the primary saliva is relatively low, suggesting that K+ might be reabsorbed through the apical membrane. Therefore, we investigated the localization of Na+-K+ pumps in acinar cells. We show that the pumps appear evenly distributed throughout the whole plasma membrane, including the apical pole of the cell. Based on these results, a new mathematical model of salivary fluid secretion is presented, where the pump reabsorbs K+ from and secretes Na+ to the lumen, which can partially supplement the paracellular Na+ pathway.

  9. Peculiarities of death and regeneration of pancreas cells at early stages of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Y. Oshmyanska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study has been conducted on 39 white laboratory male rats which formed 5 groups: experimental occlusal pancreatitis caused by ligation of the main pancreatic duct (n = 6, experimental alcoholic pancreatitis caused by oral intake of alcohol (n = 6, against the background of an excess (n = 6 or deficiency (n = 6 of nitric oxide, as well as a control group (n = 15. This study provides the detailed description of the processes of death and regeneration in the islets of Langerhans, typical for early stages of the disease. The expression of the proliferation markers (PCNA and Neurogenin-3 has been analyzed using histological and immunohistochemical methods along with the changes of morphological structure, that led to initiation of the alcoholic chronic pancreatitis against the background of imbalance in NO-ergic regulatory system caused by an excess or deficiency of nitric oxide. It has been found that ligation of the pancreatic duct in the experiment reconstructedthe circumstances of chronic pancreatitis in rats and caused the activation of fibrosis and regeneration of endocrine and exocrine tissue. Compared with occlusion, the effects of ethanol on the pancreas also manifested in the activation of fibrogenesis, but the structural changes were negligible and could unlikely lead to advanced fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis in the future. On the other side, an imbalance of NO-system in alcoholic rats leads to disruption of the zymogens secretion in the acinar cells and dilatation of the capillary network in islets. Uneven distribution of zymogen granules may lead to their intracellular activation as evidenced by the deformation of acini and focal apoptosis without inflammatory response. In this case, violation of the key adaptive responses in the pancreas makes it more vulnerable to the effects of ethanol, its metabolites, and other environmental factors, and may increase the probability of chronic pancreatitis development. At the same time

  10. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki [Department of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  11. Dimethyl fumarate protects pancreatic islet cells and non-endocrine tissue in L-arginine-induced chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Robles

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP is a progressive disorder resulting in the destruction and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma which ultimately leads to impairment of the endocrine and exocrine functions. Dimethyl Fumarate (DMF was recently approved by FDA for treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. DMF's unique anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties make it an interesting drug to test on other inflammatory conditions. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of DMF on islet cells and non-endocrine tissue in a rodent model of L-Arginine-induced CP.Male Wistar rats fed daily DMF (25 mg/kg or vehicle by oral gavage were given 5 IP injections of L-Arginine (250 mg/100 g × 2, 1 hr apart. Rats were assessed with weights and intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT, 2 g/kg. Islets were isolated and assessed for islet mass and viability with flow cytometry. Non-endocrine tissue was assessed for histology, myeloperoxidase (MPO, and lipid peroxidation level (MDA. In vitro assessments included determination of heme oxygenase (HO-1 protein expression by Western blot.Weight gain was significantly reduced in untreated CP group at 6 weeks. IPGTT revealed significant impairment in untreated CP group and its restoration with DMF therapy (P <0.05. Untreated CP rats had pancreatic atrophy, severe acinar architectural damage, edema, and fatty infiltration as well as elevated MDA and MPO levels, which were significantly improved by DMF treatment. After islet isolation, the volume of non-endocrine tissue was significantly smaller in untreated CP group. Although islet counts were similar in the two groups, islet viability was significantly reduced in untreated CP group and improved with DMF treatment. In vitro incubation of human pancreatic tissue with DMF significantly increased HO-1 expression.Administration of DMF attenuated L-Arginine-induced CP and islet function in rats. DMF treatment could be a possible strategy to improve clinical

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in pancreatic lesions induced in the rat by azaserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, C. J.; de Weger, R. A.; van Blokland, W. T.; Seifert-Bock, I.; Kobrin, M. S.; Korc, M.; Woutersen, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was investigated in putative preneoplastic and neoplastic acinar cell lesions induced in the rat pancreas by azaserine, using Northern blotting, in situ hybridisation (ISH) and immunohistochemistry. EGFR protein levels were decreased in putative preneoplastic eosinophilic acinar cell lesions (atypical acinar cell nodules, AACN) in comparison with normal acinar cells of the pancreas. However, EGFR mRNA expression correlated positively with the volume of AACN in pancreatic homogenates and ISH showed equal or stronger EGFR mRNA expression in AACN than in the surrounding normal acinar cells. Neither EGFR protein nor EGFR mRNA was detected in more advanced lesions such as acinar adenocarcinomas (in situ). Moreover, EGFR protein expression showed an inverse relationship with the mitotic rate of the acinar cells. These findings suggest that down-regulation of EGFR at the protein level may abrogate negative constraints on cell growth, which may stimulate the development of putative preneoplastic AACN to more advanced lesions and, ultimately, acinar adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8679465

  13. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (ppancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  14. Keratin 8 sequence variants in patients with pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treiber, M.; Schulz, H.U.; Landt, O.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Castellani, C.; Real, F.X.; Akar, N.; Ammann, R.W.; Bargetzi, M.; Bhatia, E.; Demaine, A.G.; Battagia, C.; Kingsnorth, A.; O'reilly, D.; Truninger, K.; Koudova, M.; Spicak, J.; Cerny, M.; Menzel, H.J.; Moral, P.; Pignatti, P.F.; Romanelli, M.G.; Rickards, O.; Stefano, G.F. De; Zarnescu, N.O.; Choudhuri, G.; Sikora, S.S.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Weiss, F.U.; Pietschmann, M.; Teich, N.; Gress, T.M.; Ockenga, J.; Schmidt, H.; Kage, A.; Halangk, J.; Rosendahl, J.; Groneberg, D.A.; Nickel, R.; Witt, H.

    2006-01-01

    Keratin 8 (KRT8) is one of the major intermediate filament proteins expressed in single-layered epithelia of the gastrointestinal tract. Transgenic mice over-expressing human KRT8 display pancreatic mononuclear infiltration, interstitial fibrosis and dysplasia of acinar cells resulting in exocrine

  15. Transcriptome analysis of pancreatic cells across distant species highlights novel important regulator genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarifeño-Saldivia, Estefania; Lavergne, Arnaud; Bernard, Alice; Padamata, Keerthana; Bergemann, David; Voz, Marianne L; Manfroid, Isabelle; Peers, Bernard

    2017-03-21

    Defining the transcriptome and the genetic pathways of pancreatic cells is of great interest for elucidating the molecular attributes of pancreas disorders such as diabetes and cancer. As the function of the different pancreatic cell types has been maintained during vertebrate evolution, the comparison of their transcriptomes across distant vertebrate species is a means to pinpoint genes under strong evolutionary constraints due to their crucial function, which have therefore preserved their selective expression in these pancreatic cell types. In this study, RNA-sequencing was performed on pancreatic alpha, beta, and delta endocrine cells as well as the acinar and ductal exocrine cells isolated from adult zebrafish transgenic lines. Comparison of these transcriptomes identified many novel markers, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components, specific for each cell type. By performing interspecies comparisons, we identified hundreds of genes with conserved enriched expression in endocrine and exocrine cells among human, mouse, and zebrafish. This list includes many genes known as crucial for pancreatic cell formation or function, but also pinpoints many factors whose pancreatic function is still unknown. A large set of endocrine-enriched genes can already be detected at early developmental stages as revealed by the transcriptomic profiling of embryonic endocrine cells, indicating a potential role in cell differentiation. The actual involvement of conserved endocrine genes in pancreatic cell differentiation was demonstrated in zebrafish for myt1b, whose invalidation leads to a reduction of alpha cells, and for cdx4, selectively expressed in endocrine delta cells and crucial for their specification. Intriguingly, comparison of the endocrine alpha and beta cell subtypes from human, mouse, and zebrafish reveals a much lower conservation of the transcriptomic signatures for these two endocrine cell subtypes compared to the signatures of pan

  16. Carbonic anhydrase VI: a novel marker for salivary serous acinar differentiation and its application to discriminate acinic cell carcinoma from mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of the salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Min-Shu; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Jhuang, Yu-Lin; Chou, Yueh-Hung; Lin, Chiao-Ying

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VI (CA6) is present in serous acinar cells of human salivary glands. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic utility of CA6 in differentiating acinic cell carcinoma (AciCC) from its morphological mimic mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) of the salivary gland. CA6 immunostaining was performed in 28 cases of AciCC and 14 cases of MASC. All cases of AciCC showed positive CA6 staining. The staining pattern correlated with the number of serous acinar cells in tumours. All MASCs stained negatively for CA6. The results were compared with those obtained with currently used markers, including DOG1, mammaglobin, S100, and vimentin. CA6 showed sensitivity and specificity as high as those of DOG1 in diagnosing AciCC. CA6 expression was focally observed in basal cell adenoma and in one case of cystadenocarcinoma (1/3), but not in other salivary gland tumours, including mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, salivary duct carcinoma, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, and pleomorphic adenoma. CA6 is a specific marker for serous acinar cells of salivary glands and AciCC. CA6 has sensitivity and specificity equal to those of DOG1 in the differential diagnosis between AciCC and MASC. A combination of CA6 and DOG1 could be an ideal immunohistochemical panel for AciCC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effects of a diet high in fish oil (MaxEPA) on the formation of micronucleated erythrocytes in blood and on the number of atypical acinar cell foci Induced in rat pancreas by azaserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Marko J; Woutersen, Ruud A

    2003-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the influence of fish oil on the genotoxic effects of azaserine, using the formation of micronucleated erythrocytes as a measure for the degree of initiating potency and the number and size of putative preneoplastic pancreatic atypical acinar cell foci (AACF) as a measure for the actual number of initiated cells. Male Wistar rats were treated twice i.p. with 30 mg azaserine per kg body weight to induce AACF. During the initiation/early promotion phase the rats were maintained on diets containing 5 wt% vegetable oil (safflower and high-oleic sunflower oil), 25 wt% vegetable oil, 25 wt% fat (15% vegetable oil + 10 wt% fish oil), or 25 wt% fat (5% vegetable oil + 20 wt% fish oil), respectively. One day after carcinogen treatment, the numbers of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes were determined in blood smears obtained from 10 animals per group. Each high-fat diet resulted in higher percentages of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes than the low-fat diet. Dietary fish oil did not significantly influence the number of micronucleated cells. Two weeks after carcinogen treatment, the diets containing fish oil were replaced by the diet containing 25% vegetable oil, and the animals were further maintained for about 14 wk. Pancreatic tissue slides were microscopically evaluated for the number and size of AACF. Dietary fish oil caused an increase in the number and size of AACF, although a clear dose-effect relationship was absent. It was concluded that a high level of dietary fish oil, when given during the induction/early promotion phase, enhances azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in rats.

  18. Effect of pancreatic stellate cell activation regulated by microRNA on fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Yizhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive chronic inflammatory disease and finally progresses to irreversible pancreatic fibrosis. The diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis is difficult and there are still no effective measures for delaying or reversing fibrosis. This article introduces the research advances in the role of microRNA (miRNA in the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis and points out that pancreatic stellate cell activation is the key step in pancreatic fibrosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNA regulates pancreatic stellate cell activation and participates in the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis through altering gene expression and mediating signaling pathways and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and miRNA may become a new target for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

  19. Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas: new clinical and pathological features in a contemporary series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Run; Jih, Lily; Zhai, Jing; Nissen, Nicholas N; Colquhoun, Steven; Wolin, Edward; Dhall, Deepti

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the novel clinical and pathological features of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. This was a retrospective review of medical records and surgical pathology specimens of patients with a diagnosis of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center between 2005 and 2011. Additional immunohistochemistry was performed on the specimens of some patients. Five patients were identified. The median age at presentation was 74 years (range, 59-89 years), and all patients were male. The presenting symptoms were all related to tumor mass effects. The median size of the tumor was 10 cm (range, 3.9-16 cm). Preoperative clinical diagnosis aided by fine-needle aspiration biopsy was incorrect in all 5 cases. Most tumors (3/5) exhibited predominantly endocrine differentiation without hormonal production. Only 10% to 30% of cells were truly amphicrine, whereas most were differentiated into either endocrine or acinar phenotype. The clinical behavior ranged from moderate to aggressive with postoperative survival from 2.5 months to more than 3 years. Four patients received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy with variable responses. Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas appears to be not uncommon in men, may harbor predominantly endocrine component, is often misdiagnosed by cytology, and exhibits variable clinical behavior. Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas should be considered in older patients with sizable pancreatic mass and may warrant aggressive surgical resection and chemotherapy.

  20. Mouse pancreatic islet macrophages use locally released ATP to monitor beta cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Jonathan R; Makhmutova, Madina; Almaça, Joana; Stertmann, Julia; Aamodt, Kristie; Brissova, Marcela; Speier, Stephan; Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2017-09-07

    Tissue-resident macrophages sense the microenvironment and respond by producing signals that act locally to maintain a stable tissue state. It is now known that pancreatic islets contain their own unique resident macrophages, which have been shown to promote proliferation of the insulin-secreting beta cell. However, it is unclear how beta cells communicate with islet-resident macrophages. Here we hypothesised that islet macrophages sense changes in islet activity by detecting signals derived from beta cells. To investigate how islet-resident macrophages respond to cues from the microenvironment, we generated mice expressing a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator in myeloid cells. We produced living pancreatic slices from these mice and used them to monitor macrophage responses to stimulation of acinar, neural and endocrine cells. Islet-resident macrophages expressed functional purinergic receptors, making them exquisite sensors of interstitial ATP levels. Indeed, islet-resident macrophages responded selectively to ATP released locally from beta cells that were physiologically activated with high levels of glucose. Because ATP is co-released with insulin and is exclusively secreted by beta cells, the activation of purinergic receptors on resident macrophages facilitates their awareness of beta cell secretory activity. Our results indicate that islet macrophages detect ATP as a proxy signal for the activation state of beta cells. Sensing beta cell activity may allow macrophages to adjust the secretion of factors to promote a stable islet composition and size.

  1. Early events of secretory granule formation in the rat parotid acinar cell under the influence of isoproterenol. An ultrastructural and lectin cytochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F D’Amico

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The events involved in the maturation process of acinar secretory granules of rat parotid gland were investigated ultrastructurally and cytochemically by using a battery of four lectins [Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (WGA, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I, Glycine max agglutinin (SBA, Arachys hypogaea agglutinin (PNA]. In order to facilitate the study, parotid glands were chronically stimulated with isoproterenol to induce secretion. Specimens were embedded in the Lowicryl K4M resin. The trans-Golgi network (TGN derived secretory granules, which we refer to as immature secretory granules, were found to be intermediate structures in the biogenesis process of the secretory granules in the rat parotid acinar cell. These early structures do not seem to be the immediate precursor of the mature secretory granules: in fact, a subsequent interaction process between these early immature granule forms and TGN elements seems to occur, leading, finally, to the mature granules. These findings could explain the origin of the polymorphic subpopulations of the secretory granules in the normal acinar cells of the rat parotid gland. The lectin staining patterns were characteristic of each lectin. Immature and mature secretory gran- ules were labelled with WGA, SBA, PNA, and lightly with UEA-I. Cis and intermediate cisternae of the Golgi apparatus were labelled with WGA, and trans cisternae with WGA and SBA.

  2. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jingu; Park, Sangkyu; Roh, Sangho, E-mail: sangho@snu.ac.kr

    2015-05-15

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as α-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage. - Highlights: • ADSCs could transdifferentiate into acinar cells (ACs) using ACs co-culture (CCA). • Transdifferentiated ADSCs expressed ACs markers such as α-amylase and aquaporin5. • High proliferation and low senescence were presented in CCA at Day 14. • Transdifferentiation of ADSCs into ACs using CCA may be an appropriate method for cell-based therapy.

  3. Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer. Cellular senescence is a programmed response to oncogenic (tumour-causing) stress that aims to halt the expansion of cells with malignant potential. It does this by stopping the proliferation of pre-cancerous lesions and recruitment of the immune system for their elimination.

  4. Characterization of pancreatic ductal cells in human islet preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichii, Hirohito; Miki, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Molano, Ruth D; Barker, Scott; Mita, Atsuyoshi; Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Klein, Dagmar; Pastori, Ricardo; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Inverardi, Luca; Pileggi, Antonello; Ricordi, Camillo

    2008-11-01

    Substantial amounts of nonendocrine cells are implanted as part of human islet grafts, and a possible influence of nonendocrine cells on clinical islet transplantation outcome has been postulated. There are currently no product release criteria specific for nonendocrine cells due to lack of available methods. The aims of this study were to develop a method for the evaluation of pancreatic ductal cells (PDCs) for clinical islet transplantation and to characterize them regarding phenotype, viability, and function. We assessed 161 human islet preparations using laser scanning cytometry (LSC/iCys) for phenotypic analysis of nonendocrine cells and flow cytometry (FACS) for PDC viability. PDC and beta-cells obtained from different density fractions during the islet cell purification were compared in terms of viability. Furthermore, we examined PDC ability to produce proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tissue factor (TF) relevant to islet graft outcome. Phenotypic analysis by LSC/iCys indicated that single staining for CK19 or CA19-9 was not enough for identifying PDCs, and that double staining for amylase and CK19 or CA19-9 allowed for quantitative evaluation of acinar cells and PDC content in human islet preparation. PDC showed a significantly higher viability than beta-cells (PDC vs beta-cell: 75.5+/-13.9 and 62.7+/-18.7%; P<0.0001). Although beta-cell viability was independent of its density, that of PDCs was higher as the density from which they were recovered increased. There was no correlation between PDCs and beta-cell viability (R(2)=0.0078). PDCs sorted from high-density fractions produced significantly higher amounts of proinflammatory mediators and VEGF, but not TF. We conclude that PDCs isolated from different fractions had different viability and functions. The precise characterization and assessment of these cells in addition to beta-cells in human islet cell products may be of assistance in understanding

  5. HMGA1 expression levels are elevated in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia cells in the Ptf1a-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veite-Schmahl, Michelle J; Joesten, William C; Kennedy, Michael A

    2017-08-22

    Pancreatic cancer is currently the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and it is predicted to become the second by the year 2030. High-mobility group A1 protein (HMGA1) is an oncogenic transcription factor, localised and active in cell nuclei, that is linked to tumour progression in many human cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Overexpression of HMGA1 renders cancer cells resistant to chemotherapy. Although the Ptf1a-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D transgenic mouse is perhaps the most widely utilised animal model for human pancreatic cancer, expression levels of HMGA1 in pancreata from this mouse model have not been characterised. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis was used to determine nuclear HMGA1 levels in pancreatic tissue sections from Ptf1a-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D mice aged 5, 11, and 15 months. The H Score method was used for quantitative analysis. The HMGA1 levels were significantly elevated in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) epithelia compared with untransformed acinar tissues or fibroinflammatory stroma. The PanINs have long been regarded as precancerous precursors to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Significantly elevated HMGA1 levels observed in the nuclei of PanINs in Ptf1a-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D mice validate this animal model for investigating the role that HMGA1 plays in cancer progression and testing therapeutic approaches targeting HMGA1 in human cancers.

  6. A cystic fibrosis pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoumacher, R A; Ram, J; Iannuzzi, M C; Bradbury, N A; Wallace, R W; Hon, C T; Kelly, D R; Schmid, S M; Gelder, F B; Rado, T A

    1990-05-01

    We established a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line (CFPAC-1) from a patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) and assessed some of its properties. The cells show epithelial morphology and express cytokeratin and oncofetal antigens characteristic of pancreatic duct cells. Basal and stimulated levels of cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the biophysical properties of single Cl- channels in CFPAC-1 are similar to those of airway and sweat gland primary cultures and Cl(-)-secreting epithelial cell lines. Anion transport and single Cl- channel activity was stimulated by Ca2+ ionophores but not by forskolin, cAMP analogs, or phosphodiesterase inhibitors. The cells express the CF gene and manifest the most common CF mutation, deletion of three nucleotides resulting in a phenylalanine-508 deletion. These properties have been stable through greater than 80 passages (24 months), suggesting that CFPAC-1 can serve as a continuous cell line that displays the CF defect.

  7. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile E; Lolkema, Martijn P; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior

  8. Role of autophagy in development and progression of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Shuli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is considered an autodigestive disorder in which inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells leads to the development of pancreatitis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily preserved degradation process of cytoplasmic cellular constituents, and it is one of the early pathological processes in acute pancreatitis. Autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis, which mediates the key pathologic responses of this disease. Impaired autophagy, dysfunction of lysosomes, and dysregulation of autophagy suggest a disorder of the endolysosomal pathway in acute pancreatitis. The role of autophagy in acute pancreatitis is discussed from the aspects of autophagic process, autophagy and activation of trypsinogen, impaired autophagy and acute pancreatitis, and defective autophagy promoting inflammation.

  9. Metabolic signalling in pancreatic beta cells

    OpenAIRE

    Piipari, K.

    2011-01-01

    The main function of pancreatic beta cells is to maintain correct glucose homeostasis within the body by secretion of insulin in response to increased blood glucose concentration. Beta cell dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Using transgenic mouse models, the work described in this thesis has investigated the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in beta cell function and their role in the regulation of ...

  10. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-24

    Apr 24, 2009 ... Phenotypic plasticity is a phenomenon that describes the occurrence of 2 or more distinct phenotypes under diverse conditions. This article discusses the work carried out over the past few years in understanding the potential of human pancreatic islet-derived progenitors for cell replacement therapy in ...

  11. Functional proteomics screen enables enrichment of distinct cell types from human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revital Sharivkin

    Full Text Available The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+, glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9-/CD56+ and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9-/CD56-. This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples.

  12. Caffeine increases the expression of cystatin SN in human submandibular acinar-like HSG cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dsamou, Micheline; Morzel, Martine; Le Corre, Ludovic; Séverin, Isabelle; Chagnon, Marie-Christine

    2013-10-01

    The study aimed at evaluating in vitro the effect of caffeine on expression of cystatin SN, a potential marker of sensitivity to bitterness in humans. Differentiation of human submandibular gland (HSG) cells was induced by culturing cells on Matrigel. Caffeine cytotoxicity was assessed over 3 days by the Resazurin test. Finally, effects of 5, 50 and 100μM caffeine exposure on cystatin SN expression were explored over 3 days by ELISA. At concentrations relevant to human adult plasma levels (5, 50 and 100μM), caffeine did not affect cell viability whether cells were differentiated or not. Cystatin SN levels were overall higher in differentiated cells and increased with time in both conditions. There was a significant (peffect of caffeine on cystatin SN expression specifically in differentiated cells. The HSG cell line proved to be a relevant tool to study in vitro the effect of caffeine at concentrations consistent with dietary intake in human subjects. The results suggest that salivary cystatin SN abundance may depend on caffeine intake, with possible consequences on taste sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Deletion Of XIAP reduces the severity of acute pancreatitis via regulation of cell death and nuclear factor-κB activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yu, Jiang; Chi, Jun-Lin; Long, Fei-Wu; Yang, Hong-Wei; Chen, Ke-Ling; Lv, Zhao-Ying; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2017-03-16

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) still remains a clinical challenge, not only for its high mortality but the uncontrolled inflammatory progression from acute pancreatitis (AP) to SAP. Cell death, including apoptosis and necrosis are critical pathology of AP, since the severity of pancreatitis correlates directly with necrosis and inversely with apoptosis Therefore, regulation of cell death from necrosis to apoptosis may have practicably therapeutic value. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is the best characterized member of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) family, but its function in AP remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of XIAP in regulation of cell death and inflammation during acute pancreatitis. The in vivo pancreatitis model was induced by the administration of cerulein with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or by the administration of l-arginine in wild-type or XIAP-deficient mice, and ex vivo model was induced by the administration of cerulein+LPS in AR42J cell line following XIAP inhibition. The severity of acute pancreatitis was determined by serum amylase activity and histological grading. XIAP deletion on cell apoptosis, necrosis and inflammatory response were examined. Caspases activities, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and receptor-interacting protein kinase1 (RIP1) degradation were assessed by western blot. Deletion of XIAP resulted in the reduction of amylase activity, decrease of NF-κB activation and less release of TNF-α and IL-6, together with increased caspases activities and RIP1 degradation, leading to enhanced apoptosis and reduced necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells and ameliorated the severity of acute pancreatitis. Our results indicate that deletion of XIAP switches cell death away from necrosis to apoptosis and decreases the inflammatory response, effectively attenuating the severity of AP/SAP. The critical role of XIAP in cell death and inflammation suggests that

  14. Epithelial NEMO/IKKγ limits fibrosis and promotes regeneration during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Kwan; Gerstenlauer, Melanie; Konukiewitz, Björn; Steiger, Katja; Weichert, Wilko; Wirth, Thomas; Maier, Harald Jakob

    2017-11-01

    Inhibitory κB kinase (IKK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signalling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, but its precise function has remained controversial. Here, we analyse the contribution of IKK/NF-κB signalling in epithelial cells to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis by targeting the IKK subunit NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) (IKKγ), which is essential for canonical NF-κB activation. Mice with a targeted deletion of NEMO in the pancreas were subjected to caerulein pancreatitis. Pancreata were examined at several time points and analysed for inflammation, fibrosis, cell death, cell proliferation, as well as cellular differentiation. Human samples were used to corroborate findings established in mice. In acute pancreatitis, NEMO deletion in the pancreatic parenchyma resulted in minor changes during the early phase but led to the persistence of inflammatory and fibrotic foci in the recovery phase. In chronic pancreatitis, NEMO deletion aggravated inflammation and fibrosis, inhibited compensatory acinar cell proliferation, and enhanced acinar atrophy and acinar-ductal metaplasia. Gene expression analysis revealed sustained activation of profibrogenic genes and the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the absence of epithelial NEMO. In human chronic pancreatitis samples, the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis was activated as well, with CXCR4 expression correlating with the degree of fibrosis. The aggravating effects of NEMO deletion were attenuated by the administration of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Our results suggest that NEMO in epithelial cells exerts a protective effect during pancreatitis by limiting inflammation and fibrosis and improving acinar cell regeneration. The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is an important mediator of that effect and may also be of importance in human chronic pancreatitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Suppression by Ghrelin of Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Constitutive Nitric Oxide Synthase S-Nitrosylation and Apoptosis in Salivary Gland Acinar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw L. Slomiany

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal inflammatory responses to periodontopathic bacterium, P. gingivalis, and its key virulence factor, LPS, are characterized by a massive rise in epithelial cell apoptosis and the disturbances in NO signaling pathways. Here, we report that the LPS-induced enhancement in rat sublingual salivary gland acinar cell apoptosis and NO generation was associated with the suppression in constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS activity and a marked increase in the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. We demonstrate that the detrimental effect of the LPS on cNOS was manifested by the enzyme protein S-nitrosylation, that was susceptible to inhibition by iNOS inhibitor, 1400 W. Further, we show that a peptide hormone, ghrelin, countered the LPS-induced changes in apoptosis and cNOS activity. This effect of ghrelin was reflected in the decrease in cNOS S-nitrosylation and the increase in phosphorylation. Our findings imply that P. gingivalis-induced disturbances in the acinar cell NO signaling pathways result from upregulation in iNOS-derived NO that causes cNOS S-nitrosylation that interferes with its activation through phosphorylation. We also show that ghrelin protection against P. gingivalis-induced disturbances involves cNOS activation associated with a decrease in its S-nitrosylation and the increase in phosphorylation.

  16. Profile of blood glucose and ultrastucture of beta cells pancreatic islet in alloxan compound induced rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Suarsana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, and progressive changes of the structure of pancreatic islet histopathology. The objective of this research was to analyse the glucose level and histophatological feature in pancreatic islet in alloxan compound induced rats. A total of ten male Spraque Dawley rats of 2 months old were used in this study. The rats were divided into two groups: (1 negative control group (K-, and (2 positif induced alloxan group (diabetic group =DM. The rats were induced by a single dose intraperitonial injection of alloxan compound 120 mg/kg of body weight. The treatment was conducted for 28 days. Blood glucose levels of rats were analysed at 0, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days following treatment. At the end of the experiment, rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Pancreas was collected for analysis of histopathological study by Immunohistochemical technique, and ultrastructural study using transmission electron microscope (TEM. The result showed that Langerhans islet of diabetic rat (rat of DM group showed a marked reduction of size, number of Langerhans islet of diabetic rat decrease, and characterized by hyperglycemic condition. By using TEM, beta cells of DM group showed the rupture of mitochondrial membrane, the lost of cisternal structure of inner membrane of mitocondria, reduction of insulin secretory granules, linkage between cells acinar with free Langerhans islet, and the caryopicnotic of nucleus.

  17. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    of cytokines and chemokines - We showed that DC do not induce PSC expression of ECM proteins - We showed that DC induce PSC expression of cytokines... hepatocellular carcinoma by the intestinal microbiota and TLR4. Cancer Cell. 21:504–516. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2012.02.007 De Monte, L., M...nearly 15% of intrapancreatic leukocytes. Intrapancreatic DCs acquired a distinct immune phenotype in mice with acute pancreatitis; they expressed

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors / Islet Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  19. Chlamydia pneumoniae Promotes Dysfunction of Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Annette R.; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Witt, Colleen M.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Chambers, James P.; Perry, George; Guentzel, M. Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae has been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we designed a study to evaluate pancreatic beta cells and mast cells during chlamydial infection. Our study revealed that C. pneumoniae infected mast cells significantly (ppneumoniae infected mice showed increased interleukin-1β production in splenocytes and pancreatic tissues as was observed with in vitro mast cell-beta cell co-cultures during C. pneumoniae infection. Notably, infected mast cells promoted beta cell destruction. Our findings reveal the negative effect of C. pneumoniae on mast cells, and the consequential impact on pancreatic beta cell function and viability. PMID:25863744

  20. Inhibitory effect of diazepam on muscarinic receptor-stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production in rat parotid acinar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujirai, Masao; Sawaki, Kohei; Kawaguchi, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the effect of diazepam (DZP) on phosphoinositide turnover, which plays an important role in the regulation of salivary secretion, in rat parotid acinar cells. DZP (10−9 M to 10−5 M), a potent agonist of both central- and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, dose-dependently decreased inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) production stimulated by carbachol, a muscarinic receptor agonist, in the cells. DZP produced a maximum inhibitory response at a concentration of 10−5 M, with IP3 production decreased to 63% of maximal levels. The concentration inducing half maximal inhibition of IP3 production was approximately 3.5×10−8 M. An inhibitory response to DZP was produced by a short-term pretreatment (benzodiazepine receptors, flumazenil and PK 11195, respectively. DZP showed a non-competitive inhibition of carbachol-stimulated IP3 production. It did not directly inhibit the activities of GTP-binding regulatory proteins and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in the parotid gland membranes, though choline chloride inhibited PLC activity. DZP (10−5 M) attenuated the increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the cells following stimulation of the muscarinic and α1-adrenoceptors. These results suggest that in the parotid acinar cells, DZP inhibits muscarinic receptor-stimulated IP3 production through benzodiazepine receptors and that PLC activity which produces IP3 is inhibited by chloride. The decreases in IP3 and [Ca2+]i in the cells may be connected with the suppression of salivary secretion induced by DZP. PMID:12429566

  1. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jingu; Park, Sangkyu; Roh, Sangho

    2015-05-15

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as α-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytokines and Pancreatic β-Cell Apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, L A; Prause, M; Størling, J

    2016-01-01

    The discovery 30 years ago that inflammatory cytokines cause a concentration, activity, and time-dependent bimodal response in pancreatic β-cell function and viability has been a game-changer in the fields of research directed at understanding inflammatory regulation of β-cell function and survival...... and the causes of β-cell failure and destruction in diabetes. Having until then been confined to the use of pathophysiologically irrelevant β-cell toxic chemicals as a model of β-cell death, researchers could now mimic endocrine and paracrine effects of the cytokine response in vitro by titrating concentrations...... to gene expressional changes, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and triggering of mitochondrial dysfunction. Preclinical studies have shown preventive effects of cytokine antagonism in animal models of diabetes, and clinical trials demonstrating proof of concept are emerging. The full clinical potential...

  3. Lymphotoxin β receptor signaling promotes development of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznik, Gitta M; Reding, Theresia; Romrig, Franziska; Saito, Yasuyuki; Mildner, Alexander; Segerer, Stephan; Sun, Li-Kang; Regenass, Stephan; Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim; McHugh, Donal; Kumagi, Teru; Hiasa, Yoichi; Lackner, Carolin; Haybaeck, Johannes; Angst, Eliane; Perren, Aurel; Balmer, Maria Luisa; Slack, Emma; MacPherson, Andrew; Manz, Markus G; Weber, Achim; Browning, Jeffrey L; Arkan, Melek Canan; Rülicke, Thomas; Aguzzi, Adriano; Prinz, Marco; Graf, Rolf; Heikenwalder, Mathias

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), an increasingly recognized, immune-mediated form of chronic pancreatitis. Current treatment options are limited and disease relapse is frequent. We investigated factors that contribute to the development of AIP and new therapeutic strategies. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemical, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analyses to measure the expression of cytokines and chemokines in tissue and serum samples from patients with and without AIP. We created a mouse model of human AIP by overexpressing lymphotoxin (LT)α and β specifically in acinar cells (Ela1-LTab mice). Messenger RNA levels of LTα and β were increased in pancreatic tissues from patients with AIP, compared with controls, and expression of chemokines (CXCL13, CCL19, CCL21, CCL1, and B-cell-activating factor) was increased in pancreatic and serum samples from patients. Up-regulation of these factors was not affected by corticosteroid treatment. Acinar-specific overexpression of LTαβ (Ela1-LTαβ) in mice led to an autoimmune disorder with various features of AIP. Chronic inflammation developed only in the pancreas but was sufficient to cause systemic autoimmunity. Acinar-specific overexpression of LTαβ did not cause autoimmunity in mice without lymphocytes (Ela1-LTab/Rag1(-/-)); moreover, lack of proinflammatory monocytes (Ela1-LTab/Ccr2(-/-)) failed to prevent AIP but prevented early pancreatic tissue damage. Administration of corticosteroids reduced pancreatitis but did not affect production of autoantibodies, such as antipancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in Ela1-LTab mice. In contrast, inhibition of LTβR signaling reduced chemokine expression, renal immune-complex deposition, and features of AIP in Ela1-LTab mice. Overexpression of LTαβ specifically in acinar cells of mice causes features of AIP. Reagents that neutralize LTβR ligands might be used to treat patients with AIP

  4. Direct imaging of RAB27B-enriched secretory vesicle biogenesis in lacrimal acinar cells reveals origins on a nascent vesicle budding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Chiang

    Full Text Available This study uses YFP-tagged Rab27b expression in rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells, which are polarized secretory epithelial cells, to characterize early stages of secretory vesicle trafficking. Here we demonstrate the utility of YFP-Rab27b to delineate new perspectives on the mechanisms of early vesicle biogenesis in lacrimal gland acinar cells, where information is significantly limited. Protocols were developed to deplete the mature YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle pool in the subapical region of the cell, and confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to track vesicle replenishment. This analysis revealed a basally-localized organelle, which we termed the "nascent vesicle site," from which nascent vesicles appeared to emerge. Subapical vesicular YFP-Rab27b was co-localized with p150(Glued, a component of the dynactin cofactor of cytoplasmic dynein. Treatment with the microtubule-targeted agent, nocodazole, did not affect release of mature secretory vesicles, although during vesicle repletion it significantly altered nascent YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle localization. Instead of moving to the subapical region, these vesicles were trapped at the nascent vesicle site which was adjacent to, if not a sub-compartment of, the trans-Golgi network. Finally, YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicles which reached the subapical cytoplasm appeared to acquire the actin-based motor protein, Myosin 5C. Our findings show that Rab27b enrichment occurs early in secretory vesicle formation, that secretory vesicles bud from a visually discernable nascent vesicle site, and that transport from the nascent vesicle site to the subapical region requires intact microtubules.

  5. Activated wnt signaling in stroma contributes to development of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Makoto; Driscoll, David R; De Jesus-Monge, Wilfredo E; Klimstra, David S; Lewis, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), a cystic tumor of the pancreas that develops most frequently in women, is a potential precursor to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. MCNs develop primarily in the body and tail of the pancreas and are characterized by the presence of a mucinous epithelium and ovarian-like subepithelial stroma. We investigated the involvement of Wnt signaling in KRAS-mediated pancreatic tumorigenesis and development of MCN in mice, and Wnt activation in human MCN samples. LSL-Kras(G12D), Ptf1a-cre mice were crossed with elastase-tva mice to allow for introduction of genes encoded by the replication-competent avian sarcoma-leukosis virus long-terminal repeat with splice acceptor viruses to pancreatic acinar cells and acinar cell progenitors, postnatally and sporadically. Repeat with splice acceptor viruses that expressed Wnt1 were delivered to the pancreatic epithelium of these mice; pancreatic lesions were analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemical analyses. We analyzed levels of factors in Wnt signaling pathways in 19 MCN samples from patients. Expression of Wnt1 in the pancreatic acinar cells and acinar cell progenitors of female mice led to development of unilocular or multilocular epithelial cysts in the pancreas body and tail, similar to MCN. The cystic lesions resembled the estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-positive ovarian-like stroma of MCN, but lacked the typical mucinous epithelium. Activated Wnt signaling, based on nuclear localization of β-catenin, was detected in the stroma but not cyst epithelium. Wnt signaling to β-catenin was found to be activated in MCN samples from patients, within the ovarian-like stroma, consistent with the findings in mice. Based on studies of mice and pancreatic MCN samples from patients, the canonical Wnt signaling pathway becomes activated and promotes development of the ovarian-like stroma to contribute to formation of MCNs. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  6. Islet Cells Serve as Cells of Origin of Pancreatic Gastrin-Positive Endocrine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Jaafar, Rami

    2015-01-01

    The cells of origin of pancreatic gastrinomas remain an enigma, since no gastrin-expressing cells are found in the normal adult pancreas. It was proposed that the cellular origin of pancreatic gastrinomas may come from either the pancreatic cells themselves or gastrin-expressing cells which have...

  7. Susceptibility of ATM-deficient pancreatic cancer cells to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayars, Michael; Eshleman, James; Goggins, Michael

    2017-05-19

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is inactivated in a significant minority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and may be predictor of treatment response. We determined if ATM deficiency renders pancreatic cancer cells more sensitive to fractionated radiation or commonly used chemotherapeutics. ATM expression was knocked down in three pancreatic cancer cell lines using ATM-targeting shRNA. Isogenic cell lines were tested for sensitivity to several chemotherapeutic agents and radiation. DNA repair kinetics were analyzed in irradiated cells using the comet assay. We find that while rendering pancreatic cancer cells ATM-deficient did not significantly change their sensitivity to several chemotherapeutics, it did render them exquisitely sensitized to radiation. Pancreatic cancer ATM status may help predict response to radiotherapy.

  8. The effect of irradiation on the intracellular transportation of the parotid gland acinar cells in the mouse. Localization of monosaccharides studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Hajime (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of radiation on the ability to ingest monosaccharides and intracellular transportation in the parotid gland in mice. The submandibular regions, including the parotid gland, was exposed to 10 Gy of X-rays. Three days after irradiation, the localization of reducing silver grains in organelles was determined, using electron microscopic autoradiography with H-3 labeled galactosamine, glucosamine, fucose, and mannose. In the non-irradiated group, the proportion of reducing silver grains in the acinar cells began to increase 15 min after administration of monosaccharides, reached a peak at 180 min, and thereafter decreased. Similar findings were observed in the irradiated group, although the values were lower than the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the endoplasmic reticulum reached a peak at 15 min in both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups, and gradually decreased until 120 min. Thereafter, it became almost constant and low, but the proportion in the irradiated group was slightly higher than in the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the Golgi apparatus was maximum at 60 min in the non-irradiated group, and gradually decreased until 360 min. A similar tendency was seen in the irradiated group, although its variation was not so marked as in the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the condensing vacuoles was maximum at 120 min, and thereafter, it decreased; the decrease was only slight in the irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in secretory granules increased with time in both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups, although this was only slight in the irradiated group, and reached a peak at 360 min. Transportation of monosaccharides in an acinar cell was found to be delayed by irradiation. (N.K.).

  9. Oleic acid and glucose regulate glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor expression in a rat pancreatic ductal cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Leshuai W.; McMahon Tobin, Grainne A.; Rouse, Rodney L., E-mail: rodney.rouse@fda.hhs.gov

    2012-10-15

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and has become an important target for a growing class of drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes. In vitro studies were designed to investigate the effect of the GLP1R agonist, exenatide (Ex4), in “on-target” RIN-5mF (islet) cells as well as in “off-target” AR42J (acinar) and DSL-6A/C1 (ductal) cells in a diabetic environment. Ex4 increased islet cell proliferation but did not affect acinar cells or ductal cells at relevant concentrations. A high caloric, high fat diet is a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type-2 diabetes. An in vitro Oleic acid (OA) model was used to investigate the effect of Ex4 in a high calorie, high fat environment. At 0.1 and 0.4 mM, OA mildly decreased the proliferation of all pancreatic cell types. Ex4 did not potentiate the inhibitory effect of OA on cell proliferation. Akt phosphorylation in response to Ex4 was diminished in OA-treated ductal cells. GLP1R protein detected by western blot was time and concentration dependently decreased after glucose stimulation in OA-treated ductal cells. In ductal cells, OA treatment altered the intracellular localization of GLP1R and its co-localization with early endosome and recycling endosomes. Chloroquine (lysosomal inhibitor), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) and wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor), fully or partially, rescued GLP1R protein in OA-pretreated, glucose-stimulated ductal cells. The impact of altered regulation on phenotype/function is presently unknown. However, these data suggest that GLP1R regulation in ductal cells can be altered by a high fat, high calorie environment. -- Highlights: ► Exenatide did not inhibit islet, acinar or ductal cell proliferation. ► GLP1R protein decreased after glucose stimulation in oleic acid-treated ductal cells. ► Oleic acid treatment altered localization of GLP1R with early and recycling

  10. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule regulates the interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Geng, Chang-Xin; Sun, Xin; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Xie, Xiang-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is involved in tumor progression and metastasis. In the present study, the expression and functional role of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was investigated. Tissue specimens were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=56) or chronic pancreatitis (CP; n=10), who underwent pancreatic resection, and from normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=10). Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the localization and expression of ALCAM in pancreatic tissues. Subsequently, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied to assess the expression of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc‑1 and T3M4 cells, as well as in PSCs. An enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure ALCAM levels in cell culture medium stimulated by hypoxia, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and transforming growth factor‑β. Silencing of ALCAM was performed using ALCAM small interfering (si)RNA and immunocytochemistry was used to analyze the inhibition efficiency. An invasion assay and a cell interaction assay were performed to assess the invasive ability and co‑cultured adhesive potential of Panc‑1 and T3M4 cells, as well as PSCs. Histologically, ALCAM expression was generally weak or absent in pancreatic cancer cells, but was markedly upregulated in PSCs in pancreatic cancer tissues. ALCAM was highly expressed in PSCs from CP tissues and PSCs surrounding pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as in pancreatic cancer cells. ALCAM mRNA was highly expressed in PSCs, with a low to moderate expression in T3M4 and Panc‑1 cells. Similar to the mRNA expression, immunoblotting demonstrated that ALCAM protein levels were high in PSCs and T3M4 cells, but low in Panc‑1 cells. The expression of TNF‑α increased, while hypoxia decreased the secretion of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc

  11. Dynamic landscape of pancreatic carcinogenesis reveals early molecular networks of malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Bo; Bruns, Philipp; Behler, Nora A; Chang, Ligong; Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Cao, Jing; Gewies, Andreas; Ruland, Jürgen; Fritzsche, Sina; Valkovskaya, Nataliya; Jian, Ziying; Regel, Ivonne; Raulefs, Susanne; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Friess, Helmut; Erkan, Mert; Mueller, Nikola S; Roth, Susanne; Hackert, Thilo; Esposito, Irene; Theis, Fabian J; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W

    2016-09-19

    The initial steps of pancreatic regeneration versus carcinogenesis are insufficiently understood. Although a combination of oncogenic Kras and inflammation has been shown to induce malignancy, molecular networks of early carcinogenesis remain poorly defined. We compared early events during inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis on histological and transcriptional levels with a high temporal resolution using a well-established mouse model of pancreatitis and of inflammation-accelerated KrasG12D-driven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Quantitative expression data were analysed and extensively modelled in silico. We defined three distinctive phases-termed inflammation, regeneration and refinement-following induction of moderate acute pancreatitis in wild-type mice. These corresponded to different waves of proliferation of mesenchymal, progenitor-like and acinar cells. Pancreas regeneration required a coordinated transition of proliferation between progenitor-like and acinar cells. In mice harbouring an oncogenic Kras mutation and challenged with pancreatitis, there was an extended inflammatory phase and a parallel, continuous proliferation of mesenchymal, progenitor-like and acinar cells. Analysis of high-resolution transcriptional data from wild-type animals revealed that organ regeneration relied on a complex interaction of a gene network that normally governs acinar cell homeostasis, exocrine specification and intercellular signalling. In mice with oncogenic Kras, a specific carcinogenic signature was found, which was preserved in full-blown mouse pancreas cancer. These data define a transcriptional signature of early pancreatic carcinogenesis and a molecular network driving formation of preneoplastic lesions, which allows for more targeted biomarker development in order to detect cancer earlier in patients with pancreatitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Distinct cell clusters touching islet cells induce islet cell replication in association with over-expression of Regenerating Gene (REG protein in fulminant type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Aida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic islet endocrine cell-supporting architectures, including islet encapsulating basement membranes (BMs, extracellular matrix (ECM, and possible cell clusters, are unclear. PROCEDURES: The architectures around islet cell clusters, including BMs, ECM, and pancreatic acinar-like cell clusters, were studied in the non-diabetic state and in the inflamed milieu of fulminant type 1 diabetes in humans. RESULT: Immunohistochemical and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that human islet cell clusters and acinar-like cell clusters adhere directly to each other with desmosomal structures and coated-pit-like structures between the two cell clusters. The two cell-clusters are encapsulated by a continuous capsule composed of common BMs/ECM. The acinar-like cell clusters have vesicles containing regenerating (REG Iα protein. The vesicles containing REG Iα protein are directly secreted to islet cells. In the inflamed milieu of fulminant type 1 diabetes, the acinar-like cell clusters over-expressed REG Iα protein. Islet endocrine cells, including beta-cells and non-beta cells, which were packed with the acinar-like cell clusters, show self-replication with a markedly increased number of Ki67-positive cells. CONCLUSION: The acinar-like cell clusters touching islet endocrine cells are distinct, because the cell clusters are packed with pancreatic islet clusters and surrounded by common BMs/ECM. Furthermore, the acinar-like cell clusters express REG Iα protein and secrete directly to neighboring islet endocrine cells in the non-diabetic state, and the cell clusters over-express REG Iα in the inflamed milieu of fulminant type 1 diabetes with marked self-replication of islet cells.

  13. Pancreatic α-cell mass in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbroek, Johanne H; Töns, Hendrica A M; Hanegraaf, Maaike A J; Rabelink, Ton J; Engelse, Marten A; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2017-12-01

    While it is well recognized that obesity is associated with an increased β-cell mass, the association with α-cell mass is less clear. Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) associated with obesity is a bihormonal disease characterized by inadequate insulin secretion and hyperglucagonaemia. We examined β- and α-cell mass throughout the pancreas in obese and lean subjects. Pancreatic tissue of the head, body and tail region of the pancreas was examined from 15 obese subjects (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 27 kg/m2 ) and 15 age-matched lean subjects (BMI ≤ 25 kg/m2 ) without diabetes. In obese subjects both β- and α-cell mass were proportionally higher compared with lean subjects, thereby maintaining the α- to β-cell ratio. The adaptation to obesity occurred preferentially in the head of the pancreas. As data so far have been derived from histological studies of β- and α-cell adaptation, in which the head region of the human pancreas was not included, the adaptive capacity of humans to obesity has previously been underestimated. Obesity is associated with an increased α-cell mass, which could contribute to the hyperglucagonaemia observed in people with T2DM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  15. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be present. How is pancreatitis diagnosed? How is pancreatitis treated? Treatment mainly consists of putting the pancreas to rest ( ... not as a definitive basis for diagnosis or treatment in any particular case. It is very ... pancreatitis is suspected, laboratory tests search for higher than ...

  17. The cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) transgenic mouse as a model for imaging pancreatic exocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Cao, Hop S; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Snyder, Cynthia S; Reynoso, Jose; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2009-03-09

    The use of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging has opened many new areas of research. Among the important advances in the field have been the development of transgenic mice expressing various fluorescent proteins. To report whole-body and organ-specific fluorescence imaging to characterize the transgenic cyan fluorescent protein mouse. Mice were imaged using two devices. Brightfield images were obtained with the OV100 Small Animal Imaging System (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan). Fluorescence imaging was performed under the cyan fluorescent protein filter using the iBox Small Animal Imaging System (UVP, Upland, CA, USA). All animals were sacrificed immediately before imaging. They were imaged before and throughout multiple steps of a complete necropsy. Harvested organs were also imaged with both devices. Selected organs were then frozen and processed for histology, fluorescence microscopy, and H&E staining. Fluorescence microscopy was performed with an Olympus IMT-2 inverted fluorescence microscope. Determination of fluorescence intensity of different organs. Surprisingly, we found that there is differential enhancement of fluorescence among organs; most notably, the pancreas stands out from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, displaying the strongest fluorescence of all organs in the mouse. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the cyan fluorescent protein fluorescence resided in the acinar cells of the pancreas and not the islet cells. The cyan fluorescent protein mouse should lead to a deeper understanding of pancreatic function and pathology, including cancer.

  18. Postprandial lipemia induces pancreatic α cell dysfunction characteristic of type 2 diabetes: studies in healthy subjects, mouse pancreatic islets, and cultured pancreatic α cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederwanger, Andreas; Ciardi, Christian; Tatarczyk, Tobias; Khan, Mohammad I; Hermann, Martin; Mittermair, Christof; Al-Zoairy, Ramona; Salzmann, Karin; Pedrini, Michael T

    2014-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with pancreatic α cell dysfunction, characterized by elevated fasting plasma glucagon concentrations and inadequate postprandial glucose- and insulin-induced suppression of glucagon secretion. The cause and the underlying mechanisms of α cell dysfunction are unknown. Because Western dietary habits cause postprandial lipemia for a major part of a day and, moreover, increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, we tested the hypothesis that postprandial lipemia with its characteristic elevation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRLs) might cause pancreatic α cell dysfunction. In a crossover study with 7 healthy volunteers, 2 experiments using 2 fat-enriched meals were performed on each volunteer; meal 1 was designed to increase plasma concentrations of both TGRLs and nonesterified fatty acids and meal 2 to increase TGRLs only. Intravenous glucose boli were injected at 0800 after an overnight fast and postprandially at 1300, 3 h after ingestion of a fat-enriched meal. Glucagon concentrations were measured throughout the days of the experiments. In addition to the study in humans, in vitro experiments were performed with mouse pancreatic islets and cultured pancreatic alpha TC 1 clone 9 (αTC1c9) cells, which were incubated with highly purified TGRLs. In humans, postprandial lipemia increased plasma glucagon concentrations and led to an inadequate glucose- and insulin-induced suppression of glucagon. There was no difference between the 2 meal types. In mouse pancreatic islets and cultured pancreatic αTC1c9 cells, purified postprandial TGRLs induced abnormalities in glucagon kinetics comparable with those observed in humans. The TGRL-induced α cell dysfunction was due to reduced γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor activation in pancreatic α cells. We concluded that postprandial lipemia induces pancreatic α cell dysfunction characteristic of type 2 diabetes and, therefore, propose that pancreatic α cell dysfunction could be viewed

  19. Adenoviral vectors stimulate glucagon transcription in human mesenchymal stem cells expressing pancreatic transcription factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaldumbide, Arnaud; Carlotti, Françoise; Gonçalves, Manuel A; Knaän-Shanzer, Shoshan; Cramer, Steve J; Roep, Bart O; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Hoeben, Rob C

    2012-01-01

    .... Forced expression of key regulators of pancreatic differentiation in stem cells, liver cells, pancreatic duct cells, or cells from the exocrine pancreas, can lead to the initiation of endocrine...

  20. Myxoma virus is oncolytic for human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Yanghee; Kelly, Kaitlyn J; Stanford, Marianne M; Galanis, Charles; Chun, Yun Shin; Fong, Yuman; McFadden, Grant

    2008-08-01

    Viral oncolytic therapy, which seeks to exploit the use of live viruses to treat cancer, has shown promise in the treatment of cancers resistant to conventional anticancer therapies. Among the most difficult to treat cancers is advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study investigates the ability of a novel oncolytic agent, myxoma virus, to infect, productively replicate in, and kill human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The myxoma virus vMyxgfp was tested against a panel of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. Infectivity, viral proliferation, and tumor cell kill were assessed. Infection of tumor cells was assessed by expression of the marker gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (e-GFP). vMyxgfp had the ability to infect all pancreatic cancer cell lines tested. Killing of tumor cells varied among the 6 cell lines tested, ranging from >90% cell kill at 7 days for the most sensitive Panc-1 cells, to 39% in the most resistant cell line Capan-2. Sensitivity correlated to replication of virus, and was found to maximally exhibit a four-log increase in foci-forming units for the most sensitive Panc-1 cells within 72 h. Our study demonstrates for the first time the ability of the myxoma virus to productively infect, replicate in, and lyse human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. These data encourage further investigation of this virus, which is pathogenic only in rabbits, for treatment of this nearly uniformly fatal cancer.

  1. Cigarette smoking impairs pancreatic duct cell bicarbonate secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Vivek; Lee, Linda S; Banks, Peter A; Suleiman, Shadeah; Paulo, Joao A; Wang, Wei; Rosenblum, Jessica; Sainani, Nisha I; Mortele, Koenraad; Conwell, Darwin Lewis

    2013-01-10

    To compare pancreatic duct cell function in smokers (current and past) and never smokers by measurement of secretin-stimulated peak bicarbonate concentration ([HCO3-]) in endoscopic collected pancreatic fluid (PF). This retrospective study was cross-sectional in design, recording demographic information (age, gender, etc.), smoking status (former, current, never), alcohol intake, clinical data (imaging, endoscopy), and laboratory results (peak PF [HCO3-]) from subjects evaluated for pancreatic disease at a tertiary pancreas center. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis (SAS Version 9.2, Cary, NC, USA) was performed to assess the relationship between cigarette smoking and secretin-stimulated pancreatic fluid bicarbonate concentration. A total of 131 subjects underwent pancreatic fluid collection (endoscopic pancreatic function test, ePFT) for bicarbonate analysis: 25.2% (33 out of 131) past smokers, 31.3% (41 out of 131) current smokers, and 43.5% (57 out of 131) were never smokers. Measures of Association: The mean peak PF [HCO3-] in never smokers (81.3 ± 18.5 mEq/L) was statistically higher (indicating better duct cell function) when compared to past smokers (66.8 ± 24.7 mEq/L, P=0.005) and current smokers (70.0 ± 20.2 mEq/L, P=0.005). However, the mean peak [HCO3-] in past smokers was not statistically different from that in current smokers (P=0.575), and therefore, the two smoking groups were combined to form a single "smokers cohort". When compared to the never smokers, the smokers cohort was older (P=0.037) and had a greater proportion of subjects with definite chronic pancreatitis imaging (P=0.010), alcohol consumption ≥20 g/day (P=0.012), and abnormal peak PF [HCO3-] (Psmoking (risk ratio, RR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.5; PSmoking (odds ratio, OR: 3.8, 95% CI: 1.6-9.1; P=0.003) and definite chronic pancreatitis imaging (OR: 5.7, 95% CI: 2.2-14.8; Psmoking status and alcohol intake in predicting duct cell dysfunction (P=0.571). Measurement of

  2. Reappraisal of xenobiotic-induced, oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury in chronic pancreatitis: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To reappraise the hypothesis of xenobiotic induced, cytochrome P450-mediated, micronutrient-deficient oxidative injury in chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: Individual searches of the Medline and Embase databases were conducted for each component of the theory of oxidative-stress mediated cellular injury for the period from 1st January 1990 to 31st December 2012 using appropriate medical subject headings. Boolean operators were used. The individual components were drawn from a recent update on theory of oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury in chronic pancreatitis. RESULTS: In relation to the association between exposure to volatile hydrocarbons and chronic pancreatitis the studies fail to adequately control for alcohol intake. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction occurs as a diffuse hepatic and extra-hepatic response to xenobiotic exposure rather than an acinar cell-specific process. GSH depletion is not consistently confirmed. There is good evidence of superoxide dismutase depletion in acute phases of injury but less to support a chronic intra-acinar depletion. Although the liver is the principal site of CYP induction there is no evidence to suggest that oxidative by-products are carried in bile and reflux into the pancreatic duct to cause injury. CONCLUSION: Pancreatic acinar cell injury due to short-lived oxygen free radicals (generated by injury mediated by prematurely activated intra-acinar trypsin) is an important mechanism of cell damage in chronic pancreatitis. However, in contemporary paradigms of chronic pancreatitis this should be seen as one of a series of cell-injury mechanisms rather than a sole mediator. PMID:24659895

  3. FGF-2b and h-PL Transform Duct and Non-Endocrine Human Pancreatic Cells into Endocrine Insulin Secreting Cells by Modulating Differentiating Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Donadel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a multifactorial disease orphan of a cure. Regenerative medicine has been proposed as novel strategy for DM therapy. Human fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2b controls β-cell clusters via autocrine action, and human placental lactogen (hPL-A increases functional β-cells. We hypothesized whether FGF-2b/hPL-A treatment induces β-cell differentiation from ductal/non-endocrine precursor(s by modulating specific genes expression. Methods: Human pancreatic ductal-cells (PANC-1 and non-endocrine pancreatic cells were treated with FGF-2b plus hPL-A at 500 ng/mL. Cytofluorimetry and Immunofluorescence have been performed to detect expression of endocrine, ductal and acinar markers. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and annexin-V quantified cells proliferation and apoptosis. Insulin secretion was assessed by RIA kit, and electron microscopy analyzed islet-like clusters. Results: Increase in PANC-1 duct cells de-differentiation into islet-like aggregates was observed after FGF-2b/hPL-A treatment showing ultrastructure typical of islets-aggregates. These clusters, after stimulation with FGF-2b/hPL-A, had significant (p < 0.05 increase in insulin, C-peptide, pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, somatostatin, glucagon, and glucose transporter 2 (Glut-2, compared with control cells. Markers of PANC-1 (Cytokeratin-19, MUC-1, CA19-9 were decreased (p < 0.05. These aggregates after treatment with FGF-2b/hPL-A significantly reduced levels of apoptosis. Conclusions: FGF-2b and hPL-A are promising candidates for regenerative therapy in DM by inducing de-differentiation of stem cells modulating pivotal endocrine genes.

  4. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-09-07

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis.

  5. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Yan, Y.Q. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, F.X. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China)

    2013-09-27

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  6. Role of parathyroid hormone-related protein in the pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic response associated with acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Vandanajay; Kim, Sung O K; Aronson, Judith F; Chao, Celia; Hellmich, Mark R; Falzon, Miriam

    2012-04-10

    Pancreatitis is a common and potentially lethal necro-inflammatory disease with both acute and chronic manifestations. Current evidence suggests that the accumulated damage incurred during repeated bouts of acute pancreatitis (AP) can lead to chronic disease, which is associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. While parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) exerts multiple effects in normal physiology and disease states, its function in pancreatitis has not been previously addressed. Here we show that PTHrP levels are transiently elevated in a mouse model of cerulein-induced AP. Treatment with alcohol, a risk factor for both AP and chronic pancreatitis (CP), also increases PTHrP levels. These effects of cerulein and ethanol are evident in isolated primary acinar and stellate cells, as well as in the immortalized acinar and stellate cell lines AR42J and irPSCc3, respectively. Ethanol sensitizes acinar and stellate cells to the PTHrP-modulating effects of cerulein. Treatment of acinar cells with PTHrP (1-36) increases expression of the inflammatory mediators interleukin-6 (IL-6) and intracellular adhesion protein (ICAM-1), suggesting a potential autocrine loop. PTHrP also increases apoptosis in AR42J cells. Stellate cells mediate the fibrogenic response associated with pancreatitis; PTHrP (1-36) increases procollagen I and fibronectin mRNA levels in both primary and immortalized stellate cells. The effects of cerulein and ethanol on levels of IL-6 and procollagen I are suppressed by the PTH1R antagonist, PTHrP (7-34). Together these studies identify PTHrP as a potential mediator of the inflammatory and fibrogenic responses associated with alcoholic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Bukowczan

    Full Text Available Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion.Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8 nmol/kg/dose was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula.Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food intake and

  8. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomaszewska, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8nmol/kg/dose) was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula. Results Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food

  9. Pancreatic function and enzyme synthesis rates in mild chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, I; Boyd, E J; Jacyna, M R; Penston, J G; Soutar, J S; Bouchier, I A

    1986-06-01

    Incorporation of intravenous 75Se-methionine into duodenal juice proteins during pancreatic stimulation was measured as an index of pancreatic enzyme synthesis rates in 12 patients with a normal pancreatogram and in 6 with mild chronic pancreatitis. Isotope incorporation was significantly greater in subjects with mild chronic pancreatitis than in those with a normal pancreatogram. Thus in most patients in whom pancreatography demonstrates the characteristic radiological features of 'mild chronic pancreatitis' pancreatic acinar function is abnormal. The coexistence of morphological and functional abnormality implies that such patients do have chronic pancreatitis.

  10. Pancreatic Cancer: Molecular Characterization, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Elvira; Castelli, Germana

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death and is the most lethal of common malignancies with a five-year survival rate of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. The genetic landscape of PDAC is characterized by the presence of four frequently-mutated genes: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53 and SMAD4. The development of mouse models of PDAC has greatly contributed to the understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms through which driver genes contribute to pancreatic cancer development. Particularly, oncogenic KRAS-driven genetically-engineered mouse models that phenotypically and genetically recapitulate human pancreatic cancer have clarified the mechanisms through which various mutated genes act in neoplasia induction and progression and have led to identifying the possible cellular origin of these neoplasias. Patient-derived xenografts are increasingly used for preclinical studies and for the development of personalized medicine strategies. The studies of the purification and characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells have suggested that a minority cell population is responsible for initiation and maintenance of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The study of these cells could contribute to the identification and clinical development of more efficacious drug treatments. PMID:29156578

  11. Neonatal pancreatic pericytes support β-cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alona Epshtein

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: This study introduces pancreatic pericytes as regulators of neonatal β-cell proliferation. In addition to advancing current understanding of the physiological β-cell replication process, these findings could facilitate the development of protocols aimed at expending these cells as a potential cure for diabetes.

  12. Parthenolide suppresses pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Weifeng Liu,1 Xinshuai Wang,2 Junjun Sun,1 Yanhui Yang,1 Wensheng Li,1 Junxin Song1 1Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, 2Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, and College of Clinical Medicine of Henan University of Science and Technology, Luo Yang, China Abstract: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and is unresponsive to conventional chemotherapies. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from feverfew, has exhibited potent anticancer effects against various cancers. The purpose of this report was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of parthenolide in human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and BxPC3 cells. The results demonstrated that parthenolide suppressed the growth and induced apoptosis of Panc-1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ranging between 7 and 9 µM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by parthenolide treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Parthenolide treatment concentration-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression levels of p62/SQSTM1, Beclin 1, and LC3II in Panc-1 cells. Punctate LC3II staining confirmed autophagy. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, 3-methyladenine, or LC3II siRNA significantly blocked parthenolide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that parthenolide induced apoptosis through autophagy in this study. In conclusion, these studies established that parthenolide inhibits pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Data of the present study suggest that parthenolide can serve as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. Keywords: parthenolide, pancreatic cancer, autophagy, apoptosis, P62, cleaved PAPRP

  13. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David; Miller, George

    2015-11-16

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. © 2015 Zambirinis et al.

  14. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, impaired pancreatic β-cell function, and risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpin, Brian M; Bao, Ying; Qian, Zhi Rong; Wu, Chen; Kraft, Peter; Ogino, Shuji; Stampfer, Meir J; Sato, Kaori; Ma, Jing; Buring, Julie E; Sesso, Howard D; Lee, I-Min; Gaziano, John Michael; McTiernan, Anne; Phillips, Lawrence S; Cochrane, Barbara B; Pollak, Michael N; Manson, JoAnn E; Giovannucci, Edward L; Fuchs, Charles S

    2013-07-17

    Obesity and diabetes mellitus are associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. These associations may be secondary to consequences of peripheral insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, or hyperglycemia itself. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a measure of hyperglycemia, whereas plasma insulin and proinsulin are markers of peripheral insulin resistance, and the proinsulin to insulin ratio marks pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. This was a prospective, nested case-control study of 449 case patients and 982 control subjects with prediagnostic blood samples and no diabetes history from five prospective US cohorts followed through 2008. Two or three control subjects were matched to each case patient by year of birth, cohort, smoking, and fasting status. Pancreatic cancer risk was assessed by prediagnostic HbA1c, insulin, proinsulin, and proinsulin to insulin ratio with multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. All P values were two-sided. The highest vs lowest quintiles of HbA1c, insulin, and proinsulin were associated with with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17 to 2.72, P trend = .04 for HbA1c; OR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.08 to 2.30; Ptrend = .002 for insulin; and OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.50 to 3.29; P trend pancreatic cancer risk. Results were similar across studies (all P heterogeneity > .29). In cancers developing 10 or more years after blood collection, the associations with insulin and proinsulin became stronger (highest vs lowest quintile, OR = 2.77; 95% CI = 1.28 to 5.99 for insulin and OR = 3.60; 95% CI = 1.68 to 7.72 for proinsulin). In mutually adjusted models including HbA1c, insulin, and proinsulin, only proinsulin remained statistically significant ( highest vs lowest quintile, OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.54 to 4.21; Ptrend pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, were independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

  15. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  16. A cell-based approach to study changes in the pancreas following nicotine exposure in an animal model of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Walker, Azida

    2008-07-01

    Cigarette smoking is a recognized risk factor for the induction of pancreatic diseases and is suspected to play a major role in the development of pancreatic cancer in smokers. This study was designed to characterize the mechanisms of nicotine-induced injury to the pancreas. AR42Jcells, a stable mutant pancreatic tumor cell line, was chosen for the study because of its stability in culture media and also because of its known secretory capacity, which is like that of a normal pancreatic acinar cell. It is hypothesized that nicotine-induced effects on the pancreas are triggered by oxidative stress induced in pancreatic acinar cell via oxidative stress signaling pathways. The results from our study showed that, in vitro, nicotine induced generation of oxygen free radicals measured as malondialdehyde, an end product of lipid peroxidation. Treatment of AR42J cells with nicotine induced p-ERK 1/2 activation as confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence imaging of cytoplasmic localization of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signals. Nicotine enhanced AR42J cell proliferation and cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase release in AR42J cells. These effects of nicotine were confirmed by simultaneous studies conducted on the same cells by hydrogen peroxide, a known oxidative biomarker. Allopurinol, a XOD inhibitor, suppressed these effects induced by nicotine and H(2)O(2) with the exception that cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase release by H(2)O(2) remained unaltered when AR42J cells were preincubated with allopurinol. These results suggest that nicotine-induced effects on pancreatic acinar cells were associated with generation of oxyradical mediated via the XOD pathway. The results have a direct impact on cell proliferation, MAPK signaling, and acinar cell function. We conclude that nicotine induces oxidative stress in pancreatic acinar cells and that these events trigger pathophysiological changes in the pancreas, leading to increased cell proliferation and injury.

  17. Human pancreatic cancer-associated stellate cells remain activated after in vivo chemoradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Carla Cabrera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is characterized by an extensive fibrotic reaction or desmoplasia and complex involvement of the surrounding tumor microenvironment. Pancreatic stellate cells are a key mediator of the pancreatic matrix and they promote progression and invasion of pancreatic cancer by increasing cell proliferation and offering protection against therapeutic interventions. Our study utilizes human tumor-derived pancreatic stellate cells (HTPSCs isolated from fine needle aspirates of pancreatic cancer tissue from patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma before and after treatment with full dose gemcitabine plus concurrent hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery. We show that HTPSCs survive in vivo chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment and display a more activated phenotype post therapy. These data support the idea that stellate cells play an essential role in supporting and promoting pancreatic cancer and further research is needed to develop novel treatments targeting the pancreatic tumor microenvironment.

  18. Oleanolic acid enhances insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teodoro, T.; Zhang, L.; Alexander, T.; Yue, J.; Vranic, M.; Volchuk, A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of oleanolic acid, a plant-derived triterpenoid, on insulin secretion and content in pancreatic beta-cells and rat islets. Oleanolic acid significantly enhanced insulin secretion at basal and stimulatory glucose concentrations in INS-1 832/13 cells and enhanced acute

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Unc.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: His.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Unc.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: DNS.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: His.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 TFs and others Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174586,SRX174585 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 Histone Pancreas Pancreatic cancer cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  19. Functions of pancreatic stellate cell-derived soluble factors in the microenvironment of pancreatic ductal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jingqiu; Zhang, Hongpeng; Gu, Fengming; Lu, Yongdie; Zou, Shengnan; Chen, Yuji; Sun, Pengxiang; Xu, Mengyue; Sun, Xiaoming; Xia, Chao; Chi, Hao; Ying Zhu, A; Tang, Dong; Wang, Daorong

    2017-11-24

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer with poor prognosis because it is highly resistant to traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy and it has a low rate of surgical resection eligibility. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) have become a research hotspot in recent years, and play a vital role in PDAC microenvironment by secreting soluble factors such as transforming growth factor β, interleukin-6, stromal cell-derived factor-1, hepatocyte growth factor and galectin-1. These PSC-derived cytokines and proteins contribute to PSC activation, participating in PDAC cell proliferation, migration, fibrosis, angiogenesis, immunosuppression, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and chemoradiation resistance, leading to malignant outcome. Consequently, targeting these cytokines and proteins or their downstream signaling pathways is promising for treating PDAC.

  20. Islet Cells Serve as Cells of Origin of Pancreatic Gastrin-Positive Endocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Jaafar, Rami; Ripoche, Doriane; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Chen, Yuan-Jia; Rehfeld, Jens F; Lepinasse, Florian; Hervieu, Valérie; Pattou, François; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bertolino, Philippe; Zhang, Chang Xian

    2015-10-01

    The cells of origin of pancreatic gastrinomas remain an enigma, since no gastrin-expressing cells are found in the normal adult pancreas. It was proposed that the cellular origin of pancreatic gastrinomas may come from either the pancreatic cells themselves or gastrin-expressing cells which have migrated from the duodenum. In the current study, we further characterized previously described transient pancreatic gastrin-expressing cells using cell lineage tracing in a pan-pancreatic progenitor and a pancreatic endocrine progenitor model. We provide evidence showing that pancreatic gastrin-expressing cells, found from embryonic day 12.5 until postnatal day 7, are derived from pancreatic Ptf1a(+) and neurogenin 3-expressing (Ngn3(+)) progenitors. Importantly, the majority of them coexpress glucagon, with 4% coexpressing insulin, indicating that they are a temporary subpopulation of both alpha and beta cells. Interestingly, Men1 disruption in both Ngn3 progenitors and beta and alpha cells resulted in the development of pancreatic gastrin-expressing tumors, suggesting that the latter developed from islet cells. Finally, we detected gastrin expression using three human cohorts with pancreatic endocrine tumors (pNETs) that have not been diagnosed as gastrinomas (in 9/34 pNETs from 6/14 patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, in 5/35 sporadic nonfunctioning pNETs, and in 2/20 sporadic insulinomas), consistent with observations made in mouse models. Our work provides insight into the histogenesis of pancreatic gastrin-expressing tumors. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Functional assessment of pancreatic beta-cell area in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Juris J; Menge, Bjoern A; Breuer, Thomas G K; Müller, Christophe A; Tannapfel, Andrea; Uhl, Waldemar; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Schrader, Henning

    2009-07-01

    beta-Cell mass declines progressively during the course of diabetes, and various antidiabetic treatment regimens have been suggested to modulate beta-cell mass. However, imaging methods allowing the monitoring of changes in beta-cell mass in vivo have not yet become available. We address whether pancreatic beta-cell area can be assessed by functional test of insulin secretion in humans. A total of 33 patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 17), benign pancreatic adenomas (n = 13), and tumors of the ampulla of Vater (n = 3) at various stages of glucose tolerance were examined with an oral glucose load before undergoing pancreatic surgery. Indexes of insulin secretion were calculated and compared with the fractional beta-cell area of the pancreas. beta-Cell area was related to fasting glucose concentrations in an inverse linear fashion (r = -0.53, P = 0.0014) and to 120-min postchallenge glycemia in an inverse exponential fashion (r = -0.89). beta-Cell area was best predicted by a C-peptide-to-glucose ratio determined 15 min after the glucose drink (r = 0.72, P fasting C-peptide-to-glucose ratio already yielded a reasonably close correlation (r = 0.63, P fasting measures, such as the HOMA index.

  2. Isolated pancreatic metastases from a bronchogenic small cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walshe, T

    2012-01-31

    We describe the case of a 60 year old female smoker who presented with a three month history of weight loss (14 Kg), generalized abdominal discomfort and malaise. Chest radiography demonstrated a mass projected inferior to the hilum of the right lung. Computed Tomography of thorax confirmed a lobulated lesion in the right infrahilar region and subsequent staging abdominal CT demonstrated a low density lesion in the neck of the pancreas. Percutaneous Ultrasound guided pancreatic biopsy was performed, histology of which demonstrated pancreatic tissue containing a highly necrotic small cell undifferentiated carcinoma consistent with metastatic small cell carcinoma of the bronchus.

  3. The reprogrammed pancreatic progenitor-like intermediate state of hepatic cells is more susceptible to pancreatic beta cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiwei; Wang, Hai; Sun, Yu; Li, Shi-Wu; Donelan, William; Chang, Lung-Ji; Jin, Shouguang; Terada, Naohiro; Cheng, Henrique; Reeves, Westley H; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-08-15

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapy. However, their low efficiency of lineage-specific differentiation and tumorigenesis severely hinder clinical translation. We hypothesized that reprogramming of somatic cells into lineage-specific progenitor cells might allow for large-scale expansion, avoiding the tumorigenesis inherent with iPSCs and simultaneously facilitating lineage-specific differentiation. Here we aimed at reprogramming rat hepatic WB cells, using four Yamanaka factors, into pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) or intermediate (IM) cells that have characteristics of PPCs. IM clones were selected based on their specific morphology and alkaline phosphatase activity and stably passaged under defined culture conditions. IM cells did not have iPSC properties, could be stably expanded in large quantity, and expressed all 14 genes that are used to define the PPC developmental stage. Directed differentiation of IM and WB cells by Pdx1-Ngn3-MafA (PNM) into pancreatic beta-like cells revealed that the IM cells are more susceptible to directed beta cell differentiation because of their open chromatin configuration, as demonstrated by expression of key pancreatic beta cell genes, secretion of insulin in response to glucose stimulation, and easy access to exogenous PNM proteins at the rat insulin 1 and Pdx1 promoters. This notion that IM cells are superior to their parental cells is further supported by the epigenetic demonstration of accessibility of Pdx1 and insulin 1 promoters. In conclusion, we have developed a strategy to derive and expand PPC cells from hepatic WB cells using conventional cell reprogramming. This proof-of-principal study may offer a novel, safe and effective way to generate autologous pancreatic beta cells for cell therapy of diabetes.

  4. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic ...

  5. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, Gary W., E-mail: gary.cline@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Zhao, Xiaojian [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L. [Pfizer Global Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton CT (United States)

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution

  6. Keratins provide virus-dependent protection or predisposition to injury in coxsackievirus-induced pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Toivola, SE Ostrowski

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available DM Toivola1, SE Ostrowski2, H Baribault3, TM Magin4, AI Ramsingh2, MB Omary51Åbo Akademi University, Dept. Biology, BioCity, Turku, Finland and Stanford University School of Medicine and Digestive Disease Center; 2New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA; 3Amgen, South San Francisco, CA, USA; 4University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; 5Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Mi, USAAbstract: Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18 are the two major intermediate filament proteins in hepatocytes and pancreatic acinar cells. Acinar cell keratins are organized as cytoplasmic and apicolateral filaments. An important role of hepatocyte K8/K18 is to maintain cellular integrity, while this cytoprotective function of K8/K18 is not evident in the pancreas since keratin-deficient mice cope well with pancreatitis models. To further study the roles of keratins in the exocrine pancreas, we used coxsackievirus B4-models, CVB4-V and CVB4-P, to induce severe acute/chronic pancreatitis and acute pancreatitis, respectively, in K8-null (which lack acinar keratins and K18-null (which lack cytoplasmic keratins mice. Despite similar virus titers in all mice, CVB4-V resulted in 40% mortality of the K8-null mice 14 days post-infection compared to no lethality of WT and K18-null mice. In contrast, K8-null mice were far less susceptible to CVB4-P-induced damage as determined by histology and serology analysis, and they recover faster than WT and K18-null mice. After CVB4 virus infection, keratins aggregated during acinar degranulation, and K8/K18 site-specific phosphorylation was observed during degranulation and recovery. Hence, keratins significantly affect CVB4 virulence, positively or negatively, depending on the virus subtype and keratin makeup, in a virus replication-independent manner.Keywords: keratin, pancreatitis, coxsackievirus

  7. Genetic inhibition of protein kinase Cε attenuates necrosis in experimental pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yannan; Tan, Tanya; Jia, Wenzhuo; Lugea, Aurelia; Mareninova, Olga; Waldron, Richard T.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of death pathways, necrosis and apoptosis, in pancreatitis is important for developing therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disease. Protein kinase Cε (PKCε) has been previously shown to regulate inflammatory responses and zymogen activation in pancreatitis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ethanol specifically activated PKCε in pancreatic acinar cells and that PKCε mediated the sensitizing effects of ethanol on inflammatory response in pancreatitis. Here we investigated the role of PKCε in the regulation of death pathways in pancreatitis. We found that genetic deletion of PKCε resulted in decreased necrosis and severity in the in vivo cerulein-induced pancreatitis and that inhibition of PKCε protected the acinar cells from CCK-8 hyperstimulation-induced necrosis and ATP reduction. These findings were associated with upregulation of mitochondrial Bak and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, proapoptotic and prosurvival members in the Bcl-2 family, respectively, as well as increased mitochondrial cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and apoptosis in pancreatitis in PKCε knockout mice. We further confirmed that cerulein pancreatitis induced a dramatic mitochondrial translocation of PKCε, suggesting that PKCε regulated necrosis in pancreatitis via mechanisms involving mitochondria. Finally, we showed that PKCε deletion downregulated inhibitors of apoptosis proteins, c-IAP2, survivin, and c-FLIPs while promoting cleavage/inactivation of receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP). Taken together, our findings provide evidence that PKCε activation during pancreatitis promotes necrosis through mechanisms involving mitochondrial proapoptotic and prosurvival Bcl-2 family proteins and upregulation of nonmitochondrial pathways that inhibit caspase activation and RIP cleavage/inactivation. Thus PKCε is a potential target for prevention and/or treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25035113

  8. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  9. A Mini-Review on the Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) on Cerulein-Induced and Hypertriglyceridemic Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoo Kyung; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-10-25

    Acute pancreatitis refers to the sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It is associated with premature activation and release of digestive enzymes into the pancreatic interstitium and systemic circulation, resulting in pancreatic tissue autodigestion and multiple organ dysfunction, as well as with increased cytokine production, ultimately leading to deleterious local and systemic effects. Although mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have not been completely elucidated, oxidative stress is regarded as a major risk factor. In human acute pancreatitis, lipid peroxide levels in pancreatic tissues increase. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (C22:6n-3), exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on various cells. Previous studies have shown that DHA activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and induces catalase, which inhibits oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory signaling required for cytokine expression in experimental acute pancreatitis using cerulein. Cerulein, a cholecystokinin analog, induces intra-acinar activation of trypsinogen in the pancreas, which results in human acute pancreatitis-like symptoms. Therefore, DHA supplementation may be beneficial for preventing or inhibiting acute pancreatitis development. Since DHA reduces serum triglyceride levels, addition of DHA to lipid-lowering drugs like statins has been investigated to reduce hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis. However, high DHA concentrations increase cytosolic Ca2+, which activates protein kinase C and may induce hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. In this review, effect of DHA on cerulein-induced and hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis has been discussed. The relation of high concentration of DHA to hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis has been included.

  10. Therapeutic Effect of Low Doses of Acenocoumarol in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Sendur, Paweł; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Dembiński, Marcin; Sendur, Ryszard; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Olszanecki, Rafał; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomasz, Kaczmarzyk; Tomaszewska, Romana; Dembiński, Artur

    2017-01-01

    Intravascular activation of coagulation is observed in acute pancreatitis and is related to the severity of this inflammation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of acenocoumarol therapy on the course of acute pancreatitis induced in male rats by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion. Acenocoumarol at a dose of 50, 100, or 150 µg/kg/dose was administered intragastrically once a day, starting the first dose 24 h after the initiation of pancreatic reperfusion. Results: Histological examination showed that treatment with acenocoumarol reduces pancreatic edema, necrosis, and hemorrhages in rats with pancreatitis. Moreover, the administration of acenocoumarol decreased pancreatic inflammatory infiltration and vacuolization of pancreatic acinar cells. These findings were accompanied with a reduction in the serum activity of lipase and amylase, concentration of interleukin-1β, and plasma d-Dimer concentration. Moreover, the administration of acenocoumarol improved pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis. Acenocoumarol given at a dose of 150 µg/kg/dose was the most effective in the treatment of early phase acute pancreatitis. However later, acenocoumarol given at the highest dose failed to exhibit any therapeutic effect; whereas lower doses of acenocoumarol were still effective in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Conclusion: Treatment with acenocoumarol accelerates the recovery of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis in rats. PMID:28430136

  11. Therapeutic Effect of Low Doses of Acenocoumarol in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Sendur, Paweł; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Dembiński, Marcin; Sendur, Ryszard; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Olszanecki, Rafał; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomasz, Kaczmarzyk; Tomaszewska, Romana; Dembiński, Artur

    2017-04-21

    Intravascular activation of coagulation is observed in acute pancreatitis and is related to the severity of this inflammation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of acenocoumarol therapy on the course of acute pancreatitis induced in male rats by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion. Acenocoumarol at a dose of 50, 100, or 150 µg/kg/dose was administered intragastrically once a day, starting the first dose 24 h after the initiation of pancreatic reperfusion. Histological examination showed that treatment with acenocoumarol reduces pancreatic edema, necrosis, and hemorrhages in rats with pancreatitis. Moreover, the administration of acenocoumarol decreased pancreatic inflammatory infiltration and vacuolization of pancreatic acinar cells. These findings were accompanied with a reduction in the serum activity of lipase and amylase, concentration of interleukin-1β, and plasma d-Dimer concentration. Moreover, the administration of acenocoumarol improved pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis. Acenocoumarol given at a dose of 150 µg/kg/dose was the most effective in the treatment of early phase acute pancreatitis. However later, acenocoumarol given at the highest dose failed to exhibit any therapeutic effect; whereas lower doses of acenocoumarol were still effective in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Treatment with acenocoumarol accelerates the recovery of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

  12. File list: ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: ALL.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: ALL.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: InP.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: InP.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: InP.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreat...ic cells SRX146010,SRX146009 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  20. Mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mark; Klöppel, Günter; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    of the English-language literature revealed 44 previously published cases of resected MAECs. We found that, compared to pure acinar cell carcinoma, patients with MAEC have a slightly higher age and are less frequently males, as the male / female ratio was almost equal. The histogenesis of MAEC is still...

  1. Chronic pancreatitis in a patient with malnutrition due to anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Russell N; Sparaco, Anna; Smith, Martin D

    2008-05-08

    Both acute and chronic pancreatitis are associated with eating disorders, including malnutrition found in anorexia, bulimia, and major depression. We report a case of a female patient suffering from severe malnutrition and anorexia with repeated attacks of pancreatic pain and an enlarging cystic lesion in the pancreatic head. Due to a progressively enlarging lesion on CT, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histology demonstrated chronic pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis remains to be well defined. There is evidence that an imbalance between oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity results in pancreatic inflammation and activation of periacinar myofibroblasts. It has been demonstrated that protein energy malnutrition is associated with increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines as well as pancreatic acinar cell damage and ductal disruption. Furthermore, it has been shown that protein energy malnutrition including anorexia nervosa is associated with a depleted antioxidant status. Thus there is a possible pathogenic basis for severe malnutrition leading to chronic pancreatitis. Our patient underwent surgery based on the presumption that she had a symptomatic cystic neoplasm. Chronic pancreatitis was demonstrated. Patients presenting with malnutrition and recurrent epigastric pain should be investigated for pancreatic pathology and the possibility of pancreatitis and the presence of pseudocysts entertained.

  2. Molecular Mechanism of Pancreatic and Salivary Glands Fluid and HCO3− Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Goo; Ohana, Ehud; Park, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dongki; Muallem, Shmuel

    2013-01-01

    Fluid and HCO3− secretion is a vital function of all epithelia and is required for the survival of the tissue. Aberrant fluid and HCO3− secretion is associated with many epithelial diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, Sjögren’s syndrome and other epithelial inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Significant progress has been made over the last 20 years in our understanding of epithelial fluid and HCO3− secretion, in particular by secretory glands. Fluid and HCO3− secretion by secretory glands is a two step process. Acinar cells secrete isotonic fluid in which the major salt is NaCl. Subsequently, the duct modifies the volume and electrolyte composition of the fluid to absorb the Cl− and secrete HCO3−. The relative volume secreted by acinar and duct cells and modification of electrolyte composition of the secreted fluids varies among secretory glands to meet their physiological functions. In the pancreas, acinar cells secrete small amount of NaCl-rich fluid, while the duct absorbs the Cl− and secretes HCO3− and the bulk of the fluid in the pancreatic juice. Fluid secretion appears to be driven by active HCO3− secretion. In the salivary glands, acinar cells secrete the bulk of the fluid in the saliva that contains high concentrations of Na+ and Cl− and fluid secretion is mediated by active Cl− secretion. The salivary glands duct absorbs both the Na+ and Cl− and secretes K+ and HCO3−. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanism of fluid and HCO3− secretion by the pancreas and salivary glands, to highlight the similarities of the fundamental mechanisms of acinar and duct cell functions, and point the differences to meet glands specific secretions. PMID:22298651

  3. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic ? Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Julien Véret; Lara Bellini; Paola Giussani; Carl Ng; Christophe Magnan; Hervé Le Stunff

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated ...

  4. Pancreatic duct cells as a source of VEGF in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Prasadan, Krishna; Guo, Ping; El-Gohary, Yousef; Fischbach, Shane; Wiersch, John; Gaffar, Iljana; Shiota, Chiyo; Gittes, George K

    2014-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential for proper pancreatic development, islet vascularisation and insulin secretion. In the adult pancreas, VEGF is thought to be predominantly secreted by beta cells. Although human duct cells have previously been shown to secrete VEGF at angiogenic levels in culture, an analysis of the kinetics of VEGF synthesis and secretion, as well as elucidation of an in vivo role for this ductal VEGF in affecting islet function and physiology, has been lacking. We analysed purified duct cells independently prepared by flow cytometry, surgical isolation or laser-capture microdissection. We infected duct cells in vivo with Vegf (also known as Vegfa) short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in an intrapancreatic ductal infusion system and examined the effect of VEGF knockdown in duct cells in vitro and in vivo. Pancreatic duct cells express high levels of Vegf mRNA. Compared with beta cells, duct cells had a much higher ratio of secreted to intracellular VEGF. As a bioassay, formation of tubular structures by human umbilical vein endothelial cells was essentially undetectable when cultured alone and was substantially increased when co-cultured with pancreatic duct cells but significantly reduced when co-cultured with duct cells pretreated with Vegf shRNA. Compared with islets transplanted alone, improved vascularisation and function was detected in the islets co-transplanted with duct cells but not in islets co-transplanted with duct cells pretreated with Vegf shRNA. Human islet preparations for transplantation typically contain some contaminating duct cells and our findings suggest that the presence of duct cells in the islet preparation may improve transplantation outcomes.

  5. Pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration with phytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Hosseini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although currently available drugs are useful in controlling early onset complications of diabetes, serious late onset complications appear in a large number of patients. Considering the physiopathology of diabetes, preventing beta cell degeneration and stimulating the endogenous regeneration of islets will be essential approaches for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The current review focused on phytochemicals, the antidiabetic effect of which has been proved by pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration. Among the hundreds of plants that have been investigated for diabetes, a small fraction has shown the regenerative property and was described in this paper. Processes of pancreatic beta cell degeneration and regeneration were described. Also, the proposed mechanisms for the protective/regenerative effects of such phytochemicals and their potential side effects were discussed.

  6. Pancreas++ : Automated Quantification of Pancreatic Islet Cells in Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu eChen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic image analysis of pancreatic Islet of Langerhans morphology is crucial for the investigation of diabetes and metabolic diseases. Besides the general size of the islet, the percentage and relative position of glucagon-containing alpha-, and insulin-containing beta-cells is also important for pathophysiological analyses, especially in rodents. Hence, the ability to identify, quantify and spatially locate peripheral and ‘involuted’ alpha-cells in the islet core is an important analytical goal. There is a dearth of software available for the automated and sophisticated positional-quantification of multiple cell types in the islet core. Manual analytical methods for these analyses, while relatively accurate, can suffer from a slow throughput rate as well as user-based biases. Here we describe a newly developed pancreatic islet analytical software program, Pancreas++, which facilitates the fully-automated, non-biased, and highly reproducible investigation of islet area and alpha- and beta-cell quantity as well as position within the islet for either single or large batches of fluorescent images. We demonstrate the utility and accuracy of Pancreas++ by comparing its performance to other pancreatic islet size and cell type (alpha, beta quantification methods. Our Pancreas++ analysis was significantly faster than other methods, while still retaining low error rates and a high degree of result correlation with the manually generated reference standard.

  7. Pancreatic Stellate Cells : A Starring Role in Normal and Diseased Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoti eApte

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While the morphology and function of cells of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas have been studied over several centuries, one important cell type in the gland, the pancreatic stellate cell (PSC, had remained undiscovered until as recently as twenty years ago. Even after its first description in 1982, it was to be another 16 years before its biology could begin to be studied, because it was only in 1998 that methods were developed to isolate and culture PSCs from rodent and human pancreas. PSCs are now known to play a critical role in pancreatic fibrosis, a consistent histological feature of two major diseases of the pancreas - chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In health, PSCs maintain normal tissue architecture via regulation of the synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. Recent studies have also implied other additional functions for PSCs as progenitor cells, immune cells or intermediaries in exocrine pancreatic secretion in humans.During pancreatic injury, PSCs transform from their quiescent phase into an activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype that secretes excessive amounts of ECM proteins leading to the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. An ever increasing number of factors that stimulate and/or inhibit PSC activation via paracrine and autocrine pathways are being identified and characterized. It is also now established that PSCs interact closely with pancreatic cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression. Based on these findings, several therapeutic strategies have been examined in experimental models of chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer, in a bid to inhibit/retard PSC activation and thereby alleviate chronic pancreatitis or reduce tumour growth in pancreatic cancer. The challenge that remains is to translate these pre-clinical developments into clinically applicable treatments for patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  8. Effect of parenteral and early intrajejunal nutrition on pancreatic digestive enzyme synthesis, storage and discharge in dog models of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huan-Long; Su, Zhen-Dong; Hu, Lei-Guang; Ding, Zai-Xian; Lin, Qing-Tian

    2007-02-21

    To study the effect of early intrajejunal nutrition on enzyme-protein synthesis and secretion during acute pancreatitis. Fifteen dogs were randomly divided into parenteral nutrition (n = 7) and early intrajejunal nutrition groups (n = 8). An acute pancreatitis model was induced by injecting 5% sodium taurocholate and trypsin into the pancreas via the pancreatic duct. Intrajejunal nutrition was delivered with a catheter via a jejunostomy tube after the model was established for 24 h. On d 1 and 7 and at the beginning of nutritional support, radioactive tracing and electron microscopes were used to evaluate the enzyme-protein synthesis in acinar cells, the subcellular fractionation and the change in zymogen granules after 1.85 x 10(6) Bq L-(3)H phenylalanine was infused at 30, 60, 120, and 180 min. The 3H radioactivity in pancreatic acinar cells reached its peak level at 60 min, and the contents in the early intrajejunal nutrition group were higher than those in the parenteral nutrition group, which were then decreased. The mean number and area of zymogen granules did not show any significant statistical difference in both groups on d 1 or on d 7 (P > 0.05). Early intrajejunal nutrition might be effective in dogs with acute pancreatitis.

  9. Non-invasive discrimination between pancreatic islets and exocrine cells using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Li, Ge; Hao, Mingming; Mukherjee, Sushmita

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we propose a non-invasive method to distinguish pancreatic islet cells from exocrine cell clusters using multiphoton (MP) imaging. We demonstrate the principle of distinguishing them based on autofluorescence. The results show that MP imaging has a potential to distinguish pancreatic islets from exocrine cells. This ability to distinguish the two cell types could have many applications, such as the examination of fresh pancreatic biopsies when staining is not possible or desirable.

  10. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    exploring alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for cell based therapy in diabetes. Since in vitro culture of islet β-cells demonstrates loss in insulin (Beattie et al. 1999), several attempts have been made to identify stem / progenitor cells capable of differentiation into insulin-producing cells. Embryonic stem cells, which ...

  11. Bifurcation structure of a model of bursting pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Lading, B.; Yanchuk, S.

    2001-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other. The transit......One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other....... The transition from this structure to the so-called period-adding structure is found to involve a subcritical period-doubling bifurcation and the emergence of type-III intermittency. The period-adding transition itself is not smooth but consists of a saddle-node bifurcation in which (n + 1)-spike bursting...

  12. The pancreatic β-cell transcriptome and integrated-omics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, David M; Cura, Anthony J; Harlan, David M

    2014-04-01

    β Cells represent one of many cell types in heterogeneous pancreatic islets and play the central role in maintaining glucose homeostasis, such that disrupting β-cell function leads to diabetes. This review summarizes the methods for isolating and characterizing β cells, and describes integrated 'omics' approaches used to define the β cell by its transcriptome and proteome. RNA sequencing and mass spectrometry-based protein identification have now identified RNA and protein profiles for mouse and human pancreatic islets and β cells, and for β-cell lines. Recent publications have outlined these profiles and, more importantly, have begun to assign the presence or absence of specific genes and regulatory molecules to β-cell function and dysfunction. Overall, researchers have focused on understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes by connecting genome, transcriptome, proteome, and regulatory RNA profiles with findings from genome-wide association studies. Studies employing these relatively new techniques promise to identify specific genes or regulatory RNAs with altered expression as β-cell function begins to deteriorate in the spiral toward the development of diabetes. The ultimate goal is to identify the potential therapeutic targets to prevent β-cell dysfunction and thereby better treat the individual with diabetes. http://links.lww.com/COE/A5.

  13. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, M.; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (K 3.1), KCNMA1 (K1.1), KCNQ1 (K7.1), KCNH2 (K11.1), KCNH5 (K10.2), KCNT1 (K4.1), KCNT2 (K4.2), and KCNK5 (K5.1). We will give an overview of K channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from...

  14. The Crucial Role of Early Mitochondrial Injury in L-Lysine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biczó, György; Hegyi, Péter; Dósa, Sándor; Shalbuyeva, Natalia; Berczi, Sándor; Sinervirta, Riitta; Hracskó, Zsuzsanna; Siska, Andrea; Kukor, Zoltán; Jármay, Katalin; Venglovecz, Viktória; Varga, Ilona S.; Iványi, Béla; Alhonen, Leena; Wittmann, Tibor; Gukovskaya, Anna; Takács, Tamás

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aims Large doses of intraperitoneally injected basic amino acids, L-arginine, or L-ornithine, induce acute pancreatitis in rodents, although the mechanisms mediating pancreatic toxicity remain unknown. Another basic amino acid, L-lysine, was also shown to cause pancreatic acinar cell injury. The aim of the study was to get insight into the mechanisms through which L-lysine damages the rat exocrine pancreas, in particular to characterize the kinetics of L-lysine-induced mitochondrial injury, as well as the pathologic responses (including alteration of antioxidant systems) characteristic of acute pancreatitis. Results We showed that intraperitoneal administration of 2 g/kg L-lysine induced severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis. L-lysine administration caused early pancreatic mitochondrial damage that preceded the activation of trypsinogen and the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which are commonly thought to play an important role in the development of acute pancreatitis. Our data demonstrate that L-lysine impairs adenosine triphosphate synthase activity of isolated pancreatic, but not liver, mitochondria. Innovation and Conclusion Taken together, early mitochondrial injury caused by large doses of L-lysine may lead to the development of acute pancreatitis independently of pancreatic trypsinogen and NF-κB activation. PMID:21644850

  15. Derivation and characterization of a pig embryonic stem cell-derived exocrine pancreatic cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    The establishment and initial characterization of a pig embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic cell line, PICM-31, and a colony-cloned derivative cell line, PICM-31A, is described. The cell lines were propagated for several months at split ratios of 1:3 or 1:5 at each passage on STO feeder cells af...

  16. Dynamics and Synchrony of Pancreatic beta-cells and Islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to raised glucose levels. Malfunctioning of this system plays an important role in the metabolic disease diabetes. The biological steps from glucose stimulus to the final release of insulin are incompletely understood, and a more complete descript......Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to raised glucose levels. Malfunctioning of this system plays an important role in the metabolic disease diabetes. The biological steps from glucose stimulus to the final release of insulin are incompletely understood, and a more complete...... description of these processes and their interactions would provide important input in the search for a better treatment of the disease. The thesis describes several aspects of mathematical modeling of beta-cells relevant for the understanding of glucose stimulated insulin secretion. It consists...... biological hypotheses. The subjects addressed are: Quasi-steady-state approximations of enzyme reactions, the effect of noise on bursting electrical behavior, exciation wave propagation in pancreatic islets, intra- and inter-islet synchronization and pulsatile insulin secretion, and mitochondrial dynamics....

  17. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  18. In vitro secretion of zymogens by bovine pancreatic acini and ultra-structural analysis of exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivalingam Jayaveni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to establish a bovine pancreatic acinar cell culture model with longer viability and functionality. The cells could be maintained in a functional state for upto 20 days with normal morphology. Cells were positive for amylase as observed by immunofluorescence staining. Acinar cells are spherical and range about 2–3 µm in diameter. The porosome formed by exocytosis and heterogenous enzyme granules of size ranging 100–300 nm were seen on the surface of cells by electron microscopy. The activity of the enzymes was high on day 15 and the activity profile of the enzymes is in the order: protease>lipase>amylase and the enzymes were identified by SDS-PAGE. Long-term culture of bovine pancreatic acini could be useful in studying the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Since the bovine genome shares about 80% identity with the human genome, the cells derived from bovine pancreas can be engineered and used as a potential xenotransplant to treat conditions like pancreatitis as the tissue source is abundantly available.

  19. Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Pancreatic Metastasis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Alibakhshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors of pancreas are usually primary neoplasms and pancreatic metastases are rare findings. We are reporting a case of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the esophagus with pancreatic metastasis. A 59-year old woman was admitted with chief complaint of abdominal pain and mass. She was a known case of esophageal SCC since 4 years before when she had undergone transthoracic esophagectomy and cervical esophago-gastrostomy. In order to evaluate recent abdominal mass, CT scan was done which revealed septated cystic lesion in the body and the tail of the pancreas. Palliative resection of the tumor was performed and its histological study showed SCC compatible with her previously diagnosed esophageal cancer.

  20. Differentiation of a pancreatic metastasis of a renal cell carcinoma from a primary pancreatic carcinoma by echo-enhanced power Doppler sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flath, B; Rickes, S; Schweigert, M; Lochs, H; Possinger, K; Wermke, W

    2003-01-01

    In a 70-year-old patient who had been treated for a renal cell carcinoma, a pancreatic mass was detected on CT scan. To differentiate a pancreatic metastasis of the renal cell carcinoma from a pancreatic carcinoma, an echo-enhanced power Doppler sonography was performed. The pancreatic mass demonstrated a strong echo enhancement, proving its hypervascularization. This behaviour favoured the diagnosis of a pancreatic metastasis of the renal cell carcinoma which was confirmed by histology. The principles and the role of echo-enhanced power Doppler sonography in the differential diagnosis between a primary pancreatic carcinoma and a metastasis of a renal carcinoma in the pancreas are discussed. We conclude that this technique can provide an important contribution to the diagnosis in this special instance. However, histology is the standard in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumours. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP

  1. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT-1 Enhances Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs play a vital role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, chemoresistance, and recurrence. The mechanisms that maintain the stemness of these cells remain largely unknown. Our previous study indicated that MALAT-1 may serve as an oncogenic long noncoding RNA in pancreatic cancer by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and regulating CSCs markers expression. More significantly, there is emerging evidence that the EMT process may give rise to CSCs, or at least cells with stem cell-like properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that MALAT-1 might enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, our data showed that MALAT-1 could increase the proportion of pancreatic CSCs, maintain self-renewing capacity, decrease the chemosensitivity to anticancer drugs, and accelerate tumor angiogenesis in vitro. In addition, subcutaneous nude mouse xenografts revealed that MALAT-1 could promote tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. The underlying mechanisms may involve in increased expression of self-renewal related factors Sox2. Collectively, we for the first time found the potential effects of MALAT-1 on the stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of MALAT-1 in tumor stemness, which remains to be fully elucidated.

  2. Rat pancreatic beta cells and cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelt, Maaike J; Faas, Marijke M; de Haan, Bart J; Hofstede, Jeroen; Cheung, Chi-Wai; van der Iest, Hanna; de Haan, Aalzen; de Vos, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been suggested to accelerate beta-cell destruction and thereby to contribute to new-onset diabetes and failure of islet allografts in both humans and rodents. Surprisingly, direct CMV infection of beta cells has received only minor attention. Therefore, we investigated the susceptibility of rat beta cells for rat CMV (RCMV) infection and the direct effects on the regulation of immune cell-activating ligands. Primary rat beta cells, the rat beta-cell line Rin-m5F, and fibroblasts were RCMV-infected in vitro. The viral gene and protein expression levels were determined as a measure for RCMV susceptibility. Gene expression levels of intracellular adhesion molecule 1, lymphocyte function associated antigen 3, rat major histocompatibility complex region A, rat major histocompatibility complex region E, toll like receptor 2, and clustered domain 14 were determined as a measure for cellular immunogenicity. We demonstrate that beta cells are susceptible for RCMV infection but allow only low levels of viral gene expression. In contrast, infected fibroblasts demonstrated productive viral infection and formation of viral progeny. After RCMV infection, beta-cell immunogenicity was markedly increased, as demonstrated by the increased cellular expression of immune cell-activating ligands. Direct beta-cell infection by RCMV and subsequent low-grade viral gene expression may lead to increased immunogenicity of native or transplanted beta cells in vivo. An infection-induced enhanced beta-cell recognizability may have important consequences for beta-cell survival and the development of diabetes or rejection of islet grafts.

  3. Human pancreatic stellate cells modulate 3D collagen alignment to promote the migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drifka, Cole R; Loeffler, Agnes G; Esquibel, Corinne R; Weber, Sharon M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Kao, W John

    2016-12-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the ability for cancer cells to aggressively infiltrate and navigate through a dense stroma during the metastatic process. Key features of the PDAC stroma include an abundant population of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and highly aligned collagen fibers; however, important questions remain regarding how collagen becomes aligned and what the biological manifestations are. To better understand how PSCs, aligned collagen, and PDAC cells might cooperate during the transition to invasion, we utilized a microchannel-based in vitro tumor model and advanced imaging technologies to recreate and examine in vivo-like heterotypic interactions. We found that PSCs participate in a collaborative process with cancer cells by orchestrating the alignment of collagen fibers that, in turn, are permissive to enhanced cell migration. Additionally, direct contact between PSCs, collagen, and PDAC cells is critical to invasion and co-migration of both cell types. This suggests PSCs may accompany and assist in navigating PDAC cells through the stromal terrain. Together, our data provides a new role for PSCs in stimulating the metastatic process and underscores the importance of collagen alignment in cancer progression.

  4. Regulatory volume increase in rat pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, H E; Holden, D; Grint, R; Best, L; Brown, P D

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated regulatory volume increase (RVI) in rat pancreatic beta-cells. Volume changes in isolated beta-cells were measured by a video-imaging method. Cell shrinkage was induced by exposure to solutions made hypertonic by the addition of 100 mM mannitol. In HEPES-buffered solutions, beta-cells exhibited an RVI which was almost completely abolished by 10 microM bumetanide. These data indicate that Na+-2Cl--K+ cotransporters make a major contribution to RVI in beta-cells. In HCO3--buffered solutions, however, an RVI was observed in the presence of 10 microM bumetanide. This bumetanide-insensitive component of RVI was inhibited by 100 microM amiloride or 100 microM 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). These data suggest that, in addition to the Na+-2Cl--K+ cotransporter, functionally coupled Na+-H+ exchangers and Cl--HCO3- exchangers may also contribute to RVI in pancreatic beta-cells.

  5. Piperlongumine induces pancreatic cancer cell death by enhancing reactive oxygen species and DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsharan Dhillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers with a nearly 95% mortality rate. The poor response of pancreatic cancer to currently available therapies and the extremely low survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients point to a critical need for alternative therapeutic strategies. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS-inducing agents has emerged as an innovative and effective strategy to treat various cancers. In this study, we investigated the potential of a known ROS inducer, piperlongumine (PPLGM, a bioactive agent found in long peppers, to induce pancreatic cancer cell death in cell culture and animal models. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cell cultures by elevating ROS levels and causing DNA damage. PPLGM-induced DNA damage and pancreatic cancer cell death was reversed by treating the cells with an exogenous antioxidant. Similar to the in vitro studies, PPLGM caused a reduction in tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. Tumors from the PPLGM-treated animals showed decreased Ki-67 and increased 8-OHdG expression, suggesting PPLGM inhibited tumor cell proliferation and enhanced oxidative stress. Taken together, our results show that PPLGM is an effective inhibitor for in vitro and in vivo growth of pancreatic cancer cells, and that it works through a ROS-mediated DNA damage pathway. These findings suggest that PPLGM has the potential to be used for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Derivation and Characterization of a Pig Embryonic-Stem-Cell-Derived Exocrine Pancreatic Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Neil C; Shannon, Amy E; Phillips, Caitlin E; Garrett, Wesley M

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify an epithelial cell line isolated from the spontaneous differentiation of totipotent pig epiblast cells. PICM-31 and its colony-cloned derivative cell line, PICM-31A, were established from the culture and differentiation of an epiblast mass isolated from an 8-day-old pig blastocyst. The cell lines were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, marker gene expression, and mass spectroscopy-based proteomics. The PICM-31 cell lines were continuously cultured and could be successively colony cloned. They spontaneously self-organized into acinarlike structures. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the cell lines' cells were epithelial and filled with secretory granules. Candidate gene expression analysis of the cells showed an exocrine pancreatic profile that included digestive enzyme expression, for example, carboxypeptidase A1, and expression of the fetal marker, α-fetoprotein. Pancreatic progenitor marker expression included pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1, NK6 homeobox 1, and pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a, but not neurogenin 3. Proteomic analysis of cellular proteins confirmed the cells' production of digestive enzymes and showed that the cells expressed cytokeratins 8 and 18. The PICM-31 cell lines provide in vitro models of fetal pig pancreatic exocrine cells. They are the first demonstration of continuous cultures, that is, cell lines, of nontransformed pig pancreas cells.

  7. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreati...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX146012,SRX146011 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX404487 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX404487 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreati...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: His.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX146012,SRX146011 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreati...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX404487 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX146012,SRX146011 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: His.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX146012,SRX146011 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX404487 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreati...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  10. Reprogramming pancreatic stellate cells via p53 activation: A putative target for pancreatic cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Saison-Ridinger

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is characterized by an extremely dense fibrotic stroma, which contributes to tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. During tumorigenesis, quiescent pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs are activated and become major contributors to fibrosis, by increasing growth factor signaling and extracellular matrix deposition. The p53 tumor suppressor is known to restrict tumor initiation and progression through cell autonomous mechanisms including apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and senescence. There is growing evidence that stromal p53 also exerts anti-tumor activity by paracrine mechanisms, though a role for stromal p53 in PDAC has not yet been described. Here, we demonstrate that activation of stromal p53 exerts anti-tumor effects in PDAC. We show that primary cancer-associated PSCs (caPSCs isolated from human PDAC express wild-type p53, which can be activated by the Mdm2 antagonist Nutlin-3a. Our work reveals that p53 acts as a major regulator of PSC activation and as a modulator of PDAC fibrosis. In vitro, p53 activation by Nutlin-3a induces profound transcriptional changes, which reprogram activated PSCs to quiescence. Using immunofluorescence and lipidomics, we have also found that p53 activation induces lipid droplet accumulation in both normal and tumor-associated fibroblasts, revealing a previously undescribed role for p53 in lipid storage. In vivo, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with the clinical form of Nutlin-3a induces stromal p53 activation, reverses caPSCs activation, and decreases fibrosis. All together our work uncovers new functions for stromal p53 in PDAC.

  11. Role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, M. J.; Meijers, M.; Van Garderen-Hoetmer, A.; Lamers, C. B.; Rovati, L. C.; Sprij-Mooij, D.; Jansen, J. B.; Woutersen, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    The role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted pancreatic carcinogenesis was investigated in azaserine-treated rats, using lorglumide, a highly specific cholecystokinin-receptor antagonist. The animals were killed 8 months after the start of treatment. Cholecystokinin, but not dietary unsaturated fat, increased pancreatic weight. Rats treated with cholecystokinin developed more acidophilic atypical acinar cell nodules, adenomas and adenocarcinomas than control animals. Rats maintained on the high-fat diet developed significantly more adenomas and adenocarcinomas than controls given a diet low in unsaturated fat. Lorglumide largely inhibited the enhancing effect of cholecystokinin, but not of dietary fat, on pancreatic carcinogenesis indicating that it is unlikely that the promoting effect of dietary unsaturated fat on pancreatic carcinogenesis is mediated via cholecystokinin. PMID:1637675

  12. The Notch pathway is important in maintaining the cancer stem cell population in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan V Abel

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells that have the capacity to initiate and propagate tumor formation. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic CSCs are maintained are not well understood or characterized.Expression of Notch receptors, ligands, and Notch signaling target genes was quantitated in the CSC and non-CSC populations from 8 primary human pancreatic xenografts. A gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI that inhibits the Notch pathway and a shRNA targeting the Notch target gene Hes1 were used to assess the role of the Notch pathway in CSC population maintenance and pancreatic tumor growth.Notch pathway components were found to be upregulated in pancreatic CSCs. Inhibition of the Notch pathway using either a gamma secretase inhibitor or Hes1 shRNA in pancreatic cancer cells reduced the percentage of CSCs and tumorsphere formation. Conversely, activation of the Notch pathway with an exogenous Notch peptide ligand increased the percentage of CSCs as well as tumorsphere formation. In vivo treatment of orthotopic pancreatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice with GSI blocked tumor growth and reduced the CSC population.The Notch signaling pathway is important in maintaining the pancreatic CSC population and is a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.

  13. Glucolipotoxicity in Pancreatic β-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Won Kim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent epidemic of type 2 diabetes in Asia differs from that reported in other regions of the world in several key areas: it has evolved over a much shorter time, in an earlier stage of life, and in people with lower body mass indices. These phenotypic characteristics of patients strongly suggest that insulin secretory defects may perform a more important function in the development and progression of diabetes. A genetic element clearly underlies β-cell dysfunction and insufficient β-cell mass; however, a number of modifiable factors are also linked to β-cell deterioration, most notably chronic hyperglycemia and elevated free fatty acid (FFA levels. Neither glucose nor FFAs alone cause clinically meaningful β-cell toxicity, especially in patients with normal or impaired glucose tolerance. Thus the term "glucolipotoxicity" is perhaps more appropriate in describing the phenomenon. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain glucolipotoxicity-induced β-cell dysfunction and death, but its major factors appear to be depression of key transcription factor gene expression by altered intracellular energy metabolism and oxidative stress. Therefore, stabilization of metabolic changes induced by glucolipotoxicity in β-cells represents a new avenue for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Weaning triggers a maturation step of pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolovich-Rain, Miri; Enk, Jonatan; Vikesa, Jonas; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Saada, Ann; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2015-03-09

    Because tissue regeneration deteriorates with age, it is generally assumed that the younger the animal, the better it compensates for tissue damage. We have examined the effect of young age on compensatory proliferation of pancreatic β cells in vivo. Surprisingly, β cells in suckling mice fail to enter the cell division cycle in response to a diabetogenic injury or increased glycolysis. The potential of β cells for compensatory proliferation is acquired following premature weaning to normal chow, but not to a diet mimicking maternal milk. In addition, weaning coincides with enhanced glucose-stimulated oxidative phosphorylation and insulin secretion from islets. Transcriptome analysis reveals that weaning increases the expression of genes involved in replication licensing, suggesting a mechanism for increased responsiveness to the mitogenic activity of high glucose. We propose that weaning triggers a discrete maturation step of β cells, elevating both the mitogenic and secretory response to glucose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of nicotine on exocytotic pancreatic secretory response: role of calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury Parimal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine is a risk factor for pancreatitis resulting in loss of pancreatic enzyme secretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms of nicotine-induced secretory response measured in primary pancreatic acinar cells isolated from Male Sprague Dawley rats. The study examines the role of calcium signaling in the mechanism of the enhanced secretory response observed with nicotine exposure. Methods Isolated and purified pancreatic acinar cells were subjected to a nicotine exposure at a dose of 100 μM for 6 minutes and then stimulated with cholecystokinin (CCK for 30 min. The cell’s secretory response was measured by the percent of amylase released from the cells in the incubation medium Calcium receptor antagonists, inositol trisphosphate (IP3 receptor blockers, mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitors and specific nicotinic receptor antagonists were used to confirm the involvement of calcium in this process. Results Nicotine exposure induced enhanced secretory response in primary cells. These responses remained unaffected by mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK’s inhibitors. The effects, however, have been completely abolished by nicotinic receptor antagonist, calcium channel receptor antagonists and inositol trisphosphate (IP3 receptor blockers. Conclusions The data suggest that calcium activated events regulating the exocytotic secretion are affected by nicotine as shown by enhanced functional response which is inhibited by specific antagonists… The results implicate the role of nicotine in the mobilization of both intra- and extracellular calcium in the regulation of stimulus-secretory response of enzyme secretion in this cell system. We conclude that nicotine plays an important role in promoting enhanced calcium levels inside the acinar cell.

  16. Lipotoxicity Causes Multisystem Organ Failure and Exacerbates Acute Pancreatitis in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navina, Sarah; Acharya, Chathur; DeLany, James P.; Orlichenko, Lidiya S.; Baty, Catherine J.; Shiva, Sruti S.; Durgampudi, Chandra; Karlsson, Jenny M.; Lee, Kenneth; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Furlan, Alessandro; Behari, Jaideep; Liu, Shiguang; McHale, Teresa; Nichols, Larry; Papachristou, Georgios Ioannis; Yadav, Dhiraj; Singh, Vijay P.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk of adverse outcomes during acute critical illnesses such as burns, severe trauma, and acute pancreatitis. Although individuals with more body fat and higher serum cytokines and lipase are more likely to experience problems, the roles that these characteristics play are not clear. We used severe acute pancreatitis as a representative disease to investigate the effects of obesity on local organ function and systemic processes. In obese humans, we found that an increase in the volume of intrapancreatic adipocytes was associated with more extensive pancreatic necrosis during acute pancreatitis and that acute pancreatitis was associated with multisystem organ failure in obese individuals. In vitro studies of pancreatic acinar cells showed that unsaturated fatty acids were proinflammatory, releasing intracellular calcium, inhibiting mitochondrial complexes I and V, and causing necrosis. Saturated fatty acids had no such effects. Inhibition of lipolysis in obese (ob/ob) mice with induced pancreatitis prevented a rise in serum unsaturated fatty acids and prevented renal injury, lung injury, systemic inflammation, hypocalcemia, reduced pancreatic necrosis, and mortality. Thus, therapeutic approaches that target unsaturated fatty acid–mediated lipotoxicity may reduce adverse outcomes in obese patients with critical illnesses such as severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:22049070

  17. Spontaneous Pancreatitis Caused by Tissue-Specific Gene Ablation of Hhex in MiceSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Perturbations in pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion cause chronic pancreatitis. The physiologic mechanism of ductal secretion is known, but its transcriptional control is not. We determine the role of the transcription factor hematopoietically expressed homeobox protein (Hhex in ductal secretion and pancreatitis. Methods: We derived mice with pancreas-specific, Cre-mediated Hhex gene ablation to determine the requirement of Hhex in the pancreatic duct in early life and in adult stages. Histologic and immunostaining analyses were used to detect the presence of pathology. Pancreatic primary ductal cells were isolated to discover differentially expressed transcripts upon acute Hhex ablation on a cell autonomous level. Results: Hhex protein was detected throughout the embryonic and adult ductal trees. Ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors resulted in postnatal ductal ectasia associated with acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a progressive phenotype that ultimately resulted in chronic pancreatitis. Hhex ablation in adult mice, however, did not cause any detectable pathology. Ductal ectasia in young mice did not result from perturbation of expression of Hnf6, Hnf1β, or the primary cilia genes. RNA-seq analysis of Hhex-ablated pancreatic primary ductal cells showed mRNA levels of the G-protein coupled receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (Npr3, implicated in paracrine signaling, up-regulated by 4.70-fold. Conclusions: Although Hhex is dispensable for ductal cell function in the adult, ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors results in pancreatitis. Our data highlight the critical role of Hhex in maintaining ductal homeostasis in early life and support ductal hypersecretion as a novel etiology of pediatric chronic pancreatitis. Keywords: Npr3, Pancreatic Ducts, Primary Cilia

  18. Treatment with H2S-releasing diclofenac protects mice against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Madhav; Sidhapuriwala, Jenab N; Sparatore, Anna; Moore, Philip K

    2008-01-01

    Impaired lung function in severe acute pancreatitis is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in this condition. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a naturally occurring gas that has been shown to be a potent vasodilator. Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activity. ACS15 is an H(2)S-releasing derivative of diclofenac. Little is known about its effectiveness as an anti-inflammatory drug. In this report, we describe the effect of diclofenac and its H(2)S-releasing derivative on acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury in the mouse. Acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by hourly i.p. injections of cerulein. Diclofenac and ACS15 were administered either 1 hour before or 1 hour after starting cerulein injections, and the severity of acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury was assessed. The severity of acute pancreatitis was determined by hyperamylasemia, neutrophil sequestration in the pancreas (pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity), and pancreatic acinar cell injury/necrosis on histological examination of pancreas sections. The severity of acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury was assessed by neutrophil sequestration in the lungs (lung myeloperoxidase activity) and by histological examination of lung sections. ACS15, given prophylactically and therapeutically, significantly reduced lung inflammation without having any significant effect on pancreatic injury. These results suggest the usefulness of H(2)S-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as potential treatments for pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

  19. File list: InP.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: InP.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: InP.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: NoD.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available NoD.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 No description Pancreas Pancreatic beta ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: NoD.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 No description Pancreas Pancreatic beta ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: NoD.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 No description Pancreas Pancreatic beta ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: InP.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 Input control Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174587 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 No description Pancreas Pancreatic can...cer cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  10. Model for glucagon secretion by pancreatic α-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia González-Vélez

    Full Text Available Glucagon hormone is synthesized and released by pancreatic α-cells, one of the islet-cell types. This hormone, along with insulin, maintains blood glucose levels within the physiological range. Glucose stimulates glucagon release at low concentrations (hypoglycemia. However, the mechanisms involved in this secretion are still not completely clear. Here, using experimental calcium time series obtained in mouse pancreatic islets at low and high glucose conditions, we propose a glucagon secretion model for α-cells. Our model takes into account that the resupply of releasable granules is not only controlled by cytoplasmic Ca2+, as in other neuroendocrine and endocrine cells, but also by the level of extracellular glucose. We found that, although calcium oscillations are highly variable, the average secretion rates predicted by the model fall into the range of values reported in the literature, for both stimulated and non-stimulated conditions. For low glucose levels, the model predicts that there would be a well-controlled number of releasable granules refilled slowly from a large reserve pool, probably to ensure a secretion rate that could last for several minutes. Studying the α-cell response to the addition of insulin at low glucose, we observe that the presence of insulin reduces glucagon release by decreasing the islet Ca2+ level. This observation is in line with previous work reporting that Ca2+ dynamics, mainly frequency, is altered by insulin. Thus, the present results emphasize the main role played by Ca2+ and glucose in the control of glucagon secretion by α-cells. Our modeling approach also shows that calcium oscillations potentiate glucagon secretion as compared to constant levels of this cellular messenger. Altogether, the model sheds new light on the subcellular mechanisms involved in α-cell exocytosis, and provides a quantitative predictive tool for studying glucagon secretion modulators in physiological and pathological

  11. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

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    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Liu, Wen Wu [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xiang, Hong Gang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Fan, Lie Ying [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Shanghai East Hospital, Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Sun, Qiang [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xu, Xin Yun [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Cai, Jian Mei [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Sun, Xue Jun, E-mail: sunxjk@hotmail.com [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wang2929@hotmail.com [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  12. Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans protected the cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis by inhibiting high-mobility group box protein-1.

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    Jo, Il-Joo; Bae, Gi-Sang; Park, Kyoung-Chel; Choi, Sun Bok; Jung, Won-Seok; Jung, Su-Young; Cho, Jung-Hee; Choi, Mee-Ok; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2013-03-14

    To evaluate the inhibitory effects of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans (SSM) on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in a mouse model. SSM water extract (0.1, 0.5, or 1 g/kg) was administrated intraperitoneally 1 h prior to the first injection of cerulein. Once AP developed, the stable cholecystokinin analogue, cerulein was injected hourly, over a 6 h period. Blood samples were taken 6 h later to determine serum amylase, lipase, and cytokine levels. The pancreas and lungs were rapidly removed for morphological examination, myeloperoxidase assay, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. To specify the role of SSM in pancreatitis, the pancreatic acinar cells were isolated using collagenase method. Then the cells were pre-treated with SSM, then stimulated with cerulein. The cell viability, cytokine productions and high-mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB-1) were measured. Furthermore, the regulating mechanisms of SSM action were evaluated. The administration of SSM significantly attenuated the severity of pancreatitis and pancreatitis associated lung injury, as was shown by the reduction in pancreatic edema, neutrophil infiltration, vacuolization and necrosis. SSM treatment also reduced pancreatic weight/body weight ratio, serum amylase, lipase and cytokine levels, and mRNA expression of multiple inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. In addition, treatment with SSM inhibited HMGB-1 expression in the pancreas during AP. In accordance with in vivo data, SSM inhibited the cerulein-induced acinar cell death, cytokine, and HMGB-1 release. SSM also inhibited the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, p38 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. These results suggest that SSM plays a protective role during the development of AP and pancreatitis associated lung injury via deactivating c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, p38 and NF-κB.

  13. Lessons from models of pancreatic beta cells for engineering glucose-sensing cells.

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    Sherman, Arthur

    2010-09-01

    Mathematical models of pancreatic beta cells suggest design principles that can be applied to engineering cells to sense glucose and secrete insulin. Engineering cells can potentially both contribute to future diabetes therapies and generate new insights into beta-cell function. The focus is on ion channels, Ca(2+)handling, and elements of metabolism that combine to produce the varied oscillatory patterns exhibited by beta cells. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

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    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  15. Profile of MMP and TIMP Expression in Human Pancreatic Stellate Cells: Regulation by IL-1α and TGFβ and Implications for Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

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    Tjomsland, Vegard; Pomianowska, Eva; Aasrum, Monica; Sandnes, Dagny; Verbeke, Caroline Sophie; Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by a prominent fibroinflammatory stroma with both tumor-promoting and tumor-suppressive functions. The pancreatic stellate cell (PSC) is the major cellular stromal component and the main producer of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagens, which are degraded by metalloproteinases (MMPs). PSCs interact with cancer cells through various factors, including transforming growth factor (TGF)β and interleukin (IL)-1α. The role of TGFβ in the dual nature of tumor stroma, i.e., protumorigenic or tumor suppressive, is not clear. We aimed to investigate the roles of TGFβ and IL-1α in the regulation of MMP profiles in PSCs and the subsequent effects on cancer cell migration. Human PSCs isolated from surgically resected specimens were cultured in the presence of pancreatic cancer cell lines, as well as IL-1α or TGFβ. MMP production and activities in PSCs were quantified by gene array transcripts, mRNA measurements, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based activity assay, and zymography. PSC-conditioned media and pancreatic cancer cells were included in a collagen matrix cell migration model. We found that production of IL-1α by pancreatic cancer cells induced alterations in MMP and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) profiles and activities in PSCs, upregulated expression and activation of MMP1 and MMP3, and enhanced migration of pancreatic cancer cells in the collagen matrix model. TGFβ counteracted the effects of IL-1α on PSCs, reestablished PSC MMP and TIMP profiles and activities, and inhibited migration of cancer cells. This suggests that tumor TGFβ has a role as a suppressor of stromal promotion of tumor progression through alterations in PSC MMP profiles with subsequent inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell migration. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

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    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Bei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Ying-Jian, E-mail: yjzhang111@aliyun.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Ying-Yi, E-mail: liyingyi@fudan.edu.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-04-22

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  17. Pathomorphological feature of chronic pancreatitis (CP is the development of pancreatic fibrosis with the accumulation of various collagen types, tubulin, fibronectin, laminin, and also intermediate filament proteins produced by activated pancreatic stel

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    T. V. Turovskaya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available T. V. Turovskaya, A. M. Gnilorybov, L. V. Vasilyeva Pathomorphological feature of chronic pancreatitis (CP is the development of pancreatic fibrosis with the accumulation of various collagen types, tubulin, fibronectin, laminin, and also intermediate filament proteins produced by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs, which express the cytoskeletal α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA. The aim of the research: determination of immunophenotype and proliferative activity of pancreatic stellate cells as well as the main histotopographic components of severe pancreatic fibrosis and accumulation of collagen I, III and IV types in pancreas at CP. Materials and methods. Histological, histochemical (Van Gieson's and Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemical (α-SMA, vimentin, desmin, fibronectin, Ki-67, collagen I, III and IV types and morphometric studies (Image J program of accumulation of various collagen types, represented in standard unit of optical density (SUOD, were held at pancreas biopsies of 30 patients (35-72 years old with CP. Results. It was found that development of severe pancreatic fibrosis is promoted by proliferation and increase of α-SMA+, vimentin+, desmin+ activated stellate cells and deposition of significant amount of collagen I, III, IV types and fibronectin in pancreas that are synthesized by PSCs. In areas of severe fibrosis Ki-67 expression is detected in the nuclei of at least 25% of PSCs, that corresponds to relatively low levels of proliferation. Four components of severe pancreatic fibrosis: circular-periductal fibrosis involving the large ducts of the pancreas, laminar fibrosis in extensive fibrous fields between large ducts and acinar tissue, as well as tape-like interlobular and septal-periacinar intralobular pancreatic fibrosis are identified in patients with CP. Conclusion. Morphological manifestation of severe circular-periductal pancreatic fibrosis is the presence of significant concentric fibrosis around the

  18. Endothelial cells control pancreatic cell fate at defined stages through EGFL7 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Der-I; Lacko, Lauretta A; Ding, Bi-Sen; Huang, Chen; Phung, Kathleen; Gu, Guoqiang; Rafii, Shahin; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Chen, Shuibing

    2015-02-10

    Although endothelial cells have been shown to affect mouse pancreatic development, their precise function in human development remains unclear. Using a coculture system containing human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived progenitors and endothelial cells, we found that endothelial cells play a stage-dependent role in pancreatic development, in which they maintain pancreatic progenitor (PP) self-renewal and impair further differentiation into hormone-expressing cells. The mechanistic studies suggest that the endothelial cells act through the secretion of EGFL7. Consistently, endothelial overexpression of EGFL7 in vivo using a transgenic mouse model resulted in an increase of PP proliferation rate and a decrease of differentiation toward endocrine cells. These studies not only identified the role of EGFL7 as the molecular handle involved in the crosstalk between endothelium and pancreatic epithelium, but also provide a paradigm for using hESC stepwise differentiation to dissect the stage-dependent roles of signals controlling organogenesis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Endothelial Cells Control Pancreatic Cell Fate at Defined Stages through EGFL7 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-I Kao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although endothelial cells have been shown to affect mouse pancreatic development, their precise function in human development remains unclear. Using a coculture system containing human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived progenitors and endothelial cells, we found that endothelial cells play a stage-dependent role in pancreatic development, in which they maintain pancreatic progenitor (PP self-renewal and impair further differentiation into hormone-expressing cells. The mechanistic studies suggest that the endothelial cells act through the secretion of EGFL7. Consistently, endothelial overexpression of EGFL7 in vivo using a transgenic mouse model resulted in an increase of PP proliferation rate and a decrease of differentiation toward endocrine cells. These studies not only identified the role of EGFL7 as the molecular handle involved in the crosstalk between endothelium and pancreatic epithelium, but also provide a paradigm for using hESC stepwise differentiation to dissect the stage-dependent roles of signals controlling organogenesis.

  20. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Cha, Kyoung Je; Han, Jiyou; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-03-22

    Although previous studies suggest that nanotopographical features influence properties and behaviors of stem cells, only a few studies have attempted to derive clinically useful somatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells using nanopatterned surfaces. In the present study, we report that polystyrene nanopore-patterned surfaces significantly promote the pancreatic differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. We compared different diameters of nanopores and showed that 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces highly upregulated the expression of PDX1, a critical transcription factor for pancreatic development, leading to an approximately 3-fold increase in the percentage of differentiating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors compared with control flat surfaces. Furthermore, in the presence of biochemical factors, 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces profoundly enhanced the derivation of pancreatic endocrine cells producing insulin, glucagon, or somatostatin. We also demonstrate that nanopore-patterned surface-induced upregulation of PDX1 is associated with downregulation of TAZ, suggesting the potential role of TAZ in nanopore-patterned surface-mediated mechanotransduction. Our study suggests that appropriate cytokine treatments combined with nanotopographical stimulation could be a powerful tool for deriving a high purity of desired cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

  1. Stem cells for pancreatic β-cell replacement in diabetes mellitus: actual perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calafiore, Riccardo; Montanucci, Pia; Basta, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus represent a widespread metabolic disorder, related to autoimmune β-cell destruction and insulin resistance, leading to β-cell dysfunction, respectively, that are associated with severe chronic complications with irreversible multiorgan morphological and functional damage. Conventional treatment, based on exogenous insulin or oral agents may control and delay but not prevent the disease complications, which has lead, so far, to a steady increase in mortality and morbidity. β-Cell substitution cell therapy, initially pursued by whole pancreatic and isolated islet transplantation, with scarce and limited efficiency, now is looking at the new technologies for cell and molecular therapy for diabetes, based on stem cells. Pancreatic endocrine cells regeneration might replenish the destroyed β-cell pool, with neogenerated β-cell derived from pancreatic and extrapancreatic stem cell sources. Additionally, embryonic or adult stem cells derived from different cell lineages, and able to differentiate into β-like cell elements, may not only restore the original insulin secretory patterns but also exert the immunomodulatory effects aimed at interrupting the β-cell-directed autoimmune destruction vicious cycle. These new strategies may, one day, provide for the final cure of diabetes mellitus.

  2. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

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    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ho Young [Department of Microbiology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Manbok [Department of Medical Science, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells.

  3. From cell culture to a cure: pancreatic β-cell replacement strategies for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhoun, Jennifer M; Voltzke, Kristin J; Firpo, Meri T

    2012-09-01

    Numerous advances have been made in pancreatic β-cell replacement therapies for diabetes mellitus. While these therapies provide a positive impact and possible cure for the individual recipient, access is limited by availability of donor tissues. The derivation of pluripotent stem cells using efficient differentiation technologies has resulted in the generation of insulin-producing cells with characteristics similar to islet β-cells. Experimental transplantation studies have shown that these cells are capable of reducing hyperglycemia in short-term assays. Novel methodologies that facilitate the neogenesis of β-cells from endogenous hepatic or pancreatic tissue sources are also being investigated as a β-cell replacement strategy. Further research is necessary to protect these transplanted or regenerated cells from diabetic autoimmune pathology.

  4. Morphometric Measurements to Quantify the Cerulein Induced Hyperstimulatory Pancreatitis of Rats under the Protective Effect of Lectins

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    Ludwig Jonas

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In preceding papers we demonstrated an inhibitory effect of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA and Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA on the cholecystokinin (CCK binding to the CCK receptor of rat pancreatic cells and also on the CCK induced Ca2+ release and α-amylase secretion in vitro as well as on pancreatic secretion of intact rats in vivo. In the present study we show the same inhibitory effect of both lectins on the cerulein pancreatitis of rats. This acute pancreatitis was induced by supramaximal injections (5 µg/kg/h iv or 10 µg/kg/h ip of the CCK analogue cerulein in rats every hour. To monitor the degree of pancreatitis, we measured the number and diameter of injury vacuoles in the pancreatic acinar cells as one of the most important signs of this type of pancreatitis by light microscopic morphometry with two different systems on paraffin sections. Furthermore, the serum α-amylase activity was measured biochemically. We found a correlation between the diameter of vacuoles inside the acinar cells and the serum enzyme activity up to 24 h. The simultaneous ip administration of cerulein and WGA or UEA in a dosage of 125 µg/kg/h for 8 h led to a reduction of vacuolar diameter from 13.1 ± 2.0 µm (cerulein to 7.5 ± 1.1 µm (cerulein + WGA or 7.2 ± 1.3 µm (cerulein + UEA. The serum amylase activity was reduced from 63.7 ± 15.8 mmol/l \\times min (cerulein to 37.7 ± 11.8 (cerulein + WGA or 39.4; +52.9; -31.1 (cerulein + UEA-I. Both parameters allow the grading this special type of pancreatitis to demonstrate the protective effect of the lectins.

  5. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

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    Laura Bravo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  6. Evaluation of islets derived from human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells in diabetes treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Jian; Xu, Shi-Qing; Cai, Han-Qing; Men, Xiu-Li; Wang, Zai; Lin, Hua; Chen, Li; Jiang, Yong-Wei; Liu, Hong-Lin; Li, Cheng-Hui; Sui, Wei-Guo; Deng, Hong-Kui; Lou, Jin-Ning

    2013-01-01

    With the shortage of donor organs for islet transplantation, insulin-producing cells have been generated from different types of stem cell. Human fetal pancreatic stem cells have a better self-renewal capacity than adult stem cells and can readily differentiate into pancreatic endocrine cells, making them a potential source for islets in diabetes treatment. In the present study, the functions of pancreatic islets derived from human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Human pancreatic progenitor cells isolated from the fetal pancreas were expanded and differentiated into islet endocrine cells in culture. Markers for endocrine and exocrine functions as well as those for alpha and beta cells were analyzed by immunofluorescent staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To evaluate the functions of these islets in vivo, the islet-like structures were transplanted into renal capsules of diabetic nude mice. Immunohistochemical staining for human C-peptide and human mitochondrion antigen was applied to confirm the human origin and the survival of grafted islets. Human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells were able to expand in medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and leukemia inhibitor factor (LIF), and to differentiate into pancreatic endocrine cells with high efficiency upon the actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 and activin-A. The differentiated cells expressed insulin, glucagon, glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), GLUT2 and voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC), and were able to aggregate into islet-like structures containing alpha and beta cells upon suspension. These structures expressed and released a higher level of insulin than adhesion cultured cells, and helped to maintain normoglycemia in diabetic nude mice after transplantation. Human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells have good capacity for generating insulin producing cells and provide a promising potential source for diabetes treatment.

  7. Bifurcation and Firing Patterns of the Pancreatic β-Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Shenquan; Liu, Xuanliang; Zeng, Yanjun

    Using a model of individual isolated pancreatic β-cells, we investigated bifurcation diagrams of interspike intervals (ISIs) and largest Lyapunov exponents (LLE), which clearly demonstrated a wide range of transitions between different firing patterns. The numerical simulation results revealed the effect of different time constants and ion channels on the neuronal discharge rhythm. Furthermore, an individual cell exhibited tonic spiking, square-wave bursting, and tapered bursting. Additionally, several bifurcation phenomena can be observed in this paper, such as period-doubling, period-adding, inverse period-doubling and inverse period-adding scenarios. In addition, we researched the mechanisms underlying two kinds of bursting (tapered and square-wave bursting) by use of fast-slow dynamics analysis. Finally, we analyzed the codimension-two bifurcation of the fast subsystem and studied cusp bifurcation, generalized Hopf (or Bautin) bifurcation and Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation.

  8. Repeated Gene Transfection Impairs the Engraftment of Transplanted Porcine Neonatal Pancreatic Cells

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    Min Koo Seo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPreviously, we reported that neonatal porcine pancreatic cells transfected with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF gene in an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-based plasmid (pEBVHGF showed improved proliferation and differentiation compared to those of the control. In this study, we examined if pancreatic cells transfected repeatedly with pEBVHGF can be successfully grafted to control blood glucose in a diabetes mouse model.MethodsNeonatal porcine pancreatic cells were cultured as a monolayer and were transfected with pEBVHGF every other day for a total of three transfections. The transfected pancreatic cells were re-aggregated and transplanted into kidney capsules of diabetic nude mice or normal nude mice. Blood glucose level and body weight were measured every other day after transplantation. The engraftment of the transplanted cells and differentiation into beta cells were assessed using immunohistochemistry.ResultsRe-aggregation of the pancreatic cells before transplantation improved engraftment of the cells and facilitated neovascularization of the graft. Right before transplantation, pancreatic cells that were transfected with pEBVHGF and then re-aggregated showed ductal cell marker expression. However, ductal cells disappeared and the cells underwent fibrosis in a diabetes mouse model two to five weeks after transplantation; these mice also did not show controlled blood glucose levels. Furthermore, pancreatic cells transplanted into nude mice with normal blood glucose showed poor graft survival regardless of the type of transfected plasmid (pCEP4, pHGF, or pEBVHGF.ConclusionFor clinical application of transfected neonatal porcine pancreatic cells, further studies are required to develop methods of overcoming the damage for the cells caused by repeated transfection and to re-aggregate them into islet-like structures.

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in feline pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Shelley Joy; Mrkonjich, Ladonna

    2006-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-II) is an inducible enzyme that is responsible for the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which is often upregulated in neoplastic conditions. Expression of COX-II is documented in the majority of human pancreatic adenocarcinomas and in many epithelial neoplasms in humans and animals. The purpose of this study was to assess a series of feline pancreatic adenocarcinomas for the expression of COX-II. Eight feline pancreatic adenocarcinomas (5 poorly differentiated ductular variants and 3 well-differentiated acinar variants) were included. Immunohistochemical staining showed that COX-II was expressed in 2 (both poorly differentiated ductular variants) of the 8 neoplasms (25%). Approximately 10% of the epithelial cells from these 2 neoplasms expressed intense cytoplasmic staining. However, because feline pancreatic adenocarcinoma does not appear to consistently express COX-II, it is not a useful prognostic indicator for this group of feline neoplasms. In addition, COX-II inhibitors are not likely to be effective therapeutics for cats with this neoplasm.

  10. Modeling Cystic Fibrosis Using Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Human Pancreatic Ductal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Senem; Zhou, Ting; Robinson, Christopher L; Tsai, Su-Yi; Crespo, Miguel; Amin, Sadaf; Lin, Xiangyi; Hon, Jane; Evans, Todd; Chen, Shuibing

    2016-05-01

    We established an efficient strategy to direct human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line derived from patients with cystic fibrosis, to differentiate into pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs). After purification, more than 98% of hESC-derived PDECs expressed functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. In addition, iPSC lines were derived from a patient with CF carrying compound frameshift and mRNA splicing mutations and were differentiated to PDECs. PDECs derived from Weill Cornell cystic fibrosis (WCCF)-iPSCs showed defective expression of mature CFTR protein and impaired chloride ion channel activity, recapitulating functional defects of patients with CF at the cellular level. These studies provide a new methodology to derive pure PDECs expressing CFTR and establish a "disease in a dish" platform to identify drug candidates to rescue the pancreatic defects of patients with CF. An efficient strategy was established to direct human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and an induced pluripotent stem cell line derived from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF-iPSCs), to differentiate into pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs). After purification, more than 98% of hESC-PDECs derived from CF-iPSCs showed defective expression of mature cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein and impaired chloride ion channel activity, recapitulating functional pancreatic defects of patients with CF at the cellular level. These studies provide a new methodology for deriving pure PDECs expressing CFTR, and they establish a "disease-in-a-dish" platform for identifying drug candidates to rescue the pancreatic defects of these patients. ©AlphaMed Press.

  11. Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Kurt W; Head, W Steve; Piston, David W

    2014-02-01

    The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36(-/-)). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36(+/-) and Cx36(-/-) mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology.

  12. A positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qiao, E-mail: zhangqiao200824@126.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Yang, Zhe, E-mail: zheyang@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Wang, Weiping, E-mail: wwp@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Guo, Ting, E-mail: luckyguoting@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Gastrointestinal Translation Research, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Peking University Cancer Hospital, 52 Fucheng Road, 100142 Beijing (China); Jia, Zhuqing, E-mail: zhuqingjia@126.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Ma, Kangtao, E-mail: makangtao11@126.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Zhou, Chunyan, E-mail: chunyanzhou@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China)

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • ISL-1 is highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL. • ISL-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. • c-Myc positively regulates ISL-1 expression in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells. • ISL-1 and c-Myc forms an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex only in DLBCL. • Positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 does not exist in normal pancreatic β-cell. - Abstract: Insulin enhancer binding protein-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been reported to play essential roles in promoting adult pancreatic β-cells proliferation. Recent studies indicate that ISL-1 may also involve in the occurrence of a variety of tumors. However, whether ISL-1 has any functional effect on tumorigenesis, and what are the differences on ISL-1 function in distinct conditions, are completely unknown. In this study, we found that ISL-1 was highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells, as well as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but to a much less extent in other normal tissues or tumor specimens. Further study revealed that ISL-1 promoted the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL cells, and also accelerated the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. We also found that ISL-1 could activate c-Myc transcription not only in pancreatic β-cells but also in DLBCL cells. However, a cell-specific feedback regulation was detectable only in DLBCL cells. This auto-regulatory loop was established by the interaction of ISL-1 and c-Myc to form an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex, and synergistically to promote ISL-1 transcription through binding on the ISL-1 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells, which might result in the functional diversities of ISL-1 in different physiological and pathological processes.

  13. In vivo gene transfer targeting in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with cell surface antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafitte Marie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a deadly malignancy resistant to current therapies. It is critical to test new strategies, including tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. This study tested the possibility to target the transfer of a suicide gene in tumor cells using an oncotropic lentiviral vector. Results Three cell surface markers were evaluated to target the transduction of cells by lentiviruses pseudotyped with a modified glycoprotein from Sindbis virus. Only Mucin-4 and the Claudin-18 proteins were found efficient for targeted lentivirus transductions in vitro. In subcutaneous xenografts of human pancreatic cancer cells models, Claudin-18 failed to achieve efficient gene transfer but Mucin-4 was found very potent. Human pancreatic tumor cells were modified to express a fluorescent protein detectable in live animals by bioimaging, to perform a direct non invasive and costless follow up of the tumor growth. Targeted gene transfer of a bicistronic transgene bearing a luciferase gene and the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene into orthotopic grafts was carried out with Mucin-4 oncotropic lentiviruses. By contrast to the broad tropism VSV-G carrying lentivirus, this oncotropic lentivirus was found to transduce specifically tumor cells, sparing normal pancreatic cells in vivo. Transduced cells disappeared after ganciclovir treatment while the orthotopic tumor growth was slowed down. Conclusion This work considered for the first time three aspect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma targeted therapy. First, lentiviral transduction of human pancreatic tumor cells was possible when cells were grafted orthotopically. Second, we used a system targeting the tumor cells with cell surface antigens and sparing the normal cells. Finally, the TK/GCV anticancer system showed promising results in vivo. Importantly, the approach presented here appeared to be a safer, much more specific and an as efficient way to perform gene

  14. Chinese herb derived-Rocaglamide A is a potent inhibitor of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baochun; Li, Yixiong; Tan, Fengbo; Xiao, Zhanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks No.1 in mortality rate worldwide. This study aims to identify the novel anti-pancreatic cancer drugs. Human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines were purchased from ATCC. CPE-based screening assay was used to examine the cell viability. Patient derived tumor xenografts in SCID mice was established. The Caspase-3 and 7 activities were measured using the Caspase Glo 3/7 Assay kit. Soft agar colony formation assay was used to evaluate the colony formation. Wound healing assay was employed to determine the cell migration. We screened a Chinese herbal product library and found three "hits" that kill cancer cells at nanomolar to micromolar concentrations. One of these compounds, rocaglamide, was found to be potent inhibitors of a wide spectrum of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Furthermore, Rocaglamide reduced the tumor size in a patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse model without noticeable toxicity in vivo. Rocaglamide also inhibits pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, these data support that Rocaglamide may be a promising anti-pancreatic cancer drug.

  15. Renal cell carcinoma metastasizing to pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm - the second case described in the world literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek-Rajewska, Katarzyna; Zalewski, Przemysław; Bręborowicz, Danuta; Woźniak, Aldona

    Tumor-to-tumor metastases are very rare events. We report a case of a 64-year-old man who presented with a tumor of the pancreas. The patient underwent partial pancreatectomy. Frozen section diagnosis of the tumor was an endocrine neoplasm. Paraffin block slide examination revealed a tumor consisting of two components: pancreatic endocrine neoplasm at the periphery of the tumor and the central part composed of clear cells with delicate vessels. The results of immunohistochemical stains revealed renal cell carcinoma surrounded by pancreatic endocrine neoplasm, therefore representing an unusual case of renal cell carcinoma metastasizing to a pancreatic endocrine neoplasm.

  16. Pancreatic differentiation of Pdx1-GFP reporter mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porciuncula, Angelo; Kumar, Anujith; Rodriguez, Saray; Atari, Maher; Araña, Miriam; Martin, Franz; Soria, Bernat; Prosper, Felipe; Verfaillie, Catherine; Barajas, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    Efficient induction of defined lineages in pluripotent stem cells constitutes the determinant step for the generation of therapeutically relevant replacement cells to potentially treat a wide range of diseases, including diabetes. Pancreatic differentiation has remained an important challenge in large part because of the need to differentiate uncommitted pluripotent stem cells into highly specialized hormone-secreting cells, which has been shown to require a developmentally informed step-by-step induction procedure. Here, in the framework of using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to generate pancreatic cells for pancreatic diseases, we have generated and characterized iPSCs from Pdx1-GFP transgenic mice. The use of a GFP reporter knocked into the endogenous Pdx1 promoter allowed us to monitor pancreatic induction based on the expression of Pdx1, a pancreatic master transcription factor, and to isolate a pure Pdx1-GFP(+) population for downstream applications. Differentiated cultures timely expressed markers specific to each stage and end-stage progenies acquired a rather immature beta-cell phenotype, characterized by polyhormonal expression even among cells highly expressing the Pdx1-GFP reporter. Our findings highlight the utility of employing a fluorescent protein reporter under the control of a master developmental gene in order to devise novel differentiation protocols for relevant cell types for degenerative diseases such as pancreatic beta cells for diabetes. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Immunohistochemical localization of glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide on rat endocrine pancreas: coexistence in rat islet cells

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    YH Huang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We used immunofluorescence double staining method to investigate the cellular localization of glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide (PP in rat pancreatic islets. The results showed that both A-cells (glucagon-secreting cells and PP-cells (PPsecreting cells were located in the periphery of the islets. However, A-cells and PP-cells had a different regional distribution. Most of A-cells were located in the splenic lobe but a few of them were in the duodenal lobe of the pancreas. In contrast, the majority of PP-cells were found in the duodenal lobe and a few of them were in the splenic lobe of the pancreas. Furthermore, we found that 67.74% A-cells had PP immunoreactivity, 70.92% PP-cells contained glucagon immunoreactivity with immunofluorescence double staining. Our data support the concept of a common precursor stem cell for pancreatic hormone-producing cells.

  18. Solanine Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hongwei Sun; Chongqing Lv; Longlong Yang; Yingxiu Wang; Qingshun Zhang; Suhui Yu; Hongru Kong; Meng Wang; Jianming Xie; Chunwu Zhang; Mengtao Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptos...

  19. Effect of Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossum, Carlo G.; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    consisting of 3 to 20 amino acids, can be released from proteins upon degradation by proteolytic enzymes, e.g. in the intestinal tract. The numerous described bioactivities include antihypertensive, anticancerous, antimicrobial, and immunomodulating effects. Here, we investigate the effect of fish protein......Effect of Fish Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells Carlo G. Ossum1, Lisa Lystbæk Andersen2, Henrik Hauch Nielsen2, Else K. Hoffmann1, and Flemming Jessen2 1University of Copenhagen, Department of Biology, Denmark, 2Technical University of Denmark (DTU), National Food Institute, Denmark...... Corresponding author: Carlo G. Ossum (cgossum@gmail.com) A large number of bioactive peptides have been identified in and isolated from various food sources. Milk seems to be a particularly rich source but also different fish species have been found to yield bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides, usually...

  20. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véret, Julien; Bellini, Lara; Giussani, Paola; Ng, Carl; Magnan, Christophe; Le Stunff, Hervé

    2014-06-20

    Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D.

  1. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Véret

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D.

  2. CD47-CAR-T Cells Effectively Kill Target Cancer Cells and Block Pancreatic Tumor Growth

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    Vita Golubovskaya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available CD47 is a glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is often overexpressed in different types of hematological and solid cancer tumors and plays important role in blocking phagocytosis, increased tumor survival, metastasis and angiogenesis. In the present report, we designed CAR (chimeric antigen receptor-T cells that bind CD47 antigen. We used ScFv (single chain variable fragment from mouse CD47 antibody to generate CD47-CAR-T cells for targeting different cancer cell lines. CD47-CAR-T cells effectively killed ovarian, pancreatic and other cancer cells and produced high level of cytokines that correlated with expression of CD47 antigen. In addition, CD47-CAR-T cells significantly blocked BxPC3 pancreatic xenograft tumor growth after intratumoral injection into NSG mice. Moreover, we humanized mouse CD47 ScFv and showed that it effectively bound CD47 antigen. The humanized CD47-CAR-T cells also specifically killed ovarian, pancreatic, and cervical cancer cell lines and produced IL-2 that correlated with expression of CD47. Thus, CD47-CAR-T cells can be used as a novel cellular therapeutic agent for treating different types of cancer.

  3. CD47-CAR-T Cells Effectively Kill Target Cancer Cells and Block Pancreatic Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Berahovich, Robert; Zhou, Hua; Xu, Shirley; Harto, Hizkia; Li, Le; Chao, Cheng-Chi; Mao, Mike Ming; Wu, Lijun

    2017-10-21

    CD47 is a glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is often overexpressed in different types of hematological and solid cancer tumors and plays important role in blocking phagocytosis, increased tumor survival, metastasis and angiogenesis. In the present report, we designed CAR (chimeric antigen receptor)-T cells that bind CD47 antigen. We used ScFv (single chain variable fragment) from mouse CD47 antibody to generate CD47-CAR-T cells for targeting different cancer cell lines. CD47-CAR-T cells effectively killed ovarian, pancreatic and other cancer cells and produced high level of cytokines that correlated with expression of CD47 antigen. In addition, CD47-CAR-T cells significantly blocked BxPC3 pancreatic xenograft tumor growth after intratumoral injection into NSG mice. Moreover, we humanized mouse CD47 ScFv and showed that it effectively bound CD47 antigen. The humanized CD47-CAR-T cells also specifically killed ovarian, pancreatic, and cervical cancer cell lines and produced IL-2 that correlated with expression of CD47. Thus, CD47-CAR-T cells can be used as a novel cellular therapeutic agent for treating different types of cancer.

  4. Modulation of the leptin receptor mediates tumor growth and migration of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisha M Mendonsa

    Full Text Available Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration.

  5. Modulation of the leptin receptor mediates tumor growth and migration of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonsa, Alisha M; Chalfant, Madeleine C; Gorden, Lee D; VanSaun, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration.

  6. Pancreatic Fibroblasts Stimulate the Motility of Pancreatic Cancer Cells through IGF1/IGF1R Signaling under Hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Hirakawa

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is characterized by its hypovascularity, with an extremely poor prognosis because of its highly invasive nature. PDAC proliferates with abundant stromal cells, suggesting that its invasive activity might be controlled by intercellular interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts. Using four PDAC cell lines and two pancreas cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1 and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R was evaluated by RT-PCR, FACScan, western blot, or ELISA. Correlation between IGF1R and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 was examined by immunohistochemical staining of 120 pancreatic specimens. The effects of CAFs, IGF1, and IGF1R inhibitors on the motility of cancer cells were examined by wound-healing assay or invasion assay under normoxia (20% O2 and hypoxia (1% O2. IGF1R expression was significantly higher in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells than in Panc-1 cells. Hypoxia increased the expression level of IGF1R in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells. CA9 expression was correlated with IGF1R expression in pancreatic specimens. CAFs produced IGF1 under hypoxia, but PDAC cells did not. A conditioned medium from CAFs, which expressed αSMA, stimulated the migration and invasion ability of MiaPaCa-2, RWP-1, and OCUP-AT cells. The motility of all PDAC cells was greater under hypoxia than under normoxia. The motility-stimulating ability of CAFs was decreased by IGF1R inhibitors. These findings might suggest that pancreas CAFs stimulate the invasion activity of PDAC cells through paracrine IGF1/IGF1R signaling, especially under hypoxia. Therefore the targeting of IGF1R signaling might represent a promising therapeutic approach in IGF1R-dependent PDAC.

  7. Pancreatic Fibroblasts Stimulate the Motility of Pancreatic Cancer Cells through IGF1/IGF1R Signaling under Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Toshiki; Yashiro, Masakazu; Doi, Yosuke; Kinoshita, Haruhito; Morisaki, Tamami; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by its hypovascularity, with an extremely poor prognosis because of its highly invasive nature. PDAC proliferates with abundant stromal cells, suggesting that its invasive activity might be controlled by intercellular interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts. Using four PDAC cell lines and two pancreas cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) was evaluated by RT-PCR, FACScan, western blot, or ELISA. Correlation between IGF1R and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) was examined by immunohistochemical staining of 120 pancreatic specimens. The effects of CAFs, IGF1, and IGF1R inhibitors on the motility of cancer cells were examined by wound-healing assay or invasion assay under normoxia (20% O2) and hypoxia (1% O2). IGF1R expression was significantly higher in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells than in Panc-1 cells. Hypoxia increased the expression level of IGF1R in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells. CA9 expression was correlated with IGF1R expression in pancreatic specimens. CAFs produced IGF1 under hypoxia, but PDAC cells did not. A conditioned medium from CAFs, which expressed αSMA, stimulated the migration and invasion ability of MiaPaCa-2, RWP-1, and OCUP-AT cells. The motility of all PDAC cells was greater under hypoxia than under normoxia. The motility-stimulating ability of CAFs was decreased by IGF1R inhibitors. These findings might suggest that pancreas CAFs stimulate the invasion activity of PDAC cells through paracrine IGF1/IGF1R signaling, especially under hypoxia. Therefore the targeting of IGF1R signaling might represent a promising therapeutic approach in IGF1R-dependent PDAC.

  8. Species- and dose-specific pancreatic responses and progression in single- and repeat-dose studies with GI181771X: a novel cholecystokinin 1 receptor agonist in mice, rats, and monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, James R; Romach, Elizabeth H; Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2014-01-01

    Compound-induced pancreatic injury is a serious liability in preclinical toxicity studies. However, its relevance to humans should be cautiously evaluated because of interspecies variations. To highlight such variations, we evaluated the species- and dose-specific pancreatic responses and progression caused by GI181771X, a novel cholecystokinin 1 receptor agonist investigated by GlaxoSmithKline for the treatment of obesity. Acute (up to 2,000 mg/kg GI181771X, as single dose) and repeat-dose studies in mice and/or rats (0.25-250 mg/kg/day for 7 days to 26 weeks) showed wide-ranging morphological changes in the pancreas that were dose and duration dependent, including necrotizing pancreatitis, acinar cell hypertrophy/atrophy, zymogen degranulation, focal acinar cell hyperplasia, and interstitial inflammation. In contrast to rodents, pancreatic changes were not observed in cynomolgus monkeys given GI181771X (1-500 mg/kg/day with higher systemic exposure than rats) for up to 52 weeks. Similarly, no GI181771X treatment-associated abnormalities in pancreatic structure were noted in a 24-week clinical trial with obese patients (body mass index >30 or >27 kg/m(2)) as assessed by abdominal ultrasound or by magnetic resonance imaging. Mechanisms for interspecies variations in the pancreatic response to CCK among rodents, monkeys, and humans and their relevance to human risk are discussed.

  9. αv integrin: a new gastrin target in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrol, Celine; Bertrand, Claudine; Kowalski-Chauvel, Aline; Daulhac, Laurence; Cohen-Jonathan-Moyal, Elizabeth; Ferrand, Audrey; Seva, Catherine

    2011-10-28

    To analyse αv integrin expression induced by gastrin in pancreatic cancer models. αv integrin mRNA expression in human pancreatic cancer cells was analysed using a "cancer genes" array and confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Western blotting and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry were used to examine protein levels in human pancreatic cancer cell lines and pancreatic tissues, respectively. The role of αv integrin on gastrin-induced cell adhesion was examined using blocking anti-αv integrin monoclonal antibodies. Adherent cells were quantified by staining with crystal violet. Using a "cancer genes" array we identified αv integrin as a new gastrin target gene in human pancreatic cancer cells. A quantitative real-time PCR approach was used to confirm αv integrin gene expression. We also demonstrate that Src family kinases and the PI 3-kinase, two signalling pathways specifically activated by the CCK-2 receptor (CCK2R), are involved in gastrin-mediated αv integrin expression. In contrast, inhibition of the ERK pathway was without any effect on αv integrin expression induced by gastrin. Our results also show that gastrin modulates cell adhesion via αv integrins. Indeed, in vitro adhesion assays performed on fibronectin show that gastrin significantly increases adhesion of pancreatic cancer cells. The use of blocking anti-αv integrin monoclonal antibodies completely reversed the increase in cell-substrate adhesion induced by gastrin. In addition, we showed in vivo that the targeted CCK2R expression in the pancreas of Elas-CCK2 mice, leads to the overexpression of αv integrin. This process may contribute to pancreatic tumour development observed in these transgenic animals. αv integrin is a new gastrin target in pancreatic cancer models and contributes to gastrin effects on cell adhesion.

  10. On the Structure of Bovine Pancreatic Ribonuclease B. Isolation of a Glycopeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, Jr., T. H.; Hirs, C. H.W.

    Ribonuclease B is a constituent of the zymogen granules of bovine pancreatic acinar cells and is secreted in the pancreatic juice of cattle. Its isolation from bovine pancreatic juice has been described. The enzyme is a glycoprotein that possesses an amino acid composition indistinguishable from that of ribonuclease A and contains carbohydrate to the extent of six residues of mannose and two residues of glucosamine per molecule. The experiments to be described in the present communication were designed to provide preliminary structural information about the protein, and, in particular, to furnish an understanding of the distribution of the carbohydrate in the molecule. The experiments have demonstrated that the carbohydrate content is accounted for by a single covalently-bonded oligosaccharide moiety attached at an aspartic acid or asparagine residue, and have provided further presumptive evidence that the structure of the protein is otherwise identical to that of ribonuclease A. (auth)

  11. Role of bone marrow cells in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a rat model of pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akita, Shingo; Kubota, Koji [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Kobayashi, Akira, E-mail: kbys@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Misawa, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Akira; Nakata, Takenari; Yokoyama, Takahide [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Takahashi, Masafumi [Center for Molecular Medicine Division of Bioimaging Sciences, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimono, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Miyagawa, Shinichi [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs play a role in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived activated PSCs can produce PDGF and TGF {beta}1. -- Abstract: Bone marrow cell (BMC)-derived myofibroblast-like cells have been reported in various organs, including the pancreas. However, the contribution of these cells to pancreatic fibrosis has not been fully discussed. The present study examined the possible involvement of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) originating from BMCs in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a clinically relevant rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. BMCs from female transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were transplanted into lethally irradiated male rats. Once chimerism was established, acute pancreatitis was induced by a CDE diet. Chronological changes in the number of PSCs originating from the donor BMCs were examined using double immunofluorescence for GFP and markers for PSCs, such as desmin and alpha smooth muscle actin ({alpha}SMA), 1, 3 and 8 weeks after the initiation of CDE feeding. We also used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate whether the PSCs from the BMCs produce growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1. The percentage of BMC-derived activated PSCs increased significantly, peaking after 1 week of CDE treatment (accounting for 23.3 {+-} 0.9% of the total population of activated PSCs) and then decreasing. These cells produced both PDGF and TGF{beta}1 during the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Our results suggest that PSCs originating from BMCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic injury, at least in part, by producing growth factors in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model.

  12. [Pancreatic metastases of renal cell carcinomas - evaluation of the contrast behavior at echo-enhanced power-Doppler sonography in comparison to primary pancreatic tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickes, S; Flath, B; Unkrodt, K; Ocran, K; Neye, H; Lochs, H; Wermke, W

    2001-08-01

    Renal cell carcinomas are the most common primary tumors leading to pancreatic metastases. The differentiation of metastases from primary pancreatic tumors is important for the prognosis. Echo-enhanced power-Doppler sonography may be used for the differential diagnosis of tumors. In this study, the contrast behavior of metastases of renal cell carcinomas was evaluated in comparison to primary pancreatic tumors. Each 5 patients with pancreatic metastases of a renal cell carcinoma, a ductal carcinoma, a neuroendocrine tumor and a pancreatitis-associated mass were investigated by B-mode sonography, fundamental and echo-enhanced power-Doppler sonography. Similar to neuroendocrine tumors, metastases of renal cell carcinomas were found to be hypervascularized. In contrast, ductal carcinomas are hypovascularized compared to the surrounding tissue. Tumors associated with pancreatitis show different vascularization pattern depending on inflammation and necrosis. Metastases of renal cell carcinomas and ductal carcinomas show different vascularization pattern at echo-enhanced power-Doppler sonography. Renal cell metastases and neuroendocrine tumors have similar contrast behaviors, therefore, clinical symptoms should be referred for their differentiation. However, histology is the standard of reference for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors.

  13. Animal Models of Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Otsuki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models for CP in rats can be classified into 2 groups: one is noninvasive or nonsurgical models and the other is invasive or surgical models. Pancreatic injury induced by repetitive injections of supramaximal stimulatory dose of caerulein (Cn or by intraductal infusion of sodium taurocholate (NaTc recovered within 14 days, whereas that caused by repetitive injection of arginine or by intraductal infusion of oleic acid was persistent. However, the destroyed acinar tissues were replaced by fatty tissues without fibrosis. Transient stasis of pancreatic fluid flow by 0.01% agarose and minimum injury of the pancreatic duct by 0.1% NaTc solution induced progressive pancreatic injury although one alone is insufficient to cause persistent pancreatic injury. However, the damaged tissue was replaced by fatty tissue without fibrosis. Continuous pancreatic ductal hypertension (PDH caused diffuse interlobular and intralobular fibrosis closely resembling human CP.

  14. HIF1 Contributes to Hypoxia-Induced Pancreatic Cancer Cells Invasion via Promoting QSOX1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ye Shi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 (QSOX1, which oxidizes sulfhydryl groups to form disulfide bonds in proteins, is found to be over-expressed in various pancreatic cancer cell lines and patients. QSOX1 promotes invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by activating MMP-2 and MMP-9. However, its regulatory mechanism remains largely undefined. Methods: Real-time PCR and Western blot were employed to detect the expression of QSOX1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines under hypoxic condition. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays were used to assess the regulation of QSOX1 by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Small interfering RNA (siRNA was applied to knock down endogenous expression of QSOX1. Matrigel-coated invasion chamber essays were conducted to detect the invasion capacity of QSOX1-depleted cells. Results: Both hypoxia and hypoxia mimicking reagent up-regulated the expression of QSOX1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Knockdown of HIF-1α eliminated hypoxia induced QSOX1 expression. HIF-1α was found directly bound to two hypoxia-response elements (HRE of QSOX1 gene, both of which were required for HIF-1 induced QSOX1 expression. Moreover, QSOX1 silencing blocked hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer cells invasion. Conclusion: QSOX1 is a direct target of HIF-1 and may contribute to hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer cells invasion.

  15. Gemcitabine/cannabinoid combination triggers autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadelli, M; Dando, I; Zaniboni, T; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; Scupoli, M T; Scarpa, A; Zappavigna, S; Marra, M; Abbruzzese, A; Bifulco, M; Caraglia, M; Palmieri, M

    2011-01-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM, 2′,2′-difluorodeoxycytidine) is currently used in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with a response rate of cannabinoids. Here, we show that GEM induces both cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptors by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism and that its association with cannabinoids synergistically inhibits pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by single treatments. The antiproliferative synergism is prevented by the radical scavenger N-acetyl--cysteine and by the specific NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7085, demonstrating that the induction of ROS by GEM/cannabinoids and of NF-κB by GEM is required for this effect. In addition, we report that neither apoptotic nor cytostatic mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic cell growth inhibition, which is strictly associated with the enhancement of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Noteworthy, the antiproliferative synergism is stronger in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with GEM-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines. The combined treatment strongly inhibits growth of human pancreatic tumor cells xenografted in nude mice without apparent toxic effects. These findings support a key role of the ROS-dependent activation of an autophagic program in the synergistic growth inhibition induced by GEM/cannabinoid combination in human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:21525939

  16. Tenascin-C enhances pancreatic cancer cell growth and motility and affects cell adhesion through activation of the integrin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Paron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer (PDAC is characterized by an abundant fibrous tissue rich in Tenascin-C (TNC, a large ECM glycoprotein mainly synthesized by pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs. In human pancreatic tissues, TNC expression increases in the progression from low-grade precursor lesions to invasive cancer. Aim of this study was the functional characterization of the effects of TNC on biologic relevant properties of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: Proliferation, migration and adhesion assays were performed on pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with TNC or grown on a TNC-rich matrix. Stable transfectants expressing the large TNC splice variant were generated to test the effects of endogenous TNC. TNC-dependent integrin signaling was investigated by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence and pharmacological inhibition. RESULTS: Endogenous TNC promoted pancreatic cancer cell growth and migration. A TNC-rich matrix also enhanced migration as well as the adhesion to the uncoated growth surface of poorly differentiated cell lines. In contrast, adhesion to fibronectin was significantly decreased in the presence of TNC. The effects of TNC on cell adhesion were paralleled by changes in the activation state of paxillin and Akt. CONCLUSION: TNC affects proliferation, migration and adhesion of poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cell lines and might therefore play a role in PDAC spreading and metastasis in vivo.

  17. A Mini-Review on the Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA on Cerulein-Induced and Hypertriglyceridemic Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Kyung Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis refers to the sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It is associated with premature activation and release of digestive enzymes into the pancreatic interstitium and systemic circulation, resulting in pancreatic tissue autodigestion and multiple organ dysfunction, as well as with increased cytokine production, ultimately leading to deleterious local and systemic effects. Although mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have not been completely elucidated, oxidative stress is regarded as a major risk factor. In human acute pancreatitis, lipid peroxide levels in pancreatic tissues increase. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (C22:6n-3, exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on various cells. Previous studies have shown that DHA activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and induces catalase, which inhibits oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory signaling required for cytokine expression in experimental acute pancreatitis using cerulein. Cerulein, a cholecystokinin analog, induces intra-acinar activation of trypsinogen in the pancreas, which results in human acute pancreatitis-like symptoms. Therefore, DHA supplementation may be beneficial for preventing or inhibiting acute pancreatitis development. Since DHA reduces serum triglyceride levels, addition of DHA to lipid-lowering drugs like statins has been investigated to reduce hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis. However, high DHA concentrations increase cytosolic Ca2+, which activates protein kinase C and may induce hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. In this review, effect of DHA on cerulein-induced and hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis has been discussed. The relation of high concentration of DHA to hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis has been included.

  18. Comparison of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog Expression in Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines and Human Pancreatic Tumor

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    Vahideh Assadollahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genes are involved in the control of stem cell self-renewal as a new class of molecular markers of cancer. Objectives: In this study, the expression of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 in cell lines MIA Paca-2, PA-TU-8902 and AsPC-1 and pancreatic cancer tissue were examined. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, cell lines, MIA Paca-2, PA-TU-8902 and AsPC-1, were cultured in DMEM (Dulbecco’s Modified Eagles Medium and RPMI-1640 (Roswell Park Memorial Institute containing FBS 10% (fetal bovine serum in a 37°C incubator containing Co2 5% and humidity 90%. Samples of tumor and non-cancer pancreatic tumor were purchased Iran tumor bank. Extraction of RNA and synthesis of cDNA was performed. Expression levels of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 were determined using Real-time PCR. The protein expression levels of target genes in the cell lines were studied by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Results: The expression rate of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 is more in the cancer cell lines than those in the control (normal tissue samples. The protein expression levels of target genes in the cell lines were confirmed by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Conclusions: The genes are involved in stem cell self-renewal as a new class of molecular markers of cancer that detected in the pancreatic cell lines. Maybe, these genes play important role in the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells.

  19. A Novel Biosensor for Evaluation of Apoptotic or Necrotic Effects of Nitrogen Dioxide during Acute Pancreatitis in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jacewicz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The direct and accurate estimation of nitric dioxide levels is an extremely laborious and technically demanding procedure in the molecular diagnostics of inflammatory processes. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that a stop-flow technique utilizing a specific spectroscopic biosensor can be used for detection of nanomolar quantities of NO2 in biological milieu. The use of novel compound cis-[Cr(C2O4(AaraNH2(OH22]+ increases NO2 estimation accuracy by slowing down the rate of NO2 uptake. In this study, an animal model of pancreatitis, where nitrosative stress is induced by either 3g/kg bw or 1.5 g/kg bw dose of L-arginine, was used. Biochemical parameters and morphological characteristics of acute pancreatitis were monitored, specifically assessing pancreatic acinar cell death mode, NO2 generation and cellular glutathione level. The severity of the process correlated positively with NO2 levels in pancreatic acinar cell cytosol samples, and negatively with cellular glutathione levels.

  20. Pancreatic β- and α-cell adaptation in response to metabolic changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, Johanne Hendrike (Rianne)

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells are essential to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. β-cells can adapt to an increased insulin demand by enhancing insulin secretion via increased β-cell function and/or increased β-cell mass. Inadequate β-cell adaptation leads to hyperglycemia

  1. Pancreatic islet-cell viability, functionality and oxidative status ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indiscriminate use of antibiotics to combat infectious diseases is one of the commonest forms of misuse of drugs. Antibiotics seem to have a correlation with diabetes and pancreatic function. There are controversial reports about the effect of antibiotics on the pancreatic islets; some suggesting their harmless action, some ...

  2. ( Aquilaria crassna ) essential oils against pancreatic cancer cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignant tumors which remains a rampant killer across the globe. Lack of early diagnosis and toxic drugs have failed to improve the survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients, thus new agents that are safe, available and effective are urgently needed. Objective: The ...

  3. Transformation of Nonfunctioning Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma Cells into Insulin Producing Cells after Treatment with Sunitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hun Ohn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of severe hypoglycemia after sunitinib treatment for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. We describe the initial clinical presentation, laboratory results, pathologic findings, and managment in a patient with a nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma with liver metastases who developed life threatening hypoglycemia after 2 months of sunitinib therapy. A 46-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with loss of consciousness from hypoglycemia. Serum C-peptide and insulin levels at fasting state revealed that the hypoglycemia resulted from endogenous hyperinsulinemia. She had been diagnosed with nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma based on a biopsy of metastatic cervical lymph node and was being treated with sunitinib, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Immunohistochemical stain of the metastatic liver mass demonstrated that the initially nonfunctioning neuroendocrine carcinoma cells had changed into insulin-producing cells after sunitinib therapy. Transarterial chemoembolization of the liver masses and systemic chemotherapy with streptozotocin/adriamycin relieved the hypoglycemia. A nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma was transformed into an insulin-producing tumor after treatment with sunitinib, causing endogenous hyperinsulinemia and severe hypoglycemia.

  4. KIF20A-Mediated RNA Granule Transport System Promotes the Invasiveness of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

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    Keisuke Taniuchi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancers are aggressive because they are highly invasive and highly metastatic; moreover, effective treatments for aggressive pancreatic cancers are lacking. Here, we report that the motor kinesin protein KIF20A promoted the motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through transporting the RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 and IGF2BP3-bound transcripts toward cell protrusions along microtubules. We previously reported that IGF2BP3 and its target transcripts are assembled into cytoplasmic stress granules of pancreatic cancer cells, and that IGF2BP3 promotes the motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through regulation of localized translation of IGF2BP3-bound transcripts in cell protrusions. We show that knockdown of KIF20A inhibited accumulation of IGF2BP3-containing stress granules in cell protrusions and suppressed local protein expression from specific IGF2BP3-bound transcripts, ARF6 and ARHGEF4, in the protrusions. Our results provide insight into the link between regulation of KIF20A-mediated trafficking of IGF2BP3-containing stress granules and modulation of the motility and invasiveness in pancreatic cancers.

  5. Construction of functional pancreatic artificial islet tissue composed of fibroblast-modified polylactic- co-glycolic acid membrane and pancreatic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liping; Tan, Jing; Li, Baoyuan; Xie, Qian; Sun, Junwen; Pu, Hongli; Zhang, Li

    2017-09-01

    Objective To improve the biocompatibility between polylactic- co-glycolic acid membrane and pancreatic stem cells, rat fibroblasts were used to modify the polylactic- co-glycolic acid membrane. Meanwhile, we constructed artificial islet tissue by compound culturing the pancreatic stem cells and the fibroblast-modified polylactic- co-glycolic acid membrane and explored the function of artificial islets in diabetic nude mice. Methods Pancreatic stem cells were cultured on the fibroblast-modified polylactic- co-glycolic acid membrane in dulbecco's modified eagle medium containing activin-A, β-catenin, and exendin-4. The differentiated pancreatic stem cells combined with modified polylactic- co-glycolic acid membrane were implanted subcutaneously in diabetic nude mice. The function of artificial islet tissue was explored by detecting blood levels of glucose and insulin in diabetic nude mice. Moreover, the proliferation and differentiation of pancreatic stem cells on modified polylactic- co-glycolic acid membrane as well as the changes on the tissue structure of artificial islets were investigated by immunofluorescence and haematoxylin and eosin staining. Results The pancreatic stem cells differentiated into islet-like cells and secreted insulin when cultured on fibroblast-modified polylactic- co-glycolic acid membrane. Furthermore, when the artificial islet tissues were implanted into diabetic nude mice, the pancreatic stem cells combined with polylactic- co-glycolic acid membrane modified by fibroblasts proliferated, differentiated, and secreted insulin to reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic nude mice. Conclusion Pancreatic stem cells can be induced to differentiate into islet-like cells in vitro. In vivo, the artificial islet tissue can effectively regulate the blood glucose level in nude mice within a short period. However, as time increased, the structure of the artificial islets was destroyed due to the erosion of blood cells that resulted in the gradual

  6. Role of Biomarkers in Diagnosis and Prognostic Evaluation of Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Susanta; Mishra, Tushar Subhadarshan; Sasmal, Prakash Kumar; Rath, Satyajit; Sharma, Rakesh; Rout, Bikram; Sahu, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life threatening disease. The spectrum of severity of the illness ranges from mild self-limiting disease to a highly fatal severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite intensive research and improved patient care, overall mortality still remains high, reaching up to 30–40% in cases with infected pancreatic necrosis. Although little is known about the exact pathogenesis, it has been widely accepted that premature activation of digestive enzymes within the pancreatic acinar cell is the trigger that leads to autodigestion of pancreatic tissue which is followed by infiltration and activation of leukocytes. Extensive research has been done over the past few decades regarding their role in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of severe acute pancreatitis. Although many standalone biochemical markers have been studied for early assessment of severity, C-reactive protein still remains the most frequently used along with Interleukin-6. In this review we have discussed briefly the pathogenesis and the role of different biochemical markers in the diagnosis and severity evaluation in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26345247

  7. FEATURES OF ISLET-LIKE CLUSTERS GENERATION IN PANCREATIC DUCTAL CELL MOLOLAYER CULTURING

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    L. A. Kirsanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborn rabbit pancreatic cell monolayer was obtained as we described earlier.The cultivated epithelial cells were shown by immunofluorescence to express special ductal marker CK19 and were insulin-and glucagon- negative for 10–15 days. A few fusiforms of nestin-positive cells were found in monolayer. Over 2 weeks in serum-free medium the plaques of epithelial cells became crowded and formed 3-dimentional structures – islet- like clusters. Islet-like clusters contain some insulin- and glucagon-positive cells recognized by immunohysto- chemistry staining. Pancreatic endocrine cell generation in 3-dimentional structures is discussed. 

  8. ATRA mechanically reprograms pancreatic stellate cells to suppress matrix remodelling and inhibit cancer cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Benjamin; Sarper, Muge; Cortes, Ernesto; Auernheimer, Vera; Lachowski, Dariusz; Attwood, Simon; García, Rebeca; Ghassemi, Saba; Fabry, Ben; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with a dismal survival rate. Persistent activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can perturb the biomechanical homoeostasis of the tumour microenvironment to favour cancer cell invasion. Here we report that ATRA, an active metabolite of vitamin A, restores mechanical quiescence in PSCs via a mechanism involving a retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β)-dependent downregulation of actomyosin (MLC-2) contractility. We show that ATRA reduces the ability of PSCs to generate high traction forces and adapt to extracellular mechanical cues (mechanosensing), as well as suppresses force-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling to inhibit local cancer cell invasion in 3D organotypic models. Our findings implicate a RAR-β/MLC-2 pathway in peritumoural stromal remodelling and mechanosensory-driven activation of PSCs, and further suggest that mechanical reprogramming of PSCs with retinoic acid derivatives might be a viable alternative to stromal ablation strategies for the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27600527

  9. Intraislet Pancreatic Ducts Can Give Rise to Insulin-Positive Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gohary, Yousef; Wiersch, John; Tulachan, Sidhartha; Xiao, Xiangwei; Guo, Ping; Rymer, Christopher; Fischbach, Shane; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Gaffar, Iljana; Song, Zewen; Galambos, Csaba; Esni, Farzad; Gittes, George K

    2016-01-01

    A key question in diabetes research is whether new β-cells can be derived from endogenous, nonendocrine cells. The potential for pancreatic ductal cells to convert into β-cells is a highly debated issue. To date, it remains unclear what anatomical process would result in duct-derived cells coming to exist within preexisting islets. We used a whole-mount technique to directly visualize the pancreatic ductal network in young wild-type mice, young humans, and wild-type and transgenic mice after partial pancreatectomy. Pancreatic ductal networks, originating from the main ductal tree, were found to reside deep within islets in young mice and humans but not in mature mice or humans. These networks were also not present in normal adult mice after partial pancreatectomy, but TGF-β receptor mutant mice demonstrated formation of these intraislet duct structures after partial pancreatectomy. Genetic and viral lineage tracings were used to determine whether endocrine cells were derived from pancreatic ducts. Lineage tracing confirmed that pancreatic ductal cells can typically convert into new β-cells in normal young developing mice as well as in adult TGF-β signaling mutant mice after partial pancreatectomy. Here the direct visual evidence of ducts growing into islets, along with lineage tracing, not only represents strong evidence for duct cells giving rise to β-cells in the postnatal pancreas but also importantly implicates TGF-β signaling in this process.

  10. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity.

  11. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-08

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [A Case of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma in the Fat Replacement of the Pancreatic Body and Tail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tameyoshi; Hoshino, Hiromitsu; Yoshimura, Jumpei; Sasamatsu, Shingo; Hiraki, Yoko; Nishi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Katsushu; Kawada, Masahiro; Inoue, Toshiya; Kato, Fumitaka; Amano, Koji; Mikami, Jota; Yamamura, Jun; Makari, Yoichi; Nakata, Ken; Ikeda, Naoki; Kamigaki, Shunji; Tsujie, Masaki; Kimura, Yutaka; Nakata, Yasuki; Munakata, Satoru; Ohzato, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    A 56 year-old woman with obesity (BMI3 2) and diabetes mellitus was diagnosed with right renal cell carcinoma. She underwent right nephrectomy 1 year ago. Seven months after surgery, CT revealed a rapidly growing mass near the spleen. The mass showed slight accumulation of FDG (SUVmax=2.4) on PET-CT. Since the lesion grew rapidly and was not enhanced in the early phase of enhanced CT, we diagnosed pancreatic cancer. Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. The final pathological diagnosis was invasive ductal carcinoma in the fat replacement of the pancreatic body and tail. Postoperatively, the patient had no complications such as pancreatic fistula or aggravation of glucose intolerance. She received postoperative chemotherapy with gemcitabine. Since she developed pulmonary artery thrombosis, postoperative chemotherapy was interrupted after 8 courses. Thirty-two months after the surgery, she was still living without any recurrence. Acinar cells were absent in the fat replacement of the pancreas, but the pancreatic duct cells were still present. There was carcinoma in situ in the main pancreatic duct surrounding chronic inflammation. Fat replacement itself could be potentially precursor of the pancreatic cancer.

  13. Hedgehog signaling antagonist GDC-0449 (Vismodegib inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cell characteristics: molecular mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahma N Singh

    Full Text Available Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies has demonstrated that aberrant reactivation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway regulates genes that promote cellular proliferation in various human cancer stem cells (CSCs. Therefore, the chemotherapeutic agents that inhibit activation of Gli transcription factors have emerged as promising novel therapeutic drugs for pancreatic cancer. GDC-0449 (Vismodegib, orally administrable molecule belonging to the 2-arylpyridine class, inhibits SHH signaling pathway by blocking the activities of Smoothened. The objectives of this study were to examine the molecular mechanisms by which GDC-0449 regulates human pancreatic CSC characteristics in vitro.GDC-0499 inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis in three pancreatic cancer cell lines and pancreatic CSCs. This inhibitor also suppressed cell viability, Gli-DNA binding and transcriptional activities, and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in pancreatic CSCs. GDC-0449-induced apoptosis in CSCs showed increased Fas expression and decreased expression of PDGFRα. Furthermore, Bcl-2 was down-regulated whereas TRAIL-R1/DR4 and TRAIL-R2/DR5 expression was increased following the treatment of CSCs with GDC-0449. Suppression of both Gli1 plus Gli2 by shRNA mimicked the changes in cell viability, spheroid formation, apoptosis and gene expression observed in GDC-0449-treated pancreatic CSCs. Thus, activated Gli genes repress DRs and Fas expressions, up-regulate the expressions of Bcl-2 and PDGFRα and facilitate cell survival.These data suggest that GDC-0499 can be used for the management of pancreatic cancer by targeting pancreatic CSCs.

  14. Targeting anticancer drug delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using a fucose-bound nanoparticle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy.

  15. CUB-domain containing protein 1 represses the epithelial phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Shin; Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-02-15

    The prognosis of pancreatic cancer is dismal due to the frequent metastasis and invasion to surrounding organs. Numerous molecules are involved in the malignant behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, but the entire process remains unclear. Several reports have suggested that CUB-domain containing protein-1 (CDCP1) is highly expressed in pancreatic cancer, but its impact on the invasive growth and the upstream regulator remain elusive. To clarify the role of CDCP1 in pancreatic cancer, we here examined the effects of CDCP1 knockdown on the cell behaviors of pancreatic cancer cells. Knockdown of CDCP1 expression in Panc-1 resulted in reduced cellular migration accompanied by the increased expression of E-cadherin and decreased expression of N-cadherin. Knockdown of CDCP1 attenuated the spheroid formation and resistance against gemcitabine, which are some of the cancer stem cell-related phenotypes. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) was found to induce CDCP1 expression via the extracellular signal regulated kinase pathway, suggesting that CDCP1 has a substantial role in the BMP4-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These results indicate that CDCP1 represses the epithelial phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus enters CHSE-214 cells via macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levican, Jorge; Miranda-Cárdenas, Camila; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Aguayo, Francisco; Gaggero, Aldo; León, Oscar

    2017-06-08

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is a non-enveloped virus belonging to the Birnaviridae family. IPNV produces an acute disease in salmon fingerlings, with high mortality rates and persistent infection in survivors. Although there are reports of IPNV binding to various cells, the viral receptor and entry pathways remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the endocytic pathway that allows for IPNV entry. We observed that IPNV stimulated fluid uptake and virus particles co-localysed with the uptake marker dextran in intracellular compartments, suggesting a role for macropinocytosis in viral entry. Consistent with this idea, viral infection was significantly reduced when the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 was inhibited with 5-(N-Ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA). Neither chlorpromazine nor filipin complex I affected IPNV infection. To examine the role of macropinocytosis regulators, additional inhibitors were tested. Inhibitors of the EGFR pathway and the effectors Pak1, Rac1 and PKC reduced viral infection. Together, our results indicate that IPNV is mainly internalized into CHSE-214 cells by macropinocytosis.

  17. Oxidative stress and NO generation in the rat pancreatitis induced by pancreatic duct ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwalow, Igor; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Atiakshin, Dmitri; Samoilova, Vera; Wolf, Eduard; Boecker, Werner; Tiemann, Katharina

    2017-04-01

    The interaction between nitric oxide (NO) and superoxides is critical in the development of an acute pancreatitis. Previously, we reported that the expression of superoxides and of the NO-generating enzyme (NO synthase, NOS) was up-regulated in the human pancreatitis, especially within the exocrine compartment indicating an exceptional susceptibility of the exocrine parenchyma to oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to compare the regulation of NO signalling pathways in the human pancreatitis and in an animal model of an acute pancreatitis induced by pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) in rats. In the PDL-induced rat pancreatitis, we revealed a similar pattern of oxidative stress and NOS up-regulation in acinar and in ductal compartments, like in the human pancreatitis. This demonstrates that the PDL-induced rat pancreatitis is a proper model for further studies of acute pancreatitis development in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Successful treatment of recurrent pancreatitis secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus with B-cell depletion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musawi, Zakiya S; Nabar, Umesh J

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent pancreatitis secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus is a rare entity of unknown etiology. We report an adolescent with systemic lupus erythematosus and recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis, which were poorly controlled with conventional therapy for approximately four years. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy resulted in remission of symptoms for more than two years without major toxicity of treatment. Based on tolerability and high efficiency of rituximab therapy, we would suggest using B-cell depletion therapy as an alternative therapy for refractory pancreatitis secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus.

  19. Cell-free DNA promoter hypermethylation in plasma as a diagnostic marker for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Stine Dam; Madsen, Poul Henning; Larsen, Anders Christian; Johansen, Martin Berg; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Krarup, Henrik; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a 5-year survival rate of only 5-7%. Difficulties in detecting pancreatic cancer at early stages results in the high mortality and substantiates the need for additional diagnostic tools. Surgery is the only curative treatment and unfortunately only possible in localized tumours. A diagnostic biomarker for pancreatic cancer will have a major impact on patient survival by facilitating early detection and the possibility for curative treatment. DNA promoter hypermethylation is a mechanism of early carcinogenesis, which can cause inactivation of tumour suppressor genes. The aim of this study was to examine promoter hypermethylation in a panel of selected genes from cell-free DNA, as a diagnostic marker for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with suspected or biopsy-verified pancreatic cancer were included prospectively and consecutively. Patients with chronic/acute pancreatitis were included as additional benign control groups. Based on an optimized accelerated bisulfite treatment protocol, methylation-specific PCR of a 28 gene panel was performed on plasma samples. A diagnostic prediction model was developed by multivariable logistic regression analysis using backward stepwise elimination. Patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma ( n  = 95), chronic pancreatitis ( n  = 97) and acute pancreatitis ( n  = 59) and patients screened, but negative for pancreatic adenocarcinoma ( n  = 27), were included. The difference in mean number of methylated genes in the cancer group (8.41 (95% CI 7.62-9.20)) vs the total control group (4.74 (95% CI 4.40-5.08)) was highly significant ( p  diagnostic prediction model (age >65, BMP3 , RASSF1A , BNC1 , MESTv2 , TFPI2 , APC , SFRP1 and SFRP2 ) had an area under the curve of 0.86 (sensitivity 76%, specificity 83%). The model performance was independent of cancer stage. Cell-free DNA promoter hypermethylation has the potential to be a diagnostic marker for pancreatic adenocarcinoma and differentiate

  20. Initial cell seeding density influences pancreatic endocrine development during in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Blair K; Webber, Travis D; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the ability to form cells derived from all three germ layers, and as such have received significant attention as a possible source for insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells for diabetes treatment. While considerable advances have been made in generating hESC-derived insulin-producing cells, to date in vitro-derived glucose-responsive beta-cells have remained an elusive goal. With the objective of increasing the in vitro formation of pancreatic endocrine cells, we examined the effect of varying initial cell seeding density from 1.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) to 5.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) followed by a 21-day pancreatic endocrine differentiation protocol. Low density-seeded cells were found to be biased toward the G2/M phases of the cell cycle and failed to efficiently differentiate into SOX17-CXCR4 co-positive definitive endoderm cells leaving increased numbers of OCT4 positive cells in day 4 cultures. Moderate density cultures effectively formed definitive endoderm and progressed to express PDX1 in approximately 20% of the culture. High density cultures contained approximately double the numbers of PDX1 positive pancreatic progenitor cells and also showed increased expression of MNX1, PTF1a, NGN3, ARX, and PAX4 compared to cultures seeded at moderate density. The cultures seeded at high density displayed increased formation of polyhormonal pancreatic endocrine cell populations co-expressing insulin, glucagon and somatostatin. The maturation process giving rise to these endocrine cell populations followed the expected cascade of pancreatic progenitor marker (PDX1 and MNX1) expression, followed by pancreatic endocrine specification marker expression (BRN4, PAX4, ARX, NEUROD1, NKX6.1 and NKX2.2) and then pancreatic hormone expression (insulin, glucagon and somatostatin). Taken together these data suggest that initial cell seeding density plays an important role in both germ layer specification and pancreatic progenitor commitment, which

  1. Effects of Melatonin and Its Analogues on Pancreatic Inflammation, Enzyme Secretion, and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Jaworek

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is an indoleamine produced from the amino acid l-tryptophan, whereas metabolites of melatonin are known as kynuramines. One of the best-known kynuramines is N1-acetyl-N1-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK. Melatonin has attracted scientific attention as a potent antioxidant and protector of tissue against oxidative stress. l-Tryptophan and kynuramines share common beneficial features with melatonin. Melatonin was originally discovered as a pineal product, has been detected in the gastrointestinal tract, and its receptors have been identified in the pancreas. The role of melatonin in the pancreatic gland is not explained, however several arguments support the opinion that melatonin is probably implicated in the physiology and pathophysiology of the pancreas. (1 Melatonin stimulates pancreatic enzyme secretion through the activation of entero-pancreatic reflex and cholecystokinin (CCK release. l-Tryptophan and AFMK are less effective than melatonin in the stimulation of pancreatic exocrine function; (2 Melatonin is a successful pancreatic protector, which prevents the pancreas from developing of acute pancreatitis and reduces pancreatic damage. This effect is related to its direct and indirect antioxidant action, to the strengthening of immune defense, and to the modulation of apoptosis. Like melatonin, its precursor and AFMK are able to mimic its protective effect, and it is commonly accepted that all these substances create an antioxidant cascade to intensify the pancreatic protection and acinar cells viability; (3 In pancreatic cancer cells, melatonin and AFMK activated a signal transduction pathway for apoptosis and stimulated heat shock proteins. The role of melatonin and AFMK in pancreatic tumorigenesis remains to be elucidated.

  2. Framework for interpretation of trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun; Gao, Feng; Chen, Qingquan; Liu, Qicai; Chen, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NFκB activation is the major inflammatory pathway involved in the occurrence and development of pancreatitis and it can be induced by intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen. Synthesis of trypsinogen occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and ER stress is an important early acinar cell event. Components of ER stress response are known to be able to trigger cell death as well as NFκB signaling cascade. The strongest evidence supporting the trypsin-centered theory is that gene mutations, which lead to the generation of more trypsin, or reduce the activity of trypsin inhibitors or trypsin degradation, are associated with pancreatitis. Thus, trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance may be the first step leading to pancreatic autodigestion and inducing other pathways. Continued experimental studies are necessary to determine the specific relationships between trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis. In this article, we review the latest advances that contributed to the understanding of the basic mechanisms behind the occurrence and development of pancreatitis with a focus on the interpretation of trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and their relationships with other inflammation pathways. We additionally highlight genetic predispositions to pancreatitis and possible mechanisms associated with them.

  3. Framework for Interpretation of Trypsin–antitrypsin Imbalance and Genetic Heterogeneity in Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun; Gao, Feng; Chen, Qingquan; Liu, Qicai; Chen, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NFκB activation is the major inflammatory pathway involved in the occurrence and development of pancreatitis and it can be induced by intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen. Synthesis of trypsinogen occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and ER stress is an important early acinar cell event. Components of ER stress response are known to be able to trigger cell death as well as NFκB signaling cascade. The strongest evidence supporting the trypsin-centered theory is that gene mutations, which lead to the generation of more trypsin, or reduce the activity of trypsin inhibitors or trypsin degradation, are associated with pancreatitis. Thus, trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance may be the first step leading to pancreatic autodigestion and inducing other pathways. Continued experimental studies are necessary to determine the specific relationships between trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis. In this article, we review the latest advances that contributed to the understanding of the basic mechanisms behind the occurrence and development of pancreatitis with a focus on the interpretation of trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and their relationships with other inflammation pathways. We additionally highlight genetic predispositions to pancreatitis and possible mechanisms associated with them. PMID:26228362

  4. ETV4 Facilitates Cell-Cycle Progression in Pancreatic Cells through Transcriptional Regulation of Cyclin D1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Nikhil; Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Azim, Shafquat; Ahmad, Aamir; Al-Ghadhban, Ahmed; Singh, Ajay P; Carter, James E; Wang, Bin; Singh, Seema

    2017-11-08

    The ETS family transcription factor ETV4 is aberrantly expressed in a variety of human tumors and plays an important role in carcinogenesis through upregulation of relevant target gene expression. Here, it is demonstrated that ETV4 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer tissues as compared with the normal pancreas, and is associated with enhanced growth and rapid cell-cycle progression of pancreatic cancer cells. ETV4 expression was silenced through stable expression of a specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (ASPC1 and Colo357), while it was ectopically expressed in BXPC3 cells. Silencing of ETV4 in ASPC1 and Colo357 cells reduced the growth by 55.3% and 38.9%, respectively, while forced expression of ETV4 in BXPC3 cells increased the growth by 46.8% in comparison with respective control cells. Furthermore, ETV4-induced cell growth was facilitated by rapid transition of cells from G1- to S-phase of the cell cycle. Mechanistic studies revealed that ETV4 directly regulates the expression of Cyclin D1 CCND1, a protein crucial for cell-cycle progression from G1- to S-phase. These effects on the growth and cell cycle were reversed by the forced expression of Cyclin D1 in ETV4-silenced pancreatic cancer cells. Altogether, these data provide the first experimental evidence for a functional role of ETV4 in pancreatic cancer growth and cell-cycle progression.Implications: The functional and mechanistic data presented here regarding ETV4 in pancreatic cancer growth and cell-cycle progression suggest that ETV4 could serve as a potential biomarker and novel target for pancreatic cancer therapy. Mol Cancer Res; 1-10. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Inflammatory cells contribute to the generation of an angiogenic phenotype in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, I; Menicagli, M; Funel, N; Bergmann, F; Boggi, U; Mosca, F; Bevilacqua, G; Campani, D

    2004-06-01

    Inflammatory cells contribute to the growth and spread of human malignancies by producing molecules that enhance tumour invasiveness. To characterise the inflammatory infiltrate in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and to analyse its contribution to angiogenesis and its prognostic relevance. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify inflammatory cells and evaluate the expression of proangiogenic and prolymphangiogenic molecules (vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), VEGF-C, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)) by inflammatory and cancer cells in 137 pancreatic cancers. Intratumorous microvessel density (IMD) was assessed using CD34 as an endothelial cell marker. There were significantly more mast cells and macrophages in pancreatic cancers than in normal pancreas and the number of mast cells directly correlated with the presence of lymph node metastases. However, there was no relation between numbers of infiltrating inflammatory cells and the presence of chronic pancreatitis (CP)-like changes in the parenchyma surrounding the tumour. Double immunostaining revealed that both pancreatic mast cells and macrophages express VEGF-A, VEGF-C, and bFGF. These factors were also expressed in the tumour cells in many cases. The numbers of VEGF-A expressing tumour cells and bFGF expressing tumour and inflammatory cells significantly correlated with IMD. Moreover, tumours with higher IMD had higher numbers of infiltrating mast cells and macrophages. Mononuclear inflammatory cells of the non-specific immune response are recruited to pancreatic cancer tissues independent of the presence of CP-like changes, may influence the metastatic capacity of the cancer cells, and may contribute to the development of tumours with high angiogenic activity.

  6. Cannabinoids reduce markers of inflammation and fibrosis in pancreatic stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph W Michalski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While cannabinoids have been shown to ameliorate liver fibrosis, their effects in chronic pancreatitis and on pancreatic stellate cells (PSC are unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The activity of the endocannabinoid system was evaluated in human chronic pancreatitis (CP tissues. In vitro, effects of blockade and activation of cannabinoid receptors on pancreatic stellate cells were characterized. In CP, cannabinoid receptors were detected predominantly in areas with inflammatory changes, stellate cells and nerves. Levels of endocannabinoids were decreased compared with normal pancreas. Cannabinoid-receptor-1 antagonism effectuated a small PSC phenotype and a trend toward increased invasiveness. Activation of cannabinoid receptors, however, induced de-activation of PSC and dose-dependently inhibited growth and decreased IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion as well as fibronectin, collagen1 and alphaSMA levels. De-activation of PSC was partially reversible using a combination of cannabinoid-receptor-1 and -2 antagonists. Concomitantly, cannabinoid receptor activation specifically decreased invasiveness of PSC, MMP-2 secretion and led to changes in PSC phenotype accompanied by a reduction of intracellular stress fibres. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Augmentation of the endocannabinoid system via exogenously administered cannabinoid receptor agonists specifically induces a functionally and metabolically quiescent pancreatic stellate cell phenotype and may thus constitute an option to treat inflammation and fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; López-Acosta, José Francisco; Villa-Pérez, Pablo; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Muñoz-Barrera, Jennifer; Fernández-Luis, Sara; Heras-Pozas, Blanca; Perdomo, Germán; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover functional β-cell mass. We used isolated rat and human islets transduced with adenovirus expressing cyclin C. We measured multiple markers of proliferation: [3H]thymidine incorporation, BrdU incorporation and staining, and Ki67 staining. Furthermore, we detected β-cell death by TUNEL, β-cell differentiation by RT-PCR, and β-cell function by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, we have found that cyclin C increases rat and human β-cell proliferation. This augmented proliferation did not induce β-cell death, dedifferentiation, or dysfunction in rat or human islets. Our results indicate that cyclin C is a potential target for inducing β-cell regeneration. PMID:25564474

  8. Production of Secretory Leucocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI in Human Pancreatic β-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Nyström

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI is a potent inhibitor of granulocyte elastase and cathepsin G, and also an inhibitor of pancreatic enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin and pancreatic elastase. SLPI has also been shown to inhibit HIV-1 infections by blocking viral DNA synthesis. Since SLPI is an inhibitor of pancreatic proteases we wished to investigate whether SLPI was also actually produced in the pancreas. M-RNA from human pancreatic tissue showed evidence of SLPI production using the reverse transcriptase polymer chain reaction technique (RTPCR. Using immunohistochemical methods SLPI was demonstrated in the β-ce1ls of the islets of Langerhans. The function could be local protease/antiprotease regulation or antiviral/antibacterial defence in the close vicinity of the cell surface, or even inside the β-cell itself.

  9. Chloroquine targets pancreatic cancer stem cells via inhibition of CXCR4 and hedgehog signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic, Anamaria; Sørensen, Morten Dræby; Trabulo, Sara Maria

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest carcinomas and is characterized by highly tumorigenic and metastatic cancer stem cells (CSC). CSCs evade available therapies, which preferentially target highly proliferative and more differentiated progenies, leaving behind CSCs...... as a putative source for disease relapse. Thus, to identify potentially more effective treatment regimens, we screened established and new compounds for their ability to eliminate CSCs in primary pancreatic cancer (stem) cells in vitro and corresponding patient-derived pancreatic cancer tissue xenografts...... in vivo. Intriguingly, we found that in vitro treatment with the antimalarial agent chloroquine significantly decreased CSCs, translating into diminished in vivo tumorigenicity and invasiveness in a large panel of pancreatic cancers. In vivo treatment in combination with gemcitabine was capable of more...

  10. The telomerase inhibitor imetelstat depletes cancer stem cells in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Immanual; Tressler, Robert; Bassett, Ekaterina; Harley, Calvin; Buseman, Christen M; Pattamatta, Preeti; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W; Go, Ning F

    2010-11-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are rare drug-resistant cancer cell subsets proposed to be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Telomerase is constitutively active in both bulk tumor cell and CSC populations but has only limited expression in normal tissues. Thus, inhibition of telomerase has been shown to be a viable approach in controlling cancer growth in nonclinical studies and is currently in phase II clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the effects of imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor, on both the bulk cancer cells and putative CSCs. When breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with imetelstat in vitro, telomerase activity in the bulk tumor cells and CSC subpopulations were inhibited. Additionally, imetelstat treatment reduced the CSC fractions present in the breast and pancreatic cell lines. In vitro treatment with imetelstat, but not control oligonucleotides, also reduced the proliferation and self-renewal potential of MCF7 mammospheres and resulted in cell death after telomerase activity expression levels or telomere length of CSCs and bulk tumor cells in these cell lines did not correlate with the increased sensitivity of CSCs to imetelstat, suggesting a mechanism of action independent of telomere shortening for the effects of imetelstat on the CSC subpopulations. Our results suggest that imetelstat-mediated depletion of CSCs may offer an alternative mechanism by which telomerase inhibition may be exploited for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  11. Ski modulate the characteristics of pancreatic cancer stem cells via regulating sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Libin; Chen, Xiangyuan; Gao, Song; Zhang, Chenyue; Qu, Chao; Wang, Peng; Liu, Luming

    2016-10-12

    Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies shows that Ski may act as both a tumor proliferation-promoting factor and a metastatic suppressor in human pancreatic cancer and also may be a therapeutic target of integrative therapies. At present, pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor recurrence accompanied by resistance to conventional therapies. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is found to be aberrantly activated in CSCs. The objectives of this study were to investigate the role of Ski in modulating pancreatic CSCs and to examine the molecular mechanisms involved in pancreatic cancer treatment both in vivo and in vitro. In in vitro study, the results showed that enhanced Ski expression could increase the expression of pluripotency maintaining markers, such as CD24, CD44, Sox-2, and Oct-4, and also components of Shh signaling pathway, such as Shh, Ptch-1, Smo, Gli-1, and Gli-2, whereas depletion of Ski to the contrary. Then, we investigated the underlying mechanism and found that inhibiting Gli-2 expression by short interfering RNA (siRNA) can decrease the effects of Ski on the maintenance of pancreatic CSCs, indicating that Ski mediates the pluripotency of pancreatic CSCs mainly through Shh pathway. The conclusion is that Ski may be an important factor in maintaining the stemness of pancreatic CSCs through modulating Shh pathway.

  12. [Impact of surgery in the management of pancreatic metastases of renal cell cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, J; Saint-Aubert, B; Joly, E; Philippe, C; Quenet, F; Carrere, S; Rouanet, P; Domergue, J

    2014-04-01

    Incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing over the 25 last years. Pancreatic metastases of RCC are rare. The aim of this work was to study overall survival of patients operated for pancreatic metastases of RCC in Montpellier cancer institute. Between 2000 and 2012, a retrospective monocentric study was performed at Montpellier cancer institute. We evaluated the outcomes of curative pancreatic metastases from renal primary and the impact of targeted therapies. Thirty-eight patients were treated in our center for pancreatic metastases of RCC. Twelve patients had a curative surgery of metachronous pancreatic metastases. Four patients were without recurrence after pancreatic resection (33.3%). None had adjuvant therapy. Six patients were treated by targeted therapies, because of metastatic progression. Five of 6 died, the sixth evolved with targeted therapies by thyrosine kinase inhibitor. Average deadline between appearance of metastases and death was 89.9 months for operated patients. Average deadline between appearance of c metastases and death was 33.1 months for the others (P=0.004). Surgical treatment of pancreatic metastases should increase life expectancy of patients. Others studies are necessary to prove the impact of targeted therapies in metastatics patients in this indication. 5. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Association between hypermethylation of DNA repetitive elements in white blood cell DNA and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Rachel E; Clark, Paul J; Fawcett, Jonathan; Fritschi, Lin; Nagler, Belinda N; Risch, Harvey A; Walters, Rhiannon J; Crawford, William J; Webb, Penelope M; Whiteman, David C; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Methylation of DNA may influence risk or be a marker of early disease. The aim of this study was to measure the association between methylation of three DNA repetitive elements in white blood cell (WBC) DNA and pancreatic cancer. DNA from WBCs of pancreatic cancer cases (n=559) and healthy unrelated controls (n=603) were tested for methylation of the LINE-1, Alu and Sat2 DNA repetitive elements using MethyLight quantitative PCR assays. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) between both continuous measures of percent of methylated sample compared to a reference (PMR) or quintiles of PMR and pancreatic cancer, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, BMI, alcohol and higher education, were estimated. The PMR for each of the three markers was higher in cases than in controls, although only LINE-1 was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (OR per log unit=1.37, 95%CI=1.16-1.63). The marker methylation score for all three markers combined was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (p-trend=0.0006). There were no associations between measures of PMR and either presence of metastases, or timing of blood collection in relation to diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy or death (all p>0.1). We observed an association between methylation of LINE-1 in WBC DNA and risk of pancreatic cancer. Further studies are needed to confirm this association. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Chun-You; Yu, Feng; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wu, He-Shui; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Zhou, Feng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To observe whether pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro. METHODS: Rat pancreatic tissue was submitted to digestion by collagenase, ductal epithelial cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation and then cultured in RPMI1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum. After 3-5 passages, the cells were incubated in a six-well plate for 24 h before transfection of recombination plasmid XlHbox8VP16. Lightcycler quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of PDX-1 and insulin mRNA in pancreatic epithelial cells. The expression of PDX-1 and insulin protein was analyzed by Western blotting. Insulin secretion was detected by radioimmunoassay. Insulin-producing cells were detected by dithizone-staining. RESULTS: XlHbox8 mRNA was expressed in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. PDX-1 and insulin mRNA as well as PDX-1 and insulin protein were significantly increased in the transfected group. The production and insulin secretion of insulin-producing cells differentiated from pancreatic ductal epithelial cells were higher than those of the untransfected cells in vitro with a significant difference (1.32 ± 0.43 vs 3.48 ± 0.81, P < 0.01 at 5.6 mmol/L; 4.86 ± 1.15 vs 10.25 ± 1.32, P < 0.01 at 16.7 mmol/L). CONCLUSION: PDX-1 can differentiate rat pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro. In vitro PDX-1 transfection is a valuable strategy for increasing the source of insulin-producing cells. PMID:17876894

  15. Pancreatic Cancer: Molecular Characterization, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira Pelosi; Germana Castelli; Ugo Testa

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death and is the most lethal of common malignancies with a five-year survival rate of <10%. PDAC arises from different types of non-invasive precursor lesions: intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, mucinous cystic neoplasms and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. The genetic landscape of PDAC is characterized by the presence of four frequently-mutated genes: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53 and SMAD4. The dev...

  16. Escin Chemosensitizes Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells and Inhibits the Nuclear Factor-kappaB Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rimmon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is an urgent need to develop new treatment strategies and drugs for pancreatic cancer that is highly resistant to radio-chemotherapy. Aesculus hippocastanum (the horse chestnut known in Chinese medicine as a plant with anti-inflammatory, antiedema, antianalgesic, and antipyretic activities. The main active compound of this plant is Escin (C54H84O23. Objective. To evaluate the effect of Escin alone and combined with chemotherapy on pancreatic cancer cell survival and to unravel mechanism(s of Escin anticancer activity. Methods. Cell survival was measured by XTT colorimetric assay. Synergistic effect of combined therapy was determined by CalcuSyn software. Cell cycle and induction of apoptosis were evaluated by FACS analysis. Expression of NF-κB-related proteins (p65, IκBα, and p-IκBα and cyclin D was evaluated by western blot analysis. Results. Escin decreased the survival of pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 = 10–20 M. Escin combined with gemcitabine showed only additive effect, while its combination with cisplatin resulted in a significant synergistic cytotoxic effect in Panc-1 cells. High concentrations of Escin induced apoptosis and decreased NF-κB-related proteins and cyclin D expression. Conclusions. Escin decreased pancreatic cancer cell survival, induced apoptosis, and downregulated NF-κB signaling pathway. Moreover, Escin sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy. Further translational research is required.

  17. Bovine seminal ribonuclease triggers Beclin1-mediated autophagic cell death in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Claudia; Gotte, Giovanni; Donnarumma, Federica; Picone, Delia; Donadelli, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    Among the large number of variants belonging to the pancreatic-type secretory ribonuclease (RNase) superfamily, bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) is the proto-type and bovine seminal RNase (BS-RNase) represents the unique natively dimeric member. In the present manuscript, we evaluate the anti-tumoral property of these RNases in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines and in nontumorigenic cells as normal control. We demonstrate that BS-RNase stimulates a strong anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect in cancer cells, while RNase A is largely ineffective. Notably, we reveal for the first time that BS-RNase triggers Beclin1-mediated autophagic cancer cell death, providing evidences that high proliferation rate of cancer cells may render them more susceptible to autophagy by BS-RNase treatment. Notably, to improve the autophagic response of cancer cells to BS-RNase we used two different strategies: the more basic (as compared to WT enzyme) G38K mutant of BS-RNase, known to interact more strongly than wt with the acidic membrane of cancer cells, or BS-RNase oligomerization (tetramerization or formation of larger oligomers). Both mutant BS-RNase and BS-RNase oligomers potentiated autophagic cell death as compared to WT native dimer of BS-RNase, while the various RNase A oligomers remained completely ineffective. Altogether, our results shed more light on the mechanisms lying at the basis of BS-RNase antiproliferative effect in cancer cells, and support its potential use to develop new anti-cancer strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ethanol and the tobacco-specific carcinogen, NNK, contribute to signaling in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Minoo D F; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Cekanova, Maria; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2006-07-01

    Smoking is a well-documented risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The tobacco-specific nitrosamine, NNK (4-[methylnitrosamino]-1-[3-pyridyl]-1-butanone), significantly induces pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas in laboratory rodents. Recent observations suggest that ethanol enhances the tumorigenic effects of smoking. Ethanol consumption is associated with the development of chronic pancreatitis, also considered a predisposing factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Because the precise role of ethanol in pancreatic carcinogenesis is not known, this study sought to elucidate the cumulative effects of ethanol and NNK on particular signal transduction pathways that might play a role in cell proliferation in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. The HPDE6-c7 cells are developed from pancreatic duct epithelial cells, which are the putative cells of origin of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Cell proliferation assays, Western blot, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate assays were used to demonstrate the effects of ethanol and NNK treatments on these cells. Ethanol cotreatments enhanced the NNK-induced proliferation of these cells. This response was inhibited by the adenylyl cyclase, protein kinase A, mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42/p44), and epidermal growth factor receptor-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cotreatments of NNK and ethanol also increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation, cAMP response element-binding family of proteins and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, and protein kinase A activation. These findings suggest a potential role for these pathways contributing to the development of smoking- and alcohol-related pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  19. Present and future cell therapies for pancreatic beta cell replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Ricordi, Camillo

    2012-12-21

    If only at a small scale, islet transplantation has successfully addressed what ought to be the primary endpoint of any cell therapy: the functional replenishment of damaged tissue in patients. After years of less-than-optimal approaches to immunosuppression, recent advances consistently yield long-term graft survival rates comparable to those of whole pancreas transplantation. Limited organ availability is the main hurdle that stands in the way of the widespread clinical utilization of this pioneering intervention. Progress in stem cell research over the past decade, coupled with our decades-long experience with islet transplantation, is shaping the future of cell therapies for the treatment of diabetes. Here we review the most promising avenues of research aimed at generating an inexhaustible supply of insulin-producing cells for islet regeneration, including the differentiation of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells of embryonic and adult origin along the beta cell lineage and the direct reprogramming of non-endocrine tissues into insulin-producing cells.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. MiR-200a inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of pancreatic cancer stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuhua; Lu, Jingjing; Li, Xiaohong; Zhu, Hui; Fan, Xiangjun; Zhu, Shajun; Wang, Yao; Guo, Qingsong; Wang, Lei; Huang, Yan; Zhu, Mingyan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-02-12

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers, and the aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer is in part due to its intrinsic and extrinsic drug resistance characteristics, which are also associated with the acquisition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Increasing evidence suggests that EMT-type cells share many biological characteristics with cancer stem-like cells. And miR-200 has been identified as a powerful regulator of EMT. Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) of human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 were processed for CD24, CD44 and ESA multi-colorstaining, and sorted out on a BD FACS Aria II machine. RT-qPCR was performed using the miScript PCR Kit to assay the expression of miR-200 family. In order to find the role of miR-200a in the process of EMT, miR-200a mimic was transfected to CSCs. Pancreatic cancer cells with EMT phenotype displayed stem-like cell features characterized by the expression of cell surface markers CD24, CD44 and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA), which was associated with decreased expression of miR-200a. Moreover, overexpression of miR-200a was resulted in down-regulation of N-cadherin, ZEB1 and vimentin, but up-regulation of E-cadherin. In addition, miR-200a overexpression inhibited cell migration and invasion in CSCs. In our study, we found that miR-200a played an important role in linking the characteristics of cancer stem-like cells with EMT-like cell signatures in pancreatic cancer. Selective elimination of cancer stem-like cells by reversing the EMT phenotype to mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) phenotype using novel agents would be useful for prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass and proliferation by SOCS-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, K; Rønn, S G; Tornehave, D

    2005-01-01

    Growth hormone and prolactin are important growth factors for pancreatic beta-cells. The effects exerted by these hormones on proliferation and on insulin synthesis and secretion in beta-cells are largely mediated through the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (ST......-type littermates following an oral glucose-tolerance test. Together these data suggest that SOCS-3 modulates cytokine signaling in pancreatic beta-cells and therefore potentially could be a candidate target for development of new treatment strategies for diabetes.......Growth hormone and prolactin are important growth factors for pancreatic beta-cells. The effects exerted by these hormones on proliferation and on insulin synthesis and secretion in beta-cells are largely mediated through the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT...

  6. An imidazoline compound completely counteracts interleukin-1[beta] toxic effects to rat pancreatic islet [beta] cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Pisanti, Francesco A

    2002-01-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that interleukin (IL)-1beta decreases insulin and DNA contents in pancreatic islet beta cells, causing structural damage, that it is toxic to cultured human islet beta cells and that it is able to induce apoptosis in these cells....

  7. Towards consistent generation of pancreatic lineage progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostovskaya, Maria; Bredenkamp, Nicholas; Smith, Austin

    2015-10-19

    Human pluripotent stem cells can in principle be used as a source of any differentiated cell type for disease modelling, drug screening, toxicology testing or cell replacement therapy. Type I diabetes is considered a major target for stem cell applications due to the shortage of primary human beta cells. Several protocols have been reported for generating pancreatic progenitors by in vitro differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. Here we first assessed one of these protocols on a panel of pluripotent stem cell lines for capacity to engender glucose sensitive insulin-producing cells after engraftment in immunocompromised mice. We observed variable outcomes with only one cell line showing a low level of glucose response. We, therefore, undertook a systematic comparison of different methods for inducing definitive endoderm and subsequently pancreatic differentiation. Of several protocols tested, we identified a combined approach that robustly generated pancreatic progenitors in vitro from both embryo-derived and induced pluripotent stem cells. These findings suggest that, although there are intrinsic differences in lineage specification propensity between pluripotent stem cell lines, optimal differentiation procedures may consistently direct a substantial fraction of cells into pancreatic specification. © 2015 The Authors.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of cellular galectin-3 reveals no consistent oncogenic function in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Hann

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a 31 kDa member of the family of beta-galactoside-binding proteins, has been implicated in the progression of different human cancers. However, the proposed roles differ widely, ranging from tumor-promoting cellular functions and negative impact on patient prognosis to tumor-suppressive properties and positive prognostic impact. We and others have previously identified Gal-3 as overexpressed in pancreatic cancer as compared to chronic pancreatitis and normal pancreatic tissue. The purpose of this study was thus the comprehensive analysis of putative cellular functions of Gal-3 by transient as well as stable silencing or overexpression of Gal-3 in a panel of 6 well-established pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our results confirm that galectin-3 is upregulated at the mRNA level in pancreatic cancer and strongly expressed in the majority of pancreatic cancer cell lines. In individual cell lines, transient knockdown of Gal-3 expression resulted in moderate inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration or anchorage-independent growth of the cells, but these effects were not consistent across the spectrum of analyzed cell lines. Moreover, functional effects of the modulation of Gal-3 expression were not observed in stable knockdown or overexpression approaches in vitro and did not alter the growth characteristics of nude mouse xenograft tumors in vivo. Our data thus do not support a direct functional role of Gal-3 in the malignant transformation of pancreatic epithelial cells, although paracrine or systemic effects of Gal-3 expression are not excluded.

  9. A small molecule inhibitor of NFκB blocks ER stress and the NLRP3 inflammasome and prevents progression of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanak, Mazhar A; Shahbazov, Rauf; Yoshimatsu, Gumpei; Levy, Marlon F; Lawrence, Michael C; Naziruddin, Bashoo

    2017-03-01

    The underlying molecular mechanism that leads to development of chronic pancreatitis remains elusive. The aim of this study is to understand the downstream inflammatory signaling involved in progression of chronic pancreatitis, and to use withaferin A (WA), a small molecule inhibitor of nuclear factor κB (NFκB), to prevent progression of chronic pancreatitis. Two different protocols were used to induce pancreatitis in mice: standard and stringent administration of cerulein. The severity of pancreatitis was assessed by means of pancreatic histology and serum amylase levels. Immunohistochemistry and flow-cytometric analysis was performed to visualize immune cell infiltration into the pancreas. Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to analyze the downstream signaling mechanism involved in the development of chronic pancreatitis. The severity of cerulein-induced pancreatitis was reduced significantly by WA, used as either preventive or curative treatment. Immune cell infiltration into the pancreas and acinar cell death were efficiently reduced by WA treatment. Expression of proinflammatory and proapoptotic genes regulated by NFκB activation was increased by cerulein treatment, and WA suppressed these genes significantly. Sustained endoplasmic reticulum stress activation by cerulein administration was reduced. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in cerulein-induced pancreatitis was identified, and this was also potently blocked by WA. The human pancreatitis tissue gene signature correlated with the mouse model. Our data provide evidence for the role of NFκB in the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis, and strongly suggest that WA could be used as a potential therapeutic drug to alleviate some forms of chronic pancreatitis.

  10. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Capsaicin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengzhang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, main pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, has been shown to have anticarcinogenic effect on various cancer cells through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of capsaicin on human pancreatic cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. In vitro, treatment of both the pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and SW1990 with capsaicin resulted in cells growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, a marker of the endoplasmic-reticulum-stress- (ERS- mediated apoptosis pathway, by specific siRNA attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis both in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. Moreover, in vivo studies capsaicin effectively inhibited the growth and metabolism of pancreatic cancer and prolonged the survival time of pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor-induced mice. Furthermore, capsaicin increased the expression of some key ERS markers, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, phosphoprotein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (phosphoPERK, and phosphoeukaryotic initiation factor-2α (phospho-eIF2α, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 and GADD153 in tumor tissues. In conclusion, we for the first time provide important evidence to support the involvement of ERS in the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by capsaicin.

  11. CNT1 expression influences proliferation and chemosensitivity in drug-resistant pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Hung, Sau Wai; Patel, Bhavi; Lovin, Dylan; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2011-01-01

    Overcoming the inherent chemoresistance of pancreatic cancers remains a major goal of therapeutic investigations in this disease. In this study, we discovered a role for the human concentrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hCNT1; SLC28A1), a high-affinity pyrimidine nucleoside transporter, in determining the chemosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, the drug used presently as a standard of care. Compared with normal pancreas and pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, hCNT1 expression was frequently reduced in pancreatic tumors and tumor cell lines. In addition, hCNT1-mediated 3H-gemcitabine transport was lower in pancreatic cancer cell lines and correlated with cytotoxic IC50 estimations of gemcitabine. In contrast to gemcitabine-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines, MIA PaCa-2, a gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cell line exhibited relatively restrictive, cell cycle-dependent hCNT1 expression and transport. hCNT1 translation was suppressed in the late G1-enriched MIA PaCa-2 cell population possibly in an miRNA-dependent manner, which corresponded with the lowest hCNT1-mediated gemcitabine transport during this phase. While hCNT1 protein was induced during G1/S transition, increased hCNT1 trafficking resulted in maximal cell surface recruitment and transport-overshoot in the G2/M phase-enriched cell population. hCNT1 protein was directed predominantly to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation in S or G2/M phase MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Pharmacological inhibition of hCNT1 degradation moderately increased cell surface hCNT1 expression and cellular gemcitabine transport in MIA PaCa-2 cells. Constitutive hCNT1 expression reduced clonogenic survival of MIA PaCa-2 cells and steeply augmented gemcitabine transport and chemosensitization. In addition to supporting a putative tumor suppressor role for hCNT1, our findings identify hCNT1 as a potential candidate to render drug-resistant pancreatic cancer cells amenable to chemotherapy. PMID

  12. Protease-activated receptor 2 agonist increases cell proliferation and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIE, LIQUN; DUAN, ZEXING; LIU, CAIJU; ZHENG, YANMIN; ZHOU, JING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the expression of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) in the human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990, and to evaluate its effect on cell proliferation and invasion. The expression of PAR-2 protein and mRNA in SW1990 cells was determined by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. MTT and cell invasion and migration assays, as well as semi-quantitative PCR and zymography analysis, were additionally performed. PAR-2 mRNA was significantly upregulated in the cells treated with trypsin or the PAR-2 activating peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Lys-Val (SLIGKV) (P0.05). Trypsin and SLIGKV significantly promoted SW1990 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, trypsin and SLIGKV significantly increased the mRNA expression (P<0.01) and gelatinolytic activity (P<0.01) of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. In conclusion, PAR-2 is expressed in SW1990 cells. PAR-2 activation may promote the invasion and migration of human pancreatic cancer cells by increasing MMP-2 expression. PMID:25452809

  13. Signals in the pancreatic islet microenvironment influence β-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, Kristie I; Powers, Alvin C

    2017-09-01

    The progressive loss of pancreatic β-cell mass that occurs in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is a primary factor driving efforts to identify strategies for effectively increasing, enhancing or restoring β-cell mass. While factors that seem to influence β-cell proliferation in specific contexts have been described, reliable stimulation of human β-cell proliferation has remained a challenge. Importantly, β-cells exist in the context of a complex, integrated pancreatic islet microenvironment where they interact with other endocrine cells, vascular endothelial cells, extracellular matrix, neuronal projections and islet macrophages. This review highlights different components of the pancreatic microenvironment, and reviews what is known about how signaling that occurs between β-cells and these other components influences β-cell proliferation. Future efforts to further define the role of the pancreatic islet microenvironment on β-cell proliferation may lead to the development of successful approaches to increase or restore β-cell mass in diabetes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Knowledge Gaps in Rodent Pancreas Biology: Taking Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Beta Cells into Our Own Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Munirah Mohamad; Low, Blaise Su Jun; Pek, Nicole Min Qian; Teo, Adrian Kee Keong

    2015-01-01

    In the field of stem cell biology and diabetes, we and others seek to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells for disease modeling and cell replacement therapy. Traditionally, knowledge gathered from rodents is extended to human pancreas developmental biology research involving human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). While much has been learnt from rodent pancreas biology in the early steps toward Pdx1(+) pancreatic progenitors, much less is known about the transition toward Ngn3(+) pancreatic endocrine progenitors. Essentially, the later steps of pancreatic β cell development and maturation remain elusive to date. As a result, the most recent advances in the stem cell and diabetes field have relied upon combinatorial testing of numerous growth factors and chemical compounds in an arbitrary trial-and-error fashion to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells from hPSCs. Although this hit-or-miss approach appears to have made some headway in maturing human pancreatic β cells in vitro, its underlying biology is vaguely understood. Therefore, in this mini-review, we discuss some of these late-stage signaling pathways that are involved in human pancreatic β cell differentiation and highlight our current understanding of their relevance in rodent pancreas biology. Our efforts here unravel several novel signaling pathways that can be further studied to shed light on unexplored aspects of rodent pancreas biology. New investigations into these signaling pathways are expected to advance our knowledge in human pancreas developmental biology and to aid in the translation of stem cell biology in the context of diabetes treatments.

  15. Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Cell Cycle Effects for Gemcitabine and Trabectedin Combinations in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xin; Koch, Gilbert; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Straubinger, Robert M.; Jusko, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Combinations of gemcitabine and trabectedin exert modest synergistic cytotoxic effects on two pancreatic cancer cell lines. Here, systems pharmacodynamic (PD) models that integrate cellular response data and extend a prototype model framework were developed to characterize dynamic changes in cell cycle phases of cancer cell subpopulations in response to gemcitabine and trabectedin as single agents and in combination. Extensive experimental data were obtained for two pancreatic cancer cell lines (MiaPaCa-2 and BxPC-3), including cell proliferation rates over 0–120 h of drug exposure, and the fraction of cells in different cell cycle phases or apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that gemcitabine induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, and trabectedin induced transient cell cycle arrest in S phase that progressed to G2/M phase. Over time, cells in the control group accumulated in G0/G1 phase. Systems cell cycle models were developed based on observed mechanisms and were used to characterize both cell proliferation and cell numbers in the sub G1, G0/G1, S, and G2/M phases in the control and drug-treated groups. The proposed mathematical models captured well both single and joint effects of gemcitabine and trabectedin. Interaction parameters were applied to quantify unexplainable drug-drug interaction effects on cell cycle arrest in S phase and in inducing apoptosis. The developed models were able to identify and quantify the different underlying interactions between gemcitabine and trabectedin, and captured well our large datasets in the dimensions of time, drug concentrations, and cellular subpopulations. PMID:27895579

  16. Solanine Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Solanine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongwei; Lv, Chongqing; Yang, Longlong; Wang, Yingxiu; Zhang, Qingshun; Yu, Suhui; Kong, Hongru; Wang, Meng; Xie, Jianming; Zhang, Chunwu; Zhou, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP) by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Phycocyanin Inhibits Tumorigenic Potential of Pancreatic Cancer Cells: Role of Apoptosis and Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Gaoyong; Gao, Bing; Gao, Yingnv; Yang, Xuegan; Cheng, Xiaodong; Ou, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most lethal human malignancies, and unresponsive to current chemotherapies. Here we investigate the therapeutic potential of phycocyanin as an anti-PDA agent in vivo and in vitro. Phycocyanin, a natural product purified from Spirulina, effectively inhibits the pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. Phycocyanin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptotic and autophagic cell death in PANC-1 cells. Inhibition of autophagy by targeting Beclin 1 using siRNA significantly suppresses cell growth inhibition and death induced by phycocyanin, whereas inhibition of both autophagy and apoptosis rescues phycocyanin-mediated cell death. Mechanistically, cell death induced by phycocyanin is the result of cross-talk among the MAPK, Akt/mTOR/p70S6K and NF-κB pathways. Phycocyanin is able to induce apoptosis of PANC-1 cell by activating p38 and JNK signaling pathways while inhibiting Erk pathway. On the other hand, phycocyanin promotes autophagic cell death by inhibiting PI3/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, phycocyanin promotes the activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which plays an important role in balancing phycocyanin-mediated apoptosis and autosis. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that phycocyanin exerts anti-pancreatic cancer activity by inducing apoptotic and autophagic cell death, thereby identifying phycocyanin as a promising anti-pancreatic cancer agent. PMID:27694919

  19. New insights in the composition of extracellular vesicles from pancreatic cancer cells: implications for biomarkers and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Scory, Susanne; Tehrani, Mahnaz Moradian; Eilert-Micus, Christina; Adamczyk, Kamila A; Wojtalewicz, Nathalie; Schnölzer, Martina; Hahn, Stephan A; Schmiegel, Wolff; Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer development is associated with characteristic alterations like desmoplastic reaction and immune escape which are mediated by the cell-cell communication mechanism and by the microenvironment of the cells. The whole of released components are important determinants in these processes. Especially the extracellular vesicles released by pancreatic cancer cells play a role in cell communication and modulate cell growth and immune responses. Here, we present the proteomic description of affinity purified extracellular vesicles from pancreatic tumour cells, compared to the secretome, defined as the whole of the proteins released by pancreatic cancer cells. The proteomic data provide comprehensive catalogues of hundreds of proteins, and the comparison reveals a special proteomic composition of pancreatic cancer cell derived extracellular vesicles. The functional analysis of the protein composition displayed that membrane proteins, glycoproteins, small GTP binding proteins and a further, heterogeneous group of proteins are enriched in vesicles, whereas proteins derived from proteasomes and ribosomes, as well as metabolic enzymes, are not components of the vesicles. Furthermore proteins playing a role in carcinogenesis and modulators of the extracellular matrix (ECM) or cell-cell interactions are components of affinity purified extracellular vesicles. The data deepen the knowledge of extracellular vesicle composition by hundreds of proteins that have not been previously described as vesicle components released by pancreatic cancer cells. Extracellular vesicles derived from pancreatic cancer cells show common proteins shared with other vesicles as well as cell type specific proteins indicating biomarker candidates and suggesting functional roles in cancer cell stroma interactions.

  20. Histone deacetylase inhibitor MGCD0103 synergizes with gemcitabine in human pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Victoria; Richard, Normand; Brady, Helen; Maier, Armin; Kelter, Gerhard; Heise, Carla

    2011-06-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a group of recently developed compounds that modulate cell growth and survival. We evaluated the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MGCD0103 on growth of pancreatic carcinoma models following single agent treatment and in combination with gemcitabine. MGCD0103 inhibited tumor cell growth and acted synergistically with gemcitabine to enhance its cytotoxic effects. Gene expression analysis identified the cell cycle pathway as one of the most highly modulated gene groups. Our data suggest that MGCD0103 + gemcitabine might be an effective treatment for gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic cancer. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  1. Conditioned media trans-differentiate mature fibroblasts into pancreatic beta-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Shumaila; Khan, Irfan; Naeem, Nadia; Iqbal, Hana'a; Ali, Anwar; Usman, Sehrish; Salim, Asmat

    2016-11-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the role of preconditioning strategies on the trans-differentiation of mature fibroblasts (NIH3T3 cells) into insulin producing β-cells. The NIH3T3 cells were treated with dexamethasone (5μM) and pancreatic extract (0.05 and 0.4mg/mL) separately or in combination. The treated cells were analyzed for the morphological changes, and expression of pancreatic genes and proteins by phase contrast microscopy, RT-PCR and flow cytometry/immunocytochemistry, respectively. Treatment of mature fibroblasts with different combinations of dexamethasone and pancreatic extract in the form of conditioned media resulted in comparable morphological changes and expression of certain pancreatic genes and proteins; however, their expression varied with each treatment. Most prominent effect was observed in case of combined treatment which resulted in significant increase (p<0.001) in gene expression levels of insulin, MafA, and Ngn3. Variable pattern was observed in insulin, MafA, Ngn3 and Sca1 expressions at the protein level. It is concluded from this study that preconditioning of NIH3T3 cells with conditioned media containing different combinations of dexamethasone and pancreatic extract can induce trans-differentiation of these cells into pancreatic β-like cells. The conditioned media however, need to be optimized. The study may offer the possibility of improved regeneration of mature cell type that could serve as a future therapeutic option for diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Protective Effect of Pretreatment with Acenocoumarol in Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Sendur, Paweł; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Olszanecki, Rafał; Tomaszewska, Romana; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation is recognized as a key player in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The aim of the current research was to examine the effect of pretreatment with acenocoumarol on the development of acute pancreatitis (AP) evoked by cerulein. Methods: AP was induced in rats by cerulein administered intraperitoneally. Acenocoumarol (50, 100 or 150 µg/kg/dose/day) or saline were given once daily for seven days before AP induction. Results: In rats with AP, pretreatment with acenocoumarol administered at the dose of 50 or 100 µg/kg/dose/day improved pancreatic histology, reducing the degree of edema and inflammatory infiltration, and vacuolization of acinar cells. Moreover, pretreatment with acenocoumarol given at the dose of 50 or 100 µg/kg/dose/day reduced the AP-evoked increase in pancreatic weight, serum activity of amylase and lipase, and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β, as well as ameliorated pancreatic DNA synthesis and pancreatic blood flow. In contrast, acenocoumarol given at the dose of 150 μg/kg/dose did not exhibit any protective effect against cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Conclusion: Low doses of acenocoumarol, given before induction of AP by cerulein, inhibit the development of that inflammation. PMID:27754317

  3. TRAIL-engineered pancreas-derived mesenchymal stem cells: characterization and cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniri, M R; Sun, X-Y; Rayat, J; Dai, D; Ao, Z; He, Z; Verchere, C B; Dai, L-J; Warnock, G L

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted great interest in cancer therapy owing to their tumor-oriented homing capacity and the feasibility of autologous transplantation. Currently, pancreatic cancer patients face a very poor prognosis, primarily due to the lack of therapeutic strategies with an effective degree of specificity. Anticancer gene-engineered MSCs specifically target tumor sites and can produce anticancer agents locally and constantly. This study was performed to characterize pancreas-derived MSCs and investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-engineered MSCs on pancreatic cancer cells under different culture conditions. Pancreas-derived MSCs exhibited positive expression on CD44, CD73, CD95, CD105, negative on CD34 and differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic cells. TRAIL expression was assessed by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis. Different patterns of TRAIL receptor expression were observed on the pancreatic cancer cell lines, including PANC1, HP62, ASPC1, TRM6 and BXPC3. Cell viability was assessed using a real-time monitoring system. Pancreatic cancer cell death was proportionally related to conditioned media from MSC(nsTRAIL) and MSC(stTRAIL). The results suggest that MSCs exhibit intrinsic inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells and that this effect can be potentiated by TRAIL-transfection on death receptor-bearing cell types.

  4. FTIR Spectroscopic and Molecular Analysis during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Pancreatic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Perez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Some of the greatest challenges in stem cells (SCs) biology and regenerative medicine are differentiation control of SCs and ensuring the purity of differentiated cells. In this work, we differentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) toward pancreatic cells characterizing this differentiation process by molecular and spectroscopic technics. Both mPSCs and Differentiated Pancreatic Cells (DPCs) were subjected to a genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical analysis by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cultured mPCSs expressed pluripotent genes and proteins (Nanog and SOX2). DPCs expressed endodermal genes (SOX17 and Pdx1) at day 11, an inductor gene of embryonic pancreas development (Pdx1) at day 17 and pancreas genes and proteins (Insulin and Glucagon) at day 21 of differentiation. Likewise, FTIR spectra of mPSCs and DPCs at different maturation stages (11, 17, and 21 days) were obtained and showed absorption bands related with different types of biomolecules. These FTIR spectra exhibited significant spectral changes agreeing with the differentiation process, particularly in proteins and nucleic acids bands. In conclusion, the obtained DPCs passed through the chronological stages of embryonic pancreas development and FTIR spectra provide a new biophysical parameter based on molecular markers indicating the differentiation process of mPSCs to specialized cells. PMID:27651798

  5. Eriocalyxin B induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through caspase- and p53-dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lin [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Yue, Grace G.L. [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lau, Clara B.S. [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Sun, Handong [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, CAS, Yunnan (China); Fung, Kwok Pui [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Leung, Ping Chung [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Han, Quanbin, E-mail: simonhan@hkbu.edu.hk [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); School of Chinese Medicine, The Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China); Leung, Po Sing, E-mail: psleung@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2012-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early and responds poorly to chemotherapy. A breakthrough in the development of new therapeutic agents is urgently needed. Eriocalyxin B (EriB), isolated from the Isodon eriocalyx plant, is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid with promise as a broad-spectrum anti-cancer agent. The anti-leukemic activity of EriB, including the underlying mechanisms involved, has been particularly well documented. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time EriB's potent cytotoxicity against four pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely PANC-1, SW1990, CAPAN-1, and CAPAN-2. The effects were comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CAM), but with much lower toxicity against normal human liver WRL68 cells. EriB's cytoxicity against CAPAN-2 cells was found to involve caspase-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Moreover, the p53 pathway was found to be activated by EriB in these cells. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that EriB inhibited the growth of human pancreatic tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice without significant secondary adverse effects. These results suggest that EriB should be considered a candidate for pancreatic cancer treatment. -- Highlights: ► We study Eriocalyxin B (EriB)'s cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cell lines. ► EriB inhibits cell proliferation via mediation of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. ► The effects are involved in caspase-dependent apoptosis and p53 pathway. ► In vivo study also shows EriB inhibits the growth of human pancreatic tumor. ► EriB can be a good candidate for chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  6. The use of β-cell transcription factors in engineering artificial β cells from non-pancreatic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, D; Martiniello-Wilks, R; O'Brien, B A; Simpson, A M

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta (β) cells. Patients with type 1 diabetes control their blood glucose levels using several daily injections of exogenous insulin; however, this does not eliminate the long-term complications of hyperglycaemia. Currently, the only clinically viable treatments for type 1 diabetes are whole pancreas and islet transplantation. As a result, there is an urgent need to develop alternative therapies. Recently, cell and gene therapy have shown promise as a potential cure for type 1 diabetes through the genetic engineering of 'artificial' β cells to regulate blood glucose levels without adverse side effects and the need for immunosuppression. This review compares putative target cells and the use of pancreatic transcription factors for gene modification, with the ultimate goal of engineering a glucose-responsive 'artificial' β cell that mimics the function of pancreatic β cells, while avoiding autoimmune destruction.

  7. Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) redistribution is involved in the regulation of cell dissociation in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Egami, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Shinji; Kurizaki, Takashi; Hirota, Masahiko; Ogawa, Michio

    2005-08-01

    In our previous study, dissociation factor (DF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) were isolated as factors relating to cancer cell dissociation in pancreatic cancer cells. On the other hand, tight junction protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) has been indicated to be involved in carcinogenesis. In this study, the expression of ZO-1 and a downstream kinase of MEK2, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2), was analyzed to clarify the regulatory mechanism of cell dissociation in pancreatic cancer cells. Two hamster (PC-1.0 and PC-1) and two human (AsPC-1 and CAPAN-2) pancreatic cancer cell lines were used. Immunocytochemical study was performed using anti-ZO-1, ERK2, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) antibodies. DF treatment obviously disrupted ZO-1 expression at the sites of cell-cell contact and markedly induced ERK2 and p-ERK1/2 expression, as well as the dissociation of cell clones in PC-1 and CAPAN-2 cells. In contrast, U0126 (a MEK1/2 inhibitor) treatment significantly induced the peripheral distribution of ZO-1 as well as cell aggregation in PC-1.0 and AsPC-1 cells, which usually grew as single cells, but seriously suppressed ERK2 and p-ERK1/2 expression. We conclude that redistribution of ZO-1 is closely correlated with cell dissociation status in pancreatic cancer cells through activation of ERK2.

  8. Sonic hedgehog signaling inhibition provides opportunities for targeted therapy by sulforaphane in regulating pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rodova

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway has been associated with cancer stem cells (CSC and implicated in the initiation of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic CSCs are rare tumor cells characterized by their ability to self-renew, and are responsible for tumor recurrence accompanied by resistance to current therapies. The lethality of these incurable, aggressive and invasive pancreatic tumors remains a daunting clinical challenge. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of Shh pathway in pancreatic cancer and to examine the molecular mechanisms by which sulforaphane (SFN, an active compound in cruciferous vegetables, inhibits self-renewal capacity of human pancreatic CSCs. Interestingly, we demonstrate here that Shh pathway is highly activated in pancreatic CSCs and plays important role in maintaining stemness by regulating the expression of stemness genes. Given the requirement for Hedgehog in pancreatic cancer, we investigated whether hedgehog blockade by SFN could target the stem cell population in pancreatic cancer. In an in vitro model, human pancreatic CSCs derived spheres were significantly inhibited on treatment with SFN, suggesting the clonogenic depletion of the CSCs. Interestingly, SFN inhibited the components of Shh pathway and Gli transcriptional activity. Interference of Shh-Gli signaling significantly blocked SFN-induced inhibitory effects demonstrating the requirement of an active pathway for the growth of pancreatic CSCs. SFN also inhibited downstream targets of Gli transcription by suppressing the expression of pluripotency maintaining factors (Nanog and Oct-4 as well as PDGFRα and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, SFN induced apoptosis by inhibition of BCL-2 and activation of caspases. Our data reveal the essential role of Shh-Gli signaling in controlling the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs. We propose that pancreatic cancer preventative effects of SFN may result from inhibition of the Shh pathway

  9. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation in human sublingual glands: a microscopic postmortem study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Reis AZEVEDO-ALANIS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although some morphological investigations on aged human sublingual glands (HSG found eventual phenomena identified as autolysis and mucous extravasation, the exact meaning of these findings has not been elucidated.Objective The aim of this work is to investigate whether acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation are related to the aging process in human sublingual glands. We also speculate if autolytic changes may assist forensic pathologists in determining time of death.Material and Methods 186 cadavers’ glands were allocated to age groups: I (0–30 years; II (31–60, and III (61–90. Time and mode of death were also recorded. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation were classified as present or absent. Ultrastructural analysis was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Data were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Spearman’s correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (p<0.05.Results There was correlation between age and acinar autolysis (r=0.38; p=0.0001. However, there was no correlation between autolysis and time of death. No differences were observed between genders. TEM showed mucous and serous cells presenting nuclear and membrane alterations and mucous cells were more susceptible to autolysis.Conclusion Acinar autolysis occurred in all age groups and increased with age while mucous extravasation was rarely found. Both findings are independent. Autolysis degrees in HSG could not be used to determine time of death.

  10. Identification of transplanted pancreatic islet cells by radioactive dithizone-[131I]-histamine conjugate. Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnuszek, P; Licińska, I; Mrozek, A; Wardawa, A; Fiedor, P S; Mazurek, A P

    2000-01-01

    The unique mechanism of dithizone action in the interior of the viable pancreatic islet suggests the possible development of a specific radiopharmaceutical that may have a potential clinical application in the diagnosis of the pancreatic organ allografts or islets rejection. The radiodiagnostic properties of the newly developed radioactive analogue of dithizone, i.e. Dithizone-[(131)I]-Histamine conjugate have been evaluated in the present study. The four islet cells transplantation models were chosen for this purpose. The most important feature of the Dithizone-[(131)I]-Histamine conjugate is its possessed ability of zinc chelation. As was presented in the recent study, the conjugate stains pink-reddish the isolated pancreatic islets in vitro. Among the studied transplantation models, only the islets grafting under testis capsule enabled determination of the pancreatic islets in rats by radioactive Dithizone-[(131)I]-Histamine conjugate. The level of the radioactivity in the recipient testis (right) was almost two times higher compared to the controls (0.24 vs. 0.13% ID/g, respectively). These preliminary data demonstrate the ability of the developed radioactive analogue of dithizone for in vivo identification of transplanted pancreatic islets, and suggests a potential clinical application of the radiodithizone in the diagnosis of the pancreatic islet rejection.

  11. The Fas pathway is involved in pancreatic beta cell secretory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumann, Desiree M; Maedler, Kathrin; Franklin, Isobel

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell mass and function increase in conditions of enhanced insulin demand such as obesity. Failure to adapt leads to diabetes. The molecular mechanisms controlling this adaptive process are unclear. Fas is a death receptor involved in beta cell apoptosis or proliferation, depending...

  12. Dynamical complexity and temporal plasticity in pancreatic ββ-cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss some of the biological and mathematical issues involved in understanding and modelling the bursting electrical activity in pancreatic -cells. These issues include single-cell versus islet behaviour, parameter heterogeneity, channel noise, the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, and ions, and multiple slow ...

  13. Pax4 Expression does not Transduce Pancreatic Alpha Cells to Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The lack of available beta cells greatly limits the use of beta cell transplantation as a therapy for diabetes. Thus, generation of beta cells from other sources is substantially required. Pax4 has been shown to induce reprograming of alpha cells into beta cells during embryogenesis. Nevertheless, whether expression of Pax4 in adult alpha cells could trigger this alpha-to-beta cell reprogramming is unknown. Methods: Here we generated an adeno-associated virus carrying Pax4 and GFP under a CMV promoter (AAV-Pax4. We used AAV-Pax4 to transduce a mouse alpha cell line in vitro, and to transduce primary alpha cells in diabetic mice. Reprogramming was examined by double immunostaining and by changes in beta cell number. The effects on blood glucose were evaluated by fasting blood glucose and glucose response. Results: In vitro, Pax4 overexpression neither induced insulin expression, nor suppressed glucagon expression in alpha cells. In vivo, Pax4 overexpression failed to increase beta cell number, and did not alter hyperglycemia and glucose response in diabetic mice. Conclusion: Pax4 expression is not sufficient to transduce pancreatic alpha cells into beta cells. Overexpression of Pax4 in alpha cells may not increase functional beta cell number in diabetic patients.

  14. Effect on pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells by low let x-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Cultured pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells, it is given normal condition of 10% FBS (fetal bovine serum), 11.1 mM glucose and hyperglycemia condition of 1% FBS, 30 mM glucose. For low LET X-ray irradiated with 0.5 Gy/hr dose-rate(total dose: 0.5 to 5 Gy). Survival rates were measured by MTT assay. When non irradiated, differentiated in the pancreatic beta cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a small reduction. However increasing the total dose of X-ray, the survival rate of normal conditions decreased slightly compared to the survival rate of hyperglycemia conditions, the synergistic effect was drastically reduced. When non irradiated, undifferentiated in the nerve cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a large reduction. As the cumulative dose of X-ray normal conditions and hyperglycemia were all relatively rapid cell death. But the rate of decreased survivals by almost parallel to the reduction proceed and it didn't show synergistic effect.

  15. Omeprazole Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Cell Invasion through a Nongenomic Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Un-Ho; Kim, Sang-Bae; Safe, Stephen

    2015-05-18

    Omeprazole and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) are aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists that inhibit the invasion of breast cancer cells through inhibition of CXCR4 transcription. Treatment of highly invasive Panc1 pancreatic cancer cells with TCDD, omeprazole, and seven other AhR-active pharmaceuticals showed that only omeprazole and tranilast, but not TCDD, inhibited invasion in a Boyden chamber assay. Similar results were observed in MiaPaCa2 cells, another quasimensenchymal pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (QM-PDA) pancreatic cancer cell line, whereas invasion was not observed with BxPC3 or L3.6pL cells, which are classified as classical (less invasive) pancreatic cancer cells. It was also observed in QM-PDA cells that TCDD, omeprazole, and tranilast did not induce CYP1A1 or CXCR4 and that treatment with these compounds did not result in nuclear uptake of AhR. In contrast, treatment of BxPC3 and L3.6pL cells with these AhR ligands resulted in induction of CYP1A1 (by TCDD) and nuclear uptake of AhR, which was similar to that observed for Ah-responsive MDA-MB-468 breast and HepG2 liver cancer cell lines. Results of AhR and AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt) knockdown experiments in Panc1 and MiaPaCa2 cells demonstrated that omeprazole- and tranilast-mediated inhibition of invasion was AhR-dependent but Arnt-independent. These results demonstrate that in the most highly invasive subtype of pancreatic cancer cells (QM-PDA) the selective AhR modulators omeprazole and tranilast inhibit invasion through a nongenomic AhR pathway.

  16. The mitochondrion interfering compound NPC-26 exerts potent anti-pancreatic cancer cell activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yang-Yang; Zhuang, Yi-Huang; Cai, Wen-Jie; Liu, Yan; Zou, Wen-Bing

    2016-11-01

    The development of novel anti-pancreatic cancer agents