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Sample records for acids survival mechanisms

  1. The Staphylococcus aureus Response to Unsaturated Long Chain Free Fatty Acids: Survival Mechanisms and Virulence Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, John G.; Deborah Ward; Elisabet Josefsson; Ing-Marie Jonsson; Jason Hinds; Rees, Huw H.; Lindsay, Jodi A; Andrej Tarkowski; Horsburgh, Malcolm J.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human commensal and opportunistic pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections. Long chain unsaturated free fatty acids represent a barrier to colonisation and infection by S. aureus and act as an antimicrobial component of the innate immune system where they are found on epithelial surfaces and in abscesses. Despite many contradictory reports, the precise anti-staphylococcal mode of action of free fatty acids remains undetermined. In this study, t...

  2. The Staphylococcus aureus response to unsaturated long chain free fatty acids: survival mechanisms and virulence implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Kenny

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important human commensal and opportunistic pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections. Long chain unsaturated free fatty acids represent a barrier to colonisation and infection by S. aureus and act as an antimicrobial component of the innate immune system where they are found on epithelial surfaces and in abscesses. Despite many contradictory reports, the precise anti-staphylococcal mode of action of free fatty acids remains undetermined. In this study, transcriptional (microarrays and qRT-PCR and translational (proteomics analyses were applied to ascertain the response of S. aureus to a range of free fatty acids. An increase in expression of the sigma(B and CtsR stress response regulons was observed. This included increased expression of genes associated with staphyloxanthin synthesis, which has been linked to membrane stabilisation. Similarly, up-regulation of genes involved in capsule formation was recorded as were significant changes in the expression of genes associated with peptidoglycan synthesis and regulation. Overall, alterations were recorded predominantly in pathways involved in cellular energetics. In addition, sensitivity to linoleic acid of a range of defined (sigB, arcA, sasF, sarA, agr, crtM and transposon-derived mutants (vraE, SAR2632 was determined. Taken together, these data indicate a common mode of action for long chain unsaturated fatty acids that involves disruption of the cell membrane, leading to interference with energy production within the bacterial cell. Contrary to data reported for other strains, the clinically important EMRSA-16 strain MRSA252 used in this study showed an increase in expression of the important virulence regulator RNAIII following all of the treatment conditions tested. An adaptive response by S. aureus of reducing cell surface hydrophobicity was also observed. Two fatty acid sensitive mutants created during this study were also shown to diplay altered

  3. Survival mechanism of Escherichia coli O157:H7 against combined treatment with acetic acid and sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Young; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The combination of salt and acid is commonly used in the production of many foods, including pickles and fermented foods. However, in our previous studies, the addition of salt significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on Escherichia coli O157:H7 in laboratory media and pickled cucumbers. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the mechanism by which salt confers resistance against acetic acid in E. coli O157:H7. The addition of high concentrations (up to 9% or 15% [w/v]) of salt increased the resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to acetic acid treatment. Combined treatment with acetic acid and salt showed varying results among different bacterial strains (an antagonistic effect for E. coli O157:H7 and Shigella and a synergistic effect for Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus). The addition of salt increased the cytoplasmic pH of E. coli O157:H7, but decreased the cytoplasmic pH of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus on treatment with acetic acid. Therefore, the addition of salt increases the acid resistance of E. coli O157:H7 possibly by increasing its acid resistance response and consequently preventing the acidification of its cytoplasm by organic acids. PMID:26742620

  4. Survival mechanism of Escherichia coli O157:H7 against combined treatment with acetic acid and sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Young; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The combination of salt and acid is commonly used in the production of many foods, including pickles and fermented foods. However, in our previous studies, the addition of salt significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on Escherichia coli O157:H7 in laboratory media and pickled cucumbers. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the mechanism by which salt confers resistance against acetic acid in E. coli O157:H7. The addition of high concentrations (up to 9% or 15% [w/v]) of salt increased the resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to acetic acid treatment. Combined treatment with acetic acid and salt showed varying results among different bacterial strains (an antagonistic effect for E. coli O157:H7 and Shigella and a synergistic effect for Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus). The addition of salt increased the cytoplasmic pH of E. coli O157:H7, but decreased the cytoplasmic pH of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus on treatment with acetic acid. Therefore, the addition of salt increases the acid resistance of E. coli O157:H7 possibly by increasing its acid resistance response and consequently preventing the acidification of its cytoplasm by organic acids.

  5. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Induces Proliferation, Survival, and Migration in A549 Lung Cancer Cells by Activating the ERK Signaling Pathway through a Transcription-Independent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Barceinas, Reyna Sara; García-Regalado, Alejandro; Aréchaga-Ocampo, Elena; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; González-De la Rosa, Claudia Haydée

    2015-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been used as an antineoplastic because of its ability to promote proliferation, inhibition, and differentiation, primarily in leukemia; however, in other types of cancer, such as lung cancer, treatment with ATRA is restricted because not all the patients experience the same results. The ERK signaling pathway is dysregulated in cancer cells, including lung cancer, and this dysregulation promotes proliferation and cell invasion. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment with ATRA can activate the ERK signaling pathway by a transcription-independent mechanism through a signaling cascade that involves RARα and PI3K, promoting growth, survival, and migration in lung cancer cells. Until now, this mechanism was unknown in lung cancer cells. The inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway restores the beneficial effects of ATRA, reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis, and blocks the cell migration process in lung cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that the combination of ATRA with ERK inhibitor in clinical trials for lung cancer is warranted. PMID:26557664

  6. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (Harvard-Med); (IIT); (NCSU); (UPENN); (Manchester); (Orthovita)

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  7. Amino acid survival in large cometary impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierazzo, E.; Chyba, C. F.

    1999-11-01

    A significant fraction of the Earth's prebiotic volatile inventory may have been delivered by asteroidal and cometary impacts during the period of heavy bombardment. The realization that comets are particularly rich in organic material seemed to strengthen this suggestion. Previous modeling studies, however, indicated that most organics would be entirely destroyed in large comet and asteroid impacts. The availability of new kinetic parameters for the thermal degradation of amino acids in the solid phase made it possible to readdress this question. We present the results of new high-resolution hydrocode simulations of asteroid and comet impact coupled with recent experimental data for amino acid pyrolysis in the solid phase. Differences due to impact velocity as well as projectile material have been investigated. Effects of angle of impacts were also addressed. The results suggest that some amino acids would survive the shock heating of large (kilometer-radius) cometary impacts. At the time of the origins of life on Earth, the steady-state oceanic concentration of certain amino acids (like aspartic and glutamic acid) delivered by comets could have equaled or substantially exceeded that due to Miller-Urey synthesis in a carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere. Furthermore, in the unlikely case of a grazing impact (impact angle around 5 degrees from the horizontal) an amount of some amino acids comparable to that due to the background steady-state production or delivery would be delivered to the early Earth.

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid-derived neuroprotectin D1 induces neuronal survival via secretase- and PPARγ-mediated mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhai Zhao

    Full Text Available Neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1 is a stereoselective mediator derived from the omega-3 essential fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA with potent inflammatory resolving and neuroprotective bioactivity. NPD1 reduces Aβ42 peptide release from aging human brain cells and is severely depleted in Alzheimer's disease (AD brain. Here we further characterize the mechanism of NPD1's neurogenic actions using 3xTg-AD mouse models and human neuronal-glial (HNG cells in primary culture, either challenged with Aβ42 oligomeric peptide, or transfected with beta amyloid precursor protein (βAPP(sw (Swedish double mutation APP695(sw, K595N-M596L. We also show that NPD1 downregulates Aβ42-triggered expression of the pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and of B-94 (a TNF-α-inducible pro-inflammatory element and apoptosis in HNG cells. Moreover, NPD1 suppresses Aβ42 peptide shedding by down-regulating β-secretase-1 (BACE1 while activating the α-secretase ADAM10 and up-regulating sAPPα, thus shifting the cleavage of βAPP holoenzyme from an amyloidogenic into the non-amyloidogenic pathway. Use of the thiazolidinedione peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, the irreversible PPARγ antagonist GW9662, and overexpressing PPARγ suggests that the NPD1-mediated down-regulation of BACE1 and Aβ42 peptide release is PPARγ-dependent. In conclusion, NPD1 bioactivity potently down regulates inflammatory signaling, amyloidogenic APP cleavage and apoptosis, underscoring the potential of this lipid mediator to rescue human brain cells in early stages of neurodegenerations.

  9. Acid adaptation promotes survival of Salmonella spp. in cheese.

    OpenAIRE

    Leyer, G J; Johnson, E A

    1992-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium was adapted to acid by exposure to hydrochloric acid at pH 5.8 for one to two doublings. Acid-adapted cells had increased resistance to inactivation by organic acids commonly present in cheese, including lactic, propionic, and acetic acids. Recovery of cells during the treatment with organic acids was increased 1,000-fold by inclusion of 0.1% sodium pyruvate in the recovery medium. Acid-adapted S. typhimurium cells survived better than nonadapted cells during a milk fer...

  10. p63 promotes cell survival through fatty acid synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Sabbisetti

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that p63, and specifically DeltaNp63, plays a central role in both development and tumorigenesis by promoting epithelial cell survival. However, few studies have addressed the molecular mechanisms through which such important function is exerted. Fatty acid synthase (FASN, a key enzyme that synthesizes long-chain fatty acids and is involved in both embryogenesis and cancer, has been recently proposed as a direct target of p53 family members, including p63 and p73. Here we show that knockdown of either total or DeltaN-specific p63 isoforms in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC9 or immortalized prostate epithelial (iPrEC cells caused a decrease in cell viability by inducing apoptosis without affecting the cell cycle. p63 silencing significantly reduced both the expression and the activity of FASN. Importantly, stable overexpression of either FASN or myristoylated AKT (myr-AKT was able to partially rescue cells from cell death induced by p63 silencing. FASN induced AKT phosphorylation and a significant reduction in cell viability was observed when FASN-overexpressing SCC9 cells were treated with an AKT inhibitor after p63 knockdown, indicating that AKT plays a major role in FASN-mediated survival. Activated AKT did not cause any alteration in the FASN protein levels but induced its activity, suggesting that the rescue from apoptosis documented in the p63-silenced cells expressing myr-AKT cells may be partially mediated by FASN. Finally, we demonstrated that p63 and FASN expression are positively associated in clinical squamous cell carcinoma samples as well as in the developing prostate. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that FASN is a functionally relevant target of p63 and is required for mediating its pro-survival effects.

  11. The Survival Advantage: Underlying Mechanisms and Extant Limitations

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    Stephanie A. Kazanas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers have begun to investigate the function of memory in our evolutionary history. According to Nairne and colleagues (e.g., Nairne, Pandeirada, and Thompson, 2008; Nairne, Thompson, and Pandeirada, 2007, the best mnemonic strategy for learning lists of unrelated words may be one that addresses the same problems that our Pleistocene ancestors faced: fitness-relevant problems including securing food and water, as well as protecting themselves from predators. Survival processing has been shown to promote better recall and recognition memory than many well-known mnemonic strategies (e.g., pleasantness ratings, imagery, generation, etc.. However, the survival advantage does not extend to all types of stimuli and tasks. The current review presents research that has replicated Nairne et al.'s (2007 original findings, in addition to the research designs that fail to replicate the survival advantage. In other words, there are specific manipulations in which survival processing does not appear to benefit memory any more than other strategies. Potential mechanisms for the survival advantage are described, with an emphasis on those that are the most plausible. These proximate mechanisms outline the memory processes that may contribute to the advantage, although the ultimate mechanism may be the congruity between the survival scenario and Pleistocene problem-solving.

  12. A New SDH-Based ATM Network Survivability Escalation Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates survivability escalation strategies in multi-layers transport networks such as ATM/SDH/WDM networks, and presents oriented-failures and oriented-traffic escalation mechanisms. Furthermore, We present a new survivability Escalation strategy for SDH-Based ATM transport networks, which addresses difficult problem for resources sharing pool(RSP) among different layers restoration mechanisms. In this paper, we also present integer programming (IP) model for the resources sharing pool (RSP) design problem and the node simulation model for escalation Node. The simulation results show that the proposed ESP is very efficient. The proposed model can be easily extended for other types of multi-layer networks, such as WDM-based ATM networks or WDM-based SDH networks.

  13. Interactive effects involving different classes of excitatory amino acid receptors and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    Differentiating granule cells develop survival requirements in culture which can be met by treatment with high K+ or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and, according to our recent findings, also with low concentrations of kainic acid (KA, 50 microM). We have now attempted to elucidate the mechanism(s) ...

  14. Political Mechanisms for Long-Range Survival and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, W.

    As the first species aware of extinction and capable of proactively ensuring our long-term survival and development, it is striking that we do not do so with the rigor, formality, and foresight it requires. Only from a reactive posture have we responded to the challenges of global warfare, human rights, environmental concerns, and sustainable development. Despite our awareness of the possibility for extinction and apocalyptic set-backs to our evolution, and despite the existence of long-range studies-which must still be dramatically increased-proactive global policy implementation regarding our long-term survival and development is arguably non-existent. This lack of long-term policy making can be attributed in part to the lack of formal political mechanisms to facilitate longer-range policy making that extends 30 years or more into the future. Political mechanisms for infusing long-range thinking, research, and strategic planning into the policy-making process can help correct this shortcoming and provide the motivation needed to adequately address long-term challenges with the political rigor required to effectively establish and implement long-term policies. There are some efforts that attempt to address longer-range issues, but those efforts often do not connect to the political process, do not extend 30 or more years into the future, are not well-funded, and are not sufficiently systemic. Political mechanisms for long-range survival and prosperity could correct these inadequacies by raising awareness, providing funding, and most importantly, leveraging political rigor to establish and enforce long-range strategic planning and policies. The feasibility of such mechanisms should first be rigorously studied and assessed in a feasibility study, which could then inform implementation. This paper will present the case for such a study and suggest some possible political mechanisms that should be investigated further in the proposed study. This work is being further

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Survival Strategies in Extreme Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Migliardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, one of the major challenges in biophysics is to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying biological processes. In such a frame, the understanding of the survival strategies in extreme conditions received a lot of attention both from the scientific and applicative points of view. Since nature provides precious suggestions to be applied for improving the quality of life, extremophiles are considered as useful model-systems. The main goal of this review is to present an overview of some systems, with a particular emphasis on trehalose playing a key role in several extremophile organisms. The attention is focused on the relation among the structural and dynamic properties of biomolecules and bioprotective mechanisms, as investigated by complementary spectroscopic techniques at low- and high-temperature values.

  16. Quorum sensing mechanism in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Yılmaz - Yıldıran

    2015-04-01

    and detection occurs as a consecution it is hard to understand their QS mechanism. In this review, connection between QS mechanism and some characteristics of lactic acid bacteria are evaluated such as concordance with its host, inhibition of pathogen development and colonization in gastrointestinal system, bacteriocin production, acid and bile resistance, adhesion to epithelium cells. Understanding QS mechanism of lactic acid bacteria will be useful to design metabiotics which is defined as novel probiotics.

  17. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis predicted serine protease is associated with acid stress and intraphagosomal survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami Kugadas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophage and MAC-T cells and coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increase bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5 conditions. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  18. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A; Bannantine, John P; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc(2) 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted. PMID:27597934

  19. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A.; Bannantine, John P.; Shoyama, Fernanda M.; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted. PMID:27597934

  20. Mechanism of histone survival during transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaeva, Olga I; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2010-01-01

    This work is related to and stems from our recent NSMB paper, "Mechanism of chromatin remodeling and recovery during passage of RNA polymerase II" (December 2009). Synopsis. Recent genomic studies from many laboratories have suggested that nucleosomes are not displaced from moderately transcribed genes. Furthermore, histones H3/H4 carrying the primary epigenetic marks are not displaced or exchanged (in contrast to H2A/H2B histones) during moderate transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in vivo. These exciting observations suggest that the large molecule of Pol II passes through chromatin structure without even transient displacement of H3/H4 histones. The most recent analysis of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-type mechanism of chromatin remodeling in vitro (described in our NSMB 2009 paper) suggests that nucleosome survival is tightly coupled with formation of a novel intermediate: a very small intranucleosomal DNA loop (Ø-loop) containing transcribing Pol II. In the submitted manuscript we critically evaluate one of the key predictions of this model: the lack of even transient displacement of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription in vitro. The data suggest that, indeed, histones H3/H4 are not displaced during Pol II transcription in vitro. These studies are directly connected with the observation in vivo on the lack of exchange of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription.

  1. The Role of Amino Acid Permeases and Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Survival.

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    João Daniel Santos Fernandes

    Full Text Available Metabolic diversity is an important factor during microbial adaptation to different environments. Among metabolic processes, amino acid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to be relevant for survival for many microbial pathogens, whereas the association between pathogenesis and amino acid uptake and recycling are less well-established. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with many habitats. As a result, it faces frequent metabolic shifts and challenges during its life cycle. Here we studied the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and found that the pathway is essential. RNAi indicated that interruptions in the biosynthetic pathway render strains inviable. However, auxotroph complementation can be partially achieved by tryptophan uptake when a non preferred nitrogen source and lower growth temperature are applied, suggesting that amino acid permeases may be the target of nitrogen catabolism repression (NCR. We used bioinformatics to search for amino acid permeases in the C. neoformans and found eight potential global permeases (AAP1 to AAP8. The transcriptional profile of them revealed that they are subjected to regulatory mechanisms which are known to respond to nutritional status in other fungi, such as (i quality of nitrogen (Nitrogen Catabolism Repression, NCR and carbon sources (Carbon Catabolism Repression, CCR, (ii amino acid availability in the extracellular environment (SPS-sensing and (iii nutritional deprivation (Global Amino Acid Control, GAAC. This study shows that C. neoformans has fewer amino acid permeases than other model yeasts, and that these proteins may be subjected to complex regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest that the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway is an excellent pharmacological target. Furthermore, inhibitors of this pathway cause Cryptococcus growth arrest in vitro.

  2. Overview on mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are a group of gram-negative or gram-variable bacteria which possess an obligate aerobic property with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, meanwhile transform ethanol and sugar to corresponding aldehydes, ketones and organic acids. Since the first genus Acetobacter of AAB was established in 1898, 16 AAB genera have been recorded so far. As the main producer of a world-wide condiment, vinegar, AAB have evolved an elegant adaptive system that enables them to survive and produce a high concentration of acetic acid. Some researches and reviews focused on mechanisms of acid resistance in enteric bacteria and made the mechanisms thoroughly understood, while a few investigations did in AAB. As the related technologies with proteome, transcriptome and genome were rapidly developed and applied to AAB research, some plausible mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in some AAB strains have been published. In this review, the related mechanisms of AAB against acetic acid with acetic acid assimilation, transportation systems, cell morphology and membrane compositions, adaptation response, and fermentation conditions will be described. Finally, a framework for future research for anti-acid AAB will be provided.

  3. Survival and resuscitation of ten strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli under acid conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaveerach, P.; Huurne, ter A.A.H.M.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Knapen, van F.

    2003-01-01

    The culturability of 10 strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli was studied after the bacteria were exposed to acid conditions for various periods of time. Campylobacter cells could not survive 2 h under acid conditions (formic acid at pH 4). The 10 Campylobacter strains could not be

  4. Mechanisms of plant survival and mortality during drought: why do some plants survive while others succumb to drought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Nate G.; Pockman, William T.; Allen, Craig D.; Breshears, David D.; Cobb, Neil; Kolb, Thomas; Plaut, Jennifer; Sperry, John; West, Adam; Williams, David G.; Yepez, Enrico A.

    2008-01-01

    Severe droughts have been associated with regional-scale forest mortality worldwide. Climate change is expected to exacerbate regional mortality events; however, prediction remains difficult because the physiological mechanisms underlying drought survival and mortality are poorly understood. We developed a hydraulically based theory considering carbon balance and insect resistance that allowed development and examination of hypotheses regarding survival and mortality. Multiple mechanisms may cause mortality during drought. A common mechanism for plants with isohydric regulation of water status results from avoidance of drought-induced hydraulic failure via stomatal closure, resulting in carbon starvation and a cascade of downstream effects such as reduced resistance to biotic agents. Mortality by hydraulic failure per se may occur for isohydric seedlings or trees near their maximum height. Although anisohydric plants are relatively drought-tolerant, they are predisposed to hydraulic failure because they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins during drought. Elevated temperatures should exacerbate carbon starvation and hydraulic failure. Biotic agents may amplify and be amplified by drought-induced plant stress. Wet multidecadal climate oscillations may increase plant susceptibility to drought-induced mortality by stimulating shifts in hydraulic architecture, effectively predisposing plants to water stress. Climate warming and increased frequency of extreme events will probably cause increased regional mortality episodes. Isohydric and anisohydric water potential regulation may partition species between survival and mortality, and, as such, incorporating this hydraulic framework may be effective for modeling plant survival and mortality under future climate conditions.

  5. Dietary proteins extend the survival of salmonella dublin in a gastric Acid environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Tina; Kristensen, Kim; Harboe, Anne;

    2012-01-01

    The pH of the human stomach is dynamic and changes over time, depending on the composition of the food ingested and a number of host-related factors such as age. To evaluate the number of bacteria surviving the gastric acid barrier, we have developed a simple gastric acid model, in which we...... of bovine serum albumin, indicating that protection could be protein specific. The simple gastric acid model was validated against a more laborious and complex fermenter model, and similar survival of Salmonella Dublin was observed in both models. Our gastric acid model allowed us to evaluate the influence...... of food components on survival of pathogens under gastric conditions, and the model could contribute to a broader understanding of the impact of specific food components on the inactivation of pathogens during gastric passage....

  6. Growth and survival of Acidithiobacilli in Acidic, metal rich environments

    OpenAIRE

    Mangold, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Acidithiobacilli are acidophilic microorganisms that play important roles in many natural processes such as acidification of the environment, influencing metal mobility, and impacting on global sulfur and iron cycles. Due to their distinct metabolic properties they can be applied in the industrial extraction of valuable metals. Acidithiobacilli thrive in an environment which is extremely acidic and usually low in organic carbon but highly polluted with metals. In the quest to gain insight int...

  7. Platelets increase survival of adenocarcinoma cells challenged with anticancer drugs: mechanisms and implications for chemoresistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Radomski, Marek; MEDINA MARTIN, CARLOS; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    PUBLISHED BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cancer cells grow without the restraints of feedback control mechanisms, leading to increased cancer cell survival. The treatment of cancer is often complicated by the lack of response to chemotherapy leading to chemoresistance and persistent survival of tumour cells. In this work we studied the role of platelets in chemotherapy-induced cancer cell death and survival. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Human adenocarcinoma cells, colonic (Caco-2) and ovaria...

  8. Tumor cell survival and immune escape mechanisms in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell survival and immune escape mechanisms in classical Hodgkin lymphoma The nature of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a minority of tumor cells in a reactive background and loss of B cell phenotype, decides its dependence on the microenvironment for signals to contribute to survival and prol

  9. High-density lipoprotein, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell survival mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C Roger; Giordano, Samantha; Anantharamaiah, G M

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic injury is associated with acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting and open heart surgery. The timely re-establishment of blood flow is critical in order to minimize cardiac complications. Reperfusion after a prolonged ischemic period, however, can induce severe cardiomyocyte dysfunction with mitochondria serving as a major target of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. An increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces damage to mitochondrial respiratory complexes leading to uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial membrane perturbations also contribute to calcium overload, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and the release of apoptotic mediators into the cytoplasm. Clinical and experimental studies show that ischemic preconditioning (ICPRE) and postconditioning (ICPOST) attenuate mitochondrial injury and improve cardiac function in the context of I/R injury. This is achieved by the activation of two principal cell survival cascades: 1) the Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinase (RISK) pathway; and 2) the Survivor Activating Factor Enhancement (SAFE) pathway. Recent data suggest that high density lipoprotein (HDL) mimics the effects of conditioning protocols and attenuates myocardial I/R injury via activation of the RISK and SAFE signaling cascades. In this review, we discuss the roles of apolipoproteinA-I (apoA-I), the major protein constituent of HDL, and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a lysosphingolipid associated with small, dense HDL particles as mediators of cardiomyocyte survival. Both apoA-I and S1P exert an infarct-sparing effect by preventing ROS-dependent injury and inhibiting the opening of the mPTP. PMID:27150975

  10. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Lactic acid bacteria species in chill brine

    OpenAIRE

    Meadows, Bridget Archibald

    2004-01-01

    SURVIVAL OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES, LISTERIA INNOCUA, AND LACTIC ACID BACTERIA SPECIES IN CHILL BRINES Bridget Archibald Meadows (ABSTRACT) Listeria monocytogenes is the major pathogen in ready-to-eat meat products such as deli meats and frankfurters. Contamination can occur via the salt brines that are used to cool thermally processed meats. Both L. monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria can grow and thrive under these brine conditions, and may become competitive with each ot...

  11. Surviving the acid barrier: responses of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae to simulated gastric fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Atheesha; Barnard, Tobias G

    2016-01-01

    When bacteria are subjected to low acidic pHs of the gastric environment, they may enter the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of survival. In this state, bacteria cannot be cultured on solid media, still exhibit signs of metabolic activity (viability). In this study, the response of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 to low pH-simulated environments of the human stomach was evaluated for their survival by culturability (plate count) and viability (flow cytometry-FC) assays. Bacteria were acid challenged with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 over a period of 180 min. Exposure to SGF up to 120 min increased acid tolerance of the Vibrios up to pH 3.5 with acid challenge occurring at pH 4.5. Bacteria were culturable from pH 2.5 to 4.5 up to 60 min SGF exposure. The stationary-phase cultures of Vibrio were able to survive SGF at all pHs in an 'injured' state with FC. This could possibly mean that the bacteria have entered the VBNC stage of survival. This is a worrying public health concern due to the fact that once favourable conditions arise (intestines), these Vibrios can change back to an infectious state and cause disease.

  12. Effect of alpha lipoic acid on retinal ganglion cell survival in an optic nerve crush model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruixing; Wang, Yanling; Pu, Mingliang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to determine whether alpha lipoic acid (ALA) promotes the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury and to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of ALA in the retina in this ONC injury model. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (180–220 g) were subjected to ONC injury surgery. ALA (63 mg/kg) was injected intravenously 1 day before or after the ONC injury. Animals were euthanized after 10 days, and the number of ganglion cells positive for RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (Rbpms), which is an RGC marker, were counted on the whole mount retinas. In addition, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting were performed to examine the localization and levels of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5) in the retinas in all experimental groups. To determine whether the EPO/EPOR signaling pathway was involved in the ALA antioxidant pathway, the rats were subjected to ruxolitinib (INCB018424, 0.25 mg/kg, bid, intraperitoneal, i.p.) treatment after the animals were injected intravenously with ALA 1 day before ONC injury. Results The average number of Rbpms-positive cells/mm2 in the control group (sham-operated group), the ONC group, the ALA-ONC group, and the ONC-ALA group retinas was 2219±28, 418±8, 848±22, and 613±18/mm2, respectively. The ALA-ONC and ONC-ALA groups showed a statistically significantly increased RGC survival rate compared to the ONC group. There were statistical differences in the RGC survival rates between the ALA-ONC (39%) and ONC-ALA groups (28%; p<0.05). Immunofluorescent labeling showed that EPOR and NT4/5 expression was significant in the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL). At the same time, western blot analysis revealed that ALA induced upregulation of EPOR protein and NT4/5 protein expression in the retina after ONC injury. However, INCB018424 reversed the protective effects of ALA on the ONC retinas. Conclusions ALA has

  13. Mechanisms of acid tolerance in bacteria and prospects in biotechnology and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuping; Tang, Hongzhi; Lin, Zhanglin; Xu, Ping

    2015-11-15

    Acidogenic and aciduric bacteria have developed several survival systems in various acidic environments to prevent cell damage due to acid stress such as that on the human gastric surface and in the fermentation medium used for industrial production of acidic products. Common mechanisms for acid resistance in bacteria are proton pumping by F1-F0-ATPase, the glutamate decarboxylase system, formation of a protective cloud of ammonia, high cytoplasmic urease activity, repair or protection of macromolecules, and biofilm formation. The field of synthetic biology has rapidly advanced and generated an ever-increasing assortment of genetic devices and biological modules for applications in biofuel and novel biomaterial productions. Better understanding of aspects such as overproduction of general shock proteins, molecular mechanisms, and responses to cell density adopted by microorganisms for survival in low pH conditions will prove useful in synthetic biology for potential industrial and environmental applications.

  14. Chlorogenic Acid Enhances Abdominal Skin Flap Survival Based on Epigastric Artery in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdas, Deniz; Etoz, Betul Cam; Gul, Zulfiye; Ozyigit, Musa Ozgur; Cinkilic, Nilufer; Inan, Sevda; Buyukcoskun, Naciye Isbil; Ozluk, Kasim; Gurun, Mine Sibel

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies showed that chlorogenic acid (CGA) accelerates wound healing via its antioxidant activity. We aimed to investigate the effect of CGA in an experimental epigastric abdominal skin flap model in nondiabetic and diabetic rats. Rats were firstly divided into 2 groups: nondiabetic and diabetic. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin. Then, 4 subgroups were created for each group: vehicle as well as 0.2 mg/0.5 mL, 1 mg/0.5 mL, and 5 mg/0.5 mL CGA treatments. Right epigastric artery-based abdominal skin flaps were elevated and sutured back into their original position. Chlorogenic acid or vehicle was injected once into the femoral arteries by leaving the epigastric artery as the single artery feeding the flaps during the injection. On postoperative day 7, flap survivals were evaluated, and the rats were killed. Distal flap tissues were collected for histopathological and biochemical assays. Chlorogenic acid showed greater flap survival in both nondiabetic and diabetic rats. Capillary density was increased, and necrosis was reduced in the CGA-treated rats. Chlorogenic acid decreased malondialdehyde levels as well as increased reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase levels in the flap tissues. This study showed that CGA significantly improved flap survival by its antioxidant activities with intra-arterial local injections. PMID:25356637

  15. Effect of fatty acids on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell energy metabolism and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, Natasha; Huqi, Alda; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Mori, Jun; Paulin, Roxane; Haromy, Alois; Onay-Besikci, Arzu; Ionescu, Lavinia; Thébaud, Bernard; Michelakis, Evangelos; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Successful stem cell therapy requires the optimal proliferation, engraftment, and differentiation of stem cells into the desired cell lineage of tissues. However, stem cell therapy clinical trials to date have had limited success, suggesting that a better understanding of stem cell biology is needed. This includes a better understanding of stem cell energy metabolism because of the importance of energy metabolism in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here the first direct evidence that human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMMSC) energy metabolism is highly glycolytic with low rates of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The contribution of glycolysis to ATP production is greater than 97% in undifferentiated BMMSCs, while glucose and fatty acid oxidation combined only contribute 3% of ATP production. We also assessed the effect of physiological levels of fatty acids on human BMMSC survival and energy metabolism. We found that the saturated fatty acid palmitate induces BMMSC apoptosis and decreases proliferation, an effect prevented by the unsaturated fatty acid oleate. Interestingly, chronic exposure of human BMMSCs to physiological levels of palmitate (for 24 hr) reduces palmitate oxidation rates. This decrease in palmitate oxidation is prevented by chronic exposure of the BMMSCs to oleate. These results suggest that reducing saturated fatty acid oxidation can decrease human BMMSC proliferation and cause cell death. These results also suggest that saturated fatty acids may be involved in the long-term impairment of BMMSC survival in vivo.

  16. Asiatic Acid Prevents the Deleterious Effects of Valproic Acid on Cognition and Hippocampal Cell Proliferation and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jariya Umka Welbat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid (VPA is commonly prescribed as an anticonvulsant and mood stabilizer used in the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. A recent study has demonstrated that VPA reduces histone deacetylase (HDAC activity, an action which is believed to contribute to the effects of VPA on neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation which may explain the cognitive impairments produced in rodents and patients. Asiatic acid is a triterpenoid derived from the medicinal plant Centella asiatica. Our previous study has shown that Asiatic acid improves working spatial memory and increases cell proliferation in the sub granular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the present study we investigate the effects of Asiatic acid in preventing the memory and cellular effects of VPA. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were orally administered Asiatic acid (30 mg/kg/day for 28 days, while VPA-treated animals received injections of VPA (300 mg/kg twice a day from Day 15 to Day 28 for 14 days. Spatial memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL test and hippocampal cell proliferation and survival was quantified by immuostaining for Ki-67 and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, respectively. The results showed that VPA-treated animals were unable to discriminate between objects in familiar and novel locations. Moreover, VPA significantly reduced numbers of Ki-67 and BrdU positive cells. These results indicate that VPA treatment caused impairments of spatial working memory, cell proliferation and survival in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG. However, these abnormalities were restored to control levels by co-treatment with Asiatic acid. These data demonstrate that Asiatic acid could prevent the spatial memory and neurogenesis impairments caused by VPA.

  17. Ascorbic acid improves embryonic cardiomyoblast cell survival and promotes vascularization in potential myocardial grafts in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, E. C.; Wang, J; Gan, S U; Singh, R.; Lee, C. N.; Kofidis, T

    2010-01-01

    Organ restoration via cell therapy and tissue transplantation is limited by impaired graft survival. We tested the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA) reduces cell death in myocardial grafts both in vitro and in vivo and introduced a new model of autologous graft vascularization for later transplantation. Luciferase (Fluc)- and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing H9C2 cardiomyoblasts were seeded in gelatin scaffolds to form myocardial artificial grafts (MAGs). MAGs were supplemented wit...

  18. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Phenyl Acetic Acid and Dl-Mandelic Acid by Permanganate in Acid Medium

    OpenAIRE

    B. Syama Sundar; P.S.Radhakrishna murti

    2014-01-01

    Kinetics of oxidation of phenyl acetic acid and DL- Mandelic acid by potassium permanganate in aqueous acetic acid and perchloric acid mixture reveals that the kinetic orders are first order in oxidant, first order in H+ and zero order in substrate for phenyl acetic acid. DL-Mandelic acid exhibits first order in oxidant and zero order in substrate. The results are rationalised by a mechanism involving intermediate formation of mandelic acid in case of Phenyl acetic acid and ester formation wi...

  19. Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Permutation and Survival of Caralluma Species (Apocynaceae in Arid Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya S. Masrahi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several species of the stem succulent Caralluma (Apocynaceae are abundant perennials in arid regions of the Arabian Peninsula. These arid regions have a short wet season with erratic rainfall and are characterized by harsh climatic conditions of high temperature, high evaporation and sand storms. Work presented in this paper aimed at investigating importance of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM for survival of three Caralluma species in their natural habitat. Investigations involved studying stomatal characteristics, stomatal diffusive conductance, chlorophyll fluorescence, and CAM in three species of Caralluma, namely C. acutangula (Decne. N.E.Br., C. edulis (Edgew. Benth. ex Hook.f., and C. subulata (Forssk. Decne. Microscopic examination revealed a pattern of stomatal characteristics typical of CAM plants in these three Caralluma species. Results showed that these three Caralluma species were obligate CAM plants exhibiting this mode of photosynthesis during both the wet and the dry seasons. Under protracted water stress during the long dry season very low values of stomatal diffusive conductance and dampening of CAM acidification-deacidification cycles denoted the tendency of these three Caralluma species to shift from the obligate CAM physiotype to CAM-idling mode. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements indicated that protracted water stress induced a reduction in Photosystem II (PSII antenna efficiency and quantum yield in the three studied Caralluma species. This reduction of PSII activity occurred in concomitance with a marked rise in non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence denoting operation of non-photochemical energy dissipating mechanisms known to be important for photoprotection of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  20. Bile components and amino acids affect survival of the newly excysted juvenile Clonorchis sinensis in maintaining media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunyu; Kim, Tae Im; Yoo, Won Gi; Cho, Pyo Yun; Kim, Tong-Soo; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2008-10-01

    Clonorchis sinensis thrives on bile juice. The effects of bile and bile acids on newly excysted juvenile C. sinensis (CsNEJ) were studied in terms of survival. Survival of CsNEJs maintained in 1x Locke's solution, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, NCTC 109, Eagle's, RPMI 1640, and 0.1% glucose was high, but dropped rapidly in 2x Locke's, 0.85% NaCl, and phosphate-buffered saline. Most amino acids in the media favored CsNEJ survival; however, aspartic and glutamic acids and adenine reduced survival. Survival was also significantly lower in media containing more than 0.1% bile. CsNEJs preconditioned in low bile media survived longer in higher bile media. All bile acids and conjugated bile salts were found to favor CsNEJ survival, except for lithocholic acid (LCA) which was toxic. NCTC 109 medium was found to be optimal for the in vitro maintenance of CsNEJs and 1x Locke's solution to be suitable for analyzing the biological effects of bioactive compounds and molecules. Based on these results, we propose that bile acids enhance activity of CsNEJs, but LCA deteriorate CsNEJs.

  1. Programmed cell death in trypanosomatids: is it an altruistic mechanism for survival of the fittest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrabant, Alain; Nakhasi, Hira

    2003-06-25

    The protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei show multiple features consistent with a form of programmed cell death (PCD). Despite some similarities with apoptosis of mammalian cells, PCD in trypanosomatid protozoans appears to be significantly different. In these unicellular organisms, PCD could represent an altruistic mechanism for the selection of cells, from the parasite population, that are fit to be transmitted to the next host. Alternatively, PCD could help in controlling the population of parasites in the host, thereby increasing host survival and favoring parasite transmission, as proposed by Seed and Wenk. Therefore, PCD in trypanosomatid parasites may represent a pathway involved both in survival and propagation of the species.

  2. The Francisella intracellular life cycle: towards molecular mechanisms of intracellular survival and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey eChong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The tularemia-causing bacterium Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular organism with a complex intracellular lifecycle that ensures its survival and proliferation in a variety of mammalian cell types, including professional phagocytes. Because this cycle is essential to Francisella pathogenesis and virulence, much research has focused on deciphering the mechanisms of its intracellular survival and replication and characterizing both bacterial and host determinants of the bacterium’s intracellular cycle. Studies of various strains and host cell models have led to the consensual paradigm of Francisella as a cytosolic pathogen, but also to some controversy about its intracellular cycle. In this review, we will detail major findings that have advanced our knowledge of Francisella intracellular survival strategies and also attempt to reconcile discrepancies that exist in our molecular understanding of the Francisella-phagocyte interaction.

  3. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Phenyl Acetic Acid and Dl-Mandelic Acid by Permanganate in Acid Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Syama Sundar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of oxidation of phenyl acetic acid and DL- Mandelic acid by potassium permanganate in aqueous acetic acid and perchloric acid mixture reveals that the kinetic orders are first order in oxidant, first order in H+ and zero order in substrate for phenyl acetic acid. DL-Mandelic acid exhibits first order in oxidant and zero order in substrate. The results are rationalised by a mechanism involving intermediate formation of mandelic acid in case of Phenyl acetic acid and ester formation with Mn (VII in case of DL-Mandelic acid. The following order of reactivity is observed: DL-Mandelic acid > Phenyl acetic acid. The high reactivity of DL-Mandelic acid over phenyl acetic acid may be due to different mechanisms operating with the two substrates and benzaldehyde is the final product in both the cases.

  4. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Increase Survival and Decrease Bacterial Load in Mice Subjected to Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svahn, Sara L; Ulleryd, Marcus A; Grahnemo, Louise; Ståhlman, Marcus; Borén, Jan; Nilsson, Staffan; Jansson, John-Olov; Johansson, Maria E

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is increasing in incidence. With the alarming use of antibiotics,S. aureus is prone to become methicillin resistant. Antibiotics are the only widely used pharmacological treatment for sepsis. Interestingly, mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids have better survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis than mice fed HFD rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S). To investigate what component of polyunsaturated fatty acids, i.e., omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids, exerts beneficial effects on the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis, mice were fed HFD rich in omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids for 8 weeks prior to inoculation with S. aureus Further, mice fed HFD-S were treated with omega-3 fatty acid metabolites known as resolvins. Mice fed HFD rich in omega-3 fatty acids had increased survival and decreased bacterial loads compared to those for mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis. Furthermore, the bacterial load was decreased in resolvin-treated mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis compared with that in mice treated with vehicle. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids increase the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis by reversing the deleterious effect of HFD-S on mouse survival.

  5. A paradoxical teratogenic mechanism for retinoic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Leo M. Y.; Leung, Chun-Yin; Tang, Walfred W. C.; Choi, Heung-Ling; Leung, Yun-Chung; McCaffery, Peter J.; Wang, Chi-Chiu; Woolf, Adrian S.; Shum, Alisa S.W.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoic acid, an active metabolite of vitamin A, plays essential signaling roles in mammalian embryogenesis. Nevertheless, it has long been recognized that overexposure to vitamin A or retinoic acid causes widespread teratogenesis in rodents as well as humans. Although it has a short half-life, exposure to high levels of retinoic acid can disrupt development of yet-to-be formed organs, including the metanephros, the embryonic organ which normally differentiates into the mature kidney. Parado...

  6. Association Mechanism Between Propionic Acid and Trioctylamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振宇; 秦炜; 戴猷元

    2002-01-01

    Tertiary amines dissolved in diluents are attractive extractants for recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. Quantitative Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis of organic solutions containing various concentrations of trioctylamine (TOA), n-octanol, and propionic acid was carried out, and liquid-liquid equilibrium was investigated using TOA in n-octanol as the solvent. The fraction of ion-pair association between TOA and propionic acid in the organic phase was quantitatively determined by FTIR. The apparent reactive extraction equilibrium constant, K11, was calculated using the quantitative FTIR spectrum and the equilibrium data. The results show that the fraction of ion-pair association depends on diluent concentration, complex dissolution for propionic acid, and association between TOA and propionic acid. The K11 based on quantitative FTIR has the same loading trend as that from the equilibrium data.

  7. Resilient Voting Mechanisms for Mission Survivability in Cyberspace: Combining Replication and Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Kamhoua

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While information systems became ever more complex and the interdependence of these systems increased, mission-critical services should be survivable even in the presence of cyber attacks or internal failures. Node replication can be used to protect a mission-critical system against faults that may occur naturally or be caused by malicious attackers. The overall reliability increases by the number of replicas. However, when the replicas are a perfect copy of each other, a successful attack or failure in any node can be instantaneously repeated in all the other nodes. Eventually, the service of those nodes will discontinue, which may affect the system’s mission. Therefore, it becomes evident that there must be more survivable approach with diversity among the replicas in mission-critical systems. In particular, thisresearch investigates the best binary voting mechanism among replicas. Furthermore, with experimental results, we compare the simple majority mechanism with hierarchical decision process and discuss theirtrade-offs.

  8. Mechanisms of Sensorineural Cell Damage, Death and Survival in the Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Frederic Ryan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of acquired hearing loss, including presbycusis, is caused by irreversible damage to the sensorineural tissues of the cochlea. This article reviews the intracellular mechanisms that contribute to sensorineural damage in the cochlea, as well as the survival signaling pathways that can provide endogenous protection and tissue rescue. These data have primarily been generated in hearing loss not directly related to age. However, there is evidence that similar mechanisms operate in presbycusis. Moreover, accumulation of damage from other causes can contribute to age-related hearing loss. Potential therapeutic interventions to balance opposing but interconnected cell damage and survival pathways, such as antioxidants, anti-apoptotics, and pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibitors, are also discussed.

  9. Survival of acid adapted and non-acid adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in pasteurized orange juice and yogurt under different storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Valdés, Lorena; Bernardo, Ana; Prieto, Miguel; López, Mercedes

    2013-10-01

    The survival capacity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acid adapted and non-acid adapted cells was monitored in pasteurized yogurt (pH 4.1) and orange juice (pH 3.6) during storage at different temperatures (4, 10, 25 and 37 ). Acid adapted and non-acid adapted cells were obtained by means of their growth for 36 h in Brain Heart Infusion broth acidified at pH 4.8 with citric acid and buffered (pH 7.0) Brain Heart Infusion broth, respectively. S. typhimurium showed a great ability to survive in both foodstuffs and, especially, in yogurt, where both acid adapted and non-acid adapted populations suffered only a reduction of about 1.3-1.9 log10 cycles after 43 days of storage in the range of temperatures 4-25 . At 37  a higher bacterial inactivation was observed (4.0-4.4 log10 cycles). In orange juice, a different behaviour was observed for acid-adapted and non-acid adapted cells. Whereas non-acid adapted cells survived better than acid adapted cells at 4 and 10 , acid adapted cells showed enhanced survival abilities at higher temperatures (25 and 37 ). Thus, the times required to achieve a 5 log10 cycles reduction for non-acid adapted and acid adapted cells were 10.2 and 6.0 (4 ), 6.3 and 4.2 (10 ), 0.6 and 1.0 (25 ) and 0.10 and 0.15 (37 ) days, respectively. Evidence found in this study demonstrates that refrigeration temperatures protect S. typhimurium from inactivation in acid foods and indicates that S. typhimurium acid tolerance response (ATR) is determined by storage temperature and food composition.

  10. Polysialic acid sustains cancer cell survival and migratory capacity in a hypoxic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkashef, Sara M; Allison, Simon J; Sadiq, Maria; Basheer, Haneen A; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M; Pors, Klaus; Falconer, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) is a unique carbohydrate polymer expressed on the surface of NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule) in a number of cancers where it modulates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, migration, invasion and metastasis and is strongly associated with poor clinical prognosis. We have carried out the first investigation into the effect of polySia expression on the behaviour of cancer cells in hypoxia, a key source of chemoresistance in tumours. The role of polysialylation and associated tumour cell migration and cell adhesion were studied in hypoxia, along with effects on cell survival and the potential role of HIF-1. Our findings provide the first evidence that polySia expression sustains migratory capacity and is associated with tumour cell survival in hypoxia. Initial mechanistic studies indicate a potential role for HIF-1 in sustaining polySia-mediated migratory capacity, but not cell survival. These data add to the growing body of evidence pointing to a crucial role for the polysialyltransferases (polySTs) in neuroendocrine tumour progression and provide the first evidence to suggest that polySia is associated with an aggressive phenotype in tumour hypoxia. These results have significant potential implications for polyST inhibition as an anti-metastatic therapeutic strategy and for targeting hypoxic cancer cells. PMID:27611649

  11. Polysialic acid sustains cancer cell survival and migratory capacity in a hypoxic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkashef, Sara M.; Allison, Simon J.; Sadiq, Maria; Basheer, Haneen A.; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M.; Pors, Klaus; Falconer, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) is a unique carbohydrate polymer expressed on the surface of NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule) in a number of cancers where it modulates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, migration, invasion and metastasis and is strongly associated with poor clinical prognosis. We have carried out the first investigation into the effect of polySia expression on the behaviour of cancer cells in hypoxia, a key source of chemoresistance in tumours. The role of polysialylation and associated tumour cell migration and cell adhesion were studied in hypoxia, along with effects on cell survival and the potential role of HIF-1. Our findings provide the first evidence that polySia expression sustains migratory capacity and is associated with tumour cell survival in hypoxia. Initial mechanistic studies indicate a potential role for HIF-1 in sustaining polySia-mediated migratory capacity, but not cell survival. These data add to the growing body of evidence pointing to a crucial role for the polysialyltransferases (polySTs) in neuroendocrine tumour progression and provide the first evidence to suggest that polySia is associated with an aggressive phenotype in tumour hypoxia. These results have significant potential implications for polyST inhibition as an anti-metastatic therapeutic strategy and for targeting hypoxic cancer cells. PMID:27611649

  12. tPA promotes cortical neuron survival via mTOR-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummisch, Julia A; Jadavji, Nafisa M; Smith, Patrice D

    2016-07-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a thrombolytic agent commonly used in the treatment of ischemic stroke. While the thrombolytic effects of tPA have been well established, the impact of this blood-brain barrier (BBB) crossing drug on neurons is not known. Given the widespread use of tPA in the clinical setting and the strict therapeutic window established for effective use of the drug, we examined the molecular mechanisms mediating the impact of tPA on postnatal cortical neurons isolated from the mouse brain. Dissociated postnatal primary cortical neurons were treated with tPA and the effects on neuron survival were evaluated. Pharmacological inhibitors of several signaling pathways previously implicated in neuroprotection (mTOR, JAK/STAT, MAPK and PKA-dependent mechanisms) were used to pinpoint the mechanistic effectors of tPA on neuron survival in vitro. We report here that tPA treatment results in a time-dependent neuroprotective effect on postnatal cortical neurons that relies predominantly on Janus kinase (JAK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling mechanisms. Taken together, these data suggest that tPA promotes neuroprotection in a temporally-regulated manner and that both JAK and mTOR signaling effectors are critical mediators of this neuroprotective effect. The results suggest the possibility of targeting these defined mechanisms to potentially expand the therapeutic window for tPA. PMID:26995507

  13. The mechanism and properties of acid-coagulated milk gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanokphat Phadungath

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Acid-coagulated milk products such as fresh acid-coagulated cheese varieties and yogurt areimportant dairy food products. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms involved in gel formation, physical properties of acid gels, and the effects of processing variables such as heat treatment and gelation temperature on the important physical properties of acid milk gels. This paper reviews the modern concepts of possible mechanisms involved in the formation of particle milk gel aggregation, along with recent developments including the use of techniques such as dynamic low amplitude oscillatory rheology to observe the gel formation process, and confocal laser scanning microscopy to monitor gel microstructure.

  14. Sulfuric acid leaching of mechanically activated manganese carbonate ore

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    Kenan Yıldız

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acidic leaching of mechanically activated manganese ore from Denizli – Tavas was investigated. The ore was activated mechanically in a planetary mill and the amorphisation in manganese structure was analyzed with X-ray diffraction. The parameters in acidic leaching of the ore were milling time, acid concentration and time. All experiments were performed at 25°C with solid to liquid ratio: 1/10. The activation procedure led to amorphization and structural disordering in manganese ore and accelerated the dissolution of manganese in acidic media.

  15. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA- induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus

  16. Survival of Salmonella serovars on beef carcasses and molecular mechanisms to survive low temperature stress and desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Aabo, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    P genes of the S. Typhimurium C5 wildtype are under investigation. The mutants and the wildtype have been tested for growth and survival at low temperature and desiccation. No differences were observed between wildtype and mutants after 20 days at fridge temperature (~4°C) on LB agar plates. However, both...

  17. Mitochondrial genome depletion in human liver cells abolishes bile acid-induced apoptosis: role of the Akt/mTOR survival pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Jose J G; Hernandez, Alicia; Revuelta, Isabel E; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Gonzalez-Buitrago, Jose M; Perez, Maria J

    2013-08-01

    Acute accumulation of bile acids in hepatocytes may cause cell death. However, during long-term exposure due to prolonged cholestasis, hepatocytes may develop a certain degree of chemoresistance to these compounds. Because mitochondrial adaptation to persistent oxidative stress may be involved in this process, here we have investigated the effects of complete mitochondrial genome depletion on the response to bile acid-induced hepatocellular injury. A subline (Rho) of human hepatoma SK-Hep-1 cells totally depleted of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was obtained, and bile acid-induced concentration-dependent activation of apoptosis/necrosis and survival signaling pathways was studied. In the absence of changes in intracellular ATP content, Rho cells were highly resistant to bile acid-induced apoptosis and partially resistant to bile acid-induced necrosis. In Rho cells, both basal and bile acid-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, was decreased. Bile acid-induced proapoptotic signals were also decreased, as evidenced by a reduction in the expression ratios Bax-α/Bcl-2, Bcl-xS/Bcl-2, and Bcl-xS/Bcl-xL. This was mainly due to a downregulation of Bax-α and Bcl-xS. Moreover, in these cells the Akt/mTOR pathway was constitutively activated in a ROS-independent manner and remained similarly activated in the presence of bile acid treatment. In contrast, ERK1/2 activation was constitutively reduced and was not activated by incubation with bile acids. In conclusion, these results suggest that impaired mitochondrial function associated with mtDNA alterations, which may occur in liver cells during prolonged cholestasis, may activate mechanisms of cell survival accounting for an enhanced resistance of hepatocytes to bile acid-induced apoptosis. PMID:23597504

  18. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eGiannattasio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications.

  19. Mechanisms Regulating Acid-Base Transporter Expression in Breast- and Pancreatic Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbatenko, Andrej

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women, and the second most frequent cause of death from cancer in women. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest forms of cancer with only a 5% 5-year survival rate. Both types of cancer form solid tumors......, characteristics of which are a shift towards glycolytic metabolism and increased acid production. HER2 receptor overexpression in breast cancer leads to further increased glycolysis, invasion and metastasis, drug resistance and poor prognosis. Increased tumor glycolysis requires acquisition of mechanisms...... for dealing with excess acid production. In this light, evidence accumulates on the importance of pH regulatory proteins to cancer cell survival and motility. Our group previously demonstrated upregulation of the Na+/HCO3 - co-transporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7) by a constitutively active form of HER2 receptor (p95HER...

  20. Interaction Mechanism of Anthracene with Benzoic Acid and Its Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ying-Ying; WANG Xiao-Chang; FAN Xiao-Yuan; ZHAO Bo; JIN Peng-Kang

    2008-01-01

    Interaction mechanism of anthracene, one of the typical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, with benzoic acid and its hydroxyl-substituted derivatives, o-hydroxylbenzoic acid and p-hydroxylbenzoic acid, were studied using FFIR, UV and fluorescence spectra. The experiments confirmed that there was a specific and oriented interaction between anthracene and the aromatic carboxylic acids, and the bonding mode depended on both the chemical struc- ture of reactants and acidity of solution. The π-H hydrogen bond played a main role in the interaction between an-thracene and the aromatic carboxylic proton of benzoic acid or o-hydroxylbenzoic acid when pH≤pK, and the π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interaction increasingly became the main binding mode when pH>pK. The de-crease of interaction intensity of benzoic acid was observed by introducing hydroxyl at its ortho position. The spe-cial D-π-A structure of p-hydroxylbenzoic acid made it easy to form the planar multi-molecule congeries that could interact with anthracene, so the interaction between anthracene and p-hydroxylbenzoic acid always followed the π-π EDA model no matter the solution acidity. For p-hydroxylbenzoic acid, the π-π interaction mode remained un-changed when pH increased from 2.0 to 10.0, and the binding intensity was higher than that between benzoic acid and anthracene because of the formation of the multi-molecule congeries.

  1. Mechanisms of survival, responses and sources of Salmonella in low-moisture environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eFinn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Some Enterobacteriaceae possess the ability to survive in low-moisture environments for extended periods of time. Many of the reported food-borne outbreaks associated with low-moisture foods involve Salmonella contamination. The control of Salmonella in low-moisture foods and their production environments represents a significant challenge for all food manufacturers. This review summarises the current state of knowledge with respect to Salmonella survival in intermediate- and low-moisture food matrices and their production environments. The mechanisms utilised by this bacterium to ensure their survival in these dry conditions remain to be fully elucidated, however in depth transcriptiomic data is now beginning to emerge regarding this observation. Earlier research work described the effect(s that low-moisture can exert on the long-term persistence and heat tolerance of Salmonella, however, data are also now available highlighting the potential cross-tolerance to other stressors including commonly used microbicidal agents. Sources and potential control measures to reduce the risk of contamination will be explored. By extending our understanding of these geno- and phenotypes, we may be able to exploit them to improve food safety and protect public health.

  2. Salvianolic acid B promotes survival of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord-injured rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-bin BI; Yu-bin DENG; Dan-hui GAN; Ya-zhu WANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Stem cells hold great promise for brain and spinal cord injuries (SCI), but cell survival following transplantation to adult central nervous system has been poor. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) has been shown to improve functional recovery in brain-injured rats. The present study was designed to determine whether Sal B could improve transplanted mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) survival in SCI rats. Methods: SCI rats were treated with Sal B. The Basso-Beatie-Bresnahan (BBB) scale was used to test the functional recovery. Sal B was used to protect MSC from being damaged by TNF-α in vitro. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeled MSC were transplanted into SCI rats with Sal B intraperitoneal injection, simul-taneously. MSC were examined, and the functional recovery of the SCI rats was tested. Results: Sal B treatment significantly reduced the lesion area from 0.26±0.05 mm2 to 0.15±0.03 mm2 (P<0.01) and remarkably raised the BBB scores on d 28, post-injury, from 7.3±0.9 to 10.5±1.3 (P<0.05), compared with the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control group. MSC were protected from the damage of TNF-α by Sal B. The number of surviving MSC in the MSC plus Sal B groups were 1143.3± 195.6 and 764.0±81.3 on d 7 and 28, post-transplantation, more than those in the MSC group, which was 569.3±72.3 and 237.0±61.3, respectively (P<0.05). Rats with MSC trans-planted and Sal B injected obtained higher BBB scores than those with MSC transplanted alone (P<0.05) and PBS (P<0.01). Conclusion: Sal B provides neuroprotection to SCI and promotes the survival of MSC in vitro and after cell transplantation to the injured spinal cord in vivo.

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial Proteins Reveals Pro-Survival Mechanisms in the Perpetuation of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Stefani N.; Waters, Katrina M.; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Baulch, Janet E.

    2012-07-26

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon that is measured as mitotically heritable genetic alterations observed in the progeny of an irradiated cell. The mechanisms that perpetuate this instability are unclear, however, a role for chronic oxidative stress has consistently been demonstrated. In the chromosomally unstable LS12 cell line, oxidative stress and genomic instability were correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To clarify this mitochondrial dysfunction and gain insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation induced genomic instability we have evaluated the mitochondrial sub-proteome and performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of LS12 cells. Of 98 quantified mitochondrial proteins, 17 met criteria for fold changes and reproducibility; and 11 were statistically significant in comparison with the stable parental GM10115 cell line. Previous observations implicated defects in the electron transport chain (ETC) in the LS12 cell mitochondrial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis supports these observations, demonstrating significantly reduced levels of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the intermediary between complexes III and IV of the ETC. Results also suggest that LS12 cells compensate for ETC dysfunction and oxidative stress through increased levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and up-regulation of proteins that protect against oxidative stress and apoptosis. More than one cellular defect is likely to contribute to the genomic instability phenotype. These data suggest that LS12 cells have adapted mechanisms that allow survival under sub-optimal conditions of oxidative stress and compromised mitochondrial function to perpetuate genomic instability.

  4. Antiobesity mechanisms of action of conjugated linoleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennedy, Arion; Martinez, Kristina; Schmidt, Soren;

    2010-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a family of fatty acids found in beef, dairy foods and dietary supplements, reduces adiposity in several animal models of obesity and some human studies. However, the isomer-specific antiobesity mechanisms of action of CLA are unclear, and its use in humans is...

  5. Pathway analysis reveals common pro-survival mechanisms of metyrapone and carbenoxolone after traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L Hellmich

    Full Text Available Developing new pharmacotherapies for traumatic brain injury (TBI requires elucidation of the neuroprotective mechanisms of many structurally and functionally diverse compounds. To test our hypothesis that diverse neuroprotective drugs similarly affect common gene targets after TBI, we compared the effects of two drugs, metyrapone (MT and carbenoxolone (CB, which, though used clinically for noncognitive conditions, improved learning and memory in rats and humans. Although structurally different, both MT and CB inhibit a common molecular target, 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, which converts inactive cortisone to cortisol, thereby effectively reducing glucocorticoid levels. We examined injury-induced signaling pathways to determine how the effects of these two compounds correlate with pro-survival effects in surviving neurons of the injured rat hippocampus. We found that treatment of TBI rats with MT or CB acutely induced in hippocampal neurons transcriptional profiles that were remarkably similar (i.e., a coordinated attenuation of gene expression across multiple injury-induced cell signaling networks. We also found, to a lesser extent, a coordinated increase in cell survival signals. Analysis of injury-induced gene expression altered by MT and CB provided additional insight into the protective effects of each. Both drugs attenuated expression of genes in the apoptosis, death receptor and stress signaling pathways, as well as multiple genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway such as subunits of NADH dehydrogenase (Complex1, cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV and ATP synthase (Complex V. This suggests an overall inhibition of mitochondrial function. Complex 1 is the primary source of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway, thus linking the protective effects of these drugs to a reduction in oxidative stress. The net effect of the drug-induced transcriptional changes observed here indicates that

  6. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Santangelo, Carmela; Filesi, Carmelina; Galvano, Fabio; D'Archivio, Massimo; Masella, Roberta; Giovannini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA), one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 macrophages. We found that the presence of PCA in cells treated with oxLDL completely inhibited the p53-dependent apoptosis induced by oxLDL. PCA decreased oxLDL-induced ROS overproduction and in particular prevented the early increase of ROS. This decrease seemed to be the main signal responsible for maintaining the intracellular redox homeostasis hindering the activation of p53 induced by ROS, p38MAPK, and PKCδ. Consequently the overexpression of the proapoptotic p53-target genes such as p66Shc protein did not occur. Finally, we demonstrated that PCA induced the activation of JNK, which, in turn, determined the increase of nuclear Nrf2, leading to inhibition of the early ROS overproduction. We concluded that the antiapoptotic mechanism of PCA was most likely related to the activation of the JNK-mediated survival signals that strengthen the cellular antioxidant defences rather than to the PCA antioxidant power. PMID:26180584

  7. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaria Varì

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protocatechuic acid (PCA, one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 macrophages. We found that the presence of PCA in cells treated with oxLDL completely inhibited the p53-dependent apoptosis induced by oxLDL. PCA decreased oxLDL-induced ROS overproduction and in particular prevented the early increase of ROS. This decrease seemed to be the main signal responsible for maintaining the intracellular redox homeostasis hindering the activation of p53 induced by ROS, p38MAPK, and PKCδ. Consequently the overexpression of the proapoptotic p53-target genes such as p66Shc protein did not occur. Finally, we demonstrated that PCA induced the activation of JNK, which, in turn, determined the increase of nuclear Nrf2, leading to inhibition of the early ROS overproduction. We concluded that the antiapoptotic mechanism of PCA was most likely related to the activation of the JNK-mediated survival signals that strengthen the cellular antioxidant defences rather than to the PCA antioxidant power.

  8. Mechanisms controlling renal hemodynamics and electrolyte excretion during amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, L.L.; Mizelle, H.L.; Montani, J.P.; Hall, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the mechanisms by which increased plasma amino acids elevate renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Since transport of amino acids and Na is linked in the proximal tubule, the authors hypothesized that increased amino acids might stimulate proximal tubular Na reabsorption (PR/sub Na/) and thus increase RBF and GFR by a macula densa feedback mechanism. A solution of four amino acids (Ala, Ser, Gly, Pro) was infused intravenously into anesthetized dogs with normal kidneys (NK) and with kidneys in which the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism was blunted by lowering renal artery pressure (LPK) or blocked by making the kidneys nonfiltering (NFK). In NK, RBF and GFR increased by 35 +/- 4% and 30 +/- 7% after 90 min of amino acid infusion, while PR/sub Na/ (estimated from lithium clearance) and O2 consumption increased by 31 +/- 5% and 29 +/- 5% and distal Na delivery remained relatively constant. Autoregulation of RBF and GFR in response to step deceases in renal artery pressure was impaired during amino acids in NK. The hemodynamic responses to amino acids were abolished in LPK and NFK. Infusion of the nonmetabolized -aminoisobutyric acid into NK produced changes in renal hemodynamics that were similar to the responses observed with the four metabolizable amino acids. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevation of plasma amino acids increases RBF and GFR by a mechanism that requires an intact macula densa feedback. Metabolism of the amino acids does not appear to be necessary for these changes to occur.

  9. Endotoxin-stimulated Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells Induce Autophagy in Hepatocytes as a Survival Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangi, Anil; Huang, Chao; Tandon, Ashish; Stolz, Donna; Wu, Tong; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) produce many cytokines including IFNβ, TNFα, and IL6, strongly inhibit DNA synthesis, but induce apoptosis of a small number of hepatocytes. In vivo administration of LPS (up to 10 mg/mL) causes modest inflammation and weight loss in rats but not mortality. We determined whether LPS-stimulated HSCs instigate mechanisms of hepatocyte survival. Rats received 10 mg/kg LPS (i.p.) and determinations were made at 6 h. In vitro, HSCs were treated with 100 ng/mL LPS till 24 h. The medium was transferred to hepatocytes, and determinations were made at 0-12 h. Controls were HSC-conditioned medium or medium-containing LPS. LPS treatment of rats caused autophagy in hepatocytes, a physiological process for clearance of undesirable material including injured or damaged organelles. This was accompanied by activation of c-Jun NH2 terminal kinase (JNK) and apoptosis of ~4-5% of hepatocytes. In vitro, LPS-conditioned HSC medium (LPS/HSC) induced autophagy in hepatocytes but apoptosis of only ~10% of hepatocytes. While LPS/HSC stimulated activation of JNK (associated with cell death), it also activated NFkB and ERK1/2 (associated with cell survival). LPS-stimulated HSCs produced IFNβ, and LPS/HSC-induced autophagy in hepatocytes and their apoptosis were significantly inhibited by anti-IFNβ antibody. Blockade of autophagy, on the other hand, strongly augmented hepatocyte apoptosis. While LPS-stimulated HSCs cause apoptosis of a subpopulation of hepatocytes by producing IFNβ, they also induce cell survival mechanisms, which may be of critical importance in resistance to liver injury during endotoxemia.

  10. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winyoo Chowanadisai

    Full Text Available The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05 (S2 Table. Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  11. Single sample expression-anchored mechanisms predict survival in head and neck cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinan Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression signatures that are predictive of therapeutic response or prognosis are increasingly useful in clinical care; however, mechanistic (and intuitive interpretation of expression arrays remains an unmet challenge. Additionally, there is surprisingly little gene overlap among distinct clinically validated expression signatures. These "causality challenges" hinder the adoption of signatures as compared to functionally well-characterized single gene biomarkers. To increase the utility of multi-gene signatures in survival studies, we developed a novel approach to generate "personal mechanism signatures" of molecular pathways and functions from gene expression arrays. FAIME, the Functional Analysis of Individual Microarray Expression, computes mechanism scores using rank-weighted gene expression of an individual sample. By comparing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC samples with non-tumor control tissues, the precision and recall of deregulated FAIME-derived mechanisms of pathways and molecular functions are comparable to those produced by conventional cohort-wide methods (e.g. GSEA. The overlap of "Oncogenic FAIME Features of HNSCC" (statistically significant and differentially regulated FAIME-derived genesets representing GO functions or KEGG pathways derived from HNSCC tissue among three distinct HNSCC datasets (pathways:46%, p<0.001 is more significant than the gene overlap (genes:4%. These Oncogenic FAIME Features of HNSCC can accurately discriminate tumors from control tissues in two additional HNSCC datasets (n = 35 and 91, F-accuracy = 100% and 97%, empirical p<0.001, area under the receiver operating characteristic curves = 99% and 92%, and stratify recurrence-free survival in patients from two independent studies (p = 0.0018 and p = 0.032, log-rank. Previous approaches depending on group assignment of individual samples before selecting features or learning a classifier are limited by design to

  12. Queen survival and oxalic acid residues in sugar stores after summer application against Varroa destructor in honey bees (Apis mellifera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, B.; Donders, J.N.L.C.; Stratum, van P.; Blacquière, T.; Dooremalen, van C.

    2012-01-01

    Methods using oxalic acid (OA) to control Varroa destructor in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies are widely applied. In this study, the effects of an OA spray application in early summer on the survival of young and old queens, and on OA residues in sugar stores were investigated. A questionnaire

  13. Survival and SOS response induction in ultraviolet B irradiated Escherichia coli cells with defective repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada Medina, Cesar Augusto; Aristizabal Tessmer, Elke Tatjana; Quintero Ruiz, Nathalia; Serment-Guerrero, Jorge; Fuentes, Jorge Luis

    2016-06-01

    Purpose In this paper, the contribution of different genes involved in DNA repair for both survival and SOS induction in Escherichia coli mutants exposed to ultraviolet B radiation (UVB, [wavelength range 280-315 nm]) was evaluated. Materials and methods E. coli strains defective in uvrA, oxyR, recO, recN, recJ, exoX, recB, recD or xonA genes were used to determine cell survival. All strains also had the genetic sulA::lacZ fusion, which allowed for the quantification of SOS induction through the SOS Chromotest. Results Five gene products were particularly important for survival, as follows: UvrA > RecB > RecO > RecJ > XonA. Strains defective in uvrA and recJ genes showed elevated SOS induction compared with the wild type, which remained stable for up to 240 min after UVB-irradiation. In addition, E. coli strains carrying the recO or recN mutation showed no SOS induction. Conclusions The nucleotide excision and DNA recombination pathways were equally used to repair UVB-induced DNA damage in E. coli cells. The sulA gene was not turned off in strains defective in UvrA and RecJ. RecO protein was essential for processing DNA damage prior to SOS induction. In this study, the roles of DNA repair proteins and their contributions to the mechanisms that induce SOS genes in E. coli are proposed.

  14. Survival and SOS response induction in ultraviolet B irradiated Escherichia coli cells with defective repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada Medina, Cesar Augusto; Aristizabal Tessmer, Elke Tatjana; Quintero Ruiz, Nathalia; Serment-Guerrero, Jorge; Fuentes, Jorge Luis

    2016-06-01

    Purpose In this paper, the contribution of different genes involved in DNA repair for both survival and SOS induction in Escherichia coli mutants exposed to ultraviolet B radiation (UVB, [wavelength range 280-315 nm]) was evaluated. Materials and methods E. coli strains defective in uvrA, oxyR, recO, recN, recJ, exoX, recB, recD or xonA genes were used to determine cell survival. All strains also had the genetic sulA::lacZ fusion, which allowed for the quantification of SOS induction through the SOS Chromotest. Results Five gene products were particularly important for survival, as follows: UvrA > RecB > RecO > RecJ > XonA. Strains defective in uvrA and recJ genes showed elevated SOS induction compared with the wild type, which remained stable for up to 240 min after UVB-irradiation. In addition, E. coli strains carrying the recO or recN mutation showed no SOS induction. Conclusions The nucleotide excision and DNA recombination pathways were equally used to repair UVB-induced DNA damage in E. coli cells. The sulA gene was not turned off in strains defective in UvrA and RecJ. RecO protein was essential for processing DNA damage prior to SOS induction. In this study, the roles of DNA repair proteins and their contributions to the mechanisms that induce SOS genes in E. coli are proposed. PMID:26967458

  15. Survival mechanisms of vertebrate ectotherms at subfreezing temperatures: applications in cryomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, J P; Lee, R E; DeVries, A L; Wang, T; Layne, J R

    1995-03-01

    Various marine fishes, amphibians, and reptiles survive at temperatures several degrees below the freezing point of their body fluids by virtue of adaptive mechanisms that promote freeze avoidance or freeze tolerance. Freezing is avoided by a colligative depression of the blood freezing point, supercooling of the body fluids, or the biosynthesis of unique antifreeze proteins that inhibit the propagation of ice within body fluids. Conversely, freeze tolerance is an adaptation for the survival of tissue freezing under ecologically relevant thermal and temporal conditions that is conferred by the biosynthesis of permeating carbohydrate cryoprotectants and an extensive dehydration of tissues and organs. Such cryoprotective responses, invoked by the onset of freezing, mitigate the osmotic stress associated with freeze-concentration of cytoplasm, attendant metabolic perturbations, and physical damage. Cryomedical research has historically relied on mammalian models for experimentation even though endotherms do not naturally experience subfreezing temperatures. Some vertebrate ectotherms have "solved" not only the problem of freezing individual tissues and organs, but also that of simultaneously freezing all organ systems. An emerging paradigm in cryomedicine is the application of principles governing natural cold hardiness to the development of protocols for the cryopreservation of mammalian tissues and organs. PMID:7896003

  16. Selective stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptor subtypes and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture: effect of kainic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate. Here we report on the influence of another glutamate analogue, kainic acid, which, in contrast to N-methyl-D-aspartate, is believed to stimulate transmitter rec...

  17. Mutant p53 - heat shock response oncogenic cooperation: a new mechanism of cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evguenia eAlexandrova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main tumor suppressor function of p53 as a ‘guardian of the genome’ is to respond to cellular stress by transcriptional activation of apoptosis, growth arrest or senescence in damaged cells. Not surprisingly, mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in human cancers. Importantly, mutant p53 (mutp53 proteins not only lose their wild-type tumor suppressor activity, but also can actively promote tumor development. Two main mechanisms accounting for mutp53 proto-oncogenic activity are inhibition of the wild-type p53 in a dominant-negative fashion and gain of additional oncogenic activities known as gain-of-function (GOF. Here we discuss a novel mechanism of mutp53 GOF, which relies on its oncogenic cooperation with the heat shock machinery. This coordinated adaptive mechanism renders cancer cells more resistant to proteotoxic stress and provides both, a strong survival advantage to cancer cells and a promising means for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Friction and wear experiment were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  19. Applications of hydroxy acids: classification, mechanisms, and photoactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Kornhauser

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Andrija Kornhauser1, Sergio G Coelho2, Vincent J Hearing21US Food and Drug Administration [retired], Annandale, VA, USA; 2Laboratory of Cell Biology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Hydroxy acids (HAs represent a class of compounds which have been widely used in a number of cosmetic and therapeutic formulations in order to achieve a variety of beneficial effects for the skin. We review and discuss the most frequently used classes of these compounds, such as a-hydroxy acids, β-hydroxy acids, polyhydroxy acids, and bionic acids, and describe their applications as cosmetic and therapeutic agents. Special emphasis is devoted to the safety evaluation of these formulations, in particular on the effects of their prolonged use on sun-exposed skin. Furthermore, we summarize the very limited number of studies dealing with the modifications evoked by topical application of products containing HAs on photocarcinogenesis. In spite of the large number of reports on the cosmetic and clinical effects of HAs, their biological mechanism(s of action still require more clarification. Some of these mechanisms are discussed in this article along with important findings on the effect of HAs on melanogenesis and on tanning. We also emphasize the important contribution of cosmetic vehicles in these types of studies. Thus, HAs play an important role in cosmetic formulations, as well as in many dermatologic applications, such as in treating photoaging, acne, ichthyosis, rosacea, pigmentation disorders, and psoriasis.Keywords: hydroxy acids, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, UV, erythema, cosmetics

  20. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarmistha Devi Aribam

    Full Text Available Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  1. ACID RAIN AND SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY: EFFECTS AND THEIR MECHANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the investigation, our aim was to determine if acid rain affects soil microbial activity and to identify possible mechanisms of observed effects. A Sierran forest soil (pH 6.4) planted with Ponderosa pine seedlings was exposed to simulated rain (pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.6) with ...

  2. Formation mechanism of coamorphous drug−amino acid mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Cornett, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    Two coamorphous drug−amino acid systems, indomethacin−tryptophan (Ind−Trp) and furosemide−tryptophan Fur−Trp), were analyzed toward their ease of amorphization and mechanism of coamorphization during ball milling. The two mixtures were compared to the corresponding amorphization of the pure drug...

  3. Plurality of anxiety and depression alteration mechanism by oleanolic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajemiroye, James O; Galdino, Pablinny M; Florentino, Iziara F; Da Rocha, Fabio F; Ghedini, Paulo C; Polepally, Prabhakar R; Zjawiony, Jordan K; Costa, Elson A

    2014-10-01

    Our study sought to evaluate the anxiolytic and antidepressant activities of oleanolic acid as well as the neural mechanisms involved. Animal models such as barbiturate sleep-induction, light-dark box, elevated plus maze, forced swimming test, tail suspension test and open field test were conducted. Male Albino Swiss mice were treated orally with vehicle 10 mL/kg, fluoxetine 20 mg/kg, imipramine 15 mg/kg, diazepam 1 mg/kg or oleanolic acid 5-40 mg/kg. Pretreatment (intraperitoneal) of animals with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) 20 mg/kg, 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[4- (2-phthalimido) butyl]piperazine hydrobromide (NAN-190) 0.5 mg/kg, p-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA) 100 mg/kg or α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) 100 mg/kg, WAY100635 (WAY) 0.3 mg/kg, prazosin (PRAZ) 1 mg/kg, yohimbine 2 mg/kg as well as monoamine oxidase assay and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) quantification were carried out. Oleanolic acid potentiated the hypnotic effect of barbiturate and demonstrated an anxiolytic effect in both the light-dark box and elevated plus maze. This effect was not reversed by PTZ. Acute and/or chronic oral treatment of mice with oleanolic acid (5-20 mg/kg) elicited an antidepressant effect in the forced swimming test and the tail suspension test without interfering with the locomotor activity. The antidepressant effect of oleanolic acid was attenuated by NAN-190, AMPT, PCPA, WAY and PRAZ. Although monoamine oxidase activity remained unaltered by oleanolic acid, chronic administration of oleanolic acid augmented hippocampal BDNF level. These findings demonstrate multiple mechanisms of the anxiolytic and antidepressant effect of oleanolic acid.

  4. The role and mechanism of fatty acids in gallstones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo-Dong Wu; Kazuhisa Uchiyama; Ying Fan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholelithiasis is a common entity in China, but its etiology and pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated. Pigment stones of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct still form a high proportion in China, while they are rare in Europeans. To date, reports on fatty acids in stones remain few. We analyzed the quantity of fatty acids in different stones from Chinese and Japanese cases and discussed the role and mechanism of fatty acids in the formation of pigment stones. METHODS: Clinical data from 18 Chinese and 37 Japanese patients with different types of stones were analyzed using the procedure for extracting fatty acids from gallstones and high performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS: The total fatty acid and free fatty acid contents of pigment stones were markedly higher than those in black or cholesterol stones. The ratio of free saturated to free unsaturated fatty acids was highest in intrahepatic and less in extrahepatic pigment stones, which were signiifcantly different from the other two kinds of stones. CONCLUSIONS: This indicates that phospholipase participates in the course of pigment stone formation. The action of phospholipase A1 is more important than phospholipase A2.

  5. Glycolic acid modulates the mechanical property and degradation of poly(glycerol, sebacate, glycolic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Jie; Wu, Lan; Huang, Wei; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yan; Lu, Xi-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Lan; Yang, Bao-Feng; Dong, De-Li

    2010-01-01

    The development of biodegradable materials with controllable degradation properties is beneficial for a variety of applications. Poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS) is a promising candidate of biomaterials; so we synthesize a series of poly(glycerol, sebacate, glycolic acid) (PGSG) with 1:2:0, 1:2:0.2, 1:2:0.4, 1:2:0.6, 1:2:1 mole ratio of glycerol, sebacate, and glycolic acid to elucidate the relation of doped glycolic acid to the degradation rate and mechanical properties. The microstructures of the polymers with different doping of glycolic acid were dissimilar. PGSG with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0.2 displayed an integral degree of ordering, different to those with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0, 0.4, 0.6, and 1, which showed mild phase separation structure. The number, DeltaH(m), and temperature of the PGSG melting peaks tended to decrease with the increasing ratio of doped glycolic acid. In vitro and in vivo degradation tests showed that the degradation rate of PGSG with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0.2 was slowest, but in the ratio range of 0, 0.4, and 0.6, the degradation rate increased with the increase of glycolic acid. All PGSG samples displayed good tissue response and anticoagulant effects. Our data suggest that doping glycolic acid can modulate the microstructure and degree of crosslinking of PGS, thereby control the degradation rate of PGS.

  6. Drying of Micro-Encapsulated Lactic Acid Bacteria-Effects of Trehalose and Immobilization on Cell Survival and Release Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaoyan; CHEN Xiguang

    2009-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were encapsulated with alginate, gelatin and trehalose additives by the extrusion method and dried at 4℃. The microcapsules were generally spherical and had a wrinkled surface with a size of 1.7mm±0.2mm. Trehalose as a carbohydrate source in the culture medium could reduce acid production and performed no function in the positive proliferation of LAB. Using trehalose as a carbohydrate source and protective medium simultaneously had a benefit in the protection of LAB cells during the storage at 4℃. The density of hve LAB cells could be 10- CFU g-1 after 8 weeks of storage. Cells of LAB could be con-tinuously released from the capsules from the acidic (pH 1.2) to neutral conditions (plt 6.8). The release amounts and proliferation speeds of LAB cells in neutral medium were much larger and faster than those m acidic conditions. Additionally, immobilization of LAB could improve the survival of cells when they, were exposed to acidic medium (pH 1.2) with a survival rate of 76 %.

  7. Drying of micro-encapsulated lactic acid bacteria — Effects of trehalose and immobilization on cell survival and release properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xiguang

    2009-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were encapsulated with alginate, gelatin and trehalose additives by the extrusion method and dried at 4 °C. The microcapsules were generally spherical and had a wrinkled surface with a size of 1.7 mm ± 0.2 mm. Trehalose as a carbohydrate source in the culture medium could reduce acid production and performed no function in the positive proliferation of LAB. Using trehalose as a carbohydrate source and protective medium simultaneously had a benefit in the protection of LAB cells during the storage at 4 °C. The density of live LAB cells could be 107 CFU g-1 after 8 weeks of storage. Cells of LAB could be continuously released from the capsules from the acidic (pH 1.2) to neutral conditions (pH 6.8). The release amounts and proliferation speeds of LAB cells in neutral medium were much larger and faster than those in acidic conditions. Additionally, immobilization of LAB could improve the survival of cells when they were exposed to acidic medium (pH 1.2) with a survival rate of 76 %.

  8. Extended Survival of Several Microorganisms and Relevant Amino Acid Biomarkers under Simulated Martian Surface Conditions as a Function of Burial Depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Adam [Indiana University; Pratt, L.M. [Indiana University; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Pfiffner, S. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bryan, R. A. [Yeshiva University, New York; Dadachova, E. [Yeshiva University, New York; Whyte, L G [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Radtke, K. [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Chan, E. [Princeton University; Tronick, S. [Princeton University; Borgonie, G. [Ghent University, Belgium; Mancinelli, R. [SETI Institute; Rothschild, L. [NASA Ames Research Center; Rogoff, D. [NASA Ames Research Center; Horikawa, D. D. [NASA Ames Research Center; Onstott, T. C. [Princeton University

    2011-01-01

    Recent orbital and landed missions have provided substantial evidence for ancient liquid water on the martian surface as well as evidence of more recent sedimentary deposits formed by water and/or ice. These observations raise serious questions regarding an independent origin and evolution of life on Mars. Future missions seek to identify signs of extinct martian biota in the form of biomarkers or morphological characteristics, but the inherent danger of spacecraft-borne terrestrial life makes the possibility of forward contamination a serious threat not only to the life detection experiments, but also to any extant martian ecosystem. A variety of cold and desiccation-tolerant organisms were exposed to 40 days of simulated martian surface conditions while embedded within several centimeters of regolith simulant in order to ascertain the plausibility of such organisms survival as a function of environmental parameters and burial depth. Relevant amino acid biomarkers associated with terrestrial life were also analyzed in order to understand the feasibility of detecting chemical evidence for previous biological activity. Results indicate that stresses due to desiccation and oxidation were the primary deterrent to organism survival, and that the effects of UV-associated damage, diurnal temperature variations, and reactive atmospheric species were minimal. Organisms with resistance to desiccation and radiation environments showed increased levels of survival after the experiment compared to organisms characterized as psychrotolerant. Amino acid analysis indicated the presence of an oxidation mechanism that migrated downward through the samples during the course of the experiment and likely represents the formation of various oxidizing species at mineral surfaces as water vapor diffused through the regolith. Current sterilization protocols may specifically select for organisms best adapted to survival at the martian surface, namely species that show tolerance to radical

  9. Autophagy as a Survival Mechanism for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells in Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Atsushi; Hamada, Masakazu; Kameyama, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ken; Takasu, Ayako; Imai, Tomoaki; Iwai, Soichi; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Safingol, L- threo-dihydrosphingosine, induces cell death in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells through an endonuclease G (endoG) -mediated pathway. We herein determined whether safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in oral SCC cells. Safingol induced apoptotic cell death in oral SCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In safingol-treated cells, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I was changed to LC3-II and the cytoplasmic expression of LC3, amount of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) stained by acridine orange and autophagic vacuoles were increased, indicating the occurrence of autophagy. An inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), enhanced the suppressive effects of safingol on cell viability, and this was accompanied by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and extent of nuclear fragmentation. The nuclear translocation of endoG was minimal at a low concentration of safingol, but markedly increased when combined with 3-MA. The suppressive effects of safingol and 3-MA on cell viability were reduced in endoG siRNA- transfected cells. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevented cell death induced by the combinational treatment, whereas a pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. These results indicated that safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in SCC cells and that the suppression of autophagy by 3-MA enhanced apoptosis. Autophagy supports cell survival, but not cell death in the SCC cell system in which apoptosis occurs in an endoG-mediated manner. PMID:27658240

  10. Molecular Simulation of Naphthenic Acid Removal on Acidic Catalyst (Ⅰ) Mechanism of Catalytic Decarboxylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xiaoqin; Dai Zhenyu; Tian Songbai; Hou Suandi; Wang Xieqing

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the charge distribution, the chemical bond order and the reactive performance of carboxylic acid model compounds on acidic catalyst were investigated by using molecular simulation technology. The simulation results showed that the bond order of C-O was higher than that of C-C,and C-C bond connected to the carbon atom in the carboxyl radical had the lowest bond order. The charge distributions of model naphthenic acids were similar in characteristics that the negative charges were concentrated on carboxyls. According to the simulation results, the mechanisms of catalytic decarboxylation over acidic solid catalyst were proposed, and a new route was put forward regarding removal of the naphthenic acid from crude oil through catalytic decarboxylation.

  11. Mechanisms of spinal motoneurons survival in rats under simulated hypogravity on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamov, R. R.; Mishagina, E. A.; Tyapkina, O. V.; Shajmardanova, G. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Nikolskij, E. E.; Grigorjev, A. I.

    2011-05-01

    It was previously shown that different cell types in vivo and in vitro may die via apoptosis under weightlessness conditions in space as well as in simulated hypogravity on the Earth. We assessed survivability of spinal motoneurons of rats after 35-day antiorthostatic hind limb suspension. Following weight bearing, unloading the total protein content in lumbar spinal cord is dropped by 21%. The electrophysiological studies of m. gastrocnemius revealed an elevated motoneurons' reflex excitability and conduction disturbances in the sciatic nerve axons. The number of myelinated fibers in the ventral root of experimental animals was insignificantly increased by 35-day of antiorthostatic hind limb suspension, although the retrograde axonal transport was significantly decreased during the first week of simulated hypogravity. The results of the immunohistochemical assay with antibodies against proapoptotic protein caspase 9 and cytotoxicity marker neuron specific nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the TUNEL staining did not reveal any signs of apoptosis in motoneurons of suspended and control animals. To examine the possible adaptation mechanisms activated in motoneurons in response to simulated hypogravity we investigated immunoexpression of Hsp25 and Hsp70 in lumbar spinal cord of the rats after 35-day antiorthostatic hind limb suspension. Comparative analysis of the immunohistochemical reaction with anti-Hsp25 antibodies revealed differential staining of motoneurons in intact and experimental animals. The density of immunoprecipitate with anti-Hsp25 antibodies was substantially higher in motoneurons of the 35-day suspended than control rats and the more intensive precipitate in this reaction was observed in motoneuron neuritis. Quantitative analysis of Hsp25 expression demonstrated an increase in the Hsp25 level by 95% in experimental rats compared to the control. The immunoexpression of Hsp70 found no qualitative and quantitative differences in control and experimental

  12. Nodulation of cowpeas and survival of cowpeas Rhizobia in acid, aluminum-rich soils. [Vigna unguiculata; Rhizobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartel, P.G.; Whelan, A.M.; Alexander, M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether the reduced nodulation of cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) grown in certain acid, Alrich soils resulted from the poor survival of the potentially infective rhizobia. Two strains of Rhizobium capable of nodulating cowpeas were used. The lowest pH for growth in defined liquid medium was 4.2 for one strain and 3.9 for the other. Only the latter was Al tolerant and could grow in a defined liquid medium containing 50 ..mu..M KAl(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/. The survival of the bacteria and their ability to nodulate cowpeas in three soils were measured after the soils were amended with Ca or Al salts to give pH values ranging from 5.7 to 4.1 and extractable-Al concentrations from < 0.1 to 3.7 cmol(p/sup +/)/kg of soil. Only small differences in survival in 7 or 8 weeks were noted between the two strains. Plants inoculated with the Al-sensitive strain bore significantly fewer nodules in the more acid, Al-rich soils than in the same soils with higher pH values and less extractable Al. No significant reduction in nodule number was evident for plants inoculated with the Al-tolerant strain and grown in the more acid, Al-rich soils compared to cowpeas grown in the same soils with higher pH values and less extractable Al. It is suggested that the Al content of soil is not a major factor in the survival of cowpea rhizobia but that it does have a significant effect on nodulation. 24 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Antiatherogenic effects of n-3 fatty acids - evidence and mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Zampolli

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available N-3 (omega-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acids are thought to display a variety of beneficial effects for human health. Clues to the occurrence of cardiovascular protective effects have been, however, the spur for the first biomedical interest in these compounds, and are the best documented. Historically, the epidemiologic association between dietary consumption of n-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular protection was first suggested by Bang and Dyerberg, who identified the high consumption of fish, and therefore, of fish oil-derived n-3 fatty acids, as the likely explanation for the strikingly low rate of coronary heart disease events reported in the Inuit population. Since their initial reports, research has proceeded in parallel to provide further evidence for their cardioprotection and to understand underlying mechanisms. Decreased atherogenesis is currently thought to be a part of the cardiovascular protection by n-3 fatty acids. This article summarizes the evidence for such a claim and the mechanisms putatively involved. (Heart International 2006; 3-4: 141-54

  14. Effect of Organic Acids and Marination Ingredients on the Survival of Campylobacter jejuni on Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Tina; Grønlund, Anne Christine Jørgensen; Christensen, Bjarke Bak;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether marination of chicken meat in different food ingredients call be used to reduce populations of Campylobacter jejuni strains, were exposed to different organic acids (tartaric, acetic. lactic, malic, and citric acids) and food marinating ingredients...... at 4 degrees C in broth and on chicken meat. The organic acids (0.5%) reduced populations of C. jejuni broth (chicken juice and brain heart infusion broth) by 4 to 6 1011 units (after 24 h): tartaric acid was the most efficient treatment. Large strain variation was observed among 14 C. jejuni isolates...... inoculated in brain heart infusion broth containing 0.3% tartaric acid. On chicken meat medallions, reductions of C. jejuni were 0.5 to 2 log units when tartaric acid solutions (2, 4, 6, and 10%) were spread onto the meal. Analysis of acidic food ingredient (e.g., vinegar. lemon juice, pomegranate syrup...

  15. Effect of organic acids and marination ingredients on the survival of Campylobacter jejuni on meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Tina; Grønlund, Anne Christine Jørgensen; Christensen, Bjarke Bak;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether marination of chicken meat in different food ingredients can be used to reduce populations of Campylobacter jejuni. C. jejuni strains were exposed to different organic acids (tartaric, acetic, lactic, malic, and citric acids) and food marinating...... ingredients at 4°C in broth and on chicken meat. The organic acids (0.5%) reduced populations of C. jejuni in broth (chicken juice and brain heart infusion broth) by 4 to 6 log units (after 24 h); tartaric acid was the most efficient treatment. Large strain variation was observed among 14 C. jejuni isolates...... inoculated in brain heart infusion broth containing 0.3% tartaric acid. On chicken meat medallions, reductions of C. jejuni were 0.5 to 2 log units when tartaric acid solutions (2, 4, 6, and 10%) were spread onto the meat. Analysis of acidic food ingredient (e.g., vinegar, lemon juice, pomegranate syrup...

  16. Thermal tolerance and survival of Cronobacter sakazakii in powdered infant formula supplemented with vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and vanillic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemiş, Gökçe Polat; Pagotto, Franco; Bach, Susan; Delaquis, Pascal

    2012-09-01

    The thermal tolerance Cronobacter sakazakii was examined in sterile powdered infant formula (PIF) rehydrated at 58 °C in water or apple juice supplemented with vanillin, ethyl vanillin, or vanillic acid. All three compounds decreased thermal tolerance during-rehydration and the lowest decimal reduction time (D-value, 0.19 ± 0.01 min) was measured in PIF rehydrated in apple juice supplemented with 20 mM vanillic acid. At this level of supplementation no C. sakazakii were detected in PIF stored for 48 h at 10 and 24 h at 21 °C subsequent to a sublethal heat treatment. Thermal tolerance during rehydration and survival in reconstituted PIF were influenced by compound type, concentration, and temperature. Supplementation of PIF with vanillin, ethyl vanillin, or vanillic acid could enhance the safety of PIF or other dehydrated foods contaminated with C. sakazakii.

  17. Mechanism of antiinflammatory actions of curcumine and boswellic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, H P; Safayhi, H; Mack, T; Sabieraj, J

    1993-03-01

    Curcumine from Curcuma longa and the gum resin of Boswellia serrata, which were demonstrated to act as anti-inflammatories in in vivo animal models, were studied in a set of in vitro experiments in order to elucidate the mechanism of their beneficial effects. Curcumine inhibited the 5-lipoxygenase activity in rat peritoneal neutrophils as well as the 12-lipoxygenase and the cyclooxygenase activities in human platelets. In a cell free peroxidation system curcumine exerted strong antioxidative activity. Thus, its effects on the dioxygenases are probably due to its reducing capacity. Boswellic acids were isolated from the gum resin of Boswellia serrata and identified as the active principles. Boswellic acids inhibited the leukotriene synthesis via 5-lipoxygenase, but did not affect the 12-lipoxygenase and the cyclooxygenase activities. Additionally, boswellic acids did not impair the peroxidation of arachidonic acid by iron and ascorbate. The data suggest that boswellic acids are specific, non-redox inhibitors of leukotriene synthesis either interacting directly with 5-lipoxygenase or blocking its translocation. PMID:8510458

  18. Mechanism of arachidonic acid action on syntaxin-Munc18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Emma; Darios, Frédéric; Broersen, Kerensa; Gatsby, Naomi; Peak-Chew, Sew-Yeu; Rickman, Colin; Davletov, Bazbek

    2007-04-01

    Syntaxin and Munc18 are, in tandem, essential for exocytosis in all eukaryotes. Recently, it was shown that Munc18 inhibition of neuronal syntaxin 1 can be overcome by arachidonic acid, indicating that this common second messenger acts to disrupt the syntaxin-Munc18 interaction. Here, we show that arachidonic acid can stimulate syntaxin 1 alone, indicating that it is syntaxin 1 that undergoes a structural change in the syntaxin 1-Munc18 complex. Arachidonic acid is incapable of dissociating Munc18 from syntaxin 1 and, crucially, Munc18 remains associated with syntaxin 1 after arachidonic-acid-induced syntaxin 1 binding to synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa (SNAP25). We also show that the same principle operates in the case of the ubiquitous syntaxin 3 isoform, highlighting the conserved nature of the mechanism of arachidonic acid action. Neuronal soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) can be isolated from brain membranes in a complex with endogenous Munc18, consistent with a proposed function of Munc18 in vesicle docking and fusion.

  19. Quinic Acid Could Be a Potential Rejuvenating Natural Compound by Improving Survival of Caenorhabditis elegans under Deleterious Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longze; Zhang, Junjing

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Quinic acid (QA) is an active ingredient of Cat's Claw (Uncaria tomentosa), which is found to be active in enhancing DNA repair and immunity in model systems and able to generate neuroprotective effects in neurons. However, QA's role in improving survival is not well studied. Here we report that QA can provide protection in Caenorhabidits elegans and improve worm survival under stress. Under heat stress and oxidative stress, QA-treated wild-type C. elegans N2 (N2) survived 17.8% and 29.7% longer, respectively, than the control worms. Our data suggest that under heat stress, QA can upregulate the expression of the small heat shock protein hsp-16.2 gene, which could help the worms survive a longer time. We also found that QA extended the C. elegans mutant VC475 [hsp-16.2 (gk249)] life span by 15.7% under normal culture conditions. However, under normal culture conditions, QA did not affect hsp-16.2 expression, but upregulated the expression of daf-16 and sod-3 in a DAF-16–dependent manner, and downregulated the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that under normal conditions QA acts in different pathways. As a natural product, QA demonstrates great potential as a rejuvenating compound. PMID:22950425

  20. IL-1RAcPb signaling regulates adaptive mechanisms in neurons that promote their long-term survival following excitotoxic insults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eGosselin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Excitotoxicity is a major component of neurodegenerative diseases and is typically accompanied by an inflammatory response. Cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta are key regulators of this inflammatory response and modulate the activity of numerous cell types, including neurons. IL-1RAcPb is an isoform of IL-1RAcP expressed specifically in neurons and promotes their survival during acute inflammation. Here, we investigated in vivo whether IL-1RAcPb also promotes neuronal survival in a model of excitotoxicity. Intrastriatal injection of kainic acid in mice caused a strong induction of IL-1 cytokines mRNA in the brain. The stress response of cortical neurons at 12 hours post-injection, as measured by expression of Atf3, FoxO3a and Bdnf mRNAs, was similar in WT and AcPb-deficient mice. Importantly however, a delayed upregulation in the transcription calpastatin was significantly higher in WT than in AcPb-deficient mice. Finally, although absence of AcPb signaling had no effects on neuronal damage in the cortex at early time points, it significantly impaired their long-term survival. These data suggest that in a context of excitotoxicity, stimulation of IL-1RAcPb signaling may promote the activity of a key neuroprotective mechanism.

  1. Effects of pH, dissolved oxygen, and ionic strength on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in organic acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to survive in acidified vegetable products is of concern because of previously documented outbreaks associated with fruit juices. A study was conducted to determine the survival of E. coli O157:H7 in organic acids at pH values typical of acidified vegetable pr...

  2. Decreased Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Content Contributes to Increased Survival in Human Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Oraldi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Among diet components, some fatty acids are known to affect several stages of colon carcinogenesis, whereas others are probably helpful in preventing tumors. In light of this, our aim was to determine the composition of fatty acids and the possible correlation with apoptosis in human colon carcinoma specimens at different Duke's stages and to evaluate the effect of enriching human colon cancer cell line with the possible reduced fatty acid(s. Specimens of carcinoma were compared with the corresponding non-neoplastic mucosa: a significant decrease of arachidonic acid, PPARα, Bad, and Bax and a significant increase of COX-2, Bcl-2, and pBad were found. The importance of arachidonic acid in apoptosis was demonstrated by enriching a Caco-2 cell line with this fatty acid. It induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner via induction of PPARα that, in turn, decreased COX-2. In conclusion, the reduced content of arachidonic acid is likely related to carcinogenic process decreasing the susceptibility of cancer cells to apoptosis.

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor regulates osteoblast survival – evidence for an autocrine feedback mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Street John

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteoclasts regulates bone homeostasis. Skeletal injury in humans results in 'angiogenic' responses primarily mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF, a protein essential for bone repair in animal models. Osteoblasts release VEGF in response to a number of stimuli and express receptors for VEGF in a differentiation dependent manner. This study investigates the putative role of VEGF in regulating the lifespan of primary human osteoblasts(PHOB in vitro. Methods PHOB were examined for VEGF receptors. Cultures were supplemented with VEGF(0–50 ng/mL, a neutralising antibody to VEGF, mAB VEGF(0.3 ug/mL and Placental Growth Factor (PlGF, an Flt-1 receptor-specific VEGF ligand(0–100 ng/mL to examine their effects on mineralised nodule assay, alkaline phosphatase assay and apoptosis.. The role of the VEGF specific antiapoptotic gene target BCl2 in apoptosis was determined. Results PHOB expressed functional VEGF receptors. VEGF 10 and 25 ng/mL increased nodule formation 2.3- and 3.16-fold and alkaline phosphatase release 2.6 and 4.1-fold respectively while 0.3 ug/mL of mAB VEGF resulted in approx 40% reductions in both. PlGF 50 ng/mL had greater effects on alkaline phosphatase release (103% increase than on nodule formation (57% increase. 10 ng/mL of VEGF inhibited spontaneous and pathological apoptosis by 83.6% and 71% respectively, while PlGF had no significant effect. Pretreatment with mAB VEGF, in the absence of exogenous VEGF resulted in a significant increase in apoptosis (14 vs 3%. VEGF 10 ng/mL increased BCl2 expression 4 fold while mAB VEGF decreased it by over 50%. Conclusion VEGF is a potent regulator of osteoblast life-span in vitro. This autocrine feedback regulates survival of these cells, mediated via a non flt-1 receptor mechanism and expression of BCl2 antiapoptotic gene.

  4. Potential mechanisms for low uric acid in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampat, Radhika; Young, Sarah; Rosen, Ami; Bernhard, Douglas; Millington, David; Factor, Stewart; Jinnah, H A

    2016-04-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have described an association between low serum uric acid (UA) and Parkinson disease (PD). Uric acid is a known antioxidant, and one proposed mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD is oxidative damage of dopamine neurons. However, other complex metabolic pathways may contribute. The purpose of this study is to elucidate potential mechanisms of low serum UA in PD. Subjects who met diagnostic criteria for definite or probable PD (n = 20) and controls (n = 20) aged 55-80 years were recruited. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected from all participants, and both uric acid and allantoin were measured and corrected for body mass index (BMI). Urinary metabolites were compared using a twoway ANOVA with diagnosis and sex as the explanatory variables. There were no significant differences between PD and controls for total UA (p = 0.60), UA corrected for BMI (p = 0.37), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on UA (p = 0.24). Similarly, there were no significant differences between PD and controls for allantoin (p = 0.47), allantoin corrected for BMI (p = 0.57), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on allantoin (p = 0.78). Allantoin/UA ratios also did not significantly differ by diagnosis (p = 0.99). Our results imply that low serum UA in PD may be due to an intrinsic mechanism that alters the homeostatic set point for serum UA in PD, and may contribute to relatively lower protection against oxidative damage. These findings provide indirect support for neuroprotection trials aimed at raising serum UA.

  5. Mechanisms of abscisic acid-mediated control of stomatal aperture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munemasa, Shintaro; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Waadt, Rainer; Brandt, Benjamin; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-12-01

    Drought stress triggers an increase in the level of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA), which initiates a signaling cascade to close stomata and reduce water loss. Recent studies have revealed that guard cells control cytosolic ABA concentration through the concerted actions of biosynthesis, catabolism as well as transport across membranes. Substantial progress has been made at understanding the molecular mechanisms of how the ABA signaling core module controls the activity of anion channels and thereby stomatal aperture. In this review, we focus on our current mechanistic understanding of ABA signaling in guard cells including the role of the second messenger Ca(2+) as well as crosstalk with biotic stress responses. PMID:26599955

  6. Reactive oxygen species and autophagy associated apoptosis and limitation of clonogenic survival induced by zoledronic acid in salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line SACC-83.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Yuan Ge

    Full Text Available Salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma is an epithelial tumor in the head and neck region. Despite its slow growth, patients with salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma exhibit poor long term survival because of a high rate of distant metastasis. Lung and bone are common distant metastasis sites. Zoledronic acid, a third generation bisphosphonate, has been used for tumor-induced osteolysis due to bone metastasis and has direct antitumor activity in several human neoplasms. Here, we observed that zoledronic acid inhibited salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line SACC-83 xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. In vitro, zoledronic acid induced apoptosis and reduced clonogenic survival in SACC-83. Flow cytometry and western blotting indicated that the cell cycle was arrested at G0/G1. Zoledronic acid treatment upregulated reactive oxygen species as well as the autophagy marker protein LC-3B. Reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine and autophagy antagonist 3-methyladenine decreased zoledronic acid-induced apoptosis and increased clonogenic survival. Silencing of the autophagy related gene Beclin-1 also decreased zoledronic acid-induced apoptosis and inhibition of clonogenic formation. In addition, isobolographic analysis revealed synergistic effects on apoptosis when zoledronic acid and paclitaxel/cisplatin were combined. Taken together, our results suggest that zoledronic acid induced apoptosis and reduced clonogenic survival via upregulation of reactive oxygen species and autophagy in the SACC-83 cell line. Thus, zoledronic acid should be considered a promising drug for the treatment of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic -amino acids by tetrabutylammonium tribromide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raghvendra Shukla; Pradeep K Sharma; Kalyan K Banerji

    2004-03-01

    The oxidation of eleven amino acids by tetrabutylammonium tribromide (TBATB) in aqueous acetic acid results in the formation of the corresponding carbonyl compounds and ammonia. The reaction is first order with respect to TBATB. Michaelis-Menten type kinetics is observed with some of the amino acids while others exhibit second-order dependence. It failed to induce polymerization of acrylonitrile. The effect of solvent composition indicate that the rate of reaction increases with increase in the polarity of the medium. Addition of tetrabutylammonium chloride has no effect on the rate of oxidation. Addition of bromide ion causes decrease in the oxidation rate but only to a limiting value. The reaction is susceptible to both polar and steric effects of the substituents. A suitable mechanism has been proposed.

  8. Molecular mechanisms mediating contrasting flooding survival strategies in two Rumex species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Flooding is a major recurring event for many ecosystems and is important in shaping vegetation composition. It negatively affects plant survival because in water gas diffusion is approximately 10,000 times slower than in air. This has major repercussions for photosynthesis that requires carbon dioxi

  9. Research progress on the anticarcinogenic actions and mechanisms of ellagic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Mei Zhang; Lei Zhao; Hao Li; Hao Xu; Wen-Wen Chen; Lin Tao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Cancer treatments by chemotherapeutic agents, surgery, and radiation have not been highly effective in reducing the incidence of cancers and increasing the survival rate of cancer patients. In recent years, plant-derived compounds have attracted considerable attention as alternative cancer remedies for enhancing cancer prevention and treatment because of their low toxicities, low costs, and low side effects. Ellagic acid (EA) is a natural phenolic constituent. Recentin vitro and in vivo experiments have revealed that EA elicits anticarcinogenic effects by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis, breaking DNA binding to carcinogens, blocking virus infection, and disturbing inlfammation, angiogenesis, and drug-resistance processes required for tumor growth and metastasis. hTis review enumerates the anticarcinogenic actions and mechanisms of EA. It also discusses future directions on the applications of EA.

  10. Research progress on the anticarcinogenic actions and mechanisms of ellagic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Cancer treatments by chemotherapeutic agents, surgery, and radiation have not been highly effective in reducing the incidence of cancers and increasing the survival rate of cancer patients. In recent years, plant-derived compounds have attracted considerable attention as alternative cancer remedies for enhancing cancer prevention and treatment because of their low toxicities, low costs, and low side effects. Ellagic acid (EA) is a natural phenolic constituent. Recent in vitro and in vivo experiments have revealed that EA elicits anticarcinogenic effects by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis, breaking DNA binding to carcinogens, blocking virus infection, and disturbing inflammation, angiogenesis, and drug-resistance processes required for tumor growth and metastasis. This review enumerates the anticarcinogenic actions and mechanisms of EA. It also discusses future directions on the applications of EA

  11. Helicobacter pylori requires an acidic environment to survive in the presence of urea.

    OpenAIRE

    Clyne, M.; Labigne, A; Drumm, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the significance of the urease enzyme in promoting Helicobacter pylori survival in various environments. A urease-positive H. pylori isolate, strain N6, and an isogenic urease-negative strain, strain N6(ureB::TnKm), were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline at a pH ranging from 2.2 to 7.2 for 60 min at 37 degrees C in both the presence and the absence of 10 mM urea. The number of CFU per milliliter in each solution, the pH of the bacterial supernatant, and ...

  12. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A; Chen, Irene A

    2012-05-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life.

  13. Effect of acidic lake water on survival of aurora trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) embryos and alevins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snucins, E.J.; Liimatainen, V.A.; Gale, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the 1960s the aurora trout, a rare color variant of the brook trout, disappeared from its native waters in northeastern Ontario. Its disappearance was attributed to acidification of the waters by atmospheric deposition of industrial emissions from metal smelters at Sudbury, Ontario. Recently, water quality in the Sudbury area has improved due to emission reductions. These experiments were designed to assess the toxicity of current water quality in the native lakes of aurora trout. During May 1984, hatchery-reared aurora trout alevins were held for 4 days in 3 of their native lakes (Whiligig, Whitepine and Wilderness with pH 4.5-4.8) and a control lake, Regan Lake (pH 6.5), and survival rates were assessed. In a second bioassay, embryos and alevins were buried in the substrate at 3 groundwater upwelling sites, and survival rates were assessed. The final test involved a 14-day exposure of groundwater-reared fish to ambient conditions.

  14. Mechanisms of post-myocardial infarction healing : from acute survival to chronic remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Darlene L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute survival and chronic healing after myocardial infarction (MI) depend on a myriad of processes that begin within hours of the injury and can continue in the form of remodeling even years thereafter. The myocardium has very little self-renewal capability, and tissue lost to MI is replaced with a collagenous scar. There are currently no clinical therapies that directly target myocardial healing, due in part to the pleiotropic effects and redundancy of signaling factors released after injur...

  15. Lactic acid bacteria activating innate immunity improve survival in bacterial infection model of silkworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Satoshi; Ono, Yasuo; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been thought to be helpful for human heath in the gut as probiotics. It recently was noted that activity of LAB stimulating immune systems is important. Innate immune systems are conserved in mammals and insects. Silkworm has innate immunity in response to microbes. Microbe-associated molecular pattern (ex. peptidoglycan and β-glucan) induces a muscle contraction of silkworm larva. In this study, we established an efficient method to isolate lactic acid bacteria derived from natural products. We selected a highly active LAB to activate the innate immunity in silkworm by using the silkworm muscle contraction assay, as well. The assay revealed that Lactococcus lactis 11/19-B1 was highly active on the stimulation of the innate immunity in silkworm. L. lactis 11/19-B1 solely fermented milk with casamino acid and glucose. This strain would be a starter strain to make yogurt. Compared to commercially available yogurt LAB, L. lactis 11/19-B1 has higher activity on silkworm contraction. Silkworm normally ingested an artificial diet mixed with L. lactis 11/19-B1 or a yogurt fermented with L. lactis 11/19-B1. Interestingly, silkworms that ingested the LAB showed tolerance against the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These data suggest that Lactococcus lactis 11/19-B1 would be expected to be useful for making yogurt and probiotics to activate innate immunity. PMID:26971556

  16. Cell survival during complete nutrient deprivation depends on lipid droplet-fueled β-oxidation of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabodevilla, Ainara G; Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; Nintou, Eleni; Boiadjieva, Violeta G; Picatoste, Fernando; Gubern, Albert; Claro, Enrique

    2013-09-27

    Cells exposed to stress of different origins synthesize triacylglycerols and generate lipid droplets (LD), but the physiological relevance of this response is uncertain. Using complete nutrient deprivation of cells in culture as a simple model of stress, we have addressed whether LD biogenesis has a protective role in cells committed to die. Complete nutrient deprivation induced the biogenesis of LD in human LN18 glioblastoma and HeLa cells and also in CHO and rat primary astrocytes. In all cell types, death was associated with LD depletion and was accelerated by blocking LD biogenesis after pharmacological inhibition of Group IVA phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α) or down-regulation of ceramide kinase. Nutrient deprivation also induced β-oxidation of fatty acids that was sensitive to cPLA2α inhibition, and cell survival in these conditions became strictly dependent on fatty acid catabolism. These results show that, during nutrient deprivation, cell viability is sustained by β-oxidation of fatty acids that requires biogenesis and mobilization of LD.

  17. Deciphering molecular mechanism underlying hypolipidemic activity of echinocystic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li; Lai, Peng; Du, Jun-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that a triterpene mixture, consisting of echinocystic acid (EA) and oleanolic acid (OA) at a ratio of 4 : 1, dose-dependently ameliorated the hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat/high cholesterol diets. This study was aimed at exploring the mechanisms underlying antihyperlipidemic effect of EA. Molecular docking simulation of EA was performed using Molegro Virtual Docker (version: 4.3.0) to investigate the potential targets related to lipid metabolism. Based on the molecular docking information, isotope labeling method or spectrophotometry was applied to examine the effect of EA on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) in rat liver microsomes. Our results revealed a strong affinity of EA towards ACAT and DGAT in molecular docking analysis, while low binding affinity existed between EA and HMG-CoA reductase as well as between EA and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Consistent with the results of molecular docking, in vitro enzyme activity assays showed that EA inhibited ACAT and DGAT, with IC50 values of 103 and 139  μ M, respectively, and exhibited no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. The present findings suggest that EA may exert hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting the activity of ACAT and DGAT. PMID:24669228

  18. Deciphering Molecular Mechanism Underlying Hypolipidemic Activity of Echinocystic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that a triterpene mixture, consisting of echinocystic acid (EA and oleanolic acid (OA at a ratio of 4 : 1, dose-dependently ameliorated the hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat/high cholesterol diets. This study was aimed at exploring the mechanisms underlying antihyperlipidemic effect of EA. Molecular docking simulation of EA was performed using Molegro Virtual Docker (version: 4.3.0 to investigate the potential targets related to lipid metabolism. Based on the molecular docking information, isotope labeling method or spectrophotometry was applied to examine the effect of EA on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT in rat liver microsomes. Our results revealed a strong affinity of EA towards ACAT and DGAT in molecular docking analysis, while low binding affinity existed between EA and HMG-CoA reductase as well as between EA and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Consistent with the results of molecular docking, in vitro enzyme activity assays showed that EA inhibited ACAT and DGAT, with IC50 values of 103 and 139 μM, respectively, and exhibited no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. The present findings suggest that EA may exert hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting the activity of ACAT and DGAT.

  19. Retinoic acid receptors: from molecular mechanisms to cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Pagano, Francesca; Cicconi, Laura; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Nervi, Clara

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive metabolite of retinol or vitamin A, induces a spectrum of pleiotropic effects in cell growth and differentiation that are relevant for embryonic development and adult physiology. The RA activity is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily, namely RARα, RARβ and RARγ, which belong to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. RARs form heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamily and act as ligand-regulated transcription factors through binding specific RA response elements (RAREs) located in target genes promoters. RARs also have non-genomic effects and activate kinase signaling pathways, which fine-tune the transcription of the RA target genes. The disruption of RA signaling pathways is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of hematological and non-hematological malignancies, including leukemias, skin cancer, head/neck cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of note, RA and its derivatives (retinoids) are employed as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiation, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects. In humans, retinoids reverse premalignant epithelial lesions, induce the differentiation of myeloid normal and leukemic cells, and prevent lung, liver, and breast cancer. Here, we provide an overview of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate the RA and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, mechanisms through which deregulation of RA signaling pathways ultimately impact on cancer are examined. Finally, the therapeutic effects of retinoids are reported. PMID:25543955

  20. Influence of sub-lethal stresses on the survival of lactic acid bacteria after spray-drying in orange juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, J; Borges, S; Teixeira, P

    2015-12-01

    The demand for new functional non-dairy based products makes the production of a probiotic orange juice powder an encouraging challenge. However, during drying process and storage, loss of viability of the dried probiotic cultures can occur, since the cells are exposed to various stresses. The influence of sub-lethal conditions of temperature, acidic pH and hydrogen peroxide on the viability of Pediococcus acidilactici HA-6111-2 and Lactobacillus plantarum 299v during spray drying in orange juice and subsequent storage under different conditions was investigated. At the end of storage, the survival of both microorganisms through simulated gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) conditions was also determined. The viability of cells previously exposed to each stress was not affected by the drying process. However, during 180 days of storage at room temperature, unlike P. acidilactici HA-6111-2, survival of L. plantarum 299v was enhanced by prior exposure to sub-lethal conditions. Previous exposure to sub-lethal stresses of each microorganism did not improve their viability after passage through simulated GIT. Nevertheless, as cellular inactivation during 180 days of storage was low, both microorganisms were present in numbers of ca. 10(7) cfu/mL at the end of GIT. This is an indication that both bacteria are good candidates for use in the development of an orange juice powder with functional characteristics.

  1. Effect of dietary arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on survival, growth and pigmentation in larvae of common sole ( Solea solea L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Hansen, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence confirms that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (ARA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, DHA are involved in growth as well in pigmentation of marine fish larvae. In the present study we examined the performance of common sole larvae reared...... to increased dietary ARA content. However, pigmentation was not affected by inclusion levels of EPA or DHA when ARA was high. This, and no relation between DHA: EPA or ARA: EPA ratios and pigmentation and only a weak relation to ARA: DHA ratio, advocate for that it is the absolute concentration of ARA...

  2. Expression of lipases and lipid receptors in sperm storage tubules and possible role of fatty acids in sperm survival in the hen oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, A; Isobe, N; Obitsu, T; Yoshimura, Y

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of fatty acids for sperm survival in the sperm storage tubules (SSTs) of the hen oviduct. The mucosa tissues of uterovaginal junction (UVJ) of White Leghorn laying hens with or without artificial insemination using semen from Barred Plymouth Rock roosters were collected. The lipid density in the epithelium of UVJ and SST was analyzed by Sudan black B staining. The expressions of genes encoding lipid receptors and lipases were assayed by polymerase chain reaction in UVJ mucosa and SST cells isolated by laser microdissection. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and sperm were cultured with or without the identified predominant fatty acids for 24 hours to examine their effect on sperm viability. The lipid droplets were localized in the epithelium of UVJ mucosa and SSTs. The expression of genes encoding very low-density lipoprotein receptor(VLDLR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) were found in SST cells. Expression of genes encoding endothelial lipase (EL), lipase H (LIPH), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were found in UVJ. In contrast, only ATGL was found in SST cells, and its expression was significantly upregulated after artificial insemination. In UVJ mucosal tissues, five fatty acids, namely myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16), stearic acid (C18), oleic acid (C18:1n9), and linoleic acid (C18:2n6), were identified as predominant fatty acids. The viability of sperm cultured with 1 mM oleic acid or linoleic acid was significantly higher than the sperm in the control culture without fatty acids. These results suggest that lipids in the SST cells may be degraded by ATGL, and fatty acids including oleic acid and linoleic acid may be released into the SST lumen to support sperm survival. PMID:26777559

  3. Electrochemical mechanism of thioglycolic acid depressing sulphide minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of thioglycolic acid (TGA) on the rest potential and zeta potential of sulphide minerals were studied and the electrochemical mechanism of TGA depressing sulphide minerals was put forward. Results of flotation test show that galena, pyrite and chalcopyrite can be well depressed by TGA, but sphalerite and arsenopyrite can not be depressed. Tests also show that TGA has a little influence on zeta potential of sulfide minerals covered by xanthate coatings and TGA can lower the rest potential of sulphide minerals. The electrochemical mechanism of TGA depressing sulphide minerals is that the dixanthogen adsorbing on the mineral surface will be unstable and reduced when rest potential value of sulphide mineral (φMS) is less than the reversible potential of reduction of dixanthogen to xanthate φX-|X2 in the presence of TGA, flotability of sulphide mineral becomes weak; inversely, the coatings of dixanthogen on mineral surface will keep stable when φMS>φX-|X2, sulphide mineral keeps flotability. In the system of mixed minerals, the electrochemical condition of separation of two sulphide minerals by TGA is φMS1<φX-|X2(φX-|PbX2)<φMS2.

  4. New mitochandrial mechanisms of asiatic acid against hepatotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingGAO; Xin-huiTANG; JinCHEN

    2005-01-01

    AIM Terminalia Catappa L. is a combretaceous plant broadly distributed on tropical and subtropical areas. The leaves of this plant have been used as a folk medicine for treating hepatitis in Indian, the Philippines et al. Our previous studies showed that the extract of Terminalia Catappa L. leaves (TCCE) exerted antioxidative, anti - inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities, but the active substitutes and mechanisms remain unknown. The present research focused on investigating the antihepatotoxic activity and the new mitochondrial mechanisms of asiatic acid (AA), an important active component of TCCE,on acute liver injury. METHODS LPS+D-GaIN induced-hepatic injury models was adopted to study the antihepatotoxic role of AA. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were detected, and the morphological change was observed. At the same time, the level of mRNA and protein of voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC), the most important componentprotein of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) in insulted liver was analyzed using RT-PCR and Western blot. Furthermore,

  5. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Rosaria Varì; Beatrice Scazzocchio; Carmela Santangelo; Carmelina Filesi; Fabio Galvano; Massimo D’Archivio; Roberta Masella; Claudio Giovannini

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA), one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 mac...

  6. Influence of acid tolerance responses on survival, growth, and thermal cross-protection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in acidified media and fruit juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J H; Beuchat, L R

    1998-12-22

    A study was done to determine survival and growth characteristics of acid-adapted, acid-shocked, and control cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated into tryptic soy broth (TSB) acidified with organic acids and three commercial brands of apple cider and orange juice. The three types of cells behaved similarly in TSB acidified with acetic acid; however, in TSB (pH 3.9) acidified with lactic acid, acid-adapted cells were more tolerant than acid-shocked cells which, in turn, were more tolerant than control cells. The ability of the three types of cells to grow after inoculation into acidified TSB, then plated on tryptic soy agar containing sodium chloride was determined. Tolerance of acid-adapted cells and, less markedly, acid-shocked cells to sodium chloride was diminished, compared to control cells. The pathogen showed extraordinary tolerance to the low pH of apple cider and orange juice held at 5 or 25 degrees C for up to 42 days. Growth occurred in one brand of apple cider (pH 3.98) incubated at 25 degrees C. Regardless of test parameters, there was no indication that cell types differed in tolerance to the acidic environment in apple cider or orange juice. Survival of control, acid-adapted, and acid-shocked cells heated in apple cider and orange juice was studied. Within each apple cider or orange juice, D(52 degrees C)-values of acid-adapted cells were considerably higher than those of acid-shocked or control cells, which indicates that heat tolerance can be substantially enhanced by acid adaptation compared to acid shock. PMID:9926995

  7. Effect of Gallic acid on mechanical and water barrier properties of zein-oleic acid composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masamba, Kingsley; Li, Yue; Hategekimana, Joseph; Liu, Fei; Ma, Jianguo; Zhong, Fang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the effect of gallic acid on mechanical and water barrier properties of zein-oleic acid 0-4 % composite films was investigated. Molecular weight distribution analysis was carried out to confirm gallic acid induced cross linking through change in molecular weight in fraction containing zein proteins. Results revealed that gallic acid treatment increased tensile strength from 17.9 MPa to 26.0 MPa, decreased water vapour permeability from 0.60 (g mm m(-2) h(-1) kPa(-1)) to 0.41 (g mm m(-2) h(-1) kPa(-1)), increased solubility from 6.3 % to 10.2 % and marginally increased elongation at break from 3.7 % to 4.2 % in zein films only. However, gallic acid treatment in zein-oleic composite films did not significantly influence mechanical and water barrier properties and in most instances irrespective of oleic acid concentration, the properties were negatively affected. Results from scanning electron microscopy showed that both gallic acid treated and untreated zein films and composite films containing 3 % oleic acid had a compact and homogeneous structure while those containing 4 % oleic acid had inhomogeneous structure. The findings have demonstrated that gallic acid treatment can significantly improve mechanical and water barrier properties especially in zein films only as opposed to when used in composite films using zein and oleic acid. PMID:27407188

  8. Comparative Molecular Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics Study of Microhydration of Nucleic Acid Bases

    CERN Document Server

    Lino, J; Deriabina, A; Velasco, M; Poltev, V

    2013-01-01

    DNA is the most important biological molecule, and its hydration contributes essentially to the structure and functions of the double helix. We analyze the microhydration of the individual bases of nucleic acids and their methyl derivatives using methods of molecular mechanics (MM) with the Poltev-Malenkov (PM), AMBER and OPLS force fields, as well as ab initio Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations at MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. A comparison is made between the calculated interaction energies and the experimental enthalpies of microhydration of bases, obtained from mass spectrometry at low temperatures. Each local water-base interaction energy minimum obtained with MM corresponds to the minimum obtained with QM. General qualitative agreement was observed in the geometrical characteristics of the local minima obtained via the two groups of methods. MM minima correspond to slightly more coplanar structures than those obtained via QM methods, and the absolute MM energy values overestimate corresponding values ...

  9. The bond survival time variation of polymorphic amyloid fibrils in the mechanical insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeongsang; Baek, Inchul; Chang, Hyun Joon; Yoon, Gwonchan; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-04-01

    The structure-property relationships of biological materials such as amyloid fibrils are important to developing therapeutic strategies for amyloid-related diseases. The mechanical characterization of biological materials can provide insight into such relationships. In this study, polymorphic human islet polypeptide (hIAPP) fibrils were constructed with molecular modeling, and a constant-force bending simulation was performed to characterize the different mechanical behaviors of polymorphic hIAPP protofibrils. Our simulation results showed that, owing to their different intramolecular interactions, the fracture times of polymorphic hIAPP protofibrils depend on polymorphic structures.

  10. Characteristics of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Patients with Long Survival: Prognostic Significance of Skin Lesions and Possible Beneficial Role of Valproic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plumelle Yves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the clinical and biological features of ten patients with a survival superior to ten years (long survival, out of 175 patients diagnosed with Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL in Martinique (1983–2013. There were 5 lymphoma and 5 chronic subtypes. Five of them (3 chronic, 2 lymphoma had been treated with valproic acid (VA for neurological disorders developed before or after ATL diagnosis, suggesting a beneficial role for VA as a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI in ATL treatment. Total duration of uninterrupted VA treatment ranged from 8 to 37 years. Overall, the 175 incident ATL cases presented with a median survival of 5.43 months. The five VA-treated (VA+ patients presented with longer survival compared to VA treatment-free patients (VA−. For chronic subtypes, survival periods were of 213 months for 3 VA+ patients and of 33 months for 11 VA− patients (p=0.023. For lymphoma subtypes, survival periods were of 144 months for 2 VA+ patients versus 6 months for 49 VA− patients (p=0.0046. ATL cases with skin lesions, particularly lymphoma subtypes, had a longer survival (13.96 months compared to those without skin lesions (6.06 months, p=0.002. Eight out of the 10 patients presenting with long survival had skin lesions.

  11. RNA-seq analysis of Pichia anomala reveals important mechanisms required for survival at low pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, Eugene; Feizi, Amir; Kim, SungSoo;

    2015-01-01

    coupled with an increase in mitochondrial ATP production enables the high level of acid stress tolerance of P. anomala. Conclusions: Our findings provide insight into the molecular and genetic basis of low pH tolerance in P. anomala which was previously unknown. Ultimately, this is a step towards...... pH conditions. In order to circumvent this problem, understanding the biological mechanisms involved in acid stress response and tolerance is essential. Characterisation of wild yeasts that have a natural ability to resist such harsh conditions will pave the way to understand the biological basis...... underlying acid stress resistance. Pichia anomala possesses a unique ability to adapt to and tolerate a number of environmental stresses particularly low pH stress giving it the advantage to outcompete other microorganisms under such conditions. However, the genetic basis of this resistance has not been...

  12. Structural evidence for solvent-stabilisation by aspartic acid as a mechanism for halophilic protein stability in high salt concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Samuel; Walsh, Danielle L; Rhys, Natasha H; Soper, Alan K; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-21

    Halophilic organisms have adapted to survive in high salt environments, where mesophilic organisms would perish. One of the biggest challenges faced by halophilic proteins is the ability to maintain both the structure and function at molar concentrations of salt. A distinct adaptation of halophilic proteins, compared to mesophilic homologues, is the abundance of aspartic acid on the protein surface. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of halophilic proteins suggest an important role for solvent interactions with the surface aspartic acid residues. This interaction, between the regions of the acidic protein surface and the solvent, is thought to maintain a hydration layer around the protein at molar salt concentrations thereby allowing halophilic proteins to retain their functional state. Here we present neutron diffraction data of the monomeric zwitterionic form of aspartic acid solutions at physiological pH in 0.25 M and 2.5 M concentration of potassium chloride, to mimic mesophilic and halophilic-like environmental conditions. We have used isotopic substitution in combination with empirical potential structure refinement to extract atomic-scale information from the data. Our study provides structural insights that support the hypothesis that carboxyl groups on acidic residues bind water more tightly under high salt conditions, in support of the residue-ion interaction model of halophilic protein stabilisation. Furthermore our data show that in the presence of high salt the self-association between the zwitterionic form of aspartic acid molecules is reduced, suggesting a possible mechanism through which protein aggregation is prevented. PMID:27327567

  13. Retinoic acid-loaded polymeric nanoparticles enhance vascular regulation of neural stem cell survival and differentiation after ischaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R.; Fonseca, M. C.; Santos, T.; Sargento-Freitas, J.; Tjeng, R.; Paiva, F.; Castelo-Branco, M.; Ferreira, L. S.; Bernardino, L.

    2016-04-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. However, current therapies only reach a small percentage of patients and may cause serious side effects. We propose the therapeutic use of retinoic acid-loaded nanoparticles (RA-NP) to safely and efficiently repair the ischaemic brain by creating a favourable pro-angiogenic environment that enhances neurogenesis and neuronal restitution. Our data showed that RA-NP enhanced endothelial cell proliferation and tubule network formation and protected against ischaemia-induced death. To evaluate the effect of RA-NP on vascular regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) survival and differentiation, endothelial cell-conditioned media (EC-CM) were collected. EC-CM from healthy RA-NP-treated cells reduced NSC death and promoted proliferation while EC-CM from ischaemic RA-NP-treated cells decreased cell death, increased proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In parallel, human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC), which are part of the endogenous repair response to vascular injury, were collected from ischaemic stroke patients. hEPC treated with RA-NP had significantly higher proliferation, which further highlights the therapeutic potential of this formulation. To conclude, RA-NP protected endothelial cells from ischaemic death and stimulated the release of pro-survival, proliferation-stimulating factors and differentiation cues for NSC. RA-NP were shown to be up to 83-fold more efficient than free RA and to enhance hEPC proliferation. These data serve as a stepping stone to use RA-NP as vasculotrophic and neurogenic agents for vascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases with compromised vasculature.

  14. Characterization of mechanisms underlying neuronal survival and plasticity in Huntington's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anglada Huguet, Marta

    2013-01-01

    [eng]Huntington’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the exon-1 of the huntingtin gene. Mutant huntingtin induces a large amount of toxic effects that trigger cell dysfunction and consequently, behavioral alterations such as motor dysfunction, cognitive decline and psychological disturbances. However, before the onset of symptoms individuals are healthy. Thus, it is plausible that compensatory mechanisms may be activated to regulate a...

  15. Feeding ω-3 PUFA enriched rotifers to Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns, 1842 larvae reared at different salinity conditions: effects on growth parameters, survival and fatty acids profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Dantagnan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well known importance of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in marine and freshwater fish larvae, there are few studies on how essential fatty acid requirements and composition on whole body can be altered by changes in water salinity. The present study aimed to determine the effect of salinity on ω-3 PUFA requirements, larval growth survival and fatty acid composition of Galaxias maculatus larvae cultured at two different salinities (0 and 15 g L-1 for 20 days while fed rotifers containing two different levels of ω-3 PUFA (1.87 and 3.16%. The results denoted a marked difference in ω-3 PUFA requirements and in the pattern of fatty acid deposition in the whole body of larvae reared at different salinities, depending of ω-3 PUFA in diets. Thus, to improve growth and survival larvae of G. maculatus reared at 0 g L-1 require higher levels of ω-3 PUFA, principally 18:3 ω-3. Larvae reared at salinities of 15 g L-1 require low levels of ω-3 PUFA for optimal survival, especially 18:3 ω-3. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid content in the whole body of larvae was also affected by water salinity.

  16. Omega-3 fatty acids improve psychomotor performance via mechanism not related to nitric acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan S. M. Al-Nimer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3FAs are essential polyunsaturated fats that protect the brain from cognitive impairment. It increases the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS and thereby increases the nitric acid (NO production. This study aimed to explore the effect of ω-3FAs on psychomotor performance and to relate this effect to the reactive nitrogen species. This study was conducted in Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Al-Mustansiriya University in Baghdad, Iraq. Twenty healthy subjects, allocated randomly from medical college students, were participated in the single blind clinical trial. Participants were divided into two groups, each of ten subjects to receive either placebo or (ω-3FAs (750 mg single oral dose daily for 5 days. They were asked to perform psychomotor performance before and after 5 days of treatment, and venous blood was obtained for determination of serum nitric oxide (NO and peroxynitrite (ONOO. ω-3FAs treated group was significantly different from placebo-treated group in reducing choice and motor reaction times as well as the critical flicker frequency threshold. The serum levels of NO and ONOO in ω-3FAs-treated group did not significantly differ from placebo-treated group. Short term supplementation of ω-3FAs improves the psychomotor performance in young healthy subjects via a mechanism not related to the production of nitric oxide production. Inflorescence is a panicle few flowered and fruit is a capsule. The data of the results obtained were presented and discussed.

  17. Blood-brain barrier permeability and brain uptake mechanism of kainic acid and dihydrokainic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gynther, Mikko; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Hansen, Steen H; Bunch, Lennart; Pickering, Darryl S

    2015-03-01

    The glutamatergic neurotransmitter system is involved in important neurophysiological processes and thus constitutes a promising target for the treatment of neurological diseases. The two ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists kainic acid (KA) and dihydrokainic acid (DHK) have been used as research tools in various in vivo central nervous system disease models in rodents, as well as being templates in the design of novel ligands affecting the glutamatergic system. Both molecules are highly polar but yet capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We used an in situ rat brain perfusion technique to determine the brain uptake mechanism and permeability across the BBB. To determine KA and DHK concentrations in the rat brain, simple and rapid sample preparation and liquid chromatography mass spectrometer methods were developed. According to our results the BBB permeability of KA and DHK is low, 0.25 × 10(-6) and 0.28 × 10(-6) cm/s for KA and DHK, respectively. In addition, the brain uptake is mediated by passive diffusion, and not by active transport. Furthermore, the non-specific plasma and brain protein binding of KA and DHK was determined to be low, which means that the unbound drug volume of distribution in brain is also low. Therefore, even though the total KA and DHK concentrations in the brain are low after systemic dosing, the concentrations in the vicinity of the glutamate receptors are sufficient for their activation and thus the observed efficacy.

  18. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. ► Endothelial VEGFR levels are

  19. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F. [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mughal, Nadeem A. [Leeds Vascular Institute, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H. [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi [Leeds Vascular Institute, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan, E-mail: s.ponnambalam@leeds.ac.uk [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  20. Genome-Wide Transposon Mutagenesis Indicates that Mycobacterium marinum Customizes Its Virulence Mechanisms for Survival and Replication in Different Hosts

    KAUST Repository

    Weerdenburg, Eveline M.

    2015-02-17

    The interaction of environmental bacteria with unicellular eukaryotes is generally considered a major driving force for the evolution of intracellular pathogens, allowing them to survive and replicate in phagocytic cells of vertebrate hosts. To test this hypothesis on a genome-wide level, we determined for the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium marinum whether it uses conserved strategies to exploit host cells from both protozoan and vertebrate origin. Using transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS), we determined differences in genetic requirements for survival and replication in phagocytic cells of organisms from different kingdoms. In line with the general hypothesis, we identified a number of general virulence mechanisms, including the type VII protein secretion system ESX-1, biosynthesis of polyketide lipids, and utilization of sterols. However, we were also able to show that M. marinum contains an even larger set of host-specific virulence determinants, including proteins involved in the modification of surface glycolipids and, surprisingly, the auxiliary proteins of the ESX-1 system. Several of these factors were in fact counterproductive in other hosts. Therefore, M. marinum contains different sets of virulence factors that are tailored for specific hosts. Our data imply that although amoebae could function as a training ground for intracellular pathogens, they do not fully prepare pathogens for crossing species barriers.

  1. The metabolically active subpopulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms survives exposure to membrane-targeting antimicrobials via distinct molecular mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Nilsson, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    have found that membrane-targeting antimicrobials such as colistin, EDTA, SDS, and chlorhexidine specifically kill the inactive subpopulation in P. aeruginosa biofilms, whereas the active subpopulation survives exposure to these compounds. Because treatment of P. aeruginosa biofilms with the membrane......-targeting compounds colistin, EDTA, SDS, and chlorhexidine resulted in the same spatial distribution of live and dead bacteria, we investigated whether tolerance to these compounds originated from the same molecular mechanisms. Development of colistin-tolerant subpopulations was found to depend on the pmr genes......, but does not depend on the pmr, mexAB-oprM, mexPQ-opmE, or muxABC-opmB genes. Tolerance to SDS and EDTA in P. aeruginosa biofilms is linked to metabolically active cells, but does not depend on the pmr, mexAB, mexCD, mexPQ, or muxABC genes. Our data suggest that the active subpopulation in P. aeruginosa...

  2. Harboring oil-degrading bacteria: a potential mechanism of adaptation and survival in corals inhabiting oil-contaminated reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dahash, Lulwa M; Mahmoud, Huda M

    2013-07-30

    Certain coral reef systems north of the Arabian Gulf are characterized by corals with a unique ability to thrive and flourish despite the presence of crude oil continuously seeping from natural cracks in the seabed. Harboring oil-degrading bacteria as a part of the holobiont has been investigated as a potential mechanism of adaptation and survival for corals in such systems. The use of conventional and molecular techniques verified a predominance of bacteria affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes in the mucus and tissues of Acropora clathrata and Porites compressa. These bacteria were capable of degrading a wide range of aliphatic (C9-C28) aromatic hydrocarbons (Phenanthrene, Biphenyl, Naphthalene) and crude oil. In addition, microcosms supplied with coral samples and various concentrations of crude oil shifted their bacterial population toward the more advantageous types of oil degraders as oil concentrations increased. PMID:23014479

  3. Quality attributes and microbial survival on whole cantaloupes with antimicrobial coatings containing chitosan, lauric arginate, cinnamon oil and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiumin; Zhang, Yue; Critzer, Faith; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2016-10-17

    Cantaloupes are susceptible to microbiological contamination in pre- or postharvest environments. Novel intervention strategies, such as antimicrobial coatings, are needed to improve the microbiological safety of cantaloupes. The objective of this study was to prepare whole cantaloupes coated with mixtures containing chitosan, lauric arginate (LAE), cinnamon oil (CO), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and determine survival characteristics of inoculated foodborne pathogens during storage as well as cantaloupe quality attributes. Chitosan coating with 0.1% LAE, 0.1% EDTA, and 1% CO was the most effective for inactivating foodborne pathogens inoculated on cantaloupes. This coating caused a >3logCFU/cm(2) reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes immediately after coating and reduced Salmonella enterica to below the detection limit during a 14-day storage. Total molds and yeasts also were reduced to the detection limit by the coating. The redness and yellowness of uncoated cantaloupes were significantly higher than coated ones from day 6. The firmness of uncoated cantaloupes and those coated with chitosan only was significantly lower than other treatments from day 10. No significant differences were found in total soluble solids content or weight loss between coated and uncoated cantaloupes. Results showed the potential benefits of applying the coating mixtures to improve the quality and microbiological safety of cantaloupes. PMID:27484251

  4. 高生存性乳酸菌的筛选%Screening of lactic acid bacteria strains with high survivability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱宏; 陆淳; 冯丽莉; 卢晓丽; 王世杰

    2011-01-01

    There were 80 straim of bacterias isolated from traditional fermented milk in Inner Mongolia of China with anaerobic cultured in MRSA. Among 80 strains, 43 strains of Lactobacilli were proved with G+, H2O2 test with positive, using ribose, growing at 15 ℃ and 37 ℃.And 43 strains of Lactobacilli were assessed for for their survivability, 14 strains turned out to be acid resistance and bile salt tolerance. LAB spcies of 2 strains were identified and named Lactobacillus paracase N1115 and Lactobadllus plantarum.%对MRS培养基进行了厌氧培养,从内蒙古传统发酵乳制品中分离了80株菌,通过镜检、过氧化氢实验、发酵核糖、15℃和37℃发酵试验,获得了43株乳杆菌.结果表明,14株菌具有一定的耐酸和耐胆盐特性;其中2株鉴定为副干酪乳杆菌和植物乳杆菌,分别命名为Lactobacillus paracasei N1115和Lactobacillus plantarum N3114.

  5. Understanding the 3-hydroxypropionic acid tolerance mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Juncker, Agnieszka; Hallstrom, Bjorn;

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) is an important platform chemical that can be converted into other valuable chemicals such as acrylic acid and its derivatives that are used in baby diap ers, various plastics, and paints. With the oil and gas resources becoming limiting, biotechnolo gy offers...... a sustainable alternative for production of acrylic acid from renewable feedstocks. We are establishing Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an alternative host for 3HP production. However, 3HP also inhibits yeast grow th at level well below what is desired for commercial applications. Therefore, we are aiming...

  6. Mechanism involved in enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by hyaluronic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Michinao [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Ariyoshi, Wataru [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Iwanaga, Kenjiro [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Okinaga, Toshinori [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Habu, Manabu [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Yoshioka, Izumi [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Medicine of Sensory and Motor Organs, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Tominaga, Kazuhiro [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Nishihara, Tatsuji, E-mail: tatsujin@kyu-dent.ac.jp [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} In this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. {yields} MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. {yields} Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. {yields} HA enhanced BMP-2 induces osteoblastic differentiation in MG63 cells via down-regulation of BMP-2 antagonists and ERK phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Objectives: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is expected to be utilized to fill bone defects and promote healing of fractures. However, it is unable to generate an adequate clinical response for use in bone regeneration. Recently, it was reported that glycosaminoglycans, including heparin, heparan sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid (HA), regulate BMP-2 activity, though the mechanism by which HA regulates osteogenic activities has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. Materials and methods: Monolayer cultures of osteoblastic lineage MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. To determine osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cell lysates was quantified. Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by Western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. To further elucidate the role of HA in enhancement of BMP-2-induced Smad signaling, mRNA expressions of the BMP-2 receptor antagonists noggin and follistatin were detected using real-time RT-PCR. Results: BMP-2-induced ALP activation, Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation, and

  7. Molecular mechanism of recombinant liver fatty acid binding protein's antioxidant activity

    OpenAIRE

    YAN, JING; Gong, Yuewen; She, Yi-Min; Wang, Guqi; Roberts, Michael S; Burczynski, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocytes expressing liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) are known to be more resistant to oxidative stress than those devoid of this protein. The mechanism for the observed antioxidant activity is not known. We examined the antioxidant mechanism of a recombinant rat L-FABP in the presence of a hydrophilic (AAPH) or lipophilic (AMVN) free radical generator. Recombinant L-FABP amino acid sequence and its amino acid oxidative products following oxidation were identified by MALDI quadrup...

  8. Antioxidant Activity and Mechanism of Protocatechuic Acid in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Shuzhi Chen; Xiaozhen Wang; Xican Li; Dongfeng Chen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a natural phenolic acid widely distributed in plantsand is considered as an active component of some traditional Chinese herbal medicines such as Cibotium barometz (L.) J.Sm, Stenoloma chusanum (L.) Ching, Ilex chinensis Sims. PCA was reported to possess various pharmacological effects which may be closely correlated with its antioxidant activities. However, the antioxidant of PCA has not been investigatedsystematically yet. Methods: In the study,...

  9. Characteristics of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Patients with Long Survival: Prognostic Significance of Skin Lesions and Possible Beneficial Role of Valproic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Plumelle Yves; Michel Stephane; Banydeen Rishika; Delaunay Christine; Panelatti Gérard

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical and biological features of ten patients with a survival superior to ten years (long survival), out of 175 patients diagnosed with Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL) in Martinique (1983–2013). There were 5 lymphoma and 5 chronic subtypes. Five of them (3 chronic, 2 lymphoma) had been treated with valproic acid (VA) for neurological disorders developed before or after ATL diagnosis, suggesting a beneficial role for VA as a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI) in ATL tr...

  10. Non-enzymatic depurination of nucleic acids: factors and mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran An

    Full Text Available Depurination has attracted considerable attention since a long time for it is closely related to the damage and repair of nucleic acids. In the present study, depurination using a pool of 30-nt short DNA pieces with various sequences at diverse pH values was analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. Kinetic analysis results showed that non-enzymatic depurination of oligodeoxynucleotides exhibited typical first-order kinetics, and its temperature dependence obeyed Arrhenius' law very well. Our results also clearly showed that the linear relationship between the logarithms of rate constants and pH values had a salient point around pH 2.5. Interestingly and unexpectedly, depurination depended greatly on the DNA sequences. The depurination of poly (dA was found to be extremely slow, and thymine rich sequences depurinated faster than other sequences. These results could be explained to some extent by the protonation of nucleotide bases. Moreover, two equations were obtained based on our data for predicting the rate of depurination under various conditions. These results provide basic data for gene mutagenesis and nucleic acids metabolism in acidic gastric juice and some acidic organelles, and may also help to rectify some misconceptions about depurination.

  11. CSF Amino Acids, Pterins and Mechanism of the Ketogenic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, Spain, studied the relationship between the etiology of refractory childhood epilepsy, CSF neurotransmitters, pterins, and amino acids, and response to a ketogenic diet in 60 patients with refractory epilepsy, 83% focal and 52% idiopathic.

  12. Mechanism and kinetics of mineral weathering under acid conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anbeek, C.

    1994-01-01

    This study deals with the relationships between crystal structure, grain diameter, surface morphology and dissolution kinetics for feldspar and quartz under acid conditions.Intensively ground samples from large, naturally weathered mineral fragments are frequently used in dissolution studies. The su

  13. Nitrification in acid soils: micro-organisms and mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    Nitrification in acid soils was first reported in the beginning of the 20th century. Although this finding has been well substantiated by countless studies since then, it has until recently remained unclear which micro-organisms were responsible for nitrate production at low pH. Substantial evidence

  14. Non-enzymatic depurination of nucleic acids: factors and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Jia, Yu; Wan, Baihui; Zhang, Yanfang; Dong, Ping; Li, Jing; Liang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Depurination has attracted considerable attention since a long time for it is closely related to the damage and repair of nucleic acids. In the present study, depurination using a pool of 30-nt short DNA pieces with various sequences at diverse pH values was analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Kinetic analysis results showed that non-enzymatic depurination of oligodeoxynucleotides exhibited typical first-order kinetics, and its temperature dependence obeyed Arrhenius' law very well. Our results also clearly showed that the linear relationship between the logarithms of rate constants and pH values had a salient point around pH 2.5. Interestingly and unexpectedly, depurination depended greatly on the DNA sequences. The depurination of poly (dA) was found to be extremely slow, and thymine rich sequences depurinated faster than other sequences. These results could be explained to some extent by the protonation of nucleotide bases. Moreover, two equations were obtained based on our data for predicting the rate of depurination under various conditions. These results provide basic data for gene mutagenesis and nucleic acids metabolism in acidic gastric juice and some acidic organelles, and may also help to rectify some misconceptions about depurination. PMID:25546310

  15. Effect of Initial Population Density of Criconemella xenoplax on Reducing Sugars, Free Amino Acids, and Survival of Peach Seedlings over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyczepir, A P; Reilly, C C; Okie, W R

    1987-07-01

    Percentage of mortality, growth suppression, and changes in free amino acid and reducing sugar content in root and (or) stem tissue of Nemaguard peach seedlings were studied in the greenhouse in relation to time and eight different initial population densities (Pi) of Criconemella xenoplax. After 90 and 180 days, free amino acid content in root tissue significantly increased with increasing nematode numbers. Suppression of root volume, dry root and stem weight, height increase, plant survival, and content of reducing sugars in root tissue were detected at 180 and 270 days and following pruning. All criteria were negatively correlated with nematode Pi. Changes in growth, metabolic parameters, and survival percentage were attributed to Pi density of C. xenoplax, duration of the experiment, and nematode reproduction rate.

  16. Polymers from fatty acids: poly(ω-hydroxyl tetradecanoic acid) synthesis and physico-mechanical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Liu, Fei; Cai, Jiali; Xie, Wenchun; Long, Timothy E; Turner, S Richard; Lyons, Alan; Gross, Richard A

    2011-09-12

    This Article describes the synthesis and physicomechanical properties of bioplastics prepared from methyl ω-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (Me-ω-OHC14), a new monomer available by a fermentation process using an engineered Candida tropicalis strain. Melt-condensation experiments were conducted using titanium tetraisopropoxide (Ti[OiPr](4)) as a catalyst in a two-stage polymerization (2 h at 200 °C under N(2), 4 h at 220 °C under 0.1 mmHg). Poly(ω-hydroxytetradecanoate), P(ω-OHC14), M(w), determined by SEC-MALLS, increased from 53K to 110K as the Ti(OiPr)(4) concentration increased from 50 to 300 ppm. By varying the polymerization conditions (catalyst concentration, reaction time, second-stage reaction temperature) a series of P(ω-OHC14) samples were prepared with M(w) values from 53K to 140K. The synthesized polyesters with M(w) ranging from 53K to 140K were subjected to characterization by DSC, TGA, DMTA, and tensile testing. Influences of P(ω-OHC14) molecular weight, melting point, and enthalpies of melting/crystallization on material tensile properties were explored. Cold-drawing tensile tests at room temperature for P(ω-OHC14) with M(w) 53K-78K showed a brittle-to-ductile transition. In contrast, P(ω-OHC14) with M(w) 53K undergoes brittle fracture. Increasing P(ω-OHC14) M(w) above 78K resulted in a strain-hardening phenomena and tough properties with elongation at break ~700% and true tensile strength of ~50 MPa. Comparisons between high density polyethylene and P(ω-OHC14) mechanical and thermal properties as a function of their respective molecular weights are discussed. PMID:21793591

  17. Effect of dietary supplementation of tocoferol acetate alone and with varying combinations on growth, survival and fatty acids profile of Macrobrachium rosenbergii larvae through Moina micrura enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Parakarma, M.G.I.S.; Dube, K.; Venkateshwarlu, G.; Reddy, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the effect of tocopherol acetate along with cod liver oil astaxanthin enriched Moina micrura (MC- control, Ml- tocopherol acetate enriched, M2-tocopherol acetate combined with cod liver oil (CLO) enriched and M3- tocopherol acetate combined with astaxanthin enriched) on growth, survival and fatty acid composition of M. rosenbergii (de Man) larvae (TC- unenriched Moina fed larvae, Tl- tocopherol acetate enriched Moina fed larvae, T2- tocopherol acetate + CL...

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid is a major serum noncytokine survival factor for murine macrophages which acts via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, J. S.; Lieberthal, W; Heydrick, S; Levine, J. S.

    1998-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is the smallest and structurally simplest of all the glycerophospholipids. It occurs normally in serum and binds with high affinity to albumin, while retaining its biological activity. The effects of LPA are pleiotropic and range from mitogenesis to stress fiber formation. We show a novel role for LPA: as a macrophage survival factor with potency equivalent to serum. Administration of LPA protects macrophages from apoptosis induced by serum deprivation, and protect...

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some -hydroxy acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dimple Garg; Seema Kothari

    2004-11-01

    The oxidation of lactic acid, mandelic acid and ten monosubstituted mandelic acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine (HABR) in glacial acetic acid, leads to the formation of the corresponding oxoacid. The reaction is first order with respect to each of the hydroxy acids and HABR. It is proposed that HABR itself is the reactive oxidizing species. The oxidation of -deuteriomandelic acid exhibits the presence of a substantial kinetic isotope effect (/ = 5.91 at 298 K). The rates of oxidation of the substituted mandelic acids show excellent correlation with Brown’s + values. The reaction constants are negative. The oxidation exhibits an extensive cross conjugation between the electron-donating substituent and the reaction centre in the transition state. A mechanism involving transfer of a hydride ion from the acid to the oxidant is postulated.

  20. Lowering GTP level increases survival of amino acid starvation but slows growth rate for Bacillus subtilis cells lacking (p)ppGpp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Alycia N; Kriel, Allison; Wang, Jue D

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial cells sense external nutrient availability to regulate macromolecular synthesis and consequently their growth. In the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the starvation-inducible nucleotide (p)ppGpp negatively regulates GTP levels, both to resist nutritional stress and to maintain GTP homeostasis during growth. Here, we quantitatively investigated the relationship between GTP level, survival of amino acid starvation, and growth rate when GTP synthesis is uncoupled from its major homeostatic regulator, (p)ppGpp. We analyzed growth and nucleotide levels in cells that lack (p)ppGpp and found that their survival of treatment with a nonfunctional amino acid analog negatively correlates with both growth rate and GTP level. Manipulation of GTP levels modulates the exponential growth rate of these cells in a positive dose-dependent manner, such that increasing the GTP level increases growth rate. However, accumulation of GTP levels above a threshold inhibits growth, suggesting a toxic effect. Strikingly, adenine counteracts GTP stress by preventing GTP accumulation in cells lacking (p)ppGpp. Our results emphasize the importance of maintaining appropriate levels of GTP to maximize growth: cells can survive amino acid starvation by decreasing GTP level, which comes at a cost to growth, while (p)ppGpp enables rapid adjustment to nutritional stress by adjusting GTP level, thus maximizing fitness.

  1. Acetic acid-catalyzed formation of N-phenylphthalimide from phthalanilic acid: a computational study of the mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-05-28

    In glacial acetic acid, phthalanilic acid and its monosubstituents are known to be converted to the corresponding phthalimides in relatively good yields. In this study, we computationally investigated the experimentally proposed two-step (addition-elimination or cyclization-dehydration) mechanism at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) level of theory for the unsubstituted phthalanilic acid, with an explicit acetic acid molecule included in the calculations. In the first step, a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate is formed by the nucleophilic attack of the amide nitrogen. The second step is dehydration of the intermediate to give N-phenylphthalimide. In agreement with experimental findings, the second step has been shown to be rate-determining. Most importantly, both of the steps are catalyzed by an acetic acid molecule, which acts both as proton donor and acceptor. The present findings, along with those from our previous studies, suggest that acetic acid and other carboxylic acids (in their undissociated forms) can catalyze intramolecular nucleophilic attacks by amide nitrogens and breakdown of the resulting tetrahedral intermediates, acting simultaneously as proton donor and acceptor. In other words, double proton transfers involving a carboxylic acid molecule can be part of an extensive bond reorganization process from cyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  2. Mechanisms of oxide dissolution by acid chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the different possible rate controlling processes in the dissolution of metallic oxides are examined. In particular, the following situations are assessed: mass-transfer control; coupling of mass-transfer and reactions at the interface; interface equilibration with the solution; various interface disruption and reconstruction phenomena. For each of the above mentioned cases, the influence of variables such as reagent concentration, temperature, pH, fluid hydrodynamics and general and specific catalysts is discussed. Depending upon the particular situation it is found that a more rational basis for the development of reagent is given by these considerations. The influence of chelating agents on both the thermodynamics and kinetics of the process is discussed, and the results of experimental studies in batch on magnetite and various ferrites are presented and discussed. For this purpose, several reagents were studied, including some very effective ones like thioglycolic acid, and others commonly used in actual decontamination, like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and oxalic acid. The relation to other (reductive) chemical decontamination procedures is discussed. The relevance of these studies to decontamination of metallic surfaces is discussed

  3. Ursolic acid inhibits the initiation, progression of prostate cancer and prolongs the survival of TRAMP mice by modulating pro-inflammatory pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu K Shanmugam

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men worldwide. In this study, using transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP mice, the effect of diet enriched with 1% w/w ursolic acid (UA was investigated to evaluate the stage specific chemopreventive activity against prostate cancer. We found that TRAMP mice fed with UA diet for 8 weeks (weeks 4 to 12 delayed formation of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN. Similarly, mice fed with UA diet for 6 weeks (weeks 12 to 18 inhibited progression of PIN to adenocarcinoma as determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Finally, TRAMP mice fed with UA diet for 12 weeks (weeks 24 to 36 demonstrated markedly reduced tumor growth without any significant effects on total body weight and prolonged overall survival. With respect to the molecular mechanism, we found that UA down-regulated activation of various pro-inflammatory mediators including, NF-κB, STAT3, AKT and IKKα/β phosphorylation in the dorsolateral prostate (DLP tissues that correlated with the reduction in serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6. In addition, UA significantly down-regulated the expression levels of cyclin D1 and COX-2 but up-regulated the levels of caspase-3 as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue sections. Finally, UA was detected in serum samples obtained from various mice groups fed with enriched diet in nanogram quantity indicating that it is well absorbed in the GI tract. Overall, our findings provide strong evidence that UA can be an excellent agent for both the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Mechanisms for the retention of inorganic N in acidic forest soils of southern China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jin-Bo; Cai, Zu-cong; Zhu, Tong-bin; Yang, Wen-Yan; Müller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the retention of inorganic N in acidic forest soils in southern China are not well understood. Here, we simultaneously quantified the gross N transformation rates of various subtropical acidic forest soils located in southern China (southern soil) and those of temperate forest soils located in northern China (northern soil). We found that acidic southern soils had significantly higher gross rates of N mineralization and significantly higher turnover rates but a much ...

  5. Effects of inhaled acid aerosols on lung mechanics: an analysis of human exposure studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Utell, M J

    1985-01-01

    There exist significant gaps in our understanding of human health effects from inhalation of pollutants associated with acid precipitation. Controlled clinical studies examine effects of criteria pollutants almost exclusively by assessing changes in lung mechanics. One constituent of acid precipitation, sulfuric acid aerosols, has been shown to induce bronchoconstriction in exercising extrinsic asthmatics at near ambient levels. These asthmatics may be an order of magnitude more sensitive to ...

  6. Mechanical dyssynchrony evaluated by tissue Doppler cross-correlation analysis is associated with long-term survival in patients after cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Williams, Eric S; Khouri, Michel G;

    2013-01-01

    Aims Pre-implant assessment of longitudinal mechanical dyssynchrony using cross-correlation analysis (XCA) was tested for association with long-term survival and compared with other tissue Doppler imaging (TDI)-derived indices. Methods and results In 131 patients referred for cardiac resynchroniz...

  7. Histamine reverses IL-5-Afforded human eosinophil survival by inducing apoptosis: Pharmacological evidence for a novel mechanism of action of histamine

    OpenAIRE

    Hasala, Hannele; Giembycz, Mark A.; Janka-Junttila, Mirkka; Moilanen, Eeva; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    Histamine reverses IL-5-Afforded human eosinophil survival by inducing apoptosis: Pharmacological evidence for a novel mechanism of action of histamine correspondence: Corresponding author. Tel.: +358335517318; fax: +358335518082. (Kankaanranta, Hannu) (Kankaanranta, Hannu) The Immunopharmacology Research Group--> , Medical School--> , University of Tampere--> , Tampere--> - FINLAND (Hasala, H...

  8. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Glutamic Acid by N-Bromophthalimide in Aqueous Acidic Medium

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of glutamic acid (Glu) with N-bromophthalimide (NBP) was studied in perchloric acid medium at 30 °C by potentiometric method. The reaction is first order each in NBP and glutamic acid and is negative fractional order in [H+]. Addition of KBr or the reaction product, phthalimide had no effect on the rate. Similarly variation of ionic strength of the medium did not affect the rate of the reaction. Also the rate increased with decrease in dielectric constant of the reac...

  9. A novel regulatory mechanism for whey acidic protein gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, L.H.; Bissell, M J

    1989-01-01

    When primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (PMME) are cultured on a basement membrane type matrix, they undergo extensive morphogenesis leading to the formation of 3-dimensional alveoli-like spherical structures surrounding a closed lumen. We show for the first time that cells cultured on basement membrane-type matrix express high levels of whey acidic protein (WAP) mRNA and secrete the protein into the lumen. The expression of WAP appears to be dependent upon the formation of the alveoli-li...

  10. Clavulanic acid increases dopamine release in neuronal cells through a mechanism involving enhanced vesicle trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B

    2011-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is a CNS-modulating compound with exceptional blood-brain barrier permeability and safety profile. Clavulanic acid has been proposed to have anti-depressant activity and is currently entering Phase IIb clinical trials for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Studies have also shown that clavulanic acid suppresses anxiety and enhances sexual functions in rodent and primate models by a mechanism involving central nervous system (CNS) modulation, although its detailed mechanism of action has yet to be elucidated. To further examine its potential as a CNS modulating agent as well as its mechanism of action, we investigated the effects of clavulanic acid in neuronal cells. Our results indicate that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells without affecting dopamine synthesis. Furthermore, using affinity chromatography we were able to identify two proteins, Munc18-1 and Rab4 that potentially bind to clavulanic acid and play a critical role in neurosecretion and the vesicle trafficking process. Consistent with this result, an increase in the translocation of Munc18-1 and Rab4 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane was observed in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these data suggest that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in a mechanism involving Munc18-1 and Rab4 modulation and warrants further investigation of its therapeutic use in CNS disorders, such as depression. PMID:21964384

  11. Clavulanic acid increases dopamine release in neuronal cells through a mechanism involving enhanced vesicle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B

    2011-10-24

    Clavulanic acid is a CNS-modulating compound with exceptional blood-brain barrier permeability and safety profile. Clavulanic acid has been proposed to have anti-depressant activity and is currently entering Phase IIb clinical trials for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Studies have also shown that clavulanic acid suppresses anxiety and enhances sexual functions in rodent and primate models by a mechanism involving central nervous system (CNS) modulation, although its detailed mechanism of action has yet to be elucidated. To further examine its potential as a CNS modulating agent as well as its mechanism of action, we investigated the effects of clavulanic acid in neuronal cells. Our results indicate that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells without affecting dopamine synthesis. Furthermore, using affinity chromatography we were able to identify two proteins, Munc18-1 and Rab4 that potentially bind to clavulanic acid and play a critical role in neurosecretion and the vesicle trafficking process. Consistent with this result, an increase in the translocation of Munc18-1 and Rab4 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane was observed in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these data suggest that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in a mechanism involving Munc18-1 and Rab4 modulation and warrants further investigation of its therapeutic use in CNS disorders, such as depression.

  12. A medium-chain fatty acid, capric acid, inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation via the suppression of NF-κB signaling and blocks cytoskeletal organization and survival in mature osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids, important components of a normal diet, have been reported to play a role in bone metabolism. Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells that are responsible for many bone-destructive diseases such as osteoporosis. In this study, we investigated the impact of a medium-chain fatty acid, capric acid, on the osteoclast differentiation, function, and survival induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF). Capric acid inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow-derived macrophages and suppressed RANKL-induced IκBα phosphorylation, p65 nuclear translocation, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Capric acid further blocked the RANKL-stimulated activation of ERK without affecting JNK or p38. The induction of NFATc1 in response to RANKL was also attenuated by capric acid. In addition, capric acid abrogated M-CSF and RANKL-mediated cytoskeleton reorganization, which is crucial for the efficient bone resorption of osteoclasts. Capric acid also increased apoptosis in mature osteoclasts through the induction of Bim expression and the suppression of ERK activation by M-CSF. Together, our results reveal that capric acid has inhibitory effects on osteoclast development. We therefore suggest that capric acid may have potential therapeutic implications for the treatment of bone resorption-associated disorders.

  13. Effects of Two Dietary Lipid Sources at Two Levels on the Survival, Growth and Fatty Acid Composition of the Giant Freshwater Prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Chul kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A 10 week feeding trial was conducted to investigate dietary crude palm oil (CPO or squid liver oil (SLO, at 3.5% (low or 9.5% (high as a 2 × 2 factorial design on survival, growth and whole body fatty acid composition of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.  Growth performance was lowest and highest for prawns fed the CPO-low and SLO-high diets, respectively.  While prawns fed the CPO-high diet had lower growth than those fed the SLO-low diet, no significant differences were detected.  Significant interactions were found for oleic acid, arachidonic acid, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and n-3/n-6 PUFA, while long chain PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid of the prawns were significantly lower when fed the CPO-based diets.  Lower growth of M. rosenbergii fed the CPO-based diets may be related to less favorable fatty acid ratios and/ or lowered digestibility but higher dietary CPO can help mitigate this. 

  14. Short communication: Latin-style fresh cheese enhances lactic acid bacteria survival but not Listeria monocytogenes resistance under in vitro simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C C G; Domingos-Lopes, M F P; Magalhães, V A F; Freitas, D A S R; Coelho, M C; Rosa, H J D; Dapkevicius, M L N E

    2015-07-01

    Different studies in humans have provided evidence about the health benefits of probiotics. However, most probiotic strains do not maintain good viability in the harsh conditions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). In the present study, Latin-style fresh cheese produced with potential probiotic bacteria was tested to evaluate this cheese type as a food carrier for the delivery of viable microorganisms after exposure to simulated GIT conditions. The resistance of 28 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains and Listeria monocytogenes upon exposure to acidic conditions (pH 2.5) and bile and pancreatic enzymes (0.3% of bile salts and 0.1% of pancreatin) was evaluated in vitro. When compared with fresh cultures, fresh cheese greatly improved LAB survival to simulated GIT conditions, as no loss of viability was observed in either acidic conditions (pH 2.5) or bile salts and pancreatin environment over a 3-h period. In opposition, L. monocytogenes did not survive after 1h under acidic conditions. These data demonstrated that Latin-style fresh cheese could play an important role in probiotic protection against gastrointestinal juices, enhancing delivery within the gut and thereby maximizing potential health benefits of LAB.

  15. TolC is important for bacterial survival and oxidative stress response in Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis in an acidic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jen-Jie; Wu, Ying-Chen; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chen, Ter-Hsin

    2016-09-25

    The outer membrane protein TolC, which is one of the key components of several multidrug efflux pumps, is thought to be involved in various independent systems in Enterobacteriaceae. Since the acidic environment of the stomach is an important protection barrier against foodborne pathogen infections in hosts, we evaluated whether TolC played a role in the acid tolerance of Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis. Comparison of the acid tolerance of the tolC mutant and the parental wild-type strain showed that the absence of TolC limits the ability of Salmonella to sustain life under extreme acidic conditions. Additionally, the mutant exhibited morphological changes during growth in an acidic medium, leading to the conflicting results of cell viability measured by spectrophotometry and colony-forming unit counting. Reverse-transcriptional-PCR analysis indicated that acid-related molecules, apparatus, or enzymes and oxidation-induced factors were significantly affected by the acidic environment in the null-tolC mutant. The elongated cellular morphology was restored by adding antioxidants to the culture medium. Furthermore, we found that increased cellular antioxidative activity provides an overlapping protection against acid killing, demonstrating the complexity of the bacterial acid stress response. Our findings reinforce the multifunctional characteristics of TolC in acid tolerance or oxidative stress resistance and support the correlative protection mechanism between oxygen- and acid-mediated stress responses in Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis. PMID:27599929

  16. Toll like receptor 9 antagonism modulates spinal cord neuronal function and survival: Direct versus astrocyte-mediated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acioglu, Cigdem; Mirabelli, Ersilia; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Ni, Li; Ratnayake, Ayomi; Heary, Robert F; Elkabes, Stella

    2016-08-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are expressed by cells of the immune system and mediate the host innate immune responses to pathogens. However, increasing evidence indicates that they are important contributors to central nervous system (CNS) function in health and in pathological conditions involving sterile inflammation. In agreement with this idea, we have previously shown that intrathecal administration of a TLR9 antagonist, cytidine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide 2088 (CpG ODN 2088), ameliorates the outcomes of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although these earlier studies showed a marked effect of CpG ODN 2088 on inflammatory cells, the expression of TLR9 in spinal cord (SC) neurons and astrocytes suggested that the antagonist exerts additional effects through direct actions on these cells. The current study was undertaken to assess the direct effects of CpG ODN 2088 on SC neurons, astrocytes and astrocyte-neuron interactions, in vitro. We report, for the first time, that inhibition of TLR9 in cultured SC neurons alters their function and confers protection against kainic acid (KA)-induced excitotoxic death. Moreover, the TLR9 antagonist attenuated the KA-elicited endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in neurons, in vitro. CpG ODN 2088 also reduced the transcript levels and release of chemokine (C-X-C) motif ligand 1 (CXCL1) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) by astrocytes and it diminished interleukin-6 (IL-6) release without affecting transcript levels in vitro. Conditioned medium (CM) of CpG ODN 2088-treated astroglial cultures decreased the viability of SC neurons compared to CM of vehicle-treated astrocytes. However, this toxicity was not observed when astrocytes were co-cultured with neurons. Although CpG ODN 2088 limited the survival-promoting effects of astroglia, it did not reduce neuronal viability compared to controls grown in the absence of astrocytes. We conclude that the TLR9 antagonist acts directly on both SC neurons and astrocytes

  17. Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Li, Bin; Du, Haishun; Lv, Dong; Zhang, Yuedong; Yu, Guang; Mu, Xindong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-20

    In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production. PMID:27474618

  18. Dynamic mechanical and swelling properties of maleated hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Kai; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-06-01

    A series of maleated hyaluronan (MaHA) are developed by modification with maleic anhydride. The degrees of substitution (DS) of MaHA vary between 7% and 75%. The DS of MaHA is both higher and wider than methacrylated HA derivatives (MeHA) reported in the literature. MaHA hydrogels are then prepared by photopolymerization and their dynamic mechanical and swelling properties of the hydrogels are investigated. The results showed that MaHA hydrogels with moderate DS (25%, 50% and 65%) have higher storage modulus and lower equilibrium swelling ratios than those with either low or high DS (7%, 15% and 75%). Theoretical analyses also suggest a similar pattern among hydrogels with different DS. The results confirm that the increased cross-linking density enhances the strength of hydrogels. Meanwhile, the hydrophilicity of introduced groups during modification and the degree of incomplete crosslinking reaction might have negative impact on the mechanical and swelling properties of MaHA hydrogels. PMID:25843871

  19. Dynamic mechanical and swelling properties of maleated hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Kai; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-06-01

    A series of maleated hyaluronan (MaHA) are developed by modification with maleic anhydride. The degrees of substitution (DS) of MaHA vary between 7% and 75%. The DS of MaHA is both higher and wider than methacrylated HA derivatives (MeHA) reported in the literature. MaHA hydrogels are then prepared by photopolymerization and their dynamic mechanical and swelling properties of the hydrogels are investigated. The results showed that MaHA hydrogels with moderate DS (25%, 50% and 65%) have higher storage modulus and lower equilibrium swelling ratios than those with either low or high DS (7%, 15% and 75%). Theoretical analyses also suggest a similar pattern among hydrogels with different DS. The results confirm that the increased cross-linking density enhances the strength of hydrogels. Meanwhile, the hydrophilicity of introduced groups during modification and the degree of incomplete crosslinking reaction might have negative impact on the mechanical and swelling properties of MaHA hydrogels.

  20. Cyclobutyl methyl ketone as a model compound for pinonic acid to elucidate oxidation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Praplan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 3-Methyl-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (MBTCA, terpenylic acid and diaterpenylic acid acetate were identified in secondary organic aerosol (SOA from α-pinene photooxidation or ozonolysis. These compounds display interesting structural features: MBTCA has a high oxygen to carbon ratio, terpenylic acid contains a lactone ring in its structure and diaterpenylic acid acetate possesses an ester functional group. The reaction mechanisms leading to these products are still unknown, but it was demonstrated experimentally in earlier studies that MBTCA is formed from pinonic acid, a primary ozonolysis product of α-pinene. Because the direct observation of pinonic acid oxidation in a smog chamber would be difficult due to its relatively low volatility, a model compound possessing the substructure of interest was used instead: cyclobutyl methyl ketone (CMK. From its oxidation, several organic acids could be measured with ion chromatography (IC coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS. Succinic acid, the analogous product of MBTCA is formed at molar yields of 2 to 5%. Butyrolactone is detected as butanoic acid, due to hydrolysis in the sampling device. A monocarboxylic acid with nominal mass 146 was detected in the absence of nitrogen oxides (NOx and could be the analogous product of diaterpenylic acid acetate. However, due to a lack of available standards, the exact structure of this compound remains unelucidated. Finally, 4-oxobutanoic acid could also be measured and two structures of its expected analogous compound from pinonic acid oxidation are proposed. Because these compounds are primary products of the CMK oxidation, reaction mechanisms capable of adding one or two carboxylic functional groups without formation of stable intermediate products needs to be formulated. Such a formation mechanism of MBTCA from pinonic acid was found in the literature; however, it includes a hydrogen atom migration to an acyloxy radical, which is expected to loose

  1. Contribution of Listeria monocytogenes RecA to acid and bile survival and invasion of human intestinal Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der S.; Abee, T.

    2011-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is able to colonize the human gastro-intestinal tract and subsequently cross the intestinal barrier. Thus, for L. monocytogenes to become virulent, it must survive the low pH of the stomach, high bile concentrations in the small intestine, and invade th

  2. Induction of Bladder Lesion by Terephthalic Acid and Its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To provide more information for rational evaluation of potential risks of terephthalic acid (TPA), we studied the effects of TPA on rats' bladders in 90 days after TPA exposure. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were subdivided into five groups, ingesting 0 %, 0.04 %, 0.2 %, 1 %, and 5 % TPA respectively for a sub-chronic feeding study lasting for 90 days. Urine, serum and samples of brain, liver, lung, kidney, bladder, etc. Were collected and analyzed. Results TPA ingesting decreased the value of urinary pH, and increased the contents of Ca2+, Zn2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+ in urine. The volume of 24 h urine was significantly increased in male rats in the 1 % and 5 % TPA groups. Urinary white sediment was found in both sexes, and its formation in male rats seemed more susceptible than that in female rats. Alpha 2u-globulin (AUG) in serum and urine of male rats was markedly increased in a dose-dependent manner. Fifteen cases of hyperplasia (simple or atypical) were determined in the 5 % TPA ingesting group, 14/52 in male rats and1/23 in female rats. Among them 3 male rats had no stone or calculus. Those with either bladder stones or hyperplasia were accompanied with urinary white sediments. Conclusion White sediment accompanied with elevated urine AUG is the basis of TPA induced urolith formation, and is also associated with TPA induced bladder epithelialcell proliferation. It can act as an early biomarker for the potential toxic effect of TPA.

  3. Study on Mechanism for Formation of Carbon Oxides During Catalytic Cracking of High Acidic Crude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xiaoli; Mao Anguo; Xie Chaogang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the basis of analysis and interpretation of the products distribution of catalytic cracking of high acidic crude,the mechanism for decarboxylation of petroleum acids during FCC process was discussed.The protons originated from the Br(o)nsted acid sites can combine with oxygen of the carbonyl groups with more negative charges to form reaction intermediates that Call be subjected to cleavage at the weak bonds,leading to breaking of carboxylic groups from the carboxylic acids followed by its decomposition to form alkyl three-coordinated carbenium ions,CO and H2O.The Lewis acid as an electrophilic reagent can abstract carboxylic groups from carboxylic acids to subsequently release CO2.

  4. Effect of dietary (n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids on growth and survival of fat snook (Centropomus parallelus, Pisces: Centropomidae larvae during first feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E.B. Seiffert

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of rotifers, Brachionus rotundiformis (S-type, fed three different diets: A (rotifer fed Nannochloropsis oculata, B (rotifer fed N. oculata and baker's yeast, 1:1, and C (rotifer fed N. oculata and baker's yeast, 1:1, and enriched with Selcoâ, was evaluated based on the survival, growth and swim bladder inflation rate of fat snook larvae. Rotifers of treatment A had higher levels (4.58 mg/g dry weight of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA than B (1.81 mg/g dry weight, and similar levels (0.04 and 0.06 mg/g dry weight, respectively of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Rotifers of treatment C had the highest levels of EPA (13.2 mg/g dry weight and DHA (6.08 mg/g dry weight. Fat snook eggs were obtained by spawning induction with human chorionic gonadotropin. Thirty hours after hatching, 30 larvae/liter were stocked in black cylindric-conical tanks (36-liter capacity. After 14 days of culture, there were no significant differences among treatments. Mean standard length was 3.13 mm for treatment A, 3.17 mm for B, and 3.39 mm for C. Mean survival rates were very low (2.7% for treatment A, 2.3% for B, and 1.8% for C. Swim bladder inflation rates were 34.7% for treatment A, 27.1% for B, and 11.9% for C. The lack of differences in growth and survival among treatments showed that the improvement of the dietary value of rotifer may not have been sufficient to solve the problem of larval rearing. Some other factor, probably pertaining to the quality of the larvae, may have negatively influenced survival.

  5. Effects of submergence on growth and survival of saplings of three wetland trees differing in adaptive mechanisms for flood tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Iwanaga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Withstanding total submergence and reaeration following submergence is essential for the survival and establishment of wetland species. We focused on “LOES–low oxygen escape syndrome” and “LOQS–low oxygen quiescence syndrome” and compared tolerances to total submergence among wetland woody species differing in morphological adaptation to soil flooding. Area of study, materials and methods: This study examined the survival of 2-year-old saplings of Taxodium distichum and Metasequioia glyptostroboides (LOQS species, and Alnus japonica (LOES species, during and after total submergence. Saplings were completely submerged, then de-submerged to determine trends in survival and growth Main results: The M. glyptostroboides and A. japonica saplings could not survive prolonged submergence for more than 8 weeks, whereas saplings of T. distichum survived for over 2 years. Submerged saplings of all species showed no significant growth or modifications in morphology and anatomy under water, such as shoot elongation, adventitious root formation, and/or aerenchyma development. All T. distichum saplings that were de-submerged in the second year had the same pattern of shoot growth regardless of differences in timing and seasonality of de-submergence. Wood formation in T. distichum saplings ceased during submergence and resumed after de-submergence in spring and summer, but not in autumn. Research highlights: T. distichum saplings, which survived longer submergence periods than A. japonica and M. glyptostroboides, had physiological characteristics, such as suspension of growth and metabolism, which allowed survival of protracted total submergence (at least 2 years when saplings were immersed during the dormant stage before leaf flushing.

  6. Survival in acidic and alcoholic medium of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and non-O157:H7 isolated in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz Marcelo E

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of Argentina having one of the highest frequencies of haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS, the incidence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 is low in comparison to rates registered in the US. Isolation of several non-O157 shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains from cattle and foods suggests that E. coli O157:H7 is an uncommon serotype in Argentina. The present study was undertaken to compare the survival rates of selected non-O157 STEC strains under acidic and alcoholic stress conditions, using an E. coli O157:H7 strain as reference. Results Growth at 37°C of E. coli O26:H11, O88:H21, O91:H21, O111:H-, O113:H21, O116:H21, O117:H7, O157:H7, O171:H2 and OX3:H21, was found to occur at pH higher than 4.0. When the strains were challenged to acid tolerance at pH as low as 2.5, viability extended beyond 8 h, but none of the bacteria, except E. coli O91:H21, could survive longer than 24 h, the autochthonous E. coli O91:H21 being the more resistant serotype. No survival was found after 24 h in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with 12% ethanol, but all these serotypes were shown to be very resistant to 6% ethanol. E. coli O91:H21 showed the highest resistance among serotypes tested. Conclusions This information is relevant in food industry, which strongly relies on the acid or alcoholic conditions to inactivate pathogens. This study revealed that stress resistance of some STEC serotypes isolated in Argentina is higher than that for E. coli O157:H7.

  7. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohgi Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA, which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Ursodeoxycholic Acid Toxicity & Side Effects: Ursodeoxycholic Acid Freezes Regeneration & Induces Hibernation Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magd A. Kotb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA is a steroid bile acid approved for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC. UDCA is reported to have “hepato-protective properties”. Yet, UDCA has “unanticipated” toxicity, pronounced by more than double number of deaths, and eligibility for liver transplantation compared to the control group in 28 mg/kg/day in primary sclerosing cholangitis, necessitating trial halt in North America. UDCA is associated with increase in hepatocellular carcinoma in PBC especially when it fails to achieve biochemical response (10 and 15 years incidence of 9% and 20% respectively. “Unanticipated” UDCA toxicity includes hepatitis, pruritus, cholangitis, ascites, vanishing bile duct syndrome, liver cell failure, death, severe watery diarrhea, pneumonia, dysuria, immune-suppression, mutagenic effects and withdrawal syndrome upon sudden halt. UDCA inhibits DNA repair, co-enzyme A, cyclic AMP, p53, phagocytosis, and inhibits induction of nitric oxide synthatase. It is genotoxic, exerts aneugenic activity, and arrests apoptosis even after cellular phosphatidylserine externalization. UDCA toxicity is related to its interference with drug detoxification, being hydrophilic and anti-apoptotic, has a long half-life, has transcriptional mutational abilities, down-regulates cellular functions, has a very narrow difference between the recommended (13 mg/kg/day and toxic dose (28 mg/kg/day, and it typically transforms into lithocholic acid that induces DNA strand breakage, it is uniquely co-mutagenic, and promotes cell transformation. UDCA beyond PBC is unjustified.

  9. Supply of Astaxanthin and its combinations through live feed (Moina micrura) enrichment affects the growth, survival and fatty acid profile of Macrobrachium rosenbergii larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Parakrama, M.G.I.S.; Rawat, K.D.; Venkateshwarlu, G.; Reddy, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    A study was carried out with three replicates to determine the effects of feeding Moina micrura enriched with astaxanthin alone (M1) or astaxanthin in combination with either vitamin E (M2), vitamin D (M3) or Cod Liver oil (M4) on the growth, survival and fatty acid composition of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de Man) larvae. Growth rate was expressed as the time taken to the settlement of 95% post larvae. Maximum growth, the lowest time taken to the 95% PL settlement (3...

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by quinolinium fluorochromate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Khurana; Pradeep K Sharma; Kalyan K Banerji

    2000-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by quinolinium fluorochromate (QFC) have been studied in dimethylsulphoxide. The main product of oxidation is carbon dioxide. The reaction is first-order with respect to QFC. Michaelis-Menten type of kinetics were observed with respect to the reductants. The reaction is acid-catalysed and the acid dependence has the form: obs = + [H+]. The oxidation of -deuterioformic acid exhibits a substantial primary kinetic isotope effect (H/D = 6.01 at 303 K). The reaction has been studied in nineteen different organic solvents and the solvent effect has been analysed using Taft’s and Swain’s multiparametric equations. The temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect indicates the presence of a symmetrical cyclic transition state in the rate-determining step. Suitable mechanisms have been proposed

  11. Decrease of intracellular pH as possible mechanism of embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; Bai, Y.; Verwei, M.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Blaauboer, B.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Embryotoxicity of glycol ethers is caused by their alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, but the mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of these acid metabolites is so far not known. The present study investigates a possible mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabol

  12. The mechanism of downregulation of apolipoprotein M mediated by palmitic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施媛萍

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether palmitic acid downregulates ApoM expression and further to investigate its mechanism.Methods Human hepatoma cell line,HepG2 cells were treated with the media containing palmitic acid(1 mmol/L)and/or PI-3K inhibitor LY294002(10μmol/L),protein kinase C inhibitor GF109203X(GFX,2μmol/L)and/or PARβ/δantagonist GSK3787

  13. Abnormal Unsaturated Fatty Acid Metabolism in Cystic Fibrosis: Biochemical Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Seegmiller, Adam C.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited multi-organ disorder caused by mutations in the CFTR gene. Patients with this disease exhibit characteristic abnormalities in the levels of unsaturated fatty acids in blood and tissue. Recent studies have uncovered an underlying biochemical mechanism for some of these changes, namely increased expression and activity of fatty acid desaturases. Among other effects, this drives metabolism of linoeate to arachidonate. Increased desaturase expression appears to be ...

  14. Effect and mechanism of diphosphonic acid on flotation characteristic of fersmite and intergrowth gangue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任暤; 纪绯绯; 张书香

    2003-01-01

    The effect of several collectors and their dosage on the flotation characteristics of the synthetical fersmite at different pH values, the collecting strength and selectivity of several representative collectors were investigated. The experimental results indicate that diphosphonic acid is a good collector for fersmite and recovery of fersmite ranges from 83.27% to 85.10% when the pulp pH value is at 2.5-5.0 and the dosage is 20 mg/L. The rank sequence of selectivity for several collectors is as follows: diphosphonic acid > benzyl arsonic acid >α-styrolphosphonic acid>alkyl hydroximic acid (C7-9) > cyclic alkyl hydroximic acid. At the same time, Infrared Absorption Spectrum (IAS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used to detect and analyze the action mechanism of diphosphonic acid on fersmite. IAS results show that the characteristic absorption peak relating to PO as well as P-O vibration occurs between wave number 1 178 cm-1, 1 142 cm-1, 1 087 cm-1 and 934 cm-1, and diphosphonic acid is adsorbed on the surface of fersmite. XPS results indicate that the binding energy of P 2p peak of fersmite treated by diphosphonic acid is increased by 3.85 eV. It is proved that the adsorption is mainly chemical adsorption.

  15. Effects of diphosphonic acid on ilmenorutile collecting property and research of action mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of several collectors and their dosage on pure ilmenorutile at different pH values were studied and the collecting strength of several representative collectors was investigated. The experimental results indicate that diphosphonic acid is a good collector for ilmenorutile and the recovery of ilmenorutile ranges from 90.87% to 91.70% when the pulp pH value is 2.0-4.0 and the dosage is 75mg/L. Thesequence of collecting ability for several collectors is as follows: diphosphonic acid > TF279 > cyclic alkyl hydroximic acid > benzyl arsenic acid > salicylic hydroximic acid > alkyl hydroximic acid. Meanwhile, IAS (infrared absorption spectrum) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) were used to detect and analyze the action mechanism of diphosphonic acid on ilmenorutile. IAS results showed that the characterid between wave numeber and cm, and diphosphonic acid had adsorbed on the surface of ilmenorutile. XPS results indicated that the binding energy of P2P peak of ilmenorutile had changed 0.45eV after treated by diphosphonic acid. This proves that the adsorption is mainly chemical adsorption.

  16. Mechanisms of amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion in congenital hyperinsulinism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingting Zhang; Changhong Li

    2013-01-01

    The role of amino acids in the regulation of insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells is highlighted in three forms of congenital hyperinsulinism (HI),namely gain-of-function mutations of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH),loss-of-function mutations of ATP-dependent potassium channels,and a deficiency of short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase.Studies on disease mouse models of HI suggest that amino acid oxidation and signaling effects are the major mechanisms of amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion.Amino acid oxidation via GDH produces ATP and triggers insulin secretion.The signaling effect of amino acids amplifies insulin release after beta-cell depolarization and elevation of cytosolic calcium.

  17. Mechanism and controlling strategy of the production and accumulation of propionic acid for anaerobic wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任南琪; 赵丹; 陈晓蕾; 李建政

    2002-01-01

    The production and accumulation of propionic acid affect significantly anaerobic wastewater treatment system, but the reasons are not approached until now. Based on the results of continuous-flow tests and the analysis of biochemistry and ecology, two mechanisms of producing propionic acid have been put forward. It is demonstrated that the reasons of propionic acid production and accumulation are not caused by higher hydrogen partial pressure. The combination of specific pH value and ORP is the ecological factor affecting propionic acid production, and the equilibrium regulation of NADH/NAD+ ratio in cells is the physiological factor. Meanwhile, it is put forward that using the two-phase anaerobic treatment process and the ethanol type fermentation in anaerobic reactor to avoid propionic acid accumulation are efficient methods.

  18. Acidification and buffering mechanisms in acid sulfate soil wetlands of the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Fiona; Whitworth, Kerry L; Kappen, Peter; Baldwin, Darren S; Rees, Gavin N; Webb, John A; Silvester, Ewen

    2011-04-01

    The acid generation mechanisms and neutralizing capacities of sulfidic sediments from two inland wetlands have been studied in order to understand the response of these types of systems to drying events. The two systems show vastly different responses to oxidation, with one (Bottle Bend (BB) lagoon) having virtually no acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and the other (Psyche Bend (PB) lagoon) an ANC that is an order of magnitude greater than the acid generation potential. While BB strongly acidifies during oxidation the free acid generation is less than that expected from the measured proton production and consumption processes, with additional proton consumption attributed to the formation of an acid-anion (chloride) FeIII (oxyhydr)oxide product, similar to akaganéite (Fe(OH)2.7Cl0.3). While such products can partially attenuate the acidification of these systems, resilience to acidification is primarily imparted by sediment ANC. PMID:21375259

  19. Adsorption mechanisms for fatty acids on DLC and steel studied by AFM and tribological experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simič, R.; Kalin, M., E-mail: mitjan.kalin@tint.fs.uni-lj.si

    2013-10-15

    Fatty acids are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which is one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. The understanding of the lubrication mechanisms of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) is, however, still insufficient. In this work we aimed to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. The adsorption of hexadecanoic acid in various concentrations (2–20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage of the adsorbed fatty-acid molecules was analysed. In addition, tribological tests were performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours in tribological contacts with the adsorption of molecules on the surface under static conditions. A good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour was observed. We confirmed that fatty acids can adsorb onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for DLC coatings. The adsorption of the fatty acid onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include an environmental species effect, a temperature effect and a tribochemical effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces based on our results and few potential mechanisms found in literature.

  20. Adsorption mechanisms for fatty acids on DLC and steel studied by AFM and tribological experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simič, R.; Kalin, M.

    2013-10-01

    Fatty acids are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which is one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. The understanding of the lubrication mechanisms of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) is, however, still insufficient. In this work we aimed to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. The adsorption of hexadecanoic acid in various concentrations (2-20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage of the adsorbed fatty-acid molecules was analysed. In addition, tribological tests were performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours in tribological contacts with the adsorption of molecules on the surface under static conditions. A good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour was observed. We confirmed that fatty acids can adsorb onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for DLC coatings. The adsorption of the fatty acid onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include an environmental species effect, a temperature effect and a tribochemical effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces based on our results and few potential mechanisms found in literature.

  1. Adsorption mechanisms for fatty acids on DLC and steel studied by AFM and tribological experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatty acids are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which is one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. The understanding of the lubrication mechanisms of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) is, however, still insufficient. In this work we aimed to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. The adsorption of hexadecanoic acid in various concentrations (2–20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage of the adsorbed fatty-acid molecules was analysed. In addition, tribological tests were performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours in tribological contacts with the adsorption of molecules on the surface under static conditions. A good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour was observed. We confirmed that fatty acids can adsorb onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for DLC coatings. The adsorption of the fatty acid onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include an environmental species effect, a temperature effect and a tribochemical effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces based on our results and few potential mechanisms found in literature.

  2. Review: Mechanisms of How the Intestinal Microbiota Alters the Effects of Drugs and Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-10-01

    Information on the intestinal microbiota has increased exponentially this century because of technical advancements in genomics and metabolomics. Although information on the synthesis of bile acids by the liver and their transformation to secondary bile acids by the intestinal microbiota was the first example of the importance of the intestinal microbiota in biotransforming chemicals, this review will discuss numerous examples of the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota alters the pharmacology and toxicology of drugs and other chemicals. More specifically, the altered pharmacology and toxicology of salicylazosulfapridine, digoxin, l-dopa, acetaminophen, caffeic acid, phosphatidyl choline, carnitine, sorivudine, irinotecan, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heterocyclic amines, melamine, nitrazepam, and lovastatin will be reviewed. In addition, recent data that the intestinal microbiota alters drug metabolism of the host, especially Cyp3a, as well as the significance and potential mechanisms of this phenomenon are summarized. The review will conclude with an update of bile acid research, emphasizing the bile acid receptors (FXR and TGR5) that regulate not only bile acid synthesis and transport but also energy metabolism. Recent data indicate that by altering the intestinal microbiota, either by diet or drugs, one may be able to minimize the adverse effects of the Western diet by altering the composition of bile acids in the intestine that are agonists or antagonists of FXR and TGR5. Therefore, it may be possible to consider the intestinal microbiota as another drug target.

  3. Expression and Subcellular Localization of Retinoic Acid Receptor-α (RARα) in Healthy and Varicocele Human Spermatozoa: Its Possible Regulatory Role in Capacitation and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Ida; Perri, Mariarita; Santoro, Marta; Panza, Salvatore; Caroleo, Maria C; Guido, Carmela; Mete, Annamaria; Cione, Erika; Aquila, Saveria

    2015-01-01

    Varicocele, an abnormal tortuosity and dilation of veins of the pampiniform plexus, is the most common identifiable and correctable cause of male infertility. It is now becoming apparent that signaling through vitamin A metabolites, such as all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), is indispensable for spermatogenesis and disruption of retinoic acid receptor-α (RARα) function may result in male sterility and aberrant spermatogenesis. Herein, we investigated by Western blot and immunogold electron microscopy the expression profiles and subcellular localization of RARα in healthy and varicocele human sperm; in addition, we analyzed the effects of ATRA on cholesterol efflux and sperm survival utilizing enzymatic colorimetric CHOD-PAP method and Eosin Y technique, respectively. In varicocele samples, a strong reduction of RARα expression was observed. Immunogold labeling evidenced cellular location of RARα also confirming its reduced expression in "varicocele" samples. Sperm responsiveness to ATRA treatment was reduced in varicocele sperm. Our study showed that RARα is expressed in human sperm probably with a dual role in promoting both cholesterol efflux and survival. RARα might be involved in the pathogenesis of varicocele as its expression is reduced in pathologic samples. Thus, ATRA administration in procedures for artificial insemination or dietary vitamin A supplementation might represent a promising therapeutic approach for the management of male infertility.

  4. Receptor for advanced glycation end products plays a more important role in cellular survival than in neurite outgrowth during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajithlal, Gangadharan; Huttunen, Henri; Rauvala, Heikki; Munch, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is known to interact with amphoterin. This interaction has been proposed to play a role in neurite outgrowth and process elongation during neurodifferentiation. However, there is as yet no direct evidence of the relevance of this pathway to neurodifferentiation under physiological conditions. In this study we have investigated a possible role of RAGE and amphoterin in the retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. The functional inactivation of RAGE by dominant negative and antisense strategies showed that RAGE is not required for process outgrowth or differentiation, although overexpression of RAGE accelerates the elongation of neuritic processes. Using the antisense strategy, amphoterin was shown to be essential for process outgrowth and differentiation, suggesting that amphoterin may interact with other molecules to exert its effect in this context. Interestingly, the survival of the neuroblastoma cells treated with retinoic acid was partly dependent on the expression of RAGE, and inhibition of RAGE function partially blocked the increase in anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 following retinoic acid treatment. Based on these results we propose that a combination therapy using RAGE blockers and retinoic acid may prove as a useful approach for chemotherapy for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  5. Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in dry fermented sausages containing micro-encapsulated probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumarasamy, Parthiban; Holley, Richard A

    2007-02-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is capable of surviving the rigorous processing steps during the manufacture of dry fermented sausages. The effect of adding two probiotic organisms, Lactobacillus reuteri and Bifidobacterium longum as co-cultures with the meat starter cultures Pediococcus pentosaceus and Staphylococcus carnosus on the viability of E. coli O157:H7 in dry fermented sausages was studied. A 5 strain cocktail of E. coli O157:H7 was added at 7.4 log cfu/g to the sausage batter and challenged with either or both Lb. reuteri or B. longum before or after they were micro-encapsulated. Sausages were fermented at aw), protein, moisture, and numbers of all inoculated organisms were monitored during processing. The pH and aw decreased from 5.7 and 0.98 to 4.9 and 0.88 at the end of fermentation and drying, respectively. These processes reduced E. coli O157:H7 by 1.0 and 0.7 log cfu/g at the end of fermentation and drying, respectively. Unencapsulated Lb. reuteri with or without B. longum reduced E. coli O157:H7 by 3.0 log cfu/g and B. longum caused a 1.9 log cfu/g reduction. While micro-encapsulation increased survival of Lb. reuteri and B. longum, it reduced their inhibitory action against E. coli O157:H7. PMID:16943098

  6. Enhancement of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Polylactic Acid/Polycaprolactone Blends by Hydrophilic Nanoclay

    OpenAIRE

    Chern Chiet Eng; Nor Azowa Ibrahim; Norhazlin Zainuddin; Hidayah Ariffin; Wan Md Zin Wan Yunus; Yoon Yee Then; Cher Chean Teh

    2013-01-01

    The effects of hydrophilic nanoclay, Nanomer PGV, on mechanical properties of Polylactic Acid (PLA)/Polycaprolactone (PCL) blends were investigated and compared with hydrophobic clay, Montmorillonite K10. The PLA/PCL/clay composites were prepared by melt intercalation technique and the composites were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM),...

  7. Mechanical, thermal, and biodegradable properties of polylactic acid (PLA)/coir fibre biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y.; Ghataura, A.; Haroosh, H. J.

    2013-08-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA)/coir fibre biocomposites were fabricated using a compression moulding technique. The effects of fibre content (5-30 wt%) and fibre treatment on mechanical, thermal and biodegradable properties of biocomposites were holistically investigated via mechanical testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and soil burial method to understand the applicability of manufacturing eco-efficient and sustainable "green composites".

  8. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  9. Review and hypothesis: syndromes with severe intrauterine growth restriction and very short stature--are they related to the epigenetic mechanism(s) of fetal survival involved in the developmental origins of adult health and disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Judith G

    2010-02-01

    Diagnosing the specific type of severe intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) that also has post-birth growth restriction is often difficult. Eight relatively common syndromes are discussed identifying their unique distinguishing features, overlapping features, and those features common to all eight syndromes. Many of these signs take a few years to develop and the lifetime natural history of the disorders has not yet been completely clarified. The theory behind developmental origins of adult health and disease suggests that there are mammalian epigenetic fetal survival mechanisms that downregulate fetal growth, both in order for the fetus to survive until birth and to prepare it for a restricted extra-uterine environment, and that these mechanisms have long lasting effects on the adult health of the individual. Silver-Russell syndrome phenotype has recently been recognized to be related to imprinting/methylation defects. Perhaps all eight syndromes, including those with single gene mutation origin, involve the mammalian mechanism(s) of fetal survival downsizing. Insights into those mechanisms should provide avenues to understanding the natural history, the heterogeneity and possible therapy not only for these eight syndromes, but for the common adult diseases with which IUGR is associated. PMID:20101705

  10. Atmospheric sulphuric acid and aerosol formation: implications from atmospheric measurements for nucleation and early growth mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the formation and early growth of atmospheric secondary aerosol particles building on atmospheric measurements. The measurements were part of the QUEST 2 campaign which took place in spring 2003 in Hyytiälä (Finland. During the campaign numerous new aerosol particle formation events occurred of which 15 were accompanied by gaseous sulphuric acid measurements. Our detailed analysis of these 15 events is focussed on nucleation and early growth (to a diameter of 3 nm of fresh particles. It revealed that new particle formation seems to be a function of the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration to the power from one to two. The former would be consistent with the recently developed activation theory while the latter would be consistent with the kinetic nucleation theory. We find that some events are dominated by the activation mechanism and some are dominated by the kinetic mechanism. Inferred coefficients for the two nucleation mechanisms are correlated with the product of gaseous sulphuric acid and ammonia concentrations. This indicates that besides gaseous sulphuric acid also ammonia has a role in nucleation. Early growth of fresh particles to a diameter of 3 nm has a mean rate of 1.2 nm/h and is clearly correlated with the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration.

  11. Poly(para-dioxanone) and poly(l-lactic acid) blends : Thermal, mechanical, and morphological properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pezzin, APT; van Ekenstein, GORA; Zavaglia, CAC; ten Brinke, G; Deuk, EAR; Duek, E.A.R.

    2003-01-01

    Blends of two semicrystalline polymers, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly-p-dioxanone (PPD) have been prepared by solvent casting in different compositions. Thermal, morphological, and mechanical properties of the blends were studied using modulated differential scanning calorimetry, wide-angle X-

  12. EFFECTS OF AMINO ACIDS ON THE MEMBRANE POTENTIAL OF TOAD OOCYTES AND THE MECHANISMS INVOLVED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYu-Feng; CHENGJiun; CHENGZhi-Ping

    1989-01-01

    The etTects of 23 amino acids on the membrane potential of toad ( Bufo bufo gargarizans ) oocytes and the mechanisms involved were investigated in vitro by means of microelectrode. At a concentration of I mmol/L-alanine, leucine and lyaine induced signfiant depolarization, and tryptophan provoked a marked hyperpolarization during

  13. Physical and mechanical properties of extruded poly(lactic acid)-based Paulownia elongata biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulownia wood flour (PWF), a byproduct of milling lumber, was tested as bio-filler with polylactic acid (PLA). Paulownia wood (PW) shavings were milled and separated into particle fractions and then blended with PLA with a single screw extruder. Mechanical and thermal properties were tested. Dif...

  14. CEC mechanism in electrochemical oxidation of nitrocatechol-boric acid complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiee, Mohammad, E-mail: rafiee@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nematollahi, Davood; Salehzadeh, Hamid [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Nitrochetechol and its anionic form undergo complex reaction with boric acid. > The electron transfer of complex is coupled with both proceeding and following chemical reactions. > Electrochemical behavior of complex is resolved by diagnostic criteria and digital simulation. - Abstract: The electrochemical behavior of nitrocatechols-boric acid complexes in aqueous solution has been studied using cyclic voltammetry. The results indicate that nitrocatechol-boric acid complex derivatives are involved in the CEC mechanism. In this work, the impact of empirical parameters on the shape of the voltammograms is examined based on a CEC mechanism. In addition, homogeneous rate constants of both the preceding and the following reactions were estimated by comparing the experimental cyclic voltammograms with the digitally simulated results. The calculated dissociation constants for the complexes (K{sub d}) and for ring cleavage of nitroquinone (k{sub f2}) were found to vary in the following order: 4-nitrocatechol > 3-methylnitrocatechol > 3-metoxynitrocatechol.

  15. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward D Bonnevie

    Full Text Available When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants.

  16. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnevie, Edward D; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants.

  17. Blood-brain barrier permeability and brain uptake mechanism of kainic Acid and dihydrokainic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gynther, Mikko; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Hansen, Steen Honoré;

    2015-01-01

    is low, 0.25 × 10(-6) and 0.28 × 10(-6) cm/s for KA and DHK, respectively. In addition, the brain uptake is mediated by passive diffusion, and not by active transport. Furthermore, the non-specific plasma and brain protein binding of KA and DHK was determined to be low, which means that the unbound drug...... tools in various in vivo central nervous system disease models in rodents, as well as being templates in the design of novel ligands affecting the glutamatergic system. Both molecules are highly polar but yet capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We used an in situ rat brain perfusion...... technique to determine the brain uptake mechanism and permeability across the BBB. To determine KA and DHK concentrations in the rat brain, simple and rapid sample preparation and liquid chromatography mass spectrometer methods were developed. According to our results the BBB permeability of KA and DHK...

  18. Atmospheric sulphuric acid and aerosol formation: implications from atmospheric measurements for nucleation and early growth mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the formation and early growth of atmospheric secondary aerosol particles building on atmospheric measurements. The measurements were part of the QUEST 2 campaign which took place in spring 2003 in Hyytiälä (Finland. During the campaign numerous aerosol particle formation events occurred of which 15 were accompanied by gaseous sulphuric acid measurements. Our detailed analysis of these 15 events is focussed on nucleation and early growth (to a diameter of 3 nm of fresh particles. It revealed that new particle formation seems to be a function of the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration to the power from one to two when the time delay between the sulphuric acid and particle number concentration is taken into account. From the time delay the growth rates of freshly nucleated particles from 1 nm to 3 nm were determined. The mean growth rate was 1.2 nm/h and it was clearly correlated with the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration. We tested two nucleation mechanisms – recently proposed cluster activation and kinetic type nucleation – as possible candidates to explain the observed dependences, and determined experimental nucleation coefficients. We found that some events are dominated by the activation mechanism and some by the kinetic mechanism. Inferred coefficients for the two nucleation mechanisms are the same order of magnitude as chemical reaction coefficients in the gas phase and they correlate with the product of gaseous sulphuric acid and ammonia concentrations. This indicates that besides gaseous sulphuric acid also ammonia has a role in nucleation.

  19. Study on the preparation and formation mechanism of barium sulphate nanoparticles modified by different organic acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuhua Shen; Chuanhao Li; Xuemei Zhu; Anjian Xie; Lingguang Qiu; Jinmiao Zhu

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports a simple method to prepare barium sulphate nanoparticles by use of tetradecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid and stearic acid as modifier. The barium sulphate nanoparticles obtained are characterized by using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic laser light scatter (DLLS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The results show that the BaSO4 particles are all spherical and in the nano-scale. Our method has a better dispersion and controllable diameter dependent on the length of the chain of organic acid and the pH value of the system. A possible mechanism is also discussed.

  20. Mechanisms involved in the selective transfer of long chain polyunsaturted fatty acids to the fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso eGil-Sánchez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA in the fetal brain increases dramatically from the third trimester until 18 months of life. Several studies have shown an association between the percentage of maternal plasma docosahexaenoic acid (DHA during gestation and development of the cognitive functions in the neonate. Since only very low levels of LCPUFA are synthesized in the fetus and placenta, their primary source for the fetus is that of maternal origin. Both in vitro and human in vivo studies using labelled fatty acids have shown the preferential transfer of LCPUFA from the placenta to the fetus compared with other fatty acids, although the mechanisms involved are still uncertain. The placenta takes up circulating maternal non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA and fatty acids released mainly by maternal lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase. These NEFA may enter the cell by passive diffusion or by means of membrane carrier proteins. Once in the cytosol, NEFA bind to cytosolic fatty acid-binding proteins for transfer to the fetal circulation or can be oxidized within the trophoblasts and even re-esterified and stored in lipid droplets (LD. Although trophoblast cells are not specialized in lipid storage, LCPUFA may up-regulate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ and hence the gene expression of fatty acid transport carriers, fatty acid acyl-CoA synthetases and adipophilin or other enzymes related with lipolysis, modifying their rate of placental transfer and metabolization. The placental transfer of LCPUFA during pregnancy seems to be a key factor in the neurological development of the fetus. Increased knowledge on the factors that modify placental transfer of fatty acids would contribute to our understanding of this complex process.

  1. The CDKN2A G500 allele is more frequent in GBM patients with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism tumors and is associated with poorer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice A Royds

    Full Text Available Prognostic markers for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are important for patient management. Recent advances have identified prognostic markers for GBMs that use telomerase or the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT mechanism for telomere maintenance. Approximately 40% of GBMs have no defined telomere maintenance mechanism (NDTMM, with a mixed survival for affected individuals. This study examined genetic variants in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A gene that encodes the p16(INK4a and p14(ARF tumor suppressors, and the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1 gene as potential markers of survival for 40 individuals with NDTMM GBMs (telomerase negative and ALT negative by standard assays, 50 individuals with telomerase, and 17 individuals with ALT positive tumors. The analysis of CDKN2A showed NDTMM GBMs had an increased minor allele frequency for the C500G (rs11515 polymorphism compared to those with telomerase and ALT positive GBMs (p = 0.002. Patients with the G500 allele had reduced survival that was independent of age, extent of surgery, and treatment. In the NDTMM group G500 allele carriers had increased loss of CDKN2A gene dosage compared to C500 homozygotes. An analysis of IDH1 mutations showed the R132H mutation was associated with ALT positive tumors, and was largely absent in NDTMM and telomerase positive tumors. In the ALT positive tumors cohort, IDH1 mutations were associated with a younger age for the affected individual. In conclusion, the G500 CDKN2A allele was associated with NDTMM GBMs from older individuals with poorer survival. Mutations in IDH1 were not associated with NDTMM GBMs, and instead were a marker for ALT positive tumors in younger individuals.

  2. The effects of short-chain fatty acids on colon epithelial proliferation and survival depend on the cellular phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Comalada, Monica; Bailon, Elvira; de Haro, Oscar; Lara-Villoslada, Federico; Xaus, Jordi; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Galvez, Julio

    2006-01-01

    Dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers. Dietary item or component studied: short-chain fatty acids (SCFA)Outcome studied: proliferation rate and apoptosis in the adenocarcinoma cells; proliferation rate and regeneration of intestinal epithelial cells. Study type: human colon adenocarninoma cells (HT-29); fetal human normal colon cells (FHC); Female Wistar rats Tissue/biological material/sample size: rat colon. Mode of exposure: dietary. Impact on outcome (including dose-response):in...

  3. Effect of steam and lactic acid treatments on the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni inoculated on chicken skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaine, Aline; Arnaud, Elodie; Kondjoyan, Alain; Collignan, Antoine; Sarter, Samira

    2013-04-01

    Campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis are the most frequently reported zoonotic infectious diseases. The present work evaluated the effectiveness of steam treatment at 100 °C for 8s, a 5% lactic acid treatment for 1 min and their combination for inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni inoculated on chicken skin. The impact of each treatment on the total aerobic mesophilic bacteria and the effect of rinsing after contact with lactic acid were also evaluated. Residual bacteria were counted immediately after treatment or after seven days of storage at 4 °C. Results demonstrated the immediate efficiency of the steam and the combined treatments with reductions of approximately 6 and 5 log cfu/cm2 respectively for S. Enteritidis and C. jejuni. They also showed significant reductions (equal to or >3.2 log cfu/cm2) in the total aerobic mesophilic plate count. Lactic acid had a persistent effect on pathogen growth during storage which was significantly higher when the skin was not rinsed, reaching reductions of 3.8 log cfu/cm2 for both S. Enteritidis and C. jejuni. Only the combined treatments significantly reduced the recovery of the total aerobic mesophilic bacteria during storage. The significant reductions in both pathogens and total aerobic mesophilic bacteria on treated chicken skins are possible ways to improve the safety and shelf life of the product although high levels of indigenous non-pathogenic bacteria may be beneficial due to their protective effect against potential re-contamination of chicken skin.

  4. Surgery for Glioblastoma: Impact of the Combined Use of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid and Intraoperative MRI on Extent of Resection and Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Coburger

    Full Text Available There is rising evidence that in glioblastoma (GBM surgery an increase of extent of resection (EoR leads to an increase of patient's survival. Based on histopathological assessments tumor depiction of Gd-DTPA enhancement and 5-aminolevulinic-acid-fluorescence (5-ALA might be synergistic for intraoperative resection control.To assess impact of additional use of 5-ALA in intraoperative MRI (iMRI assisted surgery of GBMs on extent of resection (EoR, progression free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS.We prospectively enrolled 33 patients with GBMs eligible for gross-total-resection(GTR and performed a combined approach using 5-ALA and iMRI. As a control group, we performed a retrospective matched pair assessment, based on 144 patients with iMRI-assisted surgery. Matching criteria were, MGMT promotor methylation, recurrent surgery, eloquent location, tumor size and age. Only patients with an intended GTR and primary GBMs were included. We calculated Kaplan Mayer estimates to compare OS and PFS using the Log-Rank-Test. We used the T-test to compare volumetric results of EoR and the Chi-Square-Test to compare new permanent neurological deficits (nPND and general complications between the two groups.Median follow up was 31 months. No significant differences between both groups were found concerning the matching criteria. GTR was achieved significantly more often (p <0.010 using 5-ALA&iMRI (100% compared to iMRI alone (82%. Mean EoR was significantly (p<0.004 higher in 5-ALA&iMRI-group (99.7% than in iMRI-alone-group (97.4% Rate of complications did not differ significantly between groups (21% iMRI-group, 27%5-ALA&iMRI-group, p<0.518. nPND were found in 6% in both groups. Median PFS (6 mo resp.; p<0.309 and median OS (iMRI:17 mo; 5-ALA&iMRI-group: 18 mo; p<0.708 were not significantly different between both groups.We found a significant increase of EoR when combining 5-ALA&iMRI compared to use of iMRI alone. Maximizing EoR did not lead to an

  5. Molecular approaches unravel the mechanism of acid soil tolerance in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao; Bian; Meixue; Zhou; Dongfa; Sun; Chengdao; Li

    2013-01-01

    Acid soil is a worldwide problem to plant production. Acid toxicity is mainly caused by a lack of essential nutrients in the soil and excessive toxic metals in the plant root zone. Of the toxic metals, aluminum(Al) is the most prevalent and most toxic. Plant species have evolved to variable levels of tolerance to aluminum enabling breeding of high Al-tolerant cultivars.Physiological and molecular approaches have revealed some mechanisms of Al toxicity in higher plants. Mechanisms of plant tolerance to Al stress include: 1) exclusion of Al from the root tips, and 2) absorbance, but tolerance of Al in root cells. Organic acid exudation to chelate Al is a feature shared by many higher plants. The future challenge for Al tolerance studies is the identification of novel tolerance mechanisms and the combination of different mechanisms to achieve higher tolerance. Molecular approaches have led to significant progress in explaining mechanisms and detection of genes responsible for Al tolerance.Gene-specific molecular markers offer better options for marker-assisted selection in breeding programs than linked marker strategies. This paper mainly focuses on recent progress in the use of molecular approaches in Al tolerance research.

  6. Effects of mechanical stress or abscisic acid on growth, water status and leaf abscisic acid content of eggplant seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, J. G.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Container-grown eggplant (Solanum melongena L. var esculentum Nees. 'Burpee's Black Beauty') seedlings were conditioned with brief, periodic mechanical stress or abscisic acid (ABA) in a greenhouse prior to outdoor exposure. Mechanical stress consisted of seismic (shaking) or thigmic (stem flexing) treatment. Exogenous ABA (10(-3) or 10(-4)M) was applied as a soil drench 3 days prior to outdoor transfer. During conditioning, only thigmic stress reduced stem elongation and only 10(-3) M ABA reduced relative growth rate (RGR). Both conditioning treatments increased leaf specific chlorophyll content, but mechanical stress did not affect leaf ABA content. Outdoor exposure of unconditioned eggplant seedlings decreased RGR and leaf-specific chlorophyll content, but tended to increase leaf ABA content relative to that of plants maintained in the greenhouse. Conditioning did not affect RGR of plants subsequently transferred outdoors, but did reduce stem growth. Seismic stress applied in the greenhouse reduced dry weight gain by plants subsequently transferred outdoors. Mechanical stress treatments increased leaf water potential by 18-25% relative to that of untreated plants.

  7. INTERACTION OF AMINO ACID WITH ION EXCHANGE RESIN Ⅲ.FURTHER INVESTIGA TION OF SUPEREQUIVALENT ADSORPTION MECHANISM OF AMINO ACID ON ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHui; SHAOTong; 等

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption isotherms of glycine,alanine and oxidized glutathion on strong acid cation and strong base anion exchange resins from aqueous solutions were measured and the superequivalent adsorptions of glycine and alanine observed.The infrared spectra of glycine adsorbed on the cation and the anion exchange resins,001×7 and 201×7,were measured.From these results,it is concluded that the amino acid adsorption on the ion exchange resin proceeds not only through ion exchange and proton transfer mechanisms,but also through aminecarboxylate interaction between the adsorbed amino acid molecules,and the formation of second layer of amino acid molecules is the mechanism of superequivalent adsorption of amino acid,the carboxylate or amine groups of the first layer of amino acid molecules on the ion exchange resin act as the exchange sites for the second layer of amino acid molecules.

  8. Mechanisms of action of okadaic acid class tumor promoters on mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami; Yoshizawa, Seiji; Nishiwaki, Shinji; Winyar, Boonsong (National Cancer Center Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)); Sugimura, Takashi (National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-06-01

    Okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-1 (35-methylokadaic acid), and calyculin A are the okadaic acid class of non-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type tumor promoters, which do not bind to the phorbol ester receptors in cell membranes or activate protein kinase C in vitro. They have potent tumor-promoting activities on mouse skin, as strong as TPA-type tumor promoters, such as TPA, teleocidin, and aplysiatoxin. DNA samples isolated from tumors induced by dimethylbenz(a)anthracene and each of the okadaic acid class tumor promoters had the same mutation at the second nucleotide of codon 61 (CAA to CTA) in the c-H-ras gene. Okadaic acid receptors, protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, are present in the particulate as well as cytosolic fractions of various mouse tissues. The apparent activation of protein kinases by the okadaic acid class tumor promoters, after their incubation with {sup 32}P-ATP, protein kinases, and protein phosphatases, was observed. This activation was caused by inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A by the okadaic acid class tumor promoters. Treatment of primary human fibroblasts and human keratinocytes with the okadaic acid class tumor promoters induced the hyperphosphorylation of a 60-k-Da protein in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, due to the inhibition of protein phosphatases. The 60-kDa protein is a proteolytic fragment of nucleolin, a major nonhistone protein and is designated as N-60. The mechanisms of action of the okadaic acid class tumor promoters are discussed with emphasis on the inhibition of protein phosphatase activity.

  9. Investigation of mechanism of fade of gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, B H

    1988-01-01

    1. In conscious cats prepared with gastric fistulae gastric acid secretion in response to pentagastrin was found to reach a maximum after 45 min of stimulation, and to fade thereafter. Over the period 45-150 min of stimulation the fade was 5.4-7.8% of the maximum response per 15 min. 2. Once the response to pentagastrin had declined, acid secretion could not be restored by doubling the dose of pentagastrin, although an equisecretory dose of histamine could restore it. 3. Low doses of histamine were additive to the pentagastrin acid secretory response; they tended to prolong the peak response, but did not alter the subsequent fade of acid secretion. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist mepyramine did not affect maximal acid secretion or the fade of the pentagastrin response. 4. The beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist propranolol increased the secretory response to pentagastrin, whilst the alpha-adrenoreceptor antagonist phentolamine was without effect. Neither agent altered the fade of the pentagastrin response. Isoprenaline tended to inhibit pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion and increase the rate of fade of the response. 5. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor antagonist methylsergide slightly enhanced the acid secretory response to pentagastrin, but did not alter the fade of the response. A low dose of 5-HT did not alter pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion, whilst a higher dose of 5-HT inhibited it. 6. Tetra-, penta- and pentadecagastrin demonstrated tachyphylaxis, i.e. progressively reduced responses upon repeated stimulation, whilst histamine did not. A low dose of histamine did not prevent tachyphylaxis of the pentagastrin response. 7. It is concluded that fade of pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion in the conscious cat cannot be satisfactorily explained by the failure of the acid secretory mechanism, depletion of histamine, release of 5-HT, or activation of histamine H1-, alpha- or beta-adreno-, or 5-HT-receptors. The similar characteristics of fade

  10. Passivation Mechanism of 316L Stainless Steel in Oxidizing Acid Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The compositions and the chemical valence states of elements of 316L stainless steel passive film formed in the oxidizing acid solution were studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic (XPS) analysis. The electrochemical polarization curve was measured. The passivation process in the oxidizing acid solution was studied by AC impedance technology. The results indicated that the stable compounds layer was formed on the surface of the sample and the adsorption was the main step in the nitrite solution during passivation process. The catalysis passivation mechanism was put forward according to the experimental results. During passivation process, the water molecule was adsorbed on the surface of the sample at first in the oxidizing acid solution. The oxidizer in the solution played a role as catalyst. The oxide and hydroxide, which could be changed each other and finally formed stable passive film, were generated from adsorbing intermediate under the catalytic action. The mathematical models for predicting the steady polarization curve and the AC impedance spectra at certain conditions have been obtained. The passivation mechanism of 316L stainless steel in the oxidizing acid solution can be interpreted by the catalysis passivation mechanism.

  11. Mechanisms of all-trans retinoic acid-induced differentiation of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ji-Wang Zhang; Jian Gu; Zhen-Yi Wang; Sai-Juan Chen; Zhu Chen

    2000-09-01

    Retinoic acids (RA) play a key role in myeloid differentiation through their agonistic nuclear receptors (RAR/RXR) to modulate the expression of target genes. In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells with rearrangement of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) (including: PML-RAR, PLZF-RAR, NPM-RAR, NuMA-RAR or STAT5b-RAR) as a result of chromosomal translocations, the RA signal pathway is disrupted and myeloid differentiation is arrested at the promyelocytic stage. Pharmacologic dosage of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) directly modulates PML-RAR and its interaction with the nuclear receptor co-repressor complex, which restores the wild-type RAR/RXR regulatory pathway and induces the transcriptional expression of downstream genes. Analysing gene expression profiles in APL cells before and after ATRA treatment represents a useful approach to identify genes whose functions are involved in this new cancer treatment. A chronologically well coordinated modulation of ATRA-regulated genes has thus been revealed which seems to constitute a balanced functional network underlying decreased cellular proliferation, initiation and progression of maturation, and maintenance of cell survival before terminal differentiation.

  12. Effect of milk fermentation by kefir grains and selected single strains of lactic acid bacteria on the survival of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macuamule, C L S; Wiid, I J; van Helden, P D; Tanner, M; Witthuhn, R C

    2016-01-18

    Mycobacterium bovis that causes Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) can be transmitted to humans thought consumption of raw and raw fermented milk products from diseased animals. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) used in popular traditional milk products in Africa produce anti-microbial compounds that inhibit some pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. M. bovis BCG is an attenuated non-pathogenic vaccine strain of M. bovis and the aim of the study was to determine the effect of the fermentation process on the survival of M. bovis BCG in milk. M. bovis BCG at concentrations of 6 log CFU/ml was added to products of kefir fermentation. The survival of M. bovis BCG was monitored at 12-h intervals for 72 h by enumerating viable cells on Middlebrook 7H10 agar plates enriched with 2% BD BACTEC PANTA™. M. bovis BCG was increasingly reduced in sterile kefir that was fermented for a period of 24h and longer. In the milk fermented with kefir grains, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei or Lactobacillus casei, the viability of M. bovis BCG was reduced by 0.4 logs after 24h and by 2 logs after 48 h of fermentation. No viable M. bovis BCG was detected after 60 h of fermentation. Results from this study show that long term fermentation under certain conditions may have the potential to inactivate M. bovis BCG present in the milk. However, to ensure safety of fermented milk in Africa, fermentation should be combined with other hurdle technologies such as boiling and milk pasteurisation.

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of acetanilide by quinquevalent vanadium in acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of the oxidation of acetanilide with vanadium(V) in sulphuric acid medium at constant ionic strength has been studied. The reaction is first order with oxidant. The order of reaction in acetanilide varies from one to zero. The reaction follows an acid catalyzed independent path, exhibiting square dependence in H+. A Bunnett plot indicates that the water acts as a nucleophile. The thermodynamic parameters have been computed. A probable reaction mechanism and rate law consistent with these data are given. (Author)

  14. Docosahexaenoic acid signaling modulates cell survival in experimental ischemic stroke penumbra and initiates long-term repair in young and aged rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany N Eady

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Docosahexaenoic acid, a major omega-3 essential fatty acid family member, improves behavioral deficit and reduces infarct volume and edema after experimental focal cerebral ischemia. We hypothesize that DHA elicits neuroprotection by inducing AKT/p70S6K phosphorylation, which in turn leads to cell survival and protects against ischemic stroke in young and aged rats. METHODS AND RESULTS: Rats underwent 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. DHA, neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1 or vehicle (saline was administered 3 h after onset of stroke. Neurological function was evaluated on days 1, 2, 3, and 7. DHA treatment improved functional recovery and reduced cortical, subcortical and total infarct volumes 7 days after stroke. DHA also reduced microglia infiltration and increased the number of astrocytes and neurons when compared to vehicle on days 1 and 7. Increases in p473 AKT and p308 AKT phosphorylation/activation were observed in animals treated with DHA 4 h after MCAo. Activation of other members of the AKT signaling pathway were also observed in DHA treated animals including increases in pS6 at 4 h and pGSK at 24 h. DHA or NPD1 remarkably reduced total and cortical infarct in aged rats. Moreover, we show that in young and aged rats DHA treatment after MCAo potentiates NPD1 biosynthesis. The phosphorylation of p308 AKT or pGSK was not different between groups in aged rats. However, pS6 expression was increased with DHA or NPD1 treatment when compared to vehicle. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that DHA induces cell survival, modulates the neuroinflammatory response and triggers long term restoration of synaptic circuits. Both DHA and NPD1 elicited remarkable protection in aged animals. Accordingly, activation of DHA signaling might provide benefits in the management of ischemic stroke both acutely as well as long term to limit ensuing disabilities.

  15. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the –OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  16. Investigation of Nalidixic Acid Resistance Mechanism in Salmonella enterica Using Molecular Simulation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preethi, B; Shanthi, V; Ramanathan, K

    2015-09-01

    The emergence of nalidixic acid-resistant strains of Salmonella typhimurium remains to be a major public health problem. In particular, the substitution of Asn in place of Asp at the 87 loci in the GyrA of S. typhimurium was experimentally stated for nalidixic acid resistance. However, the data on the possible mechanism of nalidixic acid resistance are limited. In this study, I-Mutant2.0 and DUET program were employed to explore the impact of mutation on the stability of GyrA protein. Subsequently, molecular simulation techniques were employed to provide detailed information on the nalidixic acid-resistant associates with the D87N mutation in the GyrA of S. typhimurium. The binding free energy data depicts that nalidixic acid forms stable complex only with native-type GyrA than mutant (D87N) type GyrA protein. Moreover, our results theoretically suggest that hydrogen bonding formed by the Arg91 is certainly responsible for the GyrA of S. typhimurium drug selectivity. It is hoped that these evidences are immensely important for the development of new antibiotic and to overcome the nalidixic acid resistance in the near future. PMID:26208690

  17. Mechanism of cAMP-induced H+ -efflux of Dictyostelium cells: a role for fatty acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Flaadt; R Schaloske; D Malchow

    2000-09-01

    Aggregating Dictyostelium cells release protons when stimulated with cAMP. To find out whether the protons are generated by acidic vesicles or in the cytosol, we permeabilized the cells and found that this did not alter the cAMP-response. Proton efflux in intact cells was inhibited by preincubation with the V-type H+ ATPase inhibitor concanamycin A and with the plasma membrane H+ ATPase blocker miconazole. Surprisingly, miconazole also inhibited efflux in permeabilized cells, indicating that this type of H+ ATPase is present on intracellular vesicles as well. Vesicular acidification was inhibited by miconazole and by concanamycin A, suggesting that the acidic vesicles contain both V-type and P-type H+ ATPases. Moreover, concanamycin A and miconazole acted in concert, both in intact cells and in vesicles. The mechanism of cAMP-induced Ca2+-fluxes involves phospholipase A2 activity. Fatty acids circumvent the plasma membrane and stimulate vesicular Ca2+-efflux. Here we show that arachidonic acid elicited H+-efflux not only from intact cells but also from acidic vesicles. The target of regulation by arachidonic acid seemed to be the vesicular Ca2+-relase channel.

  18. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in low acid italian sausage produced under brazilian conditions Sobrevivência de Listeria monocytogenes em salame tipo italiano de baixa acidez, produzido sob condições brasileiras de fabricação

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Degenhardt; Ernani S. Sant'Anna

    2007-01-01

    Dry sausages have been considered ready-to-eat products with low risk of causing listeriosis due to the hurdles created during the manufacturing process such as low pH and a w, high salt concentration and presence of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). However, several studies have detected survival of Listeria monocytogenes in these products and also shown that process parameters, LAB and L. monocytogenes strains directly influence the results. In this work, survival of the pathogen in sausages prep...

  19. Sprouty2 and -4 hypomorphism promotes neuronal survival and astrocytosis in a mouse model of kainic acid induced neuronal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongrong, Sitthisak; Hausott, Barbara; Marvaldi, Letizia; Agostinho, Alexandra S; Zangrandi, Luca; Burtscher, Johannes; Fogli, Barbara; Schwarzer, Christoph; Klimaschewski, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Sprouty (Spry) proteins play a key role as negative feedback inhibitors of the Ras/Raf/MAPK/ERK pathway downstream of various receptor tyrosine kinases. Among the four Sprouty isoforms, Spry2 and Spry4 are expressed in the hippocampus. In this study, possible effects of Spry2 and Spry4 hypomorphism on neurodegeneration and seizure thresholds in a mouse model of epileptogenesis was analyzed. The Spry2/4 hypomorphs exhibited stronger ERK activation which was limited to the CA3 pyramidal cell layer and to the hilar region. The seizure threshold of Spry2/4(+/-) mice was significantly reduced at naive state but no difference to wildtype mice was observed 1 month following KA treatment. Histomorphological analysis revealed that dentate granule cell dispersion (GCD) was diminished in Spry2/4(+/-) mice in the subchronic phase after KA injection. Neuronal degeneration was reduced in CA1 and CA3 principal neuron layers as well as in scattered neurons of the contralateral CA1 and hilar regions. Moreover, Spry2/4 reduction resulted in enhanced survival of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y expressing interneurons. GFAP staining intensity and number of reactive astrocytes markedly increased in lesioned areas of Spry2/4(+/-) mice as compared with wildtype mice. Taken together, although the seizure threshold is reduced in naive Spry2/4(+/-) mice, neurodegeneration and GCD is mitigated following KA induced hippocampal lesions, identifying Spry proteins as possible pharmacological targets in brain injuries resulting in neurodegeneration. The present data are consistent with the established functions of the ERK pathway in astrocyte proliferation as well as protection from neuronal cell death and suggest a novel role of Spry proteins in the migration of differentiated neurons.

  20. Mechanism of Corrosion by Naphthenic Acids and Organosulfur Compounds at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng

    Due to the law of supply and demand, the last decade has witnessed a skyrocketing in the price of light sweet crude oil. Therefore, refineries are increasingly interested in "opportunity crudes", characterized by their discounted price and relative ease of procurement. However, the attractive economics of opportunity crudes come with the disadvantage of high acid/organosulfur compound content, which could lead to corrosion and even failure of facilities in refineries. However, it is generally accepted that organosulfur compounds may form protective iron sulfide layers on the metal surface and decrease the corrosion rate. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the corrosive property of crudes at high temperatures, the mechanism of corrosion by acids (naphthenic acids) in the presence of organosulfur compounds, and methods to mitigate its corrosive effect. In 2004, an industrial project was initiated at the Institute for Corrosion and Multiphase Technology to investigate the corrosion by naphthenic acids and organosulfur compounds. In this project, for each experiment there were two experimentation phases: pretreatment and challenge. In the first pretreatment phase, a stirred autoclave was filled with a real crude oil fraction or model oil of different acidity and organosulfur compound concentration. Then, the stirred autoclave was heated to high temperatures to examine the corrosivity of the oil to different materials (specimens made from CS and 5% Cr containing steel were used). During the pretreatment, corrosion product layers were formed on the metal surface. In the second challenge phase, the steel specimens pretreated in the first phase were inserted into a rotating cylinder autoclave, called High Velocity Rig (HVR). The HVR was fed with a high-temperature oil solution of naphthenic acids to attack the iron sulfide layers. Based on the difference of specimen weight loss between the two steps, the net corrosion rate could be calculated and the protectiveness

  1. Examination of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Mechanisms controlling survival and induction of apoptosis following selective inhibition

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cathcart, Mary Clare

    2011-06-01

    Background: Platelet-type 12-LOX is an arachidonic acid metabolising enzyme resulting in the formation of 12(S)-HETE, which stimulates tumour cell adhesion, invasion and metastasis. This study aimed to examine the expression profile and role of this enzyme in NSCLC, and determine if it is a potential target for intervention. Methods: A panel of retrospective resected lung tumours was stained for 12-LOX expression by IHC. Levels of the 12-LOX metabolite, 12(S)-HETE, were examined in 50 NSCLC serum samples, and correlated with serum VEGF. A panel of NSCLC cell lines were treated with baicalein (10 uM), a selective inhibitor of 12-LOX, or 12(S)-HETE (100 ng\\/ml) and cell survival\\/proliferation examined by BrdU. Apoptosis following 12-LOX inhibition was examined by HCS and validated by FACS and DNA laddering. The effect of 12-LOX inhibition on NSCLC tumour growth and survival was examined in-vivo using an athymic nude mouse model. Gene alterations following 12-LOX inhibition in NSCLC cell lines were assessed by qPCR arrays and validated by RT-PCR. Transient transfection methods were used to examine the effects of 12-LOX overexpression in NSCLC cells. Results: 12-LOX expression was observed to a varying degree in human lung cancers of varying histological subtypes. 12(S)-HETE levels were correlated (p<0.05) with those of VEGF. Baicalein inhibited proliferation\\/survival in all cell lines, while 12(S)-HETE increased proliferation. 12-LOX inhibition increased apoptosis, indicated by a reduction in f-actin content and mitochondrial mass potential. Treatment with baicalein significantly reduced the growth of NSCLC tumours and increased overall survival in athymic nude mice. qPCR array data implicated a number of apoptosis\\/angiogenesis genes regulating these effects, including bcl-2, VEGF, integrin A2 and A4. 12-LOX overexpression resulted in an increase in VEGF secretion, confirming qPCR observations. Conclusions: 12-LOX is a survival factor\\/potential target in

  2. Sensory-motor responses to mechanical stimulation of the esophagus after sensitization with acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asbj(ф)rn Mlohr Drewes; Hariprasad Reddy; Camilla Staahl; Jan Pedersen; Peter Funch-Jensen; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Hans Gregersen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Sensitization most likely plays an important role in chronic pain disorders, and such sensitization can be mimicked by experimental acid perfusion of the esophagus.The current study systematically investigated the sensory and motor responses of the esophagus to controlled mechanical stimuli before and after sensitization.METHODS: Thirty healthy subjects were included.Distension of the distal esophagus with a balloon was performed before and after perfusion with 0.1 mol/L hydrochloric acid for 30 min. An impedance planimetry system was used to measure cross-sectional area,volume, pressure, and tension during the distensions. A new model allowed evaluation of the phasic contractions by the tension during contractions as a function of the initial muscle length before the contraction (comparable to the Frank-Starling law for the heart). Length-tension diagrams were used to evaluate the muscle tone before and after relaxation of the smooth muscle with butylscopolamine.RESULTS: The sensitization resulted in allodynia and hyperalgesia to the distension volumes, and the degree of sensitization was related to the infused volume of acid. Furthermore, a nearly 50% increase in the evoked referred pain was seen after sensitization. The mechanical analysis demonstrated hyper-reactivity of the esophagus following acid perfusion, with an increased number and force of the phasic contractions, but the muscle tone did not change.CONCLUSION: Acid perfusion of the esophagus sensitizes the sensory pathways and facilitates secondary contractions.The new model can be used to study abnormal sensorymotor mechanisms in visceral organs.

  3. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Lactic Acid by Dihydroxyditelluratoargentate(Ⅲ)in Alkaline Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANJin-huan; WANGLi; LIUBao-sheng; SHENShi-gang

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of lactic acid(Lac) by dihydroxyditelluratoargentate(Ⅲ)[abbreviated as DDA of Ag(Ⅲ)]anions was studied in an aqueous alkaline medium by conventional spectrophotometry in a temperature range of 25-40℃.The order of the redox reaction of lactic acid and DDA was found to be first-order.The rates increased with the increase in [OH-]and decreased with the increase in [tellurate].No free radical was detected.In the view of this the dihydroxymonotelluratoargentate(Ⅲ)species(DMA) is assumed to be the active species.A plausible mechanism involving a two-electron transfer is proposed,and the rate equation derived from the mechanism can be used to explain all the experimenttal results.The activation parameters(25℃)and the rate constants of the rate-determining step along with the preequilibrium constants at different temperatures were evaluated.

  4. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Lactic Acid by Dihydroxyditelluratoargentate(Ⅲ) in Alkaline Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of lactic acid(Lac) by dihydroxyditelluratoargentate(Ⅲ)[abbreviated as DDA of Ag(Ⅲ)] anions was studied in an aqueous alkaline medium by conventional spectrophotometry in a temperature range of 25—40 ℃. The order of the redox reaction of lactic acid and DDA was found to be first-order. The rates increased with the increase in [OH-] and decreased with the increase in [tellurate]. No free radical was detected. In the view of this the dihydroxymonotelluratoargentate(Ⅲ) species(DMA) is assumed to be the active species. A plausible mechanism involving a two-electron transfer is proposed, and the rate equation derived from the mechanism can be used to explain all the experimental results. The activation parameters(25 ℃) and the rate constants of the rate-determining step along with the preequilibrium constants at different temperatures were evaluated.

  5. Abnormal Unsaturated Fatty Acid Metabolism in Cystic Fibrosis: Biochemical Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Seegmiller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is an inherited multi-organ disorder caused by mutations in the CFTR gene. Patients with this disease exhibit characteristic abnormalities in the levels of unsaturated fatty acids in blood and tissue. Recent studies have uncovered an underlying biochemical mechanism for some of these changes, namely increased expression and activity of fatty acid desaturases. Among other effects, this drives metabolism of linoeate to arachidonate. Increased desaturase expression appears to be linked to cystic fibrosis mutations via stimulation of the AMP-activated protein kinase in the absence of functional CFTR protein. There is evidence that these abnormalities may contribute to disease pathophysiology by increasing production of eicosanoids, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes, of which arachidonate is a key substrate. Understanding these underlying mechanisms provides key insights that could potentially impact the diagnosis, clinical monitoring, nutrition, and therapy of patients suffering from this deadly disease.

  6. Mechanism of Efficient Proton Conduction in Diphosphoric Acid Elucidated via First-Principles Simulation and NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Rachel A; Vilčiauskas, Linas; Melchior, Jan-Patrick; Bester, Gabriel; Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-12-31

    Diphosphoric acid (H4P2O7) is the first condensation product of phosphoric acid (H3PO4), the compound with the highest intrinsic proton conductivity in the liquid state. It exists at higher temperature (T > 200 °C) and lower relative humidity (RH ≈ 0.01%) and shows significant ionic conductivity under these conditions. In this work, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of a pure H4P2O7 model system and NMR spectroscopy on nominal H4P2O7 (which contains significant amounts of ortho- and triphosphoric acid in thermodynamic equilibrium) were performed to reveal the nature and underlying mechanisms of the ionic conductivity. The central oxygen of the molecule is found to be excluded from any hydrogen bonding, which has two interesting consequences: (i) compared to H3PO4, the acidity of H4P2O7 is severely increased, and (ii) the condensation reaction only leads to a minor decrease in hydrogen bond network frustration, which is thought to be one of the features enabling high proton conductivity. A topological analysis of diphosphoric acid's hydrogen bond network shows remarkable similarities to that of phosphonic acid (H3PO3). The hydrogen bonding facilitates protonic polarization fluctuations (Zundel polarization) extending over several molecules (Grotthuss chains), the other important ingredient for efficient structural diffusion of protons. At T = 160 °C, this is estimated to make a conductivity contribution of about 0.1 S/cm, which accounts for half of the total ionic conductivity (σ ≈ 0.2 S/cm). The other half is suggested to result from diffusion of charged phosphate species (vehicle mechanism) that are present in high concentration, resembling conduction in ionic liquids. PMID:26633234

  7. Stearic acid based oleogels: a study on the molecular, thermal and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagiri, S S; Singh, Vinay K; Pal, K; Banerjee, I; Basak, Piyali

    2015-03-01

    Stearic acid and its derivatives have been used as gelators in food and pharmaceutical gel formulations. However, the mechanism pertaining to the stearic acid based gelation has not been deciphered yet. Keeping that in mind, we investigated the role of stearic acid on physic-chemical properties of oleogel. For this purpose, two different oil (sesame oil and soy bean oil) formulations/oleogels were prepared. In depth analysis of gel kinetics, gel microstructure, molecular interactions, thermal and mechanical behaviors of the oleogels were done. The properties of the oleogels were dependent on the type of the vegetable oil used and the concentration of the stearic acid. Avrami analysis of DSC thermograms indicated that heterogeneous nucleation was coupled with the one-dimensional growth of gelator fibers as the key phenomenon in the formation of oleogels. Viscoelastic and pseudoplastic nature of the oleogels was analyzed in-depth by fitting the stress relaxation data in modified Peleg's model and rheological studies, respectively. Textural studies have revealed that the coexistence of hydrogen bond dissipation and formation of new bonds is possible under stress conditions in the physical oleogels. PMID:25579972

  8. Mechanism of Calcium Lactate Facilitating Phytic Acid Degradation in Soybean during Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Qianru; Yang, Runqiang; Shen, Chang; Zhou, Yulin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-07-13

    Calcium lactate facilitates the growth and phytic acid degradation of soybean sprouts, but the mechanism is unclear. In this study, calcium lactate (Ca) and calcium lactate with lanthanum chloride (Ca+La) were used to treat soybean sprouts to reveal the relevant mechanism. Results showed that the phytic acid content decreased and the availability of phosphorus increased under Ca treatment. This must be due to the enhancement of enzyme activity related to phytic acid degradation. In addition, the energy metabolism was accelerated by Ca treatment. The energy status and energy metabolism-associated enzyme activity also increased. However, the transmembrane transport of calcium was inhibited by La(3+) and concentrated in intercellular space or between the cell wall and cell membrane; thus, Ca+La treatment showed reverse results compared with those of Ca treatment. Interestingly, gene expression did not vary in accordance with their enzyme activity. These results demonstrated that calcium lactate increased the rate of phytic acid degradation by enhancing growth, phosphorus metabolism, and energy metabolism. PMID:27324823

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid solution

    OpenAIRE

    Sokić M.; Marković B.; Matković V.; Živković D.; Štrbac N.; Stojanović J.

    2012-01-01

    Interest for application of hydrometallurgical processes in a processing of complex sulphide ores and concentrates has increased in recent years. Their application provides better metal recoveries and reduced emission of gaseous and toxic ageneses in the environment. The kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching from complex sulphide concentrate with sulphuric acid and sodium nitrate solution at standard conditions was presented in this paper. The influences of temperature and time ...

  10. Poly(para-dioxanone) and poly(l-lactic acid) blends: Thermal, mechanical, and morphological properties

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzin, APT; van Ekenstein, GORA; Zavaglia, CAC; ten Brinke, G.; Deuk, EAR; E.A.R. Duek

    2003-01-01

    Blends of two semicrystalline polymers, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly-p-dioxanone (PPD) have been prepared by solvent casting in different compositions. Thermal, morphological, and mechanical properties of the blends were studied using modulated differential scanning calorimetry, wide-angle X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarizing light microscopy (PLM), and tensile tests. Thermal analysis showed two glass transition temperatures nearly constant and equal to ...

  11. Browning inhibition mechanisms by cysteine, ascorbic acid and citric acid, and identifying PPO-catechol-cysteine reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hussein M; El-Gizawy, Ahmed M; El-Bassiouny, Rawia E I; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-06-01

    The titled compounds were examined as PPO inhibitors and antibrowning agents; their various mechanisms were investigated and discussed. All compounds reduced significantly both the browning process and PPO activity. Browning index gave strong correlation with PPO activity (r(2) = 0.96, n = 19) indicating that the browning process is mainly enzymatic. Ascorbic acid could reduce the formed quinone instantly to the original substrate (catechol) at high concentration (>1.5 %) while at lower concentrations acted as competitive inhibitor (KI = 0.256 ± 0.067 mM). Cysteine, at higher concentrations (≥1.0 %), reacted with the resulted quinone to give a colorless products while at the low concentrations, cysteine worked as competitive inhibitor (KI = 1.113 ± 0.176 mM). Citric acid acted only as PPO non-competitive inhibitor with KI = 2.074 ± 0.363 mM. The products of PPO-catechole-cysteine reaction could be separation and identification by LC-ESI-MS. Results indicated that the product of the enzymatic oxidation of catechol, quinone, undergoes two successive nucleophilic attacks by cysteine thiol group. Cysteine was condensed with the resulted mono and dithiocatechols to form peptide side chains.

  12. Mechanisms of volatile production from sulfur-containing amino acids by irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uk Ahn, Dong; Joo Lee, Eun; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Wangang; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jo, Cheorun; Nam, Kichang

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids were used to study the mechanisms of off-odor production in meat by irradiation. Irradiation not only increased the amounts of volatiles but also produced many new volatiles from sulfur-containing amino acid monomers. We speculate that the majority of the volatiles were the direct radiolytic products of the side chains, but Strecker degradation as well as deamination and decarboxylation of radiolytic products were also involved in the production of volatile compounds from sulfur amino acids. The volatile compounds produced in amino acids were not only the primary products of irradiation, but also the products of secondary chemical reactions after the primary compounds were produced. Cysteine and methionine produced odor characteristics similar to that of the irradiated meat, but the amounts of sulfur volatiles from methionine were far greater than that of cysteine. Although the present study was carried out using an amino acid model system, the information can be applied to the quality indexes of irradiated meats as well as other food products.

  13. The contribution of mediated oxidation mechanisms in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid using diamond anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensalah, Nasr; Dbira, Sondos; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the contribution of mediated oxidation mechanisms in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid using boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes was investigated in different electrolytes. A complete mineralization of cyanuric acid was obtained in NaCl; however lower degrees of mineralization of 70% and 40% were obtained in Na2SO4 and NaClO4, respectively. This can be explained by the nature of the oxidants electrogenerated in each electrolyte. It is clear that the contribution of active chlorine (Cl2, HClO, ClO(-)) electrogenerated from oxidation of chlorides on BDD is much more important in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid than the persulfate and hydroxyl radicals produced by electro-oxidation of sulfate and water on BDD anodes. This could be explained by the high affinity of active chlorine towards nitrogen compounds. No organic intermediates were detected during the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid in any the electrolytes, which can be explained by their immediate depletion by hydroxyl radicals produced on the BDD surface. Nitrates and ammonium were the final products of electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid on BDD anodes in all electrolytes. In addition, small amounts of chloramines were formed in the chloride medium. Low current density (≤10mA/cm(2)) and neutral medium (pH in the range 6-9) should be used for high efficiency electrolytic degradation and negligible formation of hazardous chlorate and perchlorate. PMID:27372125

  14. Mechanism analysis of acid tolerance response of bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum BBMN 68 by gene expression profile using RNA-sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Jin

    Full Text Available To analyze the mechanism of the acid tolerance response (ATR in Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum BBMN68, we optimized the acid-adaptation condition to stimulate ATR effectively and analyzed the change of gene expression profile after acid-adaptation using high-throughput RNA-Seq. After acid-adaptation at pH 4.5 for 2 hours, the survival rate of BBMN68 at lethal pH 3.5 for 120 min was increased by 70 fold and the expression of 293 genes were upregulated by more than 2 fold, and 245 genes were downregulated by more than 2 fold. Gene expression profiling of ATR in BBMN68 suggested that, when the bacteria faced acid stress, the cells strengthened the integrity of cell wall and changed the permeability of membrane to keep the H(+ from entering. Once the H(+ entered the cytoplasm, the cells showed four main responses: First, the F(0F(1-ATPase system was initiated to discharge H(+. Second, the ability to produce NH(3 by cysteine-cystathionine-cycle was strengthened to neutralize excess H(+. Third, the cells started NER-UVR and NER-VSR systems to minimize the damage to DNA and upregulated HtpX, IbpA, and γ-glutamylcysteine production to protect proteins against damage. Fourth, the cells initiated global response signals ((pppGpp, polyP, and Sec-SRP to bring the whole cell into a state of response to the stress. The cells also secreted the quorum sensing signal (AI-2 to communicate between intraspecies cells by the cellular signal system, such as two-component systems, to improve the overall survival rate. Besides, the cells varied the pathways of producing energy by shifting to BCAA metabolism and enhanced the ability to utilize sugar to supply sufficient energy for the operation of the mechanism mentioned above. Based on these reults, it was inferred that, during industrial applications, the acid resistance of bifidobacteria could be improved by adding BCAA, γ-glutamylcysteine, cysteine, and cystathionine into the acid-stress environment.

  15. Loss of N-glycolylneuraminic acid in humans: Mechanisms, consequences, and implications for hominid evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varki, A

    2001-01-01

    The surface of all mammalian cells is covered with a dense and complex array of sugar chains, which are frequently terminated by members of a family of molecules called sialic acids. One particular sialic acid called N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) is widely expressed on most mammalian tissues, but is not easily detectable on human cells. In fact, it provokes an immune response in adult humans. The human deficiency of Neu5Gc is explained by an inactivating mutation in the gene encoding CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in generating Neu5Gc in cells of other mammals. This deficiency also results in an excess of the precursor sialic acid N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) in humans. This mutation appears universal to modern humans, occurred sometime after our last common ancestor with the great apes, and happens to be one of the first known human-great ape genetic differences with an obvious biochemical readout. While the original selection mechanisms and major biological consequences of this human-specific mutation remain uncertain, several interesting clues are currently being pursued. First, there is evidence that the human condition can explain differences in susceptibility or resistance to certain microbial pathogens. Second, the functions of some endogenous receptors for sialic acids in the immune system may be altered by this difference. Third, despite the lack of any obvious alternate pathway for synthesis, Neu5Gc has been reported in human tumors and possibly in human fetal tissues, and traces have even been detected in normal human tissues. One possible explanation is that this represents accumulation of Neu5Gc from dietary sources of animal origin. Finally, a markedly reduced expression of hydroxylase in the brains of other mammals raises the possibility that the human-specific mutation of this enzyme could have played a role in human brain evolution.

  16. [Forming mechanism of humic acid-kaolin complexes and the adsorption of trichloroethylene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-jing; He, Jiang-tao; Su, Si-hui

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between soil organic components and mineral components was explored in this study. Humic acid and kaolin were used for the preparation of organic-mineral complexes with different contents of organic matter, for experimental study of the adsorption of trichloroethylene. The results showed that the adsorption of trichlorethylene fitted the Freundlich isotherm model. The existence of interaction between humic acid and kaolin was indicated by the significant difference between the actual value and the theoretically overlaid value of the adsorption capacity. With various characterizations, such as FTIR and surface area & pore analysis, the mechanism of interaction between humic acid and kaolin was suggested as follows. When their contents were low, humic acid molecules firstly loaded on the surface binding sites of kaolin. Then with the content increased, as O/M( organic-mineral mass ratio) was 0.02-0.04, some surface pores of kaolin were filled by part of the molecules. After reaching a relatively stable stage, as O/M was 0.04-0.08, humic molecules continued to load on the surface of kaolin and formed the first humic molecule-layer. With humic acid content continued increasing, as O/M was 0.08-0.10, more humic molecules attached to kaolin surface through the interaction with the first layer of molecules and then formed the second layer. O/M was 0.10-0.16 as the whole second layer stage, meanwhile the first layer was compressed. Then when O/M was 0.16-0.4, there were still some humic loadings onto the second layer as the third layer, and further compressed the inner humic acid layers. Besides, some humic acid molecules or aggregates might go on attaching to form as further outer layer. PMID:25898669

  17. Depletion of retinoic acid receptors initiates a novel positive feedback mechanism that promotes teratogenic increases in retinoic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico D'Aniello

    Full Text Available Normal embryonic development and tissue homeostasis require precise levels of retinoic acid (RA signaling. Despite the importance of appropriate embryonic RA signaling levels, the mechanisms underlying congenital defects due to perturbations of RA signaling are not completely understood. Here, we report that zebrafish embryos deficient for RA receptor αb1 (RARαb1, a conserved RAR splice variant, have enlarged hearts with increased cardiomyocyte (CM specification, which are surprisingly the consequence of increased RA signaling. Importantly, depletion of RARαb2 or concurrent depletion of RARαb1 and RARαb2 also results in increased RA signaling, suggesting this effect is a broader consequence of RAR depletion. Concurrent depletion of RARαb1 and Cyp26a1, an enzyme that facilitates degradation of RA, and employment of a novel transgenic RA sensor line support the hypothesis that the increases in RA signaling in RAR deficient embryos are the result of increased embryonic RA coupled with compensatory RAR expression. Our results support an intriguing novel mechanism by which depletion of RARs elicits a previously unrecognized positive feedback loop that can result in developmental defects due to teratogenic increases in embryonic RA.

  18. Gastroprotective Mechanisms of Action of Semisynthetic Carnosic Acid Derivatives in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Theoduloz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carnosic acid (CA and its semisynthetic derivatives display relevant gastroprotective effects on HCl/ethanol induced gastric lesions in mice. However, little is known on the mechanisms of action of the new compounds. The aim of the present work was to assess the gastroprotective action mechanisms of CA and its derivatives using human cell culture models. A human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5 were used to reveal the possible mechanisms involved. The ability of the compounds to protect cells against sodium taurocholate (NaT-induced damage, and to increase the cellular reduced glutathione (GSH and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 content was determined using AGS cells. Stimulation of cell proliferation was studied employing MRC-5 fibroblasts. Carnosic acid and its derivatives 10–18 raised GSH levels in AGS cells. While CA did not increase the PGE2 content in AGS cells, all derivatives significantly stimulated PGE2 synthesis, the best effect being found for the 12-O-indolebutyrylmethylcarnosate 13. A significant increase in MRC-5 fibroblast proliferation was observed for the derivatives 7 and 16–18. The antioxidant effect of the compounds was assessed by the inhibition of lipid peroxidation in human erythrocyte membranes, scavenging of superoxide anion and DPPH discoloration assay. The new CA derivatives showed gastroprotective effects by different mechanisms, including protection against cell damage induced by NaT, increase in GSH content, stimulation of PGE2 synthesis and cell proliferation.

  19. Mechanism of toxicity of the branched-chain fatty acid phytanic acid, a marker of Refsum disease, in astrocytes involves mitochondrial impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Georg; Schönfeld, Peter; Kahlert, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Phytanic acid is a saturated branched-chain fatty acid, which is formed by bacterial degradation of chlorophyll in the intestinal tract of ruminants. The methyl group in beta-position prevents degradation of phytanic acid by the beta-oxidation pathway. Therefore, degradation of phytanic acid is initiated by alpha-oxidation in peroxisomes. The inherited peroxisomal disorder Refsum disease is characterised by accumulation of phytanic acid. Unusually high concentrations of phytanic acid can be found in the plasma of Refsum disease patients, who suffer from neurodegeneration and muscle dystrophy. Phytanic acid has been suggested to be causally involved in the clinical symptoms. To elucidate the pathogenic mechanism, we investigated the influence of phytanic acid in rat hippocampal astrocytes by monitoring the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)), the generation of reactive oxygen species as well as the cellular ATP level. In response to phytanic acid (100 microM) cytosolic Ca(2+) was quickly increased. The phytanic acid-evoked Ca(2+) response was transient and involved activation of intracellular Ca(2+) stores. In isolated rat brain mitochondria, phytanic acid dissipated Deltapsi(m) in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, phytanic acid released cytochrome c from mitochondria. Depending on the mitochondrial activity state, phytanic acid either stimulated or inhibited the electron flux within the respiratory chain. In addition, phytanic acid induced substantial generation of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria as well as in intact cells. Phytanic acid caused cell death of astrocytes within a few hours of exposure. In conclusion, we suggest that phytanic acid initiates astrocyte cell death by activating the mitochondrial route of apoptosis.

  20. The Mechanism of Electropolishing of Niobium in Hydrofluoric-Sulfuric Acid Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Hui; Corcoran, Sean; Reece, Charles; Kelley, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Niobium surfaces are commonly electropolished in an effort to obtain optimal smoothness for high-field superconducting radio-frequency cavity applications. We report the use of controlled electrochemical analysis techniques to characterize electropolishing of Nb in a sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. Through the use of a reference electrode, we are able to clearly distinguish the anode and cathode polarization potentials as well as the electrolyte voltage drop, which together sum to the applied power supply voltage. We then identify the temperature and HF concentration dependence of each potential. We also report the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on this system. EIS results are consistent with the compact salt film mechanism for niobium electropolishing (EP) in this electrolyte and are not consistent with either the porous salt film or the absorbate-acceptor mechanism. Microscopic understanding of the basic Nb EP mechanism is expected to provide an appro

  1. Anti-apoptotic activity of caffeic acid, ellagic acid and ferulic acid in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: a Bcl-2 independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanduja, Krishan Lal; Avti, Pramod Kumar; Kumar, Surender; Mittal, Nidhi; Sohi, Kiranjit Kaur; Pathak, Chander Mohan

    2006-02-01

    Polyphenols have been shown to induce apoptosis in a variety of tumor cells including leukemia both in vitro and in vivo. However, their action on normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during oxidative stress remains to be explored. In this study, we have evaluated the anti-apoptotic and radical scavenging activities of dietary phenolics, namely caffeic acid (CA), ellagic acid (EA) and ferulic acid (FA). H2O2-induced apoptosis in normal human PBMCs was assayed by phosphotidylserine externalization, nucleosomal damage and DNA fragmentation. Incubation of PBMCs with 5 mM H2O2 led to increased Annexin-V binding to externalized phosphatidyl serine (PS), an event of pre-apoptotic stage of the cell. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells pretreated with phenolics could resist H2O2-induced apoptotic damage. Caffeic acid (60 and 120 microM) and EA (100 and 200 microM) caused no change in externalization of PS, whereas FA (100 and 200 microM) increased externalization of PS in PBMCs treated with H2O2. The effects of phenolics were abolished to a large extent by culturing the PBMCs for 24 h after washing the phenolics from the medium. Inhibitory activities of these phenolics on lipid peroxidation were in the order of EAmechanism. PMID:16459021

  2. Dissolution mechanisms of goethite in the presence of siderophores and organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, P. U.; Kretzschmar, R.; Kraemer, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    In dynamic natural systems such as soils and surface waters, transient biogeochemical processes can induce strong chemical non-steady-state conditions. In this paper, we investigate the effects of non-steady-state conditions on ligand-controlled iron oxide dissolution. The rates of goethite dissolution at pH 6 in the presence of low molecular weight organic acids (oxalate, citrate or malonate) were observed. Non-steady-state conditions were induced by rapid additions of fungal, bacterial or plant siderophores. In the presence of the low molecular weight organic acids, dissolved iron concentrations are below detection limit as predicted by equilibrium solubility calculations. The rapid addition of the siderophores triggered reproducible, fast dissolution of kinetically labile iron from the iron oxide surface. The same effect was observed upon rapid additions of high citrate concentrations to goethite-oxalate suspensions. The concentration of the labile iron pool at the mineral surface was a function of the surface concentration of the low molecular weight organic acids and of the reaction time before addition of the siderophores. Isotopic exchange with 59Fe independently confirmed the existence of the labile iron pool before addition of the siderophore. A dissolution mechanism was elucidated that is consistent with these observations and with accepted models of ligand-controlled dissolution. We conclude that the fast dissolution reaction observed here is an important process in biological iron acquisition and that it is based on a general geochemical mechanism.

  3. Mechanisms of insulin secretion in malnutrition: modulation by amino acids in rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; de Mello, Maria Alice Rostom; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães

    2011-04-01

    Protein restriction at early stages of life reduces β-cell volume, number of insulin-containing granules, insulin content and release by pancreatic islets in response to glucose and other secretagogues, abnormalities similar to those seen in type 2 diabetes. Amino acids are capable to directly modulate insulin secretion and/or contribute to the maintenance of β-cell function, resulting in an improvement of insulin release. Animal models of protein malnutrition have provided important insights into the adaptive mechanisms involved in insulin secretion in malnutrition. In this review, we discuss studies focusing on the modulation of insulin secretion by amino acids, specially leucine and taurine, in rodent models of protein malnutrition. Leucine supplementation increases insulin secretion by pancreatic islets in malnourished mice. This effect is at least in part due to increase in the expression of proteins involved in the secretion process, and the activation of the PI3K/PKB/mTOR pathway seems also to contribute. Mice supplemented with taurine have increased insulin content and secretion as well as increased expression of genes essential for β-cell functionality. The knowledge of the mechanisms through which amino acids act on pancreatic β-cells to stimulate insulin secretion is of interest for clinical medicine. It can reveal new targets for the development of drugs toward the treatment of endocrine diseases, in special type 2 diabetes. PMID:20711845

  4. DFT computational study on decarboxylation mechanism of salicylic acid and its derivatives in the anionic state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lu; Hu, Yanying; Zhang, Huitu; Liu, Yanchun; Song, Zhidan; Dai, Yujie

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms of the decarboxylation of salicylic acid anion and its ortho substituted derivatives in gas phase and aqueous solution have been investigated by B3LYP method of DFT theory using the 6-31++G (d,p) basis set. The decarboxylation process includes hydrogen transfers from hydroxyl to carboxyl group and from carboxyl to the α-C of the aryl ring. The mechanism suggested is a pseudo-unimolecular decomposition of the salicylic acid anion and the hydrogen transfer from carboxyl to the α-C of the aryl ring is the rate determining step. Compared with the decarboxylation process in gas phase, the energy barriers in aqueous solution approximately declined by 25%-31%with the water mediation of the hydrogen transfer from carboxyl to the α-C of the aryl ring. The effects of substituents at the ortho position on the decarboxylation process were also investigated. Both the electron donating CH3 and withdrawing group NO2 at the ortho position of carboxyl group can further reduce the reaction energy barriers of the decarboxylation of salicylic acid anions.

  5. Effect of carboxylic acids as compatibilizer agent on mechanical properties of thermoplastic starch and polypropylene blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Andréa Bercini; Santana, Ruth Marlene Campomanes

    2016-01-01

    In this work, polypropylene/thermoplastic starch (PP/TPS) blends were prepared as an alternative material to use in disposable packaging, reducing the negative polymeric environmental impact. Unfortunately, this material displays morphological characteristics typical of immiscible polymer blends and a compatibilizer agent is needed. Three different carboxyl acids: myristic (C14), palmitic (C16) and stearic acids (C18) were used as natural compatibilizer agent (NCA). The effects of NCA on the mechanical, physical, thermal and morphological properties of PP/TPS blends were investigated and compared against PP/TPS with and without PP-grafted maleic anhydride (PPgMA). When compared to PP/TPS, blends with C18, PPgMA and C14 presented an improvement of 25, 22 and 17% in tensile strength at break and of 180, 194 and 259% in elongation at break, respectively. The highest increase, 54%, in the impact strength was achieved with C14 incorporation. Improvements could be seen, through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, in the compatibility between the immiscible components by acids incorporation. These results showed that carboxylic acids, specifically C14, could be used as compatibilizer agent and could substitute PPgMA. PMID:26453854

  6. Electro-oxidation of perfluorooctanoic acid by carbon nanotube sponge anode and the mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, An; Yuan, Zi-Wen; Sun, Yan; Cao, An-Yuan; Zhao, Hua-Zhang

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging persistent organic pollutant (POPs), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) exists widely in natural environment. It is of particular significance to develop efficient techniques to remove low-concentration PFOA from the contaminated waters. In this work, we adopted a new material, carbon nanotube (CNT) sponge, as electrode to enhance electro-oxidation and achieve high removal efficiency of low-concentration (100μgL(-1)) PFOA from water. CNT sponge was pretreated by mixed acids to improve the surface morphology, hydrophilicity and the content of carbonyl groups on the surface. The highest removal efficiencies for low-concentration PFOA electrolyzed by acid-treated CNT sponge anode proved higher than 90%. The electro-oxidation mechanism of PFOA on CNT sponge anode was also discussed. PFOA is adsorbed on the CNT sponge rapidly increasing the concentration of PFOA on anode surface. When the potential on the anode is adjusted to more than 3.5V, the adsorbed PFOA undergoes electrochemically oxidation and hydrolysis to produce shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids with less CF2 unit. The efficient electro-oxidation of PFOA by CNT sponge anode is due to the combined effect of adsorption and electrochemical oxidation. These findings provide an efficient method to remove actual concentration PFOA from water. PMID:26172515

  7. Dietary fatty acids affecting hepatic metabolism and atherosclerosis - mechanisms unravelled using a proteomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Gutiérrez, Guillermo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fatty acids play an important role in the aetiology of coronary heart disease. The effects of dietary fatty acids on lipoprotein metabolism are well described, but additional or alternative mechanisms relating to potential influence on coronary heart disease are not known. This review describes how proteomics techniques have been used to identify proteins that are differentially regulated by dietary fatty acids. Such proteins may reveal pathways by which dietary fatty acids influence disease risk.Los ácidos grasos de la dieta cumplen un importante papel en la etiología de las enfermedades coronarias. A pesar de estar bien descrito el efecto de dichos ácidos grasos sobre el metabolismo lipoproteíco, no se conocen mecanismos alternativos que relacionen su influencia sobre posibles enfermedades coronarias. En esta revisión se describe el uso de técnicas proteómicas para la identificación de proteínas diferencialmente reguladas por dichos ácidos grasos. Tales proteínas pueden revelar rutas metabólicas implicadas en el riesgo de enfermedades y reguladas por los ácidos grasos de la dieta.

  8. SEPARATION OF p-AMINOBENZOIC ACID BY REACTIVE EXTRACTION. 1. MECHANISM AND INFLUENCING FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAN CASCAVAL

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The comparative study on the reactive extraction of p-aminobenzoic acid with Amberlite LA-2 and D2EHPA in two solvents with different polarity (n-heptane and dichloromethane indicated that the extractant type and solvent polarity control the extraction mechanism. Thus, the reactive extraction with Amberlite LA-2 occurs by means of the interfacial formation of an aminic adduct with three extractant molecules in low-polar solvent, or of an salt with one extractant molecule in higher polar solvent. Similarly, the extraction with D2EHPA is based on the formation of an acidic adduct with two extractant molecules in n-heptane, or of a salt with one extractant molecule in dichloromethane. The most efficient extraction has been reached for the combination Amberlite LA-2-dichloromethane.

  9. Mechanical Properties and Water Absorption Behaviour of Durian Rind Cellulose Reinforced Poly(lactic acid Biocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patpen Penjumras

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental concerns have resulted in replacing petrochemically derived polymer with biodegradable renewable resource. In this study, mechanical properties and water absorption behaviour of durian rind cellulose reinforced poly(lactic acid biocomposites were investigated. Poly(lactic acid was mixed with 25 and 35 wt. % of durian rind cellulose that was derived from durian consumption wastes. The biocomposties were melt-blended at 165 and 175 °C with 15 min using a Brabender internal mixer followed by a hot compression moulding technique. The results showed that impact strength and modulus of Young increased with increasing of cellulose content but decreased at higher mixing temperature. Water absorption behaviour of biocomposites as function of days was also investigated. It was found that the water absorption amount of biocomposites increased with increasing of cellulose content and exposure time.    

  10. Morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of poly(lactic acid) toughened by precipitated barium sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinian; Wang, Chuang; Shao, Kaiyun; Ding, Guoxin; Tao, Yulun; Zhu, Jinbo

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-based composites were prepared by blending PLA with precipitated barium sulfate (BaSO4) modified with stearic acid. The morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of samples with increased mass fraction of BaSO4 were investigated. Results showed that PLA was toughened and reinforced simultaneously by incorporation of precipitated BaSO4 particles. The highest impact toughness and elongation at break were both achieved at 15% BaSO4, while the elastic modulus increased monotonically with increasing BaSO4 loading. Little effect of BaSO4 on the thermal behavior of PLA was observed in the present case. However, the thermal stability of PLA/BaSO4 composites at high temperature was enhanced.

  11. Implication of glutathione in the in vitro antiplasmodial mechanism of action of ellagic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Njomnang Soh

    Full Text Available The search for new antimalarial chemotherapy has become increasingly urgent due to parasite resistance to current drugs. Ellagic acid (EA is a polyphenol, recently found in various plant products, that has effective antimalarial activity in vitro and in vivo without toxicity. To further understand the antimalarial mechanism of action of EA in vitro, we evaluated the effects of EA, ascorbic acid and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, alone and/or in combination on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS during the trophozoite and schizonte stages of the erythrocytic cycle of P. falciparum. The parasitized erythrocytes were pre-labelled with DCFDA (dichlorofluorescein diacetate. We showed that NAC had no effect on ROS production, contrary to ascorbic acid and EA, which considerably reduced ROS production. Surprisingly, EA reduced the production of the ROS with concentrations (6.6×10(-9 - 6.6×10(-6 M ten-fold lower than ascorbic acid (113×10(-6 M. Additionally, the in vitro drug sensitivity of EA with antioxidants showed that antiplasmodial activity is independent of the ROS production inside parasites, which was confirmed by the additive activity of EA and desferrioxamine. Finally, EA could act by reducing the glutathione content inside the Plasmodium parasite. This was consolidated by the decrease in the antiplasmodial efficacy of EA in the murine model Plasmodium yoelii- high GSH strain, known for its high glutathione content. Given its low toxicity and now known mechanism of action, EA appears as a promising antiplasmodial compound.

  12. Influence of Mechanical Activation on Acid Leaching Dephosphorization of High-phosphorus Iron Ore Concentrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-qing ZHU; Hao WANG; Jian PAN; Cong-cong YANG

    2016-01-01

    High pressure roll grinding (HPRG)and ball milling were compared to investigate the influence of me-chanical activation on the acid leaching dephosphorization of a high-phosphorus iron ore concentrate,which was man-ufactured through magnetizing roasting-magnetic separation of high-phosphorus oolitic iron ores.The results indica-ted that when high-phosphorus iron ore concentrates containing 54·92 mass% iron and 0·76 mass% phosphorus were directly processed through acid leaching,iron ore concentrates containing 55·74 mass% iron and 0·33 mass%phosphorus with an iron recovery of 84·64% and dephosphorization of 63·79% were obtained.When high-phosphor-us iron ore concentrates activated by ball milling were processed by acid leaching,iron ore concentrates containing 56·03 mass% iron and 0·21 mass% phosphorus with an iron recovery of 85·65% and dephosphorization of 77·49%were obtained.Meanwhile,when high-phosphorus iron ore concentrates activated by HPRG were processed by acid leaching,iron ore concentrates containing 58·02 mass% iron and 0·10 mass% phosphorus were obtained,with the iron recovery reaching 88·42% and the dephosphorization rate reaching 88·99%.Mechanistic studies demonstrated that ball milling can reduce the particle size,demonstrating a prominent reunion phenomenon.In contrast,HPRG pretreatment contributes to the formation of more cracks within the particles and selective dissociation of iron and P bearing minerals,which can provide the favorable kinetic conditions to accelerate the solid-liquid reaction rate.As such,the crystal structure is destroyed and the surface energy of mineral particles is strengthened by mechanical ac-tivation,further strengthening the dephosphorization.

  13. Impact of citric acid and calcium ions on acid solubilization of mechanically separated turkey meat: effect on lipid and pigment content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynets, Y; Omana, D A; Xu, Y; Betti, M

    2011-02-01

    Increased demand for poultry products has resulted in an increased availability of by-products, such as the neck, back, and frame, that can be processed into mechanically separated poultry meat. The major problems with mechanically separated poultry meat are its high lipid content, color instability, and high susceptibility to lipid oxidation. The present work was undertaken to determine the effect of different concentrations of citric acid and calcium ions on protein yield, color characteristics, and lipid removal from protein isolates prepared using an acid-aided extraction process. Six levels of citric acid (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mmol/L) and 2 levels of calcium chloride (0 and 8 mmol/L) were examined. The entire experiment was replicated 3 times, resulting in 36 extractions (3 × 6 × 2). The highest (P citric acid. In general, all the combinations removed an average of 90.8% of the total lipids from mechanically separated turkey meat, ranging from 86.2 to 94.7%. The lowest amount (1.14%) of total lipids obtained was for samples treated with 4 mmol/L of citric acid. Maximum removal of neutral lipids (96.5%) and polar lipids (96.4%) was attained with the addition of 6 and 2 mmol/L of citric acid, respectively. Polar lipid content was found to be significantly (P = 0.0045) affected by the presence of calcium chloride. The isolated proteins were less (P citric acid. Addition of calcium chloride had a negative effect on total pigment content. The study revealed that acid extractions with the addition of citric acid resulted in substantial removal of lipids and pigments from mechanically separated turkey meat, improved stability of the recovered proteins against lipid oxidation, and appreciable protein recovery yields.

  14. Mass transfer characterization of gamma-aminobutyric acid production by Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003: encapsulation improves its survival under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divyashri, Gangaraju; Prapulla, Siddalingaiya Gurudatt

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production by free and Ca-alginate encapsulated cells of Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003 was investigated. Mass transfer rates characterizing the GABA production process using encapsulated cells were investigated. Experiments were performed to investigate external film and internal pore diffusion mass transfer rates. The Damkohler and Thiele analysis provides a good description of external film and internal pore diffusion resistances, respectively. The experiments revealed that the external film effects could be neglected but the process is affected to the greater extent by internal mass transfer effects and was found to be the principal rate-controlling step. Protective effect of encapsulation on cell survivability was tested under digestive environment, when challenged to salivary α-amylase, simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluid. Viability of encapsulated cells was significantly higher under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions and could produce higher GABA than those observed with free cells. The results indicate that the Ca-alginate encapsulated probiotics could effectively be delivered to the colonic site for effective inhibitory action.

  15. Effects of calanoid copepod Schmackeria poplesia as a live food on the growth, survival and fatty acid composition of larvae and juveniles of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangxing; Xu, Donghui

    2009-12-01

    Zooplankton constitutes a major part of the diet for fish larvae in the marine food web, and it is generally believed that copepods can meet the nutritional requirements of fish larvae. In this study, calanoid copepod Schmackeria poplesia, rotifer Brachionus plicatilis and anostraca crustacean Artemia sp. were analyzed for fatty acid contents, and were used as live food for culturing larval Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. The total content of three types of HUFAs (DHA, EPA and ARA) in S. poplesia was significantly higher than that in the other two live foods ( PDHA, EPA and ARA) and the ratio of DHA/EPA in larval and juvenile flounder P. olivaceus were analyzed. The results showed that the contents of DHA, EPA and ARA in the larvae and juveniles fed with S. poplesia were higher than those fed with a mixed diet or Artemia only, and the ratio of EPA/ARA in larvae and juveniles of P. olivaceus fed with S. poplesia was lower than that in the case of feeding with a mixed diet or Artemia only. The present data showed that copepod is the best choice for feeding the larvae and juveniles of fish considering its effects on the survival, growth and nutrition composition of the fish.

  16. Mechanism of Ascorbic Acid-induced Reversion Against Malignant Phenotype in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YA-XUAN SUN; QIU-SHENG ZHENG; GANG LI; DE-AN GUO; ZI-REN WANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To find out the mechanisms of redifferentiation and reversion of malignant human gastric cancer cells induced by ascorbic acid. Methods Human gastric cancer cells grown in the laboratory were used. The Trypan blue dye exclusion method was used to determine the cell doubling time. The electrophoresis rate and colonogenic potential were the indices used to measure the rate of redifferentiation. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured using the thiobarbituric acid(TBA) method. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and the content of H2O2 were evaluated by spectrophotography. Results Six mmol/L ascorbic acid was used as a positive control. Human gastric cancer cells were treated with 75 μm hydrogen peroxide, which alleviated many of the malignant characteristics. For example, the cell surface charge obviously decreased and the electrophoresis rate dropped from 2.21 to 1.10 μm·s-1·V-1·cm-1. The colonogenic potential, a measure of cell differentiation, decreased 90.2%. After treatment with ascorbic acid, there was a concentration- and time-dependent increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD). However, the activity of catalase (CAT) resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease. SOD and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT) exhibited some effects, but there were statistically significant differences between the SOD and AT group and the H2O2 group. Conclusions Ascorbic acid induces growth inhibition and redifferentiation of human gastric cancer cells through the production of hydrogen peroxide.

  17. Mycobacterium leprae-induced Insulin-like Growth Factor I attenuates antimicrobial mechanisms, promoting bacterial survival in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista-Silva, L. R.; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Vivarini, Aislan de Carvalho; Costa, Fabrício da Mota Ramalho; Mattos, Katherine Antunes de; Costa, Maria Renata Sales Nogueira; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Toledo-Pinto, T. G.; Dias, André Alves; Moura, Danielle Fonseca; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (ML), the etiologic agent of leprosy, can subvert macrophage antimicrobial activity by mechanisms that remain only partially understood. In the present study, the participation of hormone insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in this phenomenum was investigated. Macrophages from the dermal lesions of the disseminated multibacillary lepromatous form (LL) of leprosy expressed higher levels of IGF-I than those from the self-limited paucibacillary tuberculoid form (BT). Higher levels of IGF-I secretion by ML-infected macrophages were confirmed in ex vivo and in vitro studies. Of note, the dampening of IGF-I signaling reverted the capacity of ML-infected human and murine macrophages to produce antimicrobial molecules and promoted bacterial killing. Moreover, IGF-I was shown to inhibit the JAK/STAT1-dependent signaling pathways triggered by both mycobacteria and IFN-γ most probably through its capacity to induce the suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3). Finally, these in vitro findings were corroborated by in vivo observations in which higher SOCS3 expression and lower phosphorylation of STAT1 levels were found in LL versus BT dermal lesions. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that IGF-I contributes to the maintenance of a functional program in infected macrophages that suits ML persistence in the host, reinforcing a key role for IGF-I in leprosy pathogenesis. PMID:27282338

  18. Evolution reveals a glutathione-dependent mechanism of 3-hydroxypropionic acid tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Hallström, Björn M.; Blicher, Thomas H.;

    2014-01-01

    , preferably at low pH. Through adaptive laboratory evolution we selected S. cerevisiae strains with improved tolerance to 3HP at pH 3.5.Genome sequencing followed by functional analysis identified the causal mutation in SFA1 gene encoding S-(hydroxymethyl)glutathione dehydrogenase. Based on our findings, we...... propose that 3HP toxicity is mediated by3-hydroxypropionic aldehyde (reuterin) and that glutathione-dependent reactions are used for reuterin detoxification. The identified molecular response to 3HP and reuterin may well be a general mechanism for handling resistance to organic acid and aldehydes by...

  19. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of caffeic acid with eaq-, (CH3)2(OH) CCH2·, CO2·-, H·, ·OH and N3· radicals were studied by γ-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/·OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  20. Effects of primary dicarboxylic acids on microstructure and mechanical properties of sub-microcrystalline Ni-Co alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, J., E-mail: sanjnamohan@yahoo.com [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006 (India); Mohan, S., E-mail: mohan40159@cecri.res.in [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006 (India); Yadav, S. Sunil [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006 (India)

    2011-10-06

    Highlights: > The electrodeposited Ni-Co alloys are mostly used in magnetic sensors and it has good mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. > The effect of dicarboxylic acid leads to preferred (2 0 0) crystalline orientation, this may improve magnetic properties dicarboxylic acid can alter the elemental composition of Ni-Co alloy. > Dicarboxylic acid acts as a good brightner. - Abstract: Nickel-cobalt alloys were deposited from sulfate electrolyte with oxalic, malonic and succinic acids as additives and their microstructure and mechanical properties were studied. The crystal structure, surface morphologies, and chemical composition of coatings were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The crystal structure and surface morphology analysis showed that the addition of dicarboxylic acid leads to (2 0 0) crystal face and the surface were more compact and uniform due to the grain refining. Ni{sub 60}-Co{sub 40} alloy was achieved when succinic acid is used as additive.

  1. Poly(acrylic acid surface grafted polypropylene films: Near surface and bulk mechanical response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Radical photo-grafting polymerization constitutes a promising technique for introducing functional groups onto surfaces of polypropylene films. According to their final use, surface grafting should be done without affecting overall mechanical properties. In this work the tensile drawing, fracture and biaxial impact response of biaxially oriented polypropylene commercial films grafted with poly(acrylic acid (PAA were investigated in terms of film orientation and surface modification. The variations of surface roughness, elastic modulus, hardness and resistance to permanent deformation induced by the chemical treatment were assessed by depth sensing indentation. As a consequence of chemical modification the optical, transport and wettability properties of the films were successfully varied. The introduced chains generated a PAA-grafted layer, which is stiffer and harder than the neat polypropylene surface. Regardless of the surface changes, it was proven that this kind of grafting procedure does not detriment bulk mechanical properties of the PP film.

  2. Fulx-pinning mechanism and activation energy in malic acid-doped MgB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR Ghorbani

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Fulx-pinning mechanism and activation energy of MgB2 doped with 10 wt % malic- acid has been investigated by measurement of critical current density and resistivity as a function of magnetic fields and temperatures. The field dependence of the critical current density, Jc(B, was analyzed within the collective pinning model. A crossover field, Bsb, from the single vortex to the small vortex bundle-pinning regime was observed. For sintered sample, the temperature dependence of Bsb(T at low temperature is in good agreement with the δℓ pinning mechanism, i.e., pinning associated with charge-carrier mean free path fluctuation. The activation energy was decreased linearly by increasing magnetic field.

  3. A novel mechanism for poisoning of metal oxide SCR catalysts: base-acid explanation correlated with redox properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Huazhen; Li, Junhua; Su, Wenkang; Shao, Yuankai; Hao, Jiming

    2014-09-11

    A novel mechanism is proposed for the poisoning effect of acid gases and N2O formation on SCR catalysts involving base-acid properties correlated with redox ability of M-O or M-OH (M = Ce or V) of metal oxides and the strength of their basicity responsible for resistance to HCl and SO2 at medium and low temperatures.

  4. Mechanical behavior of alumina and alumina-feldspar based ceramics in an acetic acid (4%) environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the mechanical properties of alumina-feldspar based ceramics when exposed to an aggressive environment (acetic acid 4%). Alumina ceramics containing different concentrations of feldspar (0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, or 40%) were sintered at either 1300, 1600, or 1700 oC. Flaws (of width 0%, 30%, or 50%) were introduced into the specimens using a saw. Half of these ceramic bodies were exposed to acetic acid. Their flexural strength, KIC, and porosity were measured and the fractured samples were evaluated using scanning electronic- and optical microscopy. It was found that in the ceramic bodies sintered at 1600 oC, feldspar content up to 10% improved flexural strength and KIC, and reduced porosities. Generally, it was found that acetic acid had a weakening effect on the flexural strength of samples sintered at 1700 oC but a beneficial effect on KIC of ceramics sintered at 1600 oC. It was concluded that alumina-based ceramics with feldspar content up to 10% and sintered at higher temperatures would perform better in an aggressive environment similar to oral cavity.

  5. Bulk, surface properties and water uptake mechanisms of salt/acid amorphous composite systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Stefano; Tewes, Frederic; Tajber, Lidia; Caron, Vincent; Corrigan, Owen I; Healy, Anne Marie

    2013-11-01

    Developing amorphous pharmaceuticals can be desirable due to advantageous biopharmaceutical properties. Low glass transition temperature (Tg) amorphous drugs can be protected from crystallisation by mixing with high Tg excipients, such as polymers, or with salt forms. However, both polymers and salts can enhance the water uptake. The aim of this study was to formulate physico-chemically stable amorphous materials, by co-processing different proportions of sulfathiazole and its sodium salt to produce an optimum ratio, characterised by the best physical stability and lowest hygroscopicity. Both sulfathiazole and salt amorphised upon spray drying. At room temperature, sulfathiazole crystallised within 1h at salt deliquesced when exposed to ambient humidity conditions. In the case of composite systems, FTIR spectroscopy, thermal and surface analysis suggested interactions with an acid:salt stoichiometry of 1:2. Increasing proportions of salt raised the Tg, enhancing the storage stability, however this was opposed by an enhanced hygroscopicity. The water uptake mechanism within the different amorphous systems, analysed by fitting the water sorption isotherms with the Young and Nelson equation, was dependent on the ratio employed, with the salt and the acid facilitating absorption and adsorption, respectively. Tuning the properties of amorphous salt/acid composites by optimising the ratio appears potentially promising to improve the physical stability of amorphous formulations. PMID:23948137

  6. Effects of Inorganic Fillers on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of filler to polylactic acid (PLA may affect its crystallization behavior and mechanical properties. The effects of talc and hydroxyapatite (HA on the thermal and mechanical properties of two types of PLA (one amorphous and one semicrystalline have been investigated. The composites were prepared by melt blending followed by injection molding. The molecular weight, morphology, mechanical properties, and thermal properties have been characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscope (SEM, instron tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. It was found that the melting blending led to homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler within the PLA matrix but decreased the molecular weight of PLA. Regarding the filler, addition of talc increased the crystallinity of PLA, but HA decreased the crystallinity of PLA. The tensile strength of the composites depended on the crystallinity of PLA and the interfacial properties between PLA and the filler, but both talc and HA filler increased the toughness of PLA.

  7. Surviving Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... his or her health status, when diagnosed with cancer may have an effect on their survival and recovery. Older adults are more likely to have other health conditions such as diabetes and heart disease. Managing these conditions can complicate ...

  8. Mechanisms of the rapid dissolution of plutonium dioxide in acidic media under oxidizing or reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently plutonium dioxide was known to be among the metallic oxides most difficult to dissolve. This property is understandable given the free energy of the dissolution reaction (ΔG0) in acidic noncomplexing media (ΔG0 = 32.04 kJ/mol). Thermodynamic calculations predict that PuO2 will dissolve under oxidizing or reducing conditions. The oxidizing dissolution, leading to Pu(VI) ion in solution, is easy to perform with a strong oxidant like Ag(II). The mechanism of the oxidizing dissolution of PuO2 was investigated by using carbon paste electrochemistry (CPE) and 18 O labeling. PuO2 can also be dissolved in acidic solution if the redox potential of the mixture is low (e.g., Cr2+, V2+, or U3+ as reducing agents). The kinetics of the heterogeneous reducing dissolution of PuO2 with Cr2+ were investigated and the reaction mechanism was determined by 18 O labeling. All the results will be presented and discussed in the context of minimizing the amount of plutonium-contaminated solid wastes in the nuclear fuel cycle. 9 figs., 17 refs

  9. Protocatechuic acid and human disease prevention: biological activities and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, R; Santangelo, C; D'Archivio, M; Li Volti, G; Giovannini, C; Galvano, F

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence has shown that a high dietary intake of vegetables and fruit rich in polyphenols is associated with a reduction of cancer incidence and mortality from coronary heart disease. The healthy effects associated with polyphenol consumption have made the study of the mechanisms of action a matter of great importance. In particular, the hydroxybenzoic acid protocatechuic acid (PCA) has been eliciting a growing interest for several reasons. Firstly, PCA is one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols such as anthocyanins and procyanidins that are normally found at high concentrations in vegetables and fruit, and are absorbed by animals and humans. Since the daily intake of anthocyanins has been estimated to be much higher than that of other polyphenols, the nutritional value of PCA is increasingly recognized. Secondly, a growing body of evidence supports the concept that PCA can exert a variety of biological effects by acting on different molecular targets. It has been shown that PCA possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory as well as antihyperglycemic and neuroprotective activities. Furthermore, PCA seems to have chemopreventive potential because it inhibits the in vitro chemical carcinogenesis and exerts pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects in different tissues. This review is aimed at providing an up-dated and comprehensive report on PCA giving a special emphasis on its biological activities and the molecular mechanisms of action most likely responsible for a beneficial role in human disease prevention. PMID:22519395

  10. Mechanisms of the rapid dissolution of plutonium dioxide in acidic media under oxidizing or reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently plutonium dioxide was known to be among the metallic oxides most difficult to dissolve. This property is understandable given the free energy of the dissolution reaction (ΔG0) in acidic noncomplexing media (ΔG0 = 32.04 kJ/mol). Thermodynamic calculations predict that PuO2 will dissolve under oxidizing or reducing conditions. The oxidizing dissolution, leading to Pu(VI) ion in solution, is easy to perform with a strong oxidant like Ag(II). The mechanism of the oxidizing dissolution of PuO2 was investigated by using carbon paste electrochemistry (CPE) and 18O labeling. PuO2 can also be dissolved in acidic solution if the redox potential of the mixture is low (e.g., Cr2+, V2+, or U3+ as reducing agents). The kinetics of the heterogeneous reducing dissolution of PuO2 with Cr2+ were investigated and the reaction mechanism was determined by 18O labeling. In this paper all the results are presented and discussed in the context of minimizing the amount of plutonium-contaminated solid wastes in the nuclear fuel cycle

  11. Effect of All-trans Retinoic Acid on Airway Inflammation in Asthmatic Rats and Its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方红; 金红芳; 王宏伟

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The inhibitive effects of all-trans retinoic acid (ARTA) on airway inflammation in asthmatic rats and its mechanism on the basis of the regulation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) were explored. Thirty-two SD rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control group, asthma group,dexamethasone treatment group and retinotic acid treatment group. The total and differential cell counts in the collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. The pathological changes in lung tissues were estimated by scoring. The expression of NF-κB inhibitor (IκBa), NF-κB,intercellular adhering molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in lung tissue was detected by immunohistochemical method. The results showed that in the two treatment groups, the total cell counts and proportion of inflammatory cells in BALF were significantly reduced, but there was no significant difference in differential cell counts in BALF between, them. The pathological changes in lung tissues in the treatment groups were significantly attenuated as compared with asthma group. Except the epithelial injury in retinotic acid treatment group was milder than in dexamethasone treatment group, the remaining lesions showed no significant difference between them. In the two treatment groups, the expression of IκBa was increased, while the expression of NF-κB and ICAM-1 decreased with the difference between the two groups being not significant. It was concluded that the similar anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of ATRA on airway in asthmatic rats to those of dexamethasone were contributed to the increase of cytoplasmic IκBa content and suppression of NF-cB activation and expression.

  12. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organophosphorus-ester induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia progressing to paralysis with a concomitant central and peripheral, distal axonapathy. Diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) produces OPIDN in the chicken that results in mild ataxia in 7–14 days and severe paralysis as the disease progresses with a single dose. White leghorn layer hens were treated with DFP (1.7 mg/kg, sc) after prophylactic treatment with atropine (1 mg/kg, sc) in normal saline and eserine (1 mg/kg, sc) in dimethyl sulfoxide. Control groups were treated with vehicle propylene glycol (0.1 ml/kg, sc), atropine in normal saline and eserine in dimethyl sulfoxide. The hens were euthanized at different time points such as 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 days, and the tissues from cerebrum, midbrain, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord were quickly dissected and frozen for mRNA (northern) studies. Northern blots were probed with BCL2, GADD45, beta actin, and 28S RNA to investigate their expression pattern. Another set of hens was treated for a series of time points and perfused with phosphate buffered saline and fixative for histological studies. Various staining protocols such as Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E); Sevier-Munger; Cresyl echt Violet for Nissl substance; and Gallocynin stain for Nissl granules were used to assess various patterns of cell death and degenerative changes. Complex cell death mechanisms may be involved in the neuronal and axonal degeneration. These data indicate altered and differential mRNA expressions of BCL2 (anti apoptotic gene) and GADD45 (DNA damage inducible gene) in various tissues. Increased cell death and other degenerative changes noted in the susceptible regions (spinal cord and cerebellum) than the resistant region (cerebrum), may indicate complex molecular pathways via altered BCL2 and GADD45 gene expression, causing the homeostatic imbalance between cell survival and cell death mechanisms. Semi quantitative

  13. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damodaran, T.V., E-mail: tdamodar@nccu.edu [Dept of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Dept of Biology, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707 (United States); Attia, M.K. [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Abou-Donia, M.B., E-mail: donia@mc.duke.edu [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Organophosphorus-ester induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia progressing to paralysis with a concomitant central and peripheral, distal axonapathy. Diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) produces OPIDN in the chicken that results in mild ataxia in 7-14 days and severe paralysis as the disease progresses with a single dose. White leghorn layer hens were treated with DFP (1.7 mg/kg, sc) after prophylactic treatment with atropine (1 mg/kg, sc) in normal saline and eserine (1 mg/kg, sc) in dimethyl sulfoxide. Control groups were treated with vehicle propylene glycol (0.1 ml/kg, sc), atropine in normal saline and eserine in dimethyl sulfoxide. The hens were euthanized at different time points such as 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 days, and the tissues from cerebrum, midbrain, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord were quickly dissected and frozen for mRNA (northern) studies. Northern blots were probed with BCL2, GADD45, beta actin, and 28S RNA to investigate their expression pattern. Another set of hens was treated for a series of time points and perfused with phosphate buffered saline and fixative for histological studies. Various staining protocols such as Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E); Sevier-Munger; Cresyl echt Violet for Nissl substance; and Gallocynin stain for Nissl granules were used to assess various patterns of cell death and degenerative changes. Complex cell death mechanisms may be involved in the neuronal and axonal degeneration. These data indicate altered and differential mRNA expressions of BCL2 (anti apoptotic gene) and GADD45 (DNA damage inducible gene) in various tissues. Increased cell death and other degenerative changes noted in the susceptible regions (spinal cord and cerebellum) than the resistant region (cerebrum), may indicate complex molecular pathways via altered BCL2 and GADD45 gene expression, causing the homeostatic imbalance between cell survival and cell death mechanisms. Semi quantitative

  14. Dormência em sementes de plantas daninhas como mecanismo de sobrevivência: breve revisão Weed seed dormancy as a survival mechanism: brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vivian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Um dos principais mecanismos de sobrevivência das plantas daninhas em ambientes constantemente perturbados é a alta produção de sementes. Essas possuem geralmente algum mecanismo de dormência, o qual contribui para a perpetuação de espécies interferentes nos cultivos agrícolas. A dormência pode ser caracterizada pela ausência temporária da germinação, mesmo quando em condições adequadas de sua ocorrência. Isso permite que inúmeras espécies vegetais sobrevivam às adversidades, sobretudo aquelas que dificultam ou impeçam o seu crescimento vegetativo e reprodutivo. As causas da dormência são provenientes de dois mecanismos básicos, sendo o primeiro relacionado a eventos internos das sementes (embrião e o segundo, às características externas (tegumento, endosperma ou as barreiras impostas pelo fruto. Conceitualmente, a dormência pode ser distinguida em dois tipos: dormência primária (quando os mecanismos de dormência ocorrem ainda na planta-mãe e secundária (quando os mecanismos de estabelecimento da dormência ocorrem após a dispersão das sementes. A ocorrência desses dois tipos de dormência é comum em plantas daninhas. A sua alternância ou ciclagem garante o fluxo de germinação destas espécies, o qual depende das características iniciais durante a formação das sementes (dormência primária e, posteriormente, das condições ambientais (dormência secundária. Todavia, muitos são os mecanismos que coordenam a dormência, sendo a distinção destes ainda controversos. Nesse sentido, este estudo tem por objetivo abordar alguns dos principais conceitos e mecanismos de dormência em plantas daninhas, com intuito de contribuir e estimular as pesquisas, ainda escassas, nessa área.The high production of seeds in constantly disturbed environments is one of the main mechanisms of weeds survival. These seeds have usually some dormancy mechanism which constitutes weed species perpetuation in the crops. Seed

  15. The loss of function of PhaC1 is a survival mechanism that counteracts the stress caused by the overproduction of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates in Pseudomonas putidaΔfadBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, José I; Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M; Olivera, Elías R; Luengo, José M

    2015-09-01

    The poly-3-hydroxylkanoate (PHA)-overproducing mutant Pseudomonas putida U ΔfadBA (PpΔfadBA) lacks the genes encoding the main β-oxidation pathway (FadBA). This strain accumulates enormous amounts of bioplastics when cultured in chemically defined media containing PHA precursors (different n-alkanoic or n-aryl-alkanoic acids) and an additional carbon source. In medium containing glucose or 4-hydroxy-phenylacetate, the mutant does not accumulate PHAs and grows just as the wild type (P. putida U). However, when the carbon source is octanoate, growth is severely impaired, suggesting that in PpΔfadBA, the metabolic imbalance resulting from a lower rate of β-oxidation, together with the accumulation of bioplastics, causes severe physiological stress. Here, we show that PpΔfadBA efficiently counteracts this latter effect via a survival mechanism involving the introduction of spontaneous mutations that block PHA accumulation. Surprisingly, genetic analyses of the whole pha cluster revealed that these mutations occurred only in the gene encoding one of the polymerases (phaC1) and that the loss of PhaC1 function was enough to prevent PHA synthesis. The influence of these mutations on the structure of PhaC1 and the existence of a protein-protein (PhaC1-PhaC2) interaction that explains the functionality of the polymerization system are discussed herein. PMID:25627209

  16. The EGFR/ErbB3 Pathway Acts as a Compensatory Survival Mechanism upon c-Met Inhibition in Human c-Met+ Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven N Steinway

    Full Text Available c-Met, a high-affinity receptor for Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, plays a critical role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients with activated HGF/c-Met signaling have a significantly worse prognosis. Targeted therapies using c-Met tyrosine kinase inhibitors are currently in clinical trials for HCC, although receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition in other cancers has demonstrated early success. Unfortunately, therapeutic effect is frequently not durable due to acquired resistance.We utilized the human MHCC97-H c-Met positive (c-Met+ HCC cell line to explore the compensatory survival mechanisms that are acquired after c-Met inhibition. MHCC97-H cells with stable c-Met knockdown (MHCC97-H c-Met KD cells were generated using a c-Met shRNA vector with puromycin selection and stably transfected scrambled shRNA as a control. Gene expression profiling was conducted, and protein expression was analyzed to characterize MHCC97-H cells after blockade of the c-Met oncogene. A high-throughput siRNA screen was performed to find putative compensatory survival proteins, which could drive HCC growth in the absence of c-Met. Findings from this screen were validated through subsequent analyses.We have previously demonstrated that treatment of MHCC97-H cells with a c-Met inhibitor, PHA665752, results in stasis of tumor growth in vivo. MHCC97-H c-Met KD cells demonstrate slower growth kinetics, similar to c-Met inhibitor treated tumors. Using gene expression profiling and siRNA screening against 873 kinases and phosphatases, we identified ErbB3 and TGF-α as compensatory survival factors that are upregulated after c-Met inhibition. Suppressing these factors in c-Met KD MHCC97-H cells suppresses tumor growth in vitro. In addition, we found that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway serves as a negative feedback signal responsible for the ErbB3 upregulation after c-Met inhibition. Furthermore, in vitro studies demonstrate that

  17. Association of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony with survival benefit from revascularization: a study of gated positron emission tomography in patients with ischemic LV dysfunction and narrow QRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlJaroudi, Wael [Imaging Institute, Heart and Vascular, Cleveland, OH (United States); Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute, Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Alraies, M.C. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hachamovitch, Rory; Jaber, Wael A.; Brunken, Richard; Cerqueira, Manuel D.; Marwick, Thomas [Imaging Institute, Heart and Vascular, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-10-15

    LV mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) is a risk marker in narrow QRS cardiomyopathy, but its association with treatment outcome is not well defined. We determined the incremental prognostic value of LVMD in ischemic cardiomyopathy, and assessed its interaction with scar, myocardium in jeopardy and subsequent revascularization. Stress and rest {sup 82}Rb gated PET were performed in 486 consecutive patients (66 {+-} 11 years of age, 82 % men, LV ejection fraction 26 {+-} 6 %) with ischemic cardiomyopathy and QRS <120 ms. LVMD was determined as the standard deviation (SD) of the regional time to minimum volume on phase analysis of the gated PET scan. A propensity score was determined to adjust for nonrandomized referral after imaging to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In a Cox proportional hazards model used to determine the association between measures of LVMD and survival time, CABG was included as a time-dependent covariate and the use of an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) after imaging was modeled as a stratification factor. Over 1.9 {+-} 1.4 years, 96 patients (20 %) underwent CABG and 108 (22 %) died. LVMD was a predictor of mortality (HR 1.16. 95 % CI 1.03;1.30, per 10 increase in phase SD, p = 0.02) after adjusting for baseline covariates, prior ICD use, the use of postimaging CABG, and other imaging data. There was a significant interaction between phase SD and CABG. Nested Cox models showed that LVMD carried prognostic information incremental to clinical variables, ejection fraction and CABG. LVMD is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in ischemic cardiomyopathy, and may identify patients with a differential survival benefit from CABG versus medical therapy. (orig.)

  18. Effect of urine pH changed by dietary intervention on uric acid clearance mechanism of pH-dependent excretion of urinary uric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanbara Aya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The finding reported in a previous paper - alkalization of urine facilitates uric acid excretion - is contradictory to what one might expect to occur: because food materials for the alkalization of urine contain fewer purine bodies than those for acidification, less uric acid in alkaline urine should have been excreted than in acid urine. To make clear what component of uric acid excretion mechanisms is responsible for this unexpected finding, we simultaneously collected data for the concentration of both creatinine and uric acid in serum as well as in urine, in order to calculate both uric acid and creatinine clearances. Methods Within the framework of the Japanese government’s health promotion program, we made recipes which consisted of protein-rich and less vegetable-fruit food materials for H + -load (acidic diet and others composed of less protein and more vegetable-fruit rich food materials (alkaline diet. This is a crossover study within some limitations. Healthy female students, who had no medical problems at the regular physical examination provided by the university, were enrolled in this consecutive 5-day study for each test. From whole-day collected urine, total volume, pH, organic acid, creatinine, uric acid, titratable acid and all cations (Na+,K+,Ca2+,Mg2+,NH4+ and anions (Cl−,SO42−,PO4− necessary for the estimation of acid–base balance were measured. In the early morning before breakfast of the 1st, 3rd and 5th experimental day, we sampled 5 mL of blood to estimate the creatinine and uric acid concentration in serum. Results and discussion Urine pH reached a steady state 3 days after switching from ordinary daily diets to specified regimens. The amount of acid generated ([SO42−] + organic acid − gut alkaliwas linearly related with the excretion of acid (titratable acid + [NH4+] − [HCO3−], indicating that H + in urine is generated by the metabolic degradation of

  19. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-22

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  20. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  1. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  2. Possible mechanism of flubendiamide sorption onto humic acids: a spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoski, I.; D'Orazio, V.; Caboni, P.; Miano, T.

    2009-04-01

    Flubendiamide,N'-[1,1-dimethyl-2-(methylsulfonyl)ethyl]-3-iodo-N-{4-[2,2,2 tetrafluoro-1-(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-0-tolyl} phthalimide is a potent insecticide widely used against lepidopteran pests on a large variety of annual and perennial crops, and belonging to a new chemical class, the phthalic acid diamides. Residues of flubendiamide and its metabolite, the desiodo flubendiamide, were determined in a number of crops. It is stable both under aerobic-anaerobic soil conditions and aerobic-aquatic laboratory conditions whereas it degrades in field condition very slowly. Flubendiamide is almost insoluble in water. Because soils exhibit a marked affinity for hydrophobic organic compounds, they exert an essential role in controlling the environmental fate of these chemicals. There are numerous physical, physico-chemical and chemical binding mechanisms between organic pollutants and soil organic matter. However, the nature and the extent of these binding mechanisms for highly hydrophobic contaminants are not yet fully understood. Humic substances play a major role in the sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds in soils. Adsorption of hydrophobic, non-polar organic compounds can be considered as a non-specific, partitioning process between soil water and soil organic phase, such as the mechanism for retention of nonionic, non-polar organic pollutant that weakly interact with water. The sensitive and nondestructive nature of fluorescence spectroscopy renders this technique well suitable in analysing the physico-chemical properties of organic matter of various origin, as well as a powerful approach both to carry out studies on the structural and functional properties of HA and to investigate their interaction with metals and/or organic contaminants. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies were used to obtain specific information about the mechanisms involved in flubendiamide sorption onto HAs. The HA-flubendiamide interaction products were

  3. A spectroscopic study of possible mechanism of flubendiamide sorption onto humic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoski, I.; D'Orazio, V.; Caboni, P.; Miano, T.

    2009-04-01

    Flubendiamide,N'-[1,1-dimethyl-2-(methylsulfonyl)ethyl]-3-iodo-N-{4-[2,2,2 tetrafluoro-1-(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-0-tolyl} phthalimide is a potent insecticide widely used against lepidopteran pests on a large variety of annual and perennial crops, and belonging to a new chemical class, the phthalic acid diamides. Residues of flubendiamide and its metabolite, the desiodo flubendiamide, were determined in a number of crops. It is stable both under aerobic-anaerobic soil conditions and aerobic-aquatic laboratory conditions whereas it degrades in field condition very slowly. Flubendiamide is almost insoluble in water. Because soils exhibit a marked affinity for hydrophobic organic compounds, they exert an essential role in controlling the environmental fate of these chemicals. There are numerous physical, physico-chemical and chemical binding mechanisms between organic pollutants and soil organic matter. However, the nature and the extent of these binding mechanisms for highly hydrophobic contaminants are not yet fully understood. Humic substances play a major role in the sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds in soils. Adsorption of hydrophobic, non-polar organic compounds can be considered as a non-specific, partitioning process between soil water and soil organic phase, such as the mechanism for retention of nonionic, non-polar organic pollutant that weakly interact with water. The sensitive and nondestructive nature of fluorescence spectroscopy renders this technique well suitable in analysing the physico-chemical properties of organic matter of various origin, as well as a powerful approach both to carry out studies on the structural and functional properties of HA and to investigate their interaction with metals and/or organic contaminants. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies were used to obtain specific information about the mechanisms involved in flubendiamide sorption onto HAs. The HA-flubendiamide interaction products were

  4. Survival of falling robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-01-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  5. Palladium-atom catalyzed formic acid decomposition and the switch of reaction mechanism with temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nan; Li, Zhen Hua

    2016-04-21

    Formic acid decomposition (FAD) reaction has been an innovative way for hydrogen energy. Noble metal catalysts, especially palladium-containing nanoparticles, supported or unsupported, perform well in this reaction. Herein, we considered the simplest model, wherein one Pd atom is used as the FAD catalyst. With high-level theoretical calculations of CCSD(T)/CBS quality, we investigated all possible FAD pathways. The results show that FAD catalyzed by one Pd atom follows a different mechanism compared with that catalyzed by surfaces or larger clusters. At the initial stage of the reaction, FAD follows a dehydration route and is quickly poisoned by CO due to the formation of very stable PdCO. PdCO then becomes the actual catalyst for FAD at temperatures approximately below 1050 K. Beyond 1050 K, there is a switch of catalyst from PdCO to Pd atom. The results also show that dehydration is always favoured over dehydrogenation on either the Pd-atom or PdCO catalyst. On the Pd-atom catalyst, neither dehydrogenation nor dehydration follows the formate mechanism. In contrast, on the PdCO catalyst, dehydrogenation follows the formate mechanism, whereas dehydration does not. We also systematically investigated the performance of 24 density functional theory methods. We found that the performance of the double hybrid mPW2PLYP functional is the best, followed by the B3LYP, B3PW91, N12SX, M11, and B2PLYP functionals.

  6. Enhancement of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Polylactic Acid/Polycaprolactone Blends by Hydrophilic Nanoclay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern Chiet Eng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hydrophilic nanoclay, Nanomer PGV, on mechanical properties of Polylactic Acid (PLA/Polycaprolactone (PCL blends were investigated and compared with hydrophobic clay, Montmorillonite K10. The PLA/PCL/clay composites were prepared by melt intercalation technique and the composites were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. FTIR spectra indicated that formation of hydrogen bond between hydrophilic clay with the matrix. XRD results show that shifting of basal spacing when clay incorporated into polymer matrix. TEM micrographs reveal the formation of agglomerate in the composites. Based on mechanical properties results, addition of clay Nanomer PGV significantly enhances the flexibility of PLA/PCL blends about 136.26%. TGA showed that the presence of clay improve thermal stability of blends. DMA show the addition of clay increase storage modulus and the presence of clay Nanomer PGV slightly shift two Tg of blends become closer suggest that the presence of clay slightly compatibilizer the PLA/PCL blends. SEM micrographs revealed that presence of Nanomer PGV in blends influence the miscibility of the blends. The PLA/PCL blends become more homogeneous and consist of single phase morphology.

  7. Investigation on crystalline perfection, mechanical, piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of L-tartaric acid single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugan, G. Senthil, E-mail: nanosen@gmail.com; Ramasamy, P., E-mail: nanosen@gmail.com [Centre for Crystal Growth, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam, Tamilnadu - 603110 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Polar organic nonlinear optical material, L-tartaric acid single crystals have been grown from slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study indicates that the grown crystal crystallized in monoclinic system with space group P2{sub 1}. Crystalline perfection of the crystal has been evaluated by high resolution X-ray diffraction technique and it reveals that the crystal quality is good and free from structural grain boundaries. Mechanical stability of the crystal has been analyzed by Vickers microhardness measurement and it exhibits reverse indentation size effect. Piezoelectric d{sub 33} co-efficient for the crystal has been examined and its value is 47 pC/N. The ferroelectric behaviour of the crystal was analyzed by polarization-electric field hysteresis loop measurement.

  8. Structrue and Characteristics of Mesoporous Silica Synthesized in Acid Medium and Its Reaction Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Jia-heng; ZHAO Jun; CHEN Yong-xi; GUO Li-ping; LIU Dan

    2004-01-01

    Structrue and pore characteristics of the mesoporous silica synthesized in acid medium were studied by means of XRD, HRTEM, BET, FT-IR, DSC-TGA, and the reaction mechanism was also investigated deeply. The results show that mesopores in the sample possess hexagonal arrays obviously, whereas the structure of silica matrix is amorphous. The results also show that the acting mode of silica and CTMA+ inside the mesopores was chemical bonding force. The structure of mesoporous silica was mainly dependent on the aggregational condition of micelle of CTMA+ as well as their liquid-crystallized status. In addition, condensation and dehydration of silicate radicals were accompanied in the process of calcination, which resulted in the mesoporous structure ordered in local range and the pore sizes largening.

  9. Poly(lactic acid) / Poly(ethylene glycol) blends: Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijarimi, M.; Ahmad, S.; Rasid, R.; Khushairi, M. A.; Zakir, M.

    2016-04-01

    The poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was melt blended with linear polyethylene glycol (PEG) in an effort to increase the toughness of PLA. Melt blending was carried out in an internal mixer at 180 °C mixing temperature with 50 rpm for 15 minutes. The blends were characterized in terms of mechanical, thermal and morphological properties. It was found that tensile and flexural strength, stiffness and notched Izod impact strength decreased significantly when the PEG was added to the PLA matrix at 2.5-10% of PEG concentrations. Both glass transition and melting temperatures (Tg and Tm) lowered as the concentration of PEG was increased. Moreover, it was noted that the PLA/PEG blends showed a lower onset and peak degradation temperatures but with lower final degradation temperature as compared to the neat PLA. The morphological analysis revealed that the PEG was dispersed as droplets in the PLA matrix with a clear boundary between PLA matrix and PEG phases.

  10. Enhancement of Mechanical and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Hydrophilic Nanoclay Reinforced Polylactic Acid/Polycaprolactone/Oil Palm Mesocarp Fiber Hybrid Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Chern Chiet Eng; Nor Azowa Ibrahim; Norhazlin Zainuddin; Hidayah Ariffin; Wan Md Zin Wan Yunus; Yoon Yee Then

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, the effect of the addition of 1 wt% hydrophilic nanoclay on polylactic acid (PLA)/polycaprolactone (PCL)/oil palm mesocarp fiber (OPMF) biocomposites was investigated by tensile properties, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The current studies focus on the effect of addition of 1 wt% hydrophilic nanoclay on mechanical (flexural and impact properties) and dynamic mechanical properties of composites. The composites were characterized ...

  11. Mechanical and acid neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition of amorphous calcium phosphate dental nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Jennifer L; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C; Xu, Hockin H K

    2011-07-01

    Dental composites do not hinder bacteria colonization and plaque formation. Caries at the restoration margins is a frequent reason for replacement of existing restorations, which accounts for 50 to 70% of all restorations. The objectives of this study were to examine the filler level effect on nanocomposite containing nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and investigate the load-bearing and acid-neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition. NACP with 116-nm particle size were synthesized via a spray-drying technique and incorporated into a resin. Flexural strength of nanocomposite with 10 to 30% NACP fillers matched the strength of a commercial hybrid composite (p > 0.1). Nanocomposite with 40% NACP matched the strength of a microfill composite, which was 2-fold that of a resin-modified glass ionomer. Nanocomposite with 40% NACP neutralized a lactic acid solution of pH 4 by rapidly increasing the pH to 5.69 in 10 min. In contrast, the commercial controls had pH staying at near 4. Using Streptoccocus mutans, an agar disk-diffusion test showed no inhibition zone for commercial controls. In contrast, the inhibition zone was (2.5 ± 0.7) mm for nanocomposite with 40% NACP. Crystal violet staining showed that S. mutans coverage on nanocomposite was 1/4 that on commercial composite. In conclusion, novel calcium-phosphate nanocomposite matched the mechanical properties of commercial composite and rapidly neutralized lactic acid of pH 4. The nanocomposite appeared to moderately reduce the S. mutans growth, and further study is needed to obtain strong antimicrobial properties. The new nanocomposite may have potential to reduce secondary caries and restoration fracture, two main challenges facing tooth cavity restorations. PMID:21504057

  12. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization.

  13. Gallic acid conjugated with gold nanoparticles: antibacterial activity and mechanism of action on foodborne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattanata N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Narintorn Rattanata,1 Sompong Klaynongsruang,1 Chanvit Leelayuwat,2 Temduang Limpaiboon,2 Aroonlug Lulitanond,2 Patcharee Boonsiri,3 Sirinart Chio-Srichan,4 Siriwat Soontaranon,4 Supagorn Rugmai,4 Jureerut Daduang2 1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, 2Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, 3Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 4Synchrotron Light Research Institute (Public Organization, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand Abstract: Foodborne pathogens, including Plesiomonas shigelloides and Shigella flexneri B, are the major cause of diarrheal endemics worldwide. Antibiotic drug resistance is increasing. Therefore, bioactive compounds with antibacterial activity, such as gallic acid (GA, are needed. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs are used as drug delivery agents. This study aimed to conjugate and characterize AuNP–GA and to evaluate the antibacterial activity. AuNP was conjugated with GA, and the core–shell structures were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Antibacterial activity of AuNP–GA against P. shigelloides and S. flexneri B was evaluated by well diffusion method. AuNP–GA bactericidal mechanism was elucidated by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopic analysis. The results of small-angle X-ray scattering showed that AuNP–GA conjugation was successful. Antibacterial activity of GA against both bacteria was improved by conjugation with AuNP because the minimum inhibitory concentration value of AuNP–GA was significantly decreased (P<0.0001 compared to that of GA. Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed that AuNP–GA resulted in alterations of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids at the bacterial cell membrane. Our findings show that AuNP–GA has potential for further application in biomedical sciences.Keywords: gold nanoparticles, gallic acid

  14. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization. PMID:27108970

  15. Fracture Mechanisms of Layer-By-Layer Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheng, Eugene R.

    A layer-by-layer(LBL) manufactured material is examined in detail in this thesis. Improvements are made to the method of its manufacture. Efforts are made to understand its fracture mechanisms and take advantage of these fracture mechanisms in the absorption of impact energy. A novel series of experiments has been performed on LBL manufactured thin films to demonstrate their unique fracture mechanisms. Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) (PU/PAA) and PU/PAA/(PU/Clay)5 nanocomposite films readily undergo Interlaminar mode II fracture, because of the relatively weak elctrostatic bonds between monolayers. Tensile tests performed while under observation by a scanning electron microscope demonstrate the tendency of these nanocomposite films to undergo interlaminar mode II fracture even when loads are applied in the plane of nanocomposite film. It is concluded that these mechanisms of energy dissipation are responsible for the enhanced toughness of these films when used as layers between glass blocks in the prevention of impact damage to the glass. A novel automated manufacturing facility has been designed and built to deposit large sheets of Layer-by-Layer nanocomposite film. These large sheets are incorporated into a borosillicate glass composite in order to compare the ballistic characteristics of LBL PU based nanocomposite films to a single cast layer of polyurethane. It is demonstrated that shear fracture is the mode of failure in the blocks containing the nanocomposite film. The shear fracture surface in the nanocomposite after it has undergone a ballistic impact is characterized. Additional experiments are performed to characterize the interlaminar fracture stresses and toughnesses of the nanocomposite LBL layers, to assist in the implementation of a numerical crack band model that describes the nanocomposite film. The computational model predicts the failure of the ballistic nanocomposite samples, and the predicted V50 velocity is found to be in good agreement with

  16. Mechanism on microwave-assisted acidic solvolysis of black-liquor lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chengjian; Feng, Chunguang; Liu, Qian; Shen, Dekui; Xiao, Rui

    2014-06-01

    Microwave-assisted degradation of black-liquor lignin with formic acid was studied, concerning the product yield and distribution of phenolic compounds against reaction temperature (110-180°C) and reaction time (5-90 min). The liquid product consisting of bio-oil 1 and bio-oil 2, achieved the maxima yield of 64.08% at 160°C and 30 min (bio-oil 1: 9.69% and bio-oil 2: 54.39%). The chemical information of bio-oil 1 and bio-oil 2 were respectively identified by means of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), while the solid residue was analyzed by Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). A possible mechanism was proposed for the microwave-assisted acidic solvolysis of lignin, specifying the kinetic relationship among the primary cracking of lignin, repolymerization of the oligomers and formation of solid residue. PMID:24747392

  17. Gallic acid conjugated with gold nanoparticles: antibacterial activity and mechanism of action on foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanata, Narintorn; Klaynongsruang, Sompong; Leelayuwat, Chanvit; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Lulitanond, Aroonlug; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Chio-Srichan, Sirinart; Soontaranon, Siriwat; Rugmai, Supagorn; Daduang, Jureerut

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne pathogens, including Plesiomonas shigelloides and Shigella flexneri B, are the major cause of diarrheal endemics worldwide. Antibiotic drug resistance is increasing. Therefore, bioactive compounds with antibacterial activity, such as gallic acid (GA), are needed. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are used as drug delivery agents. This study aimed to conjugate and characterize AuNP-GA and to evaluate the antibacterial activity. AuNP was conjugated with GA, and the core-shell structures were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Antibacterial activity of AuNP-GA against P. shigelloides and S. flexneri B was evaluated by well diffusion method. AuNP-GA bactericidal mechanism was elucidated by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopic analysis. The results of small-angle X-ray scattering showed that AuNP-GA conjugation was successful. Antibacterial activity of GA against both bacteria was improved by conjugation with AuNP because the minimum inhibitory concentration value of AuNP-GA was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to that of GA. Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed that AuNP-GA resulted in alterations of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids at the bacterial cell membrane. Our findings show that AuNP-GA has potential for further application in biomedical sciences. PMID:27555764

  18. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of cadmium on strong-acid cation exchange resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fei; WANG Lian-jun; LI Jian-sheng; SUN Xiu-yun; HAN Wei-qing

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Cd2+ on 001×7 strong-acid cation exchange resin was studied with the static adsorption method. The adsorption process was analyzed from thermodynamics and kinetics aspects. The influences of experimental parameters such as pH, temperature, initial concentration and adsorption rate were investigated. The experimental results show that in the studied concentration range, 001×7 resin has a good sorption ability for Cd2+, and the equilibrium adsorption data fit to Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption is an exothermic process which runs spontaneously. Kinetic analysis shows that the adsorption rate is mainly governed by liquid film diffusion. The best adsorption condition is pH 4-5. The saturated resin can be regenerated by 3 mol/L nitric acid, and the desorption efficiency is over 98%. The maximal static saturated adsorption capacity is 355 mg/g (wet resin) at 293 K. The adsorption mechanism of Cd2+ on 001×7 resin was discussed based on IR spectra.

  19. Biologic plausibility, cellular effects, and molecular mechanisms of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borow, Kenneth M; Nelson, John R; Mason, R Preston

    2015-09-01

    Residual cardiovascular (CV) risk remains in dyslipidemic patients despite intensive statin therapy, underscoring the need for additional intervention. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is incorporated into membrane phospholipids and atherosclerotic plaques and exerts beneficial effects on the pathophysiologic cascade from onset of plaque formation through rupture. Specific salutary actions have been reported relating to endothelial function, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, inflammation, plaque formation/progression, platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, and plaque rupture. EPA also improves atherogenic dyslipidemia characterized by reduction of triglycerides without raising low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Other beneficial effects of EPA include vasodilation, resulting in blood pressure reductions, as well as improved membrane fluidity. EPA's effects are at least additive to those of statins when given as adjunctive therapy. In this review, we present data supporting the biologic plausibility of EPA as an anti-atherosclerotic agent with potential clinical benefit for prevention of CV events, as well as its cellular effects and molecular mechanisms of action. REDUCE-IT is an ongoing, randomized, controlled study evaluating whether the high-purity ethyl ester of EPA (icosapent ethyl) at 4 g/day combined with statin therapy is superior to statin therapy alone for reducing CV events in high-risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia. The results from this study are expected to clarify the role of EPA as adjunctive therapy to a statin for reduction of residual CV risk.

  20. Evolution of the C(4) photosynthetic mechanism: are there really three C(4) acid decarboxylation types?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbank, Robert T

    2011-05-01

    Some of the most productive plants on the planet use a variant of photosynthesis known as the C(4) pathway. This photosynthetic mechanism uses a biochemical pump to concentrate CO(2) to levels up to 10-fold atmospheric in specialized cells of the leaf where Rubisco, the primary enzyme of C(3) photosynthesis, is located. The basic biochemical pathways underlying this process, discovered more than 40 years ago, have been extensively studied and, based on these pathways, C(4) plants have been subdivided into two broad groups according to the species of C(4) acid produced in the mesophyll cells and into three groups according to the enzyme used to decarboxylate C(4) acids in the bundle sheath to release CO(2). Recent molecular, biochemical, and physiological data indicate that these three decarboxylation types may not be rigidly genetically determined, that the possibility of flexibility between the pathways exists and that this may potentially be both developmentally and environmentally controlled. This evidence is synthesized here and the implications for C(4) engineering discussed.

  1. Effect of ultrasonic frequency on the mechanism of formic acid sono-lysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics and mechanism of formic acid sono-chemical degradation were studied at ultrasonic frequencies of 20, 200, and 607 kHz under argon atmosphere. Total yield of HCOOH sono-chemical degradation increases approximately 6-8-fold when the frequency increased from 20 to 200 or to 607 kHz. At low ultrasonic frequencies, HCOOH degradation has been attributed to oxidation with OH. radicals from water sono-lysis and to the HCOOH decarboxylation occurring at the cavitation bubble-liquid interface. With high-frequency ultrasound, the sono-chemical reaction is also influenced by HCOOH dehydration. Whatever the ultrasonic frequency, the sono-lysis of HCOOH yielded H2 and CO2 in the gas phase as well as trace, amounts of oxalic acid and formaldehyde in the liquid phase. However, CO and CH4 formations were only detected under high frequency ultrasound. The most striking difference between low frequency and high frequency ultrasound is that the sono-lysis of HCOOH at high ultrasonic frequencies initiates Fischer-Tropsch hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. (authors)

  2. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Glass Substrate with α-Alumina-g-Polystyrene Sulfonic Acid Composite Abrasive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Hong; BU Naijing; ZHANG Zefang; CHEN Ruling

    2010-01-01

    Abrasive is the one of key influencing factors during chemical mechanical polishing(CMP) process. Currently, α-Alumina (α-Al2O3) particle, as a kind of abrasive, has been widely used in CMP slurries, but their high hardness and poor dispersion stability often lead to more surface defects. After being polished with composite particles, the surface defects of work pieces decrease obviously. So the composite particles as abrasives in slurry have been paid more attention. In order to reduce defect caused by pure α-Al2O3 abrasive, α-alumina-g-polystyrene sulfonic acid (α-Al2O3-g-PSS) composite abrasive was prepared by surface graft polymerization. The composition, structure and morphology of the product were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy(TOF-SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy(SEM), respectively. The results show that polystyrene sulfonic acid grafts onto α-Al2O3, and has well dispersibility. Then, the chemical mechanical polishing performances of the composite abrasive on glass substrate were investigated with a SPEEDFAM-16B-4M CMP machine. Atomic force microscopy(AFM) images indicate that the average roughness of the polished glass substrate surface can be decreased from 0.835 nm for pure α-Al2O3 abrasive to 0.583 nm for prepared α-Al2O3-g-PSS core-shell abrasive. The research provides a new and effect way to improve the surface qualities during CMP.

  3. Oxidative degradation of organic acid conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization: products, kinetics and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.J.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1987-03-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (FGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant k/sub 12/ is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate times the ratio of the concentration of dissolved S(IV) and organic acid. It is not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Fe, Co, and Ni and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnifies these effects. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately 3 times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids, while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude factor. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product - smaller dicarboxylic acids, monocarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons. 30 references, 7 figures, 7 tables.

  4. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae Sung; Frey, John W; Hornberger, Troy A

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA) may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k) T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis. PMID:23077579

  5. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sung You

    Full Text Available Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  6. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae Sung; Frey, John W; Hornberger, Troy A

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA) may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k) T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  7. The mechanism and kinetics of the electrochemical cleavage of azo bond of 2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenyl-azo-benzoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandic, Zoran; Nigovic, Biljana; Simunic, Branimir

    2004-02-15

    The electrochemical reduction of 2-hydroxy-5-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]benzoic acid, 2-hydroxy-5-[(3-sulfophenyl)azo]benzoic acid, 2-hydroxy-5-[(2-sulfophenyl)azo]benzoic acid and 2-hydroxy-5-azo-benzoic acid has been carried out in aqueous solutions at glassy carbon electrode using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The position of sulfo substituent relative to azo bridge as well as pH of the solution have significant impact on the electrochemical behavior of these compounds. It has been proposed that these compounds are reduced predominantly as hydrazone tautomers resulting in corresponding hydrazo compounds. The overall electrochemical reduction follows DISP2 mechanism, ultimately leading to the 5-amino salicylic acid and sulfanilic acid. The rate determining step is the homogenous redox reaction between intermediate hydrazo compound and 5-amino salicylic acid quinoneimine. The mechanism is proposed in which activated complex of 5-amino salicylic acid quinoneimine and intermediate hydrazo compound is formed with the simultaneous loss of one proton.

  8. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  9. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  10. Long-term follow-up of myelodysplastic syndrome patients with moderate/severe anaemia receiving human recombinant erythropoietin + 13-cis-retinoic acid and dihydroxylated vitamin D3: independent positive impact of erythroid response on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisà, Elena; Foli, Cristina; Passera, Roberto; Darbesio, Antonella; Garvey, Kimberly B; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported a 60% erythroid response rate with recombinant erythropoietin + 13-cis retinoic acid + dihydroxylated vitamin D3 in 63 elderly myelodysplastic patients (median age 75 years) with unfavourable features for response to erythropoietin alone [70% transfusion-dependent, 35% refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts/refractory anaemia with excess of blasts type 1 (RAEB1), 70% with International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) Intermediate-1 or -2]. This report updates that case study at a 7-year follow-up, and compared the impact on overall survival of erythroid response to known prognostic factors. The erythroid response duration (median 17 months; 22 in non-RAEB patients, with 20% patients in response after 6 years of therapy) was longer than in most studies with erythropoietin alone. Overall survival (median 55 months in non-RAEB, 15 in RAEB1 patients) was negatively affected by RAEB1 diagnosis, IPSS and WPSS intermediate scores and transfusion-dependence. In the multivariate analysis, erythroid response maintained an independent positive impact on survival, particularly in non-RAEB patients in the first 3 years from diagnosis (90% survival compared to 50% of non-responders). In conclusion, the long-term follow-up confirmed the achievement, by our combined treatment, of fairly long-lasting erythroid response in the majority of MDS patients with unfavourable prognostic features for response to erythropoietin: this translated in a survival benefit that was independent from other prognostic features. PMID:22571649

  11. Listeria monocytogenes: survival and adaptation in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahan, Cormac G M; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the capacity to survive and grow in a diverse range of natural environments. The transition from a food environment to the gastrointestinal tract begins a process of adaptation that may culminate in invasive systemic disease. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of how L. monocytogenes adapts to the gastrointestinal environment prior to initiating systemic infection. We will discuss mechanisms used by the pathogen to survive encounters with acidic environments (which include the glutamate decarboxylase and arginine deiminase systems), and those which enable the organism to cope with bile acids (including bile salt hydrolase) and competition with the resident microbiota. An increased understanding of how the pathogen survives in this environment is likely to inform the future design of novel prophylactic approaches that exploit specific pharmabiotics; including probiotics, prebiotics, or phages. PMID:24551601

  12. Listeria monocytogenes: survival and adaptation in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormac G.M. Gahan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the capacity to survive and grow in a diverse range of natural environments. The transition from a food environment to the gastrointestinal tract begins a process of adaptation that may culminate in invasive systemic disease. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of how L. monocytogenes adapts to the gastrointestinal environment prior to initiating systemic infection. We will discuss mechanisms used by the pathogen to survive encounters with acidic environments (which include the glutamate decarboxylase and arginine deiminase systems, and those which enable the organism to cope with bile acids (including bile salt hydrolase and competition with the resident microbiota. An increased understanding of how the pathogen survives in this environment is likely to inform the future design of novel prophylactic approaches that exploit specific pharmabiotics; including probiotics, prebiotics or phages.

  13. Kinetics and Mechanism of Electron Transfer Reaction: Oxidation of Sulfanilic Acid by N-Chloro-p-Toluene Sulfonamide in Acid Perchlorate Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailani, Riya; Bhasin, Meneka; Khandelwal, C. L.; Sharma, P. D. [Univ. of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India)

    2014-01-15

    The kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of sulfanilic acid by N-chloro-p-toluene sulfonamide (chloramine-T) have been studied in acid medium. The species of chloramine-T were analysed on the basis of experimental observations and predominantly reactive species was taken into account for proposition of most plausible reaction mechanism. The derived rate law (1) conforms to such a mechanism. All kinetic parameters were evaluated. Activation parameters such as energy and entropy of activation were calculated to be (61.67 ± 0.47) kJ mol{sup -1} and (-62.71 ± 2.48) JK{sup -1}mol{sup -1} respectively employing Eyring equation.

  14. Priming for JA-dependent defenses using hexanoic acid is an effective mechanism to protect Arabidopsis against B. cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, Zhana; Vicedo, Begonya; Flors, Víctor; Camañes, Gemma; González-Bosch, Carmen; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2011-03-01

    Soil drench treatments with hexanoic acid can effectively protect Arabidopsis plants against Botrytis cinerea through a mechanism based on a stronger and faster accumulation of JA-dependent defenses. Plants impaired in ethylene, salicylic acid, abscisic acid or glutathion pathways showed intact protection by hexanoic acid upon B. cinerea infection. Accordingly, no significant changes in the SA marker gene PR-1 in either the SA or ABA hormone balance were observed in the infected and treated plants. In contrast, the JA signaling pathway showed dramatic changes after hexanoic acid treatment, mainly when the pathogen was present. The impaired JA mutants, jin1-2 and jar1, were unable to display hexanoic acid priming against the necrotroph. In addition, hexanoic acid-treated plants infected with B. cinerea showed priming in the expression of the PDF1.2, PR-4 and VSP1 genes implicated in the JA pathways. Moreover, JA and OPDA levels were primed at early stages by hexanoic acid. Treatments also stimulated increased callose accumulation in response to the pathogen. Although callose accumulation has proved an effective IR mechanism against B. cinerea, it is apparently not essential to express hexanoic acid-induced resistance (HxAc-IR) because the mutant pmr4.1 (callose synthesis defective mutant) is protected by treatment. We recently described how hexanoic acid treatments can protect tomato plants against B. cinerea by stimulating ABA-dependent callose deposition and by priming OPDA and JA-Ile production. We clearly demonstrate here that Hx-IR is a dependent plant species, since this acid protects Arabidopsis plants against the same necrotroph by priming JA-dependent defenses without enhancing callose accumulation.

  15. Transcriptomic analysis reveals the metabolic mechanism of L-ascorbic acid in Ziziphus jujuba Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei eZhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. is the most economically important member of the Rhamnaceae family and contains a high concentration of ascorbic acid (AsA. To explore the metabolic mechanism of AsA accumulation, we investigated the abundance of AsA in the fruit development stages, the leaf and flower of Z. jujuba cv Junzao, and the mature fruit of one type of wild jujube (Z. jujuba var. spinosa Hu, Yanchuan sour jujube. And the expression patterns of genes involved in AsA biosynthesis, degradation and recycling were analyzed. The result showed that AsA biosynthesis during early fruit development (the enlargement stage is the main reason for jujube high accumulation. The L-galactose pathway plays a predominant role in the biosynthesis of AsA during jujube fruit development, and the genes GMP1, GME1, GGP, and GaLDH involved in the determination of AsA concentration during fruit development and in different genotypes; the myo-inositol pathway along with the genes GME2 and GMP2 in the L-galactose pathway play a compensatory role in maintaining AsA accumulation during the ripening stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism in regulating AsA accumulation for jujube.

  16. Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria: from health-promoting benefits to stress tolerance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggianiello, Graziano; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Spano, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is able to produce capsular or extracellular polysaccharides, with various chemical compositions and properties. Polysaccharides produced by LAB alter the rheological properties of the matrix in which they are dispersed, leading to typically viscous and "ropy" products. Polysaccharides are involved in several mechanisms such as prebiosis and probiosis, tolerance to stress associated to food process, and technological properties of food. In this paper, we summarize the beneficial properties of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by LAB with particular attention to prebiotic properties and to the effect of exopolysaccharides on the LAB-host interaction mechanisms, such as bacterial tolerance to gastrointestinal tract conditions, ability of ESP-producing probiotics to adhere to intestinal epithelium, their immune-modulatory activity, and their role in biofilm formation. The pro-technological aspect of exopolysaccharides is discussed, focusing on advantageous applications of EPS in the food industry, i.e., yogurt and gluten-free bakery products, since it was found that these microbial biopolymers positively affect the texture of foods. Finally, the involvement of EPS in tolerance to stress conditions that are commonly encountered in fermented beverages such as wine is discussed.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest for application of hydrometallurgical processes in a processing of complex sulphide ores and concentrates has increased in recent years. Their application provides better metal recoveries and reduced emission of gaseous and toxic ageneses in the environment. The kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching from complex sulphide concentrate with sulphuric acid and sodium nitrate solution at standard conditions was presented in this paper. The influences of temperature and time on the leaching degree of zinc were investigated and kinetic analysis of the process was accomplished. With temperature increasing from 60 to 90°C, the zinc leaching increased from 25.23% to 71.66% after 2 hours, i.e. from 59.40% to 99.83% after 4 hours. The selected kinetic model indicated that the diffusion through the product layer was the rate-controlling step during the sphalerite leaching. The activation energy was determined to be 55 kJ/mol in the temperature range 60-90°C. XRD, light microscopy and SEM/EDX analyses of the complex concentrate and leach residue confirmed formation of elemental sulphur and diffusion-controlled leaching mechanism.

  18. Anti-hepatoma activity and mechanism of ursolic acid and its derivatives isolated from Aralia decaisneana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze Tian; Geng Lin; Rui-Xia Zheng; Feng Huang; Meng-Su Yang; Pei-Gen Xiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-tumor activity of ursolic acid (UA) and its derivatives isolated from Aralia decaisneana on hepatocellular carcinoma both in vitro andin vivo.METHODS: In vivo cytotoxicity was first screened by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Morphological observation, DNA ladder, flow cytometry analysis, Western blot and real time PCR were employed to elucidate the cytotoxic mechanism of UA. Implanted mouse hepatoma H22 was used to evaluate the growth inhibitory effect of UA in vivo.RESULTS: UA could significantly inhibit the proliferation of HepG2 and its drug-resistance strain, R-HepG2 cells,but had no inhibitory effect on primarily cultured normal mouse hepatocytes whereas all the six derivatives of UA could not inhibit the growth of all tested cell lines. Further study on mechanism demonstrated that apoptosis and G0/G1 arrest were involved in the cytotoxicity and cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP). Downregulation of cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) protein and upregulation of heat shock protein (HSP) 105 mRNA correlated to the apoptosis of HepG2cells treated with UA. In addition, UA also could inhibit the growth of H22 hepatoma in vivo.CONCLUSION: UA is a promising anti-tumor agent, but further work needs to be done to improve its solubility.

  19. Adsorption Behaviors and Mechanism of Macroporous Phosphonic Acid Resin for Gadolinium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴香梅; 熊春华; 姚彩萍

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors and mechanism of a novel chelate resin, macroporous phosphonic acid resin(PAR)for Gd(Ⅲ)were investigated. The statically and dynamically saturated adsorption capacity is respectively 308 mg·g-1resin and 296 mg·g-1resin at 298 K in Hac-NaAc medium at pH 5.6. Gd(Ⅲ)adsorbed on PAR can be reductively eluted by 0.5~5.0 mol·L-1 HCl used as eluant and the elution percentage is up to 94.7% in 1.0 mol·L-1 HCl. The resin can be regenerated and reused without apparent decrease in adsorption capacity. The apparent adsorption rate constant is k298=3.96×10-5 s-1. The adsorption behavior of PAR for Gd(Ⅲ) conforms to the Freundlich isotherm. The thermodynamic adsorption parameter, enthalpy change △H of PAR for Gd(Ⅲ)is 22.6kJ·mol-1. The apparent adsorption activation energy(Ea)of PAR for Gd(Ⅲ)is 5.0 kJ·mol-1. The molar coordination ratio of the functional group of PAR to Gd(Ⅲ)is about 3∶1. The adsorption mechanism of PAR for Gd(Ⅲ)was examined by using chemical method and IR spectrometry.

  20. Investigating the mechanism of clofibric acid removal in Fe0/H2O systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the introduction of iron wall technology, the inherent relationship between contaminant removal and iron corrosion has been mostly attributed to electron transfer from the metal body (direct reduction). This thermodynamically founded premise has failed to explain several experimental facts. Recently, a new concept considering adsorption and co-precipitation as fundamental contaminant removal mechanisms was introduced. This consistent concept has faced very skeptic views and necessarily needs experimental validation. The present work was the first independent attempt to validate the new concept using clofibric acid (CLO) as model compound. For this purpose, a powdered Fe0 material (Fe0) was used in CLO removal experiments under various experimental conditions. Additional experiments were performed with plated Fe0 (mFe0: Fe0/Pd0, Fe0/Ni0) to support the discussion of removal mechanism. Main investigated experimental variables included: abundance of O2, abundance of iron corrosion products (ICPs) and shaking operations. Results corroborated the concept that quantitative contaminant removal in Fe0/H2O systems occurs within the oxide-film in the vicinity of Fe0. Additionally, mixing type and shaking intensity significantly influenced the extent of CLO removal. More importantly, HPLC/MS revealed that the identity of reaction products depends on the extent of iron corrosion or the abundance of ICPs. The investigation of the CLO/Fe0/H2O system disproved the popular view that direct reduction mediates contaminant removal in the presence of Fe0.

  1. Adsorption Behavior and Mechanism of Macroporous Phosphonic Acid Resin for Lu3+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-jun; XIONG Chun-hua

    2006-01-01

    The article is based on a research on the adsorption behavior and adsorption mechanism of macroporous phosphonic acid resin (PAR) for Lu3+ and the influence of the medium's pH, adsorption temperature, adsorption time, etc on adsorbing Lu3 + . The best value of medium's pH to the adsorption of PAR for Lu3 + was found to be 4.92. The static adsorption maximum capacity of PAR for Lu3 + is 220 mg· g-1. The thermodynamic adsorption parameters are respectively △H= 11.3 kJ·mol-1, △S =46.3 J·mol-1 ·K-1, △G = - 2.50 kJ·mol-1 and the apparent activity energy is Ea= 31.4 kJ· mol- 1. The adsorption behavior of PAR for Lu3 + obeys the Freundlich isotherm. The apparent adsorption rate constant is k298 = 4.68 × 10-5 s-1. The coordinate ratio of the functional radical to Lu3 + is approximately 4: 1. The best eluant is 1.0 mol· L- 1 HCl. The adsorption mechanism of PAR for Lu3 + was separately confirmed by chemical analysis and IR spectra.

  2. Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria: from health-promoting benefits to stress tolerance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggianiello, Graziano; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Spano, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is able to produce capsular or extracellular polysaccharides, with various chemical compositions and properties. Polysaccharides produced by LAB alter the rheological properties of the matrix in which they are dispersed, leading to typically viscous and "ropy" products. Polysaccharides are involved in several mechanisms such as prebiosis and probiosis, tolerance to stress associated to food process, and technological properties of food. In this paper, we summarize the beneficial properties of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by LAB with particular attention to prebiotic properties and to the effect of exopolysaccharides on the LAB-host interaction mechanisms, such as bacterial tolerance to gastrointestinal tract conditions, ability of ESP-producing probiotics to adhere to intestinal epithelium, their immune-modulatory activity, and their role in biofilm formation. The pro-technological aspect of exopolysaccharides is discussed, focusing on advantageous applications of EPS in the food industry, i.e., yogurt and gluten-free bakery products, since it was found that these microbial biopolymers positively affect the texture of foods. Finally, the involvement of EPS in tolerance to stress conditions that are commonly encountered in fermented beverages such as wine is discussed. PMID:27020288

  3. Mechanism and Kinetics Study for Photocatalytic Oxidation Degradation: A Case Study for Phenoxyacetic Acid Organic Pollutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian Mun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalysis is a rapidly expanding technology for wastewater treatment, including a wide range of organic pollutants. Thus, understanding the kinetics and mechanism of the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO for degradation of phenoxyacetic acid (PAA is an indispensable component of risk assessment. In this study, we demonstrated that the central composite design (CCD coupled with response surface methodology (RSM was successfully employed to probe the kinetics and mechanism of PCO degradation for PAA using an efficient zinc oxide (ZnO photocatalyst. In our current case study, four independent factors such as ZnO dosage, initial concentration of PAA, solution pH, and reaction time on the PCO degradation for PAA were examined in detail. Based on our results obtained from RSM analyses, an efficient pathway leading to the high degradation rate (>90% was applying 0.4 g/L of ZnO dosage with 16 mg/L of concentration of PAA at pH 6.73 for 40 minutes. The experimental results were fitted well with the derived response model with R2 = 0.9922. This study offers a cost-effective way for probing our global environmental water pollution issue.

  4. Antifungal activity of salicylic acid against Penicillium expansum and its possible mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha Neto, Argus Cezar; Maraschin, Marcelo; Di Piero, Robson Marcelo

    2015-12-23

    Apple is a fruit widely produced and consumed around the world. Blue mold (Penicillium expansum) is one of the main postharvest diseases in apples, leading to a wide use of fungicides and the search for alternative products. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of salicylic acid (SA) against P. expansum, elucidating its mechanisms of action. The antimicrobial effect was determined by exposing conidia to a 2.5 mM SA solution for 0 to 120 min, followed by incubation. The effect of pH on the efficacy of SA against P. expansum was assessed both in vitro and in situ. The action mechanisms were investigated through fluorescence assays, measurement of protein leakage, lipid damage, and transmission electronic microscopy. SA was capable of inhibiting 90% of the fungal germination after 30 min, causing damage to the conidial plasma membrane and leading to protein leakage up to 3.2 μg of soluble protein per g of mycelium. The pH of the SA solution affected the antimicrobial activity of this secondary metabolite, which inhibited the germination of P. expansum and the blue mold incidence in apples in solutions with pH≤3 by 100%, gradually losing its activity at higher pH.

  5. Trifluoroacetic acid quenching of naphthalene fluorescence: implications for the mechanism of photoelectrophilic hydrogen exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quenching of naphthalene fluorescence by trifluoroacetic acid involves the dimer of the acid. In isooctane, the activation energy for quenching is essentially zero. The previously observed decrease in quenching efficiency in more polar solvents results from their lower dimer content. Hydrogen isotope exchange in the system naphthalene-trifluoroacetic acid-alkane solvent also involves the dimer of trifluoroacetic acid. 3 tables

  6. Mechanisms of hydroxyl radical production from abiotic oxidation of pyrite under acidic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Liao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (radOH) produced from pyrite oxidation by O2 have been recognized, but mechanisms regarding the production under anoxic and oxic conditions are not well understood. In this study, the mechanisms of radOH production from pyrite oxidation under anoxic and oxic conditions were explored using benzoic acid (BA) as an radOH probe. Batch experiments were conducted at pH 2.6 to explore radOH production under anoxic and oxic conditions. The cumulative radOH concentrations produced under anoxic and oxic conditions increased linearly to 7.5 and 52.2 μM, respectively within 10 h at 10 g/L pyrite. Under anoxic conditions, radOH was produced from the oxidation of H2O on the sulfur-deficient sites on pyrite surface, showing an increased production with the increase of pyrite surface exposure due to oxidation. Under oxic conditions, the formation of radOH proceeds predominantly via the two-electron reduction of O2 on pyrite surface along with a minor contribution from the oxidation of H2O on surface sulfur-defects and the reactions of Fe2+/sulfur intermediates with O2. For both O2 reduction and H2O oxidation on the surface sulfur-defects, H2O2 was the predominant intermediate, which subsequently transformed to radOH through Fenton mechanism. The radOH produced had a significant impact on the transformation of contaminants in the environment. Anoxic pyrite suspensions oxidized 13.9% As(III) (C0 = 6.67 μM) and 17.6% sulfanilamide (C0 = 2.91 μM) within 10 h at pH 2.6 and 10 g/L pyrite, while oxic pyrite suspensions improved the oxidation percentages to 55.4% for As(III) and 51.9% for sulfanilamide. The ratios of anoxic to oxic oxidation are consistent with the relative contribution of surface sulfur-defects to radOH production. However, Fe2+ produced from pyrite oxidation competed with the contaminants for radOH, which is of particular significance with the increase of time in a static environment. We conclude that radOH can be produced from abiotic oxidation of

  7. Radical and Non-Radical Mechanisms for Alkane Oxidations by Hydrogen Peroxide-Trifluoroacetic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Bays, J. Timothy; Shaw, Wendy J.; Linehan, John C.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.

    2001-02-01

    The oxidation of cyclohexane by the H2O2-trifluoroacetic acid system is revisited. Consistent with a previous report (Deno, N.; Messer, L. A. Chem. Comm. 1976, 1051), cyclohexanol forms initially but then esterifies to cyclohexyl trifluoroacetate. Small amounts of trans-1,2-cyclohexadiyl bis(trifluoroacetate) also form. Although these products form irrespective of the presence or absence of O2, dual mechanisms are shown to operate. In the absence of O2, the dominant mechanism is a radical chain reaction that is propagated by CF3• abstracting H from C6H12 and SH2 displacement of C6H11• on CF3CO2OH. The intermediacy of C6H11• and CF3• is inferred from production of CHF3 and CO2 along with cyclohexyl trifluoroacetate, or CDF3 when cyclohexane-d12 is used. In the presence of O2, fluoroform and CO2 are suppressed, the reaction rate slows, and the rate law approaches second order (first order in peracid and in C6H12). Trapping of cyclohexyl radicals by quinoxaline is inefficient except at elevated (75 °C) temperatures. Fluoroform and CO2, telltale evidence for the chain pathway, were not produced when quinoxaline was present in room temperature reactions. These observations suggest that a parallel, nonfree radical, oxenoid insertion mechanism dominates when O2 is present. A pathway is discussed in which a biradicaloid-zwiterionic transition state is attained by hydrogen transfer from alkane to peroxide oxygen with synchronous O-O bond scission.

  8. Retention Mechanisms of Citric Acid in Ternary Kaolinite-Fe(III)-Citrate Acid Systems Using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Pan, Weinan; Regier, Tom; Hu, Yongfeng; Rumpel, Cornelia; Bolan, Nanthi; Sparks, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Organic carbon (OC) stability in tropical soils is strongly interlinked with multivalent cation interaction and mineral association. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) represent the readily biodegradable OC. Therefore, investigating retention mechanisms of LMWOAs in mineral-cation-LMWOAs systems is critical to understanding soil C cycling. Given the general acidic conditions and dominance of kaolinite in tropical soils, we investigated the retention mechanisms of citric acid (CA) in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems with various Fe/CA molar ratios at pH ~3.5 using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES techniques. With Fe/CA molar ratios >2, the formed ferrihydrite mainly contributed to CA retention through adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios from 2 to 0.5, ternary complexation of CA to kaolinite via a five-coordinated Fe(III) bridge retained higher CA than ferrihydrite-induced adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios ≤0.5, kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate complexation preferentially occurred, but less CA was retained than via outer-sphere kaolinite-CA complexation. This study highlighted the significant impact of varied Fe/CA molar ratios on CA retention mechanisms in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems under acidic conditions, and clearly showed the important contribution of Fe-bridged ternary complexation on CA retention. These findings will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of CA and other LMWOAs in tropical soils.

  9. Microbial iron management mechanisms in extremely acidic environments: comparative genomics evidence for diversity and versatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieto Pamela A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is an essential nutrient but can be toxic at high intracellular concentrations and organisms have evolved tightly regulated mechanisms for iron uptake and homeostasis. Information on iron management mechanisms is available for organisms living at circumneutral pH. However, very little is known about how acidophilic bacteria, especially those used for industrial copper bioleaching, cope with environmental iron loads that can be 1018 times the concentration found in pH neutral environments. This study was motivated by the need to fill this lacuna in knowledge. An understanding of how microorganisms thrive in acidic ecosystems with high iron loads requires a comprehensive investigation of the strategies to acquire iron and to coordinate this acquisition with utilization, storage and oxidation of iron through metal responsive regulation. In silico prediction of iron management genes and Fur regulation was carried out for three Acidithiobacilli: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (iron and sulfur oxidizer A. thiooxidans and A. caldus (sulfur oxidizers that can live between pH 1 and pH 5 and for three strict iron oxidizers of the Leptospirillum genus that live at pH 1 or below. Results Acidithiobacilli have predicted FeoB-like Fe(II and Nramp-like Fe(II-Mn(II transporters. They also have 14 different TonB dependent ferri-siderophore transporters of diverse siderophore affinity, although they do not produce classical siderophores. Instead they have predicted novel mechanisms for dicitrate synthesis and possibly also for phosphate-chelation mediated iron uptake. It is hypothesized that the unexpectedly large number and diversity of Fe(III-uptake systems confers versatility to this group of acidophiles, especially in higher pH environments (pH 4–5 where soluble iron may not be abundant. In contrast, Leptospirilla have only a FtrI-Fet3P-like permease and three TonB dependent ferri-dicitrate siderophore systems. This paucity of iron

  10. Mechanism of Tin-bridge formation on C-Dip packages in acid tin bath, and its inhibition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the mechanism of a tin-bridge formation on the solder glass surface during acid bright tin plating of a C-Dip package. In the PbO-ZnO-B2O3 system under study, the formation is found to be primarily due to the cathodic reduction of sulfates on the glass surface. And these sulfates, mainly PbSO4, are shown to be the products of a precleaning with acids. The bath conditions are varied to see their effect on the tinbridge formation. We find that the formation can be avoided by pretreating the glass surface with oxyful. Possible mechanisms for this are discussed

  11. Recent Advances in Understanding Amino Acid Sensing Mechanisms that Regulate mTORC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liufeng Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is the central regulator of mammalian cell growth, and is essential for the formation of two structurally and functionally distinct complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 can sense multiple cues such as nutrients, energy status, growth factors and hormones to control cell growth and proliferation, angiogenesis, autophagy, and metabolism. As one of the key environmental stimuli, amino acids (AAs, especially leucine, glutamine and arginine, play a crucial role in mTORC1 activation, but where and how AAs are sensed and signal to mTORC1 are not fully understood. Classically, AAs activate mTORC1 by Rag GTPases which recruit mTORC1 to lysosomes, where AA signaling initiates. Plasma membrane transceptor L amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1-4F2hc has dual transporter-receptor function that can sense extracellular AA availability upstream of mTORC1. The lysosomal AA sensors (PAT1 and SLC38A9 and cytoplasmic AA sensors (LRS, Sestrin2 and CASTOR1 also participate in regulating mTORC1 activation. Importantly, AAs can be sensed by plasma membrane receptors, like G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR T1R1/T1R3, and regulate mTORC1 without being transported into the cells. Furthermore, AA-dependent mTORC1 activation also initiates within Golgi, which is regulated by Golgi-localized AA transporter PAT4. This review provides an overview of the research progress of the AA sensing mechanisms that regulate mTORC1 activity.

  12. Recent Advances in Understanding Amino Acid Sensing Mechanisms that Regulate mTORC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liufeng; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yuanfei; Li, Fengna; Wei, Hongkui; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is the central regulator of mammalian cell growth, and is essential for the formation of two structurally and functionally distinct complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 can sense multiple cues such as nutrients, energy status, growth factors and hormones to control cell growth and proliferation, angiogenesis, autophagy, and metabolism. As one of the key environmental stimuli, amino acids (AAs), especially leucine, glutamine and arginine, play a crucial role in mTORC1 activation, but where and how AAs are sensed and signal to mTORC1 are not fully understood. Classically, AAs activate mTORC1 by Rag GTPases which recruit mTORC1 to lysosomes, where AA signaling initiates. Plasma membrane transceptor L amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1)-4F2hc has dual transporter-receptor function that can sense extracellular AA availability upstream of mTORC1. The lysosomal AA sensors (PAT1 and SLC38A9) and cytoplasmic AA sensors (LRS, Sestrin2 and CASTOR1) also participate in regulating mTORC1 activation. Importantly, AAs can be sensed by plasma membrane receptors, like G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) T1R1/T1R3, and regulate mTORC1 without being transported into the cells. Furthermore, AA-dependent mTORC1 activation also initiates within Golgi, which is regulated by Golgi-localized AA transporter PAT4. This review provides an overview of the research progress of the AA sensing mechanisms that regulate mTORC1 activity. PMID:27690010

  13. Photoinduced Hydrodefluorination Mechanisms of Perfluorooctanoic Acid by the SiC/Graphene Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dahong; Yin, Lifeng; Niu, Junfeng

    2016-06-01

    Cleavage of the strong carbon-fluorine bonds is critical for elimination of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the environment. In this work, we investigated the decomposition of PFOA with the SiC/graphene catalyst under UV light irradiation. The decomposition rate constant (k) with SiC/graphene was 0.096 h(-1), 2.2 times higher than that with commercial nano-TiO2. Surface fluorination on SiC/graphene was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), revealing the conversions of Si-H bonds into Si-F bonds. A different route was found to generate the reactive Si-H bonds on SiC/graphene, substituting for silylium (R3Si(+)) to activate C-F bonds. During the activation process, photogenerated electrons on SiC transfer rapidly to perfluoroalkyl groups by the medium of graphene, further reducing the electron cloud density of C-F bonds to promote the activation. The hydrogen-containing hydrodefluorination intermediates including (CF3(CF2)2CFH, CF3(CF2)3CH2, CF3(CF2)4CH2, and CF3(CF2)4CFHCOOH) were detected to verify the hydrodefluorination process. The photoinduced hydrodefluorination mechanisms of PFOA can be consequently inferred as follows: (1) fluorine atoms in perfluoroalkyl groups were replaced by hydrogen atoms due to the nucleophilic substitution reaction via the Si-H/C-F redistribution, and (2) generation of CH2 carbene from the hydrogen-containing perfluoroalkyl groups and the C-C bonds scission by the Photo-Kolbe decarboxylation reaction under UV light excitation. This photoinduced hydrodefluorination provides insight into the photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) in an aqueous environment. PMID:27128100

  14. [Photocatalytic degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in TiO2 dispersion and its mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Jie; Yu, Ze-Bin; Chen, Ying; Wang, Li; Liu, Qing; Liu, Yu-Xin; He, Li-Li

    2014-07-01

    Decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is of prime importance since it is recognized as a persistent organic pollutant and is widespread in the environment. Heterogeneous photocatalytic decomposition of PFOA by TiO2 (P25) was investigated under 254 nm UV light. Experimental conditions including initial pH, TiO2 content and PFOA concentration, were varied to demonstrate their effects on the decomposition of PFOA. It was observed that the photocatalytic degradation kinetics of PFOA could be fitted to the quasi-first-order equation. The pH played a determinant role in the decomposition of PFOA and the presence of O2 increased the degradation rate. Optimal conditions for a complete removal were obtained using 1.5 g x L(-1) TiO2 at pH 3 in air atmosphere, with a rate constant of 0.420 6 h(-1). The contribution experiments of various reactive species produced during the photocatalysis were also investigated with the addition of different scavengers and it was found that photogenerated holes (h+) was the major reactive species which was responsible for 66.1% of the degradation rate, and the *OH was involved in PFOA degradation as well. In addition, the photocatalytic experiment with the addition of NaF indicated that the adsorption of PFOA was of primary importance for the photocatalytic decomposition. Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) with shorter carbon chain length as intermediates and products were identified with UPLC-QTOF/MS, and a possible mechanism for PFOA decomposition was proposed. PMID:25244845

  15. Conformational mechanics, adsorption, and normal force interactions of lubricin and hyaluronic acid on model surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Debby P; Abu-Lail, Nehal I; Guilak, Farshid; Jay, Gregory D; Zauscher, Stefan

    2008-02-19

    Glycoproteins, such as lubricin, and hyaluronic acid (HA) play a prominent role in the boundary lubrication mechanism in diarthrodial joints. Although many studies have tried to elucidate the lubrication mechanisms of articular cartilage, the molecular details of how lubricin and HA interact with cartilage surfaces and mediate their interaction still remain poorly understood. Here we used model substrates, functionalized with self-assembled monolayers terminating in hydroxyl or methyl groups, (1) to determine the effect of surface chemistry on lubricin and HA adsorption using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and (2) to study normal force interactions between these surfaces as a function of lubricin and HA concentration using colloidal probe microscopy. We found that lubricin is amphiphilic and adsorbed strongly onto both methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, lubricin likely adopts a compact, looplike conformation in which its hydrophobic domains at the N and C termini serve as surface anchors. On hydrophilic surfaces, lubricin likely adsorbs anywhere along its hydrophilic central domain and adopts, with increasing solution concentration, an extended tail-like conformation. Overall, lubricin develops strong repulsive interactions when compressing two surfaces into contact. Furthermore, upon surface separation, adhesion occurs between the surfaces as a result of molecular bridging and chain disentanglement. This behavior is in contrast to that of HA, which does not adsorb appreciably on either of the model surfaces and does not develop significant repulsive interactions. Adhesive forces, particularly between the hydrophobic surfaces, are large and not appreciably affected by HA. For a mixture of lubricin and HA, we observed slightly larger adsorptions and repulsions than those found for lubricin alone. Our experiments suggest that this interaction depends on unspecific physical rather than chemical interactions between lubricin and HA. We

  16. Streptococcal hyaluronic acid: proposed mechanisms of degradation and loss of synthesis during stationary phase.

    OpenAIRE

    Van De Rijn, I

    1983-01-01

    Streptococcal hyaluronic acid was found to distribute into two discrete sizes. Cellular hyaluronic acid from strain D181 had an average molecular weight of 10 X 10(6), whereas the average molecular weight of extracellular hyaluronic acid from the same strain was 2 X 10(6). Cellular streptococcal hyaluronic acid was purified to homogeneity. Proteases were unable to cleave the purified cellular polymer, indicating that a peptide was not involved in cross-linking five extracellular hyaluronate p...

  17. Fatty-acid metabolism is involved in stress-resistance mechanisms of Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Horikawa, Makoto; Sakamoto, Kazuichi

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acids are the major components of the phospholipid bilayer and are involved in several functions of cell membrane. We previously reported that fatty-acid metabolism is involved in the regulation of DAF-2/insulin signal in Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we investigate the role of fatty-acid metabolism in stress resistance with respect to daf-16 in nematode. We found that fatty-acid metabolism regulates heat, osmotic, and oxidative-stress resistance in C. elegans. RNA interference...

  18. Effect of amino acid dopants on the spectral, optical, mechanical and thermal properties of potassium acid phthalate crystals for possible optoelectronic and frequency doubling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, J. Thomas Joseph; Gnanaraj, J. Martin Sam; Dhavud, S. Shek; Ekadevasena, S.

    2015-09-01

    Undoped and amino acid (L-Arginine and L-Valine) doped KAP crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The changes in the structural, spectral, optical, mechanical and thermal properties were observed. The sharp prominent peaks in the indexed powder XRD pattern confirms the crystalline nature of the sample. Optical studies reveal that the crystal is transparent in the entire visible light region. Thermal stability was checked by TG/DTA analysis. The mechanical stability was evaluated from Vicker's microhardness test. The SHG efficiency for the title materials was tested with different particle sizes by the Kurtz and Perry powder method, which established the existence of phase matching.

  19. Depletion of Retinoic Acid Receptors Initiates a Novel Positive Feedback Mechanism that Promotes Teratogenic Increases in Retinoic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico D'Aniello; Rydeen, Ariel B.; Jane L Anderson; Amrita Mandal; Waxman, Joshua S.

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary Retinoic acid (RA) is the most active metabolic product of Vitamin A. Appropriate levels of RA are required for proper embryonic development and tissue maintenance in all vertebrates. Inappropriate levels of RA in human embryos can cause congenital defects that affect many organs, including the heart and limbs, and lead to numerous types of cancers. Understanding how animals maintain appropriate RA levels and the consequences of inappropriate RA signaling will therefore provide...

  20. Study on the Mechanism of Interaction between Phthalate Acid Esters and Bovine Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhenxing; Zhao, Jing; You, Hong; Wang, Mingjing

    2016-08-01

    Phthalate acid esters (PAEs) are widely used in plastic products as a series of chemical softeners. However, PAEs, which now exist in many environmental media such as the atmosphere, water, and soil, have been shown to be environmental endocrine disruptors. Hemoglobin is a functional protein that carries oxygen in the red blood cells of animals. This study aims at revealing the interactions between bovine hemoglobin (BHb) and PAEs using spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results indicate that the selected representative PAEs-dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), and dibutyl phthalate (DBP)-can interact with BHb to form BHb-PAE complexes with one binding site, mainly relying on hydrophobic forces, with the affinity order DMP > DEP > DBP, opposite to the order of side-chain length. The binding of PAEs can cause conformational and micro-environmental changes in BHb, which may affect the physiological functions of Hb. Furthermore, molecular docking was applied to define the specific binding sites, the results of which show that all the three PAEs can bind into the central cavity of BHb. The study contributes to expound the toxic mechanism of PAEs in vivo from the point of hematological toxicology. PMID:27379662

  1. Morphology, thermal, mechanical, and barrier properties of graphene oxide/poly(lactic acid) nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Woo; Choi, Hyun Muk [Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To improve the physical and gas barrier properties of biodegradable poly(lactic acid) (PLA) film, two graphene nanosheets of highly functionalized graphene oxide (0.3 wt% to 0.7 wt%) and low-functionalized graphene oxide (0.5 wt%) were incorporated into PLA resin via solution blending method. Subsequently, we investigated the effects of material parameters such as loading level and degree of functionalization for the graphene nanosheets on the morphology and properties of the resultant nanocomposites. The highly functionalized graphene oxide (GO) caused more exfoliation and homogeneous dispersion in PLA matrix as well as more sustainable suspensions in THF, compared to low-functionalized graphene oxide (LFGO). When loaded with GO from 0.3 wt% to 0.7 wt%, the glass transition temperature, degree of crystallinity, tensile strength and modulus increased steadily. The GO gave rise to more pronounced effect in the thermal and mechanical reinforcement, relative to LFGO. In addition, the preparation of fairly transparent PLA-based nanocomposite film with noticeably improved barrier performance achieved only when incorporated with GO up to 0.7wt%. As a result, GO may be more compatible with hydrophilic PLA resin, compared to LFGO, resulting in more prominent enhancement of nanocomposites properties.

  2. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten

    2009-12-03

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved ?-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanical properties of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-Co-itaconic acid) hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that polymers of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) show lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior in water and its gels have a volume phase transition at about 34 degree centigree in water. In this study, we reported the polymerization of NIPA in the presence of N,N methylenebisacrylamide (BIS). Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-itaconic acid) hydrogels were obtained by swelling the resultant solid xerogels to equilibrium in water. The effects of monomer composition and concentration of added cross-linking agent on the swelling behavior and mechanical properties of these hydrogels at 22 and 37 degree centigree were investigated, the latter involving measurements of shear in a DMTA system. The storage moduli at 22 degree centigree lay within the range 9.08-5.08 KPa. At a fixed BIS concentration, an increase from 22 to 37 degree centigree resulted in an increase in the shear moduli and the effective crosslinking density (ve) and a decrease in the interaction parameter hydrogel/water, χ. (Author) 6 refs

  4. Mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets for folic acid in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, An L; Vrints, Christiaan J; Claeys, Marc J; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Champion, Hunter C; Kass, David A

    2008-05-01

    Folic acid (FA) is a member of the B-vitamin family with cardiovascular roles in homocysteine regulation and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. Its interaction with eNOS is thought to be due to the enhancement of tetrahydrobiopterin bioavailability, helping maintain eNOS in its coupled state to favor the generation of nitric oxide rather than oxygen free radicals. FA also plays a role in the prevention of several cardiac and noncardiac malformations, has potent direct antioxidant and antithrombotic effects, and can interfere with the production of the endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor. These multiple mechanisms of action have led to studies regarding the therapeutic potential of FA in cardiovascular disease. To date, studies have demonstrated that FA ameliorates endothelial dysfunction and nitrate tolerance and can improve pathological features of atherosclerosis. These effects appear to be homocysteine independent but rather related to their role in eNOS function. Given the growing evidence that nitric oxide synthase uncoupling plays a major role in many cardiovascular disorders, the potential of exogenous FA as an inexpensive and safe oral therapy is intriguing and is stimulating ongoing investigations.

  5. Mechanism of Growth Inhibition of Prostate Cancer Xenografts by Valproic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Sidana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproic Acid (VPA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, has been demonstrated to cause a marked decrease in proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa cells in vitro and a significant reduction in tumor volume in vivo. The goal of this study is to better understand the VPA-induced growth inhibition in vivo, by studying expression of various markers in PCa xenografts. Methods. For in vitro experiments, PCa cells were treated with 0, 0.6, and 1.2 mM VPA for 14 days. For in vivo models, experimental animals received 0.4% VPA in drinking water for 35 days. Tissue microarray was generated using cell pellets and excised xenografts. Results. VPA treatment causes cell cycle arrest in PCa cells in vivo, as determined by increase in p21 and p27 and decrease in cyclin D1 expression. Increased expression of cytokeratin18 was also seen in xenografts. LNCaP xenografts in treated animals had reduced androgen receptor (AR expression. While decreased proliferation was found in vitro, increase in apoptosis was found to be the reason for decreased tumor growth in vivo. Also, an anti-angiogenic effect was observed after VPA treatment. Conclusion. VPA inhibits tumor growth by multiple mechanisms including cell cycle arrest, induction of differentiation, and inhibition of growth of tumor vasculature.

  6. Mechanical, Thermal and Morphological Properties of Poly(lactic acid/Epoxidized Palm Olein Blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazimah Abu Hassan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly(lactic acid (PLA is known to be a useful material in substituting the conventional petroleum-based polymer used in packaging, due to its biodegradability and high mechanical strength. Despite the excellent properties of PLA, low flexibility has limited the application of this material. Thus, epoxidized palm olein (EPO was incorporated into PLA at different loadings (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wt% through the melt blending technique and the product was characterized. The addition of EPO resulted in a decrease in glass transition temperature and an increase of elongation-at-break, which indicates an increase in the PLA chain mobility. PLA/EPO blends also exhibited higher thermal stability than neat PLA. Further, the PLA/1 wt% EPO blend showed enhancement in the tensile, flexural and impact properties. This is due to improved interaction in the blend producing good compatible morphologies, which can be revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM analysis. Therefore, PLA can be efficiently plasticized by EPO and the feasibility of its use as flexible film for food packaging should be considered.

  7. Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of poly(lactic acid)/epoxidized palm olein blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverajah, V S Giita; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Zainuddin, Norhazlin; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Hassan, Hazimah Abu

    2012-10-08

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is known to be a useful material in substituting the conventional petroleum-based polymer used in packaging, due to its biodegradability and high mechanical strength. Despite the excellent properties of PLA, low flexibility has limited the application of this material. Thus, epoxidized palm olein (EPO) was incorporated into PLA at different loadings (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wt%) through the melt blending technique and the product was characterized. The addition of EPO resulted in a decrease in glass transition temperature and an increase of elongation-at-break, which indicates an increase in the PLA chain mobility. PLA/EPO blends also exhibited higher thermal stability than neat PLA. Further, the PLA/1 wt% EPO blend showed enhancement in the tensile, flexural and impact properties. This is due to improved interaction in the blend producing good compatible morphologies, which can be revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis. Therefore, PLA can be efficiently plasticized by EPO and the feasibility of its use as flexible film for food packaging should be considered.

  8. Ab initio Mechanism Study on the Reaction of Chlorine Atom with Formic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于海涛; 付宏刚; 等

    2003-01-01

    The potential energy surface(PES) for the reaction of Cl atom with HCOOH is predicted using ab initio molecular orbital calculation methods at UQCIDS(T,full)6-311++G(3df,2p)//UMP2(full)/6-311+G(d,P) level of theory with zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) correction.The calculated results show that the reaction mechanism of Cl atom with formic acid is a C-site hydrogen abstraction reaction from cis-HOC(H)O molecule by Cl atom with a 3.73kJ/mol reaction barrier height,leading to the formation of cis-HOCO radical which will reacts with Cl atom or other molecules in such a reaction system.Because the reaction barrier height of O-site hydrogen abstraction reaction from cis-HOC(H)O molecule by Cl atom which leads to the formation of HCO2 radical is 67.95kJ/mol,it is a secondary reaction channel in experiment,This is in good agreement with the prediction based on the previous experiments.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid Sheet Reinforced with Microfibrillated Cellulose from Corn Cobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deejam Prapatsorn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cellulose was extracted from corn cobs by successive hot NaOH solution and followed by H2O2 bleaching. XRD pattern show characteristic peak of Cellulose I. Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC was successfully prepared by dissolving the extracted cellulose in NaOH/urea solution, shearing in a homogenizer and finally by freezing and thawing. To improve strength of MFC, MFC was physically crosslinked using PVA by freezing and thawing. The crosslinked MFC/PVA was added to poly(lactic acid (PLA to improve its mechanical properties. The non-crosslinked MFC/PVA was also prepared by only stirring the solution without freezing and thawing. MFC/PVA reinforced PLA films with various ratios of PLA and MFC/PVA at100:0, 99:1, 97:3 and 95:5were prepared through a solution casting method. Tensile strength and elongation at breakof PLA films increased with the addition of physically crosslinked MFC/PVA at 1%wt, whereas, the addition of non-crosslinked MFC/PVA decreased elongation at break. Crosslinking of MFC/PVA can improve tensile strength of PLA.It can render better tensile strength than that of non-crosslinked MFC/PVA. However, when MFC/PVA contents increase, tensile strength of PLA fims reinforced with non-crosslinked and crosslinked MFC/PVA decreased. Morphology of fracture surfaces reveals good dispersion and adhesion between 1% crosslinked MFC/PVA and PLA matrix.

  10. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, Karsten; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Xu, Yong; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Park, Sang-Youl; Weiner, Joshua J; Fujii, Hiroaki; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Kovach, Amanda; Li, Jun; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang; Peterson, Francis C; Jensen, Davin R; Yong, Eu-Leong; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H Eric; (NU Sinapore); (Van Andel); (MCW); (UCR); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-01-12

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved β-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling.

  11. Competing mechanisms for perfluoroalkyl acid accumulation in plants revealed using an Arabidopsis model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Claudia E; LeFevre, Gregory H; Timofte, Anca E; Hussain, Fatima A; Sattely, Elizabeth S; Luthy, Richard G

    2016-05-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) bioaccumulate in plants, presenting a human exposure route if present in irrigation water. Curiously, accumulation of PFAAs in plant tissues is greatest for both the short-chain and long-chain PFAAs, generating a U-shaped relationship with chain length. In the present study, the authors decouple competing mechanisms of PFAA accumulation using a hydroponic model plant system (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to a suite of 10 PFAAs to determine uptake, depuration, and translocation kinetics. Rapid saturation of root concentrations occurred for all PFAAs except perfluorobutanoate, the least-sorptive (shortest-chain) PFAA. Shoot concentrations increased continuously, indicating that PFAAs are efficiently transported and accumulate in shoots. Tissue concentrations of PFAAs during depuration rapidly declined in roots but remained constant in shoots, demonstrating irreversibility of the translocation process. Root and shoot concentration factors followed the U-shaped trend with perfluoroalkyl chain length; however, when normalized to dead-tissue sorption, this relationship linearized. The authors therefore introduce a novel term, the "sorption normalized concentration factor," to describe PFAA accumulation in plants; because of their hydrophobicity, sorption is the determining factor for long-chain PFAAs, whereas the shortest-chain PFAAs are most effectively transported in the plant. The present study provides a mechanistic explanation for previously unexplained PFAA accumulation trends in plants and suggests that shorter-chained PFAAs may bioaccumulate more readily in edible portions. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1138-1147. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26383989

  12. Photolytic and photocatalytic degradation of tetracycline: Effect of humic acid on degradation kinetics and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-11-15

    The widespread occurrence of tetracycline (TC) in the aquatic environment poses a potential risk to aquatic ecosystem and human health. In this study, elimination of TC by photolysis and TiO2 photocatalysis were investigated by using mercury-free UVA-LED as an alternative light source. Particular emphasis was given to the effect of humic acid (HA) on the reaction kinetics and mechanisms of TC removal. Photolytic degradation of TC was slightly enhanced by HA due to its photosensitization effect, as evidenced by the increased steady-state concentrations of OH. The most abundant transformation product of TC, which was formed by the attack of OH radical, was enhanced during photolytic degradation. During photocatalytic experiments, HA dramatically inhibited TC loss due to the surface deactivation of TiO2 and OH quenching. The steady-state concentration of OH was dramatically decreased in the presence of HA. Identification of transformation products showed that HA could inhibit the oxidation pathways initiated by OH during photocatalysis of TC. These findings provide further insights into the assessment of photolysis and photocatalysis for antibiotics elimination in natural waters where HA exists ubiquitously. PMID:27420385

  13. Cholesterol-lowering effects and mechanisms in view of bile acid pathway of resveratrol and resveratrol-glucuronides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resveratrol (Res) was previously reported to be capable of lowering plasma TC and LDL-C. The mechanism behind Res is not clearly understood, although it is presumed to have an effect on bile acid metabolism in the liver: a significant way in eliminating cholesterol from the body. As one of the major...

  14. Acid dissociation mechanisms of Si(OH)(4) and Al(H2O)(6)(3+) in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Liu; X. Lu; E.J. Meijer; R. Wang; H. Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Silicic acid and the hexa-aqua of Al3+ are fundamental model aqueous species of chemical importance in nature. In order to investigate their hydroxyl dissociation mechanisms, Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations were carried out, which allow treating the solutes and solvents on the s

  15. JA, a new type of polyunsaturated fatty acid isolated from Juglans mandshurica Maxim, limits the survival and induces apoptosis of heptocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiu-Li; Lin, Hua; Zhao, Wei; Hou, Ya-Qin; Bao, Yong-Li; Song, Zhen-Bo; Sun, Lu-Guo; Tian, Shang-Yi; Liu, Biao; Li, Yu-Xin

    2016-03-01

    Juglans mandshurica Maxim (Juglandaceae) is a famous folk medicine for cancer treatment and some natural compounds isolated from it have been studied extensively. Previously we isolated a type of ω-9 polyunsaturated fatty acid (JA) from the bark of J. mandshurica, however little is known about its activity and the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we studied anti-tumor activity of JA on several human cancer cell lines. Results showed that JA is cytotoxic to HepG2, MDA-MB-231, SGC-7901, A549 and Huh7 cells at a concentration exerting minimal toxic effects on L02 cells. The selective toxicity of JA was better than other classical anti-cancer drugs. Further investigation indicated that JA could induce cell apoptosis, characterized by chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and activation of the apoptosis-associated proteins such as Caspase-3 and PARP-1. Moreover, we investigated the cellular apoptosis pathway involved in the apoptosis process in HepG2 cells. We found that proteins involved in mitochondrion (cleaved-Caspase-9, Apaf-1, HtrA2/Omi, Bax, and Mitochondrial Bax) and endocytoplasmic reticulum (XBP-1s, GRP78, cleaved-Caspase-7 and cleaved-Caspase-12) apoptotic pathways were up-regulated when cells were treated by JA. In addition, a morphological change in the mitochondrion was detected. Furthermore, we found that JA could inhibit DNA synthesis and induce G2/M cell cycle arrest. The expression of G2-to-M transition related proteins, such as CyclinB1 and phosphorylated-CDK1, were reduced. In contrast, the G2-to-M inhibitor p21 was increased in JA-treated cells. Overall, our results suggest that JA can induce mitochondrion- and endocytoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis, and G2/M phase arrest in HepG2 cells, making it a promising therapeutic agent against hepatoma.

  16. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid is an important intermediate in aqueous methylglyoxal oxidation and a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. Altieri et al. (2008 proposed that acetic acid was the precursor of oligoesters observed in methylglyoxal oxidation. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid at concentrations relevant to atmospheric waters (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radical. Products were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, and IC-ESI-MS. The formation of glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids were observed. In contrast to methylglyoxal oxidation, succinic acid and oligomers were not detected. Using results from these and methylglyoxal + OH radical experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  17. Survival of Salmonella enterica in poultry feed is strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, Ana; Pendleton, Sean; Zhang, Nan; Chen, Wei; Critzer, Faith; Hanning, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Feed components have low water activity, making bacterial survival difficult. The mechanisms of Salmonella survival in feed and subsequent colonization of poultry are unknown. The purpose of this research was to compare the ability of Salmonella serovars and strains to survive in broiler feed and to evaluate molecular mechanisms associated with survival and colonization by measuring the expression of genes associated with colonization (hilA, invA) and survival via fatty acid synthesis (cfa, fabA, fabB, fabD). Feed was inoculated with 1 of 15 strains of Salmonella enterica consisting of 11 serovars (Typhimurium, Enteriditis, Kentucky, Seftenburg, Heidelberg, Mbandanka, Newport, Bairely, Javiana, Montevideo, and Infantis). To inoculate feed, cultures were suspended in PBS and survival was evaluated by plating samples onto XLT4 agar plates at specific time points (0 h, 4 h, 8 h, 24 h, 4 d, and 7 d). To evaluate gene expression, RNA was extracted from the samples at the specific time points (0, 4, 8, and 24 h) and gene expression measured with real-time PCR. The largest reduction in Salmonella occurred at the first and third sampling time points (4 h and 4 d) with the average reductions being 1.9 and 1.6 log cfu per g, respectively. For the remaining time points (8 h, 24 h, and 7 d), the average reduction was less than 1 log cfu per g (0.6, 0.4, and 0.6, respectively). Most strains upregulated cfa (cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis) within 8 h, which would modify the fluidity of the cell wall to aid in survival. There was a weak negative correlation between survival and virulence gene expression indicating downregulation to focus energy on other gene expression efforts such as survival-related genes. These data indicate the ability of strains to survive over time in poultry feed was strain dependent and that upregulation of cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis and downregulation of virulence genes were associated with a response to desiccation stress.

  18. The bioactive compounds alpha-chaconine and gallic acid in potato extracts decrease survival and induce apoptosis in LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddivari, Lavanya; Vanamala, Jairam; Safe, Stephen H; Miller, J Creighton

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported that colored potato extracts and an anthocyanin rich fraction suppressed lymph-node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP) and prostate cancer-3 (PC-3) prostate cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, gallic acid, catechin, malvidin, and glycoalkaloids (alpha-chaconine and solanine) have now been identified as the major bioactive components of potato, and their effects on LNCaP and PC-3 cell proliferation and apoptosis have been investigated. alpha-chaconine (5 microg/ml) and gallic acid (15 microg/ml) exhibited potent antiproliferative properties and increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 levels in both cell lines. Both alpha-chaconine and gallic acid induced poly [adenosine diphosphate (ADP)] ribose polymerase cleavage and caspase-dependent apoptosis in LNCaP cells; however, caspase-independent apoptosis through nuclear translocation of endonuclease G was observed in both LNCaP and PC-3 cells. alpha-chaconine and gallic acid activated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), and this response played a major role in induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis in LNCaP cells; whereas modulation of JNK and mitogen-activated protein kinase did not affect alpha-chaconine- and gallic acid-induced caspase-independent apoptosis. These results suggest that apoptosis induced by whole potato extracts in prostate cancer cell lines may be in part due to alpha-chaconine and gallic acid.

  19. Optimization of the mechanical performance of bacterial cellulose/poly(L-lactic) acid composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Franck; Nogi, Masaya; Yano, Hiroyuki; Abdulsalami, Kovo; Holmes, Stuart M; Sakakini, Bahij H; Eichhorn, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the interface between nanofibers and polymer resins in composite materials is challenging because of the complexity of interactions that may occur between fibers and between the matrix and the fibers. The ability to select the most efficient amount of reinforcement for stress transfer, making a saving on both cost and weight, is also a key part of composite design. The use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate micromechanical properties of laminated bacterial cellulose (BC)/poly(l-lactic) acid (PLLA) resin composites is reported for the first time as a means for understanding the fundamental stress-transfer processes in these composites, but also as a tool to select appropriate processing and volume fraction of the reinforcing fibers. Two forms of BC networks are investigated, namely, one cultured for 3 days and another for 6 days. The mechanical properties of the latter were found to be higher than the former in terms of Young's modulus, stress at failure, and work of fracture. However, their specific Young's moduli (divided by density) were found to be similar. Young's modulus and stress at failure of transparent predominantly amorphous PLLA films were found to increase by 100 and 315%, respectively, for an 18% volume fraction of BC fibers. BC networks cultured for 3 days were shown to exhibit enhanced interaction with PLLA because of their higher total surface area compared, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, to the material cultured for 6 days. This enhanced interaction is confirmed by using the Raman spectroscopic approach, whereby larger band shift rates, of a peak initially located at 1095 cm(-1), with respect to both strain and stress, are observed, which is a quantitative measure of enhanced stress transfer. Thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry) and electron microscopy imaging (scanning electron microscopy) of the samples also confirms the enhanced coupling between the resin and the BC networks cultured for 3 days

  20. Mechanical and moisture barrier properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and halloysite nanotubes reinforced polylactic acid (PLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberton, J.; Martelli, S. M.; Fakhouri, F. M.; Soldi, V.

    2014-08-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) has been larger used in biomedical field due to its low toxicity and biodegradability. The aim of this study was to produce PLLA nanocomposites, by melt extrusion, containing Halloysite nanotubes (HNT) and/or titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. Immediately after drying, PLLA was mechanically homogenized with the nanofillers and then melt blended using a single screw extruder (L/D = 30) at a speed of 110 rpm, with three heating zones in which the following temperatures were maintained: 150, 150 and 160°C (AX Plasticos model AX14 LD30). The film samples were obtained by compression molding in a press with a temperature profile of 235 ± 5°C for 2.5 min, after pressing, films were cooled up to room temperature. The mechanical tests were performed according to ASTM D882-09 and the water vapor permeability (WVP) was measured according to ASTM E-96, in triplicate. The tensile properties indicated that the modulus was improved with increased TiO2 content up to 1g/100g PLLA. The Young's modulus (YM) of the PLA was increased from 3047 MPa to 3222 MPa with the addition of 1g TiO2/100g PLLA. The tensile strength (TS) of films increases with the TiO2 content. In both cases, the YM and TS are achieved at the 1% content of TiO2 and is due to the reinforcing effect of nanoparticles. Pristine PLA showed a strain at break (SB) of 3.56%, while the SB of nanocomposites were significant lower, for instance the SB of composite containing 7.5 g HNT/100g PLLA was around 1.90 %. The WVP of samples was increased by increasing the nano filler content. It should be expected that an increase of nanofiller content would decrease the mass transfer of water molecules throughout the samples due to the increase in the way water molecules will have to cross to permeate the material. However, this was not observed. Therefore, this result can be explained considering the molecular structure of both fillers, which contain several hydroxyl groups in the surface, making the

  1. Extraction Mechanism of La3+ from Hydrochloric Acid Solution Using Cyanex 302

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乌东北; 牛春吉; 李德谦

    2004-01-01

    The solvent extraction of La3+ from hydrochloric acid solutions was investigated using bis(2, 4, 4-trimethylpentyl) monothiophosphinic acid(Cyanex 302, HL) as an extractant. The effect of equilibrium of aqueous acidity on extraction of La3+ using Cyanex 302 in different diluents was discussed. The effects of extractant concentration and chloride ion on the extraction reaction were also studied. Stoichiometry of the extraction reactions and the nature of metal complexes formed were determined using slope analysis technique and IR measurement.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by benzyltrimethylammonium dichloroiodate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Poonam Gupta; Seema Kothari

    2001-04-01

    The oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by benzyltrimethylammonium dichloroiodate (BTMACI), in the presence of zinc chloride, leads to the formation of carbon dioxide. The reaction is first order with respect to BTMACI, zinc chloride and organic acid. Oxidation of deuteriated formic acid indicates the presence of a kinetic isotope effect. Addition of benzyltrimethylammonium chloride enhances the rate. It is proposed that the reactive oxidizing species is [(PhCH2Me3N)+ (IZn2Cl6)−]. Suitablemechanisms have been proposed.

  3. Possible mechanism for species difference on the toxicity of pivalic acid between dogs and rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a high dose toxicity study of pivalic acid (PA), PA caused skeletal muscle disorder in dog, and a significant increase of pivaloyl carnitine (PC) was observed in canine muscle, but not in rat muscle. In order to understand species difference of the toxicity of PA, we compared the in vitro metabolism of PA among dog, rat and rabbit, especially focussing on the carnitine conjugate. Canine muscle showed low, but significant carnitine conjugating activity, while that of rat was negligible. Canine kidney mitochondria had significant activity in the pivaloyl CoA synthesis (7 nmol/mg protein/h), but muscle mitochondria showed only trace activity. Both kidney and muscle mitochondria displayed similar carnitine acyltransferase activity (2-3 nmol/mg protein/h) towards pivaloyl CoA. On the other hand, with respect to the activity of carnitine acyltransferase in the reverse direction using PC as substrate, canine muscle mitochondria showed higher activity than that of kidney mitochondria. This means that PC is not the final stable metabolite, but is converted easily to pivaloyl CoA in canine muscle. These results suggest one of the possible mechanisms for canine selective muscle disorder to be as follows. Only canine muscle can metabolize PA to its carnitine conjugate slowly, but significantly. In canine muscle, PC is not the final stable metabolite; it is easily converted to pivaloyl CoA. As carnitine conjugation is thought to be the only detoxification metabolic route in canine muscle, under certain circumstances such as carnitine deficiency, the risk of exposure with toxic pivaloyl CoA might increase and the CoASH pool in canine muscle might be exhausted, resulting in toxicity in canine muscle

  4. Influence of Simulated Acid Rain Corrosion on the Uniaxial Tensile Mechanical Properties of Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-zi Zhang; Ying-fang Fan; Hong-nan Li

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study on the uniaxial tensile property of concrete exposed to the acid rain environment was carried out. Acid rain with pH level of 1.0 was deposed by the mixture of sulfate and nitric acid solution in the laboratory. Dumbbell-shaped concrete specimens were immersed in the simulated acid rain completely. After being exposed to the deposed mixture for a certain period, uniaxial tensile test was performed on the concrete specimens. The results indicate that elastic modulus, tens...

  5. Mechanisms of Radionuclide-Hyroxycarboxylic Acid Interactions for Decontamination of Metallic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.J. Francis; C.J. Dodge; J.B. Gillow; G.P. Halada; C.R. Clayton

    2002-04-24

    Is this EMSP program we investigated the key fundamental issues involved in the use of simple and safe methods for the removal of radioactive contamination from equipment and facilities using hydroxycarboxylic acids. Specifically, we investigate (i) the association of uranium with various iron oxides commonly formed on corroding plain carbon steel surfaces, (ii) the association of uranium with corroding metal coupons under a variety of conditions, and (iii) the decontamination of the uranium contaminated metal coupons by citric acid or citric acid formulations containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

  6. The Crystal Structure of the Adenylation Enzyme VinN Reveals a Unique β-Amino Acid Recognition Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp230 residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  7. The crystal structure of the adenylation enzyme VinN reveals a unique β-amino acid recognition mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-11-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp(230) residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  8. Fatty acid competition as a mechanism by which Enterobacter cloacae suppresses Pythium ultimum sporangium germination and damping-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, K; Nelson, E B

    2000-12-01

    Interactions between plant-associated microorganisms play important roles in suppressing plant diseases and enhancing plant growth and development. While competition between plant-associated bacteria and plant pathogens has long been thought to be an important means of suppressing plant diseases microbiologically, unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism has been lacking. We present evidence here that competition for plant-derived unsaturated long-chain fatty acids between the biological control bacterium Enterobacter cloacae and the seed-rotting oomycete, Pythium ultimum, results in disease suppression. Since fatty acids from seeds and roots are required to elicit germination responses of P. ultimum, we generated mutants of E. cloacae to evaluate the role of E. cloacae fatty acid metabolism on the suppression of Pythium sporangium germination and subsequent plant infection. Two mutants of E. cloacae EcCT-501R3, Ec31 (fadB) and EcL1 (fadL), were reduced in beta-oxidation and fatty acid uptake, respectively. Both strains failed to metabolize linoleic acid, to inactivate the germination-stimulating activity of cottonseed exudate and linoleic acid, and to suppress Pythium seed rot in cotton seedling bioassays. Subclones containing fadBA or fadL complemented each of these phenotypes in Ec31 and EcL1, respectively. These data provide strong evidence for a competitive exclusion mechanism for the biological control of P. ultimum-incited seed infections by E. cloacae where E. cloacae prevents the germination of P. ultimum sporangia by the efficient metabolism of fatty acid components of seed exudate and thus prevents seed infections. PMID:11097912

  9. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-01-01

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research. PMID:27399657

  10. Biological effects of propionic acid in humans; metabolism, potential applications and underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Lahham, Sa'ad H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Roelofsen, Han; Vonk, Roel J.; Venema, Koen

    2010-01-01

    Undigested food is fermented in the colon by the microbiota and gives rise to various microbial metabolites. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), including acetic, propionic and butyric acid, are the principal metabolites produced However, most of the literature focuses on butyrate and to a lesser extent

  11. Biological effects of propionic acid in humans; metabolism, potential applications and underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Lahham, S.H.; Peppelenbosch, M.P.; Roelofsen, H.; Vonk, R.J.; Venema, K.

    2010-01-01

    Undigested food is fermented in the colon by the microbiota and gives rise to various microbial metabolites. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), including acetic, propionic and butyric acid, are the principal metabolites produced. However, most of the literature focuses on butyrate and to a lesser exten

  12. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction between Chromium(III and 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic Acid in Weak Acidic Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athinoula L. Petrou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction between chromium(III and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA takes place in at least three stages, involving various intermediates. The ligand (2,3-DHBA-to-chromium(III ratio in the final product of the reaction is 1 : 1. The first stage is suggested to be the reaction of [Cr(H2O5(OH]2+ with the ligand in weak acidic aqueous solutions that follows an Id mechanism. The second and third stages do not depend on the concentrations of chromium(III, and their activation parameters are ΔH≠=61.2±3.1 kJmol−1, ΔS≠=−91.1±11.0 JK−1mol−1, ΔH≠=124.5±8.7 kJmol−1, and ΔS≠=95.1±29.0 JK−1mol−1. These two stages are proposed to proceed via associative mechanisms. The positive value of ΔS≠ can be explained by the opening of a four-membered ring (positive entropy change and the breaking of a hydrogen bond (positive entropy change at the associative step of the replacement of the carboxyl group by the hydroxyl group at the chromium(III center (negative entropy change in associative mechanisms. The reactions are accompanied by proton release, as shown by the pH decrease.

  13. Comparison of sodium hypochlorite-based foam and peroxyacetic acid-based fog sanitizing procedures in a salmon smokehouse: Survival of the general microflora and Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Gardshodn, K.; Gram, Lone;

    2003-01-01

    sample, and a total of 288 bacterial strains were randomly isolated and tentatively identified to genus level by physiological and biochemical tests. The microflora was dominated by Neisseriaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and lactic acid bacteria during production. Foam sanitization caused a change...

  14. Reactions of clofibric acid with oxidative and reductive radicals—Products, mechanisms, efficiency and toxic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of clofibric acid induced by hydroxyl radical, hydrated electron and O2−∙/HO2∙ reactive species was studied in aqueous solutions. Clofibric acid was decomposed more effectively by hydroxyl radical than by hydrated electron or O2−∙/HO2∙. Various hydroxylated, dechlorinated and fragmentation products have been identified and quantified. A new LC–MS method was developed based on 18O isotope labeling to follow the formation of hydroxylated derivatives of clofibric acid. Possible degradation pathways have been proposed. The overall degradation was monitored by determination of sum parameters like COD, TOC and AOX. It was found that the organic chlorine degrades very effectively prior to complete mineralization. After the treatment no toxic effect was found according to Vibrio fischeri tests. However, at early stages some of the reaction products were more harmful than clofibric acid. - Highlights: • Clofibric acid is effectively degraded by OH radical. • Main primary and secondary products are hydroxylated and dihydroxylated phenyl type derivatives of clofibric acid. • In air saturated aqueous solutions O2 plays an important role in decomposition of the aromatic structure. • A new LC–MS method with 18O-labeling was developed. • Early stage reaction products are more toxic to bacteria Vibrio fischeri than clofibric acid

  15. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-07-25

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair.

  16. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve A mechanical analysis*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Yu; Changfu Zhao; Peng Li; Guangyao Liu; Min Luo

    2013-01-01

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study col ected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, fol owing which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) con-duit-repaired sciatic nerve fol owing tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Fol owing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogen-ous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair.

  17. Escherichia coli K-12 survives anaerobic exposure at pH 2 without RpoS, Gad, or hydrogenases, but shows sensitivity to autoclaved broth products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Riggins

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria survive exposure to extreme acid (pH 2 or lower in gastric fluid. Aerated cultures survive via regulons expressing glutamate decarboxylase (Gad, activated by RpoS, cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (Cfa and others. But extreme-acid survival is rarely tested under low oxygen, a condition found in the stomach and the intestinal tract. We observed survival of E. coli K-12 W3110 at pH 1.2-pH 2.0, conducting all manipulations (overnight culture at pH 5.5, extreme-acid exposure, dilution and plating in a glove box excluding oxygen (10% H2, 5% CO2, balance N2. With dissolved O2 concentrations maintained below 6 µM, survival at pH 2 required Cfa but did not require GadC, RpoS, or hydrogenases. Extreme-acid survival in broth (containing tryptone and yeast extract was diminished in media that had been autoclaved compared to media that had been filtered. The effect of autoclaved media on extreme-acid survival was most pronounced when oxygen was excluded. Exposure to H2O2 during extreme-acid treatment increased the death rate slightly for W3110 and to a greater extent for the rpoS deletion strain. Survival at pH 2 was increased in strains lacking the anaerobic regulator fnr. During anaerobic growth at pH 5.5, strains deleted for fnr showed enhanced transcription of acid-survival genes gadB, cfa, and hdeA, as well as catalase (katE. We show that E. coli cultured under oxygen exclusion (<6 µM O2 requires mechanisms different from those of aerated cultures. Extreme acid survival is more sensitive to autoclave products under oxygen exclusion.

  18. Mechanism of specific influence of L-Glutamic acid on the shape of L-Valine crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiura, Hiromu; Nagano, Hiroshi; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2013-01-01

    The specific interaction between L-valine (L-Val) and L-glutamic acid (L-Glu) in the process of evaporative crystallization from an aqueous solution has been investigated. It was found that only 2.0% (wt/wt) of L-Glu against the total amount of L-Val was required to induce significant agglomeration of L-Val. Interestingly, the agglomeration was only induced under acidic conditions, suggesting that the electrostatic interaction was an effective factor for the agglomeration process. As well as the electrostatic interaction, the length of the amino acid side chain was identified as another important factor. In addition, we confirmed that the incorporation rate of L-Glu into L-Val crystals was different during the nucleation and crystal growth stages. Based on these results, a mechanism has been proposed for the interaction of L-Glu and L-Val during the agglomeration process.

  19. Vortex flux pinning mechanism and enhancement of in-field Jc in succinic acid doped MgB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, S. R.; Darini, M.; Wang, X. L.; Hossain, M. S. A.; Dou, S. X.

    2013-08-01

    The field dependence of the resistivity and the critical current density, Jc(B), of MgB2 doped with 10 wt% wet and dry succinic acid have been investigated by magnetic measurements. The dry succinic acid significantly enhanced the upper critical field, the irreversibility field, and the Jc(B) compared to the wet succinic acid doped MgB2 and the pure MgB2. The field dependence of Jc(B) was analyzed within the collective pinning model. The observed temperature dependence of the crossover field, Bsb(T), from the single vortex to the small vortex bundle pinning regime shows that flux pinning arising from variation in the critical temperature, δTc, is the dominant mechanism for the wet sample over the whole studied temperature range, while there is a competition between δTc pinning and the pinning from variation in the mean free path, δl, for the dry sample.

  20. Mechanism and Removal Efficiency of C.I. Acid Blake 1 by Pumice Stone Adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Norouzi, M; M. Zarrabi; M Noori Sepehr; M.R Samarghandi; F Amraie

    2011-01-01

    "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Treatment of colored wastewater is one of the important challenges of environmental engineers. Adsorption process is a key option for removal of organic matter from wastewater. The aim of present work was to investigate pumice stone as an adsorbent for removal of Acid Black 1 from aqueous solution."nMaterials and Methods: Removal of Acid Black 1 by pumice stone was investigated. Acid Hyrdo Chloric(HCL) 1 N was used to increse adsorbent porosity. Various par...

  1. Fatty acid circuit as a physiological mechanism of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulachev, V P

    1991-12-01

    Free fatty acids, natural uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, are shown to differ from artificial ones in that they fail to increase conductance of phospholipid bilayers which are permeable for the protonated form of fatty acids but impermeable for their anionic form. Recent studies have revealed that uncoupling by fatty acids in mitochondria is mediated by the ATP/ADP antiporter and, in brown fat, by thermogenin which is structurally very similar to the antiporter. It is suggested that both the ATP/ADP antiporter and thermogenin facilitate translocation of the fatty anions through the mitochondrial membrane. PMID:1756853

  2. Molecular mechanism of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of peptide bonds using a model compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bin; Ricci, Margaret S; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2010-04-01

    The stability of peptide bonds is a critical aspect of biological chemistry and therapeutic protein applications. Recent studies found elevated nonenzymatic hydrolysis in the hinge region of antibody molecules, but no mechanism was identified. As a first step in providing a mechanistic interpretation, this computational study examines the rate-determining step of the hydrolytic reaction of a peptide bond under acidic pH by a path sampling technique using a model compound N-MAA. Most previous computational studies did not include explicit water molecules, whose effects are significant in solution chemistry, nor did they provide a dynamic picture for the reaction process in aqueous conditions. Because no single trajectory can be used to describe the reaction dynamics due to fluctuations at finite temperatures, a variant version of the transition path sampling technique, the aimless shooting algorithm, was used to sample dynamic trajectories and to generate an ensemble of transition trajectories according to their statistical weights in the trajectory space. Each trajectory was computed as the time evolution of the molecular system using the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics technique. The likelihood maximization procedure and its modification were used in extracting dynamically relevant degrees of freedom in the system, and approximations of the reaction coordinate were compared. Its low log-likelihood score and poor p(B) histogram indicate that the C-O distance previously assumed as the reaction coordinate for the rate-determining step is inadequate in describing the dynamics of the reaction. More than one order parameter in a candidate set including millions of geometric quantities was required to produce a convergent reaction coordinate model; its involvement of many degrees of freedom suggests that this hydrolytic reaction step is very complex. In addition to affecting atoms directly involved in bond-making and -breaking processes, the water network also has

  3. A Novel Approach for the Desalination of Seawater by Means of Reusable Poly(acrylic acid) Hydrogels and Mechanical Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höpfner, Johannes; Klein, Christopher; Wilhelm, Manfred

    2010-08-01

    Desalination of a sodium chloride solution is achieved by the incorporation of salt depleted water into an acrylic acid based hydrogel and the subsequent deswelling of the gel by mechanical force to gain water with a lower salt content. This is a new approach towards the problem of desalination of seawater that has, to the best of our knowledge, not been presented before. In a proof-of-principle experiment the salt content of a 10 g/L NaCl solution could be reduced by 35% in one cycle. The influence of main chemical parameters, e.g. degree of crosslinking, degree of neutralization and experimental parameters like particle size and salt concentration on the desalination process are examined. Possible optimum conditions for the desalination using a poly(acrylic acid) network are discussed and the construction of a simple apparatus for deswelling by mechanical force is described.

  4. Data of thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch–glycerol based films with citric acid as crosslinking agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Seligra, Paula; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Interest in biodegradable edible films as packaging or coating has increased because their beneficial effects on foods. In particular, food products are highly dependents on thermal stability, integrity and transition process temperatures of the packaging. The present work describes a complete data of the thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch–glycerol based films with citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent described in the article titled: “Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch–glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent” González Seligra et al. (2016) [1]. Data describes thermogravimetric and dynamical mechanical experiences and provides the figures of weight loss and loss tangent of the films as a function of the temperature. PMID:27158645

  5. Data of thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch–glycerol based films with citric acid as crosslinking agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula González Seligra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in biodegradable edible films as packaging or coating has increased because their beneficial effects on foods. In particular, food products are highly dependents on thermal stability, integrity and transition process temperatures of the packaging. The present work describes a complete data of the thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch–glycerol based films with citric acid (CA as crosslinking agent described in the article titled: “Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch–glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent” González Seligra et al. (2016 [1]. Data describes thermogravimetric and dynamical mechanical experiences and provides the figures of weight loss and loss tangent of the films as a function of the temperature.

  6. Stearic acid coating on circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes and its effect on the mechanical performance of polymer composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Nina [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: pingzhang@swust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Song, Lixian; Kang, Ming; Lu, Zhongyuan [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Zheng, Rong [Sichuan Jinhe Group Co., Ltd., Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this work was to test circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes (CFAs) for its potential to be utilized in polymer composites manufacturing to improve its toughness. CFAs was coated by stearic acid and used in the composite of polypropylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/high density polyethylene (PP/EVA/HDPE) by molding process method. The resulting coated and uncoated CFAs were fully characterized by particle size analyzer, contact angles, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stearic acid coated onto the surface of CFAs particles in the physical and chemical ways, and the total clad ratio reached 2.05% by measuring TGA/DTA curve. The percentage of CFAs particles focused to a narrow range 2–4 μm and the median mean size was 3.2 μm more than uncoated CFAs. The properties of hydrophobic and dispersive of CFAs particles improved and original activity was reserved after stearic acid coating. The stearic acid was verified as a coupling agent by how much effect it had on the mechanical properties. It showed the elongation at break of PP/EVA/HDPE reinforced with 15 wt% coated CFAs (c-CFAs) was 80.20% and higher than that of the uncoated. The stearic acid treatment of CFAs is a very promising approach to improve the mechanical strength due to the incorporation of stearic acid on the CFAs surface, and hence, further enhances the potential for recycling CFAs as a suitable filler material in polymer composites.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of glycine by iron(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex in perchloric acid medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T V N Partha Sarathi; A Kalyan Kumar; K Krishna Kishore; P Vani

    2005-07-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of glycine by iron(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex has been studied in perchloric acid medium. The reaction is first order with respect to iron(III) and glycine. An increase in (phenanthroline) increases the rate, while increase in [H+] decreases the rate. Hence it can be inferred that the reactive species of the substrate is the zwitterionic form and that of the oxidant is [Fe(phen)2(H2O)2]3+. The proposed mechanism leads to the rate law as elucidated.

  8. Electrochemical and Mechanical Behavior of Lead-Silver and Lead-Bismuth Casting Alloys for Lead-Acid Battery Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Wislei R.; Peixoto, Leandro C.; Garcia, Amauri

    2015-09-01

    The present study focuses on the interrelation of microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance of Pb-Ag and Pb-Bi casting alloys, which can be used in the manufacture of lead-acid battery components, as potential alternatives to alloys currently used. A water-cooled solidification system is used, in which vertical upward directional solidification is promoted permitting a wide range of microstructures to be investigated. Correlations between microstructural arrays, tensile strengths, and corrosion resistances of Pb-1 wt pct Ag, Pb-2.5 wt pct Ag, Pb-1 wt pct Bi, and Pb-2.5 wt pct Bi alloys are envisaged. It is shown that a compromise between corrosion resistance (represented by the corrosion current density) and mechanical properties (represented by the ultimate tensile strength) can be obtained. Comparisons between specific strengths and mechanical/corrosion ratios are also made. It is also shown that, for microstructures solidified under cooling rates higher than 10 K/s, the Pb-Ag alloys exhibit higher specific strength and mechanical/corrosion ratio. In contrast, for casting processes in which the cooling rates are lower than 5 K/s, the dilute Pb-Bi alloy ( i.e., 1 wt pct Bi) is shown to have more appropriate requirements for lead-acid battery components. Comparisons between specific strengths, mechanical/corrosion ratio, and relative weight and cost with Pb-Sn and Pb-Sb alloys are also made.

  9. Effects of material thickness and processing method on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) degradation and mechanical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Reyhaneh Neghabat; Aldabbagh, Fawaz; Ronan, William; Erxleben, Andrea; Rochev, Yury; McHugh, Peter

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the effects of material thickness and processing method on the degradation rate and the changes in the mechanical properties of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) material during simulated physiological degradation were investigated. Two types of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) materials were considered: 0.12 mm solvent-cast films and 1 mm compression-moulded plates. The experimental results presented in this study were compared to the experimental results of Shirazi et al. (Acta Biomaterialia 10(11):4695-703, 2014) for 0.25 mm solvent-cast films. These experimental observations were used to validate the computational modelling predictions of Shirazi et al. (J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 54: 48-59, 2016) on critical diffusion length scale and also to refine the model parameters. The specific material processing methods considered here did not have a significant effect on the degradation rate and the changes in mechanical properties during degradation; however, they influenced the initial molecular weight and they determined the stiffness and hardness of the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) material. The experimental observations strongly supported the computational modelling predictions that showed no significant difference in the degradation rate and the changes in the elastic modulus of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) films for thicknesses larger than 100 μm.

  10. Effect of acid treated carbon nanotubes on mechanical, rheological and thermal properties of polystyrene nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Amr, Issam Thaher

    2011-09-01

    In this work, multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT) were functionalized by acid treatment and characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Polystyrene/CNT composites of both the untreated and acid treated carbon nanotubes were prepared by thermal bulk polymerization without any initiator at different loadings of CNT. The tensile tests showed that the addition of 0.5 wt.% of acid treated CNT results in 22% increase in Young\\'s modulus. The DSC measurements showed a decrease in glass transition temperature (Tg) of PS in the composites. The rheological studies at 190 °C showed that the addition of untreated CNT increases the viscoelastic behavior of the PS matrix, while the acid treated CNT acts as plasticizer. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the incorporation of CNT into PS enhanced the thermal properties of the matrix polymer. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fatty Acid Competition as a Mechanism by Which Enterobacter cloacae Suppresses Pythium ultimum Sporangium Germination and Damping-Off

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Karin; Nelson, Eric B.

    2000-01-01

    Interactions between plant-associated microorganisms play important roles in suppressing plant diseases and enhancing plant growth and development. While competition between plant-associated bacteria and plant pathogens has long been thought to be an important means of suppressing plant diseases microbiologically, unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism has been lacking. We present evidence here that competition for plant-derived unsaturated long-chain fatty acids between the biologi...

  12. Mechanism, kinetics and microbiology of inhibition caused by long-chain fatty acids in anaerobic digestion of algal biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Jingwei; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Laurens, Lieve L. M.; Jarvis, Eric E.; Nagle, Nick J.; Chen, Shulin; Frear, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oleaginous microalgae contain a high level of lipids, which can be extracted and converted to biofuel. The lipid-extracted residue can then be further utilized through anaerobic digestion to produce biogas. However, long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) have been identified as the main inhibitory factor on microbial activity of anaerobic consortium. In this study, the mechanism of LCFA inhibition on anaerobic digestion of whole and lipid-extracted algal biomass was investigated with a ran...

  13. Competition mechanisms of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria: Fermentative metabolism and colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Tabasco, Raquel; Fernández de Palencia, P.; Fontecha, F. Javier; Peláez, Carmen; Requena, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme activities (α- and β-glucosidases, α- and β-galactosidases and β-fructofuranosidase) and organic acid production of four strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB; Streptococcus thermophilus STY-31, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LBY-27, Lactobacillus casei LC-01 and Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5) and Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12 were tested on milk and MRS fermentation broth with glucose, lactose or fructooligosaccharides (FOS) as carbon source. The highest β-galactosidase ac...

  14. Recent advances in understanding trans-epithelial acid-base regulation and excretion mechanisms in cephalopods

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Marian Y.; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Tseng, Yung-Che

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods have evolved complex sensory systems and an active lifestyle to compete with fish for similar resources in the marine environment. Their highly active lifestyle and their extensive protein metabolism has led to substantial acid-base regulatory abilities enabling these organisms to cope with CO2 induced acid-base disturbances. In convergence to teleost, cephalopods possess an ontogeny-dependent shift in ion-regulatory epithelia with epidermal ionocytes being the major site of embry...

  15. Mechanisms Underlying the Anti-Aging and Anti-Tumor Effects of Lithocholic Bile Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Arlia-Ciommo; Amanda Piano; Veronika Svistkova; Sadaf Mohtashami; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are cholesterol-derived bioactive lipids that play essential roles in the maintenance of a heathy lifespan. These amphipathic molecules with detergent-like properties display numerous beneficial effects on various longevity- and healthspan-promoting processes in evolutionarily distant organisms. Recent studies revealed that lithocholic bile acid not only causes a considerable lifespan extension in yeast, but also exhibits a substantial cytotoxic effect in cultured cancer cells deri...

  16. The mechanism of patulin's cytotoxicity and the antioxidant activity of indole tetramic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, R.T.; Showker, J.L. (Toxicology and Mycotoxins Research Unit, U.S. Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Athens, GA (USA))

    1991-06-01

    In LLC-PK1 cells exposed to patulin (50 microM), lipid peroxidation, abrupt calcium influx, extensive blebbing, and total LDH release appeared to be serially connected events with each representing a step in the loss of structural integrity of the plasma membrane. The aforementioned patulin-induced events were prevented by concurrent incubation with butylated hydroxytoluene, deferoxamine, and cyclopiazonic acid, a fungal metabolite. Patulin also caused depletion of nonprotein sulfhydryls, increased 86Rb+ efflux, dome collapse, and eventually the loss of cell viability. These events were not prevented by antioxidants, results consistent with the hypothesis that they were also serially connected but occurring parallel to those previously mentioned. The earliest events observed in patulin-treated cells were the decrease in nonprotein sulfhydryls and increase in 86Rb+ efflux (5 min) which occurred before statistically significant alterations in protein-bound sulfhydryls. The increased potassium efflux (86Rb+ efflux) occurred via a pathway distinct from BaCl2, quinine, or tetraethylammonium sensitive potassium channels. This is the first published report of the antioxidant activity of indole tetramic acids (cyclopiazonic acid and cyclopiazonic acid imine). The protective effect of tetramic acids in LLC-PK1 cells was restricted to indole tetramic acids, and their prevention of lipid peroxidation did not involve iron chelation. The results of this study demonstrate that cyclopiazonic acid is a potent inhibitor of azide-insensitive, ATP-dependent, a23187-sensitive calcium uptake by the lysate of LLC-PK1 cells. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that the endoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase is a sensitive target for cyclopiazonic acid in LLC-PK1 cells.

  17. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Tao; ZHAO, CHANGFU; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-01-01

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transpl...

  18. Influence of various acids on the physico–mechanical properties of pozzolanic cement mortars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Türkel; B Felekoǧlu; S Dulluç

    2007-12-01

    Acidic attack represents a topic of increasing significance, owing to the spread of damages of concrete structures in both urban and industrial areas. Cement type is an important factor affecting performance of cement based materials in an aggressive environment. The goal of this study was to compare the acid resistance of a pozzolanic cement (CEM IV-A/32·5) with Portland cement (CEM I 32·5) that was made from the same clinker. For this purpose, 50 mm mortar cubes were prepared with two different kinds of cement according to TS EN 196-1. After 28 days of hardening, the samples were immersed into four different concentrations of hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid solutions for a period of 120 days. The changes in weight loss and compressive strength values for each acid solution within the test period were recorded. The acid resistance of mortars made from Portland cement was better than the pozzolanic cement incorporated samples after 120 days of acid attack.

  19. The mechanics of hyaluronic acid/adipic acid dihydrazide hydrogel: towards developing a vessel for delivery of preadipocytes to native tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoham, Naama; Sasson, Aviad Levi; Lin, Feng-Huei; Benayahu, Dafna; Haj-Ali, Rami; Gefen, Amit

    2013-12-01

    Promising treatment approaches in repairing tissue defects include implementation of regenerative medicine strategies, particularly delivery of preadipocytes to sites where adipose tissue damage needs to be repaired or where fat needs to be generated. In this study, we suggest that the injectable hyaluronic acid/adipic acid dihydrazide (HA/ADH) hydrogel may be an adipose-tissue-like material in terms of biological compatibility as well as mechanical behavior. First, we show that the hydrogel enables and supports growth, proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Second, given that adipose tissue is a weight-bearing biological structure, we investigate the large deformation mechanical behavior of the hydrogel with and without embedded preadipocytes, by performing confined and unconfined compression tests and then calibrating a strain energy density (SED) function to the results. Four test groups were examined: (1) Hydrogel specimens right after the preparation without cells, (2) and (3) 3-days-cultured hydrogel specimens with and without cells, respectively, and (4) 6-days-cultured hydrogel specimens with cells. A one-term Ogden SED was found to adequately describe the hyperelastic behavior of the hydrogel specimens in all experimental groups. Importantly, we found that the mechanical properties of the hydrogel, when subjected to compression, are in good agreement with those of native adipose tissue, with the better fit occurring 3-6 days after preparation of the hydrogel. Third, computational finite element studies of the mechanical (stress-strain) behavior of the HA/ADH hydrogel when containing mature adipocytes indicated that the stiffnesses of the constructs were mildly affected by the presence of the adipocytes. Hence, we conclude that injectable HA/ADH hydrogel may serve as a vessel for protecting preadipocytes during, and at a short-term after delivery to native tissues, e.g. in research towards regenerative medicine in tissue reconstructions.

  20. Addition of docetaxel, zoledronic acid, or both to first-line long-term hormone therapy in prostate cancer (STAMPEDE): survival results from an adaptive, multiarm, multistage, platform randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Nicholas D; Sydes, Matthew R; Clarke, Noel W; Mason, Malcolm D; Dearnaley, David P; Spears, Melissa R; Ritchie, Alastair W S; Parker, Christopher C; Russell, J Martin; Attard, Gerhardt; de Bono, Johann; Cross, William; Jones, Rob J; Thalmann, George; Amos, Claire; Matheson, David; Millman, Robin; Alzouebi, Mymoona; Beesley, Sharon; Birtle, Alison J; Brock, Susannah; Cathomas, Richard; Chakraborti, Prabir; Chowdhury, Simon; Cook, Audrey; Elliott, Tony; Gale, Joanna; Gibbs, Stephanie; Graham, John D; Hetherington, John; Hughes, Robert; Laing, Robert; McKinna, Fiona; McLaren, Duncan B; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Parikh, Omi; Peedell, Clive; Protheroe, Andrew; Robinson, Angus J; Srihari, Narayanan; Srinivasan, Rajaguru; Staffurth, John; Sundar, Santhanam; Tolan, Shaun; Tsang, David; Wagstaff, John; Parmar, Mahesh K B

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Long-term hormone therapy has been the standard of care for advanced prostate cancer since the 1940s. STAMPEDE is a randomised controlled trial using a multiarm, multistage platform design. It recruits men with high-risk, locally advanced, metastatic or recurrent prostate cancer who are starting first-line long-term hormone therapy. We report primary survival results for three research comparisons testing the addition of zoledronic acid, docetaxel, or their combination to standard of care versus standard of care alone. Methods Standard of care was hormone therapy for at least 2 years; radiotherapy was encouraged for men with N0M0 disease to November, 2011, then mandated; radiotherapy was optional for men with node-positive non-metastatic (N+M0) disease. Stratified randomisation (via minimisation) allocated men 2:1:1:1 to standard of care only (SOC-only; control), standard of care plus zoledronic acid (SOC + ZA), standard of care plus docetaxel (SOC + Doc), or standard of care with both zoledronic acid and docetaxel (SOC + ZA + Doc). Zoledronic acid (4 mg) was given for six 3-weekly cycles, then 4-weekly until 2 years, and docetaxel (75 mg/m2) for six 3-weekly cycles with prednisolone 10 mg daily. There was no blinding to treatment allocation. The primary outcome measure was overall survival. Pairwise comparisons of research versus control had 90% power at 2·5% one-sided α for hazard ratio (HR) 0·75, requiring roughly 400 control arm deaths. Statistical analyses were undertaken with standard log-rank-type methods for time-to-event data, with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs derived from adjusted Cox models. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00268476) and ControlledTrials.com (ISRCTN78818544). Findings 2962 men were randomly assigned to four groups between Oct 5, 2005, and March 31, 2013. Median age was 65 years (IQR 60–71). 1817 (61%) men had M+ disease, 448 (15%) had N+/X M0, and 697 (24%) had N0M0. 165 (6

  1. The role of phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, T A; Chu, W K; Mak, Y W; Hsiung, J W; Huang, S A; Chien, S

    2006-03-21

    Signaling by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to be necessary for mechanical load-induced growth of skeletal muscle. The mechanisms involved in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling are not known, but several studies indicate that a unique [phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)- and nutrient-independent] mechanism is involved. In this study, we have demonstrated that a regulatory pathway for mTOR signaling that involves phospholipase D (PLD) and the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) plays a critical role in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling. First, an elevation in PA concentration was sufficient for the activation of mTOR signaling. Second, the isozymes of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) are localized to the z-band in skeletal muscle (a critical site of mechanical force transmission). Third, mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle with intermittent passive stretch ex vivo induced PLD activation, PA accumulation, and mTOR signaling. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of PLD blocked the mechanically induced increase in PA and the activation of mTOR signaling. Combined, these results indicate that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling through a PLD-dependent increase in PA. Furthermore, we showed that mTOR signaling was partially resistant to rapamycin in muscles subjected to mechanical stimulation. Because rapamycin and PA compete for binding to the FRB domain on mTOR, these results suggest that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling through an enhanced binding of PA to the FRB domain on mTOR. PMID:16537399

  2. The role of phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, T A; Chu, W K; Mak, Y W; Hsiung, J W; Huang, S A; Chien, S

    2006-03-21

    Signaling by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to be necessary for mechanical load-induced growth of skeletal muscle. The mechanisms involved in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling are not known, but several studies indicate that a unique [phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)- and nutrient-independent] mechanism is involved. In this study, we have demonstrated that a regulatory pathway for mTOR signaling that involves phospholipase D (PLD) and the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) plays a critical role in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling. First, an elevation in PA concentration was sufficient for the activation of mTOR signaling. Second, the isozymes of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) are localized to the z-band in skeletal muscle (a critical site of mechanical force transmission). Third, mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle with intermittent passive stretch ex vivo induced PLD activation, PA accumulation, and mTOR signaling. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of PLD blocked the mechanically induced increase in PA and the activation of mTOR signaling. Combined, these results indicate that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling through a PLD-dependent increase in PA. Furthermore, we showed that mTOR signaling was partially resistant to rapamycin in muscles subjected to mechanical stimulation. Because rapamycin and PA compete for binding to the FRB domain on mTOR, these results suggest that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling through an enhanced binding of PA to the FRB domain on mTOR.

  3. Mechanism for enhanced degradation of clofibric acid in aqueous by catalytic ozonation over MnOx/SBA-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiangqiang; Wang, Yu; Li, Laisheng; Bing, Jishuai; Wang, Yingxin; Yan, Huihua

    2015-04-01

    Comparative experiments were conducted to investigate the catalytic ability of MnO(x)/SBA-15 for the ozonation of clofibric acid (CA) and its reaction mechanism. Compared with ozonation alone, the degradation of CA was barely enhanced, while the removal of TOC was significantly improved by catalytic ozonation (O3/MnO(x)/SBA-15). Adsorption of CA and its intermediates by MnO(x)/SBA-15 was proved unimportant in O3/MnO(x)/SBA-15 due to the insignificant adsorption of CA and little TOC variation after ceasing ozone in stopped-flow experiment. The more remarkably inhibition effect of sodium bisulfite (NaHSO3) on the removal of TOC in catalytic ozonation than in ozonation alone elucidated that MnO(x)/SBA-15 facilitated the generation of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which was further verified by electron spin-resonance spectroscopy (ESR). Highly dispersed MnO(x) on SBA-15 were believed to be the main active component in MnO(x)/SBA-15. Some intermediates were indentified and different degradation routes of CA were proposed in both ozonation alone and catalytic ozonation. The amounts of small molecular carboxylic acids (i.e., formic acid (FA), acetic acid (AA) and oxalic acid (OA)) generated in catalytic ozonation were lower than in ozonation alone, resulting from the generation of more OH.

  4. Production of bioactive substances by intestinal bacteria as a basis for explaining probiotic mechanisms: bacteriocins and conjugated linoleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Eileen F; Cotter, Paul D; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2012-01-16

    The mechanisms by which intestinal bacteria achieve their associated health benefits can be complex and multifaceted. In this respect, the diverse microbial composition of the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) provides an almost unlimited potential source of bioactive substances (pharmabiotics) which can directly or indirectly affect human health. Bacteriocins and fatty acids are just two examples of pharmabiotic substances which may contribute to probiotic functionality within the mammalian GIT. Bacteriocin production is believed to confer producing strains with a competitive advantage within complex microbial environments as a consequence of their associated antimicrobial activity. This has the potential to enable the establishment and prevalence of producing strains as well as directly inhibiting pathogens within the GIT. Consequently, these antimicrobial peptides and the associated intestinal producing strains may be exploited to beneficially influence microbial populations. Intestinal bacteria are also known to produce a diverse array of health-promoting fatty acids. Indeed, certain strains of intestinal bifidobacteria have been shown to produce conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a fatty acid which has been associated with a variety of systemic health-promoting effects. Recently, the ability to modulate the fatty acid composition of the liver and adipose tissue of the host upon oral administration of CLA-producing bifidobacteria and lactobacilli was demonstrated in a murine model. Importantly, this implies a potential therapeutic role for probiotics in the treatment of certain metabolic and immunoinflammatory disorders. Such examples serve to highlight the potential contribution of pharmabiotic production to probiotic functionality in relation to human health maintenance. PMID:21742394

  5. Amino acid analogues bind to carbon nanotube via π-π interactions: Comparison of molecular mechanical and quantum mechanical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zaixing; Wang, Zhigang; Tian, Xingling; Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Ruhong

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and biomolecules is essential to the CNT-based nanotechnology and biotechnology. Some recent experiments have suggested that the π-π stacking interactions between protein's aromatic residues and CNTs might play a key role in their binding, which raises interest in large scale modeling of protein-CNT complexes and associated π-π interactions at atomic detail. However, there is concern on the accuracy of classical fixed-charge molecular force fields due to their classical treatments and lack of polarizability. Here, we study the binding of three aromatic residue analogues (mimicking phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) and benzene to a single-walled CNT, and compare the molecular mechanical (MM) calculations using three popular fixed-charge force fields (OPLSAA, AMBER, and CHARMM), with quantum mechanical (QM) calculations using the density-functional tight-binding method with the inclusion of dispersion correction (DFTB-D). Two typical configurations commonly found in π-π interactions are used, one with the aromatic rings parallel to the CNT surface (flat), and the other perpendicular (edge). Our calculations reveal that compared to the QM results the MM approaches can appropriately reproduce the strength of π-π interactions for both configurations, and more importantly, the energy difference between them, indicating that the various contributions to π-π interactions have been implicitly included in the van der Waals parameters of the standard MM force fields. Meanwhile, these MM models are less accurate in predicting the exact structural binding patterns (matching surface), meaning there are still rooms to be improved. In addition, we have provided a comprehensive and reliable QM picture for the π-π interactions of aromatic molecules with CNTs in gas phase, which might be used as a benchmark for future force field developments.

  6. Solanum lycopersicum IAA15 functions in the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid herbicide mechanism of action by mediating abscisic acid signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Wang, Yanling; Liu, Xin; Gao, Song; Qi, Mingfang; Li, Tianlai

    2015-07-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), an important plant growth regulator, is the herbicide most commonly used worldwide to control weeds. However, broad-leaf fruits and vegetables are extremely sensitive to herbicides, which can cause damage and result in lost crops when applied in a manner inconsistent with the directions. Despite detailed knowledge of the mechanism of 2,4-D, the regulation of auxin signalling is still unclear. For example, although the major mediators of auxin signalling, including auxin/indole acetic acid (AUX/IAA) proteins and auxin response factors (ARFs), are known to mediate auxinic herbicides, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, the effects of 2,4-D on AUX/IAA gene expression in tomato were investigated, and the two most notably up-regulated genes, SlIAA15 and SlIAA29, were selected for further study. Western blotting revealed the substantial accumulation of both SlIAA15 and SlIAA29, and the expression levels of the corresponding genes were increased following abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene treatment. Overexpressing SlIAA15, but not SlIAA29, induced a 2,4-D herbicide damage phenotype. The 35S::SlIAA15 line exhibited a strong reduction in leaf stomatal density and altered expression of some R2R3 MYB genes that are putatively involved in the regulation of stomatal differentiation. Further study revealed that root elongation in 35S::SlIAA15 was sensitive to ABA treatment, and was most probably due to the altered expression of an ABA signal transduction gene. In addition, the altered auxin sensitivities of SlIAA15 transformants were also explored. These results suggested that SlIAA15 plays an important role in determining the effects of the herbicide 2,4-D. PMID:25948703

  7. Influence of Simulated Acid Rain Corrosion on the Uniaxial Tensile Mechanical Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-zi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study on the uniaxial tensile property of concrete exposed to the acid rain environment was carried out. Acid rain with pH level of 1.0 was deposed by the mixture of sulfate and nitric acid solution in the laboratory. Dumbbell-shaped concrete specimens were immersed in the simulated acid rain completely. After being exposed to the deposed mixture for a certain period, uniaxial tensile test was performed on the concrete specimens. The results indicate that elastic modulus, tensile strength, and peak strain have a slight increase at the initial corrosion stage, and with the extension of corrosion process, elastic modulus and tensile strength decrease gradually, while the peak strain still increases. It is found that the compressive strength is more sensitive than the tensile strength in aggressive environment. Based on the experimental results, an equation was proposed to describe the ascending branch of the stress-strain curve of the concrete corroded by acid rain.

  8. Modeling the survival of Salmonella on slice cooked ham as a function of apple skin polyphenols, acetic acid, oregano essential oil and carvacrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Response surface methodology was applied to investigate the combined effect of apple skin polyphenols (ASP), acetic acid (AA), oregano essential oil (O) and carvacrol (C) on the inactivation of Salmonella on sliced cooked ham. A full factorial experimental design was employed with control variables ...

  9. Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten alleviates pH pressure in acid soil and enhances the survival of Variovorax paradoxus HB44 and other bacteria in the mycosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazir, R.; Boersma, F. G. H.; Warmink, J. A.; van Elsas, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    In previous work. Variovorax paradoxus strain HB44, next to Burkholderia terrae BS001 and Dyella japonica BS003, were found to be selected in the mycosphere of the tricholomataceous fungi Laccaria proxima and Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten in an acid soil denoted G. V. paradoxus HB44 showed poor surv

  10. Effect of l-lysine-assisted surface grafting for nano-hydroxyapatite on mechanical properties and in vitro bioactivity of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuyun, Jiang; Lixin, Jiang; Chengdong, Xiong; Lijuan, Xu; Ye, Li

    2016-01-01

    It is promising and challenging to study surface modification for nano-hydroxyapatite to improve the dispersion and enhance the mechanical properties and bioactivity of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid). In this paper, we designed an effective new surface grafting with the assist of l-lysine for nano-hydroxyapatite, and the nano-hydroxyapatite surface grafted with the assist of l-lysine (g-nano-hydroxyapatite) was incorporated into poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) to develop a series of g-nano-hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) nano-composites. The surface modification reaction for nano-hydroxyapatite, the mechanical properties, and in vitro human osteoblast-like cell (MG-63) response were characterized and investigated by Fourier transformation infrared, thermal gravimetric analysis, dispersion test, electromechanical universal tester, differential scanning calorimeter measurements, and in vitro cells culture experiment. The results showed that the grafting amount on the surface of nano-hydroxyapatite was enhanced with the increase of l-lysine, and the dispersion of nano-hydroxyapatite was improved more, so that it brought about better promotion crystallization and more excellent mechanical enhancement effect for poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid), comparing with the unmodified nano-hydroxyapatite. Moreover, the cells' attachment and proliferation results confirmed that the incorporation of the g-nano-hydroxyapatite into poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) exhibited better biocompatibility than poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid). The above results indicated that the new surface grafting with the assist of l-lysine for nano-hydroxyapatite was an ideal novel surface modification method, which brought about better mechanical enhancement effect and in vitro bioactivity for poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) with adding higher g-nano-hydroxyapatite content, suggesting it had a great potential to be used as bone fracture internal fixation materials

  11. Mechanism of poly(acrylic acid) acceleration of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin: implications for the design of novel heparin mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Bernhard H; Cheang, Kai I; Desai, Umesh R

    2005-08-11

    The bridging mechanism of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin is a dominant mechanism contributing a massive approximately 2500-fold acceleration in the reaction rate and is also a key reason for the clinical usage of heparin. Our recent study of the antithrombin-activating properties of a carboxylic acid-based polymer, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), demonstrated a surprisingly high acceleration in thrombin inhibition (Monien, B. H.; Desai, U. R. J. Med. Chem. 2005, 48, 1269). To better understand this interesting phenomenon, we have studied the mechanism of PAA-dependent acceleration in antithrombin inhibition of thrombin. Competitive binding studies with low-affinity heparin and a heparin tetrasaccharide suggest that PAA binds antithrombin in both the pentasaccharide- and the extended heparin-binding sites, and these results are corroborated by molecular modeling. The salt-dependence of the K(D) of the PAA-antithrombin interaction shows the formation of five ionic interactions. In contrast, the contribution of nonionic forces is miniscule, resulting in an interaction that is significantly weaker than that observed for heparins. A bell-shaped profile of the observed rate constant for antithrombin inhibition of thrombin as a function of PAA concentration was observed, suggesting that inhibition proceeds through the "bridging" mechanism. The knowledge gained in this mechanistic study highlights important rules for the rational design of orally available heparin mimics. PMID:16078853

  12. A novel mechanism for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ on a graphite electrode in acidic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei; Zeng, Chaoliu

    2014-09-01

    With the consideration of optimizing the performance of the all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB), the oxidation reaction mechanism of VO2+ on a rotating graphite disk electrode has been investigated by potentiodynamic polarization in sulfuric acid solutions with various pH and vanadium concentrations. Furthermore, the reaction orders of VO2+ and H+ for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ have been calculated from the polarization results and compared with the theoretical results according to the possible reaction mechanisms available in the literature. However, a new oxidation reaction mechanism has been proposed to describe the oxidation of VO2+ at last, and the theoretic reaction orders of VO2+ and H+ based on the new mechanism are consistent with the experimental results when the electrochemical reaction is the rate-limited process. Moreover, a corresponding kinetic equation has been established for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ on a spectroscopically pure graphite electrode, and can be well used to predict the polarization behavior in V (IV) acidic solutions.

  13. Rate constant and mechanism for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolly, G.S.; McKenney, D.J.; Singleton, D.L.; Paraskevopoulos, G.; Bossard, A.R.

    1986-11-20

    The rate constants for the reaction of OH with the monomer and dimer of formic acid have been determined at 296 K by a laser photolysis-resonance absorption technique. The OH radicals were generated by photolysis of formic acid at 222 nm with a KrCl excimer laser and were monitored by time-resolved absorption at several resonance lines of the (0,0) band of the A/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/-X/sup 2/II transition. The rate constant for the monomer was found to be 2.95 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. The dimer is much less reactive. Experiments with small amounts of oxygen added indicate that H atoms are formed during the reaction. The results can be interpreted as indicating significantly more abstraction of hydrogen by OH from the -OH bond than from the -CH bond of formic acid.

  14. Omega-3 fatty acids: Mechanisms of benefit and therapeutic effects in pediatric and adult NAFLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Valerio; Alisi, Anna; Musso, Giovanni; Scorletti, Eleonora; Calder, Philip C; Byrne, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently considered the most common liver disease in industrialized countries, and it is estimated that it will become the most frequent indication for liver transplantation in the next decade. NAFLD may be associated with moderate (i.e. steatosis) to severe (i.e. steatohepatitis and fibrosis) liver damage and affects all age groups. Furthermore, subjects with NAFLD may be at a greater risk of other obesity-related complications later in life, and people with obesity and obesity-related complications (e.g. metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease) are at increased risk of developing NAFLD. To date, there is no licensed treatment for NAFLD and therapy has been mainly centered on weight loss and increased physical activity. Unfortunately, it is often difficult for patients to adhere to the advised lifestyle changes. Therefore, based on the known pathogenesis of NAFLD, several clinical trials with different nutritional supplementation and prescribed drugs have been undertaken or are currently underway. Experimental evidence has emerged about the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, a group of polyunsaturated fatty acids that are important for a number of health-related functions. Omega-3 fatty acids are present in some foods (oils, nuts and seeds) that also contain omega-6 fatty acids, and the best sources of exclusively omega-3 fatty acids are oily fish, krill oil and algae. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD, and we also discuss the molecular and clinical evidence for the benefits of different omega-3 fatty acid preparations in NAFLD.

  15. On the mechanism of mitochondrial permeability transition induction by glycyrrhetinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Cristina; Salvi, Mauro; Palermo, Mario; Sinigaglia, Giulietta; Armanini, Decio; Toninello, Antonio

    2004-10-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid (GE), the aglycone of glycyrrhizic acid, a triterpene glycoside which represents one of the main constituents of licorice root, induces an oxidative stress in liver mitochondria responsible for the induction of membrane permeability transition. In fact, GE, by interacting with the mitochondrial respiratory chain, generates hydrogen peroxide which in turn oxidizes critical thiol groups and endogenous pyridine nucleotides leading to the opening of the transition pore. Most likely the reactive group of GE is the carbonyl oxygen in C-11 which, by interacting mainly with a Fe/S centre of mitochondrial complex I, generates an oxygen-centered radical responsible for the pro-oxidant action. PMID:15450957

  16. Allogeneic compact bone-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation increases survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation: a potential immunological mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao Shukai; Ren Hanyun; Shi Yongjin; Liu Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced injury after accidental or therapeutic total body exposure to ionizing radiation has serious pathophysiological consequences,and currently no effective therapy exists.This study was designed to investigate whether transplantation of allogeneic murine compact bone derived-mesenchymal stem cells (CB-MSCs) could improve the survival of mice exposed to lethal dosage total body irradiation (TBI),and to explore the potential immunoprotective role of MSCs.Methods BALB/c mice were treated with 8 Gy TBI,and then some were administered CB-MSCs isolated from C57BL/6 mice.Survival rates and body weight were analyzed for 14 days post-irradiation.At three days post-irradiation,we evaluated IFN-Y and IL-4 concentrations; CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell (Treg) percentage; CXCR3,CCR5,and CCR7 expressions on CD3+T cells; and splenocyte T-bet and GATA-3 mRNA levels.CB-MSC effects on bone marrow hemopoiesis were assessed via colony-forming unit granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) assay.Results After lethal TBI,compared to non-transplanted mice,CB-MSC-transplanted mice exhibited significantly increased survival,body weight,and CFU-GM counts of bone marrow cells (P<0.05),as well as higher Treg percentages,reduced IFN-Y,CXCR3 and CCR5 down-regulation,and CCR7 up-regulation.CB-MSC transplantation suppressed Th1 immunity.Irradiated splenocytes directly suppressed CFU-GM formation from bone marrow cells,and CB-MSC co-culture reversed this inhibition.Conclusion Allogeneic CB-MSC transplantation attenuated radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity,and provided immunoprotection by alleviating lymphocyte-mediated CFU-GM inhibition,expanding Tregs,regulating T cell chemokine receptor expressions,and skewing the Th1/Th2 balance toward anti-inflammatory Th2 polarization.

  17. Anti-tumor Effect and Its Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid on Human Esophageal Carcinoma Cell Eca-109 in Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guo-qing; SHEN Yi; DUANG Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the anti-tumor effect and possible mechanisms of ursolic acid on human esophageal carcinoma in vivo.Methods:A transplanted tumor model by injecting Eca-109 cells into subcutaneous tissue of BALB/c nude mice was established.40 nude mice bearing tumors were randomly divided into 4 groups and 0.2 ml saline or 0.2 ml ursolic acid(25-100 mg·kg-1.d-1)was injected into abdominal cavity respectively once everyday and lasted for fourteen days.The changes of tumor volume were measured continuously and tumor inhibition rate was calculated.The morphological changes of apoptosis were observed by electron microscope.The expressions of COX-2,bcl-2 and Bax protein in transplanted tumors were detected by immunohistochemistry.At last the PGE2 level of transplanted tumors was detected by radioimmunoassay.Results:Treatment of nude mice with 25,50,or 100 mg·kg-1.d-1 of ursolic acid significantly inhibited the growth of the human esophageal carcinoma tumor in nude mice and induced Eca-109 cells apoptosis as demonstrated by electron microscopy analyses.The expressions of COX-2 and bcl-2 in the transplanted tumors were decreased in ursolic acid groups,while the Bax increased.The PGE2 level of transplanted tumors was decreased in ursolic acid groups with a dose-related manner.Conclusion:Ursolic acid has anti-tumor effects against human esophageal carcinoma cells in vivo,which are likely mediated via induction of tumor cell apoptosis and inhibition of COX-2 and PGE2.

  18. Functional genomics for food microbiology: Molecular mechanisms of weak organic acid preservative adaptation in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Brul; W. Kallemeijn; G. Smits

    2008-01-01

    The recent era of genomics has offered tremendous possibilities to biology. This concise review describes the possibilities of applying (functional) genomics studies to the field of microbial food stability. In doing so, the studies on weak-organic-acid stress response in yeast are discussed by way

  19. Insights into the formation mechanism of chloropropanol fatty acid esters under laboratory-scale deodorization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Katsuhito; Hori-Koriyama, Natsuko; Tsumura, Kazunobu; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Chloropropanol fatty acid esters (CPFAEs) are well-known contaminants in refined oils and fats, and several research groups have studied their formation. However, the results obtained in these studies were not satisfactory because the CPFAEs were not analyzed comprehensively. Thus, in the present study, a comprehensive analysis was performed to obtain new details about CPFAE formation. Each lipid (monopalmitin, dipalmitin, tripalmitin, monoolein, diolein, triolein, and crude palm oil) was heated at 250°C for 90 min, and the CPFAEs were analyzed using supercritical fluid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. It was found that CP fatty acid monoesters were formed from monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols after heating in the presence of a chlorine compound. In addition, CP fatty acid diesters were formed from diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols under the same conditions. In the case of crude palm oil, only CP fatty acid diesters were formed. Therefore, these results indicated that CPFAEs in refined palm oil were formed mainly from triacylglycerols. PMID:26822095

  20. Gene expression profiling identifies mechanisms of protection to recurrent trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid colitis mediated by probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariman, R.; Kremer, S.H.A.; Erk, M. van; Lagerweij, T.; Koning, F.; Nagelkerken, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Host-microbiota interactions in the intestinal mucosa play a major role in intestinal immune homeostasis and control the threshold of local inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of probiotics in the recurrent trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis

  1. Mechanism of alpha-lipoic acid in attenuating kanamycin-induced ototoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aimei Wang; Ning Hou; Dongyan Bao; Shuangyue Liu; Tao Xu

    2012-01-01

    In view of the theory that alpha-lipoic acid effectively prevents cochlear cells from injury caused by various factors such as cisplatin and noise, this study examined whether alpha-lipoic acid can prevent kanamycin-induced ototoxicity. To this end, healthy BALB/c mice were injected subcutaneously with alpha-lipoic acid and kanamycin for 14 days. Auditory brainstem response test showed that increased auditory brainstem response threshold shifts caused by kanamycin were significantly inhibited. Immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis showed that the expression of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase in mouse cochlea was significantly decreased. The experimental findings suggest that phosphorylated p38 and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase mediated kanamycin-induced ototoxic injury in BALB/c mice. Alpha-lipoic acid effectively attenuated kanamycin ototoxicity by inhibiting the kanamycin-induced high expression of phosphorylated p38 and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

  2. Replication of the five novel loci for uric acid concentrations and potential mediating mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, Pim; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Johnson, Toby; Caulfield, Mark J.; Navis, Gerjan

    2010-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is the final catabolic product of purine metabolism and elevated levels are associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A recent meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies totalling 28 141 participants identified five novel loci associated with serum UA levels. In our p

  3. MECHANISMS OF HEAVY METAL REMOVAL FROM ACID MINE DRAINAGE USING CHITIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) emanating from inactive or active mine sites contains elevated levels of toxic heavy metals, which can have an adverse impact to the surrounding environment. The major pathway involved in generation of AMD is weathering of pyritic mineral ores, where in s...

  4. Leaching Behavior and Mechanism of Cement Solidiifed Heavy Metal Pb in Acid Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Mingkai; WANG Caiping; CHEN Yan; CHEN Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Pb leaching concentration and the solution’s pH with time was analyzed when cement in its solidiifed form was leached in an acid medium. The effects of the particle size of the solidified form, the cement adding method, and the hydration degree on Pb solidification were also investigated. The experimental results indicate that cement is quickly dissolved and hydrated in the acid medium, forming a C-S-H gel or silicic acid sol with good adsorption. When cement-Pb solidified form is leached in an acetate solution, the hydrated product erodes with time, so the Pb concentration increases slightly in the beginning. Then, some of the Pb ions are absorbed by the newly generated silicic acid sol, C-S-H. Others produce Pb(OH)2 precipitation for secondary solidification, leading to a gradual decrease in the Pb concentration in a leaching time of more than two hours. Moreover, the particle size of the solidiifed form has important effects on the Pb dissolution. When the amount of added cement is low, with a pH of less than 9.5, the solidiifcation affects the sequence of the original cement powder, the cement hydrated powder, and the cement-Pb solidiifed form. When the added amount of cement increases with a pH of more than 11, the effect of adding methods on solidiifcation decreases, and the solidiifed form is a little better than others.

  5. Molecular mechanisms and cell signaling of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in vascular pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fan; Ge, Ying; Lv, Wenshan; Elliott, Matthew R; Muroya, Yoshikazu; Hirata, Takashi; Booz, George W; Roman, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s enzymes catalyze the metabolism of arachidonic acid to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and hydroxyeicosatetraeonic acid (HETEs). 20-HETE is a vasoconstrictor that depolarizes vascular smooth muscle cells by blocking K+ channels. EETs serve as endothelial derived hyperpolarizing factors. Inhibition of the formation of 20-HETE impairs the myogenic response and autoregulation of renal and cerebral blood flow. Changes in the formation of EETs and 20-HETE have been reported in hypertension and drugs that target these pathways alter blood pressure in animal models. Sequence variants in CYP4A11 and CYP4F2 that produce 20-HETE, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase involved in the biotransformation of 20-HETE and soluble epoxide hydrolase that inactivates EETs are associated with hypertension in human studies. 20-HETE contributes to the regulation of vascular hypertrophy, restenosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. It also promotes endothelial dysfunction and contributes to cerebral vasospasm and ischemia-reperfusion injury in the brain, kidney and heart. This review will focus on the role of 20-HETE in vascular dysfunction, inflammation, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and cardiac and renal ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:27100515

  6. Purification of organic acids by chromatography with strong anionic resins: Investigation of uptake mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Julien; Blanc, Claire-Line; Lutin, Florence; Théoleyre, Marc-André; Stambouli, Moncef; Pareau, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Bio-based organic acids are promising renewable carbon sources for the chemical industry. However energy-consuming purification processes are used, like distillation or crystallization, to reach high purities required in some applications. That is why preparative chromatography was studied as an alternative separation technique. In a previous work dealing with the purification of lactic, succinic and citric acids, the Langmuir model was insufficient to explain the elution profiles obtained with a strong anionic resin. Consequently the Langmuir model was coupled with a usual ion-exchange model to take into account the retention of their conjugate bases (acid uptake and ion-exchange selectivity coefficient of conjugate base) and their value were coherent with experimental and resin suppliers' data. These results confirmed that the singular tailing and apparent delay observed with succinic and citric acids can be explained by the high affinity of succinate and citrate for resin cationic sites. The model was implemented in a preparative chromatography simulation program in order to optimize operating parameters of our pilot-scale ISMB unit (Improved Simulated Moving Bed). The comparison with experimental ISMB profiles was conclusive. PMID:27373374

  7. Anodic oxidation of salicylic acid on BDD electrode: Variable effects and mechanisms of degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Oxidation with BDD is a powerful electrochemical method able to mineralize. ► SA is oxidized to aromatic compounds then CO2 and H2O. ► Polymeric intermediate products were formed. - Abstract: The degradation of 100 mL of solution with salicylic acid (SA) in the pH range 3.0–10.0 has been studied by anodic oxidation in a cell with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a stainless steel cathode, both of 3 cm2 area, by applying a current of 100, 300 and 450 mA at 25 °C. Completed mineralization is always achieved due to the great concentration of hydroxyl radical (·OH) generated at the BDD surface. The mineralization rate increases with increasing applied current, but decreases when drug concentration rises from 200 mg L−1. Nevertheless, the pH effect was not significant. During oxidation it was observed that catechol, 2,5-dihydroxylated benzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylated benzoic acid and hydroquinone were formed as aromatic intermediates. In addition, ion-exclusion chromatography allowed the detection of fumaric, maleic, oxalic and formic as the ultimate carboxylic acid.

  8. Anodic oxidation of salicylic acid on BDD electrode: Variable effects and mechanisms of degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabaaoui, Nejmeddine, E-mail: chimie_tunisie@yahoo.fr [Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, Departement de Chimie, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Allagui, Mohamed Salah [Faculte des Sciences de Gafsa, Campus Universitaire Sidi Ahmed Zarrouk, 2112 Gafsa (Tunisia)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidation with BDD is a powerful electrochemical method able to mineralize. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SA is oxidized to aromatic compounds then CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymeric intermediate products were formed. - Abstract: The degradation of 100 mL of solution with salicylic acid (SA) in the pH range 3.0-10.0 has been studied by anodic oxidation in a cell with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a stainless steel cathode, both of 3 cm{sup 2} area, by applying a current of 100, 300 and 450 mA at 25 Degree-Sign C. Completed mineralization is always achieved due to the great concentration of hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) generated at the BDD surface. The mineralization rate increases with increasing applied current, but decreases when drug concentration rises from 200 mg L{sup -1}. Nevertheless, the pH effect was not significant. During oxidation it was observed that catechol, 2,5-dihydroxylated benzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylated benzoic acid and hydroquinone were formed as aromatic intermediates. In addition, ion-exclusion chromatography allowed the detection of fumaric, maleic, oxalic and formic as the ultimate carboxylic acid.

  9. Effects of buffered vinegar and sodium dodecyl sulfate plus levulinic acid on Salmonella Typhimurium survival, shelf-life, and sensory characteristics of ground beef patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzleni, Alexander M; Ponrajan, Amudhan; Harrison, Mark A

    2013-09-01

    The inclusion of two sources of buffered vinegar and sodium dodecyl sulfate plus levulinic acid were studied as interventions for Salmonella Typhimurium and for their effect on shelf-life and sensory characteristics of ground beef. For the Salmonella challenge, beef trimmings (80/20) were inoculated then treated with 2% (w/v) liquid buffered vinegar (LVIN), 2.5% (w/w) powdered buffered vinegar (PVIN), a solution containing 1.0% levulinic acid plus 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDLA) at 10% (w/v), or had no intervention applied (CNT). The same trim source and production methods were followed during production of patties for shelf-life and sensory testing without inoculation. SDLA patties had the largest reduction (PSalmonella. However, LVIN and PVIN had the least (Pcharacteristics, except PVIN exhibited stronger off-flavor (P<0.05).

  10. α-Lipoic acid attenuates vascular calcification via reversal of mitochondrial function and restoration of Gas6/Axl/Akt survival pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Han-Jong; Lee, Kyunghee; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Hee Sun; KIM, JAE-RYONG; Ha, Chae-Myeong; Choi, Young-Keun; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Joon-young; Harris, Robert A.; Jeong, Daewon; Lee, In-Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vascular calcification is prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease and leads to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although several reports have implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease, little is known about the potential role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the process of vascular calcification. This study investigated the effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA), a naturally occurring antioxidant that improves mitochond...

  11. Marine omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids: From mechanisms to clinical implications in heart failure and arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, Tobias; Alter, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Therapeutic implications of marine omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) in cardiovascular disease are still discussed controversially. Several clinical trials report divergent findings and thus leave ambiguity on the meaning of oral omega-3 therapy. Potential prognostic indications of HUFA treatment have been predominantly studied in coronary artery disease, sudden cardiac death, ventricular arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation and heart failure of various origin. It is suspected that increased ventricular wall stress is crucially involved in the prognosis of heart failure. Increased wall stress and an unfavorable myocardial remodeling is associated with an increased risk of arrhythmias by stretch-activated membrane ion channels. Integration of HUFA into the microenvironment of cardiomyocyte ion channels lead to allosteric changes and increase the electrical stability. Increased ventricular wall stress appears to be involved in the local myocardial as well as in the hepatic fatty acid metabolism, i.e. a cardio-hepatic syndrome. Influences of an altered endogenous HUFA metabolism and an inverse shift of the fatty acid profile was underrated in the past. A better understanding of these interacting endogenous mechanisms appears to be required for interpreting the findings of recent experimental and clinical studies. The present article critically reviews major studies on basic pathophysiological mechanisms and treatment effects in clinical trials. PMID:27080538

  12. Baker's Yeast Deficient in Storage Lipid Synthesis Uses cis-Vaccenic Acid to Reduce Unsaturated Fatty Acid Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sec, Peter; Garaiova, Martina; Gajdos, Peter; Certik, Milan; Griac, Peter; Hapala, Ivan; Holic, Roman

    2015-07-01

    The role of cis-vaccenic acid (18:1n-7) in the reduction of unsaturated fatty acids toxicity was investigated in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The quadruple mutant (QM, dga1Δ lro1Δ are1Δ are2Δ) deficient in enzymes responsible for triacylglycerol and steryl ester synthesis has been previously shown to be highly sensitive to exogenous unsaturated fatty acids. We have found that cis-vaccenic acid accumulated during cultivation in the QM cells but not in the corresponding wild type strain. This accumulation was accompanied by a reduction in palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7) content in the QM cells that is consistent with the proposed formation of cis-vaccenic acid by elongation of palmitoleic acid. Fatty acid analysis of individual lipid classes from the QM strain revealed that cis-vaccenic acid was highly enriched in the free fatty acid pool. Furthermore, production of cis-vaccenic acid was arrested if the mechanism of fatty acids release to the medium was activated. We also showed that exogenous cis-vaccenic acid did not affect viability of the QM strain at concentrations toxic for palmitoleic or oleic acids. Moreover, addition of cis-vaccenic acid to the growth medium provided partial protection against the lipotoxic effects of exogenous oleic acid. Transformation of palmitoleic acid to cis-vaccenic acid is thus a rescue mechanism enabling S. cerevisiae cells to survive in the absence of triacylglycerol synthesis as the major mechanism for unsaturated fatty acid detoxification.

  13. Mechanism for release of arachidonic acid during guinea pig platelet aggregation: a role for the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor RHC 80267

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of the release of arachidonic acid from phospholipids after the stimulation of guinea pig platelets with collagen, thrombin and platelet activating factor (PAF) was studied. RHC 80267, a diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, and indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, were used. Various in vitro assays for enzymes involved in arachidonic acid release and metabolism were conducted. Platelet aggregation and simultaneous release of ADP from platelets were monitored using a Chrono-log Lumiaggregometer. Platelets were labeled with (14C)arachidonic acid to facilitate sensitive determination of small changes in platelet phospholipids during platelet aggregation. In the present investigation it is shown that collagen, thrombin and PAF increased phospholipase C activity. It was also discovered that cyclooxygenase products were responsible for further stimulation (a positive feed-back) of phospholipase C activity, while diacylglycerol provided a negative feed-back control over receptor-stimulated phospholipase C activity and inhibited ADP release. The guinea pig platelet is an ideal model to study phospholipase C-diacylglycerol lipase pathway for the release of arachidonic acid from platelet phospholipids because it does not have any phospholipase A2 activity. It was observed that cyclooxygenase products were responsible for collagen-induced guinea pig platelet aggregation. Indomethacin completely inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation, was less effective against thrombin, and had no effect on PAF-induced platelet aggregation. On the other hand, RHC 80267 was a powerful inhibitor of aggregation and ADP release induced by all three of these potent aggregating agents

  14. Simulation of the filtration mechanism of hyaluronic acid in total knee prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paolo, J Di [GBC, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Oro Verde, Ruta 11 km 10, 3101 (Argentina); Berli, M E [GBC, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Oro Verde, Ruta 11 km 10, 3101 (Argentina); Campana, D M [GBC, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Oro Verde, Ruta 11 km 10, 3101 (Argentina); Ubal, S [GBC, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Oro Verde, Ruta 11 km 10, 3101 (Argentina); Cardenes, L D [GBC, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Oro Verde, Ruta 11 km 10, 3101 (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear in current knee prosthesis causes prosthesis loosening after no more than 15 years. In this work, a steady state one-dimensional lubrication model with non- Newtonian fluid, porous elastic layer on tibial component, ultra-filtration mechanism of fluid and some features of the surface roughness is studied through a numerical technique based on the Finite Element Method. The results show that the UHMWPE stiffness makes difficult the lubrication mechanism of the artificial joint and promotes abrasive and fatigue wear. Nevertheless, the use of compliant porous materials on the tibial component could reduce friction and wear. Moreover, the ultra-filtration mechanism promotes efficiency on the joint.

  15. Simulation of the filtration mechanism of hyaluronic acid in total knee prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear in current knee prosthesis causes prosthesis loosening after no more than 15 years. In this work, a steady state one-dimensional lubrication model with non- Newtonian fluid, porous elastic layer on tibial component, ultra-filtration mechanism of fluid and some features of the surface roughness is studied through a numerical technique based on the Finite Element Method. The results show that the UHMWPE stiffness makes difficult the lubrication mechanism of the artificial joint and promotes abrasive and fatigue wear. Nevertheless, the use of compliant porous materials on the tibial component could reduce friction and wear. Moreover, the ultra-filtration mechanism promotes efficiency on the joint

  16. Impacts of amino acid nutrition on pregnancy outcome in pigs: mechanisms and implications for swine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G; Bazer, F W; Burghardt, R C; Johnson, G A; Kim, S W; Li, X L; Satterfield, M C; Spencer, T E

    2010-04-01

    Pigs suffer up to 50% embryonic and fetal loss during gestation and exhibit the most severe naturally occurring intrauterine growth retardation among livestock species. Placental insufficiency is a major factor contributing to suboptimal reproductive performance and reduced birth weights of pigs. Enhancement of placental growth and function through nutritional management offers an effective solution to improving embryonic and fetal survival and growth. We discovered an unusual abundance of the arginine family of AA in porcine allantoic fluid (a reservoir of nutrients) during early gestation, when placental growth is most rapid. Arginine is metabolized to ornithine, proline, and nitric oxide, and these compounds possess a plethora of physiological functions. Nitric oxide is a vasodilator and angiogenic factor, whereas both ornithine and proline are substrates for placental synthesis of polyamines, which are key regulators of protein synthesis and angiogenesis. Additionally, arginine, leucine, glutamine, and proline activate the mammalian target of rapamycin cell-signaling pathway to enhance protein synthesis and cell proliferation in placentae. To translate basic research on AA biochemistry and nutrition into application, dietary supplementation with 0.83% l-arginine to gilts on d 14 to 28 or d 30 to 114 of gestation increased the number and litter birth weight of live-born piglets. In addition, supplementing the gestation diet with 0.4% l-arginine plus 0.6% l-glutamine enhanced the efficiency of nutrient utilization, reduced variation in piglet birth weight, and increased litter birth weight. By regulating syntheses of nitric oxide, polyamines, and proteins, functional AA stimulate placental growth and the transfer of nutrients from mother to embryo or fetus to promote conceptus survival, growth, and development.

  17. Kinetic Approach to the Mechanism of Redox Reaction of Pyrocatechol Violet and Nitrite Ion in Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Adetoro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the oxidation of Pyrocatechol violet (PCVH by nitrite ion (NO2- in aqueous acidic medium has been studied at 24±1ºC, I = 0.50 mol/dm3(NaCl, [H+] = 1.0×10-3 mol/dm3. The reaction is first order to [PCVH] and half order to [NO2-]. The redox reaction displayed a 1:1 stoichiometry and obeys the rate law: d[PCVH]/dt = (a + b[H+] [PCVH][NO2-]½. The second-order rate constant increases with increase in acid concentration and ionic strength. This system displayed positive salt effect while spectroscopic investigation and Michaelis-Menten plot showed evidence of intermediate complex formation in the course of the reaction. A plausible mechanism has been proposed for the reaction.

  18. The Acid Hydrolysis Mechanism of Acetals Catalyzed by a Supramolecular Assembly in Basic Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-09-24

    A self-assembled supramolecular host catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetals in basic aqueous solution. The mechanism of hydrolysis is consistent with the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model. Further investigation of the rate limiting step of the reaction revealed a negative entropy of activation ({Delta}S{double_dagger} = -9 cal mol{sup -1}K{sup -1}) and an inverse solvent isotope effect (k(H{sub 2}O)/k(D{sub 2}O) = 0.62). These data suggest that the mechanism of hydrolysis that takes place inside the assembly proceeds through an A-2 mechanism, in contrast to the A-1 mechanism operating in the uncatalyzed reaction. Comparison of the rates of acetal hydrolysis in the assembly with the rate of the reaction of unencapsulated substrates reveals rate accelerations of up to 980 over the background reaction for the substrate diethoxymethane.

  19. Role of boric acid in nickel nanotube electrodeposition: a surface-directed growth mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Lauren M; Cho, Seungil; Kim, Sung Kyoung; Noked, Malachi; Lee, Sang Bok

    2014-01-18

    Nickel nanotubes have been synthesized by the popular and versatile method of template-assisted electrodeposition, and a surface-directed growth mechanism based on the adsorption of the nickel-borate complex has been proposed.

  20. Effect of peroxide and chain extender on mechanical properties and morphology of poly (butylene succinate)/poly (lactic acid) blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherykhunthod, W.; Seadan, M.; Suttiruengwong, S.

    2015-07-01

    Poly (butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly (lactic acid) (PLA) are biodegradable polymers with high potential to replace commodity fossil-based polymers in a wide range of applications. However, these two polymers are immiscible in most ratios, but partially miscible when one of the two is a major phase. In this study, a one-step process in a twin-screw extruder was used to prepare the blends between poly (butylene succinate) (PBS) as a matrix and poly (lactic acid) (PLA) as a dispersed phase. To improve mechanical properties and morphology of blends, two reactive agents, peroxide (Perkadox) and multifunctional epoxide chain extender (Joncryl) were selected and compared. All samples were characterized for melt flow index (MFI), morphology, tensile, and impact properties. The results showed that the mechanical properties and morphology of PBS/PLA blends were improved when using both reactive agents. It was demonstrated that the increased mechanical properties resulted from good interfacial adhesion between PBS and finely dispersed PLA particles. The addition of 0.075 phr Perkadox to PBS/PLA (75:25 and 80:20) blends increased elongation at break by 7.2% and 38.4%, respectively compared with the blends without reactive agents. The results from gel content also revealed the graft copolymer existed at the interface when reactive agents were added. In the case of using multifunctional epoxide chain extender, the impact strength of the blends increased.

  1. Two-Component Regulatory Systems – implication in the quorum sensing mechanisms and bacteriocin production in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia–Mara Ditu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For lactic acid bacteria, the mechanisms of quorum sensing and response are mediated by peptides or pheromones that interfere with the synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AMP called bacteriocins, when these molecules reach a certain critical level of concentration. Generally, the synthesis and activity of pheromones is adjusted by means of a two-component regulatory system. The observation that some microorganisms, in particular lactic acid bacteria, produce bacteriocins according to the cell density, has led to the discovery of the involvement of QS mechanisms in the synthesis of these peptides. Bacteriocins synthesis is inducible, the process requiring the extracellular accumulation of peptides that functions as chemical messengers activators of bacteriocins synthesis. This minireview presents the molecular architecture and functions of two-component regulatory systems and ABC transporters implicated in the synthesis and secretion of nisin, one of the most studied bacteriocin. The elucidation of the intimate mechanisms of bacteriocins synthesis is equally of biotechnological and medical importance, opening interesting perspectives for the development of improved technologies for the production of bacteriocins with good yields, and also, for increasing the beneficial anti-infective roles of probiotic bacteria when administered in vivo.

  2. Switchable mechanical DNA ``arms'' operating on nucleic acid scaffolds associated with electrodes or semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelossof, Gilad; Tel-Vered, Ran; Liu, Xiaoqing; Willner, Itamar

    2013-09-01

    Functional footholds linked to DNA scaffolds associated with surfaces provide nano-engineered assemblies acting as switching devices. By the assembly of a β-cyclodextrin receptor on one foothold, and a ferrocene-modified nucleic acid on a second foothold, the switchable and reversible, fuel-driven activation of ``molecular arms'' proceeds, transduced by electrochemical or optical signals.Functional footholds linked to DNA scaffolds associated with surfaces provide nano-engineered assemblies acting as switching devices. By the assembly of a β-cyclodextrin receptor on one foothold, and a ferrocene-modified nucleic acid on a second foothold, the switchable and reversible, fuel-driven activation of ``molecular arms'' proceeds, transduced by electrochemical or optical signals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures, time-dependent deactivation of a DNA ``arm'' using a DNA anti-fuel, and control experiments, excluding β-cyclodextrin from the systems. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02653a

  3. The Molecular Mechanism of Leptin Secretion and Expression Induced by Aristolochic Acid in Kidney Fibroblast

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tsung-Chieh; Lee, Tien-Chiang; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Yang, Chung-Shi

    2011-01-01

    Background Leptin is a peptide hormone playing pivotal role in regulating food intake and energy expenditure. Growing evidence has suggested the pro-inflammatory and fibrogenic properties of leptin. In addition, patients with renal fibrosis have higher level of plasma leptin, which was due to the increased leptin production. Aristolochic acid (AA) is a botanical toxin characterized to associate with the development of renal fibrosis including tubulointerstitial fibrosis. However, whether lept...

  4. Mechanical and acid neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition of amorphous calcium phosphate dental nanocomposite

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, Jennifer L.; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2011-01-01

    Dental composites do not hinder bacteria colonization and plaque formation. Caries at the restoration margins is a frequent reason for replacement of existing restorations, which accounts for 50 to 70% of all restorations. The objectives of this study were to examine the filler level effect on nanocomposite containing nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and investigate the load-bearing and acid-neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition. NACP with 116-nm particle size wer...

  5. Antibacterial free fatty acids : activities, mechanisms of action and biotechnological potential

    OpenAIRE

    Desbois, Andrew Paul; Smith, Valerie Jane

    2010-01-01

    Amongst the diverse and potent biological activities of free fatty acids (FFAs) is the ability to kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. The antibacterial properties of FFAs are used by many organisms to defend against parasitic or pathogenic bacteria. Whilst their antibacterial mode of action is still poorly understood, the prime target of FFA action is the cell membrane, where FFAs disrupt the electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation. Besides interfering with cellular energy ...

  6. Biochemical mechanisms involved in the Omega fatty acids digestion, absorption and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Léa Silvia Sant´Ana

    2004-01-01

    Lipids consist of a broad group of compounds that are very different from one another and fatty acids are the substances present in greater quantity. The inadequate ingestion of these substances has an influence on the incidence of various diseases, such as coronary heart disease, some types of cancer, immune diseases and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to understand the role of lipids in the animal body it is necessary to know the food lipid composition, as well the absorption and digestion m...

  7. Alteration of the phospho- or neutral lipid content and fatty acid composition in Listeria monocytogenes due to acid adaptation mechanisms for hydrochloric, acetic and lactic acids at pH 5.5 or benzoic acid at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronicolis, Sofia K; Berberi, Anita; Diakogiannis, Ioannis; Petrova, Evanthia; Kiaki, Irene; Baltzi, Triantafillia; Xenikakis, Polydoros

    2010-10-01

    This study provides a first approach to observe the effects on Listeria monocytogenes of cellular exposure to acid stress at low or neutral pH, notably how phospho- or neutral lipids are involved in this mechanism, besides the fatty acid profile alteration. A thorough investigation of the composition of polar and neutral lipids from L. monocytogenes grown at pH 5.5 in presence of hydrochloric, acetic and lactic acids, or at neutral pH 7.3 in presence of benzoic acid, is described relative to cells grown in acid-free medium. The results showed that only low pH values enhance the antimicrobial activity of an acid. We suggest that, irrespective of pH, the acid adaptation response will lead to a similar alteration in fatty acid composition [decreasing the ratio of branched chain/saturated straight fatty acids of total lipids], mainly originating from the neutral lipid class of adapted cultures. Acid adaptation in L. monocytogenes was correlated with a decrease in total lipid phosphorus and, with the exception of cells adapted to benzoic acid, this change in the amount of phosphorus reflected a higher content of the neutral lipid class. Upon acetic or benzoic acid stress the lipid phosphorus proportion was analysed in the main phospholipids present: cardiolipin, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphoaminolipid and phosphatidylinositol. Interestingly only benzoic acid had a dramatic effect on the relative quantities of these four phospholipids.

  8. Mechanism-based inactivation of serine transhydroxymethylases by D-fluoroalanine and related amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E A; Kallen, R; Walsh, C

    1981-07-10

    Serine transhydroxymethylase, from lamb or rabbit liver, is known to catalyze slow transamination of D-alanine, but not of L-amino acids, in a tetrahydrofolate-independent reaction. Both enzymes will process the D-isomer of beta-fluoroalanine for alpha, beta-elimination of HF to yield an aminoacrylate-pyridoxal-P-enzyme intermediate. This intermediate partitions between harmless hydrolysis to pyruvate, NH4+, and active enzyme-pyridoxal-P (catalytic turnover) and suicidal enzyme alkylation by covalent modification with an average partition ratio of 40-60 turnovers/inactivation event/monomer unit of this tetrameric enzyme. Enzyme inactivation occurs with stoichiometric incorporation of radioactive label from D-[1,2-14C]fluoroalanine. Titration of enzymic cysteinyl --SH groups with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) indicates loss of 1 --SH group on inactivation. Acid hydrolysis of radioactive-inactive enzyme confirms cysteine residue modification. Treatment of inactive enzyme with 6 M urea, then KBH4, followed by acid hydrolysis yields two radioactive compounds, lanthionine and S-carboxyhydroxyethylcysteine, in about equal amounts. The addition of tetrahydrofolate stimulates both pyruvate production and inactivation to equal extents with about a 200-fold rate acceleration at 0.5 mM tetrahydrofolate to turnover numbers of approximately 120 min-1. The Km for D-fluoroalanine is high, 10-60 mM, and this low substrate affinity suggests D-fluoroalanine will not be a useful in vivo agent for selective inactivation of liver cell serine transhydroxymethylases.

  9. Curative effects of enalapril combined with folic acid tablets on hypertension and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Hong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the serum homocysteine in patients with hypertension, inflammatory factors and endothelial injury effects of enalapril combined with folic acid tablets. Methods:A total of 92 cases of H type hypertension patients were average randomly divided into the observation group and control group, the control group was treated with enalapril maleate tablets for treatment, the observation group in the control group based on the combined use of folic acid tablets for treatment, compared two groups of serum homocysteine cysteine (Hcy), inflammatory factor and vascular endothelial injury related indicators of change.Results:The effective rate of the observation group was 60.9%, the control group was 60.9%, the difference was not statistically significant; the two groups Hcy, CPR, B12, TNF-α, MMP-9, NO and ET-1 were significantly better than before treatment, the difference was statistically significant, but there were significant differences between the observation group and the control group. Conclusion:For the H type hypertension patients and enalapril maleate tablets in the treatment can be in a certain extent, it can improve the patients' blood pressure, reduce Hcy levels, improve endothelial function, alleviate the inflammatory reaction, if combined with a dose of folic acid, the clinical curative effect is better, the H type hypertension patients with the treatment of the ideal method.

  10. Enhancement of Mechanical and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Hydrophilic Nanoclay Reinforced Polylactic Acid/Polycaprolactone/Oil Palm Mesocarp Fiber Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern Chiet Eng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies, the effect of the addition of 1 wt% hydrophilic nanoclay on polylactic acid (PLA/polycaprolactone (PCL/oil palm mesocarp fiber (OPMF biocomposites was investigated by tensile properties, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The current studies focus on the effect of addition of 1 wt% hydrophilic nanoclay on mechanical (flexural and impact properties and dynamic mechanical properties of composites. The composites were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. FTIR spectra show that peak shifting occurs when 1 wt% hydrophilic nanoclay was added to composites. The addition of 1 wt% hydrophilic nanoclay successfully improves the flexural properties and impact resistance of the biocomposites. The storage modulus of biocomposites was decreased when nanoclay was added which indicates that the stiffness of biocomposites was reduced. The loss modulus curve shows that the addition of nanoclay shift two tg in composites become closer to each other which indicates that the incorporation of nanoclay slightly compatibilizes the biocomposites. Tan δ indicated that hybrid composites dissipate less energy compared to biocomposites indicate that addition of clay to biocomposites improves fiber/matrix adhesion. Water sorption test shows that the addition of nanoclay enhances water resistance of composites.

  11. Roles of Small, Acid-Soluble Spore Proteins and Core Water Content in Survival of Bacillus subtilis Spores Exposed to Environmental Solar UV Radiation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Moeller, Ralf; Setlow, Peter; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2009-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis contain a number of small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) which comprise up to 20% of total spore core protein. The multiple α/β-type SASP have been shown to confer resistance to UV radiation, heat, peroxides, and other sporicidal treatments. In this study, SASP-defective mutants of B. subtilis and spores deficient in dacB, a mutation leading to an increased core water content, were used to study the relative contributions of SASP and increased core water conte...

  12. Exposure to Salt and Organic Acids Increases the Ability of Listeria monocytogenes To Invade Caco-2 Cells but Decreases Its Ability To Survive Gastric Stress†

    OpenAIRE

    Garner, Matthew R.; James, Karen E.; Callahan, Michelle C.; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of environmental stress exposure on Listeria monocytogenes growth and virulence-associated characteristics were investigated. Specifically, we measured the effects of temperature (7 or 37°C), pH (5.5 or 7.4), the presence of salt and organic acids (375 mM NaCl, 8.45 mM sodium diacetate [SD], 275 mM sodium lactate [SL], or a combination of NaCl, SD, and SL), and deletion of sigB, which encodes a key stress response regulator, on the ability of L. monocytogenes to grow, invade Caco-...

  13. Anti-Inflammation Effects and Potential Mechanism of Saikosaponins by Regulating Nicotinate and Nicotinamide Metabolism and Arachidonic Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu; Bao, Yongrui; Wang, Shuai; Li, Tianjiao; Chang, Xin; Yang, Guanlin; Meng, Xiansheng

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation is an important immune response; however, excessive inflammation causes severe tissue damages and secondary inflammatory injuries. The long-term and ongoing uses of routinely used drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are associated with serious adverse reactions, and not all patients have a well response to them. Consequently, therapeutic products with more safer and less adverse reaction are constantly being sought. Radix Bupleuri, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, saikosaponins (SS) as the main pharmacodynamic active ingredient, their pharmacological effects and action mechanism in anti-inflammation have not been reported frequently. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of SS and clarify the potential mechanism in acute inflammatory mice induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin in hind paws. Paw edema was detected as an index to evaluate the anti-inflammatory efficacy of SS. Then, a metabolomic method was used to investigate the changed metabolites and potential mechanism of SS. Metabolite profiling was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q-TOF-MS). The detection and identification of the changed metabolites were systematically analyzed by multivariate data and pathway analysis. As a result, 12 different potential biomarkers associated with SS in anti-inflammation were identified, including nicotinate, niacinamide, arachidonic acid (AA), and 20-carboxy-leukotriene B4, which are associated with nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism and arachidonic acid metabolism. The expression levels of biomarkers were effectively modulated towards the normal range by SS. It indicated that SS show their effective anti-inflammatory effects through regulating nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism and arachidonic acid metabolism. PMID:27251379

  14. [Complex effects of simulated acid rain and Cu on the physiological characteristics of Paulownia fortunei and its detoxification mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Chong-Bang; Ke, Shi-Sheng; Qian, Bao-Ying

    2010-03-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of simulated acid rain (pH 4.0, 5.0) and Cu (0-200 mg x kg(-1)) on the physiological characteristics of Paulownia fortunei and its detoxification mechanism. With no Cu addition, the leaf chlorophyll, carotenoid, O2 division by, H2O2, and MDA contents of P. fortunei had no significant differences between the two acid rain treatments. However, with the addition of 100 and 200 mg Cu x kg(-1), the chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of treatment pH 4.0 were lower, while the O2 divided by, H2O2 and MDA contents were higher thanthose of treatment pH 5.0. The chlorophyll a/b ratio of treatments Cu was higher than that of the control. The leaf Cu content decreased obviously with the increasing acidity of stimulated acid rain, but the root Cu content was in reverse. With increasing Cu addition, both the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and the total contents of phytochelatins (PCs) and glutathione (GSH) in treatment pH 5.0 increased, while the activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX in treatment pH 4.0 decreased after an initial increase, and the total contents of glutathione (GSH) decreased greatly in treatment 200 mg Cu x kg(-1). All of these demonstrated that the oxidative stress of high Cu concentration to P. fortunei was aggravated by stimulated acid rain. PMID:20560310

  15. Studies on gene structure, enzymatic activity and regulatory mechanism of acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase from G2 pea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yunjian (徐云剑); GU Xuesong (顾雪松); LI Jun (李珺); LI Qing (李 晴); Peter J. Davies; ZHU Yuxian (朱玉贤)

    2003-01-01

    The AAIR genomic DNA of G2 pea (Pisum sativum L.) was amplified by PCR method. Sequence analysis showed that it was composed of 8 introns and 9 exons with three of the introns containing specific A/T-rich endogenous promoter regions. Molecular hybridization experiments revealed that the expression of AAIR remained at a high level before and after flowering if grown in short day growth chambers. However, when grown under long day conditions, the level of AAIR expression declined very rapidly after flowering. This variation of AAIR expression is consistent with the change of enzymatic activity of acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase. Functional complementation experiments carried out using an acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase deficient E. coli strain showed that these cells could not grow on M9 medium without addition of branched-chain amino acids unless they were transformed with the AAIR expression vector. Further study revealed that overexpression of the pea AAIR cDNA in acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase deficient E. coli strain enhanced significantly its branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic capacity. Results from gel shift experiments showed that fractions of pea nuclear protein extracts could bind specifically to some A/T rich regions present in introns of the AAIR gene. The A/T-rich-region-binding proteins remained at a steady level in the non-senescing apical buds of short-day grown G2 pea. In the rapid-senescing apical buds of long-day grown G2 pea, the levels of these proteins declined rapidly after flower initiation. Therefore, the nuclear protein binding capacities to endogenous promoter regions may constitute an important mechanism to regulate AAIR gene expression.

  16. Kinetics and Mechanism of Acetoxymercuration and Acid-Catalysed Hydration of α-Alkylstyrenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldřich Pytela

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Nine α-alkylstyrenes carrying the following substituents have been synthesised: methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, pentyl, isobutyl, isopropyl, sec-butyl and tert-butyl. Kinetics has been measured for the reaction of these compounds with mercuric acetate in anhydrous acetic acid at 25 °C. The rate constants are very sensitive to inductive effects (ρI = –49.5 in AISE theory and steric effects (ψ = –1.59 according to Charton. These results support the presumed existence of an intermediate with an asymmetrically bound acetylmercuric cation to carbon atoms of the vinyl group of styrene. The kinetics of an acid-catalysed hydration of the above-mentioned α-alkylstyrenes were also measured in aqueous sulphuric acid at 25 °C. The derivatives exhibited kinetically a consecutive isomerisation reaction giving the more stable substituted styrenes. The values of the slope m‡m* of the dependence upon the excess acidity function (X were evaluated, and exceptionally low values were found for the butyl and pentyl substituents (1.02 and 0.73, respectively, while on the other hand tert-butyl showed an exceptionally high value (3.28. On the basis of the facts, a mechanism has been suggested for the acid-catalysed hydration, involving the reaction of a relatively stable and sterically hindered carbocation with water as the rate-limiting step of the reaction.

  17. Preparation of Polystyrenylphosphonous Acid of Low Polymerization Degree and Influence of Initiators upon the Free Radical Reaction Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The polystyrenylphosphonous acid (PSPA) of low polymerization degree was prepared with one step reaction. The reaction mechanism was changed with different initiators. For the reaction with AIBN or BPO as the initiator, there are 2 or 3 series of radical reaction chains and 5 or 9 series of polystyrenyl products. The main products are PSPA without or with the fragment of the initiator H[CH(C6H5)-CH2]n-PO2H2 and C6H5CO2-[CH2CH (C6H5)]n-PO2H2 respectively.

  18. Thermal and mechanical properties of polylactic acid (PLA) and bagasse carboxymethyl cellulose (CMCB) composite by adding isosorbide diesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamthai, Suthaphat; Magaraphan, Rathanawan

    2015-05-01

    An isosorbide diesters is one of isororbide types used as a plasticizer. The influence of this plasticizer on thermal and mechanical properties of polylactic acid and bagasse carboxymethyl cellulose (PLA/CMCB) composites was studied. PLA was blended with CMCB at 1%wt using various contents of isosorbide diesters (5, 10, 15 and 20%wt of PLA). The differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TGA) analyses indicated that the increment of isosorbide diesters concentration resulted in decreasing glass transition, melting and decomposition temperatures, as well as the reduction of storage modulus of PLA/CMCB composites. Moreover, the elongation of PLA/CMCB composites was significantly improved with increasing plasticizer content.

  19. Protective effect of chenodeoxycholic acid against lipid kidney injury induced by high-fructose feeding in rats and the underlying mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the intervention of chenodeoxycholic acid(CDCA) on kidney of high-fructose-fed rats,and investigate the mechanism of CDCA on lipid kidney injury.Methods Forty-eight healthy male Wistar

  20. The influence of mechanical activation of chalcopyrite on the selective leaching of copper by sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achimovičová, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper chalcopyrite, CuFeS2, has been selective leached by H2SO4 as leaching agent (170 g/dm3 in procedure of hydrometallurgical production of copper. Mechanical activation of the chalcopyrite resulted in mechanochemical surface oxidation as well as in the mineral surface and bulk disordering. Furthermore, the formation of agglomerates during grinding was also occured. Surface changes of the samples using infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy methods were investigated before and after leaching. The leaching rate, specific surface area, structural disorder as well as copper extraction increased with the mechanical activation of mineral.

  1. Domoic acid toxicokinetics in Dungeness crabs: New insights into mechanisms that regulate bioaccumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Irvin R., E-mail: ir_schultz@pnl.gov; Skillman, Ann; Sloan-Evans, Siobhan; Woodruff, Dana

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •Domoic acid is retained in the hepatopancreas after oral dosing but not after intravascular dosing. •Localization of domoic acid in the hepatopancreas is extracellular, likely in the lumen of tubules. •Isolated hepatopancreas cells do not absorb domoic acid from culture media. •Domoic acid is eliminated through urinary excretion. -- Abstract: Domoic acid (DA) is an excitatory neurotoxic amino acid produced by several marine algal species and is the causative agent of amnesic shellfish poisoning. Profound differences in the toxicokinetics of DA have been identified in a wide variety of shellfish. We characterized the toxicokinetics of DA in Dungeness crabs (Metacarcinus magister) after oral and intravascular dosing (IV) using a variety of doses ranging from 0.1 to 20 mg/kg. After a 1 mg/kg oral dose, DA disappeared from the foregut within 2 h and largely accumulated in the hepatopancreas, with hemolymph and other tissues having 100–1000 times lower concentrations. After IV dosing, hemolymph concentrations of DA were unexpectedly high and toxicokinetic analysis indicated the steady-state volume of distribution (V{sub ss}) was 123–197 ml/kg, which is well below the hemolymph volume of 350 ml/kg for crabs. This indicated only limited extravascular distribution of DA was occurring after IV injection, which is surprising considering the capacity of the hepatopancreas to sequester DA after oral dosing. Additional studies measured the partitioning of DA in hepatopancreas cellular and subcellular fractions. The subcellular distribution of DA was primarily associated with the S8 fraction and could be filtered through a 30,000 MW cut-off filter, indicating DA was not appreciably bound to macromolecules. Interestingly, very little (<0.4%) of the total hepatopancreas DA tissue content was associated with the cellular fraction isolated after dissociation and separation from tissue fragments. The in vivo and in vitro results led us to hypothesize that DA

  2. Exploration of the preventive effect of ursolic acid on retinopathy in diabetic mice and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Zhong Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the preventive effect of ursolic acid on retinopathy in diabetic mice through adjusting insulin sensitivity, glucose transport, angiogenesis and inflammation. Methods:Male C57BL/6 mice were selected as experimental animals and randomly divided into control group (N group), model group (D group) and intervention group (D+UA group), D group and D+UA group established diabetes models through intraperitoneal injection of STZ, D+UA group received intragastric administration of ursolic acid, and then insulin sensitivity, glucose metabolism in retina as well as the expression levels of GLUTs, HIF-1α/VEGF/VEGFR2 pathway and IKKβ/IKBα/NF-κB pathway in retina tissue of three groups were detected. Results:AUC of D group was significantly lower than that of N group, and HOMA-IR, sugar content in retina tissue as well as GLUT-1, GLUT-3, HIF-1α, VEGF, VEGFR2, IKKβ, IKBα, NF-κB, TNF-α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin levels were significantly higher than those of N group;AUC of D+UA group was significantly higher than that of D group, and HOMA-IR, sugar content in retina tissue as well as GLUT-1, GLUT-3, HIF-1α, VEGF, VEGFR2, IKK毬, IKBα, NF-κB, TNF-α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin levels were significantly lower than those of D group. Conclusion:Ursolic acid can increase insulin sensitivity, reduce sugar content in retina tissue and inhibit angiogenesis and inflammation degree in retina tissue, and has preventive effect on retinopathy in diabetic mice.

  3. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function.

  4. Failure mechanisms of lead/acid automotive batteries in service in the U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, John H.; Boden, David P.

    Discarded lead/acid batteries were selected at random without regard to brand or condition and these were inspected and tested to determine the causes of failure. Samples were limited to 12-V automotive passenger-car batteries. Their age was determined from the manufacturing code and shipping date. In addition to the cause of failure, information on battery components and construction was also noted. Data are presented showing the principal modes of failure, the effect of geographical location, and the influence of grid alloy on life. In particular, the differences observed between those batteries utilizing calcium alloy for the positive grids and those using antimony alloy are discussed.

  5. Kinetics and Mechanism of Acetoxymercuration and Acid-Catalysed Hydration of α-Alkylstyrenes

    OpenAIRE

    Oldřich Pytela; TaÃ…Â¥jana NevěÄÂná; Monika Pelcová; Jan Svoboda

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: Nine α-alkylstyrenes carrying the following substituents have been synthesised: methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, pentyl, isobutyl, isopropyl, sec-butyl and tert-butyl. Kinetics has been measured for the reaction of these compounds with mercuric acetate in anhydrous acetic acid at 25 °C. The rate constants are very sensitive to inductive effects (ÃÂI = –49.5 in AISE theory) and steric effects (È = –1.59 according to Charton). These results support the presumed existenc...

  6. Study on Reaction Mechanism for Cracking FCC Gasoline on Acid Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Youhao; Wang Xieqing

    2004-01-01

    This article is based on the experimental data on reaction of FCC naphtha in the presence of acid catalysts. The data published in the literature were reprocessed and compared with experimental data and the relationship of hydrogen and methane contained in the dry gas with the conversion rate was identified.The similarity between the route for cracking of olefin enriched FCC gasoline and the route for reaction of individual hydrocarbons was deduced, while the route for formation of ethylene in dry gas was also proposed to identify the relationship between the reaction path for formation of ethylene and the conversion rate.

  7. The combined efficacy of carvacrol and modified atmosphere packaging on the survival of Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and lactic acid bacteria on turkey breast cutlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Divek V T; Kiess, Aaron; Nannapaneni, Rama; Schilling, Wes; Sharma, Chander Shekhar

    2015-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of carvacrol in combination with modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) in reducing Salmonella on turkey breast cutlets stored at 4 °C. In experiment I, carvacrol (0.5, 1, and 2% v/v) was applied as surface treatment and samples were stored under aerobic condition or as surface and dip treatments followed by storage in an environment of 100% carbon dioxide. The findings of the experiment I revealed the synergistic activity of carvacrol with carbon dioxide in reducing Salmonella when used as dip treatment compared to the surface treatment. In experiment II, turkey breast cutlets were dip treated with carvacrol (0.25, 0.5, and 1% v/v) for 30 s and stored under MAP (95% carbon dioxide and 5% oxygen) to evaluate the efficacy against Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and lactic acid bacteria on turkey breast cutlets. In experiment II, the combined application of carvacrol and MAP resulted in 1.0-2.0 log CFU/g reduction (P ≤ 0.05) of both Salmonella and Campylobacter on turkey breast cutlets for 7 d storage at 4 °C. MAP alone and in combination with carvacrol reduced lactic acid bacteria (P ≤ 0.05) on cutlets stored at 4 °C for 21 d period. There was no difference (P ≤ 0.05) in meat color among treatments and controls except for an increased paleness of meat (P ≤ 0.05) observed for the 1% carvacrol treated cutlets stored under MAP after 21 d of storage. The high concentration of carbon dioxide and carvacrol treatments did not cause any alteration in meat pH (P ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, carvacrol was effective at a low concentration of 0.25% (v/v) in reducing Salmonella and C. jejuni by ∼1.0 log CFU/g when stored under MAP. PMID:25846923

  8. Effects of the Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare L. on Survival of Pathogenic Bacteria and Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria in Semihard Cheese Broth and Slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Geany Targino; de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Schaffner, Donald; de Souza, Evandro Leite; Magnani, Marciane

    2016-02-01

    This study assessed the inhibitory effects of the essential oil from Origanum vulgare L. (OVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and a mesophilic starter coculture composed of lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris) in Brazilian coalho cheese systems. The MIC of OVEO was 2.5 μl/ml against both S. aureus and L. monocytogenes and 0.6 μl/ml against the tested starter coculture. In cheese broth containing OVEO at 0.6 μl/ml, no decrease in viable cell counts (VCC) of both pathogenic bacteria was observed, whereas the initial VCC of the starter coculture decreased approximately 1.0 log CFU/ml after 24 h of exposure at 10°C. OVEO at 1.25 and 2.5 μl/ml caused reductions of up to 2.0 and 2.5 log CFU/ml in S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, respectively, after 24 h of exposure in cheese broth. At these same concentrations, OVEO caused a greater decrease of initial VCC of the starter coculture following 4 h of exposure. Higher concentrations of OVEO were required to decrease the VCC of all target bacteria in semisolid coalho cheese slurry compared with cheese broth. The VCC of Lactococcus spp. in coalho cheese slurry containing OVEO were always lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the concentrations of OVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in semihard cheese should be carefully evaluated because of its inhibitory effects on the growth of starter lactic acid cultures used during the production of the product.

  9. The combined efficacy of carvacrol and modified atmosphere packaging on the survival of Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and lactic acid bacteria on turkey breast cutlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Divek V T; Kiess, Aaron; Nannapaneni, Rama; Schilling, Wes; Sharma, Chander Shekhar

    2015-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of carvacrol in combination with modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) in reducing Salmonella on turkey breast cutlets stored at 4 °C. In experiment I, carvacrol (0.5, 1, and 2% v/v) was applied as surface treatment and samples were stored under aerobic condition or as surface and dip treatments followed by storage in an environment of 100% carbon dioxide. The findings of the experiment I revealed the synergistic activity of carvacrol with carbon dioxide in reducing Salmonella when used as dip treatment compared to the surface treatment. In experiment II, turkey breast cutlets were dip treated with carvacrol (0.25, 0.5, and 1% v/v) for 30 s and stored under MAP (95% carbon dioxide and 5% oxygen) to evaluate the efficacy against Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and lactic acid bacteria on turkey breast cutlets. In experiment II, the combined application of carvacrol and MAP resulted in 1.0-2.0 log CFU/g reduction (P ≤ 0.05) of both Salmonella and Campylobacter on turkey breast cutlets for 7 d storage at 4 °C. MAP alone and in combination with carvacrol reduced lactic acid bacteria (P ≤ 0.05) on cutlets stored at 4 °C for 21 d period. There was no difference (P ≤ 0.05) in meat color among treatments and controls except for an increased paleness of meat (P ≤ 0.05) observed for the 1% carvacrol treated cutlets stored under MAP after 21 d of storage. The high concentration of carbon dioxide and carvacrol treatments did not cause any alteration in meat pH (P ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, carvacrol was effective at a low concentration of 0.25% (v/v) in reducing Salmonella and C. jejuni by ∼1.0 log CFU/g when stored under MAP.

  10. A STUDY ON THE DEGRADATION MECHANISM OF PHOTOCROSSLINKING PRODUCTS FORMED BY CYCLIZED POLYISOPRENE-DIAZIDE SYSTEM UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALKYL BENZENE SULFONIC ACIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Junlian; SUN Meng

    1989-01-01

    The degradation mechanism of photocrosslinking products formed by cyclized polyisoprene-diazide system under the influence of the different alkyl benzene sulfonic acids was studied. The effects ofalkyl chain length and the concentration of alkyl benzene sulfonic acids on the rate of degradation reaction were discussed. It was found that in the initial stage of degradation, the cyclicity ratio and the average fused ring number did not change considerably, but the percentage of uncyclized parts content varied significantly. The suitable mechanism was supposed.

  11. Glucose transformation to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in acidic ionic liquid: A quantum mechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin; Puripat, Maneeporn; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Parasuk, Vudhichai; Irle, Stephan

    2016-01-30

    Isomerization and transformation of glucose and fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in both ionic liquids (ILs) and water has been studied by the reference interaction site model self-consistent field spatial electron density distribution (RISM-SCF-SEDD) method coupled with ab initio electronic structure theory, namely coupled cluster single, double, and perturbative triple excitation (CCSD(T)). Glucose isomerization to fructose has been investigated via cyclic and open chain mechanisms. In water, the calculations support the cyclic mechanism of glucose isomerization; with the predicted activation free energy is 23.8 kcal mol(-1) at experimental condition. Conversely, open ring mechanism is more favorable in ILs with the energy barrier is 32.4 kcal mol(-1) . Moreover, the transformation of fructose into HMF via cyclic mechanism is reasonable; the calculated activation barriers are 16.0 and 21.5 kcal mol(-1) in aqueous and ILs solutions, respectively. The solvent effects of ILs could be explained by the decomposition of free energies and radial distribution functions of solute-solvent that are produced by RISM-SCF-SEDD. PMID:26453901

  12. Agrofibre reinforced poly(lactic acid) composites: Effect of moisture on degradation and mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oever, van den M.J.A.; Beck, B.; Müssig, J.

    2010-01-01

    Natural fibre reinforced PLA composites are a 100% biobased material with a promising mechanical properties profile. However, natural fibres are hygroscopic whereas PLA is sensitive to hydrolytic degradation under melt processing conditions in the presence of small amounts of water. Here, we determi

  13. MALDI mechanism of dihydroxybenzoic acid isomers: desorption of neutral matrix and analyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chi Wei; Lee, Chih Hao; Lin, Yu-Jiun; Lee, Yuan Tseh; Ni, Chi Kung

    2013-05-01

    Angular resolved velocity distributions of laser desorbed neutral matrices (dihydroxybenzoic acids, DHB) and analytes (tryptophan) embedded in these matrices were investigated at 322 nm by a modified crossed molecular beam apparatus. Desorbed ions generated from MALDI were measured by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Desorptions of neutral matrix and analyte from 2,3-DHB, 2,4-DHB, 2,5-DHB, 2,6-DHB, and 3,5--DHB at 322 nm have similar properties, but the ion intensities are in the order 2,3DHB ≅ 2,6-DHB > 2,5-DHB ≅ 2,4-DHB > 3,5-DHB. It indicates that the combination of various parameters related to neutral species, including absorption coefficient, sublimation energy, contact of analyte and matrix in crystal, and plume dynamics of desorbed species are not crucial in the determination of MALDI process for DHB isomers. The difference of matrix activity of DHB isomers at this wavelength must result from the other properties, like the excited state lifetime, proton affinity, gas-phase basicity, acidity, ionization energy, or the other properties related to the primary reactions in ion generation.

  14. Inhibitory mechanism of dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) in the cellular biomethylation of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuping; Shi, Nan; Geng, Zhirong; Li, Xiangli; Hu, Xin; Wang, Zhilin

    2014-11-01

    Dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) has been approved for the treatment of arsenic poisoning through promoting arsenic excretion and modulating arsenic species. To clarify how DMPS regulates the excretion of arsenic species, we investigated the effects of DMPS on the biomethylation of arsenite (As(3+)) in HepG2 cells. In the experiments, we found that DMPS at low concentrations dramatically decreased the content of arsenic in HepG2 cells and inhibited the cellular methylation of As(3+). Three aspects, the expression of human arsenic (III) methyltransferase (hAS3MT), the accumulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the in vitro enzymatic methylation of arsenic, were considered to explain the reasons for the inhibition of DMPS in arsenic metabolism. The results suggested that DMPS competitively coordinated with As(3+) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(3+)) to inhibit the up-regulation of arsenic on the expression of hAS3MT and block arsenic involving in the enzymatic methylation. Moreover, DMPS eliminated arsenic-induced accumulation of ROS, which might contribute to the antidotal effects of DMPS on arsenic posing.

  15. Effects of mechanical loading on the degradability and mechanical properties of the nanocalcium-deficient hydroxyapatite–multi(amino acid copolymer composite membrane tube for guided bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan H

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hong Duan,1 Hongsheng Yang,1 Yan Xiong,1 Bin Zhang,1 Cheng Ren,1 Li Min,1 Wenli Zhang,1 Yonggang Yan,2 Hong Li,2 Fuxing Pei,1 Chongqi Tu11Department of Orthopedics, 2School of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of ChinaBackground and methods: Guided bone regeneration (GBR is a new treatment for bone defects, and the property of membrane is critical to the success of GBR. This study focuses on a novel membrane tube for GBR, which was prepared by a nanocalcium-deficient hydroxyapatite–multi(amino acid copolymer (n-CDHA-MAC composite. The biomechanical strength and degradability of this membrane tube under mechanical loading after immersion in phosphate-buffered solution were investigated to evaluate the effects of mechanical loading on the membrane tube. The membrane-tube group with no mechanical loading and femora bone were used as controls.Results: The compressive strength and bending strength of n-CDHA-MAC membrane tubes were 66.4 ± 10.2 MPa and 840.7 ± 12.1 MPa, which were lower than those of the goats’ femoral bones (69.0 ± 5.5 MPa and 900.2 ± 17.3 MPa, but there were no significant (P > 0.05 differences. In the in vitro degradability experiment, all membrane tubes were degradable and showed a surface-erosion degradation model. The PH of solution fluctuated from 7.2 to 7.5. The weight and mechanical strength of loaded tubes decreased more quickly than nonloaded ones, with significant differences (P < 0.05. However, the strength of the loaded group after degradation achieved 20.4 ± 1.2 MPa, which was greater than the maximum mechanical strength of 4.338 MPa based on goat femoral middle stationary state by three-dimensional finite-element analysis.Conclusions: n-CDHA-MAC membrane tubes have good biomechanical strength during degradation under mechanical loading. Therefore, this membrane tube is an ideal GBR membrane for critical size defects of long bones in goats for animal experiments

  16. Selective recovery of Pd(II) from extremely acidic solution using ion-imprinted chitosan fiber: Adsorption performance and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuo; Wei, Wei; Wu, Xiaohui; Zhou, Tao; Mao, Juan; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2015-12-15

    A novel, selective and acid-resisting chitosan fiber adsorbent was prepared by the ion-imprinting technique using Pd(II) and epichlorohydrin as the template and two-step crosslinking agent, respectively. The resulting ion-imprinted chitosan fibers (IIF) were used to selectively adsorb Pd(II) under extremely acidic synthetic metal solutions. The adsorption and selectivity performances of IIF including kinetics, isotherms, pH effects, and regeneration were investigated. Pd(II) rapidly adsorbed on the IIF within 100 min, achieving the adsorption equilibrium. The isotherm results showed that the maximum Pd(II) uptake on the IIF was maintained as 324.6-326.4 mg g(-1) in solutions containing single and multiple metals, whereas the Pd(II) uptake on non-imprinted fibers (NIF) decreased from 313.7 to 235.3 mg g(-1) in solution containing multiple metals. Higher selectivity coefficients values were obtained from the adsorption on the IIF, indicating a better Pd(II) selectivity. The amine group, supposedly the predominant adsorption site for Pd(II), was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The pH value played a significant role on the mechanism of the selective adsorption in the extremely acidic conditions. Furthermore, the stabilized performance for three cycles of sorption/desorption shows a potential for further large-scale applications. PMID:26073516

  17. High-fat feeding reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rats: differential mechanisms for saturated and unsaturated fatty acids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-Yao; Gao, Yu; Di, Yu-Wei; Pan, Li-Li; Zhou, Yu; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2006-08-01

    1. Chronic feeding with a high-fat diet can cause metabolic syndrome in rodents similar to humans, but the role of saturated versus unsaturated fats in vascular tension remains unclear. 2. The present study shows that rats on a diet rich in either saturated or unsaturated fat had higher blood pressure compared with chow-fed rats (approximately 130 vs 100 mmHg, respectively), along with hyperlipidaemia and insulin resistance. Compared with responses of phenylephrine-preconstricted artery segments from chow-fed rats, vasorelaxation of isolated renal arteries from high-fat fed rats was reduced substantially (> 50%) in response to acetylcholine (0.01-10 micromol/L) and moderately to nitroprusside (>or=1 micromol/L) at low concentrations. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation of arteries from high-fat fed rats was also more sensitive to inhibition by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitors NG-nitro-L-arginine and methylene blue. 3. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, the production of NO and endothelin-1 was significantly inhibited by unsaturated fatty acids. In comparison, saturated fatty acids stimulated endothelin-1 production without altering NO production. 4. The data indicate that both saturated and unsaturated high-fat feeding may result in an increase in blood pressure owing to reduced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in the arterial system. The impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation induced by saturated and unsaturated fatty acids may involve different mechanisms.

  18. Mechanism of azo dye degradation by ionizing radiation. Degradation of sulfanilic acid azochromotrop and its parent compounds in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Mechanistic studies were made on ·OH radical and hydrated electron reaction with Sulfanilic Acid Azochromotrop (SPADNS) as model azo dye. SPADNS contains 4,5-dihydroxynaphtalene 2,7-disulfonic acid part and 4-sulfophenylazo group. To establish the details of the reaction mechanism the reactions of two simpler molecules without 4-sulfophenylazo part were also studied: one of them contained one (in position 4, II), the other two (in positions 4 and 5, III) -OH groups. ·OH radicals react with these molecules with radical addition to the naphthalene 2,7-disulfonic acid part. The adduct cyclohexadienyl type radical may decay in radical-radical reactions, or undergoes a (pH dependent) water elimination to naphthoxy radical, radical decay takes place on the ms timescale. ·OH radical addition on the azo bond in dyes has low importance. Degradation efficiencies are 0.6-0.8. The hydrated electron in the case of the two simpler molecules reacts with the rings, while in the case of dye with the azo bond. Electron scavenging is followed by protonation, this reaction in the case of II and III yields cyclohexadienyl, while with the dye hydrazo radical. The efficiency of degradation with II and III is 0.2-0.6, while for the dye it is close to 1.

  19. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium. PMID:27371890

  20. Improvement of L(+)-Lactic Acid Production of Rhizopus Oryzae by Low-Energy Ions and Analysis of Its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Chunmei; YANG Yingge; FAN Yonghong; LI Wen; PAN Renrui; ZHENG Zhiming; YU Zengliang

    2008-01-01

    The wild type strain Rhizopus oryzae PW352 was mutated by means of nitrogen ion implantation (15 keV, 7.8 × 104 ~ 2.08 × 105 ions/cm2) to find an industrial strain with a higher L(+)-lactic acid yield, and two mutants RE3303 and RF9052 were isolated. In order to discuss the mechanism primarily,Lactate Dehydrogenase of Rhizopus oryzae was studied. While the two mutants produced L(+)-lactic acid by 75% more than the wild strain did, their specific activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase was found to be higher than that in the wild strain. The optimum temperature of Lactate Dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae RF9052 was higher. Compared to the wild strain, the Michaelis constant (Km) value of Lactate Dehydrogenase in the mutants was Changed. All these changes show that L(+)-lactic acid production has a correlation with the specific activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase. The low-energy ions, implanted into the strain, may improve the specific activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase by influencing its gene structure and protein structure.