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Sample records for acids survival mechanisms

  1. Mechanism of Human Influenza Virus RNA Persistence and Virion Survival in Feces: Mucus Protects Virions From Acid and Digestive Juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Ryohei; Nakaya, Takaaki; Naito, Yuji; Daidoji, Tomo; Watanabe, Yohei; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2017-07-01

    Although viral RNA or infectious virions have been detected in the feces of individuals infected with human influenza A and B viruses (IAV/IBV), the mechanism of viral survival in the gastrointestinal tract remains unclear. We developed a model that attempts to recapitulate the conditions encountered by a swallowed virus. While IAV/IBV are vulnerable to simulated digestive juices (gastric acid and bile/pancreatic juice), highly viscous mucus protects viral RNA and virions, allowing the virus to retain its infectivity. Our results suggest that virions and RNA present in swallowed mucus are not inactivated or degraded by the gastrointestinal environment, allowing their detection in feces. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The Staphylococcus aureus response to unsaturated long chain free fatty acids: survival mechanisms and virulence implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Kenny

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important human commensal and opportunistic pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections. Long chain unsaturated free fatty acids represent a barrier to colonisation and infection by S. aureus and act as an antimicrobial component of the innate immune system where they are found on epithelial surfaces and in abscesses. Despite many contradictory reports, the precise anti-staphylococcal mode of action of free fatty acids remains undetermined. In this study, transcriptional (microarrays and qRT-PCR and translational (proteomics analyses were applied to ascertain the response of S. aureus to a range of free fatty acids. An increase in expression of the sigma(B and CtsR stress response regulons was observed. This included increased expression of genes associated with staphyloxanthin synthesis, which has been linked to membrane stabilisation. Similarly, up-regulation of genes involved in capsule formation was recorded as were significant changes in the expression of genes associated with peptidoglycan synthesis and regulation. Overall, alterations were recorded predominantly in pathways involved in cellular energetics. In addition, sensitivity to linoleic acid of a range of defined (sigB, arcA, sasF, sarA, agr, crtM and transposon-derived mutants (vraE, SAR2632 was determined. Taken together, these data indicate a common mode of action for long chain unsaturated fatty acids that involves disruption of the cell membrane, leading to interference with energy production within the bacterial cell. Contrary to data reported for other strains, the clinically important EMRSA-16 strain MRSA252 used in this study showed an increase in expression of the important virulence regulator RNAIII following all of the treatment conditions tested. An adaptive response by S. aureus of reducing cell surface hydrophobicity was also observed. Two fatty acid sensitive mutants created during this study were also shown to diplay altered

  3. Survival mechanism of Escherichia coli O157:H7 against combined treatment with acetic acid and sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Young; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The combination of salt and acid is commonly used in the production of many foods, including pickles and fermented foods. However, in our previous studies, the addition of salt significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on Escherichia coli O157:H7 in laboratory media and pickled cucumbers. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the mechanism by which salt confers resistance against acetic acid in E. coli O157:H7. The addition of high concentrations (up to 9% or 15% [w/v]) of salt increased the resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to acetic acid treatment. Combined treatment with acetic acid and salt showed varying results among different bacterial strains (an antagonistic effect for E. coli O157:H7 and Shigella and a synergistic effect for Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus). The addition of salt increased the cytoplasmic pH of E. coli O157:H7, but decreased the cytoplasmic pH of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus on treatment with acetic acid. Therefore, the addition of salt increases the acid resistance of E. coli O157:H7 possibly by increasing its acid resistance response and consequently preventing the acidification of its cytoplasm by organic acids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

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    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (Harvard-Med); (IIT); (NCSU); (UPENN); (Manchester); (Orthovita)

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  5. Acid adaptation of Listeria monocytogenes can enhance survival in acidic foods and during milk fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahan, C G; O'Driscoll, B; Hill, C

    1996-09-01

    We have previously shown that tolerance to severe acid stress (pH 3.5) can be induced in Listeria monocytogenes following a 1-h adaptation to mild acid (pH 5.5), a phenomenon termed the acid tolerance response (ATR) (B. O'Driscoll, C. G. M. Gahan, and C. Hill, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:1693-1698, 1966). In an attempt to determine the industrial significance of the ATR, we have examined the survival of adapted and nonadapted cells in a variety of acidic foods. Acid adaptation enhanced the survival of L. monocytogenes in acidified dairy products, including cottage cheese, yogurt, and whole-fat cheddar cheese. Acid-adapted L. monocytogenes cultures also demonstrated increased survival during active milk fermentation by a lactic acid culture. Similarly, acid-adapted cells showed greatly improved survival in low-pH foods (orange juice and salad dressing) containing acids other than lactic acid. However, in foods with a marginally higher pH, such as mozzarella cheese, a commercial cottage cheese, or low-fat cheddar cheese, acid adaptation did not appear to enhance survival. We have previously isolated mutants of L. monocytogenes that are constitutively acid tolerant in the absence of an induction step (O'Driscoll et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:1693-1698, 1996). In the present study, one such mutant, ATM56, demonstrated an increased ability to survive in low-pH foods and during milk fermentation when compared with the wild-type strain. Significant numbers of ATM56 could be recovered even after 70 days in both whole-fat and low-fat cheddar cheese. Collectively, the data suggest that ATR mechanisms, whether constitutive or induced, can greatly influence the survival of L. monocytogenes in low-pH food environments.

  6. Uric acid, an important antioxidant contributing to survival in termites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, Eisuke; Sakurai, Hiroki; Nitao, Masaru; Matsuura, Kenji; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated spontaneously in all organisms and cause oxidative damage to biomolecules when present in excess. Accumulated oxidative damage accelerates aging; enhanced antioxidant capacity may be a positive factor for longevity. Recently, numerous studies of aging and longevity have been performed using short-lived animals, however, longevity mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show that a termite Reticulitermes speratus that is thought to be long-lived eusocial insect than other solitary insects uses large quantities of uric acid as an antioxidant against ROS. We demonstrated that the accumulation of uric acid considerably increases the free radical-scavenging activity and resistance against ultraviolet-induced oxidative stress in laboratory-maintained termites. In addition, we found that externally administered uric acid aided termite survival under highly oxidative conditions. The present data demonstrates that in addition to nutritional and metabolic roles, uric acid is an essential antioxidant for survival and contributes significantly to longevity. Uric acid also plays important roles in primates but causes gout when present in excess in humans. Further longevity studies of long-lived organisms may provide important breakthroughs with human health applications. PMID:28609463

  7. MECHANICAL TRANSMISSION AND SURVIVAL OF BACTERIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    The transmission of enset bacterial wilt with contaminated knives and the survival of the causal agent in soil and enset plant debris was studied ... Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm) isolates were observed to survive in the soil up to. 9 days. Thereafter the .... and needle, while pathogenicity tests were carried ...

  8. MECHANICAL TRANSMISSION AND SURVIVAL OF BACTERIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    Key Words: Bacterial wilt, enset, survival, transmission, Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum. RÉSUMÉ. La transmission .... than young plants. A 100% disease incidence was recorded at 60 days after inoculation on plants inoculated at 6 months after transplanting. Plants inoculated at. 6 months after transplanting had ...

  9. Influence of old age on survival after prolonged mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endeman, H.; Heeffer, L.; Holleman, F.; Westendorp, R. G. J.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While the proportion of elderly people in society is increasing, little is known about the influence of old age on survival after prolonged mechanical ventilation. METHODS: A retrospective follow-up study of 120 patients who had been mechanically ventilated for at least 10 days was

  10. The Survival Advantage: Underlying Mechanisms and Extant Limitations

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    Stephanie A. Kazanas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers have begun to investigate the function of memory in our evolutionary history. According to Nairne and colleagues (e.g., Nairne, Pandeirada, and Thompson, 2008; Nairne, Thompson, and Pandeirada, 2007, the best mnemonic strategy for learning lists of unrelated words may be one that addresses the same problems that our Pleistocene ancestors faced: fitness-relevant problems including securing food and water, as well as protecting themselves from predators. Survival processing has been shown to promote better recall and recognition memory than many well-known mnemonic strategies (e.g., pleasantness ratings, imagery, generation, etc.. However, the survival advantage does not extend to all types of stimuli and tasks. The current review presents research that has replicated Nairne et al.'s (2007 original findings, in addition to the research designs that fail to replicate the survival advantage. In other words, there are specific manipulations in which survival processing does not appear to benefit memory any more than other strategies. Potential mechanisms for the survival advantage are described, with an emphasis on those that are the most plausible. These proximate mechanisms outline the memory processes that may contribute to the advantage, although the ultimate mechanism may be the congruity between the survival scenario and Pleistocene problem-solving.

  11. Parasites in the immunized host: Mechanisms of survival : book review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, Dirk

    1975-01-01

    Despite the fact that parasites provoke immune responses in their host, they appear to have adapted themselves to those responses in ways which ensure their survival and transmission. At the symposium, 14 papers were presented, in which these escape mechanisms were further discussed for some

  12. Role of Listeria monocytogenes sigma(B) in survival of lethal acidic conditions and in the acquired acid tolerance response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Adriana; Sue, David; O'Byrne, Conor P; Boor, Kathryn J

    2003-05-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can acquire enhanced resistance to lethal acid conditions through multiple mechanisms. We investigated contributions of the stress-responsive alternative sigma factor, sigma(B), which is encoded by sigB, to growth phase-dependent acid resistance (AR) and to the adaptive acid tolerance response in L. monocytogenes. At various points throughout growth, we compared the relative survival of L. monocytogenes wild-type and DeltasigB strains that had been exposed to either brain heart infusion (pH 2.5) or synthetic gastric fluid (pH 2.5) with and without prior acid adaptation. Under these conditions, survival of the DeltasigB strain was consistently lower than that of the wild-type strain throughout all phases of growth, ranging from 4 orders of magnitude less in mid-log phase to 2 orders of magnitude less in stationary phase. Survival of both DeltasigB and wild-type L. monocytogenes strains increased by 6 orders of magnitude upon entry into stationary phase, demonstrating that the L. monocytogenes growth phase-dependent AR mechanism is sigma(B) independent. sigma(B)-mediated contributions to acquired acid tolerance appear to be greatest in early logarithmic growth. Loss of a functional sigma(B) reduced the survival of L. monocytogenes at pH 2.5 to a greater extent in the presence of organic acid (100 mM acetic acid) than in the presence of inorganic acid alone (HCl), suggesting that L. monocytogenes protection against organic and inorganic acid may be mediated through different mechanisms. sigma(B) does not appear to contribute to pH(i) homeostasis through regulation of net proton movement across the cell membrane or by regulation of pH(i) buffering by the GAD system under the conditions examined in this study. In summary, a functional sigma(B) protein is necessary for full resistance of L. monocytogenes to lethal acid treatments.

  13. Stress-Survival Gene Identification From an Acid Mine Drainage Algal Mat Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Navarrete, J.; Fujishima, K.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.; Rothschild-Mancinelli, B.; Rothschild, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities from acid mine drainage environments are exposed to multiple stressors to include low pH, high dissolved metal loads, seasonal freezing, and desiccation. The microbial and algal communities that inhabit these niche environments have evolved strategies that allow for their ecological success. Metagenomic analyses are useful in identifying species diversity, however they do not elucidate the mechanisms that allow for the resilience of a community under these extreme conditions. Many known or predicted genes encode for protein products that are unknown, or similarly, many proteins cannot be traced to their gene of origin. This investigation seeks to identify genes that are active in an algal consortium during stress from living in an acid mine drainage environment. Our approach involves using the entire community transcriptome for a functional screen in an Escherichia coli host. This approach directly targets the genes involved in survival, without need for characterizing the members of the consortium.The consortium was harvested and stressed with conditions similar to the native environment it was collected from. Exposure to low pH (E. coli. The transformed E. coli were exposed to the same stressors as the original algal consortium to select for surviving cells. Successful cells incorporated the transcripts that encode survival mechanisms, thus allowing for selection and identification of the gene(s) involved. Initial selection screens for freeze and desiccation tolerance have yielded E. coli that are 1 order of magnitude more resistant to freezing (0.01% survival of control with no transcript, 0.2% survival of E. coli with transcript) and 3 orders of magnitude more resistant to desiccation (0.005% survival of control cells with no transcripts, 5% survival of cells with transcript).This work is transformative because genetic functions can be selected without having prior knowledge of the genes or of the organisms involved. Work continues to

  14. Antioxidant supplementation can reduce the survival costs of excess amino acid intake in honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, C Ruth; Köhler, Angela; Pirk, Christian W W; Oosthuizen, Vinette; Apostolides, Zeno; Nicolson, Susan W

    2014-12-01

    Over-consuming amino acids is associated with reduced survival in many species, including honeybees. The mechanisms responsible for this are unclear but one possibility is that excessive intake of amino acids increases oxidative damage. If this is the case, antioxidant supplementation may help reduce the survival costs of high amino acid intake. We tested this hypothesis in African honeybees (Apis mellifera scutellata) using the major antioxidant in green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). We first determined the dose-range of EGCG that improved survival of caged honeybees fed sucrose solution. We then provided bees with eight diets that differed in their ratio of essential amino acids (EAA) to carbohydrate (C) (0:1, 1:250, 1:100, 1:75, 1:50, 1:25, 1:10, 1:5 EAA:C) and also in their EGCG dose (0.0 or 0.4 mM). We found that bees fed sucrose only solution survived better than bees fed EAA diets. Despite this, bees preferred a diet that contained intermediate ratios of EAA:C (ca. 1:25), which may represent the high demands for nitrogen of developing nurse bees. EGCG supplementation improved honeybee survival but only at an intermediate dose (0.3-0.5 mM) and in bees fed low EAA diets (1:250, 1:100 EAA:C). That EGCG counteracted the lifespan reducing effects of eating low EAA diets suggests that oxidative damage may be involved in the association between EAAs and lifespan in honeybees. However, that EGCG had no effect on survival in bees fed high EAA diets suggests that there are other physiological costs of over-consuming EAAs in honeybees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interactive effects involving different classes of excitatory amino acid receptors and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    Differentiating granule cells develop survival requirements in culture which can be met by treatment with high K+ or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and, according to our recent findings, also with low concentrations of kainic acid (KA, 50 microM). We have now attempted to elucidate the mechanism(s) ...

  16. Cometary impact and amino acid survival - Chemical kinetics and thermochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    The Arrhenius parameters for the initiating reactions in butane thermolysis and the formation of soot, reliable to at least 3000 K, have been applied to the question of the survival of amino acids in cometary impacts on early Earth. The pressure/temperature/time course employed here was that developed in hydrocode simulations for kilometer-sized comets (Pierazzo and Chyba, 1999), with attention to the track below 3000 K where it is shown that potential stabilizing effects of high pressure become unimportant kinetically. The question of survival can then be considered without the need for assignment of activation volumes and the related uncertainties in their application to extreme conditions. The exercise shows that the characteristic times for soot formation in the interval fall well below the cooling periods for impacts ranging from fully vertical down to about 9?? above horizontal. Decarboxylation, which emerges as more rapid than soot formation below 2000-3000 K, continues further down to extremely narrow impact angles, and accordingly cometa??ry delivery of amino acids to early Earth is highly unlikely. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  17. Survival of the Fittest: Overcoming Oxidative Stress at the Extremes of Acid, Heat and Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Maezato

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The habitat of metal respiring acidothermophilic lithoautotrophs is perhaps the most oxidizing environment yet identified. Geothermal heat, sulfuric acid and transition metals contribute both individually and synergistically under aerobic conditions to create this niche. Sulfuric acid and metals originating from sulfidic ores catalyze oxidative reactions attacking microbial cell surfaces including lipids, proteins and glycosyl groups. Sulfuric acid also promotes hydrocarbon dehydration contributing to the formation of black “burnt” carbon. Oxidative reactions leading to abstraction of electrons is further impacted by heat through an increase in the proportion of reactant molecules with sufficient energy to react. Collectively these factors and particularly those related to metals must be overcome by thermoacidophilic lithoautotrophs in order for them to survive and proliferate. The necessary mechanisms to achieve this goal are largely unknown however mechanistics insights have been gained through genomic studies. This review focuses on the specific role of metals in this extreme environment with an emphasis on resistance mechanisms in Archaea.

  18. Overview on mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are a group of gram-negative or gram-variable bacteria which possess an obligate aerobic property with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, meanwhile transform ethanol and sugar to corresponding aldehydes, ketones and organic acids. Since the first genus Acetobacter of AAB was established in 1898, 16 AAB genera have been recorded so far. As the main producer of a world-wide condiment, vinegar, AAB have evolved an elegant adaptive system that enables them to survive and produce a high concentration of acetic acid. Some researches and reviews focused on mechanisms of acid resistance in enteric bacteria and made the mechanisms thoroughly understood, while a few investigations did in AAB. As the related technologies with proteome, transcriptome and genome were rapidly developed and applied to AAB research, some plausible mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in some AAB strains have been published. In this review, the related mechanisms of AAB against acetic acid with acetic acid assimilation, transportation systems, cell morphology and membrane compositions, adaptation response, and fermentation conditions will be described. Finally, a framework for future research for anti-acid AAB will be provided.

  19. SCWISh network is essential for survival under mechanical pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, Morgan; Poterewicz, Gregory; Hoxha, Ori; Choi, Jessica; Yoo, Wonjung; Kayser, Jona; Holt, Liam; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2017-12-19

    Cells that proliferate within a confined environment build up mechanical compressive stress. For example, mechanical pressure emerges in the naturally space-limited tumor environment. However, little is known about how cells sense and respond to mechanical compression. We developed microfluidic bioreactors to enable the investigation of the effects of compressive stress on the growth of the genetically tractable model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae We used this system to determine that compressive stress is partly sensed through a module consisting of the mucin Msb2 and the cell wall protein Sho1, which act together as a sensor module in one of the two major osmosensing pathways in budding yeast. This signal is transmitted via the MAPKKK kinase Ste11. Thus, we term this mechanosensitive pathway the "SMuSh" pathway, for Ste11 through Mucin/Sho1 pathway. The SMuSh pathway delays cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and improves cell survival in response to growth-induced pressure. We also found that the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway contributes to the response to mechanical compressive stress. These latter results are confirmed in complimentary experiments in Mishra et al. [Mishra R, et al. (2017) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 10.1073/pnas.1709079114]. When both the SMuSh and the CWI pathways are deleted, cells fail to adapt to compressive stress, and all cells lyse at relatively low pressure when grown in confinement. Thus, we define a network that is essential for cell survival during growth under pressure. We term this mechanosensory system the SCWISh (survival through the CWI and SMuSh) network.

  20. Acid tolerance mechanisms utilized by Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Robert; Cvitkovitch, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1924 by J Clarke, Streptococcus mutans has been the focus of rigorous research efforts due to its involvement in caries initiation and progression. Its ability to ferment a range of dietary carbohydrates can rapidly drop the external environmental pH, thereby making dental plaque inhabitable to many competing species and can ultimately lead to tooth decay. Acid production by this oral pathogen would prove suicidal if not for its remarkable ability to withstand the acid onslaught by utilizing a wide variety of highly evolved acid-tolerance mechanisms. The elucidation of these mechanisms will be discussed, serving as the focus of this review. PMID:20210551

  1. Survival Predictions of Ceramic Crowns Using Statistical Fracture Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrin, S; Katsube, N; Seghi, R R; Rokhlin, S I

    2017-05-01

    This work establishes a survival probability methodology for interface-initiated fatigue failures of monolithic ceramic crowns under simulated masticatory loading. A complete 3-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis model of a minimally reduced molar crown was developed using commercially available hardware and software. Estimates of material surface flaw distributions and fatigue parameters for 3 reinforced glass-ceramics (fluormica [FM], leucite [LR], and lithium disilicate [LD]) and a dense sintered yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YZ) were obtained from the literature and incorporated into the model. Utilizing the proposed fracture mechanics-based model, crown survival probability as a function of loading cycles was obtained from simulations performed on the 4 ceramic materials utilizing identical crown geometries and loading conditions. The weaker ceramic materials (FM and LR) resulted in lower survival rates than the more recently developed higher-strength ceramic materials (LD and YZ). The simulated 10-y survival rate of crowns fabricated from YZ was only slightly better than those fabricated from LD. In addition, 2 of the model crown systems (FM and LD) were expanded to determine regional-dependent failure probabilities. This analysis predicted that the LD-based crowns were more likely to fail from fractures initiating from margin areas, whereas the FM-based crowns showed a slightly higher probability of failure from fractures initiating from the occlusal table below the contact areas. These 2 predicted fracture initiation locations have some agreement with reported fractographic analyses of failed crowns. In this model, we considered the maximum tensile stress tangential to the interfacial surface, as opposed to the more universally reported maximum principal stress, because it more directly impacts crack propagation. While the accuracy of these predictions needs to be experimentally verified, the model can provide a fundamental understanding of the

  2. Political Mechanisms for Long-Range Survival and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, W.

    As the first species aware of extinction and capable of proactively ensuring our long-term survival and development, it is striking that we do not do so with the rigor, formality, and foresight it requires. Only from a reactive posture have we responded to the challenges of global warfare, human rights, environmental concerns, and sustainable development. Despite our awareness of the possibility for extinction and apocalyptic set-backs to our evolution, and despite the existence of long-range studies-which must still be dramatically increased-proactive global policy implementation regarding our long-term survival and development is arguably non-existent. This lack of long-term policy making can be attributed in part to the lack of formal political mechanisms to facilitate longer-range policy making that extends 30 years or more into the future. Political mechanisms for infusing long-range thinking, research, and strategic planning into the policy-making process can help correct this shortcoming and provide the motivation needed to adequately address long-term challenges with the political rigor required to effectively establish and implement long-term policies. There are some efforts that attempt to address longer-range issues, but those efforts often do not connect to the political process, do not extend 30 or more years into the future, are not well-funded, and are not sufficiently systemic. Political mechanisms for long-range survival and prosperity could correct these inadequacies by raising awareness, providing funding, and most importantly, leveraging political rigor to establish and enforce long-range strategic planning and policies. The feasibility of such mechanisms should first be rigorously studied and assessed in a feasibility study, which could then inform implementation. This paper will present the case for such a study and suggest some possible political mechanisms that should be investigated further in the proposed study. This work is being further

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Survival Strategies in Extreme Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Migliardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, one of the major challenges in biophysics is to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying biological processes. In such a frame, the understanding of the survival strategies in extreme conditions received a lot of attention both from the scientific and applicative points of view. Since nature provides precious suggestions to be applied for improving the quality of life, extremophiles are considered as useful model-systems. The main goal of this review is to present an overview of some systems, with a particular emphasis on trehalose playing a key role in several extremophile organisms. The attention is focused on the relation among the structural and dynamic properties of biomolecules and bioprotective mechanisms, as investigated by complementary spectroscopic techniques at low- and high-temperature values.

  4. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A; Bannantine, John P; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc(2) 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  5. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis predicted serine protease is associated with acid stress and intraphagosomal survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami Kugadas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophage and MAC-T cells and coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increase bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5 conditions. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  6. The immunoregulatory mechanisms of carcinoma for its survival and development

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    Du Caigan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The immune system in patients detects and eliminates tumor cells, but tumors still progress persistently. The mechanisms by which tumor cells survive under the pressure of immune surveillance are not fully understood. This review is to present the evidence from clinical studies, showing a significant correlation of clinicopathological features of carcinoma with: (1 the loss of classical human leukocyte antigen class I, (2 the up-regulation of non-classical human leukocyte antigen class I, pro-apoptotic Fas ligand and receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells I, and (3 the formation of immunosuppressive microenvironment by up-regulation of transforming growth factor-beta, Galectin-1, inhibitory ligand B7s, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and arginase, as well as by recruitment of tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells. All of these factors may together protect carcinoma cells from the immune-cytotoxicity.

  7. Pyrolysis Mechanisms of Aromatic Carboxylic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, P.F.; Eskay, T.P.; Buchanan, A.C. III

    1997-12-31

    Although decarboxylation of carboxylic acids is widely used in organic synthesis, there is limited mechanistic information on the uncatalyzed reaction pathways of aromatic carboxylic acids at 300-400 {degrees} C. The pyrolysis mechanisms of 1,2-(3,3-dicarboxyphenyl)ethane, 1,2-(4,4-dicarboxylphenyl)ethane, 1-(3-carboxyphenyl)-2-(4- biphenyl)ethane, and substituted benzoic acids have been investigated at 325-425 {degrees} C neat and diluted in an inert solvent. Decarboxylation is the dominant pyrolysis path. Arrhenius parameters, substituent effects, and deuterium isotope effects are consistent with decarboxylation by an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. Pyrolysis of benzoic acid in naphthalene, as a solvent, produces significant amounts of 1- and 2-phenylnaphthalenes. The mechanistic pathways for decarboxylation and arylation with be presented.

  8. The Role of Amino Acid Permeases and Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, João Daniel Santos; Martho, Kevin; Tofik, Veridiana; Vallim, Marcelo A.; Pascon, Renata C.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic diversity is an important factor during microbial adaptation to different environments. Among metabolic processes, amino acid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to be relevant for survival for many microbial pathogens, whereas the association between pathogenesis and amino acid uptake and recycling are less well-established. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with many habitats. As a result, it faces frequent metabolic shifts and challenges during its life cycle. Here we studied the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and found that the pathway is essential. RNAi indicated that interruptions in the biosynthetic pathway render strains inviable. However, auxotroph complementation can be partially achieved by tryptophan uptake when a non preferred nitrogen source and lower growth temperature are applied, suggesting that amino acid permeases may be the target of nitrogen catabolism repression (NCR). We used bioinformatics to search for amino acid permeases in the C. neoformans and found eight potential global permeases (AAP1 to AAP8). The transcriptional profile of them revealed that they are subjected to regulatory mechanisms which are known to respond to nutritional status in other fungi, such as (i) quality of nitrogen (Nitrogen Catabolism Repression, NCR) and carbon sources (Carbon Catabolism Repression, CCR), (ii) amino acid availability in the extracellular environment (SPS-sensing) and (iii) nutritional deprivation (Global Amino Acid Control, GAAC). This study shows that C. neoformans has fewer amino acid permeases than other model yeasts, and that these proteins may be subjected to complex regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest that the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway is an excellent pharmacological target. Furthermore, inhibitors of this pathway cause Cryptococcus growth arrest in vitro. PMID:26162077

  9. The Role of Amino Acid Permeases and Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Daniel Santos Fernandes

    Full Text Available Metabolic diversity is an important factor during microbial adaptation to different environments. Among metabolic processes, amino acid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to be relevant for survival for many microbial pathogens, whereas the association between pathogenesis and amino acid uptake and recycling are less well-established. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with many habitats. As a result, it faces frequent metabolic shifts and challenges during its life cycle. Here we studied the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and found that the pathway is essential. RNAi indicated that interruptions in the biosynthetic pathway render strains inviable. However, auxotroph complementation can be partially achieved by tryptophan uptake when a non preferred nitrogen source and lower growth temperature are applied, suggesting that amino acid permeases may be the target of nitrogen catabolism repression (NCR. We used bioinformatics to search for amino acid permeases in the C. neoformans and found eight potential global permeases (AAP1 to AAP8. The transcriptional profile of them revealed that they are subjected to regulatory mechanisms which are known to respond to nutritional status in other fungi, such as (i quality of nitrogen (Nitrogen Catabolism Repression, NCR and carbon sources (Carbon Catabolism Repression, CCR, (ii amino acid availability in the extracellular environment (SPS-sensing and (iii nutritional deprivation (Global Amino Acid Control, GAAC. This study shows that C. neoformans has fewer amino acid permeases than other model yeasts, and that these proteins may be subjected to complex regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest that the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway is an excellent pharmacological target. Furthermore, inhibitors of this pathway cause Cryptococcus growth arrest in vitro.

  10. Patulin triggers NRF2-mediated survival mechanisms in kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Y; Phulukdaree, A; Nagiah, S; Chuturgoon, A A

    2015-06-01

    Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin contaminant of apples and apple products, has been implicated in nephrotoxicity. PAT depletes glutathione (GSH) and elevates reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidant (AO) response is activated by Nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (NRF2) and enhanced by Silent information regulator 3 (SIRT3). The effects of PAT on these molecules have yet to be examined. We investigated the effects of PAT on AO response survival pathways in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). PAT cytotoxicity on HEK293 cells was evaluated (MTT assay; 24 h; [0-100 μM]) to determine an IC50. GSH levels were measured using luminometry. Intracellular ROS was evaluated by flow cytometry. Protein expression of Keap1, NRF2, SIRT3 and PGC-1α was quantified by western blotting and gene expression of SOD2, CAT and GPx was evaluated by qPCR. PAT caused a dose dependent decrease in HEK293 cell viability and a significant increase in levels of intracellular ROS (p = 0.0006). A significant increase in protein expression (p = 0.029) was observed. PAT increased gene expression of SOD2 and CAT (p = 0.0043), however, gene expression of GPx was significantly reduced (p = 0.0043). These results show the up-regulation of NRF2 mediated AO mechanisms in response to PAT toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Survival and resuscitation of ten strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli under acid conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaveerach, P.; Huurne, ter A.A.H.M.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Knapen, van F.

    2003-01-01

    The culturability of 10 strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli was studied after the bacteria were exposed to acid conditions for various periods of time. Campylobacter cells could not survive 2 h under acid conditions (formic acid at pH 4). The 10 Campylobacter strains could not be

  12. High serum uric acid concentration predicts poor survival in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Cai-Feng; Feng, Pin-Ning; Yao, Zhen-Rong; Yu, Xue-Gao; Lin, Wen-Bin; Qian, Yuan-Min; Guo, Yun-Miao; Li, Lai-Sheng; Liu, Min

    2017-10-01

    Uric acid is a product of purine metabolism. Recently, uric acid has gained much attraction in cancer. In this study, we aim to investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of serum uric acid concentration in breast cancer patients. A total of 443 female patients with histopathologically diagnosed breast cancer were included. After a mean follow-up time of 56months, survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. To further evaluate the prognostic significance of uric acid concentrations, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were applied. Of the clinicopathological parameters, uric acid concentration was associated with age, body mass index, ER status and PR status. Univariate analysis identified that patients with increased uric acid concentration had a significantly inferior overall survival (HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.15-3.94, p=0.016). In multivariate analysis, we found that high uric acid concentration is an independent prognostic factor predicting death, but insufficient to predict local relapse or distant metastasis. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that high uric acid concentration is related to the poor overall survival (p=0.013). High uric acid concentration predicts poor survival in patients with breast cancer, and might serve as a potential marker for appropriate management of breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanisms of plant survival and mortality during drought: Why do some plants survive while others succumb to drought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nate McDowell; William T. Pockman; Craig D. Allen; David D. Breshears; Neil Cobb; Thomas Kolb; Jennifer Plaut; John Sperry; Adam West; David G. Williams; Enrico A. Yepez

    2008-01-01

    Severe droughts have been associated with regional-scale forest mortality worldwide. Climate change is expected to exacerbate regional mortality events; however, prediction remains difficult because the physiological mechanisms underlying drought survival and mortality are poorly understood. We developed a hydraulically based theory considering carbon balance and...

  14. Mechanical transmission and survival of bacterial wilt on enset ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transmission of enset bacterial wilt with contaminated knives and the survival of the causal agent in soil and enset plant debris was studied at the Awassa Agricultural Research Center, Awassa, Ethiopia. Contaminated knives were found to transmit the pathogen from infected to healthy plants. Disease symptoms were ...

  15. Mechanisms of plant survival and mortality during drought: why do some plants survive while others succumb to drought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Nate G.; Pockman, William T.; Allen, Craig D.; Breshears, David D.; Cobb, Neil; Kolb, Thomas; Plaut, Jennifer; Sperry, John; West, Adam; Williams, David G.; Yepez, Enrico A.

    2008-01-01

    Severe droughts have been associated with regional-scale forest mortality worldwide. Climate change is expected to exacerbate regional mortality events; however, prediction remains difficult because the physiological mechanisms underlying drought survival and mortality are poorly understood. We developed a hydraulically based theory considering carbon balance and insect resistance that allowed development and examination of hypotheses regarding survival and mortality. Multiple mechanisms may cause mortality during drought. A common mechanism for plants with isohydric regulation of water status results from avoidance of drought-induced hydraulic failure via stomatal closure, resulting in carbon starvation and a cascade of downstream effects such as reduced resistance to biotic agents. Mortality by hydraulic failure per se may occur for isohydric seedlings or trees near their maximum height. Although anisohydric plants are relatively drought-tolerant, they are predisposed to hydraulic failure because they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins during drought. Elevated temperatures should exacerbate carbon starvation and hydraulic failure. Biotic agents may amplify and be amplified by drought-induced plant stress. Wet multidecadal climate oscillations may increase plant susceptibility to drought-induced mortality by stimulating shifts in hydraulic architecture, effectively predisposing plants to water stress. Climate warming and increased frequency of extreme events will probably cause increased regional mortality episodes. Isohydric and anisohydric water potential regulation may partition species between survival and mortality, and, as such, incorporating this hydraulic framework may be effective for modeling plant survival and mortality under future climate conditions.

  16. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich Gottfried; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether......Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial...... a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation...

  17. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich Gottfried; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial...... numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether...... a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation...

  18. Salmonella survival and differential expression of fatty acid biosynthesis-associated genes in a low-water-activity food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Golden, D A; Critzer, F J

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in expression of fatty acid biosynthesis genes and survival of different serotypes of Salmonella when incubated in a low-water-activity (aw ) food over a 14-day period. Stationary cells of five strains of Salmonella enterica belonging to 3 different serovars (Typhimurium ATCC 2486, Enteritidis H4267, Tennessee ARI-33, Tennessee S13952 and Tennessee K4643) were inoculated into granular sugar (aW   = 0·50) and held aerobically over a 14-day period at 25°C. Survival was determined by enumerating colonies on TSA and XLT-4 plates at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days. Correspondingly, gene expression was evaluated for three selected genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and modification (fabA, fabD and cfa). After 14 days of incubation, the population was reduced from 2·29 to 3·36 log for all five strains. Salmonella Tennessee ARI-33 and Salm. Tennessee K4643 displayed greater survival than Salm. Typhimurium and Salm. Enteritidis. The increased expression of the cfa gene (involved in cyclopropane fatty acid biosynthesis) over 14 days was found associated with strains with a lower survival rate. The fabA gene (involved in unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis) was observed up-regulated for all strains for at least one sampling time and for Salm. Tennessee ARI-33 for all time points tested, suggesting its potential role in enhancing Salmonella survival in low aw foods. Numerous outbreaks of salmonellosis associated with low-water-activity foods have been reported. Therefore, the adaptive mechanisms utilized by Salmonella to survive in low-water-activity foods for prolonged periods of time need to be better understood. The results in this study showed that low-water-activity environments increase expression of gene fabA, which is involved in unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis of Salmonella, while the increased expression of cfa, associated with cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis, was associated with decreased

  19. Abandoning Peracetic Acid-Based Dialyzer Reuse Is Associated with Improved Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiling; Mooney, Ann; Ofsthun, Norma; Lazarus, J. Michael; Hakim, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Higher mortality risk reported with reuse versus single use of dialyzers is potentially related to reuse reagents that modify membrane surface characteristics and the blood-membrane interface. A key mechanism may involve stimulation of an inflammatory response. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In a prospective crossover design, laboratory markers and mortality from 23 hemodialysis facilities abandoning reuse with peracetic acid mixture were tracked. C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell (WBC) count, albumin, and prealbumin were measured for 2 consecutive months before abandoning reuse and subsequently within 3 and 6 months on single use. Survival models were utilized to compare the 6-month period before abandoning reuse (baseline) and the 6-month period on single use of dialyzers after a 3-month “washout period.” Results Patients from baseline and single-use periods had a mean age of approximately 63 years; 44% were female, 54% were diabetic, 60% were white, and the mean vintage was approximately 3.2 years. The unadjusted hazard ratio for death was 0.70 and after case-mix adjustment was 0.74 for single use compared with reuse. Patients with CRP ≥ 5 mg/L during reuse (mean CRP = 26.6 mg/ml in April) declined on single use to 20.2 mg/L by August and 20.4 mg/L by November. WBC count declined slightly during single use, but nutritional markers were unchanged. Conclusions Abandonment of peracetic-acid-based reuse was associated with improved survival and lower levels of inflammatory but not nutritional markers. Further study is needed to evaluate a potential link between dialyzer reuse, inflammation, and mortality. PMID:20947788

  20. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  1. Survival and Growth of Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria in Refrigerated Pickle Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sicun; Breidt, Fred; Price, Robert; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys

    2017-01-01

    We examined 10 lactic acid bacteria that have been previously characterized for commercial use as probiotic cultures, mostly for dairy products, including 1 Pediococcus and 9 Lactobacilli. Our objectives were to develop a rapid procedure for determining the long-term survivability of these cultures in acidified vegetable products and to identify suitable cultures for probiotic brined vegetable products. We therefore developed assays to measure acid resistance of these cultures to lactic and acetic acids, which are present in pickled vegetable products. We used relatively high acid concentrations (compared to commercial products) of 360 mM lactic acid and 420 mM acetic acid to determine acid resistance with a 1 h treatment. Growth rates were measured in a cucumber juice medium at pH 5.3, 4.2, and 3.8, at 30 °C and 0% to 2% NaCl. Significant differences in acid resistance and growth rates were found among the 10 cultures. In general, the acid resistant strains had slower growth rates than the acid sensitive strains. Based on the acid resistance data, selected cultures were tested for long-term survival in a simulated acidified refrigerated cucumber product. We found that one of the most acid resistant strains (Lactobacillus casei) could survive for up to 63 d at 4 °C without significant loss of viability at 108 CFU/mL. These data may aid in the development of commercial probiotic refrigerated pickle products. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Survival under stress: molecular mechanisms of metabolic rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies in my laboratory are analysing the molecular mechanisms and regulatory events that underlie transitions to and from hypometabolic states In systems including ... Our newest research targets two areas: the role of protein kinases in regulating metabolic adjustments and the role of stress-induced gene expression in ...

  3. Malicious Botnet Survivability Mechanism Evolution Forecasting by Means of a Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaj Goranin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Botnets are considered to be among the most dangerous modern malware types and the biggest current threats to global IT infrastructure. Botnets are rapidly evolving, and therefore forecasting their survivability strategies is important for the development of countermeasure techniques. The article propose the botnet-oriented genetic algorithm based model framework, which aimed at forecasting botnet survivability mechanisms. The model may be used as a framework for forecasting the evolution of other characteristics. The efficiency of different survivability mechanisms is evaluated by applying the proposed fitness function. The model application area also covers scientific botnet research and modelling tasks.

  4. Dietary antiaging phytochemicals and mechanisms associated with prolonged survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Hongwei; Liu, Dongmin

    2014-01-01

    Aging is well-known an inevitable process that is influenced by genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the aging process are not well understood. Increasing evidence shows that aging is highly associated with chronic increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), accumulation of a low-grade proinflammatory phenotype and reduction in age-related autophagy, suggesting that these factors may play important roles in promoting aging. Indeed, reduction of ROS and low-grade inflammation and promotion of autophagy by calorie restriction or other dietary manipulation can extend lifespan in a wide spectrum of model organisms. Interestingly, recent studies show that some food-derived small molecules, also called phytochemicals, can extend lifespan in various animal species. In this paper, we review several recently identified potential antiaging phytochemicals that have been studied in cells, animals and humans and further highlight the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the antiaging actions by these molecules. PMID:24742470

  5. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation reduces oxidative stress and prolongs survival in rats with advanced liver cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoh Iwasa

    Full Text Available Long-term supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA is associated with prolonged survival and decreased frequency of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in patients with liver cirrhosis. However, the pharmaceutical mechanism underlying this association is still unclear. We investigated whether continuous BCAA supplementation increases survival rate of rats exposed to a fibrogenic agent and influences the iron accumulation, oxidative stress, fibrosis, and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Further, the effects of BCAA on gluconeogenesis in cultured cells were also investigated. A significant improvement in cumulative survival was observed in BCAA-supplemented rats with advanced cirrhosis compared to untreated rats with cirrhosis (P<0.05. The prolonged survival due to BCAA supplementation was associated with reduction of iron contents, reactive oxygen species production and attenuated fibrosis in the liver. In addition, BCAA ameliorated glucose metabolism by forkhead box protein O1 pathway in the liver. BCAA prolongs survival in cirrhotic rats and this was likely the consequences of reduced iron accumulation, oxidative stress and fibrosis and improved glucose metabolism in the liver.

  6. Probiotic bacteria survive in Cheddar cheese and modify populations of other lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, B; Weimer, B C; Pinzon, J; Dao Kong, N; Rompato, G; Brothersen, C; McMahon, D J

    2014-06-01

    Starter lactic acid bacteria in Cheddar cheese face physico-chemical stresses during manufacture and ageing that alter their abilities to survive and to interact with other bacterial populations. Nonstarter bacteria are derived from milk handling, cheese equipment and human contact during manufacture. Probiotic bacteria are added to foods for human health benefits that also encounter physiological stresses and microbial competition that may mitigate their survival during ageing. We added probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis to full-fat, reduced-fat and low-fat Cheddar cheeses, aiming to study their survival over 270 days of ageing and to determine the role of the cheese matrix in their survival. Probiotic and other lactic acid bacterial populations were enumerated by quantitative PCR using primers specifically targeting the different bacterial genera or species of interest. Bifidobacteria were initially added at 10(6) CFU g(-1) cheese and survived variably in the different cheeses over the 270-day ageing process. Probiotic lactobacilli that were added at 10(7) CFU g(-1) cheese and incident nonstarter lactobacilli (initially at 10(8) CFU g(-1) cheese) increased by 10- to 100-fold over 270 days. Viable bacterial populations were differentiated using propidium monoazide followed by species-specific qPCR assays, which demonstrated that the starter and probiotic microbes survived over ageing, independent of cheese type. Addition of probiotic bacteria, at levels 100-fold below that of starter bacteria, modified starter and nonstarter bacterial levels. We demonstrated that starter lactococci, nonstarter lactobacilli and probiotic bacteria are capable of surviving throughout the cheesemaking and ageing process, indicating that delivery via hard cheeses is possible. Probiotic addition at lower levels may also alter starter and nonstarter bacterial survival. We applied qPCR to study

  7. Increased expression of fatty acid synthase provides a survival advantage to colorectal cancer cells via upregulation of cellular respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y; Harris, Jennifer W; Mitov, Mihail I; Kim, Ji Tae; Butterfield, D Allan; Lee, Eun Y; Weiss, Heidi L; Gao, Tianyan; Evers, B Mark

    2015-08-07

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a lipogenic enzyme, is upregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC). Increased de novo lipid synthesis is thought to be a metabolic adaptation of cancer cells that promotes survival and metastasis; however, the mechanisms for this phenomenon are not fully understood. We show that FASN plays a role in regulation of energy homeostasis by enhancing cellular respiration in CRC. We demonstrate that endogenously synthesized lipids fuel fatty acid oxidation, particularly during metabolic stress, and maintain energy homeostasis. Increased FASN expression is associated with a decrease in activation of energy-sensing pathways and accumulation of lipid droplets in CRC cells and orthotopic CRCs. Immunohistochemical evaluation demonstrated increased expression of FASN and p62, a marker of autophagy inhibition, in primary CRCs and liver metastases compared to matched normal colonic mucosa. Our findings indicate that overexpression of FASN plays a crucial role in maintaining energy homeostasis in CRC via increased oxidation of endogenously synthesized lipids. Importantly, activation of fatty acid oxidation and consequent downregulation of stress-response signaling pathways may be key adaptation mechanisms that mediate the effects of FASN on cancer cell survival and metastasis, providing a strong rationale for targeting this pathway in advanced CRC.

  8. KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF REACTION OF ACIDIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For both Nile blue and Meldola\\'s blue reactions the rates have first-order dependence on each substrate, chlorite and acid. Both reactions showed negative salt effect indicating the reaction is between the oppositely charged species, likely the substrate cation and chlorite anion. The acidic chlorite reaction with MB+ was ...

  9. Survival and growth of probiotic lactic acid bacteria in refrigerated pickle products

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined 10 lactic acid bacteria that have been previously characterized for commercial use as probiotic cultures, mostly for dairy products, including 1 Pediococcus and 9 Lactobacilli. Our objectives were to develop a rapid procedure for determining the long-term survivability of these cultures ...

  10. Pyrolysis of simple amino acids and nucleobases: survivability limits and implications for extraterrestrial delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Douda, Janna

    1999-04-01

    The idea of extraterrestrial delivery of organic matter to the early Earth is strongly supported by the detection of a large variety of organic compounds in the interstellar medium, comets, and carbonaceous chondrites. Whether organic compounds essential for the emergence and evolution of life, particularly amino acids and nucleic acid bases found in the meteorites, can be efficiently delivered by other space bodies is unclear and depends primarily on capability of the biomolecules to survive high temperatures during atmospheric deceleration and impacts to the terrestrial surface. In the present study we estimated survivability of simple amino acids (glycine, Lalanine, α-aminoisobutyric acid, L-valine and L-leucine), purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (uracil and cytosine) under rapid heating to temperatures of 400-1000°C under N2 or CO2 atmosphere. We have found that most of the compounds studied cannot survive the temperatures substantially higher than 700°C; however at 500600°C, the recovery can be at a percent level (or even 10%-level for adenine, uracil, alanine, and valine). The final fate of amino acids and nucleobases during the atmospheric deceleration and surface impacts is discussed depending on such factors as size of the space body, nature and altitude of the heating, chemical composition of the space body and of the atmosphere.

  11. Dietary proteins extend the survival of salmonella dublin in a gastric Acid environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Tina; Kristensen, Kim; Harboe, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The pH of the human stomach is dynamic and changes over time, depending on the composition of the food ingested and a number of host-related factors such as age. To evaluate the number of bacteria surviving the gastric acid barrier, we have developed a simple gastric acid model, in which we...... mimicked the dynamic pH changes in the human stomach. In the present study, model gastric fluid was set up to imitate pH dynamics in the stomachs of young and elderly people after ingestion of a standard meal. To model a serious foodborne pathogen, we followed the survival of Salmonella enterica serotype...... Dublin, and found that the addition of proteins such as pepsin, ovalbumin, and blended turkey meat to the simple gastric acid model significantly delayed pathogen inactivation compared with the control, for which no proteins were added. In contrast, no delay in inactivation was observed in the presence...

  12. Exogenous Modulation of Retinoic Acid Signaling Affects Adult RGC Survival in the Frog Visual System after Optic Nerve Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mildred V Duprey-Díaz

    Full Text Available After lesions to the mammalian optic nerve, the great majority of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs die before their axons have even had a chance to regenerate. Frog RGCs, on the other hand, suffer only an approximately 50% cell loss, and we have previously investigated the mechanisms by which the application of growth factors can increase their survival rate. Retinoic acid (RA is a vitamin A-derived lipophilic molecule that plays major roles during development of the nervous system. The RA signaling pathway is also present in parts of the adult nervous system, and components of it are upregulated after injury in peripheral nerves but not in the CNS. Here we investigate whether RA signaling affects long-term RGC survival at 6 weeks after axotomy. Intraocular injection of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, the retinoic acid receptor (RAR type-α agonist AM80, the RARβ agonist CD2314, or the RARγ agonist CD1530, returned axotomized RGC numbers to almost normal levels. On the other hand, inhibition of RA synthesis with disulfiram, or of RAR receptors with the pan-RAR antagonist Ro-41-5253, or the RARβ antagonist LE135E, greatly reduced the survival of the axotomized neurons. Axotomy elicited a strong activation of the MAPK, STAT3 and AKT pathways; this activation was prevented by disulfiram or by RAR antagonists. Finally, addition of exogenous ATRA stimulated the activation of the first two of these pathways. Future experiments will investigate whether these strong survival-promoting effects of RA are mediated via the upregulation of neurotrophins.

  13. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Supplementation Reduces Oxidative Stress and Prolongs Survival in Rats with Advanced Liver Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifuji-Moroka, Rumi; Hara, Nagisa; Miyachi, Hirohide; Sugimoto, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Hideaki; Fujita, Naoki; Gabazza, Esteban C.; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Long-term supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is associated with prolonged survival and decreased frequency of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with liver cirrhosis. However, the pharmaceutical mechanism underlying this association is still unclear. We investigated whether continuous BCAA supplementation increases survival rate of rats exposed to a fibrogenic agent and influences the iron accumulation, oxidative stress, fibrosis, and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Further, the effects of BCAA on gluconeogenesis in cultured cells were also investigated. A significant improvement in cumulative survival was observed in BCAA-supplemented rats with advanced cirrhosis compared to untreated rats with cirrhosis (PBCAA supplementation was associated with reduction of iron contents, reactive oxygen species production and attenuated fibrosis in the liver. In addition, BCAA ameliorated glucose metabolism by forkhead box protein O1 pathway in the liver. BCAA prolongs survival in cirrhotic rats and this was likely the consequences of reduced iron accumulation, oxidative stress and fibrosis and improved glucose metabolism in the liver. PMID:23936183

  14. Asiatic Acid Prevents the Deleterious Effects of Valproic Acid on Cognition and Hippocampal Cell Proliferation and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jariya Umka Welbat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid (VPA is commonly prescribed as an anticonvulsant and mood stabilizer used in the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. A recent study has demonstrated that VPA reduces histone deacetylase (HDAC activity, an action which is believed to contribute to the effects of VPA on neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation which may explain the cognitive impairments produced in rodents and patients. Asiatic acid is a triterpenoid derived from the medicinal plant Centella asiatica. Our previous study has shown that Asiatic acid improves working spatial memory and increases cell proliferation in the sub granular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the present study we investigate the effects of Asiatic acid in preventing the memory and cellular effects of VPA. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were orally administered Asiatic acid (30 mg/kg/day for 28 days, while VPA-treated animals received injections of VPA (300 mg/kg twice a day from Day 15 to Day 28 for 14 days. Spatial memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL test and hippocampal cell proliferation and survival was quantified by immuostaining for Ki-67 and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, respectively. The results showed that VPA-treated animals were unable to discriminate between objects in familiar and novel locations. Moreover, VPA significantly reduced numbers of Ki-67 and BrdU positive cells. These results indicate that VPA treatment caused impairments of spatial working memory, cell proliferation and survival in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG. However, these abnormalities were restored to control levels by co-treatment with Asiatic acid. These data demonstrate that Asiatic acid could prevent the spatial memory and neurogenesis impairments caused by VPA.

  15. Reversal of shortened platelet survival in rats by the antifibrinolytic agent, epsilon aminocaproic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winocour, P D; Kinlough-Rathbone, R L; Richardson, M; Mustard, J F

    1983-01-01

    Platelet survival in rabbits and rats is shortened by placing indwelling catheters in the aorta; this shortening appears to be at least partly related to the extent of vessel wall injury and platelet interaction with the repeatedly damaged wall. Treatment of rabbit platelets with plasmin and other proteolytic enzymes in vitro shortens their survival when they are returned to the circulation. Because platelets may be exposed to plasmin and other proteolytic enzymes in rabbits and rats with indwelling aortic catheters, we examined the effect of epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) on platelet survival in rats. At a dose of 1 g/kg every 4 h, EACA significantly reduced whole blood fibrinolytic activity and prolonged the shortened platelet survival in rats with indwelling aortic catheters. Mean platelet survival for untreated rats with indwelling aortic catheters was 38.6 +/- 1.9 h, and for rats treated with EACA, 53.8 +/- 3.8 h. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the injured vessel wall of these animals was mainly covered with platelets and fibrin, whereas in control animals that did not receive EACA, the injured surface was mainly covered with platelets and little fibrin was observed. Thus shortened platelet survival during continuous vessel wall injury may result from the local generation of plasmin or the release of proteolytic enzymes at sites where platelets (and possibly leukocytes) interact with the vessel wall. Images PMID:6848557

  16. The mechanism and properties of acid-coagulated milk gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanokphat Phadungath

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Acid-coagulated milk products such as fresh acid-coagulated cheese varieties and yogurt areimportant dairy food products. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms involved in gel formation, physical properties of acid gels, and the effects of processing variables such as heat treatment and gelation temperature on the important physical properties of acid milk gels. This paper reviews the modern concepts of possible mechanisms involved in the formation of particle milk gel aggregation, along with recent developments including the use of techniques such as dynamic low amplitude oscillatory rheology to observe the gel formation process, and confocal laser scanning microscopy to monitor gel microstructure.

  17. Clinical characteristics and survival outcomes of terminally ill patients undergoing withdrawal of mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Shin; Lee, Shu-Hui; Hung, Chia-Yen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Kao, Chen-Yi; Wang, Hung-Ming; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2017-10-11

    Withdrawal of mechanical ventilation is an important, but rarely explored issue in Asia during end-of-life care. This study aimed to describe the clinical characteristics and survival outcomes of terminally ill patients undergoing withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in Taiwan. One-hundred-thirty-five terminally ill patients who had mechanical ventilation withdrawn between 2013 and 2016, from a medical center in Taiwan, were enrolled. Patients' clinical characteristics and survival outcomes after withdrawal of mechanical ventilation were analyzed. The three most common diagnoses were organic brain lesion, advanced cancer, and newborn sequelae. The initiator of the withdrawal process was family, medical personnel, and patient him/herself. The median survival time was 45 min (95% confidence interval, 33-57 min) after the withdrawal of mechanical ventilation, and 102 patients (75.6%) died within one day after extubation. The median time from diagnosis of disease to receiving life-sustaining treatment and artificial ventilation support, receiving life-sustaining treatment and artificial ventilation support to "Withdrawal meeting," "Withdrawal meeting" to ventilator withdrawn, and ventilator withdrawn to death was 12.1 months, 19 days, 1 day, and 0 days, respectively. Patients with a diagnosis of advanced cancer and withdrawal initiation by the patients themselves had a significantly shorter time interval between receiving life-sustaining treatment and artificial ventilation support to "Withdrawal meeting" compared to those with non-cancer diseases and withdrawal initiation by family or medical personnel. This study is the first observational study to describe the patients' characteristics and elaborate on the survival outcome of withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in patients who are terminally ill in an Asian population. Understanding the clinical characteristics and survival outcomes of mechanical ventilation withdrawal might help medical personnel provide

  18. Antifungal mechanisms supporting boric acid therapy of Candida vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Seta, Francesco; Schmidt, Martin; Vu, Bao; Essmann, Michael; Larsen, Bryan

    2009-02-01

    Boric acid is a commonly cited treatment for recurrent and resistant yeast vaginitis, but data about the extent and mechanism of its antifungal activity are lacking. The aim of this study was to use in vitro methods to understand the spectrum and mechanism of boric acid as a potential treatment for vaginal infection. Yeast and bacterial isolates were tested by agar dilution to determine the intrinsic antimicrobial activity of boric acid. Established microbial physiology methods illuminated the mechanism of the action of boric acid against Candida albicans. C. albicans strains (including fluconazole-resistant strains) were inhibited at concentrations attainable intravaginally; as were bacteria. Broth dilution MICs were between 1563 and 6250 mg/L and boric acid proved fungistatic (also reflected by a decrease in CO(2) generation); prolonged culture at 50,000 mg/L was fungicidal. Several organic acids in yeast nitrogen broth yielded a lower pH than equimolar boric acid and sodium borate but were less inhibitory. Cold or anaerobic incubation protected yeast at high boric acid concentrations. Cells maintained integrity for 6 h in boric acid at 37 degrees C, but after 24 h modest intrusion of propidium iodide occurred; loss of plate count viability preceded uptake of vital stain. Growth at sub-MIC concentrations of boric acid decreased cellular ergosterol. The drug efflux pump CDR1 did not protect Candida as CDR1 expression was abrogated by boric acid. Boric acid interfered with the development of biofilm and hyphal transformation. Boric acid is fungistatic to fungicidal depending on concentration and temperature. Inhibition of oxidative metabolism appears to be a key antifungal mechanism, but inhibition of virulence probably contributes to therapeutic efficacy in vivo.

  19. Survival of Listeria innocua in rainbow trout protein recovered by isoelectric solubilization and precipitation with acetic and citric acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, R A; Paker, I; Bane, L; Beamer, S; Jaczynski, J; Matak, K E

    2011-08-01

    During mechanical fish processing, a substantial amount of protein is discarded as by-products. Isoelectric solubilization and precipitation (ISP) is a process that uses extreme pH shifts to solubilize and precipitate protein from by-products to recover previously discarded protein. Typically, strong acids are used for pH reduction, but these acids do not have a pasteurization effect (6 log reduction) on bacterial load; therefore, organic acids were used during ISP processing to test the impact on Listeria innocua concentrations. Headed and gutted rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were inoculated with L. innocua, homogenized, and brought to the target pH with granular citric acid (pH 2.0 and 2.5) or glacial acetic acid (pH 3.0 and 3.5). Proteins were solubilized for 10 min at 4°C, and insoluble components (e.g., skin and insoluble protein) were removed by centrifugation. The remaining solution was pH shifted to the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.5) with sodium hydroxide, and precipitated protein was separated from the water. Microbial cells for each component (proteins, insolubles, and water) were enumerated on modified Oxford agar (MOX) and tryptic soy agar with 6% yeast extract (TSAYE). The sums of the surviving cells from each component were compared with the initial inoculum levels. No significant differences were observed between results obtained from TSAYE and from MOX (P > 0.05). Significant reductions in microbial populations were detected, regardless of pH or acid type (P acid, resulting in a mean reduction of 6.41 log CFU/g in the recovered protein and 5.88 log CFU/g in the combined components. These results demonstrate the antimicrobial potential of organic acids in ISP processing.

  20. Survival of Salmonella serovars on beef carcasses and molecular mechanisms to survive low temperature stress and desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Aabo, Søren

    2006-01-01

    . Infantis and S. Newport. This experiment indicates that storage at low temperature of beef carcasses can be used as a reduction strategy for Salmonella spp. in beef. In addition molecular mechanisms to resist low temperature stress and desiccation have been investigated. Mutants in the otsA, rpoS and clp...... at 10°C and 15°C, the ¿clpP mutant was severely affected in ability to form colonies compared to the wildtype. Neither the ¿otsA nor the ¿rpoS were affected in growth or survival at low temperature. In a desiccation model, both the ¿rpoS and ¿clpP mutant were more sensitive than the C5 wildtype...

  1. Humic substances increase survival of freshwater shrimp Caridina sp. D to acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Aleicia; Duivenvoorden, Leo J; Kinnear, Susan H W

    2013-02-01

    Humic substances (HS) are known to decrease the toxicity of heavy metals to aquatic organisms, and it has been suggested that they can provide buffering protection in low pH conditions. Despite this, little is known about the ability for HS to increase survival to acid mine drainage (AMD). In this study, the ability of HS to increase survival of the freshwater shrimp (Caridina sp. D sensu Page et al. in Biol Lett 1:139-142, 2005) to acid mine drainage was investigated using test waters collected from the Mount Morgan open pit in Central Queensland with the addition of Aldrich humic acid (AHA). The AMD water from the Mount Morgan open pit is highly acidic (pH 2.67) as well as contaminated with heavy metals (1780 mg/L aluminum, 101 mg/L copper [Cu], 173 mg/L manganese, 51.8 mg/L zinc [Zn], and 51.8 mg/L iron). Freshwater shrimp were exposed to dilutions in the range of 0.5 % to 5 % AMD water with and without the addition of 10 or 20 mg/L AHA. In the absence of HS, all shrimp died in the 2.5 % AMD treatment. In contrast, addition of HS increased survival in the 2.5 % AMD treatment by ≤66 % as well as significantly decreased the concentration of dissolved Cu, cobalt, cadmium, and Zn. The decreased toxicity of AMD in the presence of HS is likely to be due to complexation and precipitation of heavy metals with the HS; it is also possible that HS caused changes to the physiological condition of the shrimp, thus increasing their survival. These results are valuable in contributing to an improved understanding of potential role of HS in ameliorating the toxicity of AMD environments.

  2. Mechanisms Regulating Acid-Base Transporter Expression in Breast- and Pancreatic Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbatenko, Andrej

    , characteristics of which are a shift towards glycolytic metabolism and increased acid production. HER2 receptor overexpression in breast cancer leads to further increased glycolysis, invasion and metastasis, drug resistance and poor prognosis. Increased tumor glycolysis requires acquisition of mechanisms...... for dealing with excess acid production. In this light, evidence accumulates on the importance of pH regulatory proteins to cancer cell survival and motility. Our group previously demonstrated upregulation of the Na+/HCO3 - co-transporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7) by a constitutively active form of HER2 receptor (p95HER...

  3. Antiobesity mechanisms of action of conjugated linoleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennedy, Arion; Martinez, Kristina; Schmidt, Soren

    2010-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a family of fatty acids found in beef, dairy foods and dietary supplements, reduces adiposity in several animal models of obesity and some human studies. However, the isomer-specific antiobesity mechanisms of action of CLA are unclear, and its use in humans is cont...

  4. Dissolution kinetics and mechanism of pandermite in acetic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-07

    Jun 7, 2010 ... reaction temperature. Conversion rate increased up to 3 M, acid concentration then decreased with increasing acid concentration.It was observed that there was no important effect of stirring speed on the dissolution rate. Furthermore, it was observed that the dissolution mechanism was dependent on.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some -hydroxy acids ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 116; Issue 6. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some -hydroxy acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine ... The oxidation of -deuteriomandelic acid exhibits the presence of a substantial kinetic isotope effect (/ = 5.91 at 298 K). The rates of ...

  6. Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Permutation and Survival of Caralluma Species (Apocynaceae in Arid Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya S. Masrahi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several species of the stem succulent Caralluma (Apocynaceae are abundant perennials in arid regions of the Arabian Peninsula. These arid regions have a short wet season with erratic rainfall and are characterized by harsh climatic conditions of high temperature, high evaporation and sand storms. Work presented in this paper aimed at investigating importance of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM for survival of three Caralluma species in their natural habitat. Investigations involved studying stomatal characteristics, stomatal diffusive conductance, chlorophyll fluorescence, and CAM in three species of Caralluma, namely C. acutangula (Decne. N.E.Br., C. edulis (Edgew. Benth. ex Hook.f., and C. subulata (Forssk. Decne. Microscopic examination revealed a pattern of stomatal characteristics typical of CAM plants in these three Caralluma species. Results showed that these three Caralluma species were obligate CAM plants exhibiting this mode of photosynthesis during both the wet and the dry seasons. Under protracted water stress during the long dry season very low values of stomatal diffusive conductance and dampening of CAM acidification-deacidification cycles denoted the tendency of these three Caralluma species to shift from the obligate CAM physiotype to CAM-idling mode. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements indicated that protracted water stress induced a reduction in Photosystem II (PSII antenna efficiency and quantum yield in the three studied Caralluma species. This reduction of PSII activity occurred in concomitance with a marked rise in non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence denoting operation of non-photochemical energy dissipating mechanisms known to be important for photoprotection of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eGiannattasio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications.

  8. Mechanisms controlling renal hemodynamics and electrolyte excretion during amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, L.L.; Mizelle, H.L.; Montani, J.P.; Hall, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the mechanisms by which increased plasma amino acids elevate renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Since transport of amino acids and Na is linked in the proximal tubule, the authors hypothesized that increased amino acids might stimulate proximal tubular Na reabsorption (PR/sub Na/) and thus increase RBF and GFR by a macula densa feedback mechanism. A solution of four amino acids (Ala, Ser, Gly, Pro) was infused intravenously into anesthetized dogs with normal kidneys (NK) and with kidneys in which the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism was blunted by lowering renal artery pressure (LPK) or blocked by making the kidneys nonfiltering (NFK). In NK, RBF and GFR increased by 35 +/- 4% and 30 +/- 7% after 90 min of amino acid infusion, while PR/sub Na/ (estimated from lithium clearance) and O2 consumption increased by 31 +/- 5% and 29 +/- 5% and distal Na delivery remained relatively constant. Autoregulation of RBF and GFR in response to step deceases in renal artery pressure was impaired during amino acids in NK. The hemodynamic responses to amino acids were abolished in LPK and NFK. Infusion of the nonmetabolized -aminoisobutyric acid into NK produced changes in renal hemodynamics that were similar to the responses observed with the four metabolizable amino acids. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevation of plasma amino acids increases RBF and GFR by a mechanism that requires an intact macula densa feedback. Metabolism of the amino acids does not appear to be necessary for these changes to occur.

  9. Drug survival of fumaric acid esters for psoriasis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, N; Collins, P; Rogers, S; Kirby, B; Lally, A

    2014-08-01

    Fumaric acid esters (FAEs) have been used for over 30 years in the management of psoriasis. To determine drug survival of FAEs in patients with psoriasis, treatment-limiting adverse drug events and the range of effective drug doses. A retrospective, single-centre study assessing all patients commenced on FAEs between October 2003 and July 2012. Demographic data, length of treatment, reasons for discontinuation of FAEs, side-effects and range of doses were recorded. Two hundred and forty-nine patients [160 (64%) male] were included. The mean age at which FAEs were commenced was 44·5 years (range 17-82 years). The mean length of treatment was 28 months (range 1 week to 106 months). In patients who were commenced on FAEs ≥ 4 years before inclusion in this study, the 4-year drug survival was 60% (64/107). FAEs were discontinued in 146/249 patients (59%); this was due to lack of efficacy in 59/146 (40%) and gastrointestinal upset in 39/146 (27%). A very low dose of FAEs (psoriasis in 26 (10%) patients. The mean treatment duration of these patients was 64 months (range 32-106 months). Fumaric acid esters have a 4-year drug survival rate of 60%, which compares favourably with reported 4-year survival rates of 40% for etanercept and adalimumab and 70% for infliximab. Longer drug survival is more likely in the significant subgroup of patients in whom a very low dose of FAEs is sufficient to control disease. The reasons for this are unclear. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. MECHANISMS IN THE INHIBITION OF MICROORGANISMS BY SORBIC ACID

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, George K.; Vaughn, Reese H.

    1964-01-01

    York, George K. (University of California, Davis), and Reese H. Vaughn. Mechanisms in the inhibition of microorganisms by sorbic acid. J. Bacteriol. 88:411–417. 1964.—Oxidative assimilation of glucose, acetate, succinate, and fumarate by washed cells of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was inhibited by concentrations of sorbic acid ranging from 15 to 105 mg per 100 ml. At higher concentrations, the oxidation of these substrates was inhibited. Oxidative phosphorylation by submicroscopic particles of E. coli was reduced by about 30% by 37 mg per 100 ml of sorbic acid. The sulfhydryl enzymes fumarase, aspartase, and succinic dehydrogenase were inhibited by sorbic acid. The loss of activity of sorbic acid after reacting with cysteine suggested that a thiol addition occurred, which is believed to be the mechanism of action against sulfhydryl enzymes or cofactors. PMID:14203358

  11. Roles of Diet and the Acid Tolerance Response in Survival of Common Salmonella Serotypes in Feces of Finishing Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajtak, Ursula; Boland, Fiona; Bolton, Declan; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-01-01

    The persistence of Salmonella in the environment is an important factor influencing the transmission of infection in pig production. This study evaluated the effects of acid tolerance response (ATR), organic acid supplementation, and physical properties of feed on the survival of a five-strain Salmonella mixture in porcine feces held at 4 and 22°C for 88 days. Acid-adapted or non-acid-adapted nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella strains were used to inoculate feces of pigs fed four different diets, which consisted of a nonpelleted, finely ground meal feed or a finely ground, pelleted feed that was left unsupplemented or was supplemented with K-diformate. Organic acid supplementation and physical properties of feed markedly influenced Salmonella survival, but the effects were highly dependent on storage temperature; survival was unaffected by ATR. The most pronounced effects were observed at 22°C, a temperature similar to that of finishing pig houses. The supplementation of meal diets with K-diformate significantly reduced the duration of survival (P salmonellae in feces compared to survival in feces of pigs fed unsupplemented meal. The pelleting of feed, compared to feeding meal, significantly reduced (P survival in feces held at 22°C. Only minor effects of feed form and acid supplementation on survivor numbers were observed at 4°C. Differences in the fecal survival of Salmonella could not be related to diet-induced changes in fecal physiochemical parameters. The predominant survival of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT193 and serotype 4,[5],12:i:- in porcine feces demonstrates the superior ability of these serotypes to survive in this environment. Fecal survival and transmission of Salmonella in pig herds may be reduced by dietary approaches, but effects are highly dependent on environmental temperature. PMID:22038599

  12. Roles of diet and the acid tolerance response in survival of common Salmonella serotypes in feces of finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajtak, Ursula; Boland, Fiona; Leonard, Nola; Bolton, Declan; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-01-01

    The persistence of Salmonella in the environment is an important factor influencing the transmission of infection in pig production. This study evaluated the effects of acid tolerance response (ATR), organic acid supplementation, and physical properties of feed on the survival of a five-strain Salmonella mixture in porcine feces held at 4 and 22°C for 88 days. Acid-adapted or non-acid-adapted nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella strains were used to inoculate feces of pigs fed four different diets, which consisted of a nonpelleted, finely ground meal feed or a finely ground, pelleted feed that was left unsupplemented or was supplemented with K-diformate. Organic acid supplementation and physical properties of feed markedly influenced Salmonella survival, but the effects were highly dependent on storage temperature; survival was unaffected by ATR. The most pronounced effects were observed at 22°C, a temperature similar to that of finishing pig houses. The supplementation of meal diets with K-diformate significantly reduced the duration of survival (P salmonellae in feces compared to survival in feces of pigs fed unsupplemented meal. The pelleting of feed, compared to feeding meal, significantly reduced (P survival in feces held at 22°C. Only minor effects of feed form and acid supplementation on survivor numbers were observed at 4°C. Differences in the fecal survival of Salmonella could not be related to diet-induced changes in fecal physiochemical parameters. The predominant survival of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT193 and serotype 4,[5],12:i:- in porcine feces demonstrates the superior ability of these serotypes to survive in this environment. Fecal survival and transmission of Salmonella in pig herds may be reduced by dietary approaches, but effects are highly dependent on environmental temperature.

  13. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Increase Survival and Decrease Bacterial Load in Mice Subjected to Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svahn, Sara L; Ulleryd, Marcus A; Grahnemo, Louise; Ståhlman, Marcus; Borén, Jan; Nilsson, Staffan; Jansson, John-Olov; Johansson, Maria E

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is increasing in incidence. With the alarming use of antibiotics,S. aureus is prone to become methicillin resistant. Antibiotics are the only widely used pharmacological treatment for sepsis. Interestingly, mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids have better survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis than mice fed HFD rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S). To investigate what component of polyunsaturated fatty acids, i.e., omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids, exerts beneficial effects on the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis, mice were fed HFD rich in omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids for 8 weeks prior to inoculation with S. aureus Further, mice fed HFD-S were treated with omega-3 fatty acid metabolites known as resolvins. Mice fed HFD rich in omega-3 fatty acids had increased survival and decreased bacterial loads compared to those for mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis. Furthermore, the bacterial load was decreased in resolvin-treated mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis compared with that in mice treated with vehicle. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids increase the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis by reversing the deleterious effect of HFD-S on mouse survival. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Home tracheotomy mechanical ventilation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: causes, complications and 1-year survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Jesús; Servera, Emilio; Díaz, José Luis; Bañuls, Pilar; Marín, Julio

    2011-11-01

    Home tracheotomy mechanical ventilation (HTMV) can prolong survival in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) when non-invasive ventilation (NIV) fails, but knowledge about HTMV is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of tracheotomy and the main issues of 1-year HTMV in a cohort of patients with ALS. A prospective study of all patients needing HTMV was performed in a referral respiratory care unit (RCU) from April 2001 to January 2010. Patients' informed decisions about HTMV were fully respected. Caregivers were trained and could telephone the RCU. Hospital staff made home visits. All patients (n=116) agreed to participate and a tracheotomy was needed for 76, mainly due to bulbar dysfunction. Of the 38 who had a tracheotomy, in 21 it was performed in an acute setting and in 17 as a non-emergency procedure. In 19 patients the tracheotomy was related to the inadequacy of mechanically assisted coughing (MAC) to maintain normal oxygen saturation. During HTMV, 19 patients required hospitalisation, 12 with respiratory problems. The 1-year survival rate was 78.9%, with a mean survival of 10.39 months (95% CI 9.36 to 11.43). Sudden death was the main cause of death (n=9) and only one patient died from respiratory causes. No predictive factors for survival were found. Besides NIV inadequacy, the ineffectiveness of mechanically assisted coughing appears to be a relevant cause of tracheotomy for patients with ALS with severe bulbar dysfunction. Patients choosing HTMV provided by a referral RCU could have a good 1-year survival rate, respiratory problems being the main cause of hospitalisation but not of death.

  15. Adaptive memory: determining the proximate mechanisms responsible for the memorial advantages of survival processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Daniel J; Burns, Sarah A; Hwang, Ana J

    2011-01-01

    J. S. Nairne, S. R. Thompson, and J. N. S. Pandeirada (2007) suggested that our memory systems may have evolved to help us remember fitness-relevant information and showed that retention of words rated for their relevance to survival is superior to that of words encoded under other deep processing conditions. The authors present 4 experiments that uncover the proximate mechanisms likely responsible. The authors obtained a recall advantage for survival processing compared with conditions that promoted only item-specific processing or only relational processing. This effect was eliminated when control conditions encouraged both item-specific and relational processing. Data from separate measures of item-specific and relational processing generally were consistent with the view that the memorial advantage for survival processing results from the encoding of both types of processing. Although the present study suggests the proximate mechanisms for the effect, the authors argue that survival processing may be fundamentally different from other memory phenomena for which item-specific and relational processing differences have been implicated. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Survival of the functional yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus B0399 in fermented milk with added sorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanelli, G; Verardo, V; Pasini, F; Cavina, P; Lanciotti, R; Caboni, M F; Gardini, F; Montanari, C

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the survival of the functional yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus B0399 in an industrially produced fermented milk was evaluated. In particular, the yeast viability was assessed throughout the entire shelf-life of the product (30 d) to ensure the presence of the effective yeast dose (20 million viable cells for each serving of 125 g) while avoiding, by sorbic acid addition, yeast growth, which could affect product quality and stability. To find the best combination of yeast and sorbic acid concentration, 13 different combinations were tested, and then 2 of them were chosen for industrial production. In production at lower concentrations (30 million viable cells, 150 mg/kg of sorbic acid) the effective dose was maintained only at 4 and 6°C, whereas at higher dosages (70 million viable cells, 250 mg/kg of sorbic acid) the effect of temperature was less evident. In all the trials, the concentration of sorbic acid was not affected by microbial metabolism and remained stable throughout the entire shelf-life. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular mechanisms for sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kusakabe, Yuko; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Nakamura, Seiji; Imoto, Toshiaki; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2014-09-12

    Gymnemic acids are triterpene glycosides that selectively suppress taste responses to various sweet substances in humans but not in mice. This sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids is diminished by rinsing the tongue with γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids and the interaction between gymnemic acids versus sweet taste receptor and/or γ-CD. To investigate whether gymnemic acids directly interact with human (h) sweet receptor hT1R2 + hT1R3, we used the sweet receptor T1R2 + T1R3 assay in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. Similar to previous studies in humans and mice, gymnemic acids (100 μg/ml) inhibited the [Ca(2+)]i responses to sweet compounds in HEK293 cells heterologously expressing hT1R2 + hT1R3 but not in those expressing the mouse (m) sweet receptor mT1R2 + mT1R3. The effect of gymnemic acids rapidly disappeared after rinsing the HEK293 cells with γ-CD. Using mixed species pairings of human and mouse sweet receptor subunits and chimeras, we determined that the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 was mainly required for the sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids. Directed mutagenesis in the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 revealed that the interaction site for gymnemic acids shared the amino acid residues that determined the sensitivity to another sweet antagonist, lactisole. Glucuronic acid, which is the common structure of gymnemic acids, also reduced sensitivity to sweet compounds. In our models, gymnemic acids were predicted to dock to a binding pocket within the transmembrane domain of hT1R3. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Mechanisms of Sensorineural Cell Damage, Death and Survival in the Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Frederic Ryan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of acquired hearing loss, including presbycusis, is caused by irreversible damage to the sensorineural tissues of the cochlea. This article reviews the intracellular mechanisms that contribute to sensorineural damage in the cochlea, as well as the survival signaling pathways that can provide endogenous protection and tissue rescue. These data have primarily been generated in hearing loss not directly related to age. However, there is evidence that similar mechanisms operate in presbycusis. Moreover, accumulation of damage from other causes can contribute to age-related hearing loss. Potential therapeutic interventions to balance opposing but interconnected cell damage and survival pathways, such as antioxidants, anti-apoptotics, and pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibitors, are also discussed.

  19. Impact of Acetic Acid on the Survival of L. plantarum upon Microencapsulation by Coaxial Electrospraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura G. Gómez-Mascaraque

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, coaxial electrospraying was used for the first time to microencapsulate probiotic bacteria, specifically Lactobacillus plantarum, within edible protein particles with the aim of improving their resistance to in vitro digestion. The developed structures, based on an inner core of whey protein concentrate and an outer layer of gelatin, were obtained in the presence of acetic acid in the outer solution as a requirement for the electrospraying of gelatin. Despite the limited contact of the inner suspension and outer solution during electrospraying, the combination of the high voltage used during electrospraying with the presence of acetic acid was found to have a severe impact on the lactobacilli, not only decreasing initial viability but also negatively affecting the survival of the bacteria during storage and their resistance to different stress conditions, including simulated in vitro digestion.

  20. Antimicrobial effects of weak acids on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huiying J; Breidt, Frederick; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys M; Osborne, Jason A

    2011-06-01

    Outbreaks of disease due to vegetative bacterial pathogens associated with acid foods (such as apple cider) have raised concerns about acidified vegetables and related products that have a similar pH (3.2 to 4.0). Escherichia coli O157:H7 and related strains of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) have been identified as the most acid resistant vegetative pathogens in these products. Previous research has shown that the lack of dissolved oxygen in many hermetically sealed acid or acidified food products can enhance survival of EHEC compared with their survival under aerobic conditions. We compared the antimicrobial effects of several food acids (acetic, malic, lactic, fumaric, benzoic, and sorbic acids and sulfite) on a cocktail of EHEC strains under conditions representative of non-heat-processed acidified vegetables in hermetically sealed jars, holding the pH (3.2) and ionic strength (0.342) constant under anaerobic conditions. The overall antimicrobial effectiveness of weak acids used in this study was ranked, from most effective to least effective: sulfite > benzoic acid > sorbic acid > fumaric acid > L- and D-lactic acid > acetic acid > malic acid. These rankings were based on the estimated protonated concentrations required to achieve a 5-log reduction in EHEC after 24 h of incubation at 30°C. This study provides information that can be used to formulate safer acid and acidified food products and provides insights about the mode of action of weak acids against EHEC.

  1. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Lactic Acid and Mandelic Acid by Pyridinium Chlorochromate in Aqueous Acidic Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapana Jain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyridinium chlorochromate (PCC act as two electron oxidant in kinetic studies of the oxidation of lactic and mandelic acid in acidic medium. The influence of several factors such as acidity, salts, solvent composition and temperature on the reaction rate has been studied. The reaction shows first order dependence with respect to [PCC] and [H+]. The various thermodynamic parameters have been evaluated. Products as oxoacids and absence of free radical were confirmed. Suitable reaction mechanism has been proposed.

  2. Effects of food resources on the fatty acid composition, growth and survival of freshwater mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Michelle; Bartsch, Lynn; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jon; Moraska Lafrancois, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Increased nutrient and sediment loading in rivers have caused observable changes in algal community composition, and thereby, altered the quality and quantity of food resources available to native freshwater mussels. Our objective was to characterize the relationship between nutrient conditions and mussel food quality and examine the effects on fatty acid composition, growth and survival of juvenile mussels. Juvenile Lampsilis cardium and L. siliquoidea were deployed in cages for 28 d at four riverine and four lacustrine sites in the lower St. Croix River, Minnesota/Wisconsin, USA. Mussel foot tissue and food resources (four seston fractions and surficial sediment) were analyzed for quantitative fatty acid (FA) composition. Green algae were abundant in riverine sites, whereas cyanobacteria were most abundant in the lacustrine sites. Mussel survival was high (95%) for both species. Lampsilis cardium exhibited lower growth relative to L. siliquoidea (p diet. In contrast, growth of L. siliquiodea was negatively related to nearly all FAs in the largest size fraction (i.e., >63 μm) of seston, including the bacterial FAs, and several of the FAs associated with sediments. Reduced mussel growth was observed in L. siliquoidea when the abundance of cyanobacteria exceeded 9% of the total phytoplankton biovolume. Areas dominated by cyanobacteria may not provide sufficient food quality to promote or sustain mussel growth.

  3. The mechanism of oleic acid nitration by *NO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kavita; Siddam, Anjaiah; Marathi, Archana; Roy, Uzzal; Falck, J R; Balazy, Michael

    2008-08-01

    Fatty acid nitration is a recently discovered process that generates biologically active nitro lipids; however, its mechanism has not been fully characterized. For example, some structural details such as vinyl and allyl isomers of the nitro fatty acids have not been established. To characterize lipids that originated from a biomimetic reaction of *NO(2) with oleic acid, we synthesized several isomers of nitro oleic acids and studied their chromatography and mass spectra by various techniques of mass spectrometry. LC/MS analysis performed on a high resolution micro column detected molecular carboxylic anions of various oleic acid nitro isomers (NO(2)OA). Esterification of NO(2)OA with pentafluorobenzyl bromide and diisopropylethylamine as a catalyst produced a unique isoxazole ester derivative exclusively from allyl NO(2)OA isomers via dehydration of the nitro group at ambient temperatures. This new analytical procedure revealed that *NO(2) generated two vinyl and two allyl isomers of NO(2)OA. The vinyl isomers showed high regioselectivity with the 1.8:1 preference for the 10-NO(2)OA isomer that was absent among allylic isomers. The nitration also generated elaidic acid via cis-trans isomerization and diatereoisomers of vicinal nitro hydroxy, nitro keto and alpha-nitro epoxy stearic acids with high stereo and regioselectivity. Nitration of small unilamelar phospholipid vesicles resulted in several phospholipids containing nitro lipids and elaidic acid amenable to hydrolysis by phospholipase A(2).

  4. Promoting survival, migration, and integration of transplanted Schwann cells by over-expressing polysialic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juan; Bo, Xuenong; Wu, Dongsheng; Yeh, John; Richardson, Peter M; Zhang, Yi

    2011-03-01

    The poor survival and migration of transplanted Schwann cells (SCs) are major drawbacks for their clinical application in cell therapy for neurotrauma. To overcome such drawbacks we genetically modified SCs to over-express polysialic acid (PSA) by lentiviral delivery of polysialyltransferase (PST) to study whether over-expression of PSA could enhance their survival, migration, and integration when transplanted into the spinal cord. It was found that more PSA-expressing SCs (PST/SCs) survived than GFP-expressing SCs (GFP/SCs) after transplantation, although cell loss was still quite significant. PSA expression did not enhance the motility of transplanted SCs in uninjured spinal cord. However, in a spinal cord crush injury model PST/SCs transplanted caudal to the lesion showed that increased number of PST/SCs migrated to the injury site compared with that of GFP/SCs. Induced expression of PSA in spinal cord can further facilitate the infiltration of PST/SCs into the lesion site. PST/SCs were also shown to intermingle well with host spinal cells while GFP/SCs formed boundaries with host tissue. This was confirmed by an in vitro confrontation assay showing that more PST/SCs crossed over to astrocyte territory than GFP/SCs. Furthermore, PST/SCs induced much less expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the surrounding tissues than GFP/SCs, indicating that expression of PSA on SCs do not cause significant stress response of astrocytes. These results demonstrate that expression of PSA on SCs significantly changes their biological properties and makes them more feasible for neural repair after neurotrauma. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Temperature dependence of poly(lactic acid) mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Guo, Huilong; Li, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymers are not only determined by their structures, but also related to the temperature field in which they are located. The yield behaviors, Young's modulus and structures of injection-molded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) samples after annealing at different temperatures...

  6. Effects of Acid treatment on the compression and mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of acid treatment on the compression and mechanical properties of the cellulosic fibrous residue obtained after a high proportion of starch has been removed from the peeled and rasped tuberous root of Xanthosoma sagittifolium (Family: Araceae). Powdered fibrous residues were subjected ...

  7. Effects of sulphuric acid, mechanical scarification and wet heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of different treatment methods on the germination of seeds of Parkia biglobosa (mimosaceae) were carried out. Prior treatment of seeds with sulphuric acid, wet heat and mechanical scarification were found to induce germination of the dormant seeds. These methods could be applied to raise seedlings of the plant for ...

  8. Formation mechanism of coamorphous drug−amino acid mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Cornett, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Two coamorphous drug−amino acid systems, indomethacin−tryptophan (Ind−Trp) and furosemide−tryptophan Fur−Trp), were analyzed toward their ease of amorphization and mechanism of coamorphization during ball milling. The two mixtures were compared to the corresponding amorphization of the pure drug...

  9. Bacillus subtilis vegetative isolate surviving chlorine dioxide exposure: an elusive mechanism of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D J H; Wesgate, R L; Denyer, S P; McDonnell, G; Maillard, J-Y

    2015-12-01

    Oxidizing agents such as chlorine dioxide are widely used microbicides, including for disinfection of medical equipment. We isolated a Bacillus subtilis isolate from a washer-disinfector whose vegetative form demonstrated unique resistance to chlorine dioxide (0·03%) and hydrogen peroxide (7·5%). The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms of resistance expressed by this isolate. A range of resistance mechanisms were investigated in the B. subtilis isolate and a reference B. subtilis strain (ATCC 6051) to include bacterial cell aggregation, the presence of profuse exopolysaccharide (EPS), and the expression of detoxification enzymes. The basis of resistance of the isolate to high concentrations of oxidizing agents was not linked to the presence of endospores. Although, the presence of EPS, aggregation and expression of detoxification enzymes may play a role in bacterial survival to low concentrations of chlorine dioxide, it is unlikely that the mechanisms helped tested to survive the bactericidal effect of higher oxidizer concentrations. Overall, the mechanisms conferring resistance to chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide remains elusive. Based on recent advances in the mode of action of oxidizing agents and notably hydrogen peroxide, we postulate that additional efficient intracellular mechanisms may be involved to explain significant resistance to in-use concentrations of commonly used high-level disinfectants. The isolation of a highly resistant vegetative Gram-positive bacterium to a highly reactive oxidizing agent is worrying. Understanding the mechanisms conferring such resistance is essential to effectively control such bacterial isolates. Here, we postulate that there are still mechanisms of bacterial resistance that have not been fully characterized. © 2015 The Authors published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Survival and growth of wildlife shrubs and trees on acid mine spoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, D.K.; Adkisson, L.F.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the survival and growth of selected wildlife plants over a wide range of acid mine spoil conditions and to identify species suitable for surface mine reclamation. A major criterion in selection of study sites was inclusion of a wide range of spoil acidity conditions. The Ollis Creek (Study Area A) and Farrell (Study Area B) coal surface mines located in Campbell and Scott Counties, Tennessee, were selected for study. Seven plant species, all of which had been used in past reclamation demonstrations, were introduced on the 22 plots during March 1972. Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) was included as a control plant. Ten additional plant species were introduced during March 1973. With the exception of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum var.). European filbert (Corylus avellana), and red maple (Acer rubrum), these species had not been used in TVA reclamation demonstrations. To assess the effects of spoil pH on the plants, the plots were grouped into seven pH categories, and mean percent survival and growth for each species were calculated. Results indicate that autumn olive, elaeagnus cherry, arnot locust, sawtooth oak, red maple, and Toringo crabapple are suitable for quick improvement of surface mine habitat over a wide range of spoil acidity in the Appalachian coalfield. Bessey cherry and European filbert need further study before a decision can be made regarding their reclamation utility. Species that are not recommended for quick habitat improvement over a wide range of surface mine spoil pH conditions include bush honeysuckle, barberry, Siberian crabapple, Manchu cherry, American beautyberry, bear oak, blueberry, rem-red honeysuckle, and redcedar.

  11. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA- induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus

  12. Survival and growth of conservation shrubs and trees, with thin-cover reclamation on acid substrate, Iowa, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, L

    1986-09-01

    Many abandoned strip-mine sites in midwestern USA are highly acidic and require a separate layer of low-acidity cover materials for successful revegetation. Economics and logistics often constrain this reclamation to a very thin cover. Twenty-two species of shrubs and trees were tested for 6 years of survival and growth on a thin wedge of silt loess (up to 0.75m thick) emplaced over highly acid spoils, in south-central Iowa. No weed control or maintenance was provided. The performance of 21 of the species could be categorized into 3 groups: Group 1-consistent survival (10 species); Group 2-irregular survival and growth (6 species); Group 3-little suitability for survival (5 species). Mouldy nursery stock precluded evaluation of 1 species.For most species, the most favourable survival and growth was not on the thickest loess cover (0.75 meters) because weeds became too well established. In general, the shrubs survived severe weed competition in dwarfed form until they could break through the weed canopy. But the tree species had to penetrate the weed canopy within their first few years of growth or perish. There is evidence that if weed competition were reduced or eliminated, the species in Group 2 would probably have survival and growth equivalent to those in Group 1. The use of "tubelings" for establishing shrubs and trees on thincover reclamation sites is suggested.

  13. Glycolic acid modulates the mechanical property and degradation of poly(glycerol, sebacate, glycolic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Jie; Wu, Lan; Huang, Wei; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yan; Lu, Xi-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Lan; Yang, Bao-Feng; Dong, De-Li

    2010-01-01

    The development of biodegradable materials with controllable degradation properties is beneficial for a variety of applications. Poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS) is a promising candidate of biomaterials; so we synthesize a series of poly(glycerol, sebacate, glycolic acid) (PGSG) with 1:2:0, 1:2:0.2, 1:2:0.4, 1:2:0.6, 1:2:1 mole ratio of glycerol, sebacate, and glycolic acid to elucidate the relation of doped glycolic acid to the degradation rate and mechanical properties. The microstructures of the polymers with different doping of glycolic acid were dissimilar. PGSG with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0.2 displayed an integral degree of ordering, different to those with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0, 0.4, 0.6, and 1, which showed mild phase separation structure. The number, DeltaH(m), and temperature of the PGSG melting peaks tended to decrease with the increasing ratio of doped glycolic acid. In vitro and in vivo degradation tests showed that the degradation rate of PGSG with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0.2 was slowest, but in the ratio range of 0, 0.4, and 0.6, the degradation rate increased with the increase of glycolic acid. All PGSG samples displayed good tissue response and anticoagulant effects. Our data suggest that doping glycolic acid can modulate the microstructure and degree of crosslinking of PGS, thereby control the degradation rate of PGS.

  14. Amino acid secondary transporters: toward a common transport mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikhard, Eva S; Ziegler, Christine M

    2012-01-01

    Solute carriers (SLC) that transport amino acids are key players in health and diseases in humans. Their prokaryotic relatives are often involved in essential physiological processes in microorganisms, e.g. in homeostasis and acidic/osmotic stress response. High-resolution X-ray structures of the sequence-unrelated amino acid transporters unraveled a striking structural similarity between carriers, which were formerly assigned to different families. The highly conserved fold is characterized by two inverted structural repeats of five transmembrane helices each and indicates common mechanistic transport concepts if not an evolutionary link among a large number of amino acid transporters. Therefore, these transporters are classified now into the structural amino acid-polyamine-organocation superfamily (APCS). The APCS includes among others the mammalian SLC6 transporters and the heterodimeric SLC7/SLC3 transporters. However, it has to be noted that the APCS is not limited entirely to amino acid transporters but contains also transporters for, e.g. amino acid derivatives and sugars. For instance, the betaine-choline-carnitine transporter family of bacterial activity-regulated Na(+)- and H(+)-coupled symporters for glycine betaine and choline is also part of this second largest structural superfamily. The APCS fold provides different possibilities to transport the same amino acid. Arginine can be transported by an H(+)-coupled symport or by antiport mechanism in exchange against agmatine for example. The convergence of the mechanistic concept of transport under comparable physiological conditions allows speculating if structurally unexplored amino acid transporters, e.g. the members of the SLC36 and SLC38 family, belong to the APCS, too. In the kidney, which is an organ that depends critically on the regulated amino acid transport, these different SLC transporters have to work together to account for proper function. Here, we will summarize the basic concepts of Na

  15. A novel approach in acidic disinfection through inhibition of acid resistance mechanisms; Maleic acid-mediated inhibition of glutamate decarboxylase activity enhances acid sensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudyal, Ranju; Barnes, Ruth H; Karatzas, Kimon Andreas G

    2018-02-01

    Here it is demonstrated a novel approach in disinfection regimes where specific molecular acid resistance systems are inhibited aiming to eliminate microorganisms under acidic conditions. Despite the importance of the Glutamate Decarboxylase (GAD) system for survival of Listeria monocytogenes and other pathogens under acidic conditions, its potential inhibition by specific compounds that could lead to its elimination from foods or food preparation premises has not been studied. The effects of maleic acid on the acid resistance of L. monocytogenes were investigated and found that it has a higher antimicrobial activity under acidic conditions than other organic acids, while this could not be explained by its pKa or Ka values. The effects were found to be more pronounced on strains with higher GAD activity. Maleic acid affected the extracellular GABA levels while it did not affect the intracellular ones. Maleic acid had a major impact mainly on GadD2 activity as also shown in cell lysates. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that maleic acid is able to partly remove biofilms of L. monocytogenes. Maleic acid is able to inhibit the GAD of L. monocytogenes significantly enhancing its sensitivity to acidic conditions and together with its ability to remove biofilms, make a good candidate for disinfection regimes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pathway analysis reveals common pro-survival mechanisms of metyrapone and carbenoxolone after traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L Hellmich

    Full Text Available Developing new pharmacotherapies for traumatic brain injury (TBI requires elucidation of the neuroprotective mechanisms of many structurally and functionally diverse compounds. To test our hypothesis that diverse neuroprotective drugs similarly affect common gene targets after TBI, we compared the effects of two drugs, metyrapone (MT and carbenoxolone (CB, which, though used clinically for noncognitive conditions, improved learning and memory in rats and humans. Although structurally different, both MT and CB inhibit a common molecular target, 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, which converts inactive cortisone to cortisol, thereby effectively reducing glucocorticoid levels. We examined injury-induced signaling pathways to determine how the effects of these two compounds correlate with pro-survival effects in surviving neurons of the injured rat hippocampus. We found that treatment of TBI rats with MT or CB acutely induced in hippocampal neurons transcriptional profiles that were remarkably similar (i.e., a coordinated attenuation of gene expression across multiple injury-induced cell signaling networks. We also found, to a lesser extent, a coordinated increase in cell survival signals. Analysis of injury-induced gene expression altered by MT and CB provided additional insight into the protective effects of each. Both drugs attenuated expression of genes in the apoptosis, death receptor and stress signaling pathways, as well as multiple genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway such as subunits of NADH dehydrogenase (Complex1, cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV and ATP synthase (Complex V. This suggests an overall inhibition of mitochondrial function. Complex 1 is the primary source of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway, thus linking the protective effects of these drugs to a reduction in oxidative stress. The net effect of the drug-induced transcriptional changes observed here indicates that

  17. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winyoo Chowanadisai

    Full Text Available The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05 (S2 Table. Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  18. Antiatherogenic effects of n-3 fatty acids - evidence and mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Zampolli

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available N-3 (omega-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acids are thought to display a variety of beneficial effects for human health. Clues to the occurrence of cardiovascular protective effects have been, however, the spur for the first biomedical interest in these compounds, and are the best documented. Historically, the epidemiologic association between dietary consumption of n-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular protection was first suggested by Bang and Dyerberg, who identified the high consumption of fish, and therefore, of fish oil-derived n-3 fatty acids, as the likely explanation for the strikingly low rate of coronary heart disease events reported in the Inuit population. Since their initial reports, research has proceeded in parallel to provide further evidence for their cardioprotection and to understand underlying mechanisms. Decreased atherogenesis is currently thought to be a part of the cardiovascular protection by n-3 fatty acids. This article summarizes the evidence for such a claim and the mechanisms putatively involved. (Heart International 2006; 3-4: 141-54

  19. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Hye Won; Yang, Byoung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos? implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos? implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to ag...

  20. Mechanism of arachidonic acid action on syntaxin-Munc18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Emma; Darios, Frédéric; Broersen, Kerensa; Gatsby, Naomi; Peak-Chew, Sew-Yeu; Rickman, Colin; Davletov, Bazbek

    2007-04-01

    Syntaxin and Munc18 are, in tandem, essential for exocytosis in all eukaryotes. Recently, it was shown that Munc18 inhibition of neuronal syntaxin 1 can be overcome by arachidonic acid, indicating that this common second messenger acts to disrupt the syntaxin-Munc18 interaction. Here, we show that arachidonic acid can stimulate syntaxin 1 alone, indicating that it is syntaxin 1 that undergoes a structural change in the syntaxin 1-Munc18 complex. Arachidonic acid is incapable of dissociating Munc18 from syntaxin 1 and, crucially, Munc18 remains associated with syntaxin 1 after arachidonic-acid-induced syntaxin 1 binding to synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa (SNAP25). We also show that the same principle operates in the case of the ubiquitous syntaxin 3 isoform, highlighting the conserved nature of the mechanism of arachidonic acid action. Neuronal soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) can be isolated from brain membranes in a complex with endogenous Munc18, consistent with a proposed function of Munc18 in vesicle docking and fusion.

  1. Mechanism of arachidonic acid action on syntaxin–Munc18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Emma; Darios, Frédéric; Broersen, Kerensa; Gatsby, Naomi; Peak-Chew, Sew-Yeu; Rickman, Colin; Davletov, Bazbek

    2007-01-01

    Syntaxin and Munc18 are, in tandem, essential for exocytosis in all eukaryotes. Recently, it was shown that Munc18 inhibition of neuronal syntaxin 1 can be overcome by arachidonic acid, indicating that this common second messenger acts to disrupt the syntaxin–Munc18 interaction. Here, we show that arachidonic acid can stimulate syntaxin 1 alone, indicating that it is syntaxin 1 that undergoes a structural change in the syntaxin 1–Munc18 complex. Arachidonic acid is incapable of dissociating Munc18 from syntaxin 1 and, crucially, Munc18 remains associated with syntaxin 1 after arachidonic-acid-induced syntaxin 1 binding to synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa (SNAP25). We also show that the same principle operates in the case of the ubiquitous syntaxin 3 isoform, highlighting the conserved nature of the mechanism of arachidonic acid action. Neuronal soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) can be isolated from brain membranes in a complex with endogenous Munc18, consistent with a proposed function of Munc18 in vesicle docking and fusion. PMID:17363971

  2. Single sample expression-anchored mechanisms predict survival in head and neck cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinan Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression signatures that are predictive of therapeutic response or prognosis are increasingly useful in clinical care; however, mechanistic (and intuitive interpretation of expression arrays remains an unmet challenge. Additionally, there is surprisingly little gene overlap among distinct clinically validated expression signatures. These "causality challenges" hinder the adoption of signatures as compared to functionally well-characterized single gene biomarkers. To increase the utility of multi-gene signatures in survival studies, we developed a novel approach to generate "personal mechanism signatures" of molecular pathways and functions from gene expression arrays. FAIME, the Functional Analysis of Individual Microarray Expression, computes mechanism scores using rank-weighted gene expression of an individual sample. By comparing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC samples with non-tumor control tissues, the precision and recall of deregulated FAIME-derived mechanisms of pathways and molecular functions are comparable to those produced by conventional cohort-wide methods (e.g. GSEA. The overlap of "Oncogenic FAIME Features of HNSCC" (statistically significant and differentially regulated FAIME-derived genesets representing GO functions or KEGG pathways derived from HNSCC tissue among three distinct HNSCC datasets (pathways:46%, p<0.001 is more significant than the gene overlap (genes:4%. These Oncogenic FAIME Features of HNSCC can accurately discriminate tumors from control tissues in two additional HNSCC datasets (n = 35 and 91, F-accuracy = 100% and 97%, empirical p<0.001, area under the receiver operating characteristic curves = 99% and 92%, and stratify recurrence-free survival in patients from two independent studies (p = 0.0018 and p = 0.032, log-rank. Previous approaches depending on group assignment of individual samples before selecting features or learning a classifier are limited by design to

  3. Survival mechanisms of vertebrate ectotherms at subfreezing temperatures: applications in cryomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, J P; Lee, R E; DeVries, A L; Wang, T; Layne, J R

    1995-03-01

    Various marine fishes, amphibians, and reptiles survive at temperatures several degrees below the freezing point of their body fluids by virtue of adaptive mechanisms that promote freeze avoidance or freeze tolerance. Freezing is avoided by a colligative depression of the blood freezing point, supercooling of the body fluids, or the biosynthesis of unique antifreeze proteins that inhibit the propagation of ice within body fluids. Conversely, freeze tolerance is an adaptation for the survival of tissue freezing under ecologically relevant thermal and temporal conditions that is conferred by the biosynthesis of permeating carbohydrate cryoprotectants and an extensive dehydration of tissues and organs. Such cryoprotective responses, invoked by the onset of freezing, mitigate the osmotic stress associated with freeze-concentration of cytoplasm, attendant metabolic perturbations, and physical damage. Cryomedical research has historically relied on mammalian models for experimentation even though endotherms do not naturally experience subfreezing temperatures. Some vertebrate ectotherms have "solved" not only the problem of freezing individual tissues and organs, but also that of simultaneously freezing all organ systems. An emerging paradigm in cryomedicine is the application of principles governing natural cold hardiness to the development of protocols for the cryopreservation of mammalian tissues and organs.

  4. Mechanism of fumaric acid accumulation in Rhizopus nigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, A H; Bright, M M; Scott, W E

    1967-02-01

    It is doubtful that the glyoxylate bypass plays a significant role in the accumulation of fumaric acid by fungi, as has been postulated. In high glucose media, which favor fumarate production, isocitrate lyase (threo-D(s) isocitrate glyoxylate lyase), which is the key enzyme of the glyoxylate bypass, is strongly repressed. The specific activity of this enzyme remains low as long as glucose is present in the medium, even though fumarate formation proceeds at a high level. In addition, the activity of isocitrate lyase is inhibited by phosphoenolpyruvate, which would be formed from glucose. Alternatively, evidence is presented that bulk accumulation of fumaric acid under aerobic conditions in high glucose media takes place through a C(3) plus C(1) carbon dioxide fixation. CO(2) fixation was measured by the direct incorporation of NaHC(14)O(3) into fumaric acid, and by demonstrating that the specific radioactivity of fumaric acid formed from uniformly labeled C(14)-glucose was decreased in the presence of nonradioactive carbonate. The extent of decrease in specific radioactivity is in accord with a C(3) plus C(1) CO(2) fixation mechanism.

  5. Cardioprotective mechanism of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Jin; Arita, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, are widely regarded as cardioprotective. Several large-scale, randomized clinical trials have shown that dietary intake of omega-3 PUFAs improves the prognosis of patients with symptomatic heart failure or recent myocardial infarction. Therefore, dietary consumption of omega-3 PUFA is recommended in international guidelines for the general population to prevent the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, the precise mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effects of omega-3 PUFAs are not fully understood. Omega-3 PUFAs can be incorporated into the phospholipid bilayer of cell membranes and can affect membrane fluidity, lipid microdomain formation, and signaling across membranes. Omega-3 PUFAs also modulate the function of membrane ion channels, such as Na and L-type Ca channels, to prevent lethal arrhythmias. Moreover, omega-3 PUFAs also prevent the conversion of arachidonic acid into pro-inflammatory eicosanoids by serving as an alternative substrate for cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase, resulting in the production of less potent products. In addition, a number of enzymatically oxygenated metabolites derived from omega-3 PUFAs were recently identified as anti-inflammatory mediators. These omega-3 metabolites may contribute to the beneficial effects against CVDs that are attributed to omega-3 PUFAs. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Queen survival and oxalic acid residues in sugar stores after summer application against Varroa destructor in honey bees (Apis mellifera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, B.; Donders, J.N.L.C.; Stratum, van P.; Blacquière, T.; Dooremalen, van C.

    2012-01-01

    Methods using oxalic acid (OA) to control Varroa destructor in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies are widely applied. In this study, the effects of an OA spray application in early summer on the survival of young and old queens, and on OA residues in sugar stores were investigated. A questionnaire

  7. Selective stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptor subtypes and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture: effect of kainic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate. Here we report on the influence of another glutamate analogue, kainic acid, which, in contrast to N-methyl-D-aspartate, is believed to stimulate transmitter rec...

  8. Kinetic studies of Candida parapsilosis phagocytosis by macrophages and detection of intracellular survival mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata eToth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though the number of Candida infections due to non-albicans species like C. parapsilosis has been increasing, little is known about their pathomechanisms. Certain aspects of C. parapsilosis and host interactions have already been investigated; however we lack information about the innate cellular responses towards this species. The aim of our project was to dissect and compare the phagocytosis of C. parapsilosis to C. albicans and to another Candida species C. glabrata by murine and human macrophages by live cell video microscopy. We broke down the phagocytic process into three stages: macrophage migration, engulfment of fungal cells and host cell killing after the uptake. Our results showed increased macrophage migration towards C. parapsilosis and we observed differences during the engulfment processes when comparing the three species. The engulfment time of C. parapsilosis was comparable to that of C. albicans regardless of the pseudohypha length and spatial orientation relative to phagocytes, while the rate of host cell killing and the overall uptake regarding C. parapsilosis showed similarities mainly with C. glabrata. Furthermore, we observed difference between human and murine phagocytes in the uptake of C. parapsilosis. UV-treatment of fungal cells had varied effects on phagocytosis dependent upon which Candida strain was used. Besides statistical analysis, live cell imaging videos showed that this species similarly to the other two also has the ability to survive in host cells via the following mechanisms: yeast replication, and pseudohypha growth inside of phagocytes, exocytosis of fungal cells and also abortion of host cell mitosis following the uptake. According to our knowledge this is the first study that provides a thorough examination of C. parapsilosis phagocytosis and reports intracellular survival mechanisms associated with this species.

  9. Effect of mechanical site preparation treatments on oak survival in a retired field afforestation effort -- first-year results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew B. Self; Andrew W. Ezell; Damon B. Hollis; Derek. Alkire

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical site preparation is frequently proposed to alleviate poor soil conditions when afforesting retired agricultural fields. Without management of soil problems, oak seedlings planted in these areas may exhibit poor survival. While mechanical site preparation methods currently employed in hardwood afforestation are proven, there is a substantial void in research...

  10. Efficacy and possible mechanisms of topical tranexamic acid in melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S J; Park, J-Y; Shibata, T; Fujiwara, R; Kang, H Y

    2016-07-01

    Tranexamic acid (TA) has been suggested as an effective treatment for melasma. To investigate the effects and mechanism of action of topical TA in the treatment of melasma. In this study, 23 participants with melasma applied a 2% TA formulation to the whole face for 12 weeks. Clinical effects were evaluated using the modified Melasma Area and Severity Index (mMASI) and a chromameter. Skin biopsies were obtained from 10 participants to evaluate pigmentation, vascularity and the expression levels of possible paracrine factors contributing to the effect of TA. Most of the participants had mild melasma, with mMASI of melasma. This immunohistochemical study found that suppression of ET-1 could be one of the mechanisms of action of TA on melasma. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-12-21

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  12. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarmistha Devi Aribam

    Full Text Available Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  13. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribam, Swarmistha Devi; Harada, Tomoyuki; Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kanehira, Katsushi; Hikono, Hirokazu; Matsui, Hidenori; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb)-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  14. Membrane fouling mechanism in ultrafiltration of succinic acid fermentation broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caixia; Li, Qiang; Tang, Huang; Yan, Daojiang; Zhou, Wei; Xing, Jianmin; Wan, Yinhua

    2012-07-01

    The membrane fouling mechanism was studied in treating succinic acid fermentation broth during dead-end ultrafiltration. Different membranes were used and two models were applied to analyze the fouling mechanism. Resistance-in-series model was applied to determine the main factor that caused the operation resistance. Results indicated that most membranes tended to be fouled by cake layer or concentration polarization. Hermia's model, which is composed of four individual sub-models, was used to analyze the predominant fouling mechanism. Results showed that the fouling of RC 10 kDa and PES 30 kDa was controlled by the complete blocking mechanism, while PES 100 kDa was controlled by the intermediate blocking and PES 10 kDa was controlled by cake layer. This conclusion was also proved by SEM photos. Membrane characteristics were monitored before and after ultrafiltration by AFM and goniometer. Both contact angle and roughness of most membranes increased after ultrafiltration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Promoting extracellular matrix remodeling via ascorbic acid enhances the survival of primary ovarian follicles encapsulated in alginate hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagler, David; Makanji, Yogeshwar; Tu, Tao; Bernabé, Beatriz Peñalver; Lee, Raymond; Zhu, Jie; Kniazeva, Ekaterina; Hornick, Jessica E; Woodruff, Teresa K; Shea, Lonnie D

    2014-07-01

    The in vitro growth of ovarian follicles is an emerging technology for fertility preservation. Various strategies support the culture of secondary and multilayer follicles from various species including mice, non-human primate, and human; however, the culture of early stage (primary and primordial) follicles, which are more abundant in the ovary and survive cryopreservation, has been limited. Hydrogel-encapsulating follicle culture systems that employed feeder cells, such as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), stimulated the growth of primary follicles (70-80 µm); yet, survival was low and smaller follicles (ascorbic acid based on its role in extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition/remodeling for other applications. The selection of ascorbic acid was further supported by a microarray analysis that suggested a decrease in mRNA levels of enzymes within the ascorbate pathway between primordial, primary, and secondary follicles. The supplementation of ascorbic acid (50 µg/mL) significantly enhanced the survival of primary follicles (<80 µm) cultured in alginate hydrogels, which coincided with improved structural integrity. Follicles developed antral cavities and increased to diameters exceeding 250 µm. Consistent with improved structural integrity, the gene/protein expression of ECM and cell adhesion molecules was significantly changed. This research supports the notion that modifying the culture environment (medium components) can substantially enhance the survival and growth of early stage follicles. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. VILIP-1 downregulation in non-small cell lung carcinomas: mechanisms and prediction of survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Fu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available VILIP-1, a member of the neuronal Ca++ sensor protein family, acts as a tumor suppressor gene in an experimental animal model by inhibiting cell proliferation, adhesion and invasiveness of squamous cell carcinoma cells. Western Blot analysis of human tumor cells showed that VILIP-1 expression was undetectable in several types of human tumor cells, including 11 out of 12 non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC cell lines. The down-regulation of VILIP-1 was due to loss of VILIP-1 mRNA transcripts. Rearrangements, large gene deletions or mutations were not found. Hypermethylation of the VILIP-1 promoter played an important role in gene silencing. In most VILIP-1-silent cells the VILIP-1 promoter was methylated. In vitro methylation of the VILIP-1 promoter reduced its activity in a promoter-reporter assay. Transcriptional activity of endogenous VILIP-1 promoter was recovered by treatment with 5'-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5'-Aza-dC. Trichostatin A (TSA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, potently induced VILIP-1 expression, indicating that histone deacetylation is an additional mechanism of VILIP-1 silencing. TSA increased histone H3 and H4 acetylation in the region of the VILIP-1 promoter. Furthermore, statistical analysis of expression and promoter methylation (n = 150 primary NSCLC samples showed a significant relationship between promoter methylation and protein expression downregulation as well as between survival and decreased or absent VILIP-1 expression in lung cancer tissues (p<0.0001. VILIP-1 expression is silenced by promoter hypermethylation and histone deacetylation in aggressive NSCLC cell lines and primary tumors and its clinical evaluation could have a role as a predictor of short-term survival in lung cancer patients.

  17. Mechanisms of neptunium redox reactions in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Bryan, Samuel A.; Casella, Amanda J.; Peterson, James M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2017-01-01

    First transuranium element neptunium (Np) exhibits complicated behavior in acidic solutions because it can adopt wide range of oxidation states typically from +3 to +6 and coordinate large variety of ligands. In particular, accurate determination of Np redox potentials in nitric acid solutions is challenging due to overlapping chemical and electrochemical reactions leading to significant experimental uncertainties. Furthermore, over past decades spectrophotometry has been extensively applied to identify and characterize Np solution species in different oxidation states. However, relevant spectral database of Np in nitric acid solutions that can serve for the reference purposes has yet to be established due to the experimental difficulty to isolate and stabilize Np species in pure oxidation states without compromising solution optical properties. This work demonstrates that combination of voltammetry and controlled-potential in situ thin-layer spectropotentiometry overcomes these challenges so that Np species in pure +3, +4, +5, or +6 oxidation states were electrochemically generated in the systematically varied 0.1 – 5 M nitric acid solutions, and corresponding vis-NIR spectral signatures were obtained. In situ optical monitoring of the interconversion between adjacent Np oxidation states resulted in elucidation of the mechanisms of the involved redox reactions, in-depth understanding of the relative stability of the Np oxidation states, and allowed benchmarking of the redox potentials of the NpO22+/NpO2+, NpO2+/Np4+ and Np4+/Np3+ couples. Notably, the NpO2+/Np4+ couple was distinguished from the proximal Np4+/Np3+ process overcoming previous concerns and challenges encountered in accurate determination of the respective potentials.

  18. Free fatty acids and their metabolism affect function and survival of podocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas eSieber

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Podocyte injury and loss critically contribute to the pathogenesis of proteinuric kidney diseases including diabetic nephropathy. Deregulated lipid metabolism with disturbed free fatty acid (FFA metabolism is a characteristic of metabolically unhealthy obesity and type 2 diabetes and likely contributes to end-stage kidney disease irrespective of the underlying kidney disease. In the current review we summarize recent findings related to FFAs and altered renal FFA metabolism with a special focus on podocytes. We will outline the opposing effects of saturated and monounsaturated FFAs and a particular emphasis will be given to the underlying molecular mechanisms involving insulin resistance and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. Finally, recent data suggesting a critical role of renal FFA metabolism to adapt to an altered lipid environment will be discussed.

  19. HBx regulates fatty acid oxidation to promote hepatocellular carcinoma survival during metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Da; Wu, Han; Huang, Shuai; Zhang, Hui-Lu; Qin, Chen-Jie; Zhao, Ling-Hao; Fu, Gong-Bo; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Xian-Ming; Tang, Liang; Wen, Wen; Yang, Wen; Tang, Shan-Hua; Cao, Dan; Guo, Lin-Na; Zeng, Min; Wu, Meng-Chao; Yan, He-Xin; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2016-02-09

    Due to a high rate of nutrient consumption and inadequate vascularization, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells constantly undergo metabolic stress during tumor development. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HBV-induced HCC. In this study, we investigated the functional roles of HBx in HCC adaptation to metabolic stress. Up-regulation of HBx increased the intracellular ATP and NADPH generation, and induced the resistance to glucose deprivation, whereas depletion of HBx via siRNA abolished these effects and conferred HCC cells sensitive to glucose restriction. Though HBx did not affect the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation capacity of HCC cells under normal culture conditions, it facilitated fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in the absence of glucose, which maintained NADPH and ATP levels. Further investigation showed that HBx expression, under glucose deprivation, stimulated phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) via a calcium/CaMKK-dependent pathway, which was required for the activation of FAO. Conversely, inhibition of FAO by etomoxir (ETO) restored the sensitivity of HBx-expressing cells to glucose deficiency in vitro and retarded xenograft tumor formation in vivo. Finally, HBx-induced activation of the AMPK and FAO pathways were also observed in xenograft tumors and HBV-associated HCC specimens. Our data suggest that HBx plays a key role in the maintenance of redox and energy homeostasis by activating FAO, which is critical for HCC cell survival under conditions of metabolic stress and might be exploited for therapeutic benefit.

  20. Thrombolytic Therapy for Right-Sided Mechanical Pulmonic and Tricuspid Valves: The Largest Survival Analysis to Date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherkhani, Maryam; Hashemi, Seyed Reza; Hekmat, Manouchehr; Safi, Morteza; Taherkhani, Adineh; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    Data regarding thrombolytic treatment of right-sided mechanical valve thrombosis are almost nonexistent, and all current guidelines arise from very small case series. We retrospectively studied the in-hospital and long-term outcome data of a larger series of patients who had received, from September 2005 through June 2012, thrombolytic therapy for right-sided mechanical pulmonary valve or tricuspid valve thrombosis. We identified 16 patients aged 8-67 years who had undergone thrombolytic therapy for definite thrombotic mechanical valve obstruction in the tricuspid or pulmonary valve position (8 in each position). All study patients except one had subtherapeutic international normalized ratios. The 8 patients with pulmonary mechanical valve thrombosis had a 100% response rate to thrombolytic therapy, and their in-hospital survival rate was also 100%. The 8 patients with tricuspid mechanical valve thrombosis had a 75% response rate to thrombolytic therapy, with an in-hospital survival rate of 87.5%. The one-year survival rate for mechanical valve thrombosis treated with thrombolytic therapy (whether pulmonary or tricuspid) was 87.5%. On the basis of our data, we recommend that thrombolytic therapy remain the first-line therapy for right-sided mechanical valve thrombosis in adults or children-including children with complex congenital heart disease and patients with mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis. Surgery should be reserved for patients in whom this treatment fails.

  1. Tillage Reduces Survival of Grape Berry Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), via Burial Rather Than Mechanical Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlock, Jason M; Isaacs, Rufus; Grieshop, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    The grape berry moth, Paralobesia viteana (Clemens), is a key pest of vineyards in eastern North America that overwinters as pupae in leaf litter on the vineyard floor. This presents an opportunity for tillage to disturb and bury the pupae, providing a potential nonchemical approach to control of this pest. Using a Lilleston-style rotary cultivator, we determined the distribution of pupae within the soil profile after single tillage passes, measured the type and severity of damage inflicted on pupae, and investigated how these effects on pupae influenced their survival. Survivorship of pupae recovered from the vineyard immediately after tillage and held until emergence was not significantly different from those recovered from an untilled control area, indicating little effect of mechanical damage on this pest. However, a single pass of the tillage implement buried three-quarters of pupae under at least 1 cm of soil. A laboratory experiment to recreate these conditions resulted in significant increase in mortality when pupae were buried in more than 1 cm of sand. We conclude that 1) interference with adult emergence of diapausing pupae via burial is the primary mechanism by which tillage controls grape berry moth, and 2) efforts to optimize the impact of tillage on grape berry moth populations should focus on maximizing the number of pupae buried. We discuss the potential integration of tillage into different vineyard management systems to enhance pest management. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The cancer glycocalyx mechanically primes integrin-mediated growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszek, Matthew J; DuFort, Christopher C; Rossier, Olivier; Bainer, Russell; Mouw, Janna K; Godula, Kamil; Hudak, Jason E; Lakins, Jonathon N; Wijekoon, Amanda C; Cassereau, Luke; Rubashkin, Matthew G; Magbanua, Mark J; Thorn, Kurt S; Davidson, Michael W; Rugo, Hope S; Park, John W; Hammer, Daniel A; Giannone, Grégory; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Weaver, Valerie M

    2014-07-17

    Malignancy is associated with altered expression of glycans and glycoproteins that contribute to the cellular glycocalyx. We constructed a glycoprotein expression signature, which revealed that metastatic tumours upregulate expression of bulky glycoproteins. A computational model predicted that these glycoproteins would influence transmembrane receptor spatial organization and function. We tested this prediction by investigating whether bulky glycoproteins in the glycocalyx promote a tumour phenotype in human cells by increasing integrin adhesion and signalling. Our data revealed that a bulky glycocalyx facilitates integrin clustering by funnelling active integrins into adhesions and altering integrin state by applying tension to matrix-bound integrins, independent of actomyosin contractility. Expression of large tumour-associated glycoproteins in non-transformed mammary cells promoted focal adhesion assembly and facilitated integrin-dependent growth factor signalling to support cell growth and survival. Clinical studies revealed that large glycoproteins are abundantly expressed on circulating tumour cells from patients with advanced disease. Thus, a bulky glycocalyx is a feature of tumour cells that could foster metastasis by mechanically enhancing cell-surface receptor function.

  3. The cancer glycocalyx mechanically primes integrin-mediated growth and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszek, Matthew J.; DuFort, Christopher C.; Rossier, Olivier; Bainer, Russell; Mouw, Janna K.; Godula, Kamil; Hudak, Jason E.; Lakins, Jonathon N.; Wijekoon, Amanda C.; Cassereau, Luke; Rubashkin, Matthew G.; Magbanua, Mark J.; Thorn, Kurt S.; Davidson, Michael W.; Rugo, Hope S.; Park, John W.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Giannone, Grégory; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2015-01-01

    Malignancy is associated with altered expression of glycans and glycoproteins that contribute to the cellular glycocalyx. We constructed a glycoprotein expression signature, which revealed that metastatic tumours upregulate expression of bulky glycoproteins. A computational model predicted that these glycoproteins would influence transmembrane receptor spatial organization and function. We tested this prediction by investigating whether bulky glycoproteins in the glycocalyx promote a tumour phenotype in human cells by increasing integrin adhesion and signalling. Our data revealed that a bulky glycocalyx facilitates integrin clustering by funnelling active integrins into adhesions and altering integrin state by applying tension to matrix-bound integrins, independent of actomyosin contractility. Expression of large tumour-associated glycoproteins in non-transformed mammary cells promoted focal adhesion assembly and facilitated integrin-dependent growth factor signalling to support cell growth and survival. Clinical studies revealed that large glycoproteins are abundantly expressed on circulating tumour cells from patients with advanced disease. Thus, a bulky glycocalyx is a feature of tumour cells that could foster metastasis by mechanically enhancing cell-surface receptor function. PMID:25030168

  4. Deciphering Molecular Mechanism Underlying Hypolipidemic Activity of Echinocystic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that a triterpene mixture, consisting of echinocystic acid (EA and oleanolic acid (OA at a ratio of 4 : 1, dose-dependently ameliorated the hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat/high cholesterol diets. This study was aimed at exploring the mechanisms underlying antihyperlipidemic effect of EA. Molecular docking simulation of EA was performed using Molegro Virtual Docker (version: 4.3.0 to investigate the potential targets related to lipid metabolism. Based on the molecular docking information, isotope labeling method or spectrophotometry was applied to examine the effect of EA on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT in rat liver microsomes. Our results revealed a strong affinity of EA towards ACAT and DGAT in molecular docking analysis, while low binding affinity existed between EA and HMG-CoA reductase as well as between EA and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Consistent with the results of molecular docking, in vitro enzyme activity assays showed that EA inhibited ACAT and DGAT, with IC50 values of 103 and 139 μM, respectively, and exhibited no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. The present findings suggest that EA may exert hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting the activity of ACAT and DGAT.

  5. Microbial Resistance Mechanisms to the Antibiotic and Phytotoxin Fusaric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutcher, Frankie K; Puckhaber, Lorraine S; Stipanovic, Robert D; Bell, Alois A; Nichols, Robert L; Lawrence, Katheryn S; Liu, Jinggao

    2017-10-06

    Fusaric acid (FA) produced by Fusarium oxysporum plays an important role in disease development in plants, including cotton. This non-specific toxin also has antibiotic effects on microorganisms. Thus, one expects a potential pool of diverse detoxification mechanisms of FA in nature. Bacteria and fungi from soils infested with Fusarium and from laboratory sources were evaluated for their ability to grow in the presence of FA and to alter the structure of FA into less toxic compounds. None of the bacterial strains were able to chemically modify FA. Highly FA-resistant strains were found only in Gram-negative bacteria, mainly in the genus of Pseudomonas. The FA resistance of the Gram-negative bacteria was positively correlated with the number of predicted genes for FA efflux pumps present in the genome. Phylogenetic analysis of predicted FA resistance proteins (FUSC, an inner membrane transporter component of the efflux pump) revealed that FUSC proteins having high sequence identities with the functionally characterized FA resistance protein FusC or Fdt might be the major contributors of FA resistance. In contrast, most fungi converted FA to less toxic compounds regardless of the level of FA resistance they exhibited. Five derivatives were detected, and the detoxification of FA involved either oxidative reactions on the butyl side chain or reductive reactions on the carboxylic acid group. The production of these metabolites from widely different phyla indicates that resistance to FA by altering its structure is highly conserved. A few FA resistant saprophytic or biocontrol strains of fungi were incapable of altering FA, indicating a possible involvement of efflux transporters. Deployment of both efflux and derivatization mechanisms may be a common feature of fungal FA resistance.

  6. Drying of micro-encapsulated lactic acid bacteria — Effects of trehalose and immobilization on cell survival and release properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xiguang

    2009-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were encapsulated with alginate, gelatin and trehalose additives by the extrusion method and dried at 4 °C. The microcapsules were generally spherical and had a wrinkled surface with a size of 1.7 mm ± 0.2 mm. Trehalose as a carbohydrate source in the culture medium could reduce acid production and performed no function in the positive proliferation of LAB. Using trehalose as a carbohydrate source and protective medium simultaneously had a benefit in the protection of LAB cells during the storage at 4 °C. The density of live LAB cells could be 107 CFU g-1 after 8 weeks of storage. Cells of LAB could be continuously released from the capsules from the acidic (pH 1.2) to neutral conditions (pH 6.8). The release amounts and proliferation speeds of LAB cells in neutral medium were much larger and faster than those in acidic conditions. Additionally, immobilization of LAB could improve the survival of cells when they were exposed to acidic medium (pH 1.2) with a survival rate of 76 %.

  7. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: impact of pulmonary follow-up and mechanical ventilation on survival. A study of 114 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán-López, Pilar; Valiño-López, Paz; Ricoy-Gabaldón, Jorge; Verea-Hernando, Héctor

    2014-12-01

    To study the impact of ventilatory management and treatment on the survival of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Retrospective analysis of 114 consecutive patients admitted to a general hospital, evaluating demographic data, type of presentation, clinical management, treatment with mechanical ventilation and survival. descriptive and Kaplan-Meier estimator. Sixty four patients presented initial bulbar involvement. Overall mean survival after diagnosis was 28.0 months (95%CI, 21.1-34.8). Seventy patients were referred to the pulmonary specialist (61.4%) and 43 received non-invasive ventilation (NIV) at 12.7 months (median) after diagnosis. Thirty seven patients continued to receive NIV with no subsequent invasive ventilation. The mean survival of these patients was 23.3 months (95%CI, 16.7-28.8), higher in those without bulbar involvement, although below the range of significance. Survival in the 26 patients receiving programmed NIV was higher than in the 11 patients in whom this was indicated without prior pulmonary assessment (considered following diagnosis, P<.012, and in accordance with the start of ventilation, P<.004). A total of 7 patients were treated invasively; mean survival in this group was 72 months (95%CI, 14.36-129.6), median 49.6±17.5 (95%CI, 15.3-83.8), and despite the difficulties involved in home care, acceptance and tolerance was acceptable. Long-term mechanical ventilation prolongs survival in ALS. Programmed pulmonary assessment has a positive impact on survival of ALS patients and is key to the multidisciplinary management of this disease. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Extended Survival of Several Microorganisms and Relevant Amino Acid Biomarkers under Simulated Martian Surface Conditions as a Function of Burial Depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Adam [Indiana University; Pratt, L.M. [Indiana University; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Pfiffner, S. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bryan, R. A. [Yeshiva University, New York; Dadachova, E. [Yeshiva University, New York; Whyte, L G [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Radtke, K. [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Chan, E. [Princeton University; Tronick, S. [Princeton University; Borgonie, G. [Ghent University, Belgium; Mancinelli, R. [SETI Institute; Rothschild, L. [NASA Ames Research Center; Rogoff, D. [NASA Ames Research Center; Horikawa, D. D. [NASA Ames Research Center; Onstott, T. C. [Princeton University

    2011-01-01

    Recent orbital and landed missions have provided substantial evidence for ancient liquid water on the martian surface as well as evidence of more recent sedimentary deposits formed by water and/or ice. These observations raise serious questions regarding an independent origin and evolution of life on Mars. Future missions seek to identify signs of extinct martian biota in the form of biomarkers or morphological characteristics, but the inherent danger of spacecraft-borne terrestrial life makes the possibility of forward contamination a serious threat not only to the life detection experiments, but also to any extant martian ecosystem. A variety of cold and desiccation-tolerant organisms were exposed to 40 days of simulated martian surface conditions while embedded within several centimeters of regolith simulant in order to ascertain the plausibility of such organisms survival as a function of environmental parameters and burial depth. Relevant amino acid biomarkers associated with terrestrial life were also analyzed in order to understand the feasibility of detecting chemical evidence for previous biological activity. Results indicate that stresses due to desiccation and oxidation were the primary deterrent to organism survival, and that the effects of UV-associated damage, diurnal temperature variations, and reactive atmospheric species were minimal. Organisms with resistance to desiccation and radiation environments showed increased levels of survival after the experiment compared to organisms characterized as psychrotolerant. Amino acid analysis indicated the presence of an oxidation mechanism that migrated downward through the samples during the course of the experiment and likely represents the formation of various oxidizing species at mineral surfaces as water vapor diffused through the regolith. Current sterilization protocols may specifically select for organisms best adapted to survival at the martian surface, namely species that show tolerance to radical

  9. Restriction endonuclease triggered bacterial apoptosis as a mechanism for long time survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamalleswari, Easa; Rao, Sandhya; Vasu, Kommireddy; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2017-08-21

    Programmed cell death (PCD) under certain conditions is one of the features of bacterial altruism. Given the bacterial diversity and varied life style, different PCD mechanisms must be operational that remain largely unexplored. We describe restriction endonuclease (REase) mediated cell death by an apoptotic pathway, beneficial for isogenic bacterial communities. Cell death is pronounced in stationary phase and when the enzyme exhibits promiscuous DNA cleavage activity. We have elucidated the molecular mechanism of REase mediated cell killing and demonstrate that released nutrients from dying cells support the growth of the remaining cells in the population. These findings illustrate a new intracellular moonlighting role for REases which are otherwise established host defence arsenals. REase induced PCD appears to be a cellular design to replenish nutrients for cells undergoing starvation stress and the phenomenon could be wide spread in bacteria, given the abundance of restriction-modification (R-M) systems in the microbial population. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Mechanisms of spinal motoneurons survival in rats under simulated hypogravity on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamov, R. R.; Mishagina, E. A.; Tyapkina, O. V.; Shajmardanova, G. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Nikolskij, E. E.; Grigorjev, A. I.

    2011-05-01

    It was previously shown that different cell types in vivo and in vitro may die via apoptosis under weightlessness conditions in space as well as in simulated hypogravity on the Earth. We assessed survivability of spinal motoneurons of rats after 35-day antiorthostatic hind limb suspension. Following weight bearing, unloading the total protein content in lumbar spinal cord is dropped by 21%. The electrophysiological studies of m. gastrocnemius revealed an elevated motoneurons' reflex excitability and conduction disturbances in the sciatic nerve axons. The number of myelinated fibers in the ventral root of experimental animals was insignificantly increased by 35-day of antiorthostatic hind limb suspension, although the retrograde axonal transport was significantly decreased during the first week of simulated hypogravity. The results of the immunohistochemical assay with antibodies against proapoptotic protein caspase 9 and cytotoxicity marker neuron specific nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the TUNEL staining did not reveal any signs of apoptosis in motoneurons of suspended and control animals. To examine the possible adaptation mechanisms activated in motoneurons in response to simulated hypogravity we investigated immunoexpression of Hsp25 and Hsp70 in lumbar spinal cord of the rats after 35-day antiorthostatic hind limb suspension. Comparative analysis of the immunohistochemical reaction with anti-Hsp25 antibodies revealed differential staining of motoneurons in intact and experimental animals. The density of immunoprecipitate with anti-Hsp25 antibodies was substantially higher in motoneurons of the 35-day suspended than control rats and the more intensive precipitate in this reaction was observed in motoneuron neuritis. Quantitative analysis of Hsp25 expression demonstrated an increase in the Hsp25 level by 95% in experimental rats compared to the control. The immunoexpression of Hsp70 found no qualitative and quantitative differences in control and experimental

  11. Acid and low temperature treatments on Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated in pork and its subsequent survival in simulated gastric fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Quintão Silva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the acid resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis in stored pork and in simulated gastric fluid (SGF. A culture of S. Enteritidis was subjected to acid treatment prior to inoculation into pork, stored under refrigeration at frozen temperatures and exposed to SGF. The S. Enteritidis CCS3 and ATCC 13076 strains previously subjected to acid treatment (at pH 4.0-5.0 were inoculated in pork and stored at 4°C and -18°C. Storage at 4ºC did not affect the populations of both S. Enteritidis strains. After 84 days at -18°C, the mean population of both CCS3 and ATCC strains were reduced by 0.8 and 1.5 log cycles, respectively. Prior acid treatment did not enhance the survival of both strains at low temperatures. After acid treatment and low temperature storage, S. Enteritidis ATCC 13076 lost culturability after being exposed to SGF for 10 minutes. In contrast, S. Enteritidis CCS3 was tolerant until three hours of SGF exposure. S. Enteritidis CCS3 submitted to pH 4.0 was more tolerant to SGF exposure than when submitted to pH 4.5, 5.0 and without acid treatment. Therefore, this study indicates that exposure to an acidic and cold environment during processing enhanced the ability of S. Enteritidis to survive in the gastric environment of the human stomach, possibly increasing the risk of a Salmonella infection after consumption of pork.

  12. Mitochonic Acid 5 (MA-5 Facilitates ATP Synthase Oligomerization and Cell Survival in Various Mitochondrial Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Matsuhashi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction increases oxidative stress and depletes ATP in a variety of disorders. Several antioxidant therapies and drugs affecting mitochondrial biogenesis are undergoing investigation, although not all of them have demonstrated favorable effects in the clinic. We recently reported a therapeutic mitochondrial drug mitochonic acid MA-5 (Tohoku J. Exp. Med., 2015. MA-5 increased ATP, rescued mitochondrial disease fibroblasts and prolonged the life span of the disease model “Mitomouse” (JASN, 2016. To investigate the potential of MA-5 on various mitochondrial diseases, we collected 25 cases of fibroblasts from various genetic mutations and cell protective effect of MA-5 and the ATP producing mechanism was examined. 24 out of the 25 patient fibroblasts (96% were responded to MA-5. Under oxidative stress condition, the GDF-15 was increased and this increase was significantly abrogated by MA-5. The serum GDF-15 elevated in Mitomouse was likewise reduced by MA-5. MA-5 facilitates mitochondrial ATP production and reduces ROS independent of ETC by facilitating ATP synthase oligomerization and supercomplex formation with mitofilin/Mic60. MA-5 reduced mitochondria fragmentation, restores crista shape and dynamics. MA-5 has potential as a drug for the treatment of various mitochondrial diseases. The diagnostic use of GDF-15 will be also useful in a forthcoming MA-5 clinical trial.

  13. Growth and Survival of Acid-Resistant and Non-Acid-Resistant Shiga-Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains during the Manufacture and Ripening of Camembert Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Montet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth and survival of acid-resistant (AR and non-acid-resistant (NAR Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains were investigated during the manufacture and ripening of microfiltered milk Camembert cheeses. The induction of acid resistance of the STEC strains in cheeses was also studied. Six different mixtures of AR and/or NAR STEC strains were inoculated separately into microfiltered milk at a level of 103 CFU mL−1. The STEC counts (AR and NAR initially increased by 1 to 2 log⁡10 CFU g−1 during cheese-making. Thereafter, the populations stabilized during salting/drying and then decreased during the early stages of ripening. Exposing the STEC strains in artificially inoculated cheeses to simulated gastric fluid (SGF - pH: 2.0 reduced the number of NAR strains to undetectable levels within 40 minutes, versus 120 minutes for the AR STEC strains. AR and NAR STEC were able to survive during the manufacture and ripening of Camembert cheese prepared from microfiltered milk with no evidence of induced acid tolerance in NAR STEC strains.

  14. Growth and Survival of Acid-Resistant and Non-Acid-Resistant Shiga-Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains during the Manufacture and Ripening of Camembert Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montet, M. P.; Jamet, E.; Ganet, S.; Dizin, M.; Miszczycha, S.; Dunière, L.; Thevenot, D.; Vernozy-Rozand, C.

    2009-01-01

    Growth and survival of acid-resistant (AR) and non-acid-resistant (NAR) Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains were investigated during the manufacture and ripening of microfiltered milk Camembert cheeses. The induction of acid resistance of the STEC strains in cheeses was also studied. Six different mixtures of AR and/or NAR STEC strains were inoculated separately into microfiltered milk at a level of 103 CFU mL−1. The STEC counts (AR and NAR) initially increased by 1 to 2 log10 CFU g−1 during cheese-making. Thereafter, the populations stabilized during salting/drying and then decreased during the early stages of ripening. Exposing the STEC strains in artificially inoculated cheeses to simulated gastric fluid (SGF - pH: 2.0) reduced the number of NAR strains to undetectable levels within 40 minutes, versus 120 minutes for the AR STEC strains. AR and NAR STEC were able to survive during the manufacture and ripening of Camembert cheese prepared from microfiltered milk with no evidence of induced acid tolerance in NAR STEC strains. PMID:20016668

  15. Effect of Organic Acids and Marination Ingredients on the Survival of Campylobacter jejuni on Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Tina; Grønlund, Anne Christine Jørgensen; Christensen, Bjarke Bak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether marination of chicken meat in different food ingredients call be used to reduce populations of Campylobacter jejuni strains, were exposed to different organic acids (tartaric, acetic. lactic, malic, and citric acids) and food marinating ingredients...... at 4 degrees C in broth and on chicken meat. The organic acids (0.5%) reduced populations of C. jejuni broth (chicken juice and brain heart infusion broth) by 4 to 6 1011 units (after 24 h): tartaric acid was the most efficient treatment. Large strain variation was observed among 14 C. jejuni isolates...... inoculated in brain heart infusion broth containing 0.3% tartaric acid. On chicken meat medallions, reductions of C. jejuni were 0.5 to 2 log units when tartaric acid solutions (2, 4, 6, and 10%) were spread onto the meal. Analysis of acidic food ingredient (e.g., vinegar. lemon juice, pomegranate syrup...

  16. Ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic liver disease: mechanisms of action and therapeutic use revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paumgartner, Gustav; Beuers, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UCDA) is increasingly used for the treatment of cholestatic liver diseases. Experimental evidence suggests three major mechanisms of action: (1) protection of cholangiocytes against cytotoxicity of hydrophobic bile acids, resulting from modulation of the composition of mixed

  17. Putrescine production via the ornithine decarboxylation pathway improves the acid stress survival of Lactobacillus brevis and is part of a horizontally transferred acid resistance locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Andrea; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A; Lucas, Patrick M

    2014-04-03

    Decarboxylation pathways are widespread among lactic acid bacteria; their physiological role is related to acid resistance through the regulation of the intracellular pH and to the production of metabolic energy via the generation of a proton motive force and its conversion into ATP. These pathways include, among others, biogenic amine (BA) production pathways. BA accumulation in foodstuffs is a health risk; thus, the study of the factors involved in their production is of major concern. The analysis of several lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from different environments, including fermented foods and beverages, revealed that the genes encoding these pathways are clustered on the chromosome, which suggests that these genes are part of a genetic hotspot related to acid stress resistance. Further attention was devoted to the ornithine decarboxylase pathway, which affords putrescine from ornithine. Studies were performed on three lactic acid bacteria belonging to different species. The ODC pathway was always shown to be involved in cytosolic pH alkalinisation and acid shock survival, which were observed to occur with a concomitant increase in putrescine production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. kinetics and mechanism of reaction of acidic chlorite with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    overall third order rate constants for the reaction of acidic chlorite with Nile blue and Meldola's blue were (0.363 ... of interest to investigate, how these differences affect the reaction rates of these dyes with acidic chlorite. .... To establish the order with respect to chlorite and acid, the effect of initial concentration of chlorite and ...

  19. Regulatory Mechanism of Mycotoxin Tenuazonic Acid Production in Pyricularia oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Motoyama, Takayuki; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-15

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA) is a mycotoxin produced by the rice blast fungus Pyricularia oryzae and some plant pathogenic fungi. We previously demonstrated that TeA is biosynthesized in P. oryzae by TeA synthetase 1 (TAS1) and that its production is induced by osmo-sensory MAPK-encoding gene (OSM1) deletion or the addition of 1% DMSO to cultures; however, the regulatory mechanisms of TeA production were unknown. Here, we identify a Zn(II)2-Cys6-type transcription factor in the upstream region of TAS1, which is encoded by TAS2 and regulates TeA production. We also find PoLAE1, which is a homologue of LaeA, a regulator of fungal secondary metabolism. Analysis of PoLAE1 deletion and overexpression strains indicate that PoLAE1 drives TeA production. We also demonstrate that two TeA-inducing signals, 1% DMSO addition and OSM1 deletion, were transmitted through PoLAE1. Our results indicate that TeA production is regulated by two specific regulators, TAS2 and PoLAE1, in P. oryzae.

  20. Optical, mechanical and thermal behaviors of Nitrilotriacetic acid single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, B.; Philominathan, P.

    2017-11-01

    An organic nonlinear single crystal of Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTAA) was grown for the first time by employing a simple slow evaporation technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that the grown crystal belongs to the monoclinic system with noncentrosymmetric space group CC. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral study ascertains the presence of functional groups in NTAA. The molecular structure of the grown crystal was confirmed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectral analysis. The optical parameters such as transmittance, absorption coefficient and band gap were calculated from UV-Visible and fluorescence studies. Dielectric measurements were carried out for different frequency and temperature. The mechanical strength of the grown crystal was measured using Vickers microhardness test. The high thermal stability and the melting point of the grown crystal were also estimated using thermogravimetric (TGA) and differential thermal analyses (DTA). The confirmation of the grown crystals belonging to nonlinear optical crystals was performed by Kurtz-Perry technique and found as suitable candidate for optoelectronics applications.

  1. Tyrosinase inhibitory mechanism of betulinic acid from Dillenia indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rajarshi; Chanda, Joydeb; Kar, Amit; Mukherjee, Pulok K

    2017-10-01

    The fruit of Dillenia indica L. is extensively used as a food additive. Betulinic acid (BA) is the most prominent secondary metabolite present in D. indica. This study screened the bioassay guided isolation of BA from D. indica and explored its tyrosinase inhibitory mechanism. Half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of BA were calculated as 13.93µM and 25.66µM for diphenolase and monophenolase. Enzyme kinetic analysis revealed that BA inhibited tyrosinase activity non-competitively. Further, conformational analysis of tyrosinase with BA was measured by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. These results implied that diminish rigidity of enzyme might disturb the catalytic conformation of tyrosinase. Moreover, In-silico analysis confirmed probable binding polar and non-polar region on the active site of tyrosinase. Based on these findings, we suggest that BA from D. indica may be useful in preventing enzymatic browning reactions in food products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Survival and expression of acid resistance genes in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli acid adapted in pineapple juice and exposed to synthetic gastric fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G-H; Fratamico, P; Breidt, F; Oh, D-H

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the ability of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups to survive with exposure to synthetic gastric fluid (SGF) after adaptation to pineapple juice (PJ) at room and refrigerated temperatures compared to E. coli O157:H7 and to examine the relative transcriptional expression of acid resistance (AR) genes, rpoS, gadA and adiA. Resistant and sensitive strains belonging to five different STEC serogroups (O26, O103, O104, O111 and O157; n = 10) were used in this study. All strains were adapted in PJ (pH 3·8) stored at 4 and 20°C for 24 h, and then the relative transcription levels of genes in all strains were quantified using a real-time quantitative-PCR assay. After adaptation in PJ, the STEC strains were exposed to SGF (pH 1·5 and 2·0) at 37°C for 2 h. Generally, the STEC adapted in PJ at 4°C displayed enhanced survival compared to acid adaptation in PJ at 20°C and nonadapted controls with exposure to SGF (P < 0·05). Moreover, resistant strains exhibited higher survival rates compared to sensitive strains (P < 0·05). Overall, adaptation at 4°C resulted in significantly (P < 0·05) enhanced gene expression levels in PJ, and transcript levels of gadA were higher than those of the rpoS and adiA genes. The up-regulation of AR genes due to adaptation in PJ at low temperature may increase STEC survival in acidic environments such as the gastrointestinal tract. Some non-O157 STEC strains, including serotypes O103:H2 and O111:H8, showed relatively high AR levels similar to those of STEC O157:H7. Induction of AR genes in acidic fruit juice, and potentially in other acidic foods may increase the risk of foodborne illness by non-O157 STEC serogroups. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Proteomic analysis reveals the mechanisms of Mycena dendrobii promoting transplantation survival and growth of tissue culture seedlings of Dendrobium officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X B; Ma, X Y; Lei, H H; Song, H M; Ying, Q C; Xu, M J; Liu, S B; Wang, H Z

    2015-06-01

    Dendrobium officinale is an important traditional Chinese medicinal herb. Its seedlings generally show low survival and growth when transferred from in vitro tissue culture to a greenhouse or field environment. In this study, the effect of Mycena dendrobii on the survival and growth of D. officinale tissue culture seedlings and the mechanisms involved was explored. Mycena dendrobii were applied underneath the roots of D. officinale tissue culture seedlings. The seedling survival and growth were analysed. The root proteins induced by M. dendrobii were identified using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS (MALDI-TOF-MS). Mycena dendrobii treatment significantly enhanced survival and growth of D. officinale seedlings. Forty-one proteins induced by M. dendrobii were identified. Among them, 10 were involved in defence and stress response, two were involved in the formation of root or mycorrhizae, and three were related to the biosynthesis of bioactive constituents. These results suggest that enhancing stress tolerance and promoting new root formation induced by M. dendrobii may improve the survival and growth of D. officinale tissue culture seedlings. This study provides a foundation for future use of M. dendrobii in the large-scale cultivation of Dendrobiums. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Survival of Salmonella in home-style mayonnaise and acid solutions as affected by acidulant type and preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junli; Li, Jianrong; Chen, Jinru

    2012-03-01

    Mayonnaise made from contaminated eggs has been linked to outbreaks of Salmonella infections. This study was undertaken to determine the fate of salmonellae in home-style mayonnaise and acid solutions with or without chemical preservatives. Egg yolks were inoculated with different levels of a three-serotype (Typhimurium, Heidelberg, and Enteritidis [untypeable phage type]) mixture of Salmonella or a three-phage-type (4, 8, and 13) mixture of Salmonella Enteritidis. The inoculated yolks were used to make mayonnaise with 2, 3, or 4 teaspoons of a commercial wine vinegar or lemon juice. The mayonnaise was sampled for salmonellae over a 15-day period at 4°C, and negative samples were tested further by a three-tube most-probable-number assay. The same Salmonella mixtures were respectively inoculated into six acid solutions including wine vinegar, lemon juice, and acetic or citric solutions with or without chemical preservatives. The Salmonella populations of the Salmonella Enteritidis mixture were more persistent than those of the other Salmonella mixture in mayonnaise. Both Salmonella mixtures survived longer in mayonnaise made with vinegar than with lemon juice during storage at 4°C. In the acid solutions, however, the populations of the two Salmonella mixtures were not significantly different. The numbers of the two Salmonella mixtures in acetic or citric acid solutions with the preservatives were significantly lower than those in vinegar, lemon juice, and the solutions without the preservatives. Results suggest that Salmonella in contaminated egg yolks could survive the mayonnaise-making process. The inhibition of Salmonella by vinegar and lemon juice is due to the hurdle effect of organic acids and chemical preservatives.

  5. Effect of Organic Acids and Marination Ingredients on the Survival of Campylobacter jejuni on Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Tina; Grønlund, Anne Christine Jørgensen; Christensen, Bjarke Bak

    2010-01-01

    inoculated in brain heart infusion broth containing 0.3% tartaric acid. On chicken meat medallions, reductions of C. jejuni were 0.5 to 2 log units when tartaric acid solutions (2, 4, 6, and 10%) were spread onto the meal. Analysis of acidic food ingredient (e.g., vinegar. lemon juice, pomegranate syrup......, and soya sauce) revealed that such ingredients reduced counts of C. jejuni by at least 0.8 log units Oil meat medallions. Three low pH marinades (pH lemon juice, and white wine vinegar were prepared. When applied in whole filets, these marinades resulted in a reduction...... at 4 degrees C in broth and on chicken meat. The organic acids (0.5%) reduced populations of C. jejuni broth (chicken juice and brain heart infusion broth) by 4 to 6 1011 units (after 24 h): tartaric acid was the most efficient treatment. Large strain variation was observed among 14 C. jejuni isolates...

  6. The Promotion Effect and Mechanism of Methanoic Acid on the Photoelectrocatalytic Degradation of Fulvic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant promotion effect of methanoic acid (MA was proposed in the photoelectrocatalytic (PEC degradation of fulvic acid (FA and the degradation mechanism was also discussed. The PEC degradation property of FA and MA was investigated by an assembled thin-layer PEC reactor in which photoanode is TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNAs material. The result shows that only about 40% of FA was degraded, while MA could be completely degraded at the same condition. When mixing MA with FA, it shows a significant improvement in the degradation of FA. For instance, 50 mg/L FA mixed with 45 mg/L MA could achieve exhausted degradation. The results could be attributed to the promotion effect of MA that enhanced the generation of hydroxyl radicals, which maintain the continuous degradation of both FA and the intermediate products during the PEC process. This study proposed a new way of promoting the PEC degradation of FA as well as removing humus from the polluted water.

  7. Effects of acid adaptation and modified marinades on survival of postdrying Salmonella contamination on beef jerky during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calicioglu, Mehmet; Sofos, John N; Kendall, Patricia A; Smith, Gary C

    2003-03-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the survival of acid-adapted and nonadapted Salmonella cultures inoculated after drying on beef jerky that had been treated with marinades before drying at 60 degrees C for 10 h. Beef slices were (i) not treated prior to refrigeration at 4 degrees C for 24 h (control [C]); (ii) marinated with traditional marinade (TM), (iii) marinated with TM modified with 1.2% sodium lactate, 9% acetic acid, and 68% soy sauce containing 5% ethanol (MM) at twice the amount used in the TM treatment; (iv) dipped into 5% acetic acid and then marinated with TM (AATM); and (v) dipped into 1% Tween 20, then dipped into 5% acetic acid, and then marinated with TM (TWTM); after each treatment, meat slices were refrigerated at 4 degrees C for 24 h prior to drying. Dried slices were inoculated with acid-adapted or nonadapted Salmonella (ca. 5.7 log CFU/cm2) prior to aerobic storage at 25 degrees C for 60 days. Tryptic soy agar with 0.1% pyruvate, as well as xylose-lysine-tergitol 4 (XLT4) agar, was used to determine survivor counts. Bacterial decreases achieved with the different treatments were found to be in the following order: TWTM (5.4 to 6.3 log units) > or = AATM > or = MM > C > or = TM (2.9 to 5.1 log units). Acid-adapted Salmonella decreased faster than nonadapted Salmonella for all treatments. Bacterial populations decreased to below the detection limit (-0.4 log CFU/cm2) in as few as 14 days or remained detectable by direct plating after 60 days of storage, depending on acid adaptation, treatment, and agar media. The results of this study indicate that the modified marinades used in jerky processing and the low water activity of the dried product provide antimicrobial effects against possible postprocessing contamination with Salmonella, while the preparation of cultures under acid-adaptation conditions did not increase Salmonella survival during storage and may have reduced it.

  8. Drug insight: Mechanisms and sites of action of ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) exerts anticholestatic effects in various cholestatic disorders. Several potential mechanisms and sites of action of UDCA have been unraveled in clinical and experimental studies, which could explain its beneficial effects. The relative contribution of these mechanisms to

  9. A novel mechanism for a survival advantage of vigilant individuals in groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Post, Daniel J.; de Weerd, Harmen; Verbrugge, Rineke; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K.

    2013-01-01

    In many animal species, vigilance is crucial for avoiding predation. In groups, however, nonvigilant individuals could benefit from the vigilance of others without any of the associated costs. In an evolutionary sense, such exploitation may be compensated if vigilant individuals have a survival

  10. Molecular mechanisms mediating contrasting flooding survival strategies in two Rumex species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Flooding is a major recurring event for many ecosystems and is important in shaping vegetation composition. It negatively affects plant survival because in water gas diffusion is approximately 10,000 times slower than in air. This has major repercussions for photosynthesis that requires carbon

  11. Physical training is beneficial to functional status and survival in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiauyee Chen

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: Six weeks physical therapy training plus 6 weeks unsupervised maintenance exercise enhanced functional levels and increased survival for the PMV patients compared with those with no such intervention. Early physical therapy interventions are needed for the PMV patients in respiratory care centers. [J Formos Med Assoc 2011; 110(X:XX–XX

  12. Ferulic acid promotes survival and differentiation of neural stem cells to prevent gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lintao; Cui, Xinhua; Wei, Wei; Yang, Jia; Li, Xuezhong

    2017-11-15

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have exhibited promising potential in therapies against neuronal hearing loss. Ferulic acid (FA) has been widely reported to enhance neurogenic differentiation of different stem cells. We investigated the role of FA in promoting NSC transplant therapy to prevent gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss. NSCs were isolated from mouse cochlear tissues to establish in vitro culture, which were then treated with FA. The survival and differentiation of NSCs were evaluated. Subsequently, neurite outgrowth and excitability of the in vitro neuronal network were assessed. Gentamicin was used to induce neuronal hearing loss in mice, in the presence and absence of FA, followed by assessments of auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product optoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) amplitude. FA promoted survival, neurosphere formation and differentiation of NSCs, as well as neurite outgrowth and excitability of in vitro neuronal network. Furthermore, FA restored ABR threshold shifts and DPOAE in gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss mouse model in vivo. Our data, for the first time, support potential therapeutic efficacy of FA in promoting survival and differentiation of NSCs to prevent gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ursolic acid improves survival and attenuates lung injury in septic rats induced by cecal ligation and puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhansheng; Gu, Zhilong; Sun, Meina; Zhang, Ke; Gao, Penghui; Yang, Qinwu; Yuan, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Sepsis is characterized as a systemic inflammatory response syndrome during infection, which can result in multiple organ dysfunction and death. Ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpene acid, has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to detect the possible protective effects of UA on sepsis-evoked acute lung injury. A rat model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with UA (10 mg/kg) after CLP, and then the survival was determined twice a day for 4 d. The protective effects of UA on CLP-induced acute lung injury were assayed at 24 h after CLP. The results revealed that UA treatment markedly improved the survival of septic rats, and attenuated CLP-induced lung injury, including reduction of lung wet/dry weight ratio, infiltration of leukocytes and proteins, myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde content. In addition, UA significantly decreased the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β, inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in the lung, which are involved in the productions of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2. These findings indicate that UA exerts protective effects on CLP-induced septic rats. UA may be a potential therapeutic agent against sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanism of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide Interference with Rabbit Antibody Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Edward W.; Winkelhake, Jeffrey L.

    1974-01-01

    Lymphoid cells from hyperimmune rabbits producing antibodies to a hapten, incubated in the presence of d-lysergic acid diethylamide, continued to synthesize protein at a normal rate. Isoelectric focusing analysis of the low-molecular-weight protein secreted by the cells incubated with lysergic acid diethylamide indicated two components, with pI's of 4.9 and 5.2. Immune cells not exposed to lysergic acid diethylamide secreted only 7S IgG molecules with an average pI of approximately 7.0. PMID:4524614

  15. Mechanism involved in enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by hyaluronic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Michinao [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Ariyoshi, Wataru [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Iwanaga, Kenjiro [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Okinaga, Toshinori [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Habu, Manabu [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Yoshioka, Izumi [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Medicine of Sensory and Motor Organs, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Tominaga, Kazuhiro [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Nishihara, Tatsuji, E-mail: tatsujin@kyu-dent.ac.jp [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} In this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. {yields} MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. {yields} Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. {yields} HA enhanced BMP-2 induces osteoblastic differentiation in MG63 cells via down-regulation of BMP-2 antagonists and ERK phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Objectives: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is expected to be utilized to fill bone defects and promote healing of fractures. However, it is unable to generate an adequate clinical response for use in bone regeneration. Recently, it was reported that glycosaminoglycans, including heparin, heparan sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid (HA), regulate BMP-2 activity, though the mechanism by which HA regulates osteogenic activities has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. Materials and methods: Monolayer cultures of osteoblastic lineage MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. To determine osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cell lysates was quantified. Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by Western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. To further elucidate the role of HA in enhancement of BMP-2-induced Smad signaling, mRNA expressions of the BMP-2 receptor antagonists noggin and follistatin were detected using real-time RT-PCR. Results: BMP-2-induced ALP activation, Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation, and

  16. Mechanisms and mediation in survival analysis: towards an integrated analytical framework.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haase, Trutz

    2016-02-29

    A wide-ranging debate has taken place in recent years on mediation analysis and causal modelling, raising profound theoretical, philosophical and methodological questions. The authors build on the results of these discussions to work towards an integrated approach to the analysis of research questions that situate survival outcomes in relation to complex causal pathways with multiple mediators. The background to this contribution is the increasingly urgent need for policy-relevant research on the nature of inequalities in health and healthcare.

  17. Mechanism and kinetics of mineral weathering under acid conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anbeek, C.

    1994-01-01

    This study deals with the relationships between crystal structure, grain diameter, surface morphology and dissolution kinetics for feldspar and quartz under acid conditions.

    Intensively ground samples from large, naturally weathered mineral fragments are frequently used in

  18. Dietary fatty acids affecting hepatic metabolism and atherosclerosis - mechanisms unravelled using a proteomics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Gutierrez, G.; Roos, B. de

    2009-07-01

    Dietary fatty acids play an important role in the aetiology of coronary heart disease. The effects of dietary fatty acids on lipoprotein metabolism are well described, but additional or alternative mechanisms relating to potential influence on coronary heart disease are not known. This review describes how proteomics techniques have been used to identify proteins that are differentially regulated by dietary fatty acids. Such proteins may reveal pathways by which dietary fatty acids influence disease risk. (Author) 40 refs.

  19. Acidic Groundwater Discharge and in Situ Egg Survival in Redds of Lake-Spawning Brook Trout

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Warren, Dana R; Sebestyen, Stephen D; Josephson, Daniel C; Lepak, Jesse M; Kraft, Clifford E

    2005-01-01

    .... While most studies have reported that groundwater discharge in brook trout redds is buffered relative to the surrounding lake water, we documented brook trout spawning over an area of acidic groundwater discharge (pH as low as 4.7...

  20. The role of transport processes in survival of lactic acid bacteria. Energy transduction and multidrug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, W.N; Lolkema, J.S.; Bolhuis, H; van Veen, H.W.; Poolman, B.; Driessen, A.J.M.

    Lactic acid bacteria play an essential role in many food fermentation processes. They are anaerobic organisms which obtain their metabolic energy by substrate phosphorylation. In addition three secondary energy transducing processes can contribute to the generation of a proton motive force:

  1. Effect of dietary arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on survival, growth and pigmentation in larvae of common sole ( Solea solea L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Hansen, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence confirms that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (ARA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, DHA are involved in growth as well in pigmentation of marine fish larvae. In the present study we examined the performance of common sole larvae reared...... to increased dietary ARA content. However, pigmentation was not affected by inclusion levels of EPA or DHA when ARA was high. This, and no relation between DHA: EPA or ARA: EPA ratios and pigmentation and only a weak relation to ARA: DHA ratio, advocate for that it is the absolute concentration of ARA...

  2. Survival to different acid challenges and outer membrane protein profiles of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from pozol, a Mexican typical maize fermented food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, Teresita; Pérez, Julia; Villaseca, Jorge; Hernández, Ulises; Eslava, Carlos; Mendoza, Guillermo; Wacher, Carmen

    2005-12-15

    In this study, the acid resistance and the changes in outer membrane protein (Omps) profiles of Escherichia coli strains isolated from pozol, an acid-fermented maize beverage consumed in Southeastern Mexico, were determined. Results showed that adaptation to acid by these E. coli strains significantly enhances their survival in acid conditions. Changes in Omp profiles were found in non-adapted acid challenged cells compared with non-challenged cells that had not been adapted to acid. Challenged adapted cells showed no significant changes in these profiles when compared with the acid adapted non-challenged strains. N-terminal sequences of some of the Omps were determined. The intensity of the main porins OmpC and OmpA was lower in the acid challenged strains, than in the non-challenged ones. The OmpF porin was identified in non-challenged K12 strain, but did not appear in adapted or non-adapted pozol strains nor in E. coli O157:H7. A protein band with an approximate molecular mass of 22 kDa corresponds to OmpW and its expression decreased in pozol strains challenged with HCl and lactic acid. OmpX was one of the main proteins expressed when strains were acid challenged with organic acids. Seventy out of seventy-three E. coli strains isolated from pozol in a previous work [Sainz, T., Wacher, C., Espinoza, J., Centurion, D., Navarro, A., Molina, J., Cravioto, A., Eslava, C., 2001. Survival and characterization of Escherichia coli strains in a typical Mexican acid-fermented food. International Journal of Food Microbiology 71, 169-176] carry this gene and belong to a reported pathogenic class of E. coli strains, or have virulence factors or survived at pH values less than 4.8. We suggest this protein could be involved in survival to stress conditions.

  3. The effect of aspirated barium sulfate, iodixanol, and diatrizoic acid on survival and lung injury in a lagomorph model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, M Tausif; Litts, Juliana K; Cheney, Diane M; Kuhn, Maggie A; Nativ-Zeltzer, Nogah; Belafsky, Peter C

    2017-05-01

    Contrast agents are an integral component of the video fluoroscopic swallow study. Agents commonly used include barium sulfate (E-Z Paque), iodixanol (Visipaque), and diatrizoic acid (Gastrografin). Barium is water insoluble, whereas iodixanol and diatrizoic acid are water-soluble iodine-based agents. The detrimental effect of these agents on the lungs has not been systematically evaluated. Our aim was to evaluate and compare the effects of aspirated barium, iodixanol, and diatrizoic acid on pulmonary injury in a lagomorph model. Animal model. Twenty adult male New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups (n = 5). Group 1 received 3 mL of barium sulfate injected into the trachea for 3 consecutive days. Group 2 received 3 mL of iodixanol injected into the trachea for 3 consecutive days. Group 3 received 3 mL of diatrizoic acid injected into the trachea for 3 consecutive days. A control group received 3 mL of air injected into the trachea under an identical protocol. All animals were euthanized on day 4, and the lung and trachea were harvested for blinded histopathologic analysis. The primary outcome measure was survival. The secondary endpoint was a blinded, histologic grading system of lung injury. Two animals in the barium group, one in the diatrizoic acid group, and 0 animals in the iodixanol and control groups died. The overall lung injury score for the barium (60.60 ± 6.34) and iodixanol groups (52.30 ± 3.11) were significantly higher (worse) than the diatrizoic acid (49.60 ± 7.64) and control groups (37.80 ± 3.56) (P barium sulfate (E-Z Paque) over 3 consecutive days causes more severe lung injury in a lagomorph model than 3 mL of aspirated iodixanol (Visipaque) and diatrizoic acid (Gastrografin). Diatrizoic acid caused the least histologic evidence of lung injury. NA Laryngoscope, 127:E148-E152, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Alternate mechanism for amino acid entry into Neurospora crassa: extracellular deamination and subsequent keto acid transport.

    OpenAIRE

    DeBusk, R M; Brown, D T; DeBusk, A G; Penderghast, R D

    1981-01-01

    The growth of the pm nbg mutant strain of Neurospora crassa was inhibited by the amino acid analog para-fluorophenylalanine despite the fact that none of the three constitutive amino acid permeases is functional in this strain. This observation led to the detection of both a deaminase which was released into the growth medium in response to para-fluorophenylalanine and a keto acid transport system which allowed entry of the resulting keto acid into the cell. The transported keto acid was reco...

  5. Administration of isoferulic acid improved the survival rate of lethal influenza virus pneumonia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Sakai

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isoferulic acid (IFA is a main active ingredient of the rhizoma of Cimicifuga heracleifolia, which is used frequently in Japanese traditional medicine as an anti-inflammatory drug. It has been revealed that IFA inhibits the production of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2, which is a murine counterpart of the chemokine family that may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases through the chemotactic activity for inflammatory and immune effector cells.

  6. [Adsorption characteristics and mechanism of atrazine on three types of humic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-ying; Zheng, Yin-tian; Lü, Yi-zhong

    2010-10-01

    This study mainly researched the adsorption properties and adsorption mechanism of atrazine on three different types of humic acids: the black soil humic acid, the chestnut soil humic acid and the humic acid purchased. After the extraction of humic acid from the two different types of soil, the black soil and chestnut soil, adsorption experiments were carried out using the batch equilibrium techniques. Then FTIR and ESR spectral analysis methods were employed to explain the functional mechanism between atrazine and humic acid. The results showed that the sorption of humic acid on atazine was very fast at the beginning, then went to slower and finally came to equilibrium. The relationship between the amount of atrazine sorbed by the three humic acids and reaction time all fitted logarithmic and hyperbolic equations well. Adsorption isotherms of atrazine on the three humic acids all are L-type and in accordance with the linear model and the Freundlich model. Because of the different structure, there is significant difference between the adsorption isotherm of atrazine on purchased humic acid and extract humic acid. The interactions between humic acid and atrazine are mostly weak forces, such as the H-bond, proton transfer, charge transfer, van der Waals force and so on. In addition, ESR analysis proved that charge transfer exists between humic acid and atrazine during the process of adsorption.

  7. Long-term survival of critically ill patients treated with prolonged mechanical ventilation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damuth, Emily; Mitchell, Jessica A; Bartock, Jason L; Roberts, Brian W; Trzeciak, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Prolonged dependence on mechanical ventilation after critical illness is an emerging public health challenge; however, long-term outcomes are incompletely understood. We aimed to systematically analyse long-term survival of critically ill patients treated with prolonged mechanical ventilation. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library between 1988 and Nov 6, 2013, with no language restrictions, for studies on prolonged mechanical ventilation. We included studies of adult populations treated with mechanical ventilation for more than 14 days, who were admitted to a ventilator weaning unit, or who had a tracheostomy for acute respiratory failure. We abstracted data with a standardised collection template and assessed study quality (ie, risk of bias) using a customised Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. We did a stratified analysis based on study setting (eg, acute vs post-acute care hospitals), and used a random-effects model to calculate pooled statistics (proportions with 95% CIs) for all outcomes. We did sensitivity analyses based on study quality (ie, high-quality studies only) and country of origin (USA vs non-USA and USA vs UK). The primary outcome was mortality at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality, discharge destination among survivors, successful liberation from mechanical ventilation while in hospital, and mortality at timepoints longer than 1 year. Of 6326 studies identified, 402 underwent full manuscript review, and 124 studies from 16 countries met the inclusion criteria. 39 studies reported mortality at 1 year, which was 59% (95% CI 56-62). Among the 29 high-quality studies, the pooled mortality at 1 year was 62% (95% CI 57-67). Pooled mortality at hospital discharge was 29% (95% CI 26-32). However, only 19% (16-24) were discharged to home and only 50% (47-53) were successfully liberated from mechanical ventilation. For studies in post-acute care hospitals, outcomes were worse in the USA than internationally (mortality at 1 year was 73

  8. Biochemical Mechanisms and Energy Strategies of Geobacter sulfurreducens for Long- Term Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmus, R. A.; Liermann, L. J.; Brantley, S. L.; Tien, M.

    2008-12-01

    Numerous species of bacteria have been observed to exhibit a growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype, indicating that microorganisms starved of an energy source may adapt to allow for long-term survival. Understanding how Geobacter sulfurreducens persists using various metal forms as energy sources and whether a GASP phenotype develops during long-term growth are important for efficient application of this bacterium to sites requiring engineered bioremediation of soluble metals. Thus, we investigated the growth kinetics and survival of G. sulfurreducens. The growth rate of G. sulfurreducens was highest when cultured with soluble iron and generally higher on iron oxide than manganese oxide, suggesting that soluble metal forms are more readily utilized as energy sources by G. sulfurreducens. By monitoring the abundance of G. sulfurreducens in batch cultures for >6 months, distinct growth, stationary, and prolonged starvation phases were observed and a cell density of 105- 106 cells/mL persisted under long-term starvation conditions. The outgrowth of an aged G. sulfurreducens strain co-cultured with a young strain was monitored as a measure of the existence of the GASP phenotype. As the strains aged, the rpoS gene was cloned and sequenced at different stages of growth to identify mutations corresponding to a growth advantage. The results of these studies provide insight into the use of various metal forms for growth by G. sulfurreducens and its ability to persist when starved of energy sources.

  9. Mechanism of Oxidation of Brilliant Cresyl Blue with Acidic Chlorite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diethylamino-8-methyl-phenoxazine chloride) (BB+) by chlorite in the presence of acid is reported. Under [H+]0>[ClO2–]0>[BB+]0 conditions, the oxidation reaction followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to BB+. During the reaction, chlorite ...

  10. CSF Amino Acids, Pterins and Mechanism of the Ketogenic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, Spain, studied the relationship between the etiology of refractory childhood epilepsy, CSF neurotransmitters, pterins, and amino acids, and response to a ketogenic diet in 60 patients with refractory epilepsy, 83% focal and 52% idiopathic.

  11. Nitrification in acid soils: micro-organisms and mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    Nitrification in acid soils was first reported in the beginning of the 20th century. Although this finding has been well substantiated by countless studies since then, it has until recently remained unclear which micro-organisms were responsible for nitrate production at low pH. Substantial evidence

  12. Molecular mechanisms behind the antimicrobial activity of hop iso-α-acids in Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Benjamin C; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-04-01

    The main bittering component in beer, hop iso-α-acids, have been characterised as weak acids, which act as ionophores impairing microbial cells' function under acidic conditions as present in beer. Besides medium pH, divalent cations play a central role regarding the efficacy of the antimicrobial effect. The iso-α-acids' non-bitter derivatives humulinic acids can be found in isomerised hop extracts and can be generated during hop storage. Therefore, they have been under investigation concerning their influence on beer sensory properties. This study sketches the molecular mechanism behind iso-α-acids' antimicrobial activity in Lactobacillus (L.) brevis regarding their ionophore activity versus the dependence of the inhibitory potential on manganese binding, and suggests humulinic acids as novel tasteless food preservatives. We designed and synthesised chemically modified iso-α-acids to enhance the basic understanding of the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial iso-α-acids. It could be observed that a manganese-binding dependent transmembrane redox reaction (oxidative stress) plays a crucial role in inhibition. Privation of an acidic hydroxyl group neither erased ionophore activity, nor did it entirely abolish antimicrobial activity. Humulinic acids proved to be highly inhibitory, even outperforming iso-α-acids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The polysialic acid mimetics idarubicin and irinotecan stimulate neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth and signal via protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loers, Gabriele; Astafiev, Steven; Hapiak, Yuliya; Saini, Vedangana; Mishra, Bibhudatta; Gul, Sheraz; Kaur, Gurcharan; Schachner, Melitta; Theis, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is a large, negatively charged, linear homopolymer of alpha2-8-linked sialic acid residues. It is generated by two polysialyltransferases and attached to N- and/or O-linked glycans, and its main carrier is the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). PSA controls the development and regeneration of the nervous system by enhancing cell migration, axon pathfinding, synaptic targeting, synaptic plasticity, by regulating the differentiation of progenitor cells and by modulating cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions. In the adult, PSA plays a role in the immune system, and PSA mimetics promote functional recovery after nervous system injury. In search for novel small molecule mimetics of PSA that are applicable for therapy, we identified idarubicin, an antineoplastic anthracycline, and irinotecan, an antineoplastic agent of the topoisomerase I inhibitor class, as PSA mimetics using a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Idarubicin and irinotecan compete with the PSA-mimicking peptide and colominic acid, the bacterial analog of PSA, for binding to the PSA-specific monoclonal antibody 735. Idarubicin and irinotecan stimulate neurite outgrowth and survival of cultured cerebellar neurons after oxidative stress via protein kinase C and Erk1/2 in a similar manner as colominic acid, whereas Fyn, casein kinase II and the phosphatase and tensin homolog are only involved in idarubicin and irinotecan-stimulated neurite outgrowth. These novel results show that the structure and function of PSA can be mimicked by the small organic compounds irinotecan and idarubicin which trigger the same signaling cascades as PSA, thus introducing the possibility of retargeting these drugs to treat nervous system injuries. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Development, survival and reproduction of Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851 (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae with salt and amino acids solutions supplementary diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Patrícia Carneiro Freitas

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the effect of a supplementary diet with amino acids and sodium chloride solutions in addition to prey on the development, survival and reproduction of the predator Podisus nigrispinus (Heteroptera, Pentatomidae. Both solutions showed deleterious effects on nymph survival, adult weight, female longevity, number of egg masses, eggs per female, eggs per egg mass and nymphs per female besides egg viability of P. nigrispinus when compared with diet with water and prey. When compared with plant supplements in the diet the use of amino acids and salt solutions for mass rearing of P. nigrispinus was inferior.O presente estudo mostra o efeito da suplementação alimentar com soluções de aminoácidos e salina (NaCl no desenvolvimento, sobrevivência e reprodução de Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae. Ambas soluções causaram efeito deletério na sobrevivência ninfal, peso dos adultos, longevidade das fêmeas e nos números de posturas, de ovos/fêmea, de ovos/postura e de ninfas, bem como na viabilidade dos ovos de P. nigrispinus quando comparado com estes insetos que além de presa receberam água. Estes resultados são discutidos em comparação com o efeito positivo que a suplementação alimentar com plantas tem sido relatada para esses predadores e sugerem que o uso de plantas é melhor que a substituição por solução de aminoácidos em sistemas de criação em laboratório desses predadores.

  15. Kinetic and Mechanism of Oxidation of Oxalic Acid by Cerium (IV)

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Ammar J. Mohammed

    2005-01-01

    Kinetic and mechanism studies of the oxidation of oxalic acid by Cerium sulphate have been carried out in acid medium sulphuric acid. The uv- vis. Spectrophotometric technique was used to follow up the reaction and the selected wavelength to be followed was 320 nm. The kinetic study showed that the order of reaction is first order in Ce(IV) and fractional in oxalic acid. The effect of using different concentration of sulphuric acid on the rate of the reaction has been studied a and it was fou...

  16. Radiation survival of two nalidixic acid resistant strains of Salmonella typhimurium in various media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuzzaman, Kazi; Goodwin, Marlene; George, Ian; Singh, Harwant

    Radiation doses required for 90% inactivation, the D10 values, have been determined for two nalidixic acid-resistant strains of Salmonella typhimurium, Nal R ATCC 13311 and K1-2B, in different media. The D10 values were 0.20, 0.57 and 0.53 kGy for the ATCC 13311 strain, and were 0.21, 0.4 and 0.32 kGy for the K1-2B strain, in phosphate buffer, in nutrient broth and on chicken drumsticks, respectively. Since these two strains have radiation sensitivity similar to several Salmonella serotypes reported in the literature, they are good indicator organisms for use in studies on the effect of irradiation on Salmonella in foods that might frequently be contaminated with such organisms.

  17. Acetic acid-catalyzed formation of N-phenylphthalimide from phthalanilic acid: a computational study of the mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-05-28

    In glacial acetic acid, phthalanilic acid and its monosubstituents are known to be converted to the corresponding phthalimides in relatively good yields. In this study, we computationally investigated the experimentally proposed two-step (addition-elimination or cyclization-dehydration) mechanism at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) level of theory for the unsubstituted phthalanilic acid, with an explicit acetic acid molecule included in the calculations. In the first step, a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate is formed by the nucleophilic attack of the amide nitrogen. The second step is dehydration of the intermediate to give N-phenylphthalimide. In agreement with experimental findings, the second step has been shown to be rate-determining. Most importantly, both of the steps are catalyzed by an acetic acid molecule, which acts both as proton donor and acceptor. The present findings, along with those from our previous studies, suggest that acetic acid and other carboxylic acids (in their undissociated forms) can catalyze intramolecular nucleophilic attacks by amide nitrogens and breakdown of the resulting tetrahedral intermediates, acting simultaneously as proton donor and acceptor. In other words, double proton transfers involving a carboxylic acid molecule can be part of an extensive bond reorganization process from cyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  18. Relationship between volume and survival in closed intensive care units is weak and apparent only in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rafael; Altaba, Susana; Cabre, Lluis; Lacueva, Victoria; Santos, Antonio; Solsona, Jose-Felipe; Añon, Jose-Manuel; Catalan, Rosa-Maria; Gutierrez, Maria-Jose; Fernandez-Cid, Ramon; Gomez-Tello, Vicente; Curiel, Emilio; Fernandez-Mondejar, Enrique; Oliva, Joan-Carles; Tizon, Ana Isabel; Gonzalez, Javier; Monedero, Pablo; Sanchez, Manuela Garcia; de la Torre, M Victoria; Ibañez, Pedro; Frutos, Fernando; Del Nogal, Frutos; Gomez, M Jesus; Marcos, Alfredo; Vera, Paula; Serrano, Jose Manuel; Umaran, Isabel; Carrillo, Andres; Lopez-Pueyo, M-Jose; Rascado, Pedro; Balerdi, Begoña; Suberviola, Borja; Hernandez, Gonzalo

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have found an association between increased volume and increased intensive care unit (ICU) survival; however, this association might not hold true in ICUs with permanent intensivist coverage. Our objective was to determine whether ICU volume correlates with survival in the Spanish healthcare system. Post hoc analysis of a prospective study of all patients admitted to 29 ICUs during 3 months. At ICU discharge, the authors recorded demographic variables, severity score, and specific ICU treatments. Follow-up variables included ICU readmission and hospital mortality. Statistics include logistic multivariate analyses for hospital mortality according to quartiles of volume of patients. The authors studied 4,001 patients with a mean predicted risk of death of 23% (range at hospital level: 14-46%). Observed hospital mortality was 19% (range at hospital level: 11-35%), resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 0.81 (range: 0.5-1.3). Among the 1,923 patients needing mechanical ventilation, the predicted risk of death was 32% (14-60%) and observed hospital mortality was 30% (12-61%), resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 0.96 (0.5-1.7). The authors found no correlation between standardized mortality ratio and ICU volume in the entire population or in mechanically ventilated patients. Only mechanically ventilated patients in very low-volume ICUs had slightly worse outcome. In the currently studied healthcare system characterized by 24/7 intensivist coverage, the authors found wide variability in outcome among ICUs even after adjusting for severity of illness but no relationship between ICU volume and outcome. Only mechanically ventilated patients in very low-volume centers had slightly worse outcomes.

  19. Understanding the 3-hydroxypropionic acid tolerance mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Juncker, Agnieszka; Hallstrom, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    a sustainable alternative for production of acrylic acid from renewable feedstocks. We are establishing Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an alternative host for 3HP production. However, 3HP also inhibits yeast grow th at level well below what is desired for commercial applications. Therefore, we are aiming...... to improve 3HP tolerance in S. cerevisiae by applying adaptive evolution approach. We have generated yeast strains with sign ificantly improved capacity for tolerating 3HP when compared to the wild-type. We will present physiolo gical characterization, genome re-sequencing, and transcriptome analysis...

  20. A mechanism for hydrochloric acid production in cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn K. Yue; Volkar A. Mohnen; C. S. Kiang

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical model describing the general interaction between atmospheric trace gases, such as SO2, NH3, CO2 and O2, chemical reactant gaseous product H2SO4 and hydrometeors containing NaCl is proposed to study a possible mechanism...

  1. Under Stress: Social Coping Mechanisms for Survival among the Working Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Ms. Coral Barboza; Dr. Babu Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The nature of work of professionals and their family life may very often expose them to high level of stress which has the potential of affecting their productive and earning capacity. Coping strategies have been the subject of many studies and various suggestions have been made regarding the most appropriate way to categorise them in terms of function and efficacy (Amble, 2006; Buys et al., 2010). The goal of the current study was to examine how social coping mechanisms are helpful to employ...

  2. Alcohols enhance the rate of acetic acid diffusion in S. cerevisiae: biophysical mechanisms and implications for acetic acid tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Lindahl

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cell factories with the ability to maintain high productivity in the presence of weak organic acids, such as acetic acid, are required in many industrial processes. For example, fermentation media derived from lignocellulosic biomass are rich in acetic acid and other weak acids. The rate of diffusional entry of acetic acid is one parameter determining the ability of microorganisms to tolerance the acid. The present study demonstrates that the rate of acetic acid diffusion in S. cerevisiae is strongly affected by the alcohols ethanol and n-butanol. Ethanol of 40 g/L and n-butanol of 8 g/L both caused a 65% increase in the rate of acetic acid diffusion, and higher alcohol concentrations caused even greater increases. Molecular dynamics simulations of membrane dynamics in the presence of alcohols demonstrated that the partitioning of alcohols to the head group region of the lipid bilayer causes a considerable increase in the membrane area, together with reduced membrane thickness and lipid order. These changes in physiochemical membrane properties lead to an increased number of water molecules in the membrane interior, providing biophysical mechanisms for the alcohol-induced increase in acetic acid diffusion rate. n-butanol affected S. cerevisiae and the cell membrane properties at lower concentrations than ethanol, due to greater and deeper partitioning in the membrane. This study demonstrates that the rate of acetic acid diffusion can be strongly affected by compounds that partition into the cell membrane, and highlights the need for considering interaction effects between compounds in the design of microbial processes.

  3. Alcohols enhance the rate of acetic acid diffusion inS. cerevisiae: biophysical mechanisms and implications for acetic acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Lina; Genheden, Samuel; Faria-Oliveira, Fábio; Allard, Stefan; Eriksson, Leif A; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    Microbial cell factories with the ability to maintain high productivity in the presence of weak organic acids, such as acetic acid, are required in many industrial processes. For example, fermentation media derived from lignocellulosic biomass are rich in acetic acid and other weak acids. The rate of diffusional entry of acetic acid is one parameter determining the ability of microorganisms to tolerance the acid. The present study demonstrates that the rate of acetic acid diffusion in S. cerevisiae is strongly affected by the alcohols ethanol and n-butanol. Ethanol of 40 g/L and n-butanol of 8 g/L both caused a 65% increase in the rate of acetic acid diffusion, and higher alcohol concentrations caused even greater increases. Molecular dynamics simulations of membrane dynamics in the presence of alcohols demonstrated that the partitioning of alcohols to the head group region of the lipid bilayer causes a considerable increase in the membrane area, together with reduced membrane thickness and lipid order. These changes in physiochemical membrane properties lead to an increased number of water molecules in the membrane interior, providing biophysical mechanisms for the alcohol-induced increase in acetic acid diffusion rate. n-butanol affected S. cerevisiae and the cell membrane properties at lower concentrations than ethanol, due to greater and deeper partitioning in the membrane. This study demonstrates that the rate of acetic acid diffusion can be strongly affected by compounds that partition into the cell membrane, and highlights the need for considering interaction effects between compounds in the design of microbial processes.

  4. [Influencing factors and reaction mechanism of chloroacetic acid reduction by cast iron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shun; Yang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Xie, Yue-Feng

    2014-03-01

    The chloroacetic acids are ubiquitous present as a class of trace chlorinated organic pollutants in surface and drinking water. Most of chloroacetic acids are known or suspected carcinogens and, when at high concentrations, are of great concern to human health. In order to economically remove chloroacetic acids, the degradation of chloroacetic acids by cast iron was investigated. Moreover, the effect of iron style, pretreatment process, shocking mode and dissolved oxygen on chloroacetic acids reduced by cast iron was discussed. Compared to iron source and acid pretreatment, mass transfer was more important to chloroacetic acid removal. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and monochloroacetic acid (MCAA) were the main products of anoxic and oxic degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) by cast iron during the researched reaction time, respectively. With longtitudinal shock, the reaction kinetics of chloroaectic acid removal by cast iron conformed well to the pseudo first order reaction. The anoxic reaction constants of TCAA, DCAA and MCAA were 0.46 h(-1), 0.03 h(-1) and 0, and their oxic constants were 1.24 h(-1), 0.79 h(-1) and 0.28 h(-1), respectively. The removal mechanisms of chloroacetic acids were different under various oxygen concentrations, including sequential hydrogenolysis for anoxic reaction and sequential hydrogenolysis and direct transformation possible for oxic reaction, respectively.

  5. Bacterial biofilm mechanical properties persist upon antibiotic treatment and survive cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrelli, K.; Galy, O.; Latour-Lambert, P.; Kirwan, L.; Ghigo, J. M.; Beloin, C.; Henry, N.

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria living on surfaces form heterogeneous three-dimensional consortia known as biofilms, where they exhibit many specific properties one of which is an increased tolerance to antibiotics. Biofilms are maintained by a polymeric network and display physical properties similar to that of complex fluids. In this work, we address the question of the impact of antibiotic treatment on the physical properties of biofilms based on recently developed tools enabling the in situ mapping of biofilm local mechanical properties at the micron scale. This approach takes into account the material heterogeneity and reveals the spatial distribution of all the small changes that may occur in the structure. With an Escherichia coli biofilm, we demonstrate using in situ fluorescent labeling that the two antibiotics ofloxacin and ticarcillin—targeting DNA replication and membrane assembly, respectively—induced no detectable alteration of the biofilm mechanical properties while they killed the vast majority of the cells. In parallel, we show that a proteolytic enzyme that cleaves extracellular proteins into short peptides, but does not alter bacterial viability in the biofilm, clearly affects the mechanical properties of the biofilm structure, inducing a significant increase of the material compliance. We conclude that conventional biofilm control strategy relying on the use of biocides targeting cells is missing a key target since biofilm structural integrity is preserved. This is expected to efficiently promote biofilm resilience, especially in the presence of persister cells. In contrast, the targeting of polymer network cross-links—among which extracellular proteins emerge as major players—offers a promising route for the development of rational multi-target strategies to fight against biofilms.

  6. Feeding ω-3 PUFA enriched rotifers to Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns, 1842 larvae reared at different salinity conditions: effects on growth parameters, survival and fatty acids profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Dantagnan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well known importance of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in marine and freshwater fish larvae, there are few studies on how essential fatty acid requirements and composition on whole body can be altered by changes in water salinity. The present study aimed to determine the effect of salinity on ω-3 PUFA requirements, larval growth survival and fatty acid composition of Galaxias maculatus larvae cultured at two different salinities (0 and 15 g L-1 for 20 days while fed rotifers containing two different levels of ω-3 PUFA (1.87 and 3.16%. The results denoted a marked difference in ω-3 PUFA requirements and in the pattern of fatty acid deposition in the whole body of larvae reared at different salinities, depending of ω-3 PUFA in diets. Thus, to improve growth and survival larvae of G. maculatus reared at 0 g L-1 require higher levels of ω-3 PUFA, principally 18:3 ω-3. Larvae reared at salinities of 15 g L-1 require low levels of ω-3 PUFA for optimal survival, especially 18:3 ω-3. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid content in the whole body of larvae was also affected by water salinity.

  7. Retinoic acid-loaded polymeric nanoparticles enhance vascular regulation of neural stem cell survival and differentiation after ischaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R.; Fonseca, M. C.; Santos, T.; Sargento-Freitas, J.; Tjeng, R.; Paiva, F.; Castelo-Branco, M.; Ferreira, L. S.; Bernardino, L.

    2016-04-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. However, current therapies only reach a small percentage of patients and may cause serious side effects. We propose the therapeutic use of retinoic acid-loaded nanoparticles (RA-NP) to safely and efficiently repair the ischaemic brain by creating a favourable pro-angiogenic environment that enhances neurogenesis and neuronal restitution. Our data showed that RA-NP enhanced endothelial cell proliferation and tubule network formation and protected against ischaemia-induced death. To evaluate the effect of RA-NP on vascular regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) survival and differentiation, endothelial cell-conditioned media (EC-CM) were collected. EC-CM from healthy RA-NP-treated cells reduced NSC death and promoted proliferation while EC-CM from ischaemic RA-NP-treated cells decreased cell death, increased proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In parallel, human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC), which are part of the endogenous repair response to vascular injury, were collected from ischaemic stroke patients. hEPC treated with RA-NP had significantly higher proliferation, which further highlights the therapeutic potential of this formulation. To conclude, RA-NP protected endothelial cells from ischaemic death and stimulated the release of pro-survival, proliferation-stimulating factors and differentiation cues for NSC. RA-NP were shown to be up to 83-fold more efficient than free RA and to enhance hEPC proliferation. These data serve as a stepping stone to use RA-NP as vasculotrophic and neurogenic agents for vascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases with compromised vasculature.

  8. Genome-Wide Transposon Mutagenesis Indicates that Mycobacterium marinum Customizes Its Virulence Mechanisms for Survival and Replication in Different Hosts

    KAUST Repository

    Weerdenburg, Eveline M.

    2015-02-17

    The interaction of environmental bacteria with unicellular eukaryotes is generally considered a major driving force for the evolution of intracellular pathogens, allowing them to survive and replicate in phagocytic cells of vertebrate hosts. To test this hypothesis on a genome-wide level, we determined for the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium marinum whether it uses conserved strategies to exploit host cells from both protozoan and vertebrate origin. Using transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS), we determined differences in genetic requirements for survival and replication in phagocytic cells of organisms from different kingdoms. In line with the general hypothesis, we identified a number of general virulence mechanisms, including the type VII protein secretion system ESX-1, biosynthesis of polyketide lipids, and utilization of sterols. However, we were also able to show that M. marinum contains an even larger set of host-specific virulence determinants, including proteins involved in the modification of surface glycolipids and, surprisingly, the auxiliary proteins of the ESX-1 system. Several of these factors were in fact counterproductive in other hosts. Therefore, M. marinum contains different sets of virulence factors that are tailored for specific hosts. Our data imply that although amoebae could function as a training ground for intracellular pathogens, they do not fully prepare pathogens for crossing species barriers.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Addition of bromide ion causes decrease in the oxidation rate but only to a limiting value. The reaction is susceptible to both polar and steric effects of the substituents. A suitable mechanism has been propo- sed. Keywords. Amino acid; tetraalkylammonium tribromide; kinetics; mechanism; oxidation. 1. Introduction.

  10. Mechanism of biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3, a psychrotrophic bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, M.; Fukunaga, N.; Sasaki, S. (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    Biosynthesis of palmitic, palmitoleic, and cis-vaccenic acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3 was investigated with in vitro and in vivo systems. (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid was aerobically converted to palmitoleate and cis-vaccenate, and the radioactivities on their carboxyl carbons were 100 and 43%, respectively, of the total radioactivity in the fatty acids. Palmitoyl coenzyme A desaturase activity was found in the membrane fraction. (1-{sup 14}C)stearic acid was converted to octadecenoate and C16 fatty acids. The octadecenoate contained oleate and cis-vaccenate, but only oleate was produced in the presence of cerulenin. (1-{sup 14}C)lauric acid was aerobically converted to palmitate, palmitoleate, and cis-vaccenate. Under anaerobic conditions, palmitate (62%), palmitoleate (4%), and cis-vaccenate (34%) were produced from (1-{sup 14}C)acetic acid, while they amounted to 48, 39, and 14%, respectively, under aerobic conditions. In these incorporation experiments, 3 to 19% of the added radioactivity was detected in released {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, indicating that part of the added fatty acids were oxidatively decomposed. Partially purified fatty acid synthetase produced saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with chain lengths of C10 to C18. These results indicated that both aerobic and anaerobic mechanisms for the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid are operating in this bacterium.

  11. A dual, concentration-dependent absorption mechanism of linoleic acid by rat jejunum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, S L; Hollander, D

    1979-03-01

    Linoleic acid absorption was studied using everted rat jejunal sacs. At low concentrations (42-1260 microM), the relationship between linoleic acid concentration and its absorption rate fitted best to a rectangular hyperbola. At high concentrations (2.5-4.2 mM) the relationship between the two parameters was linear. The separate additions of 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyanide, or azide, or decrease in the incubation temperature from 37 to 20 degrees C did not change the absorption rate of linoleic acid. Absorption rate of linoleic acid at low concentrations increased as the hydrogen ion and taurocholate concentrations were increased or as the unstirred water layer thickness was decreased. Linoleic acid absorption rate was decreased after the additions of lecithin, oleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids or the substitution of taurocholate with the nonionic surfactant Pluronic F 68. These observations indicate that a concentration-dependent, dual mechanism of transport is operative in linoleic acid absorption. Facilitated diffusion is the predominant mechanism of absorption at low concentrations, while at high concentrations, simple diffusion is predominant. At low concentrations, the absorption rate of linoleic acid is influenced by the pH, surfactant type and concentration, the simultaneous presence of other polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the thickness of the unstirred water layer.

  12. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hye Won; Yang, Byoung-Eun

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos® implants. This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos® implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to age, sex, implant length or diameter, bone graft, arch, and position. The 8-year CSR was 96.9%. Thirteen (2.9%) implants failed because of early osseointegration failure in 3, marginal bone loss in 6, and abutment fracture in 4. Screw loosening occurred in 10 implants (2.2%), and 10 abutment fractures occurred. All abutment fractures were located in the neck, and concurrent screw fractures were observed. The CSR and rate of screw loosening did not differ significantly according to factors. The CFR was higher in middle-aged patients (5.3% vs 0.0% in younger and older patients); for teeth in a molar position (5.8% vs 0.0% for premolar or 1.1% for anterior position); and for larger-diameter implants (4.5% for 4.5 mm and 6.7% for 5.5 mm diameter vs 0.5% for 3.5 mm diameter) (all PAnkylos® implant is suitable for single-tooth restoration in Koreans. However, relatively frequent abutment fractures (2.2%) were observed and some fractures resulted in implant failures. Middle-aged patients, the molar position, and a large implant diameter were associated with a high incidence of abutment fracture.

  13. Paraffin embedding allows effective analysis of proliferation, survival, and immunophenotyping of cells cultured on poly(l-lactic acid) electrospun nanofiber scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroni, Laura; Dirani, Giorgio; Gualandi, Chiara; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea

    2010-08-01

    Morphological and immunophenotypic characterization of cells grown on poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun scaffolds is usually performed using immunofluorescence and cryosections. However, these methods present practical limits; histological processing, on the other hand, is believed to lead to artifactual changes in the scaffold structure. Here the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedding (FFPE) procedure was tailored to process PLLA electrospun scaffolds grown with human umbilical vein endothelial cells. After 1 to 7 days of culture, the scaffolds were processed with the FFPE procedure. Using this protocol, not only cross sections but also "en face" sections were obtained. This made possible to perform the effective light microscopy analysis of cell morphology and to assess cell adhesion and penetration without considerable scaffold damage. The method was also suitable for immunohistochemical assays, such as proliferation (Ki67), extracellular matrix production (type IV collagen), survival (cleaved caspase-3), and immunophenotyping (KDR, CD44, vimentin, CD45); results were compared with those obtained using complementary techniques (scanning electron microscopy, Alamar Blue assay, and cryosections). The FFPE protocol can be safely applied to PLLA scaffolds and provides information that are essential to study the mechanisms of interaction between cells and PLLA fibers before their potential implantation in vivo.

  14. Arachidonic acid intestinal absorption: mechanism of transport and influence of luminal factors of absorption in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, S L; Hollander, D

    1978-11-01

    The mechanism and characteristics of intestinal absorption of arachidonic acid were studied in vitro using everted intestinal sacs of the rat. Arachidonic acid absorption was studied at concentrations of 5 micron to 8.36 mM. The plot of absorption rate vs. concentration fitted best to a rectangular hyperbola at low micron concentrations and to a straight linear relationship in the mM range of concentrations. Metabolic inhibitors and uncouplers did not change absorption in either range of concentrations. The absorption of arachidonic acid increased with thinning of the unstirred water-layer, decrease in the pH, or the substitution of sodium taurocholate by Pluronic F 68 OR Tween 80. Absorption decreased following the equimolar additions of oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids. Absorption rate did not change when the taurocholate concentration was varied from 5-15 mM or following the additions of butyric or glutamic acids, leucine, lysine, or dextrose. It was concluded that arachidonic acid is absorbed by a concentration-dependent dual mechanism of transport which is not energy dependent. At the low micron range of concentrations, facilitated diffusion is predominant, while at mM concentrations, simple diffusion is the dominant mechanism of absorption. Changes in the intestinal fluid composition, flow rate, and pH can modify the rate of absorption of arachidonic acid.

  15. Use of Gallic Acid to Enhance the Antioxidant and Mechanical Properties of Active Fish Gelatin Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpisophon, Kanokrat; Schleining, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the potential roles of gallic acid in fish gelatin film for improving mechanical properties, UV barrier, and providing antioxidant activities. Glycerol, a common used plasticizer, also impacts on mechanical properties of the film. A factorial design was used to investigate the effects of gallic acid and glycerol concentrations on antioxidant activities and mechanical properties of fish gelatin film. Increasing the amount of gallic acid increased the antioxidant capacities of the film measured by radical scavenging assay and the ferric reducing ability of plasma assay. The released antioxidant power of gallic acid from the film was not reduced by glycerol. The presence of gallic acid not only increased the antioxidant capacity of the film, but also increased the tensile strength, elongation at break, and reduced UV absorption due to interaction between gallic acid and protein by hydrogen bonding. Glycerol did not affect the antioxidant capacities of the film, but increased the elasticity of the films. Overall, this study revealed that gallic acid entrapped in the fish gelatin film provided antioxidant activities and improved film characteristics, namely UV barrier, strength, and elasticity of the film. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  16. Expression of Ski can act as a negative feedback mechanism on retinoic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melling, Meaghan A; Friendship, Charlotte R C; Shepherd, Trevor G; Drysdale, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    Retinoic acid signaling is essential for many aspects of early development in vertebrates. To control the levels of signaling, several retinoic acid target genes have been identified that act to suppress retinoic acid signaling in a negative feedback loop. The nuclear protein Ski has been extensively studied for its ability to suppress transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling but has also been implicated in the repression of retinoic acid signaling. We demonstrate that ski expression is up-regulated in response to retinoic acid in both early Xenopus embryos and in human cell lines. Blocking retinoic acid signaling using a retinoic acid antagonist results in a corresponding decrease in the levels of ski mRNA. Finally, overexpression of SKI in human cells results in reduced levels of CYP26A1 mRNA, a known target of retinoic acid signaling. Our results, coupled with the known ability of Ski to repress retinoic acid signaling, demonstrate that Ski expression is a novel negative feedback mechanism acting on retinoic acid signaling. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Pachymic acid improves survival and attenuates acute lung injury in septic rats induced by cecal ligation and puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J-Y; Wu, H-X; Yang, G

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the possible beneficial effects of pachymic acid (PA) on acute lung injury (ALI) in a rat model of sepsis. A rat model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham, CLP, CLP + PA 1 mg/kg, CLP + PA 5 mg/kg, CLP + PA 10 mg/kg. CLP + PA groups received PA by intraperitoneal injection daily for consecutive 3 days, respectively, and the rats in sham and CLP groups were given equivalent volume of olive oil. We killed the animals 12 h after CLP and collected blood samples to determine PaO2, PaCO2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. Lung samples were taken for wet/dry weight ratios and histologic assessment. Meanwhile, the levels of lung tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were determined. The results revealed that PA treatment significantly improved the survival of septic rats and attenuated CLP-induced ALI. In PA-treated rats, the wet/dry weight ratios and the serum levels of TNF-a, IL-1β and IL-6 were down-regulated compared with the CLP group. PA also markedly decreased MDA and MPO contents and increased SOD level. These findings indicate that PA administration ameliorates ALI in a rat model of sepsis induced by CLP.

  18. Effects of Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid on the Spontaneous Mechanical Activity of Juvenile Rat Duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciora, Steven L; Williams, Kent C; Gariepy, Cheryl E

    2015-09-01

    There are a limited number of medications for the treatment of foregut dysmotility. Enteral amoxicillin/clavulanic acid induces phase III duodenal contractions in a fasting pediatric patient. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. We examined the individual contributions of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid on the spontaneous mechanical activity of juvenile rat duodenum to better understand this phenomenon. Duodenal segments from juvenile rats were longitudinally attached to force transducers in organ baths. Samples were cumulatively exposed to amoxicillin or clavulanic acid. Separate samples were exposed to carbachol alone to assess response in both the presence and absence of amoxicillin or clavulanic acid. Basal tone, frequency, and amplitude of contractions were digitized and recorded. The amplitude of the spontaneous contractions increased with amoxicillin. Inhibition of neuronal activity prevented this effect. Clavulanic acid did not affect the spontaneous contractions. Basal tone and the rate of contractions did not differ with either drug. Stimulation with carbachol in the presence of amoxicillin caused a statistically significant increase in the contractility compared with carbachol alone. Amoxicillin alters the spontaneous longitudinal mechanical activity of juvenile rat duodenum. Our results suggest that amoxicillin modulates the spontaneous pattern of cyclic mechanical activity of duodenal smooth muscle through noncholinergic, neurally mediated mechanisms. Our work provides an initial physiologic basis for the therapeutic use of amoxicillin in patients with gastrointestinal dysmotility.

  19. Physicochemical and Mechanical Properties of Bambara Groundnut Starch Films Modified with Stearic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyinka, Samson A; Singh, Suren; Amonsou, Eric O

    2017-01-01

    The physicochemical and mechanical properties of biofilm prepared from bambara starch modified with varying concentrations of stearic acid (0%, 2.5%, 3.5%, 5%, 7%, and 10%) were studied. By scanning electron microscopy, bambara starch films modified with stearic acid (≥3.5%) showed a progressively rough surface compared to those with 2.5% stearic acid and the control. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra revealed a peak shift of approximately 31 cm-1 , suggesting the promotion of hydrogen bond formation between hydroxyl groups of starch and stearic acid. The addition of 2.5% stearic acid to bambara starch film reduced water vapor permeability by approximately 17%. Bambara starch films modified with higher concentration of stearic acid were more opaque and showed significantly high melting temperatures. However, mechanical properties of starch films were generally negatively affected by stearic acid. Bambara starch film may be modified with 2.5% stearic acid for improved water vapor permeability and thermal stability with minimal effect on tensile strength. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohgi Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA, which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism.

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Ursodeoxycholic Acid Toxicity & Side Effects: Ursodeoxycholic Acid Freezes Regeneration & Induces Hibernation Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magd A. Kotb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA is a steroid bile acid approved for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC. UDCA is reported to have “hepato-protective properties”. Yet, UDCA has “unanticipated” toxicity, pronounced by more than double number of deaths, and eligibility for liver transplantation compared to the control group in 28 mg/kg/day in primary sclerosing cholangitis, necessitating trial halt in North America. UDCA is associated with increase in hepatocellular carcinoma in PBC especially when it fails to achieve biochemical response (10 and 15 years incidence of 9% and 20% respectively. “Unanticipated” UDCA toxicity includes hepatitis, pruritus, cholangitis, ascites, vanishing bile duct syndrome, liver cell failure, death, severe watery diarrhea, pneumonia, dysuria, immune-suppression, mutagenic effects and withdrawal syndrome upon sudden halt. UDCA inhibits DNA repair, co-enzyme A, cyclic AMP, p53, phagocytosis, and inhibits induction of nitric oxide synthatase. It is genotoxic, exerts aneugenic activity, and arrests apoptosis even after cellular phosphatidylserine externalization. UDCA toxicity is related to its interference with drug detoxification, being hydrophilic and anti-apoptotic, has a long half-life, has transcriptional mutational abilities, down-regulates cellular functions, has a very narrow difference between the recommended (13 mg/kg/day and toxic dose (28 mg/kg/day, and it typically transforms into lithocholic acid that induces DNA strand breakage, it is uniquely co-mutagenic, and promotes cell transformation. UDCA beyond PBC is unjustified.

  2. Adsorption mechanism of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid onto nitric-acid-modified activated carbon fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Sun, Jie; Ren, Tianhao; Guo, Lin; Yang, Zhilin; Yang, Qi; Chen, Hai

    2018-04-01

    Adsorption by carbon materials is one of the relatively fast methods in present research, which is widely used in emergency events. Activated carbon fiber (ACF) modified by nitric acid (N-ACF) was studied in this research to determine the adsorption performance for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Subsequently, influence factors, adsorption isotherm models, kinetics and thermodynamic were investigated in a batch system to realize this adsorption. Experimental results showed that ACF modified by 0.1M nitric acid had a better removal ability than 2,4-D. Removal rate of 2,4-D by N-ACF was greatly influenced by pH with the optimum pH at 2. The superiority of the Langmuir isotherm model in describing the adsorption equilibrium was revealed by correlation coefficients R2 (R 2  ≥ 0.997). Furthermore, adsorption kinetics was well described by pseudo-second-order model. The results of thermodynamic showed that adsorption was a spontaneous, endothermic process with randomness increasing. Additionally, surface structure properties of adsorbent were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Specific surface area analysis of Brunauer, Emmett and Teller and Boehm's titration. It turned out that the micropore structure and functional groups on N-ACF all can contribute to the removal of 2,4-D.

  3. Influence of marinades on survival during storage of acid-adapted and nonadapted Listeria monocytogenes inoculated post-drying on beef jerky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calicioglu, Mehmet; Sofos, John N; Kendall, Patricia A

    2003-09-15

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the survival of acid-adapted and nonadapted Listeria monocytogenes inoculated post-drying on dried beef slices (beef jerky), which were treated (24 h, 4 degrees C) with the following marinades before drying at 60 degrees C for 10 h: (1) control (C), (2) traditional marinade (TM), (3) modified marinade; double the amount of TM with added 1.2% sodium lactate, 9% acetic acid, and 68% soy sauce with 5% ethanol (MM), (4) dipping into 5% acetic acid and then TM (AATM), and (5) dipping into 1% Tween 20 and then into 5% acetic acid followed by the TM (TWTM). Dried meat slices were inoculated with acid-adapted or nonadapted L. monocytogenes (ca. 5.7 log CFU/cm(2)) prior to aerobic storage at 25 degrees C for 60 days. Survivors were determined using tryptic soy agar with 0.1% pyruvate (TSAP) and PALCAM agar. Results showed that surviving bacterial populations on TWTM, AATM, and MM treatments were significantly (P or =0.05) difference in survival of previously acid-adapted and nonadapted bacterial populations in samples of TWTM, AATM, and MM treatments. However, bacterial populations that were nonadapted were significantly higher than those that were acid-adapted on products of C and TM treatments on days 60 and 24, respectively. The earliest complete elimination (enrichment negative) of the pathogen occurred by day 28 (AATM) in products inoculated with acid-adapted cultures and by day 42 (TWTM and AATM) in products inoculated with nonadapted cultures. These results indicate that use of modified marinades in jerky processing and low water activity provided antimicrobial effects against possible post-processing contamination with L. monocytogenes.

  4. Survival of Salmonella strains differing in their biofilm-formation capability upon exposure to hydrochloric and acetic acid and to high salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akio; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko; Kumagai, Susumu

    2011-09-01

    Acidic and osmotic treatments are part of hurdle systems to control pathogens such as Salmonella in food. In the current study, Salmonella enterica isolates previously shown to differ in their ability to form biofilms were grown in diluted tryptic soy broth (TSB) (1:5 dilution in distilled water) and subsequently exposed to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) adjusted to pH 3.0 with HCl, PBS adjusted to pH 3.9 with acetic acid or rice vinegar diluted 1:15 with distilled water (pH 3.9). Cells grown in diluted TSB were also exposed to distilled water, pH 7.6, containing 5 M NaCl. No differences in survival upon exposure to PBS adjusted to pH 3.0 with HCl or distilled water containing high salt were observed between the isolates; however, exposure to acetic acid and rice vinegar resulted in lower survival levels of isolates previously shown to be poor biofilm formers. The numbers (log(10) cfu/ml) of surviving cells after exposure for 36 hr to acetic acid and rice vinegar were 4.43 ± 0.24 vs. 2.27 ± 0.87 (Psurvival data could be fitted with the Weibull model. The data suggest that the ability of Salmonella strains to survive in the presence of acetic acid and rice vinegar parallels their ability to form biofilms. Thus, Salmonella with a high biofilm-formation capability might be more difficult to kill with acetic acid found in foods or cleaning solutions.

  5. Carnosic Acid and Carnosol, Two Major Antioxidants of Rosemary, Act through Different Mechanisms1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussouarn, Margot; Birtić, Simona

    2017-01-01

    Carnosic acid, a phenolic diterpene specific to the Lamiaceae family, is highly abundant in rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). Despite numerous industrial and medicinal/pharmaceutical applications of its antioxidative features, this compound in planta and its antioxidant mechanism have received little attention, except a few studies of rosemary plants under natural conditions. In vitro analyses, using high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet and luminescence imaging, revealed that carnosic acid and its major oxidized derivative, carnosol, protect lipids from oxidation. Both compounds preserved linolenic acid and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol from singlet oxygen and from hydroxyl radical. When applied exogenously, they were both able to protect thylakoid membranes prepared from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves against lipid peroxidation. Different levels of carnosic acid and carnosol in two contrasting rosemary varieties correlated with tolerance to lipid peroxidation. Upon reactive oxygen species (ROS) oxidation of lipids, carnosic acid was consumed and oxidized into various derivatives, including into carnosol, while carnosol resisted, suggesting that carnosic acid is a chemical quencher of ROS. The antioxidative function of carnosol relies on another mechanism, occurring directly in the lipid oxidation process. Under oxidative conditions that did not involve ROS generation, carnosol inhibited lipid peroxidation, contrary to carnosic acid. Using spin probes and electron paramagnetic resonance detection, we confirmed that carnosic acid, rather than carnosol, is a ROS quencher. Various oxidized derivatives of carnosic acid were detected in rosemary leaves in low light, indicating chronic oxidation of this compound, and accumulated in plants exposed to stress conditions, in parallel with a loss of carnosic acid, confirming that chemical quenching of ROS by carnosic acid takes place in planta. PMID:28916593

  6. Carnosic Acid and Carnosol, Two Major Antioxidants of Rosemary, Act through Different Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussouarn, Margot; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Svilar, Ljubica; Bily, Antoine; Birtić, Simona; Havaux, Michel

    2017-11-01

    Carnosic acid, a phenolic diterpene specific to the Lamiaceae family, is highly abundant in rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). Despite numerous industrial and medicinal/pharmaceutical applications of its antioxidative features, this compound in planta and its antioxidant mechanism have received little attention, except a few studies of rosemary plants under natural conditions. In vitro analyses, using high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet and luminescence imaging, revealed that carnosic acid and its major oxidized derivative, carnosol, protect lipids from oxidation. Both compounds preserved linolenic acid and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol from singlet oxygen and from hydroxyl radical. When applied exogenously, they were both able to protect thylakoid membranes prepared from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves against lipid peroxidation. Different levels of carnosic acid and carnosol in two contrasting rosemary varieties correlated with tolerance to lipid peroxidation. Upon reactive oxygen species (ROS) oxidation of lipids, carnosic acid was consumed and oxidized into various derivatives, including into carnosol, while carnosol resisted, suggesting that carnosic acid is a chemical quencher of ROS. The antioxidative function of carnosol relies on another mechanism, occurring directly in the lipid oxidation process. Under oxidative conditions that did not involve ROS generation, carnosol inhibited lipid peroxidation, contrary to carnosic acid. Using spin probes and electron paramagnetic resonance detection, we confirmed that carnosic acid, rather than carnosol, is a ROS quencher. Various oxidized derivatives of carnosic acid were detected in rosemary leaves in low light, indicating chronic oxidation of this compound, and accumulated in plants exposed to stress conditions, in parallel with a loss of carnosic acid, confirming that chemical quenching of ROS by carnosic acid takes place in planta. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights

  7. TRPV6 calcium channel translocates to the plasma membrane via Orai1-mediated mechanism and controls cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphaël, Maylis; Lehen'kyi, V'yacheslav; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Beck, Benjamin; Khalimonchyk, Sergiy; Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Farsetti, Leonardo; Germain, Emmanuelle; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Mihalache, Adriana; Gosset, Pierre; Romanin, Christoph; Clézardin, Philippe; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2014-09-16

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 6 (TRPV6) is a highly selective calcium channel that has been considered as a part of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Despite its first discovery in the early 2000s, the role of this channel in prostate cancer (PCa) remained, until now, obscure. Here we show that TRPV6 mediates calcium entry, which is highly increased in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism involving the translocation of the TRPV6 channel to the plasma membrane via the Orai1/TRPC1-mediated Ca(2+)/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway, partially contributing to SOCE. The TRPV6 calcium channel is expressed de novo by the PCa cell to increase its survival by enhancing proliferation and conferring apoptosis resistance. Xenografts in nude mice and bone metastasis models confirmed the remarkable aggressiveness of TRPV6-overexpressing tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of these demonstrated the increased expression of clinical markers such as Ki-67, prostate specific antigen, synaptophysin, CD31, and CD56, which are strongly associated with a poor prognosis. Thus, the TRPV6 channel acquires its oncogenic potential in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism via the Orai1-mediated Ca(2+)/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway.

  8. TRPV6 calcium channel translocates to the plasma membrane via Orai1-mediated mechanism and controls cancer cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphaël, Maylis; Lehen’kyi, V’yacheslav; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Beck, Benjamin; Khalimonchyk, Sergiy; Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Farsetti, Leonardo; Germain, Emmanuelle; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Mihalache, Adriana; Gosset, Pierre; Romanin, Christoph; Clézardin, Philippe; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 6 (TRPV6) is a highly selective calcium channel that has been considered as a part of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Despite its first discovery in the early 2000s, the role of this channel in prostate cancer (PCa) remained, until now, obscure. Here we show that TRPV6 mediates calcium entry, which is highly increased in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism involving the translocation of the TRPV6 channel to the plasma membrane via the Orai1/TRPC1-mediated Ca2+/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway, partially contributing to SOCE. The TRPV6 calcium channel is expressed de novo by the PCa cell to increase its survival by enhancing proliferation and conferring apoptosis resistance. Xenografts in nude mice and bone metastasis models confirmed the remarkable aggressiveness of TRPV6-overexpressing tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of these demonstrated the increased expression of clinical markers such as Ki-67, prostate specific antigen, synaptophysin, CD31, and CD56, which are strongly associated with a poor prognosis. Thus, the TRPV6 channel acquires its oncogenic potential in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism via the Orai1-mediated Ca2+/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway. PMID:25172921

  9. Using experimental studies and theoretical calculations to analyze the molecular mechanism of coumarin, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and cinnamic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tiane-Jye; Su, Chia-Ching; Chen, Chung-Yi; Liou, Chyong-Huey; Lu, Li-Hwa

    2005-05-01

    Three natural products, Coumarin ( 1), p-hydroxybenzoic acid ( 2), trans-cinnamic acid ( 3) were isolated from the natural plant of indigenous cinnamon and the structures including relative stereochemistry were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data and theoretical calculations. Their sterochemical structures were determined by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. The p-hydroxybenzoic acid complex with water is reported to show the existence of two hydrogen bonds. The two hydrogen bonds are formed in the water molecule of two hydrogen-accepting oxygen of carbonyl group of the p-hydroxybenzoic acid. The intermolecular interaction two hydrogen bond of the model system of the water- p-hydroxybenzoic acid was investigated. An experimental study and a theoretical analysis using the B3LYP/6-31G* method in the GAUSSIAN-03 package program were conducted on the three natural products. The theoretical results are supplemented by experimental data. Optimal geometric structures of three compounds were also determined. The calculated molecular mechanics compared quite well with those obtained from the experimental data. The ionization potentials, highest occupied molecular orbital energy, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, energy gaps, heat of formation, atomization energies, and vibration frequencies of the compounds were also calculated. The results of the calculations show that three natural products are stable molecules with high reactive and various other physical properties. The study also provided an explicit understanding of the sterochemical structure and thermodynamic properties of the three natural products.

  10. Long-term survival in elderly patients with a do-not-intubate order treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riario-Sforza GG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Scarpazza1, Cristoforo Incorvaia2, Paolo Amboni3, Giuseppe di Franco1, Stefania Raschi1, Pierfranco Usai1, Monica Bernareggi1, Cristiano Bonacina1, Chiara Melacini1, Roberta Cattaneo1, Serena Bencini1, Chiara Pravettoni2, Gian Galeazzo Riario-Sforza2, Gianni Passalacqua4, Walter Casali11Divisione di Broncopneumotisiologia, Ospedale Civile, Vimercate, Italy; 2Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, Milan, Italy; 3Clinical Chemistry Laboratory, Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo, Italy; 4Allergy and Respiratory Diseases, University Of Genoa, Genoa, ItalyBackground: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV is an effective tool in treating patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF, since it reduces both the need for endotracheal intubation and the mortality in comparison with nonventilated patients. A particular issue is represented by the outcome of NIMV in patients referred to the emergency department for ARF and with a do-not-intubate (DNI status because of advanced age or excessively critical conditions. This study evaluated long-term survival in a group of elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF who had a DNI order and who were successfully treated by NIMV.Methods: The population consisted of 54 patients with a favorable outcome after NIMV for ARF. They were followed up for 3 years by regular control visits, with at least one visit every 4 months, or as needed according to the patient’s condition. Of these, 31 continued NIMV at home and 23 were on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT alone.Results: A total of 16 of the 52 patients had not survived at the 1-year follow-up, and another eight patients died during the 3-year observation, with an overall mortality rate of 30.8% after 1 year and 46.2% after 3 years. Comparing patients who continued NIMV at home with those who were on LTOT alone, 9 of the 29 patients on home NIMV died (6 after 1 year and 3 after 3 years and 15 of the 23 patients on LTOT alone died (10 after 1

  11. Acidification and buffering mechanisms in acid sulfate soil wetlands of the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Fiona; Whitworth, Kerry L; Kappen, Peter; Baldwin, Darren S; Rees, Gavin N; Webb, John A; Silvester, Ewen

    2011-04-01

    The acid generation mechanisms and neutralizing capacities of sulfidic sediments from two inland wetlands have been studied in order to understand the response of these types of systems to drying events. The two systems show vastly different responses to oxidation, with one (Bottle Bend (BB) lagoon) having virtually no acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and the other (Psyche Bend (PB) lagoon) an ANC that is an order of magnitude greater than the acid generation potential. While BB strongly acidifies during oxidation the free acid generation is less than that expected from the measured proton production and consumption processes, with additional proton consumption attributed to the formation of an acid-anion (chloride) FeIII (oxyhydr)oxide product, similar to akaganéite (Fe(OH)2.7Cl0.3). While such products can partially attenuate the acidification of these systems, resilience to acidification is primarily imparted by sediment ANC.

  12. Occurrence and molecular characterization of fusidic acid resistance mechanisms among Staphylococcus spp. from European countries (2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, Mariana; Watters, Amy A; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N

    2010-07-01

    To determine fusidic acid resistance rates (MICs of > or = 2 mg/L) and the prevalence of fusidic acid resistance mechanisms among Staphylococcus spp. collected from European countries (2008). Staphylococcal isolates (3134) collected from Europe were tested by CLSI broth microdilution. Isolates displaying a fusidic acid MIC of > or = 2 mg/L (non-susceptible; European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing breakpoint) were tested for fusB, fusC and fusD. The fusidic acid target sites fusA and fusE were then sequenced, and a method for the detection of the fusA mutation L461K was developed. Selected isolates were typed by PFGE. Fusidic acid resistance rates were higher among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) compared with Staphylococcus aureus. Acquired fusidic acid resistance genes were detected in 64.9% of the samples; fusB and fusC were detected among 10.1% and 16.9% of the fusidic acid-resistant S. aureus and among 26.5% and 11.3% of the CoNS, respectively. Ireland and Greece showed the highest S. aureus fusidic acid resistance levels, with low rates of acquired fusidic acid resistance genes. Isolates from these countries displayed MIC values of > or = 512 mg/L, the presence of the elongation factor G L461K alteration and clonal occurrences. Low S. aureus fusidic acid resistance rates (1%-3%) were observed in Germany, Israel, Italy, Poland, Spain and Sweden. Isolates with MIC values < or = 64 mg/L showed a great diversity of acquired fusidic acid resistance mechanisms. Acquired fusidic acid resistance genes were detected in the majority of fusidic acid-resistant isolates from Belgium, France, Switzerland, Sweden, Italy and the UK (72.2%-92.9%), and were slightly less frequent in Germany, Spain and Israel (61.3%-66.7%). This contemporary study showed that acquired fusidic acid resistance genes were prevalent among fusidic acid-non-susceptible European staphylococcal isolates.

  13. Review: Mechanisms of How the Intestinal Microbiota Alters the Effects of Drugs and Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-10-01

    Information on the intestinal microbiota has increased exponentially this century because of technical advancements in genomics and metabolomics. Although information on the synthesis of bile acids by the liver and their transformation to secondary bile acids by the intestinal microbiota was the first example of the importance of the intestinal microbiota in biotransforming chemicals, this review will discuss numerous examples of the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota alters the pharmacology and toxicology of drugs and other chemicals. More specifically, the altered pharmacology and toxicology of salicylazosulfapridine, digoxin, l-dopa, acetaminophen, caffeic acid, phosphatidyl choline, carnitine, sorivudine, irinotecan, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heterocyclic amines, melamine, nitrazepam, and lovastatin will be reviewed. In addition, recent data that the intestinal microbiota alters drug metabolism of the host, especially Cyp3a, as well as the significance and potential mechanisms of this phenomenon are summarized. The review will conclude with an update of bile acid research, emphasizing the bile acid receptors (FXR and TGR5) that regulate not only bile acid synthesis and transport but also energy metabolism. Recent data indicate that by altering the intestinal microbiota, either by diet or drugs, one may be able to minimize the adverse effects of the Western diet by altering the composition of bile acids in the intestine that are agonists or antagonists of FXR and TGR5. Therefore, it may be possible to consider the intestinal microbiota as another drug target. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. The effect of fluid mechanical stress on cellular arachidonic acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Rhee, B. G.; Eskin, S. G.; Hall, E. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of sublytic levels of mechanical perturations of cells on cell metabolism were investigated by analyzing the products of arachidonic acid (used as a marker metabolite) in blood platelets, polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and cultured umbilical-vein endothelial cells after the suspensions of these cells were subjected to a shear stress in a modified viscometer. It is shown that the sublytic levels of mechanical stress stimulated the arachidonic acid metabolism in all these cell types. Possible biological implications of this stress-metabolism coupling are discussed.

  15. Addition of L-ascorbic acid to culture and vitrification media of IVF porcine blastocysts improves survival and reduces HSPA1A levels of vitrified embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Martín, Miriam; Yeste, Marc; Soler, Albert; Morató, Roser; Bonet, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of L-ascorbic acid on embryo quality and gene expression of porcine blastocysts after supplementations of in vitro culture medium and/or vitrification-warming media. Embryo quality, in terms of total cell number (TCN), DNA fragmentation and peroxide levels, together with the relative transcript abundance of BCL-2 associated X protein (BAX), BCL2-like 1 (BCL2L1), POU class 5 homeobox 1 (POU5F1) and heat shock protein 70 (HSPA1A), was analysed. In Experiment 1, gene expression and embryo quality of fresh blastocysts were evaluated after culture with or without L-ascorbic acid; no significant differences were observed between the groups. In Experiment 2, blastocysts cultured with or without L-ascorbic acid were vitrified using two different vitrification solutions, supplemented or not with L-ascorbic acid. Supplementation of culture and vitrification media significantly enhanced survival rates and reduced peroxide levels. No significant differences in TCN, DNA fragmentation and BAX, BCL2L1 and POU5F1 expression were found in vitrified blastocysts among experimental groups. Vitrification procedures increase HSPA1A transcript abundance, but this increase was significantly lower in embryos cultured and/or vitrified with L-ascorbic acid. Thus, supplementing culture and/or vitrification media with L-ascorbic acid enhances survival rates of porcine blastocysts, suggesting a relationship with HSPA1A expression.

  16. Improved survival with ursodeoxycholic acid prophylaxis in allogeneic stem cell transplantation: long-term follow-up of a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruutu, Tapani; Juvonen, Eeva; Remberger, Mats; Remes, Kari; Volin, Liisa; Mattsson, Jonas; Nihtinen, Anne; Hägglund, Hans; Ringdén, Olle

    2014-01-01

    We report the long-term results of a prospective randomized study on the use of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) for prevention of hepatic complications after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Two hundred forty-two patients, 232 with malignant disease, were randomized to receive (n = 123) or not to receive (n = 119) UDCA from the beginning of the conditioning until 90 days post-transplantation. The results were reported after 1-year follow-up. UDCA administration reduced significantly the proportion of patients developing high serum bilirubin levels as well as the incidence of severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), liver GVHD, and intestinal GVHD. In the UDCA prophylaxis group, nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was lower and overall survival better than in the control group. After a 10-year follow-up, the difference in the survival and NRM in favor of the UDCA-treated group, seen at 1 year, was maintained (survival 48% versus 38%, P = .037; NRM 28% versus 41%, P = .01). A landmark analysis in patients surviving at 1 year post-transplantation showed no significant differences between the study groups in the long-term follow-up in chronic GVHD, relapse rate, NRM, disease-free survival, or overall survival. These long-term results continue to support the useful role of UDCA in the prevention of transplant-related complications in allogeneic transplantation. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antigen-specific killer polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres can prolong alloskin graft survival in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Fang, Kun; Wang, Xiaobing; Li, Miaochen; Wu, You; Chen, Feng; Shahzad, Khawar Ali; Gu, Ning; Shen, Chuanlai

    2015-01-01

    The strategy of specifically depleting antigen-specific T cells can potentially be used for the treatment of allograft rejection and autoimmunity because it does not suppress the overall immune systems. In this study, we generated killer polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres by covalently coupling major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens and apoptosis-inducing anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (mAb) onto PLGA microspheres. A modified double-emulsion method was used for the preparation of cell-sized PLGA microspheres. H-2K(b)/peptide monomers were generated in-house and analyzed through flow cytometry. The killer PLGA microspheres were administered intravenously into BALB/c mice (H-2K(d)) that had previously been grafted with skin squares from C57BL/6 mice (H-2K(b)). Tumor cell challenge and third-party mixed lymphocyte culture were used to assess the general immune functions of host. The alloskin graft survival was prolonged by 4 days. The killer PLGA microspheres could specifically deplete the H-2K(b) alloantigen-reactive CD8(+) T cells that infiltrated into the alloskin graft but not CD4(+) T cells, without impairment of host overall immune function. Here, we initially report that PLGA microspheres, which have been widely used as medicine-delivering carriers, were used to prepare antigen-specific killer complexes and treat allograft rejection. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of this biocompatible and biodegradable antigen-specific killer effector for the treatment of allograft rejection and autoimmune disease.

  18. d-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD) as a Model of Psychosis: Mechanism of Action and Pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Danilo De Gregorio; Stefano Comai; Luca Posa; Gabriella Gobbi

    2016-01-01

    d-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD) is known for its hallucinogenic properties and psychotic-like symptoms, especially at high doses. It is indeed used as a pharmacological model of psychosis in preclinical research. The goal of this review was to understand the mechanism of action of psychotic-like effects of LSD. We searched Pubmed, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar and articles’ reference lists for preclinical studies regarding the mechanism of action involved in the psychotic-like eff...

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC-1118 enhances the survivability of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 in an acidic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Phebe Lixuan; Toh, Mingzhan; Liu, Shao Quan

    2015-08-01

    The present study attempted to partially characterize and elucidate the viability-enhancing effect of a yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC-1118 on a probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 under acidic conditions using a model system (non-growing cells). The yeast was found to significantly enhance (P yeast concentrations. Microscopic observation and co-aggregation assay revealed that the viability-enhancing effect of the yeast could be attributed to direct cell-cell contact co-aggregation mediated by yeast cell surface and/or cell wall components or metabolites. Furthermore, non-viable yeast cells killed by thermal means were observed to enhance the viability of the probiotic strain as well, suggesting that the surface and/or cell wall component(s) of the yeast contributing to co-aggregation was heat-stable. Cell-free yeast supernatant was also found to enhance the viability of the probiotic strain, indicating the presence of protective yeast metabolite(s) in the supernatant. These findings laid the foundation for further understanding of the mechanism(s) involved and for developing novel microbial starter cultures possibly without the use of live yeast for ambient-stable high-moisture probiotic foods.

  20. Tannic acid modulates excitability of sensory neurons and nociceptive behavior and the Ionic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Huiran; Zhou, Najing; Xu, Jiaxi; Si, Man; Jia, Zhanfeng; Du, Xiaona; Zhang, Hailin

    2015-10-05

    M/Kv7 K(+) channels, Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs) and voltage gated Na(+) channels expressed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) play an important role in nociception. Tannic acid has been proposed to be involved in multiple beneficial health effects; tannic acid has also been described to be analgesic. However the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of tannic acid on M/Kv7 K(+), Na(+) currents and CaCCs, and the effects on bradykinin-induced nociceptive behavior. A perforated patch technique was used. The bradykinin-induced rat pain model was used to assess the analgesic effect of tannic acid. We demonstrated that tannic acid enhanced M/Kv7 K(+) currents but inhibited bradykinin-induced activation of CaCC/TMEM16A currents in rat small DRG neurons. Tannic acid potentiated Kv7.2/7.3 and Kv7.2 currents expressed in HEK293B cells, with an EC50 of 7.38 and 5.40 µM, respectively. Tannic acid inhibited TTX-sensitive and TTX-insensitive currents of small DRG neurons with IC50 of 5.25 and 8.43 µM, respectively. Tannic acid also potently suppressed the excitability of small DRG neurons. Furthermore, tannic acid greatly reduced bradykinin-induced pain behavior of rats. This study thus demonstrates that tannic acid is an activator of M/Kv7 K(+) and an inhibitor of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and CaCC/TMEM16A, which may underlie its inhibitory effects on excitability of DRG neurons and its analgesic effect. Tannic acid could be a useful agent in treatment of inflammatory pain conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatic arthritis and burn pain. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Insights into the mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Minhua; Yao, Rui; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Chen, Yifei, E-mail: yfchen@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The scission of C–OH bond of acetic acid is the rate-determined step in acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111). • Acetic acid adsorption and reaction barrier of C–OH scission of acetic acid are factors related to acetic acid conversion. • Acetaldehyde adsorption and reaction barriers of O–H formation of C{sub 2}–oxygenates are factors related to ethanol selectivity. - Abstract: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to theoretically explain the reaction mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu catalyst. The activation barriers of key elementary steps and the adsorption configurations of key intermediates involved in acetic acid hydrogenation on Cu(111) surface were investigated. The results indicated that the direct dissociation of acetic acid to acetyl (CH{sub 3}COOH → CH{sub 3}CO + OH) is the rate-determined step. The activation barrier of acetic acid scission to acetyl and the adsorption energy of acetic acid are two descriptors which could determine the conversion of acetic acid. The descriptors might have effects on the ethanol selectivity including: the adsorption energy of acetaldehyde and the activation barriers for O−H bond formation of C{sub 2}-oxygenates (CH{sub 3}CO + H → CH{sub 3}COH, CH{sub 3}CHO + H → CH{sub 3}CHOH and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O + H → CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH). These proposed descriptors could be used as references to design new Cu-based catalysts that have excellent catalytic performance.

  2. Amino Acids Regulate mTORC1 by an Obligate Two-step Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachok, Julia; Earnest, Svetlana; Iturraran, Erica N.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) coordinates cell growth with its nutritional, hormonal, energy, and stress status. Amino acids are critical regulators of mTORC1 that permit other inputs to mTORC1 activity. However, the roles of individual amino acids and their interactions in mTORC1 activation are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that activation of mTORC1 by amino acids includes two discrete and separable steps: priming and activation. Sensitizing mTORC1 activation by priming amino acids is a prerequisite for subsequent stimulation of mTORC1 by activating amino acids. Priming is achieved by a group of amino acids that includes l-asparagine, l-glutamine, l-threonine, l-arginine, l-glycine, l-proline, l-serine, l-alanine, and l-glutamic acid. The group of activating amino acids is dominated by l-leucine but also includes l-methionine, l-isoleucine, and l-valine. l-Cysteine predominantly inhibits priming but not the activating step. Priming and activating steps differ in their requirements for amino acid concentration and duration of treatment. Priming and activating amino acids use mechanisms that are distinct both from each other and from growth factor signaling. Neither step requires intact tuberous sclerosis complex of proteins to activate mTORC1. Concerted action of priming and activating amino acids is required to localize mTORC1 to lysosomes and achieve its activation. PMID:27587390

  3. Biologically Safe Poly(l-lactic acid) Blends with Tunable Degradation Rate: Microstructure, Degradation Mechanism, and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hideko T; Tanishima, Daisuke; Ogawa, Ryohei

    2017-04-10

    Although poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) is reputed to be biodegradable in the human body, its hydrophobic nature lets it persist for ca. 5.5 years. This study demonstrates that biologically safe lactide copolymers, poly(aspartic acid-co-l-lactide) (PAL) and poly(malic acid-co-l-lactide) (PML), dispersed in the PLLA function as detonators (triggers) for its hydrolytic degradation under physiological conditions. The copolymers significantly enhance hydrolysis, and consequently, the degradation rate of PLLA becomes easily tunable by controlling the amounts of PAL and PML. The present study elucidates the effects of uniaxial drawing on the structural development, mechanical properties, and hydrolytic degradation under physiological conditions of PLLA blend films. At initial degradation stages, the mass loss was not affected by uniaxial drawing; however, at late degradation stages, less developed crystals as well as amorphous chains were degradable at low draw ratio (DR), whereas not only highly developed crystals but also the oriented amorphous chains became insensitive to hydrolysis at high DR. Our work provides important molecular level results that demonstrate that biodegradable materials can have superb mechanical properties and also disappear in a required time under physiological conditions.

  4. Acetalization of 2-Hydroxybenzaldehyde mechanism using halogen acid catalysts based on ab initio methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Muhammad; Roza, Destria; Nasution, Ahmad Kamil

    2017-11-01

    The computational calculation was performed on the acetalization of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde by using ab initio method. Ab initio method is derived directly from theoretical principles with no inclusion of experimental data and this is an approximate quantum mechanical calculation. The aim of this research was to studies the acetalization of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde mechanism using halogen acid catalysts. Computational calculation which was applied on the acetalization of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde using halogen acid catalysts provided possible reaction steps. The first step was formation of a labile hemiacetal because it is essentially tetrahedral intermediates containing a leaving group. The second step was formation of a stable acetal. The results of computational calculation of acetalization of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde provided possible energy change in the each step of the reaction process. A labile hemiacetal showed higher energy (481.04 kJ/mol) than 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde dimethyl acetal (65.32 kJ/mol) and 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde (0 kJ/mol) due to its instability. In general, acetalization of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde reaction is a reversible reaction. The effect of Lewis acidity on halogen acid catalysts was also studied in this research. Based on the Mulliken charge on the H atom, it is found that HF has the highest Lewis acidity compared to other halogen acids with order HF> HCl> HBr> HI. As a result, HF was the efficient catalysts for acetalization of 2-Hydroxybenzaldehyde.

  5. Drug insight: Mechanisms and sites of action of ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuers, Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) exerts anticholestatic effects in various cholestatic disorders. Several potential mechanisms and sites of action of UDCA have been unraveled in clinical and experimental studies, which could explain its beneficial effects. The relative contribution of these mechanisms to the anticholestatic action of UDCA depends on the type and stage of the cholestatic injury. In early-stage primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, protection of injured cholangiocytes against the toxic effects of bile acids might prevail. Stimulation of impaired hepatocellular secretion by mainly post-transcriptional mechanisms, including stimulation of synthesis, targeting and apical membrane insertion of key transporters, seems to be relevant in more advanced cholestasis. In intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, stimulation of impaired hepatocellular secretion could be crucial for rapid relief of pruritus and improvement of serum liver tests, as it is in some forms of drug-induced cholestasis. In cystic fibrosis, stimulation of cholangiocellular calcium-dependent secretion of chloride and bicarbonate ions could have a major impact. Inhibition of bile-acid-induced hepatocyte apoptosis can have a role in all states of cholestasis that are characterized by hepatocellular bile-acid retention. Different mechanisms of action could, therefore, contribute to the beneficial effect of UDCA under various cholestatic conditions.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of formic and oxalic acids ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 112; Issue 2. Kinetics and ... Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by quinolinium fluorochromate (QFC) have been studied in dimethylsulphoxide. The main ... K Banerji1. Department of Chemistry, JNV University, Jodhpur 342 005, India ...

  7. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward D Bonnevie

    Full Text Available When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants.

  8. Mechanisms underlying the anti-aging and anti-tumor effects of lithocholic bile acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlia-Ciommo, Anthony; Piano, Amanda; Svistkova, Veronika; Mohtashami, Sadaf; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2014-09-18

    Bile acids are cholesterol-derived bioactive lipids that play essential roles in the maintenance of a heathy lifespan. These amphipathic molecules with detergent-like properties display numerous beneficial effects on various longevity- and healthspan-promoting processes in evolutionarily distant organisms. Recent studies revealed that lithocholic bile acid not only causes a considerable lifespan extension in yeast, but also exhibits a substantial cytotoxic effect in cultured cancer cells derived from different tissues and organisms. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the robust anti-aging and anti-tumor effects of lithocholic acid have emerged. This review summarizes the current knowledge of these mechanisms, outlines the most important unanswered questions and suggests directions for future research.

  9. Thermal and Mechanical Characteristics of Polymer Composites Based on Epoxy Resin, Aluminium Nanopowders and Boric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The epoxy polymers are characterized by low thermal stability and high flammability. Nanoparticles are considered to be effective fillers of polymer composites for improving their thermal and functional properties. In this work, the epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, polyethylene polyamine as a hardener, aluminum nanopowder and boric acid fine powder as flame-retardant filler. The thermal characteristics of the obtained samples were studied using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical characteristics of epoxy composites were also studied. It was found that an addition of all fillers enhances the thermal stability and mechanical characteristics of the epoxy composites. The best thermal stability showed the epoxy composite filled with boric acid. The highest flexural properties showed the epoxy composite based on the combination of boric acid and aluminum nanopowder.

  10. The Effect of Sorbic Acid on the Survival oOf Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus on Shredded Cheddar and Mozzarella Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Alison K'Ann

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of sorbic acid in inhibiting Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus on shredded cheddar and mozzarella cheese over 70 days storage. Samples of cheese were inoculated and placed into bags with a sorbic acid (0, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.3 %) and anti caking agent mixture and stored at 10â aC. Each variable was enumerated after 0,14,28,42,56, and 70 days of storage. Survival of E....

  11. The enhancement mechanism of glycolic acid on the formation of atmospheric sulfuric acid-ammonia molecular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijie; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Zhang, Xiuhui; Molinero, Valeria; Zhang, Yunhong; Li, Zesheng

    2017-05-01

    Highly oxidized multifunctional organic molecules, which span a wide range of low volatilities, are capable of driving particle formation as well as the initial growth of particles in the atmosphere. However, their participant mechanism in new particle formation still remains largely ambiguous. Here we present an investigation of the potentially participant mechanism of the simplest hydroxyl acid, glycolic acid (GA) on clusters formation by sulfuric acid (SA) and ammonia (A). Density functional theory calculations at the M062X/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory combining with atmospheric cluster dynamics code simulations of (𝐒𝐀)xṡ𝐀yṡ(𝐆𝐀)z cluster (y≤x + z ≤ 3) systems at different temperatures (298, 278, 258, 238, and 218 K) give direct evidence of the enhancement effect of GA on the formation rates of SA-A-based clusters at high concentration of GA and T = 238 K and 218 K. Moreover, within GA's enhancement concentrations, the enhancement strength R of GA presents a positive dependence on its atmospheric concentrations and a negative dependence on temperature. A competitive relationship between SA and GA has been identified through the negative dependence of R on the concentrations of SA. The influence of A on R is more complex that R first increases, reaching a maximum value, and then decreases with the increasing concentration of A. Finally, the combination of the traced growth paths of the system with the enhancement strength of GA suggests a "catalytic" enhancement mechanism of GA where GA acts as a mediate bridge for the formation of pure SA-A-based clusters.

  12. Blood-brain barrier permeability and brain uptake mechanism of kainic Acid and dihydrokainic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gynther, Mikko; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2015-01-01

    tools in various in vivo central nervous system disease models in rodents, as well as being templates in the design of novel ligands affecting the glutamatergic system. Both molecules are highly polar but yet capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We used an in situ rat brain perfusion...... technique to determine the brain uptake mechanism and permeability across the BBB. To determine KA and DHK concentrations in the rat brain, simple and rapid sample preparation and liquid chromatography mass spectrometer methods were developed. According to our results the BBB permeability of KA and DHK...... is low, 0.25 × 10(-6) and 0.28 × 10(-6) cm/s for KA and DHK, respectively. In addition, the brain uptake is mediated by passive diffusion, and not by active transport. Furthermore, the non-specific plasma and brain protein binding of KA and DHK was determined to be low, which means that the unbound drug...

  13. Atmospheric sulphuric acid and aerosol formation: implications from atmospheric measurements for nucleation and early growth mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the formation and early growth of atmospheric secondary aerosol particles building on atmospheric measurements. The measurements were part of the QUEST 2 campaign which took place in spring 2003 in Hyytiälä (Finland. During the campaign numerous aerosol particle formation events occurred of which 15 were accompanied by gaseous sulphuric acid measurements. Our detailed analysis of these 15 events is focussed on nucleation and early growth (to a diameter of 3 nm of fresh particles. It revealed that new particle formation seems to be a function of the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration to the power from one to two when the time delay between the sulphuric acid and particle number concentration is taken into account. From the time delay the growth rates of freshly nucleated particles from 1 nm to 3 nm were determined. The mean growth rate was 1.2 nm/h and it was clearly correlated with the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration. We tested two nucleation mechanisms – recently proposed cluster activation and kinetic type nucleation – as possible candidates to explain the observed dependences, and determined experimental nucleation coefficients. We found that some events are dominated by the activation mechanism and some by the kinetic mechanism. Inferred coefficients for the two nucleation mechanisms are the same order of magnitude as chemical reaction coefficients in the gas phase and they correlate with the product of gaseous sulphuric acid and ammonia concentrations. This indicates that besides gaseous sulphuric acid also ammonia has a role in nucleation.

  14. A medium-chain fatty acid, capric acid, inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation via the suppression of NF-κB signaling and blocks cytoskeletal organization and survival in mature osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids, important components of a normal diet, have been reported to play a role in bone metabolism. Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells that are responsible for many bone-destructive diseases such as osteoporosis. In this study, we investigated the impact of a medium-chain fatty acid, capric acid, on the osteoclast differentiation, function, and survival induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF). Capric acid inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow-derived macrophages and suppressed RANKL-induced IκBα phosphorylation, p65 nuclear translocation, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Capric acid further blocked the RANKL-stimulated activation of ERK without affecting JNK or p38. The induction of NFATc1 in response to RANKL was also attenuated by capric acid. In addition, capric acid abrogated M-CSF and RANKL-mediated cytoskeleton reorganization, which is crucial for the efficient bone resorption of osteoclasts. Capric acid also increased apoptosis in mature osteoclasts through the induction of Bim expression and the suppression of ERK activation by M-CSF. Together, our results reveal that capric acid has inhibitory effects on osteoclast development. We therefore suggest that capric acid may have potential therapeutic implications for the treatment of bone resorption-associated disorders.

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of N-chlorosaccharin oxidation of malic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic study of N-chlorosaccharin (NCSA oxidation of malic acid (MA in aqueous acetic acid medium in presence of perchloric acid has been investigated. The reactions exhibit first-order dependency in oxidant and HClO4 while order varies from one to zero in substrate. The reactions are acid catalyzed and retarded by the addition of saccharin, a byproduct of reaction. The rate of oxidation decreases with decrease in dielectric constant of the medium. The effect of temperature on the reaction has been investigated in the temperature range 313-333 K. The stochiometric studies revealed 1:1 mole ratio. Various thermodynamic parameters have been computed and a possible operative mechanism is proposed.

  16. Reduction of Heart Rate by Omega-3 Fatty Acids and the Potential Underlying Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xuan Kang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An elevated resting heart rate is one of the strongest predictors of cardiovascular mortality and is independently associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD. Agents capable of reducing heart rate without significant side effects are therefore of particular interest for the prevention of SCD. Recent human and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids can reduce heart rate. Our work has shown that omega-3 fatty acids significantly reduce membrane electrical excitability of the cardiac myocyte by lowering its resting membrane potential and the duration of the refractory period through inhibition of ion channels. We propose that these actions may be the underlying mechanisms for the omega-3 fatty acid-induced reduction of heart rate observed in both humans and animals. The heart rate-lowering capability of omega-3 fatty acids may contribute to their preventive effect against SCD.

  17. Characteristics of the high malic acid production mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strain No. 28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shunichi; Tabata, Ken; Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Mitsuiki, Shinji; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi

    2012-09-01

    We characterized a high malic acid production mechanism in sake yeast strain No. 28. No considerable differences in the activity of the enzymes that were involved in malic acid synthesis were observed between strain No. 28 and its parent strain, K1001. However, compared with strain K1001, which actively took up rhodamine 123 during staining, the cells of strain No. 28 were only lightly stained, even when cultured in high glucose concentrations. In addition, malic acid production by the respiratory-deficient strain of K1001 was 2.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type K1001 and wild-type No. 28. The findings of this study demonstrated that the high malic acid production by strain No. 28 is attributed to the suppression of mitochondrial activity. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Mechanisms for the retention of inorganic N in acidic forest soils of southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-bo; Cai, Zu-cong; Zhu, Tong-bin; Yang, Wen-yan; Müller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the retention of inorganic N in acidic forest soils in southern China are not well understood. Here, we simultaneously quantified the gross N transformation rates of various subtropical acidic forest soils located in southern China (southern soil) and those of temperate forest soils located in northern China (northern soil). We found that acidic southern soils had significantly higher gross rates of N mineralization and significantly higher turnover rates but a much greater capacity for retaining inorganic N than northern soils. The rates of autotrophic nitrification and NH3 volatilization in acidic southern soils were significantly lower due to low soil pH. Meanwhile, the relatively higher rates of NO3− immobilization into organic N in southern soils can counteract the effects of leaching, runoff, and denitrification. Taken together, these processes are responsible for the N enrichment of the humid subtropical forest soils in southern China. PMID:23907561

  19. Cloud droplet activation mechanisms of amino acid aerosol particles: insight from molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric amino acids constitute a large fraction of water-soluble organic nitrogen compounds in aerosol particles, and have been confirmed as effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN materials in laboratory experiments. We present a molecular dynamics (MD study of six amino acids with different structures and chemical properties that are relevant to the remote marine atmospheric aerosol–cloud system, with the aim of investigating the detailed mechanism of their induced changes in surface activity and surface tension, which are important properties for cloud drop activation. Distributions and orientations of the amino acid molecules are studied; these l-amino acids are serine (SER, glycine (GLY, alanine (ALA, valine (VAL, methionine (MET and phenylalanine (PHE and are categorised as hydrophilic and amphiphilic according to their affinities to water. The results suggest that the presence of surface-concentrated amphiphilic amino acid molecules give rise to enhanced Lennard–Jones repulsion, which in turn results in decreased surface tension of a planar interface and an increased surface tension of the spherical interface of droplets with diameters below 10 nm. The observed surface tension perturbation for the different amino acids under study not only serves as benchmark for future studies of more complex systems, but also shows that amphiphilic amino acids are surface active. The MD simulations used in this study reproduce experimental results of surface tension measurements for planar interfaces and the method is therefore applicable for spherical interfaces of nano-size for which experimental measurements are not possible to conduct.

  20. [Regulating acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-07-04

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, pharmaceutical and other industries. Acid stress is one the important survival challenges encountered by lactic acid bacteria both in fermentation process and in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, the development of systems biology and metabolic engineering brings unprecedented opportunity for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and improving the acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria. This review addresses physiological mechanisms of lactic acid bacteria during acid stress. Moreover, strategies to improve the acid stress resistance of lactic acid were proposed.

  1. Valproic acid reduces hair loss and improves survival in patients receiving temozolomide-based radiation therapy for high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yui; Suehiro, Satoshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Tanaka, Mamoru; Tanaka, Akihiro; Ohue, Shiro; Araki, Hiroaki

    2017-03-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, is also used to manage seizures in glioblastoma patients. HDAC inhibitors can protect normal cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiotherapy, and VPA is reported to improve the survival of glioblastoma patients receiving chemoradiation therapy. VPA also promotes hair growth, and thus has the potential to reduce the radiotherapy side effect of hair loss while improving the survival of patients with glioblastoma. The purpose of this study was to determine whether VPA use during radiotherapy for high-grade glioma is associated with decreased side effects of radiotherapy and an improvement in overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Medical records of 112 patients with high-grade glioma were retrospectively reviewed. We grouped patients by VPA use or non-use during radiotherapy, and evaluated hair loss, OS, and PFS. The radiation dose and fractionation at the onset of hair loss were 4 Gy and two fractions higher, respectively, in the VPA group compared with the VPA non-use group (P hair loss and improvement in survival. Hair loss prevention benefits patients suffering from the deleterious effects of radiation.

  2. Ursolic acid inhibits the initiation, progression of prostate cancer and prolongs the survival of TRAMP mice by modulating pro-inflammatory pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu K Shanmugam

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men worldwide. In this study, using transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP mice, the effect of diet enriched with 1% w/w ursolic acid (UA was investigated to evaluate the stage specific chemopreventive activity against prostate cancer. We found that TRAMP mice fed with UA diet for 8 weeks (weeks 4 to 12 delayed formation of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN. Similarly, mice fed with UA diet for 6 weeks (weeks 12 to 18 inhibited progression of PIN to adenocarcinoma as determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Finally, TRAMP mice fed with UA diet for 12 weeks (weeks 24 to 36 demonstrated markedly reduced tumor growth without any significant effects on total body weight and prolonged overall survival. With respect to the molecular mechanism, we found that UA down-regulated activation of various pro-inflammatory mediators including, NF-κB, STAT3, AKT and IKKα/β phosphorylation in the dorsolateral prostate (DLP tissues that correlated with the reduction in serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6. In addition, UA significantly down-regulated the expression levels of cyclin D1 and COX-2 but up-regulated the levels of caspase-3 as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue sections. Finally, UA was detected in serum samples obtained from various mice groups fed with enriched diet in nanogram quantity indicating that it is well absorbed in the GI tract. Overall, our findings provide strong evidence that UA can be an excellent agent for both the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer.

  3. TolC is important for bacterial survival and oxidative stress response in Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis in an acidic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jen-Jie; Wu, Ying-Chen; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chen, Ter-Hsin

    2016-09-25

    The outer membrane protein TolC, which is one of the key components of several multidrug efflux pumps, is thought to be involved in various independent systems in Enterobacteriaceae. Since the acidic environment of the stomach is an important protection barrier against foodborne pathogen infections in hosts, we evaluated whether TolC played a role in the acid tolerance of Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis. Comparison of the acid tolerance of the tolC mutant and the parental wild-type strain showed that the absence of TolC limits the ability of Salmonella to sustain life under extreme acidic conditions. Additionally, the mutant exhibited morphological changes during growth in an acidic medium, leading to the conflicting results of cell viability measured by spectrophotometry and colony-forming unit counting. Reverse-transcriptional-PCR analysis indicated that acid-related molecules, apparatus, or enzymes and oxidation-induced factors were significantly affected by the acidic environment in the null-tolC mutant. The elongated cellular morphology was restored by adding antioxidants to the culture medium. Furthermore, we found that increased cellular antioxidative activity provides an overlapping protection against acid killing, demonstrating the complexity of the bacterial acid stress response. Our findings reinforce the multifunctional characteristics of TolC in acid tolerance or oxidative stress resistance and support the correlative protection mechanism between oxygen- and acid-mediated stress responses in Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanism of Asp24 Upregulation in Brucella abortus Rough Mutant with a Disrupted O-Antigen Export System and Effect of Asp24 in Bacterial Intracellular Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Peng, Daxin

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that Brucella abortus rough mutant strain 2308 ΔATP (called the ΔrfbE mutant in this study) exhibits reduced intracellular survival in RAW264.7 cells and attenuated persistence in BALB/c mice. In this study, we performed microarray analysis to detect genes with differential expression between the ΔrfbE mutant and wild-type strain S2308. Interestingly, acid shock protein 24 gene (asp24) expression was significantly upregulated in the ΔrfbE mutant compared to S2308, as confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Further studies using additional strains indicated that the upregulation of asp24 occurred only in rough mutants with disrupted O-antigen export system components, including the ATP-binding protein gene rfbE (bab1_0542) and the permease gene rfbD (bab1_0543), while the ΔwboA rough mutant (which lacks an O-antigen synthesis-related glycosyltransferase) and the RB51 strain (a vaccine strain with the rough phenotype) showed no significant changes in asp24 expression compared to S2308. In addition, abolishing the intracellular O-antigen synthesis of the ΔrfbE mutant by deleting the wboA gene (thereby creating the ΔrfbE ΔwboA double-knockout strain) recovered asp24 expression. These results indicated that asp24 upregulation is associated with intracellular O-antigen synthesis and accumulation but not with the bacterial rough phenotype. Further studies indicated that asp24 upregulation in the ΔrfbE mutant was associated neither with bacterial adherence and invasion nor with cellular necrosis on RAW264.7 macrophages. However, proper expression of the asp24 gene favors intracellular survival of Brucella in RAW264.7 cells and HeLa cells during an infection. This study reveals a novel mechanism for asp24 upregulation in B. abortus mutants. PMID:24752516

  5. Docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid suppress adhesion molecule expression in human aortic endothelial cells via differential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Ying; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Chiang, An-Na

    2015-04-01

    Dietary PUFAs modulate the progression of cardiovascular disease, but the underlying mechanisms within vascular cells remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological function and regulatory mechanisms of PUFAs in LPS-activated human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). To simulate the in vivo conditions of atherosclerosis, we have established an in vitro model in which THP-1 monocytes adhere to HAECs. Our results showed that n-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) remarkably attenuated the adhesion of THP-1 cells to HAECs, probably through inhibiting the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Using lipid raft isolation and confocal microscopy, we found that DHA and EPA suppressed the translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts. Furthermore, DHA and EPA inhibited the ubiquitination and translocation of TRAF6, and the phosphorylation of TAK1, p38, and IκBα. We demonstrated that DHA reduced the phosphorylation of PKR, but EPA increased the expression of A20. Additionally, silencing of A20 reversed the inhibitory effect of EPA on the expression of adhesion molecules. Our study revealed differential signaling pathways modulated by n-3 PUFAs in LPS-stimulated HAECs. These signaling pathways are potential targets for the prevention of atherosclerotic progression. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. On the mechanism of a polyunsaturated fatty acid double bond isomerase from Propionibacterium acnes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liavonchanka, Alena; Rudolph, Markus G; Tittmann, Kai; Hamberg, Mats; Feussner, Ivo

    2009-03-20

    The catalytic mechanism of Propionibacterium acnes polyunsaturated fatty acid isomerase (PAI) is explored by kinetic, spectroscopic, and thermodynamic studies. The PAI-catalyzed double bond isomerization takes place by selective removal of the pro-R hydrogen from C-11 followed by suprafacial transfer of this hydrogen to C-9 as shown by conversion of C-9-deuterated substrate isotopologs. Data on the midpoint potential, photoreduction, and cofactor replacement suggest PAI to operate via an ionic mechanism with the formation of FADH(2) and linoleic acid carbocation as intermediates. In line with this proposal, no radical intermediates were detected neither by stopped flow absorption nor by EPR spectroscopy. The substrate preference toward free fatty acids is determined by the interaction between Arg-88 and Phe-193, and the reaction rate is strongly affected by replacement of these amino acids, indicating that the efficiency of the hydrogen transfer relies on a fixed distance between the free carboxyl group and the N-5 atom of FAD. Combining data obtained for PAI from the structural studies and experiments described here suggests that at least two different prototypical active site geometries exist among polyunsaturated fatty acid double bond isomerases.

  7. Mechanism of Body Weight Reducing Effect of Oral Boric Acid Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Aysan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The effect of oral boric acid intake on reducing body weight has been previously demonstrated although the mechanism has been unclear. This research study reveals the mechanism. Subjects. Twelve mice were used, in groups of six each in the control and study groups. For five days, control group mice drank standard tap water while during the same time period the study group mice drank tap water which contains 0.28 mg/250 mL boric acid. After a 5-day period, gene expression levels for uncoupling proteins (UCPs in the white adipose tissue (WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT, and skeletal muscle tissue (SMT and total body weight changes were analyzed. Results. Real time PCR analysis revealed no significant change in UCP3 expressions, but UCP2 in WAT (: 0.0317, BAT (: 0.014, and SMT (: 0.0159 and UCP1 in BAT (: 0.026 were overexpressed in the boric acid group. In addition, mice in the boric acid group lost body weight (mean 28.1% while mice in the control group experienced no weight loss but a slight weight gain (mean 0.09%, . Conclusion. Oral boric acid intake causes overexpression of thermogenic proteins in the adipose and skeletal muscle tissues. Increasing thermogenesis through UCP protein pathway results in the accelerated lipolysis and body weight loss.

  8. Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of glutaraldehyde crosslinked bovine pericardium followed by glutamic acid treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Goissis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Major problems with valve bioprostheses are associated with progressive structural deterioration and calcification, directly associated with the use of glutaraldehyde (GA. This work describes the effects of GA processing and borate/glutamic acid buffer treatment on the mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of 0.5% GA crosslinked bovine pericardium (BP. The results showed that while the treatment of 0.5% GA crosslinked BP with borate/glutamic acid significantly improves the mechanical properties, it had no visible effect on surface morphology. Better surface preservation was only achieved for BP pre-treated with a lower GA concentration followed by the conventional treatment (0.5% GA. Improvements in mechanical properties probably arises from structural changes probably involving the depolymerization of polymeric GA crosslinks and an increase electrostatic interaction due to covalent binding of glutamic acid to free carbonyl groups (Schiff base.The results indicate that the treatment GA crosslinked BP with borate/glutamic acid buffer may be an attractive procedure for the manufacture of heart valve bioprostheses.

  9. The mechanism of MAP kinase activation under acidic condition in feline esophageal smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Lee, Young Ju; Min, Youngsil; Kim, Hak Rim; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2011-10-01

    Reflux esophagitis results from repeated exposure of the esophagus to acidic gastric juice or bile-containing duodenal contents. In Barrett's adenocarcinoma, acid increases proliferation via ERK and p38 MAPK activation. This study was focused on determination of the mechanism(s) underlying MAPKs (ERK 1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK) activation induced by acidic medium at pH 4 in normal feline primary cultured esophageal smooth muscle cells (FESMCs). We detected ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation after exposure to pH 4 or neutral media in the presence or absence of several inhibitors and quantified the MAPK levels using western blotting analysis and densitometry. Acidic medium markedly increased the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK within 10 min. Acid-induced ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK activation was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX-sensitive G(i/o) protein inhibitor), DEDA (phospholipase (PL) A(2) inhibitor), ρCMB (PLD inhibitor), GF109203X (protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor) and D609 (phosphatidylcholine-specific PLC inhibitor). But, genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor), forskolin (adenylate cyclase activator) and U73122 (phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC inhibitor) had no effect on acid-induced ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK activation. These findings indicate that the activation of ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways by acidic conditions, at least in part, may be mediated by activation of the G(i/o) protein coupled receptors, PC-PLC, PLD, PLA(2), and PKC in FESMCs.

  10. Short communication: Latin-style fresh cheese enhances lactic acid bacteria survival but not Listeria monocytogenes resistance under in vitro simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C C G; Domingos-Lopes, M F P; Magalhães, V A F; Freitas, D A S R; Coelho, M C; Rosa, H J D; Dapkevicius, M L N E

    2015-07-01

    Different studies in humans have provided evidence about the health benefits of probiotics. However, most probiotic strains do not maintain good viability in the harsh conditions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). In the present study, Latin-style fresh cheese produced with potential probiotic bacteria was tested to evaluate this cheese type as a food carrier for the delivery of viable microorganisms after exposure to simulated GIT conditions. The resistance of 28 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains and Listeria monocytogenes upon exposure to acidic conditions (pH 2.5) and bile and pancreatic enzymes (0.3% of bile salts and 0.1% of pancreatin) was evaluated in vitro. When compared with fresh cultures, fresh cheese greatly improved LAB survival to simulated GIT conditions, as no loss of viability was observed in either acidic conditions (pH 2.5) or bile salts and pancreatin environment over a 3-h period. In opposition, L. monocytogenes did not survive after 1h under acidic conditions. These data demonstrated that Latin-style fresh cheese could play an important role in probiotic protection against gastrointestinal juices, enhancing delivery within the gut and thereby maximizing potential health benefits of LAB. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Asiatic acid protects against cognitive deficits and reductions in cell proliferation and survival in the rat hippocampus caused by 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornthip Chaisawang

    Full Text Available The chemotherapy drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, has been reported to cause cognitive impairments in cancer patients. The drug also reduces cell proliferation and survival in the brain. Asiatic acid (AA is a triterpene compound found in Centella asiatica that can protect against reduction of neurogenesis in the hippocampus and memory deficits induced by valproic acid (VPA. In the present study, we investigated the preventive effects of AA on the deficits in spatial working memory and cell proliferation and survival caused by 5-FU chemotherapy in a rat model. Male Sprague Dawley rats received 5-FU (5 i.v. injections, 25 mg/kg on day 8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 of the study. This was co-administered with AA (30 mg/kg, oral gavage tube either 20 days before receiving 5-FU (preventive, after receiving 5-FU (recovery, or for the entire period of the experiment (throughout. Spatial working memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL test and hippocampal cell proliferation and survival of dividing cells were quantified using immunohistochemistry. Rats in the 5-FU alone and recovery groups showed memory deficits in the NOL test and reductions in cell proliferation and cell survival in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Rats in the control, AA alone, and both preventive and throughout co-administration groups, however, did not exhibit these characteristics. The results showed that 5-FU chemotherapy impaired memory and reduced cell proliferation and cell survival in the SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, these impairments in the animals receiving 5-FU chemotherapy were restored to control levels when AA was co-administered before and during 5-FU treatment. These data demonstrate that AA can prevent the spatial working memory and hippocampal neurogenesis impairments caused by 5-FU chemotherapy.

  12. Insights into the mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minhua; Yao, Rui; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming; Chen, Yifei

    2017-08-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to theoretically explain the reaction mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu catalyst. The activation barriers of key elementary steps and the adsorption configurations of key intermediates involved in acetic acid hydrogenation on Cu(111) surface were investigated. The results indicated that the direct dissociation of acetic acid to acetyl (CH3COOH → CH3CO + OH) is the rate-determined step. The activation barrier of acetic acid scission to acetyl and the adsorption energy of acetic acid are two descriptors which could determine the conversion of acetic acid. The descriptors might have effects on the ethanol selectivity including: the adsorption energy of acetaldehyde and the activation barriers for Osbnd H bond formation of C2-oxygenates (CH3CO + H → CH3COH, CH3CHO + H → CH3CHOH and CH3CH2O + H → CH3CH2OH). These proposed descriptors could be used as references to design new Cu-based catalysts that have excellent catalytic performance.

  13. Survival of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria on fermented green table olives during packaging in polyethylene pouches at 4 and 20 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blana, Vasiliki A; Polymeneas, Napoleon; Tassou, Chrysoula C; Panagou, Efstathios Z

    2016-02-01

    The survival of selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with in vitro probiotic potential was studied during storage of cv. Halkidiki green olives previously subjected to inoculated Spanish-style fermentation. After fermentation olives were packed in polyethylene pouches, covered with freshly prepared brine (9%, w/v, NaCl), acidified with 2‰ (w/v) citric acid and 1.5‰ (w/v) ascorbic acid, and stored at 4 and 20 °C for 357 days. Four packing treatments were studied, namely olives previously fermented by (i) the indigenous microbiota (control); (ii) Lactobacillus pentosus B281; (iii) Lactobacillus plantarum B282; and (iv) a co-culture of both LAB strains. Microbiological analyses were performed on the olives in parallel with physicochemical changes (pH, titratable acidity, salt content, aw and colour) at the early (day 1), middle (day 197) and final stage (day 357) of storage, as well as sensory evaluation at the end of the storage. The survival of probiotic strains was confirmed by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). LAB decreased throughout storage reaching a final population of ca. 3.5-4.0 log CFU/g and 4.5-5.0 log CFU/g at 4 and 20 °C, respectively. The pH values ranged between 3.90 and 4.61 during storage depending on packaging condition. PFGE analysis revealed that L. pentosus B281 and L. plantarum B282 showed a high survival rate with a recovery of 100 and 96%, respectively, at 4 °C, and less than 20% for both strains at 20 °C. Finally, in the packing treatment with a co-culture of both strains, L. pentosus dominated over L. plantarum throughout storage at both temperatures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Aromatic Aldehydes by Imidazolium Dichromate in Aqueous Acetic Acid Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sheik Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde (BA and para-substituted benzaldehydes by imidazolium dichromate (IDC has been studied in aqueous acetic acid medium in the presence of perchloric acid. The reaction is first order each in [IDC], [Substrate] and [H+]. The reaction rates have been determined at different temperatures and the activation parameters calculated. Electron withdrawing substituents are found to increase the reaction and electron releasing substituents are found to retard the rate of the reaction and the rate data obey the Hammett relationship. The products of the oxidation are the corresponding acids. The rate decreases with the increase in the water content of the medium. A suitable mechanism is proposed.

  15. Identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of retinoid X and retinoic acid receptors via quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Motonori; Shudo, Koichi; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Understanding and identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of a ligand is an important issue in the field of drug discovery. Using a combination of classical molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical calculations, this report assesses the receptor subtype selectivity for the human retinoid X receptor (hRXR) and retinoic acid receptor (hRAR) ligand-binding domains (LBDs) complexed with retinoid ligands. The calculated energies show good correlation with the experimentally reported binding affinities. The technique proposed here is a promising method as it reveals the origin of the receptor subtype selectivity of selective ligands.

  16. Mechanical dyssynchrony evaluated by tissue Doppler cross-correlation analysis is associated with long-term survival in patients after cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Williams, Eric S; Khouri, Michel G

    2013-01-01

    -max was independently associated with improved survival when adjusted for QRS > 150 ms and aetiology {hazard ratio (HR) 0.35 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16-0.77], P = 0.01}. Maximal activation delay performed significantly better than Yu index, OWD, and the presence of left bundle branch block (P ..., for difference between parameters). In subgroup analysis, patients without dyssynchrony and QRS between 120 and 150 ms showed a particularly poor survival [HR 4.3 (95% CI 1.46-12.59), P QRS between 120 and 150 ms]. Conclusion Mechanical dyssynchrony assessed...... by AD-max was associated with long-term survival after CRT and was significantly better associated compared with other TDI-derived indices. Patients without dyssynchrony and QRS between 120 and 150 ms had a particularly poor prognosis. These results indicate a valuable role for XCA in selection of CRT...

  17. Study on the Effects of Adipic Acid on Properties of Dicyandiamide-Cured Electrically Conductive Adhesive and the Interaction Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Wan, Chao; Fu, Yonggao; Chen, Hongtao; Liu, Xiaojian; Li, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    A small quantity of adipic acid was found to improve the performance of dicyandiamide-cured electrically conductive adhesive (ECA) by enhancing its electrical conductivity and mechanical properties. The mechanism of action of the adipic acid and its effects on the ECA were examined. The results indicated that adipic acid replaced the electrically insulating lubricant on the surface of the silver flakes, which significantly improved the electrical conductivity. Specifically, one of the acidic functional groups in adipic acid reacted with the silver flakes, and an amidation reaction occurred between the other acidic functional group in adipic acid and the dicyandiamide, which participated in the curing reaction. Therefore, adipic acid may act as a coupling agent to improve the overall ECA performance.

  18. In vitro studies on the effect of pH and volatile fatty acid concentration, as influenced by diet, on the survival of inoculated nonacid- and acid-adapted Salmonella in bovine rumen fluid and feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Declan J; Kelly, Shane; Lenahan, Mary; Fanning, Seamus

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pH and volatile fatty acids concentrations, as influenced by bovine diet, on the survival of Salmonella in inoculated rumen fluid and feces, thus providing preliminary data on the potential application of dietary manipulation as a preharvest control strategy to reduce Salmonella contamination at slaughter. The in vitro survival of nonacid- and acid-adapted (AA) Salmonella cocktails (Salmonella serovars: Dublin, Enteritidis, Newport, Typhimurium, and Typhimurium DT104) in rumen fluid and feces, collected from fistulated cattle fed five different diets ([1] grass, [2] grass + concentrate, [3] grass silage, [4] hay, and [5] a high grain diet), was examined at 6°C and 15°C (feces) and at 37°C (rumen fluid). The pH of the rumen fluid ranged from 5.77 to 6.61 and the feces from 6.86 to 7.06. Salmonella D-values in rumen fluid were statistically similar, regardless of dietary source. Although prolonged survival (up to 84 days) was observed in feces, diet did affect survival with significantly (p Salmonella in cattle.

  19. On the Mechanism of a Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Double Bond Isomerase from Propionibacterium acnes*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Liavonchanka, Alena; Rudolph, Markus G.; Tittmann, Kai; Hamberg, Mats; Feussner, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic mechanism of Propionibacterium acnes polyunsaturated fatty acid isomerase (PAI) is explored by kinetic, spectroscopic, and thermodynamic studies. The PAI-catalyzed double bond isomerization takes place by selective removal of the pro-R hydrogen from C-11 followed by suprafacial transfer of this hydrogen to C-9 as shown by conversion of C-9-deuterated substrate isotopologs. Data on the midpoint potential, photoreduction, and cofactor replacement suggest PA...

  20. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Menthol by Potassium Bromate in Acidic Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikant na; Ms. Meena; Shrikant Sharma

    2014-01-01

    No suitable method is available for the estimation of menthol, hence in all kinetic results reported in this chapter, menthol was in excess over potassium bromate and the stoichiometry was also determined under the experimental conditions where menthol (substrate) was in excess over potassium bromate (oxidant). Present study was focused on the analysis of kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of neomenthol by potassium bromate in acidic medium. For oxidizing neomenthol, potassium bromate stock ...

  1. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Neomenthol by Potassium Bromate in Acidic Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikant na

    2014-01-01

    Present study was focused on the analysis of kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of neomenthol by potassium bromate in acidic medium. For oxidizing neomenthol, potassium bromate stock solution (5.0×10─2 mol. dm─3) was prepared by dissolving exactly weighed quantity of potassium bromate in doubly distilled water. The suitable reaction mixtures were prepared and left at 313 K for over 24 hours to ensure complete oxidation of neomenthol15. The unreacted potassium bromate was determined iodometri...

  2. Effects of all Trans Retinoic Acid Combined with Cisplatin on Survival of Gastric Cancer Cell Line (AGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Najafzadeh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: All-trans retinoic acid, a derivative of retinoids, is widely used to in-duce prolifferation, differentiation and apoptosis in normal, precancareous and cancerous cells. Cisplatin, an effective drug for cancer treatment, induces apoptosis via cross-linking to DNA. Previous studies on ovarian and melanoma cancer cells have showed synergistic ef-fects of cisplatin and retinoic acid. Our aim is to study such synergistic effect on gastric de-rived cell line, AGS. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study gastric cancer cell line was cultured with dif-ferent concentration of retinoic acid and cisplatin and their combination. The cell death was evaluated with clonogenic assay and Acridine Orange/ Ethidium Bromide staining. Results: The results showed that all-trans retinoic acid had not significant effect on cell death in gastric cancer. The results showed that high doses of retinoic acid and cisplatin can cause cell death via necrosis and early apoptosis, respectively. The plates were treated with the combination of 10 µM retinoic acid and 5, 10 µg cisplatin, and more cell death were ob-served (P<0.001. It seems that, suseptability of this cell line to retinoic acid is dose depend-ent. Conclusion: In this study, we concluded that the combination of retinoic acid and cisplatin was more effective on cell death than cisplatin and retinoic acid alone. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (3:207-214

  3. Better Rooting Procedure to Enhance Survival Rate of Field Grown Malaysian Eksotika Papaya Transformed with 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylic Acid Oxidase Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekeli, Rogayah; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Muda, Pauziah; Abu Bakar, Umi Kalsom

    2013-01-01

    A high survival rate for transformed papaya plants when transferred to the field is useful in the quest for improving the commercial quality traits. We report in this paper an improved rooting method for the production of transformed Malaysian Eksotika papaya with high survival rate when transferred to the field. Shoots were regenerated from embryogenic calli transformed with antisense and RNAi constructs of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) genes using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Regenerated transformed shoots, each measuring approximately 3-4 cm in height, were cultured in liquid half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium or sterile distilled water, and with either perlite or vermiculite supplementation. All the culturing processes were conducted either under sterile or nonsterile condition. The results showed that rooting under sterile condition was better. Shoots cultured in half-strength MS medium supplemented with vermiculite exhibited a 92.5% rooting efficiency while perlite showed 77.5%. The survival rate of the vermiculite-grown transformed papaya plantlets after transfer into soil, contained in polybags, was 94%, and the rate after transfer into the ground was 92%. Morpho-histological analyses revealed that the tap roots were more compact, which might have contributed to the high survival rates of the plantlets. PMID:25969786

  4. Boron stress activates the general amino acid control mechanism and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irem Uluisik

    Full Text Available Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance.

  5. Boron stress activates the general amino acid control mechanism and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluisik, Irem; Kaya, Alaattin; Fomenko, Dmitri E; Karakaya, Huseyin C; Carlson, Bradley A; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS) of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance.

  6. Boron Stress Activates the General Amino Acid Control Mechanism and Inhibits Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluisik, Irem; Kaya, Alaattin; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS) of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance. PMID:22114689

  7. Effects of submergence on growth and survival of saplings of three wetland trees differing in adaptive mechanisms for flood tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Iwanaga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Withstanding total submergence and reaeration following submergence is essential for the survival and establishment of wetland species. We focused on “LOES–low oxygen escape syndrome” and “LOQS–low oxygen quiescence syndrome” and compared tolerances to total submergence among wetland woody species differing in morphological adaptation to soil flooding. Area of study, materials and methods: This study examined the survival of 2-year-old saplings of Taxodium distichum and Metasequioia glyptostroboides (LOQS species, and Alnus japonica (LOES species, during and after total submergence. Saplings were completely submerged, then de-submerged to determine trends in survival and growth Main results: The M. glyptostroboides and A. japonica saplings could not survive prolonged submergence for more than 8 weeks, whereas saplings of T. distichum survived for over 2 years. Submerged saplings of all species showed no significant growth or modifications in morphology and anatomy under water, such as shoot elongation, adventitious root formation, and/or aerenchyma development. All T. distichum saplings that were de-submerged in the second year had the same pattern of shoot growth regardless of differences in timing and seasonality of de-submergence. Wood formation in T. distichum saplings ceased during submergence and resumed after de-submergence in spring and summer, but not in autumn. Research highlights: T. distichum saplings, which survived longer submergence periods than A. japonica and M. glyptostroboides, had physiological characteristics, such as suspension of growth and metabolism, which allowed survival of protracted total submergence (at least 2 years when saplings were immersed during the dormant stage before leaf flushing.

  8. Browning inhibition mechanisms by cysteine, ascorbic acid and citric acid, and identifying PPO-catechol-cysteine reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hussein M; El-Gizawy, Ahmed M; El-Bassiouny, Rawia E I; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-06-01

    The titled compounds were examined as PPO inhibitors and antibrowning agents; their various mechanisms were investigated and discussed. All compounds reduced significantly both the browning process and PPO activity. Browning index gave strong correlation with PPO activity (r(2) = 0.96, n = 19) indicating that the browning process is mainly enzymatic. Ascorbic acid could reduce the formed quinone instantly to the original substrate (catechol) at high concentration (>1.5 %) while at lower concentrations acted as competitive inhibitor (KI = 0.256 ± 0.067 mM). Cysteine, at higher concentrations (≥1.0 %), reacted with the resulted quinone to give a colorless products while at the low concentrations, cysteine worked as competitive inhibitor (KI = 1.113 ± 0.176 mM). Citric acid acted only as PPO non-competitive inhibitor with KI = 2.074 ± 0.363 mM. The products of PPO-catechole-cysteine reaction could be separation and identification by LC-ESI-MS. Results indicated that the product of the enzymatic oxidation of catechol, quinone, undergoes two successive nucleophilic attacks by cysteine thiol group. Cysteine was condensed with the resulted mono and dithiocatechols to form peptide side chains.

  9. Characteristics and mechanism of explosive reactions of Purex solvents with Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Teijiro [Radiation Application Development Association, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Takada, Junichi; Koike, Tadao; Tsukamoto, Michio; Watanabe, Koji [Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ida, Masaaki [JGC PLANTECH CO., LTD (Japan); Nakagiri, Naotaka [JGC Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, Gunji [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    This investigation was undertaken to make clear the energetic properties and mechanism of explosive decomposition of Purex solvent systems (TBP/n-Dodecane/HNO{sub 3}) by Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures using a calorimetric technique (DSC, ARC) and a chromatographic technique (GC, GC/MS). The measurement of exothermic events of solvent-HNO{sub 3} reactions using DSC with a stainless steel sealed cell showed distinct two peaks with maxima at around 170 and 320degC, respectively. The peak at around 170degC was mainly attributed to the reactions of dealkylation products (n-butyl nitrate) of TBP and the solvent with nitric acid, and the peak at around 320degC was attributed to the exothermic decomposition of nitrated dodecanes formed in the foregoing exothermic reaction of dodecane with nitric acid. By using the data obtained in ARC experiments, activation energies of 123.2 and 152.5 kJ/mol were determined for the exothermic reaction of TBP with nitric acid and for the exothermic pyrolysis of n-butyl nitrate, respectively. Some possible pathways were considered for the explosive decomposition of TBP by nitric acid at elevated temperatures. (author)

  10. Recent advances in understanding trans-epithelial acid-base regulation and excretion mechanisms in cephalopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Marian Y; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Tseng, Yung-Che

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods have evolved complex sensory systems and an active lifestyle to compete with fish for similar resources in the marine environment. Their highly active lifestyle and their extensive protein metabolism has led to substantial acid-base regulatory abilities enabling these organisms to cope with CO2 induced acid-base disturbances. In convergence to teleost, cephalopods possess an ontogeny-dependent shift in ion-regulatory epithelia with epidermal ionocytes being the major site of embryonic acid-base regulation and ammonia excretion, while gill epithelia take these functions in adults. Although the basic morphology and excretory function of gill epithelia in cephalopods were outlined almost half a century ago, modern immunohistological and molecular techniques are bringing new insights to the mechanistic basis of acid-base regulation and excretion of nitrogenous waste products (e.g. NH3/NH4 (+)) across ion regulatory epithelia of cephalopods. Using cephalopods as an invertebrate model, recent findings reveal partly conserved mechanisms but also novel aspects of acid-base regulation and nitrogen excretion in these exclusively marine animals. Comparative studies using a range of marine invertebrates will create a novel and exciting research direction addressing the evolution of pH regulatory and excretory systems.

  11. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  12. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  13. Mechanisms of volatile production from sulfur-containing amino acids by irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uk Ahn, Dong; Joo Lee, Eun; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Wangang; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jo, Cheorun; Nam, Kichang

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids were used to study the mechanisms of off-odor production in meat by irradiation. Irradiation not only increased the amounts of volatiles but also produced many new volatiles from sulfur-containing amino acid monomers. We speculate that the majority of the volatiles were the direct radiolytic products of the side chains, but Strecker degradation as well as deamination and decarboxylation of radiolytic products were also involved in the production of volatile compounds from sulfur amino acids. The volatile compounds produced in amino acids were not only the primary products of irradiation, but also the products of secondary chemical reactions after the primary compounds were produced. Cysteine and methionine produced odor characteristics similar to that of the irradiated meat, but the amounts of sulfur volatiles from methionine were far greater than that of cysteine. Although the present study was carried out using an amino acid model system, the information can be applied to the quality indexes of irradiated meats as well as other food products.

  14. [Forming mechanism of humic acid-kaolin complexes and the adsorption of trichloroethylene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-jing; He, Jiang-tao; Su, Si-hui

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between soil organic components and mineral components was explored in this study. Humic acid and kaolin were used for the preparation of organic-mineral complexes with different contents of organic matter, for experimental study of the adsorption of trichloroethylene. The results showed that the adsorption of trichlorethylene fitted the Freundlich isotherm model. The existence of interaction between humic acid and kaolin was indicated by the significant difference between the actual value and the theoretically overlaid value of the adsorption capacity. With various characterizations, such as FTIR and surface area & pore analysis, the mechanism of interaction between humic acid and kaolin was suggested as follows. When their contents were low, humic acid molecules firstly loaded on the surface binding sites of kaolin. Then with the content increased, as O/M( organic-mineral mass ratio) was 0.02-0.04, some surface pores of kaolin were filled by part of the molecules. After reaching a relatively stable stage, as O/M was 0.04-0.08, humic molecules continued to load on the surface of kaolin and formed the first humic molecule-layer. With humic acid content continued increasing, as O/M was 0.08-0.10, more humic molecules attached to kaolin surface through the interaction with the first layer of molecules and then formed the second layer. O/M was 0.10-0.16 as the whole second layer stage, meanwhile the first layer was compressed. Then when O/M was 0.16-0.4, there were still some humic loadings onto the second layer as the third layer, and further compressed the inner humic acid layers. Besides, some humic acid molecules or aggregates might go on attaching to form as further outer layer.

  15. Effect of dietary (n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids on growth and survival of fat snook (Centropomus parallelus, Pisces: Centropomidae larvae during first feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiffert M.E.B.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of rotifers, Brachionus rotundiformis (S-type, fed three different diets: A (rotifer fed Nannochloropsis oculata, B (rotifer fed N. oculata and baker's yeast, 1:1, and C (rotifer fed N. oculata and baker's yeast, 1:1, and enriched with Selcoâ, was evaluated based on the survival, growth and swim bladder inflation rate of fat snook larvae. Rotifers of treatment A had higher levels (4.58 mg/g dry weight of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA than B (1.81 mg/g dry weight, and similar levels (0.04 and 0.06 mg/g dry weight, respectively of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Rotifers of treatment C had the highest levels of EPA (13.2 mg/g dry weight and DHA (6.08 mg/g dry weight. Fat snook eggs were obtained by spawning induction with human chorionic gonadotropin. Thirty hours after hatching, 30 larvae/liter were stocked in black cylindric-conical tanks (36-liter capacity. After 14 days of culture, there were no significant differences among treatments. Mean standard length was 3.13 mm for treatment A, 3.17 mm for B, and 3.39 mm for C. Mean survival rates were very low (2.7% for treatment A, 2.3% for B, and 1.8% for C. Swim bladder inflation rates were 34.7% for treatment A, 27.1% for B, and 11.9% for C. The lack of differences in growth and survival among treatments showed that the improvement of the dietary value of rotifer may not have been sufficient to solve the problem of larval rearing. Some other factor, probably pertaining to the quality of the larvae, may have negatively influenced survival.

  16. Microbial production of amino acid-modified spider dragline silk protein with intensively improved mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haibo; Zhou, Fengli; Jiang, Xinglin; Cao, Mingle; Wang, Shilu; Zou, Huibin; Cao, Yujin; Xian, Mo; Liu, Huizhou

    2016-08-17

    Spider dragline silk is a remarkably strong fiber with impressive mechanical properties, which were thought to result from the specific structures of the underlying proteins and their molecular size. In this study, silk protein 11R26 from the dragline silk protein of Nephila clavipes was used to analyze the potential effects of the special amino acids on the function of 11R26. Three protein derivatives, ZF4, ZF5, and ZF6, were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis, based on the sequence of 11R26, and among these derivatives, serine was replaced with cysteine, isoleucine, and arginine, respectively. After these were expressed and purified, the mechanical performance of the fibers derived from the four proteins was tested. Both hardness and average elastic modulus of ZF4 fiber increased 2.2 times compared with those of 11R26. The number of disulfide bonds in ZF4 protein was 4.67 times that of 11R26, which implied that disulfide bonds outside the poly-Ala region affect the mechanical properties of spider silk more efficiently. The results indicated that the mechanical performances of spider silk proteins with small molecular size can be enhanced by modification of the amino acids residues. Our research not only has shown the feasibility of large-scale production of spider silk proteins but also provides valuable information for protein rational design.

  17. Mechanism of Amide Bond Formation from Carboxylic Acids and Amines Promoted by 9-Silafluorenyl Dichloride Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuan-Ye; Zhu, Ling; Liang, Yujie; Man, Xiaoping; Bi, Siwei

    2017-09-01

    The couplings of carboxylic acids and amines promoted by dichlorosilane derivatives provide a promising tool for amide synthesis and peptide coupling, in which an unprecedented mechanism was proposed for the amide bond formation process. To investigate this mechanistic proposal and enrich the understanding of this novel reaction, a theoretical study was conducted herein. The formation and interconversion of silylamine and silyl ester intermediates were calculated to be kinetically feasible under the experiment conditions. However, the subsequent amidation via direct elimination on the AcO-Si(L)(L')-NHMe intermediate was found to involve a high energy barrier due to the formation of an unstable silanone. By contrast, the in situ generated salts can promote the amidation process by generating a silanol as the temporary product. Similarly, the anhydride formation mechanism can proceed via direct elimination or salt-assisted elimination on the AcO-Si(L)(L')-OAc intermediate but is less favorable. Finally, we found that the intermolecular nucleophilic addition on the AcO-Si(L)(L')-Cl intermediate is the most favorable mechanism among all the candidates considered. In this mechanism, carboxylic acids or bases can act as self-catalysts to promote the amide bond formation via hydrogen bonding, and the formation of the unstable silanone or anhydride is avoided.

  18. A novel collector 2-ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid: Flotation performance and adsorption mechanism to ilmenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Haifeng; Zhong, Hong, E-mail: zhongh@csu.edu.cn; Tang, Qing; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Gang; Liu, Guangyi, E-mail: guangyiliu@csu.edu.cn

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: EHHA's synthesis route, flotation performance and coadsorption molecule–ion mechanism to ilmenite. - Highlights: • 2-Ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid (EHHA) was synthesized and characterized. • EHHA showed stronger affinity to ilmenite. • EHHA might chemisorb onto ilmenite surfaces by form of five-membered chelates. • EHHA might adsorb onto ilmenite surfaces through molecule–ion coadsorption model. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel collector, 2-ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid (EHHA) was prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectra. The flotation performance and adsorption mechanism of EHHA to ilmenite were investigated by micro-flotation tests, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, FTIR spectra, zeta potential and solution chemistry analyses. The micro-flotation results indicated that EHHA exhibited superior flotation performance compared to isooctyl hydroximic acid (IOHA) and octyl hydroxamic acid (OHA), and floated out 84.03% ilmenite at pH 8.0 with 250 mg/L dosage. The analyses of FTIR spectra and zeta potential demonstrated that EHHA might chemisorb onto ilmenite surfaces by form of five-membered chelates. The solution chemistry analyses further inferred that at pH 6.3–10.5, both Fe and Ti species on ilmenite surfaces could chelate EHHA. DFT calculation results implied EHHA owned the strongest affinity to ilmenite among the three C{sub 8} hydroximic acids. To discern the sharply improving floatability of ilmenite at pH 8–10, a schematic co-adsorption molecule–ion model of EHHA on ilmenite surfaces was suggested.

  19. Depletion of retinoic acid receptors initiates a novel positive feedback mechanism that promotes teratogenic increases in retinoic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico D'Aniello

    Full Text Available Normal embryonic development and tissue homeostasis require precise levels of retinoic acid (RA signaling. Despite the importance of appropriate embryonic RA signaling levels, the mechanisms underlying congenital defects due to perturbations of RA signaling are not completely understood. Here, we report that zebrafish embryos deficient for RA receptor αb1 (RARαb1, a conserved RAR splice variant, have enlarged hearts with increased cardiomyocyte (CM specification, which are surprisingly the consequence of increased RA signaling. Importantly, depletion of RARαb2 or concurrent depletion of RARαb1 and RARαb2 also results in increased RA signaling, suggesting this effect is a broader consequence of RAR depletion. Concurrent depletion of RARαb1 and Cyp26a1, an enzyme that facilitates degradation of RA, and employment of a novel transgenic RA sensor line support the hypothesis that the increases in RA signaling in RAR deficient embryos are the result of increased embryonic RA coupled with compensatory RAR expression. Our results support an intriguing novel mechanism by which depletion of RARs elicits a previously unrecognized positive feedback loop that can result in developmental defects due to teratogenic increases in embryonic RA.

  20. Heterotrimeric G proteins-mediated resistance to necrotrophic pathogens includes mechanisms independent of salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid/ethylene- and abscisic acid-mediated defense signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusov, Yuri; Sewelam, Nasser; Rookes, James Edward; Kunkel, Matt; Nowak, Ekaterina; Schenk, Peer Martin; Botella, José Ramón

    2009-04-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are involved in the defense response against necrotrophic fungi in Arabidopsis. In order to elucidate the resistance mechanisms involving heterotrimeric G proteins, we analyzed the effects of the Gβ (subunit deficiency in the mutant agb1-2 on pathogenesis-related gene expression, as well as the genetic interaction between agb1-2 and a number of mutants of established defense pathways. Gβ-mediated signaling suppresses the induction of salicylic acid (SA)-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, ethylene (ET)- and abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent genes during the initial phase of the infection with Fusarium oxysporum (up to 48 h after inoculation). However, at a later phase it enhances JA/ET-dependent genes such as PDF1.2 and PR4. Quantification of the Fusarium wilt symptoms revealed that Gβ- and SA-deficient mutants were more susceptible than wild-type plants, whereas JA- and ET-insensitive and ABA-deficient mutants demonstrated various levels of resistance. Analysis of the double mutants showed that the Gβ-mediated resistance to F. oxysporum and Alternaria brassicicola was mostly independent of all of the previously mentioned pathways. However, the progressive decay of agb1-2 mutants was compensated by coi1-21 and jin1-9 mutations, suggesting that at this stage of F. oxysporum infection Gβ acts upstream of COI1 and ATMYC2 in JA signaling. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Linoleic acid absorption in the unanesthetized rat: mechanism of transport and influence of luminal factors on absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, S L; Hollander, D

    1979-04-01

    Linoleic acid intestinal absorption was studied in the unanesthetized rat. At low (21-1260 micrometer) intraluminal concentrations, absorption took place by facilitated diffusion; while at high (1.26-2.5 mM) concentrations, simple diffusion was the predominant mechanism of transport. At low concentrations (840 micrometer), the equimolar additions of oleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids or lecithin inhibited the absorption of linoleic acid. Substitution of potassium for sodium in the buffer solution, substitution of Tween 80 for sodium taurocholate, or decrease in the hydrogen ion concentration all resulted in decreased rate of linoleic acid absorption. Increase in sodium taurocholate concentration, or perfusate flow rate increased linoleic acid's absorption. These experiments demonstrate that linoleic acid is absorbed by a concentration-dependent dual mechanism of transport. The absorption rate is modified by the pH, surfactant type and concentration, the simultaneous presence of other polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the thickness of the unstirred water layer.

  2. d-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD) as a Model of Psychosis: Mechanism of Action and Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregorio, Danilo; Comai, Stefano; Posa, Luca; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2016-11-23

    d-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD) is known for its hallucinogenic properties and psychotic-like symptoms, especially at high doses. It is indeed used as a pharmacological model of psychosis in preclinical research. The goal of this review was to understand the mechanism of action of psychotic-like effects of LSD. We searched Pubmed, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar and articles' reference lists for preclinical studies regarding the mechanism of action involved in the psychotic-like effects induced by LSD. LSD's mechanism of action is pleiotropic, primarily mediated by the serotonergic system in the Dorsal Raphe, binding the 5-HT2A receptor as a partial agonist and 5-HT1A as an agonist. LSD also modulates the Ventral Tegmental Area, at higher doses, by stimulating dopamine D₂, Trace Amine Associate receptor 1 (TAAR₁) and 5-HT2A. More studies clarifying the mechanism of action of the psychotic-like symptoms or psychosis induced by LSD in humans are needed. LSD's effects are mediated by a pleiotropic mechanism involving serotonergic, dopaminergic, and glutamatergic neurotransmission. Thus, the LSD-induced psychosis is a useful model to test the therapeutic efficacy of potential novel antipsychotic drugs, particularly drugs with dual serotonergic and dopaminergic (DA) mechanism or acting on TAAR₁ receptors.

  3. d-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD as a Model of Psychosis: Mechanism of Action and Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo De Gregorio

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available d-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD is known for its hallucinogenic properties and psychotic-like symptoms, especially at high doses. It is indeed used as a pharmacological model of psychosis in preclinical research. The goal of this review was to understand the mechanism of action of psychotic-like effects of LSD. We searched Pubmed, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar and articles’ reference lists for preclinical studies regarding the mechanism of action involved in the psychotic-like effects induced by LSD. LSD’s mechanism of action is pleiotropic, primarily mediated by the serotonergic system in the Dorsal Raphe, binding the 5-HT2A receptor as a partial agonist and 5-HT1A as an agonist. LSD also modulates the Ventral Tegmental Area, at higher doses, by stimulating dopamine D2, Trace Amine Associate receptor 1 (TAAR1 and 5-HT2A. More studies clarifying the mechanism of action of the psychotic-like symptoms or psychosis induced by LSD in humans are needed. LSD’s effects are mediated by a pleiotropic mechanism involving serotonergic, dopaminergic, and glutamatergic neurotransmission. Thus, the LSD-induced psychosis is a useful model to test the therapeutic efficacy of potential novel antipsychotic drugs, particularly drugs with dual serotonergic and dopaminergic (DA mechanism or acting on TAAR1 receptors.

  4. Variation of mechanical properties with amino acid content in the silk of Nephila clavipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zax, David B; Armanios, Daniel E; Horak, Sally; Brodowski, Chris; Malowniak, Chris; Yang, Zhitong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the impact of dietary deprivation, where spiders are provided diets missing one or more of the amino acids, on the properties of the spider dragline silk spun after one month on the diet. Cohorts of female N. clavipes spiders were selected for diets deprived of alanine (Ala) and glycine (Gly), arginine (Arg), leucine (Leu), or tyrosine (Tyr), and their silk was harvested twice weekly during the one-month course of the diet. Significant mechanical differences are observed after as little as 6 days on the diet. Utilizing conventional tensile testing methods, single fibers were strained to break so as to study the influence of diet on the stress/strain properties. Diets deprived of Ala and Gly appear to most directly impact the load-bearing foundation of dragline silk. Diets deprived of Arg, Tyr, and possibly Leu reduce the strength of the silk, and diets missing Tyr and Leu reduce the strain-to-failure. Observations obtained from ESEM photos of the fracture interfaces after tensile testing illustrate the fracture mechanics of spider silk. Both solid-state NMR and amino acid analysis of the digested protein suggest, however, that the relationship between diet and amino acid incorporation into the silk fiber is not straightforward.

  5. Design and Mechanism of Tetrahydrothiophene-Based γ-Aminobutyric Acid Aminotransferase Inactivators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Hoang V. [Departments; Hawker, Dustin D. [Departments; Wu, Rui [Department; Doud, Emma [Departments; Widom, Julia [Departments; Sanishvili, Ruslan [X-ray; Liu, Dali [Department; Kelleher, Neil L. [Departments; Silverman, Richard B. [Departments

    2015-03-25

    Low levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of two major neurotransmitters that regulate brain neuronal activity, are associated with many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease, Huntingtons disease, and cocaine addiction. One of the main methods to raise the GABA level in human brain is to use small molecules that cross the bloodbrain barrier and inhibit the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), the enzyme that degrades GABA. We have designed a series of conformationally restricted tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA analogues with a properly positioned leaving group that could facilitate a ring-opening mechanism, leading to inactivation of GABA-AT. One compound in the series is 8 times more efficient an inactivator of GABA-AT than vigabatrin, the only FDA-approved inactivator of GABA-AT. Our mechanistic studies show that the compound inactivates GABA-AT by a new mechanism. The metabolite resulting from inactivation does not covalently bind to amino acid residues of GABA-AT but stays in the active site via H-bonding interactions with Arg-192, a pi-pi interaction with Phe-189, and a weak nonbonded (SO)-O-...=C interaction with Glu-270, thereby inactivating the enzyme.

  6. Mechanism analysis of acid tolerance response of bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum BBMN 68 by gene expression profile using RNA-sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Jin

    Full Text Available To analyze the mechanism of the acid tolerance response (ATR in Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum BBMN68, we optimized the acid-adaptation condition to stimulate ATR effectively and analyzed the change of gene expression profile after acid-adaptation using high-throughput RNA-Seq. After acid-adaptation at pH 4.5 for 2 hours, the survival rate of BBMN68 at lethal pH 3.5 for 120 min was increased by 70 fold and the expression of 293 genes were upregulated by more than 2 fold, and 245 genes were downregulated by more than 2 fold. Gene expression profiling of ATR in BBMN68 suggested that, when the bacteria faced acid stress, the cells strengthened the integrity of cell wall and changed the permeability of membrane to keep the H(+ from entering. Once the H(+ entered the cytoplasm, the cells showed four main responses: First, the F(0F(1-ATPase system was initiated to discharge H(+. Second, the ability to produce NH(3 by cysteine-cystathionine-cycle was strengthened to neutralize excess H(+. Third, the cells started NER-UVR and NER-VSR systems to minimize the damage to DNA and upregulated HtpX, IbpA, and γ-glutamylcysteine production to protect proteins against damage. Fourth, the cells initiated global response signals ((pppGpp, polyP, and Sec-SRP to bring the whole cell into a state of response to the stress. The cells also secreted the quorum sensing signal (AI-2 to communicate between intraspecies cells by the cellular signal system, such as two-component systems, to improve the overall survival rate. Besides, the cells varied the pathways of producing energy by shifting to BCAA metabolism and enhanced the ability to utilize sugar to supply sufficient energy for the operation of the mechanism mentioned above. Based on these reults, it was inferred that, during industrial applications, the acid resistance of bifidobacteria could be improved by adding BCAA, γ-glutamylcysteine, cysteine, and cystathionine into the acid-stress environment.

  7. Uric acid and allantoin levels in Down syndrome: antioxidant and oxidative stress mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitnanová, Ingrid; Korytár, Peter; Aruoma, Okezie I; Sustrová, Mária; Garaiová, Iveta; Muchová, Jana; Kalnovicová, Terézia; Pueschel, Siegfried; Duracková, Zdenka

    2004-03-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a chromosomal abnormality (trisomy 21) leading to mental retardation, to the characteristic change of individual's phenotype and to the pathological features of Alzheimer disease. Patients with DS have elevated ratio of superoxide dismutase to (catalase plus glutathione peroxidase) with respect to controls in all age categories suggesting that oxidative imbalance contributes to the clinical manifestation of accelerated aging. We report that persons with DS have elevated uric acid levels compared with controls, 348.56+/-22.78 versus 284.00+/-20.86 micromol/l (p=0.018). The levels of hypoxanthine and xanthine in DS children (6.35+/-0.31 and 1.02+/-0.23 micromol/l) were significantly lower than in controls (7.83+/-0.59 and 2.43+/-0.66 micromol/l). This result suggests increased conversion of hypoxanthine and xanthine to uric acid with subsequent free radical-dependent oxidation of uric acid to allantoin, mechanisms potentiated by the oxidative stress in DS. Allantoin is a nonenzymatic oxidative product of uric acid in human. In DS individuals, the levels of allantoin were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (18.58+/-2.27 and 14.07+/-1.07 micromol/l, respectively, p=0.03). Our data supported the presumption of increased oxidative stress in DS.

  8. Biological effects of propionic acid in humans; metabolism, potential applications and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Lahham, Sa'ad H; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Roelofsen, Han; Vonk, Roel J; Venema, Koen

    2010-11-01

    Undigested food is fermented in the colon by the microbiota and gives rise to various microbial metabolites. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), including acetic, propionic and butyric acid, are the principal metabolites produced. However, most of the literature focuses on butyrate and to a lesser extent on acetate; consequently, potential effects of propionic acid (PA) on physiology and pathology have long been underestimated. It has been demonstrated that PA lowers fatty acids content in liver and plasma, reduces food intake, exerts immunosuppressive actions and probably improves tissue insulin sensitivity. Thus increased production of PA by the microbiota might be considered beneficial in the context of prevention of obesity and diabetes type 2. The molecular mechanisms by which PA may exert this plethora of physiological effects are slowly being elucidated and include intestinal cyclooxygenase enzyme, the G-protein coupled receptors 41 and 43 and activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, in turn inhibiting the sentinel transcription factor NF-κB and thus increasing the threshold for inflammatory responses in general. Taken together, PA emerges as a major mediator in the link between nutrition, gut microbiota and physiology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Theoretical study of 5-aminolevulinic acid tautomerization: a novel self-catalyzed mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdtman, Edvin; Eriksson, Leif A

    2008-05-08

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5ALA) is the key synthetic building block in protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), the heme chromophore in mitochondria. In this study density functional theory calculations were performed on the tautomers of 5ALA and the tautomerization reaction mechanism from its enolic forms (5-amino-4-hydroxypent-3-enoic acid and 5-amino-4-hydroxypent-4-enoic acid) to the more stable 5ALA. The hydrated form 5-amino-4,4-dihydroxypentanoic acid was also studied. The lowest energy pathway of 5ALA tautomerization is by means of autocatalysis, in that an oxygen of the carboxylic group transfers the hydrogen atom as a "crane", with an activation energy of approximately 15 kcal/mol. This should be compared to the barriers of about 35 kcal/mol for water assisted tautomerization, and 60 kcal/mol for direct hydrogen transfer. For hydration of 5ALA, the water catalyzed activation barrier is found to be approximately 35 kcal/mol, approximately 5 kcal/mol lower than direct hydration.

  10. The emergence and evolution of life in a "fatty acid world" based on quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulis, Arvydas; Grigalavicius, Mantas

    2011-02-01

    Quantum mechanical based electron correlation interactions among molecules are the source of the weak hydrogen and Van der Waals bonds that are critical to the self-assembly of artificial fatty acid micelles. Life on Earth or elsewhere could have emerged in the form of self-reproducing photoactive fatty acid micelles, which gradually evolved into nucleotide-containing micelles due to the enhanced ability of nucleotide-coupled sensitizer molecules to absorb visible light. Comparison of the calculated absorption spectra of micelles with and without nucleotides confirmed this idea and supports the idea of the emergence and evolution of nucleotides in minimal cells of a so-called Fatty Acid World. Furthermore, the nucleotide-caused wavelength shift and broadening of the absorption pattern potentially gives these molecules an additional valuable role, other than a purely genetic one in the early stages of the development of life. From the information theory point of view, the nucleotide sequences in such micelles carry positional information providing better electron transport along the nucleotide-sensitizer chain and, in addition, providing complimentary copies of that information for the next generation. Nucleotide sequences, which in the first period of evolution of fatty acid molecules were useful just for better absorbance of the light in the longer wavelength region, later in the PNA or RNA World, took on the role of genetic information storage.

  11. Comparison of sodium hypochlorite-based foam and peroxyacetic acid-based fog sanitizing procedures in a salmon smokehouse: survival of the general microflora and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagge-Ravn, Dorthe; Gardshodn, Kelna; Gram, Lone; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech

    2003-04-01

    The effects of fog sanitization with peroxyacetic acid (hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, and acetic acid in combination) on general hygiene (aerobic plate count) and on Listeria monocytogenes were assessed in a slicing area at a salmon smokehouse and compared with the effects of foam sanitization with sodium hypochlorite (routinely performed at the smokehouse). Two hundred twenty-three environmental samples were collected with sponges and swabs after each of the sanitization procedures, and 68 samples were collected during production. The total culturable aerobic plate count was determined for each sample, and a total of 288 bacterial strains were randomly isolated and tentatively identified to genus level by physiological and biochemical tests. The microflora was dominated by Neisseriaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and lactic acid bacteria during production. Foam sanitization caused a change in the composition of the flora, with Pseudomonas spp. and Alcaligenes spp. being the dominant gram-negative bacteria and Kurthia spp. and Bacillus spp. being the surviving gram-positive bacteria. Bacteria were very sensitive to fog sanitization, and yeasts accounted for almost half of the surviving flora. By a selective isolation method, strains of L. monocytogenes were isolated and subsequently characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typing. Following foam sanitization, 14 to 42% of the samples contained sanitization contained this level of bacteria. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes was unchanged, but L. monocytogenes was found only in poorly cleaned areas such as drains. The RAPD types for all positive samples were identical to the type that had persisted in the smokehouse since 1995, indicating the importance of drains as a niche.

  12. Mechanism of radioprotection by dihydroxy-1-selenolane (DHS): Effect of fatty acid conjugation and role of glutathione peroxidase (GPx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prachi; Kunwar, Amit; Arai, Kenta; Iwaoka, Michio; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2017-10-30

    Dihydroxy-1-selenolane (DHS) previously reported to exhibit radioprotective activity was investigated to understand its mechanism of action in CHO cells of epithelial origin. DHS pre-treatment at 25 μM for 16 h significantly protected CHO cells from radiation (4-11 Gy)-induced delayed mitotic cell death. Further to examine, how increased cellular uptake can influence this mechanism, studies have been performed with DHS-C6, a lipophilic conjugate of DHS. Accordingly CHO cells pre-treated with DHS-C6, showed increased survival against radiation exposure. Notably treatment with both DHS and DHS-C6 significantly increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in cells by ∼ 2.5 fold. Additionally, the compound DHS or DHS-C6 led to faster repair of DNA in irradiated cells and subsequently inhibited the G2/M arrest. Anticipating the role of GPx in radioprotection, our investigations revealed that addition of mercaptosuccinic acid, a pharmacological inhibitor of GPx reversed all the above effects of DHS or DHS-C6. Further inhibitors of check point kinase 1 (CHK1) and DNA-protein kinase (DNA-PK) although abrogated the radioprotective effect of DHS or DHS-C6 separately, did not show additive effect in combination with GPx inhibitor, suggesting their cross talk. In contrast to these results, both DHS and DHS-C6 treatment did not protect spleen lymphocytes from the radiation-induced apoptosis. Thus results confirmed that both DHS and DHS-C6 protected cells from radiation-induced mitotic death by augmenting DNA repair in a GPx dependant manner. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of poly(lactic acid) toughened by precipitated barium sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinian; Wang, Chuang; Shao, Kaiyun; Ding, Guoxin; Tao, Yulun; Zhu, Jinbo

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-based composites were prepared by blending PLA with precipitated barium sulfate (BaSO4) modified with stearic acid. The morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of samples with increased mass fraction of BaSO4 were investigated. Results showed that PLA was toughened and reinforced simultaneously by incorporation of precipitated BaSO4 particles. The highest impact toughness and elongation at break were both achieved at 15% BaSO4, while the elastic modulus increased monotonically with increasing BaSO4 loading. Little effect of BaSO4 on the thermal behavior of PLA was observed in the present case. However, the thermal stability of PLA/BaSO4 composites at high temperature was enhanced.

  14. Evolution reveals a glutathione-dependent mechanism of 3-hydroxypropionic acid tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Hallström, Björn M.; Blicher, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    propose that 3HP toxicity is mediated by3-hydroxypropionic aldehyde (reuterin) and that glutathione-dependent reactions are used for reuterin detoxification. The identified molecular response to 3HP and reuterin may well be a general mechanism for handling resistance to organic acid and aldehydes......Biologically produced 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) is a potential source for sustainable acrylates and can also find direct use as monomer in the production of biodegradable polymers. For industrial-scale production there is a need for robust cell factories tolerant to highconcentration of 3HP......, preferably at low pH. Through adaptive laboratory evolution we selected S. cerevisiae strains with improved tolerance to 3HP at pH 3.5.Genome sequencing followed by functional analysis identified the causal mutation in SFA1 gene encoding S-(hydroxymethyl)glutathione dehydrogenase. Based on our findings, we...

  15. Dissolution mechanism of calcium apatites in acids: A review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2012-01-01

    Eight dissolution models of calcium apatites (both fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite) in acids were drawn from the published literature, analyzed and discussed. Major limitations and drawbacks of the models were conversed in details. The models were shown to deal with different aspects of apatite dissolution phenomenon and none of them was able to describe the dissolution process in general. Therefore, an attempt to combine the findings obtained by different researchers was performed which resulted in creation of the general description of apatite dissolution in acids. For this purpose, eight dissolution models were assumed to complement each other and provide the correct description of the specific aspects of apatite dissolution. The general description considers all possible dissolution stages involved and points out to some missing and unclear phenomena to be experimentally studied and verified in future. This creates a new methodological approach to investigate reaction mechanisms based on sets of affine data, obtained by various research groups under dissimilar experimental conditions. PMID:25237611

  16. Formation mechanism of a new carbamazepine/malonic acid cocrystal polymorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limwikrant, Waree; Nagai, Aiko; Hagiwara, Yumi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2012-07-15

    A new 2/1 carbamazepine (CBZ)/malonic acid (MA) cocrystal polymorph form C was formed using a vibrational rod mill, whereas the known cocrystal polymorph form A was prepared using a ball mill. IR measurements showed that the interaction between CBZ and MA in cocrystal form C was formed by amide-carboxylic acid heterosynthons, similar to that in cocrystal form A. However, NMR results showed that the molecular states of CBZ at the dibenzazepine ring appeared to be different, which could be due to variation in either the conjugation of the aromatic rings or the π-π interaction of CBZ. Factors affecting the formation of cocrystal polymorphs, such as heat and force, were investigated to clarify the formation mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical characterization of porous asphalt mixes modified with fatty acid amides -FAA-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Senior Arrieta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous asphalt mixes (PAM, form a special road surface for asphalt pavement structures, have a special particle size distribution that lets infiltrate to the runoff storm water through of it because of its voids content about 20 %. Many researchers conducted studies and have concluded that the use of modified asphalts is completely necessary to design PAM. Organic and chemical additives and special procedures as foamed asphalt have enhanced the performance of PAM, during their service life. This paper is focused on the mechanical characterization of PAM and how the asphalt modified with fatty acid amides, influenced on their behavior and performance. Based on an experimental methodology with laboratory tests aimed at establishing a comparison between porous asphalt mixes, using for its design and production a penetration 60-70 pure asphalt and another one asphalt modified with fatty acid amides.

  18. Mechanical characterization of porous asphalt mixes modi-fying the asphalt with fatty acid amides -FAA-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Senior Arrieta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous asphalt mixes (PAM, form a special road surface for asphalt pavement structures, have a special particle size distribution that lets infiltrate to the runoff storm water through of it because of its voids content about 20 %. Many researchers conducted studies and have concluded that the use of modified asphalts is completely necessary to design PAM. Organic and chemical additives and special procedures as foamed asphalt have enhanced the performance of PAM, during their service life. This paper is focused on the mechanical characterization of PAM and how the asphalt modified with fatty acid amides, influenced on their behavior and performance. Based on an experimental methodology with laboratory tests aimed at establishing a comparison between porous asphalt mixes, using for its design and production a penetration 60-70 pure asphalt and another one asphalt modified with fatty acid amides.

  19. Electrochemical mechanism of uranium mononitride dissolution in aqueous solutions of nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershov, Boris G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Inst. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry

    2017-09-01

    It was shown that the dissolution of UN with metallic conduction follows an electrochemical mechanism when it proceeds in contact with an electrically conductive medium (HNO{sub 3} solution). According to this mechanism, the oxidation of UN (at the anode) passes an electron into the UN matrix, which is a conductor, and can then reduce nitric acid in a parallel reaction a short distance away at another exposed surface of the UN (at the cathode). As a result, the reduction of HNO{sub 3} affords NO and NO{sub 2}, while oxidation of uranium mononitride affords NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O. The occurrence of these two separate processes accounts for the composition and yields of the products formed from UN and HNO{sub 3} as well as for the nitrogen isotope distribution between them when UN and HNO{sub 3} were labeled with {sup 14} N or {sup 15}N. A mathematical equation describing the dependence of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O yields on HNO{sub 3} concentration was derived. It was also shown that the calculated value of standard electromotive force of the galvanic pair formed on the UN surface during its dissolution in HNO{sub 3} is high enough to initiate and support the electrochemical mechanism of its dissolution in nitric acid.

  20. Effect of organic acids and marination ingredients on the survival of Campylobacter jejuni on meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Tina; Grønlund, Anne Christine Jørgensen; Christensen, Bjarke Bak

    2010-01-01

    inoculated in brain heart infusion broth containing 0.3% tartaric acid. On chicken meat medallions, reductions of C. jejuni were 0.5 to 2 log units when tartaric acid solutions (2, 4, 6, and 10%) were spread onto the meat. Analysis of acidic food ingredient (e.g., vinegar, lemon juice, pomegranate syrup......, and soya sauce) revealed that such ingredients reduced counts of C. jejuni by at least 0.8 log units on meat medallions. Three low pH marinades (pH lemon juice, and white wine vinegar were prepared. When applied to whole filets, these marinades resulted in a reduction...... ingredients at 4°C in broth and on chicken meat. The organic acids (0.5%) reduced populations of C. jejuni in broth (chicken juice and brain heart infusion broth) by 4 to 6 log units (after 24 h); tartaric acid was the most efficient treatment. Large strain variation was observed among 14 C. jejuni isolates...

  1. Peripheral mechanisms of neuropathic pain – involvement of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda Hiroshi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in pain research provide a clear picture for the molecular mechanisms of acute pain; substantial information concerning plasticity that occurs during neuropathic pain has also become available. The peripheral mechanisms responsible for neuropathic pain are found in the altered gene/protein expression of primary sensory neurons. With damage to peripheral sensory fibers, a variety of changes in pain-related gene expression take place in dorsal root ganglion neurons. These changes, or plasticity, might underlie unique neuropathic pain-specific phenotype modifications – decreased unmyelinated-fiber functions, but increased myelinated A-fiber functions. Another characteristic change is observed in allodynia, the functional change of tactile to nociceptive perception. Throughout a series of studies, using novel nociceptive tests to characterize sensory-fiber or pain modality-specific nociceptive behaviors, it was demonstrated that communication between innocuous and noxious sensory fibers might play a role in allodynia mechanisms. Because neuropathic pain in peripheral and central demyelinating diseases develops as a result of aberrant myelination in experimental animals, demyelination seems to be a key mechanism of plasticity in neuropathic pain. More recently, we discovered that lysophosphatidic acid receptor activation initiates neuropathic pain, as well as possible peripheral mechanims of demyelination after nerve injury. These results lead to further hypotheses of physical communication between innocuous Aβ- and noxious C- or Aδ-fibers to influence the molecular mechanisms of allodynia.

  2. Flow cytometric assessment of the protectants for enhanced in vitro survival of probiotic lactic acid bacteria through simulated human gastro-intestinal stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cao, Yu; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Shu, Quan; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to apply flow cytometric (FCM) analysis to assess the use of sucrose and lecithin vesicles for the protection of probiotic lactic acid bacteria in response to the challenge of gastric acidity and bile salts. FCM analysis in combination with fluorescent probes carboxyfluorescein (cF) and propidium iodide was used to reveal the physiological heterogeneity in the stressed bacteria population. Three subpopulations (intact, stressed, and damaged) were differentiated by FCM in all six examined strains. Significant changes were observed in the presence of the selected protectants. The addition of 20 mM sucrose in the simulated gastric fluid substantially increased the number of intact cells over 20 folds and reduced the damaged subpopulation by half. The presence of 2 % (w/v) lecithin vesicles was shown to protect 50 % more intact cells from the challenge of bile salts. The improved survival as evaluated by FCM analysis was further assessed for the proliferation capacity by sorting a number of cells from each subpopulation on nutrient agar plate. The result confirmed conformity between the proliferation-based cultivability and the probe-indicated viability in the samples of the intact and the damaged subpopulations. However, it also revealed the complexities of the stressed (injured) subpopulation. In conclusion, FCM analysis confirmed that the selected protectants could improve the survival of the probiotic strains in the simulated GI environments. The FCM analysis also proved to be a useful analytical tool for the probiotics research.

  3. Genome-wide identification of tolerance mechanisms towards p-coumaric acid in Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calero, Patricia; Jensen, Sheila I.; Bojanovič, Klara

    2017-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has gained increasing biotechnological interest due to its ability to tolerate different types of stress. Here, the tolerance of P. putida KT2440 towards eleven toxic chemical compounds was investigated. P. putida was found to be significantly more...... tolerant towards three of the eleven compounds when compared to Escherichia coli. Increased tolerance was for example found towards p-coumaric acid, an interesting precursor for polymerization with a significant industrial relevance. The tolerance mechanism was therefore investigated using the genome....... This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  4. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Neomenthol by Potassium Bromate in Acidic Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikant na

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Present study was focused on the analysis of kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of neomenthol by potassium bromate in acidic medium. For oxidizing neomenthol, potassium bromate stock solution (5.0×10─2 mol. dm─3 was prepared by dissolving exactly weighed quantity of potassium bromate in doubly distilled water. The suitable reaction mixtures were prepared and left at 313 K for over 24 hours to ensure complete oxidation of neomenthol15. The unreacted potassium bromate was determined iodometrically and the results indicate that one mole of potassium bromate is consumed for every three moles of neomenthol which leads to the formation of menthone (ketone.

  5. Nitrous acid (HONO) nocturnal surface deposition and daytime acid displacement: An alternative mechanism contributing to the unknown daytime HONO source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. G.; VandenBoer, T. C.; Roberts, J. M.; Young, C. J.; Brown, S. S.; Markovic, M. Z.; Talukdar, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of HONO were made during two intensive field campaigns: NACHTT 2011 in Erie, CO and CalNex 2010 in Bakersfield, CA. These field data and results from a flow tube study provide a new perspective on the interactions of HONO with ground surfaces. Integrated atmospheric column measurements of HONO and NO2 during NACHTT provided clear evidence that the ground surface dominates HONO production and loss at night. Simultaneous measurements of the gas and particle phases made by an Ambient Ion Monitor - Ion Chromatography (AIM-IC) system during CalNex demonstrated the potential for reactive uptake of HONO on mineral dust/soil as a nocturnal sink. Similarly, the potential for nitrite salts to react with strong acids, displacing HONO during the day was suggested by this dataset. Lab study results confirmed that HONO reacts irreversibly with carbonate salts and real soil extracts. Relative humidity-dependent reactive uptake coefficients were derived. Subsequent release of HONO by displacement reactions with HNO3 and HCl was also demonstrated. Together, these field and lab studies contribute to a new picture of HONO surface interactions by providing i) a more explicit description of the nocturnal HONO sink that also is a surface reservoir and ii) a new mechanism for daytime HONO formation that does not require NO2.

  6. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase alpha promotion of glucose-mediated fatty acid synthesis enhances survival of hepatocellular carcinoma in mice and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Da; Wu, Han; Fu, Gong-Bo; Zhang, Hui-Lu; Zhou, Xu; Tang, Liang; Dong, Li-Wei; Qin, Chen-Jie; Huang, Shuai; Zhao, Ling-Hao; Zeng, Min; Wu, Meng-Chao; Yan, He-Xin; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2016-04-01

    Solid tumors often suffer from suboptimal oxygen and nutrient supplies. This stress underlies the requirement for metabolic adaptation. Aberrantly activated de novo lipogenesis is critical for development and progression of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, whether de novo lipogenesis influences biological behaviors of HCCs under conditions of metabolic stress are still poorly understood. Here, we show that HCCs display distinct levels of glucose-derived de novo lipogenesis, which are positively correlated with their survival responses to glucose limitation. The enhanced lipogenesis in HCCs is characterized by an increased expression of rate-limiting enzyme acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase alpha (ACCα). ACCα-mediated fatty acid (FA) synthesis determines the intracellular lipid content that is required to maintain energy hemostasis and inhibit cell death by means of FA oxidation (FAO) during metabolic stress. In accord, overexpression of ACCα facilitates tumor growth. ACCα forms a complex with carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) and prevents its mitochondria distribution under nutrient-sufficient conditions. During metabolic stress, phosphorylation of ACCα leads to dissociation of the complex and mitochondria localization of CPT1A, thus promoting FAO-mediated cell survival. Therefore, ACCα could provide both the substrate and enzyme storage for FAO during glucose deficiency. Up-regulation of ACCα is also significantly correlated with poorer overall survival and disease recurrence postsurgery. Multivariate Cox's regression analysis identified ACCα as an effective predictor of poor prognosis. These results present novel mechanistic insight into a pivotal role of ACCα in maintaining HCC survival under metabolic stress. It could be exploited as a novel diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  7. l-Arginine Uptake by Cationic Amino Acid Transporter Promotes Intra-Macrophage Survival of Leishmania donovani by Enhancing Arginase-Mediated Polyamine Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Mandal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The survival of intracellular protozoan parasite, Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of Indian visceral leishmaniasis (VL, depends on the activation status of macrophages. l-Arginine, a semi-essential amino acid plays a crucial regulatory role for activation of macrophages. However, the role of l-arginine transport in VL still remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that intra-macrophage survival of L. donovani depends on the availability of extracellular l-arginine. Infection of THP-1-derived macrophage/human monocyte-derived macrophage (hMDM with Leishmania, resulted in upregulation of l-arginine transport. While investigating the involvement of the transporters, we observed that Leishmania survival was greatly impaired when the transporters were blocked either using inhibitor or siRNA-mediated downregulation. CAT-2 was found to be the main isoform associated with l-arginine transport in L. donovani-infected macrophages. l-arginine availability and its transport regulated the host arginase in Leishmania infection. Arginase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression were reciprocally regulated when assayed using specific inhibitors and siRNA-mediated downregulation. Interestingly, induction of iNOS expression and nitric oxide production were observed in case of inhibition of arginase in infected macrophages. Furthermore, inhibition of l-arginine transport as well as arginase resulted in decreased polyamine production, limiting parasite survival inside macrophages. l-arginine availability and transport regulated Th1/Th2 cytokine levels in case of Leishmania infection. Upregulation of l-arginine transport, induction of host arginase, and enhanced polyamine production were correlated with increased level of IL-10 and decreased level of IL-12 and TNF-α in L. donovani-infected macrophages. Our findings provide clear evidence for targeting the metabolism of l-arginine and l-arginine-metabolizing enzymes as an important

  8. l-Arginine Uptake by Cationic Amino Acid Transporter Promotes Intra-Macrophage Survival of Leishmania donovani by Enhancing Arginase-Mediated Polyamine Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Kumar, Ajay; Roy, Saptarshi; Verma, Sudha; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Singh, Ruby; Abhishek, Kumar; Saini, Savita; Sardar, Abul Hasan; Purkait, Bidyut; Kumar, Ashish; Mandal, Chitra; Das, Pradeep

    2017-01-01

    The survival of intracellular protozoan parasite, Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of Indian visceral leishmaniasis (VL), depends on the activation status of macrophages. l-Arginine, a semi-essential amino acid plays a crucial regulatory role for activation of macrophages. However, the role of l-arginine transport in VL still remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that intra-macrophage survival of L. donovani depends on the availability of extracellular l-arginine. Infection of THP-1-derived macrophage/human monocyte-derived macrophage (hMDM) with Leishmania, resulted in upregulation of l-arginine transport. While investigating the involvement of the transporters, we observed that Leishmania survival was greatly impaired when the transporters were blocked either using inhibitor or siRNA-mediated downregulation. CAT-2 was found to be the main isoform associated with l-arginine transport in L. donovani-infected macrophages. l-arginine availability and its transport regulated the host arginase in Leishmania infection. Arginase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were reciprocally regulated when assayed using specific inhibitors and siRNA-mediated downregulation. Interestingly, induction of iNOS expression and nitric oxide production were observed in case of inhibition of arginase in infected macrophages. Furthermore, inhibition of l-arginine transport as well as arginase resulted in decreased polyamine production, limiting parasite survival inside macrophages. l-arginine availability and transport regulated Th1/Th2 cytokine levels in case of Leishmania infection. Upregulation of l-arginine transport, induction of host arginase, and enhanced polyamine production were correlated with increased level of IL-10 and decreased level of IL-12 and TNF-α in L. donovani-infected macrophages. Our findings provide clear evidence for targeting the metabolism of l-arginine and l-arginine-metabolizing enzymes as an important therapeutic and

  9. Taurolithocholic acid exerts cholestatic effects via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanisms in perfused rat livers and rat hepatocyte couplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Denk, Gerald U.; Soroka, Carol J.; Wimmer, Ralf; Rust, Christian; Paumgartner, Gustav; Boyer, James L.

    2003-01-01

    Taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) is a potent cholestatic agent. Our recent work suggested that TLCA impairs hepatobiliary exocytosis, insertion of transport proteins into apical hepatocyte membranes, and bile flow by protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon)-dependent mechanisms. Products of

  10. Simvastatin may induce insulin resistance through a novel fatty acid mediated cholesterol independent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kain, Vasundhara; Kapadia, Bandish; Misra, Parimal; Saxena, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Statins are a class of oral drugs that are widely used for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Recent clinical data suggest that chronic use of these drugs increases the frequency of new onset diabetes. Studies to define the risks of statin-induced diabetes and its underlying mechanisms are clearly necessary. We explored the possible mechanism of statin induced insulin resistance using a well-established cell based model and simvastatin as a prototype statin. Our data show that simvastatin induces insulin resistance in a cholesterol biosynthesis inhibition independent fashion but does so by a fatty acid mediated effect on insulin signaling pathway. These data may help design strategies for prevention of statin induced insulin resistance and diabetes in patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26345110

  11. Poly(acrylic acid surface grafted polypropylene films: Near surface and bulk mechanical response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Radical photo-grafting polymerization constitutes a promising technique for introducing functional groups onto surfaces of polypropylene films. According to their final use, surface grafting should be done without affecting overall mechanical properties. In this work the tensile drawing, fracture and biaxial impact response of biaxially oriented polypropylene commercial films grafted with poly(acrylic acid (PAA were investigated in terms of film orientation and surface modification. The variations of surface roughness, elastic modulus, hardness and resistance to permanent deformation induced by the chemical treatment were assessed by depth sensing indentation. As a consequence of chemical modification the optical, transport and wettability properties of the films were successfully varied. The introduced chains generated a PAA-grafted layer, which is stiffer and harder than the neat polypropylene surface. Regardless of the surface changes, it was proven that this kind of grafting procedure does not detriment bulk mechanical properties of the PP film.

  12. THE EFFECT OF CAROVERINE AND ITS COMBINATION WITH AMINOOXYACETIC ACID ON SURVIVAL TIME OF MICE WITH EXPERIMENTAL TETANUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Mujezinović

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus is a disease that occurs in humans and various animal species worldwide. Tetanus toxin, after binding itself to nerve structures in the spinal cord, blocking the release of inhibitory transmitors which results in predominance of excitatory transmitors, and this manifestes itself in skeletal muscle spasm. In theory, inhibition of excitatory transmission can try to antagonize a number of ways: by stimulating inhibitory transmission with application inhibitory transmitors, inhibition of excitatory transmission by application of antagonists of excitatory transmitors and combination of antagonists of excitatory transmitors. Bearing this in mind, we attempted to normalize the disorders by tetanus toxin with the use of caroverine, an antagonist of excitatory transmitors, alone and in combination with aminooxyacetic acid (substance that increases the level of GABA. Experiments were conducted on albino mice of both sexes, weight 20-25 g. The experimental tetanus was induced by application of tetanus toxin. The application of caroverine and combination with aminooxyacetic acid was carried out 24 hours after application of tetanus toxin, once per day, until the death. Caroverine, given alone in a dose of 1,2 mg/kg significantly prolonged the LD50 period of mice with experimental tetanus, so the obtained results can be said that its application only at this dose proved to be effective. The combination with aminooxyacetic acid was gave an insignificant extension of mice’s dying time with experimental tetanus in the trial, compared to the control group. Key words: tetanus, tetanus toxin, transmitors, caroverine, aminooxyacetic acid

  13. Antimicrobial effects of weak acids on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outbreaks of disease due to vegetative bacterial pathogens associated with acid foods (such as apple cider) have raised concerns about acidified vegetables and related products that have a similar pH (3.2 to 4.0). Escherichia coli O157:H7 and related strains of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) have ...

  14. Halotolerance and survival kinetics of lactic acid bacteria isolated from jalapeño pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Quijano, Génesis Karendash; Dorantes-Alvarez, Lidia; Hernández-Sánchez, Humberto; Jaramillo-Flores, María Eugenia; de Jesús Perea-Flores, María; Vera-Ponce de León, Arturo; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2014-08-01

    The microbiota associated with spontaneous fermentation of vegetables in a saline substrate may represent an important group of bacteria in the food industry. In this work, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Weissella cibaria, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paraplantarum, and Leuconostoc citreum were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In addition, entophytic bacteria such as Pantoea eucalypti, Pantoea anthophila, Enterobacter cowanii, and Enterobacter asburiae were detected, but they were irrelevant for the fermentation process and were inhibited after 12 h of fermentation when the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.9. Moreover, 2 species of yeast were isolated and identified as Hanseniaspora pseudoguilliermondii and Kodamaea ohmeri by their partial 26S rRNA gene sequence. The growth of LAB was evaluated at different sodium chloride contents. L. citreum was the most halotolerant species followed by L. plantarum and W. cibaria with a concentration index to obtain a 50% population reduction (IC(50)) of 7.2%, 6.6%, and 5.2%, respectively. Furthermore, the growth of LAB and Escherichia coli O157:H7 was evaluated in the presence of the main phenylpropanoids from chilli peppers such as p-coumaric and ferulic acid. It was determined that LAB can grow in both acids at 4 mM, unlike E. coli O157:H7, whose growth is inhibited in the presence of these acids. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. The effect of poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid composition on the mechanical properties of electrospun fibrous mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Aho, Johanna Maaria; Baldursdottir, Stefania G.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of polymer molecular structure on the electrospinnability and mechanical properties of electrospun fibrous mats (EFMs). Polymers with similar molecular weight but different composition ratios (lactic acid (LA) and glycolic acid (GA)) were...... dissolved in binary mixtures of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and tetrahydrofuran (THF). The intrinsic viscosity and rheological properties of polymer solutions were investigated prior to electrospinning. The morphology and mechanical properties of the resulting EFMs were characterized by scanning electron...

  16. Identification of lactic acid bacteria in the rumen and feces of dairy cows fed total mixed ration silage to assess the survival of silage bacteria in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, H; Ogata, Y; Yamamoto, Y; Nagao, S; Nishino, N

    2014-09-01

    The survival of silage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the gut of dairy cows was evaluated by examining the LAB communities of silage and gut contents. Samples were collected at 2 different research institutes (Mie and Okayama) that offered total mixed ration (TMR) silage throughout the year. Silage and feces were sampled in August, October, and November at the Mie institute, whereas silage, rumen fluid, and feces were sampled in June and August at the Okayama institute. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis using Lactobacillus-specific primers was performed to detect LAB species in the samples. The selected bands were purified for species identification and the band patterns were used for principal component analysis. Lactic acid was the predominant fermentation product in all the TMR silages analyzed, and the lactic acid level tended to be constant regardless of the sampling time and region. A total of 14 LAB species were detected in the TMR silage samples, of which 5 (Lactobacillus acetotolerans, Lactobacillus pontis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus suebicus, and Lactobacillus plantarum) were detected in the dairy cow feces. Most of the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis bands for the feces samples were also detected in the rumen fluid, suggesting that any elimination of silage LAB occurred in the rumen and not in the postruminal gut segments. The principal component analysis indicated that the LAB communities in the silage, rumen fluid, and feces were separately grouped; hence, the survival of silage LAB in the cow rumen and lower gut was deemed difficult. It was concluded that, although the gut LAB community is robust and not easily affected by the silage conditions, several LAB species can inhabit both silage and feces, which suggests the potential of using silage as a vehicle for conveying probiotics. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The CDKN2A G500 allele is more frequent in GBM patients with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism tumors and is associated with poorer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice A Royds

    Full Text Available Prognostic markers for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are important for patient management. Recent advances have identified prognostic markers for GBMs that use telomerase or the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT mechanism for telomere maintenance. Approximately 40% of GBMs have no defined telomere maintenance mechanism (NDTMM, with a mixed survival for affected individuals. This study examined genetic variants in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A gene that encodes the p16(INK4a and p14(ARF tumor suppressors, and the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1 gene as potential markers of survival for 40 individuals with NDTMM GBMs (telomerase negative and ALT negative by standard assays, 50 individuals with telomerase, and 17 individuals with ALT positive tumors. The analysis of CDKN2A showed NDTMM GBMs had an increased minor allele frequency for the C500G (rs11515 polymorphism compared to those with telomerase and ALT positive GBMs (p = 0.002. Patients with the G500 allele had reduced survival that was independent of age, extent of surgery, and treatment. In the NDTMM group G500 allele carriers had increased loss of CDKN2A gene dosage compared to C500 homozygotes. An analysis of IDH1 mutations showed the R132H mutation was associated with ALT positive tumors, and was largely absent in NDTMM and telomerase positive tumors. In the ALT positive tumors cohort, IDH1 mutations were associated with a younger age for the affected individual. In conclusion, the G500 CDKN2A allele was associated with NDTMM GBMs from older individuals with poorer survival. Mutations in IDH1 were not associated with NDTMM GBMs, and instead were a marker for ALT positive tumors in younger individuals.

  18. A mechanically strengthened polyacrylamide gel matrix fully compatible with electrophoresis of proteins and nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushparajan, Charlotte; Goswami, Shailesh K; McAdam, Christopher J; Hanton, Lyall R; Dearden, Peter K; Moratti, Stephen C; Cridge, Andrew G

    2017-11-10

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is a universal tool in a biochemist's toolkit for protein and nucleic acid separation and subsequent visualisation and analysis. The standard formulation of polyacrylamide gels consists of acrylamide (ACM) monomer crosslinked with bisacrylamide (MBA) which creates a gel with excellent sieving properties but which is mechanically fragile and prone to tearing during post-electrophoresis manipulations involved in visualisation and analysis. By adding a poly(ethylene oxide) macro-crosslinker to the standard gel formulation, we have created a tough gel matrix that can be used to fractionate proteins and nucleic acids by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein and nucleic acid resolving capabilities and performance during staining and electroblotting of the tough gel matrix rivals that of conventional acrylamide/bisacrylamide gels. The tough gel matrix is resistant to tear and remarkably elastic, capable of stretching to over four times its original length before breaking, and represents a significant improvement over standard polyacrylamide gel formulations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanism of Oxidation of (p-Substituted Phenylthioacetic Acids with N-Bromophthalimide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. I. Alhaji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of (phenylthioacetic acid (PTAA by N-Bromophthalimide (NBP in acetonitrile-water solvent mixture at 298 K in the presence of perchloric acid has been followed potentiometrically. The reaction is first-order each in NBP and PTAA and inverse fractional-order in H+. Also, it has been found that the reaction rate is not affected by changes in ionic strength of the reaction medium or by the addition of chemicals such as phthalimide, acrylonitrile and potassium bromide. However, an increase in the water content of the solvent mixture causes an increase in the rate of reaction. These observations have been well analyzed in favour of a SN2-type mechanism, involving NBP itself as the reactive species. Effect of substituents on the reaction rate has been analysed by employing various (p-sustituted phenylthioacetic acids. The electron-releasing substituent in the phenyl ring of PTAA accelerates the reaction rate while the electron-withdrawing substituent retards the rate. The excellently linear Hammett plot yields a large negative ρ value, supporting the involvement a bromosulphonium ion intermediate in the rate-determining step.

  20. Effects of Inorganic Fillers on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of filler to polylactic acid (PLA may affect its crystallization behavior and mechanical properties. The effects of talc and hydroxyapatite (HA on the thermal and mechanical properties of two types of PLA (one amorphous and one semicrystalline have been investigated. The composites were prepared by melt blending followed by injection molding. The molecular weight, morphology, mechanical properties, and thermal properties have been characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscope (SEM, instron tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. It was found that the melting blending led to homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler within the PLA matrix but decreased the molecular weight of PLA. Regarding the filler, addition of talc increased the crystallinity of PLA, but HA decreased the crystallinity of PLA. The tensile strength of the composites depended on the crystallinity of PLA and the interfacial properties between PLA and the filler, but both talc and HA filler increased the toughness of PLA.

  1. Quinolinic Acid, an Endogenous Molecule Combining Excitotoxicity, Oxidative Stress and Other Toxic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Pérez-De La Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinolinic acid (QUIN, an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is involved in several neurological disorders, including Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, HIV associated dementia (HAD etc. QUIN toxicity involves several mechanisms which trigger various metabolic pathways and transcription factors. The primary mechanism exerted by this excitotoxin in the central nervous system (CNS has been largely related with the overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and increased cytosolic Ca 2+ concentrations, followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, ATP exhaustion, free radical formation and oxidative damage. As a result, this toxic pattern is responsible for selective loss of middle size striatal spiny GABAergic neurons and motor alterations in lesioned animals. This toxin has recently gained attention in biomedical research as, in addition to its proven excitotoxic profile, a considerable amount of evidence suggests that oxidative stress and energetic disturbances are major constituents of its toxic pattern in the CNS. Hence, this profile has changed our perception of how QUIN-related disorders combine different toxic mechanisms resulting in brain damage. This review will focus on the description and integration of recent evidence supporting old and suggesting new mechanisms to explain QUIN toxicity.

  2. Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles and Their Growth Mechanism in Mildly Acidic Aqueous Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Wan Sik; Kim, Sun Tae; Cho, Hye Ryun; Jung, Euo Chang [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Previous studies suggest that U(IV) nanoparticle (NP) formation is one of key steps in mineralization or immobilization of uranium which can be mediated either by microbes or by abiotic geochemical reactions. Colloidal NPs in a groundwater system are potential carrier phases influencing RN migration in subsurface environment. However, the mechanism of U(IV) NP formation and the potential reaction intermediates during this solid phase formation process have not been elucidated in detail so far. In this study we attempted to examine the U(IV) nanoparticle formation reactions preceded by the hydrolysis of U{sup 4+} at different pHs, concentrations and temperatures. The kinetics of U(IV) NP formation from dissolved U(IV) species was monitored under mildly acidic conditions (pH 2 ∼ 3) mainly by using UV-Vis absorption spectrophotometry. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the NPs produced during the reactions. The results demonstrate that the U(IV) NP formation process is very sensitive toward temperature variation. The main outcome of this study is the discovery of the autocatalytic nature of U(IV) NP formation from the supersaturated U(OH){sup 3+} solution in a mildly acidic aqueous solution. The structure of reaction intermediates is proposed to contain oxide linkage. In the presentation the proposed mechanism of the U(IV) NP formation reaction and the properties of primary NPs and their clusters will be discussed in detail.

  3. Non-avoidance behaviour in enchytraeids to boric acid is related to the GABAergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Rita C; Gomes, Susana I L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2015-05-01

    Soil invertebrates, e.g. enchytraeids, are known to be able to avoid unfavourable conditions, which gives them an important ecological advantage. These organisms possess chemoreceptors that can detect stressors, which in turn activate responses such as avoidance behaviour. We studied the avoidance behaviour in response to boric acid (BA) using enchytraeids. Results showed not only no avoidance, but that increasing concentrations seemed to have an "attraction" effect. To study the underlying mechanism, a selection of genes targeting for neurotransmission pathways (acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAr)) were quantified via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Evidences were that BA is neurotoxic via the GABAergic system mechanism where it acts as a GABA-associated protein receptor (GABAAR) antagonist possibly causing anaesthetic effects. This is the first time that (non)avoidance behaviour in invertebrates was studied in relation with the GABAergic system. We strongly recommend the combination of such gene and/or functional assay studies with the avoidance behaviour test as it can bring many advantages and important interpretation lines for ecotoxicity with minor effort.

  4. Harnessing Neutrophil Survival Mechanisms during Chronic Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Novel Therapeutic Targets to Dampen Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît S. Marteyn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available More than two decades after cloning the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene, the defective gene in cystic fibrosis (CF, we still do not understand how dysfunction of this ion channel causes lung disease and the tremendous neutrophil burden which persists within the airways; nor why chronic colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa develops in CF patients who are thought to be immunocompetent. It appears that the microenvironment within the lung of CF patients provides favorable conditions for both P. aeruginosa colonization and neutrophil survival. In this context, the ability of bacteria to induce hypoxia, which in turn affects neutrophil survival is an additional level of complexity that needs to be accounted for when controlling neutrophil fate in CF. Recent studies have underscored the importance of neutrophils in innate immunity and their functions appear to extend far beyond their well-described role in antibacterial defense. Perhaps a disturbance in neutrophil reprogramming during the course of an infection severely modulates the inflammatory response in CF. Furthermore there is an emerging concept that the CFTR itself may be an immune modulator and stimulating CFTR function in CF patients could promote neutrophil and macrophages antimicrobial function. Fostering the resolution of inflammation by favoring neutrophil apoptosis could preserve their microbicidal activities but decrease their proinflammatory potential. In this context, triggering neutrophil apoptosis with roscovitine may be a potential therapeutic option and this is currently being evaluated in CF patients. In the present review we discuss how neutrophils functions are disturbed in CF and how this may relate to chronic infection with P. aeuginosa and we propose novel research directions aimed at modulating neutrophil survival, dampening lung inflammation and ultimately leading to an amelioration of the lung disease.

  5. The effect of using citric or acetic acid on survival of Listeria monocytogenes during fish protein recovery by isoelectric solubilization and precipitation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, R A; Beamer, S; Jaczynski, J; Matak, K E

    2011-10-01

    Isoelectric solubilization and precipitation (ISP) is a protein recovery process effective at reducing Listeria innocua, a nonpathogenic bacterium typically used as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes in recovered trout protein. The response of L. monocytogenes to ISP processing was determined and compared to the response of L. innocua. Headed and gutted rainbow trout were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (10.16 log CFU/g), homogenized, and pH-adjusted with granular citric acid (pH 2.0 and 2.5) or glacial acetic acid (pH 3.0 and 3.5). Proteins were solubilized and centrifugation was used to remove insoluble components (skin, insoluble protein, so on). The supernatant was returned to the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.5) with NaOH and centrifuged to remove precipitated protein. Microbial load was enumerated on both growth and selective media; recovery was not significantly different (P > 0.05). Surviving cells from each component (protein, insoluble, and water) were compared to initial inoculum numbers. Significant reductions were detected at all pH (P acid, with a mean log reduction of 3.03 in the combined components, and a 3.53 log reduction in the protein portion. Data were compared to results from a previous study using L. innocua. Significant differences (P acid type. These results demonstrate the variability in resistance between species and indicate that L. innocua is not an appropriate surrogate for L. monocytogenes for ISP processing with organic acids. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. RNA-seq analysis of Pichia anomala reveals important mechanisms required for survival at low pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, Eugene; Feizi, Amir; Kim, SungSoo

    2015-01-01

    previously studied. Results: To this end, we isolated an acid resistant strain of P. anomala, performed a gross phenotypic characterisation at low pH and also performed a whole genome and total RNA sequencing. By integrating the RNA-seq data with the genome sequencing data, we found that several genes...

  7. Impact of citric acid and calcium ions on acid solubilization of mechanically separated turkey meat: effect on lipid and pigment content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynets, Y; Omana, D A; Xu, Y; Betti, M

    2011-02-01

    Increased demand for poultry products has resulted in an increased availability of by-products, such as the neck, back, and frame, that can be processed into mechanically separated poultry meat. The major problems with mechanically separated poultry meat are its high lipid content, color instability, and high susceptibility to lipid oxidation. The present work was undertaken to determine the effect of different concentrations of citric acid and calcium ions on protein yield, color characteristics, and lipid removal from protein isolates prepared using an acid-aided extraction process. Six levels of citric acid (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mmol/L) and 2 levels of calcium chloride (0 and 8 mmol/L) were examined. The entire experiment was replicated 3 times, resulting in 36 extractions (3 × 6 × 2). The highest (P pigment was obtained with the addition of 6 or 8 mmol/L of citric acid. Addition of calcium chloride had a negative effect on total pigment content. The study revealed that acid extractions with the addition of citric acid resulted in substantial removal of lipids and pigments from mechanically separated turkey meat, improved stability of the recovered proteins against lipid oxidation, and appreciable protein recovery yields.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Pyrimidine Dimer Excision in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Incision of Ultraviolet-Irradiated Deoxyribonucleic Acid In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Richard J.; Friedberg, Errol C.

    1981-01-01

    A group of genetically related ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been examined in terms of their survival after exposure to UV radiation, their ability to carry out excision repair of pyrimidine dimers as measured by the loss of sites (pyrimidine dimers) sensitive to a dimer-specific enzyme probe, and in terms of their ability to effect incision of their deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) during post-UV incubation in vivo (as measured by the detection of single-stran...

  9. Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in set yogurt as influenced by the production of an exopolysaccharide, colanic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shiao Mei; Chen, Jinru

    2004-02-01

    Previous studies conducted in our laboratory revealed that Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells capable of producing colanic acid (CA), the acidic polysaccharide of mucoid slime, had increased tolerance to sublethal heat and the extreme pH of microbiological culture media. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of CA on the fate of E. coli O157:H7 during the processing and storage of an acid food: yogurt. Pasteurized and homogenized whole milk was inoculated with a wild-type E. coli O157:H7, its CA-deficient mutant, or a mixture (1:1) of the two strains. Set yogurt was processed from the contaminated milk and stored at 4 degrees and 15 degrees C for 3 weeks. Samples of milk and yogurt were withdrawn during processing and storage and analyzed for total plate counts and populations of E. coli O157:H7 and starter cultures. The results showed that E. coli O157:H7 survived longer in yogurt stored at 15 degrees C than at 4 degrees C. Cells of E. coli O157:H7 deficient in CA production died off more rapidly than those of the parent strain. This suggests that CA plays a role in protecting cells of E. coli O157:H7 from stress during the processing and storage of set yogurt.

  10. Metabolic effects of free fatty acids during endotoxaemia in a porcine model--free fatty acid inhibition of growth hormone secretion as a potential catabolic feedback mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, M; Gjedsted, J; Granfeldt, A; Larsen, P Ø; Schmitz, O; Tønnesen, E; Møller, N

    2010-05-01

    Critical illness and severe inflammation are catabolic states characterised by breakdown of tissue and protein stores, by increased levels of free fatty acids, and by insulin resistance. These metabolic features contribute to morbidity and mortality. Growth hormone and insulin are the two major anabolic hormones. The present study was designed to test whether increased levels of free fatty acids (i) inhibit growth hormone secretion and (ii) induce insulin resistance during acute endotoxin exposure in a porcine model of critical illness. We studied 20 pigs for 6 h during combined anaesthesia and endotoxin infusion and a hyperinsulinaemic glucose clamp to control glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid concentrations. Pigs were randomised to two different continuous infusion rates of Intralipid resulting in different, sustained, and elevated free fatty acid concentrations (1.63 mmol l(-1) vs. 0.58 mmol l(-1), p=0.0002). Concomitantly, we observed reduced growth hormone concentrations in the group with high free fatty acid concentrations (3.5 ng ml(-1) vs. 6.6 ng ml(-1), pfeedback mechanism whereby growth hormone induced-stimulation of free fatty acids release inhibit growth hormone secretion. This mechanism may further contribute to protein loss in critical illness. We found no evidence that the increment of plasma free fatty acids between groups contribute to insulin resistance in critical illness. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  11. The combination of energy-dependent internal adaptation mechanisms and external factors enables Listeria monocytogenes to express a strong starvation survival response during multiple-nutrient starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, Bwalya; Saldivar, Joshua C; Story, Robert; Ricke, Steven C; Johnson, Michael G

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the starvation survival response (SSR) of a wild-type Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and an isogenic DeltasigB mutant strain during multiple-nutrient starvation conditions over 28 days. This study examined the effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis, the proton motive force, substrate level phosphorylation, and oxidative phosphorylation on the SSR of L. monocytogenes 10403S and a DeltasigB mutant during multiple-nutrient starvation. The effects of starvation buffer changes on viability were also examined. During multiple-nutrient starvation, both strains expressed a strong SSR, suggesting that L. monocytogenes possesses SigB-independent mechanism(s) for survival during multiple-nutrient starvation. Neither strain was able to express an SSR following starvation buffer changes, indicating that the nutrients/factors present in the starvation buffer could be a source of energy for cell maintenance and survival. Neither the wild-type nor the DeltasigB mutant strain was able to elicit an SSR when exposed to the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol within the first 4 h of starvation. However, both strains expressed an SSR when exposed to chloramphenicol after 6 h or more of starvation, suggesting that the majority of proteins required to elicit an effective SSR in L. monocytogenes are likely produced somewhere between 4 and 6 h of starvation. The varying SSRs of both strains to the different metabolic inhibitors under aerobic or anaerobic conditions suggested that (1) energy derived from the proton motive force is important for an effective SSR, (2) L. monocytogenes utilizes an anaerobic electron transport during multiple-nutrient starvation conditions, and (3) the glycolytic pathway is an important energy source during multiple-nutrient starvation when oxygen is available, and less important under anaerobic conditions. Collectively, the data suggest that the combination of energy-dependent internal adaptation mechanisms

  12. Sub-optimal pH Preadaptation Improves the Survival of Lactobacillus plantarum Strains and the Malic Acid Consumption in Wine-Like Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succi, Mariantonietta; Pannella, Gianfranco; Tremonte, Patrizio; Tipaldi, Luca; Coppola, Raffaele; Iorizzo, Massimo; Lombardi, Silvia Jane; Sorrentino, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Forty-two oenological strains of Lb. plantarum were assessed for their response to ethanol and pH values generally encountered in wines. Strains showed a higher variability in the survival when exposed to low pH (3.5 or 3.0) than when exposed to ethanol (10 or 14%). The study allowed to individuate the highest ethanol concentration (8%) and the lowest pH value (4.0) for the growth of strains, even if the maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) resulted significantly reduced by these conditions. Two strains (GT1 and LT11) preadapted to 2% ethanol and cultured up to 14% of ethanol showed a higher growth than those non-preadapted when they were cultivated at 8% of ethanol. The evaluation of the same strains preadapted to low pH values (5.0 and 4.0) and then grown at pH 3.5 or 3.0 showed only for GT1 a sensitive μ max increment when it was cultivated in MRS at pH 3 after a preadaptation to pH 5.0. The survival of GT1 and LT11 was evaluated in Ringer's solution at 14% ethanol after a long-term adaptation in MRS with 2% ethanol or in MRS with 2% ethanol acidified at pH 5.0 (both conditions, BC). Analogously, the survival was evaluated at pH 3.5 after a long-term adaptation in MRS at pH 5.0 or in MRS BC. The impact of the physiologic state (exponential phase vs stationary phase) on the survival was also evaluated. Preadapted cells showed the same behavior of non-preadapted cells only when cultures were recovered in the stationary phase. Mathematical functions were individuated for the description of the survival of GT1 and LT11 in MRS at 14% ethanol or at pH 3.5. Finally, a synthetic wine (SW) was used to assess the behavior of Lb. plantarum GT1 and LT11 preadapted in MRS at 2% ethanol or at pH 5.0 or in BC. Only GT1 preadapted to pH 5.0 and collected in the stationary phase showed constant values of microbial counts after incubation for 15 days at 20°C. In addition, after 15 days the L-malic acid resulted completely degraded and the pH value increased of about 0.3 units.

  13. Effect of urine pH changed by dietary intervention on uric acid clearance mechanism of pH-dependent excretion of urinary uric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanbara Aya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The finding reported in a previous paper - alkalization of urine facilitates uric acid excretion - is contradictory to what one might expect to occur: because food materials for the alkalization of urine contain fewer purine bodies than those for acidification, less uric acid in alkaline urine should have been excreted than in acid urine. To make clear what component of uric acid excretion mechanisms is responsible for this unexpected finding, we simultaneously collected data for the concentration of both creatinine and uric acid in serum as well as in urine, in order to calculate both uric acid and creatinine clearances. Methods Within the framework of the Japanese government’s health promotion program, we made recipes which consisted of protein-rich and less vegetable-fruit food materials for H + -load (acidic diet and others composed of less protein and more vegetable-fruit rich food materials (alkaline diet. This is a crossover study within some limitations. Healthy female students, who had no medical problems at the regular physical examination provided by the university, were enrolled in this consecutive 5-day study for each test. From whole-day collected urine, total volume, pH, organic acid, creatinine, uric acid, titratable acid and all cations (Na+,K+,Ca2+,Mg2+,NH4+ and anions (Cl−,SO42−,PO4− necessary for the estimation of acid–base balance were measured. In the early morning before breakfast of the 1st, 3rd and 5th experimental day, we sampled 5 mL of blood to estimate the creatinine and uric acid concentration in serum. Results and discussion Urine pH reached a steady state 3 days after switching from ordinary daily diets to specified regimens. The amount of acid generated ([SO42−] + organic acid − gut alkaliwas linearly related with the excretion of acid (titratable acid + [NH4+] − [HCO3−], indicating that H + in urine is generated by the metabolic degradation of

  14. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-22

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  15. Effects of ascorbic acid and sugars on solubility, thermal, and mechanical properties of egg white protein gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza; Tabatabaei, Ramin H; Pashania, Bita; Rajabi, Hadiseh Z; Karim, A A

    2013-11-01

    The effects of reducing sugars (fructose, glucose, ribose, and arabinose), sucrose, and ascorbic acid were studied on thermo-mechanical properties and crosslinking of egg white proteins (EWP) through Maillard reaction. Sugars (0%, 1%, 5%, and 10%) and ascorbic acid (0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, and 2.5%) were added to EWP solutions. Thermal denaturation and crosslinking of EWP were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Mechanical properties (failure strength, failure strain and Young's modulus) of modified and unmodified EWP gels were evaluated by texture analyzer. Ascorbic acid decreased thermal denaturation temperature of EWP, but the reducing sugars increased the denaturation temperature. DSC thermograms of EWP showed that ascorbic acid exhibited an exothermic transition (≈110 °C) which was attributed to Maillard crosslinking of the protein. The reduction in pH (from 7.21 to ≈6) and protein solubility of egg white protein gel (from ≈70% to ≈10%) provides further evidence of the formation of Maillard cross-linking. Reactive sugars (ribose and arabinose) increased the mechanical properties of EWP gels, whereas ascorbic acid decreased the mechanical properties. Generally, the effect of ascorbic acid was more pronounced than that of various reducing sugars on the thermal and mechanical properties of egg white proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Jasmonic acid does not increase oxidative defense mechanisms or common defense-related enzymes in postharvest sugarbeet roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmonic acid (JA) treatment significantly reduces rot due to several sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage pathogens. However, the mechanisms by which JA protects postharvest sugarbeet roots from disease are unknown. In other plant species and organs, alterations in antioxidant defense mechanisms ...

  17. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  18. New insights into the mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter pasteurianus using iTRAQ-dependent quantitative proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kai; Zang, Ning; Zhang, Junmei; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yudong; Liu, Ye; Feng, Wei; Liang, Xinle

    2016-12-05

    Acetobacter pasteurianus is the main starter in rice vinegar manufacturing due to its remarkable abilities to resist and produce acetic acid. Although several mechanisms of acetic acid resistance have been proposed and only a few effector proteins have been identified, a comprehensive depiction of the biological processes involved in acetic acid resistance is needed. In this study, iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis was adopted to investigate the whole proteome of different acidic titers (3.6, 7.1 and 9.3%, w/v) of Acetobacter pasteurianus Ab3 during the vinegar fermentation process. Consequently, 1386 proteins, including 318 differentially expressed proteins (pacetic acid stress, where >150 proteins were differentially expressed. Specifically, proteins involved in amino acid metabolic processes and fatty acid biosynthesis were differentially expressed, which may contribute to the acetic acid resistance of Acetobacter. Transcription factors, two component systems and toxin-antitoxin systems were implicated in the modulatory network at multiple levels. In addition, the identification of proteins involved in redox homeostasis, protein metabolism, and the cell envelope suggested that the whole cellular system is mobilized in response to acid stress. These findings provide a differential proteomic profile of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter pasteurianus and have potential application to highly acidic rice vinegar manufacturing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Carboxylic acids in PM 2.5 over Pinus morrisonicola forest and related photoreaction mechanisms identified via Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Su-Ching; Tsai, Ying I.; Tsai, Cheng-Hsien; Hsieh, Li-Ying

    2011-12-01

    The PM 2.5 aerosol from within an area of Pinus morrisonicola Hayata in Taiwan was collected and analyzed for its low molecular weight carboxylic acid (LMWCAs) content. Oxalic acid was the major LMWCA in the aerosol, followed by acetic, tartaric and maleic acids. This differs significantly from the LMWCA composition of PM 2.5 aerosol reported for a southern Taiwan suburban region (oxalic > succinic > malonic) [Atmospheric Environment 42, 6836-6850 (2008)]. P. morrisonicola Hayata emits oxalic, malic and formic acids and yet there was an abundance of maleic and tartaric acids in the PM 2.5 forest aerosol, indicating that tartaric acid is derived from the transformation of other P. morrisonicola Hayata emissions. Raman spectroscopy was applied and 28 species of LMWCAs and inorganic species were identified. The photochemical mechanisms of maleic and tartaric acids were studied and it was found that the abundant tartaric acid in forest aerosol is most probably the photochemical product from reactions of maleic acid. Furthermore, tartaric acid is photochemically transformed into formic acid and ultimately into CO 2.

  20. Enhancement of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Polylactic Acid/Polycaprolactone Blends by Hydrophilic Nanoclay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern Chiet Eng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hydrophilic nanoclay, Nanomer PGV, on mechanical properties of Polylactic Acid (PLA/Polycaprolactone (PCL blends were investigated and compared with hydrophobic clay, Montmorillonite K10. The PLA/PCL/clay composites were prepared by melt intercalation technique and the composites were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. FTIR spectra indicated that formation of hydrogen bond between hydrophilic clay with the matrix. XRD results show that shifting of basal spacing when clay incorporated into polymer matrix. TEM micrographs reveal the formation of agglomerate in the composites. Based on mechanical properties results, addition of clay Nanomer PGV significantly enhances the flexibility of PLA/PCL blends about 136.26%. TGA showed that the presence of clay improve thermal stability of blends. DMA show the addition of clay increase storage modulus and the presence of clay Nanomer PGV slightly shift two Tg of blends become closer suggest that the presence of clay slightly compatibilizer the PLA/PCL blends. SEM micrographs revealed that presence of Nanomer PGV in blends influence the miscibility of the blends. The PLA/PCL blends become more homogeneous and consist of single phase morphology.

  1. Palladium-atom catalyzed formic acid decomposition and the switch of reaction mechanism with temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nan; Li, Zhen Hua

    2016-04-21

    Formic acid decomposition (FAD) reaction has been an innovative way for hydrogen energy. Noble metal catalysts, especially palladium-containing nanoparticles, supported or unsupported, perform well in this reaction. Herein, we considered the simplest model, wherein one Pd atom is used as the FAD catalyst. With high-level theoretical calculations of CCSD(T)/CBS quality, we investigated all possible FAD pathways. The results show that FAD catalyzed by one Pd atom follows a different mechanism compared with that catalyzed by surfaces or larger clusters. At the initial stage of the reaction, FAD follows a dehydration route and is quickly poisoned by CO due to the formation of very stable PdCO. PdCO then becomes the actual catalyst for FAD at temperatures approximately below 1050 K. Beyond 1050 K, there is a switch of catalyst from PdCO to Pd atom. The results also show that dehydration is always favoured over dehydrogenation on either the Pd-atom or PdCO catalyst. On the Pd-atom catalyst, neither dehydrogenation nor dehydration follows the formate mechanism. In contrast, on the PdCO catalyst, dehydrogenation follows the formate mechanism, whereas dehydration does not. We also systematically investigated the performance of 24 density functional theory methods. We found that the performance of the double hybrid mPW2PLYP functional is the best, followed by the B3LYP, B3PW91, N12SX, M11, and B2PLYP functionals.

  2. Unconjugated secondary bile acids activate the unfolded protein response and induce golgi fragmentation via a src-kinase-dependant mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ruchika; Quilty, Francis; Gilmer, John F.; Long, Aideen; Byrne, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are components of gastro-duodenal refluxate and regarded as causative agents in oesophageal disease but the precise mechanisms are unknown. Here we demonstrate that a specific subset of physiological bile acids affect the protein secretory pathway by inducing ER stress, activating the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) and causing disassembly of the Golgi apparatus in oesophageal cells. Deoxycholic acid (DCA), Chemodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and Lithocholic acid (LCA) activated the PERK arm of the UPR, via phosphorylation of eIF2α and up-regulation of ATF3, CHOP and BiP/GRP78. UPR activation by these bile acids is mechanistically linked with Golgi fragmentation, as modulating the UPR using a PERK inhibitor (GSK2606414) or salubrinal attenuated bile acid-induced effects on Golgi structure. Furthermore we demonstrate that DCA, CDCA and LA activate Src kinase and that inhibition of this kinase attenuated both bile acid-induced BiP/GRP78 expression and Golgi fragmentation. This study highlights a novel mechanism whereby environmental factors (bile acids) impact important cellular processes regulating cell homeostasis, including the UPR and Golgi structure, which may contribute to cancer progression in the oesophagus. PMID:27888615

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some α-hydroxy acids by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2004-11-08

    Nov 8, 2004 ... Abstract. The oxidation of lactic acid, mandelic acid and ten monosubstituted mandelic acids by hexa- methylenetetramine-bromine (HABR) in glacial acetic acid, leads to the formation of the corresponding oxoacid. The reaction is first order with respect to each of the hydroxy acids and HABR. It is proposed.

  4. All guns blazing: management and survival of massive valproic acid overdose – case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Jawder S

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Shaikha Al Jawder,1 Eiman AlJishi,2 Shaikhah Al-Otaibi,2 Mohammed S Al-Shahrani3 1King Hamad University Hospital, Busaiteen, Bahrain; 2Emergency Medicine Department, 3Emergency and Critical Care Department, King Fahad Hospital of the University, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia Abstract: A 51-year-old woman, who intentionally ingested a massive dose of ~60 g of valproic acid which she was using as a mood stabilizer for bipolar affective disorder, presented within 30 minutes of ingestion to the emergency department. The patient was asymptomatic and was immediately started on decontamination therapy with activated charcoal (AC. Drug serum levels, liver functions, and ammonia levels were tested and followed up during treatment. Due to the massive ingestion and continuous rise in serum drug levels, the patient received regular multiple doses of AC, as well as l-carnitine for liver protection. The patient was started on extracorporeal therapy in the form of renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU, followed by intermittent hemodialysis. Drug serum levels dropped significantly. Ammonia levels showed improvement with treatment. The patient was discharged from the ICU after 14 days of treatment. She was stable and in good condition with no residual hepatic or central nervous system (CNS manifestations. Keywords: valproic acid, multiple dose activated charcoal, l-carnitine, hemodialysis

  5. Examination of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Mechanisms controlling survival and induction of apoptosis following selective inhibition

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cathcart, Mary Clare

    2011-06-01

    Background: Platelet-type 12-LOX is an arachidonic acid metabolising enzyme resulting in the formation of 12(S)-HETE, which stimulates tumour cell adhesion, invasion and metastasis. This study aimed to examine the expression profile and role of this enzyme in NSCLC, and determine if it is a potential target for intervention. Methods: A panel of retrospective resected lung tumours was stained for 12-LOX expression by IHC. Levels of the 12-LOX metabolite, 12(S)-HETE, were examined in 50 NSCLC serum samples, and correlated with serum VEGF. A panel of NSCLC cell lines were treated with baicalein (10 uM), a selective inhibitor of 12-LOX, or 12(S)-HETE (100 ng\\/ml) and cell survival\\/proliferation examined by BrdU. Apoptosis following 12-LOX inhibition was examined by HCS and validated by FACS and DNA laddering. The effect of 12-LOX inhibition on NSCLC tumour growth and survival was examined in-vivo using an athymic nude mouse model. Gene alterations following 12-LOX inhibition in NSCLC cell lines were assessed by qPCR arrays and validated by RT-PCR. Transient transfection methods were used to examine the effects of 12-LOX overexpression in NSCLC cells. Results: 12-LOX expression was observed to a varying degree in human lung cancers of varying histological subtypes. 12(S)-HETE levels were correlated (p<0.05) with those of VEGF. Baicalein inhibited proliferation\\/survival in all cell lines, while 12(S)-HETE increased proliferation. 12-LOX inhibition increased apoptosis, indicated by a reduction in f-actin content and mitochondrial mass potential. Treatment with baicalein significantly reduced the growth of NSCLC tumours and increased overall survival in athymic nude mice. qPCR array data implicated a number of apoptosis\\/angiogenesis genes regulating these effects, including bcl-2, VEGF, integrin A2 and A4. 12-LOX overexpression resulted in an increase in VEGF secretion, confirming qPCR observations. Conclusions: 12-LOX is a survival factor\\/potential target in

  6. Assessing the survival of MRC5 and a549 cell lines upon exposure to pyruvic Acid, sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate - biomed 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ibrahim O; Lewis, Veshell L; Ayensu, Wellington K; Cameron, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is among the most prevalent and deadly cancers in United States. In general, cancer cells are known to exhibit higher rates of glycolysis in comparison to normal cells. In attempting to exploit this unique cancer-dependent ATP generation phenomenon, it was our hypothesis that upon exposure to organic inhibitors of glycolysis, cancer cells would not survive normally and that their growth and viability would be vastly decreased; essential glycolytic ATP production will be exhausted to the point of collapsing energy utilization. Furthermore, we hypothesize that no negative effect would be seen with exposures to organic inhibitors for normal lung cells. The human lung fibroblast MRC-5 and the human A549 alveolar epithelial cell lines were used as in vitro models of normal lung and lung cancers respectively. Using standard methods, both cell lines were maintained and exposed to pyruvic acid, sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate reagents at concentration levels ranging from 31.3-2,000 µg/ml in 96 well plates in quadruplets and experiments repeated at least three times using MTT, and cell counting (T4 Cellometer) assays as well as phase-contrast photo-imaging for parallel morphological displays of any changes in the course of their vitality and metabolic activities. Our results indicate that exposure of both cell lines to these organics resulted in concentration dependent cell destruction/cell survival depending on the cell line exposed. Pyruvic acid, sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate showed statistically significant (p<0.05) differential negative effects on the A549 cell line in comparison to its unexposed control as well as to their effects on the MRC-5 cell line, presenting a potential promise for their use as cancer biotherapeutics.

  7. Effects and mechanisms of the combined pollution of lanthanum and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2013-09-01

    Rare earth pollution and acid rain pollution are both important environmental issues worldwide. In regions which simultaneously occur, the combined pollution of rare earth and acid rain becomes a new environmental issue, and the relevant research is rarely reported. Accordingly, we investigated the combined effects and mechanisms of lanthanum ion (La(3+)) and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings. The combined pollution of low-concentration La(3+) and acid rain exerted deleterious effects on the phenotype and growth of roots, which were aggravated by the combined pollution of high-concentration La(3+) and acid rain. The deleterious effects of the combined pollution were stronger than those of single La(3+) or acid rain pollution. These stronger deleterious effects on the root phenotype and growth of roots were due to the increased disturbance of absorption and utilization of mineral nutrients in roots. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Protective effects and its mechanism on neural cells after folic acid intervention in preeclampsia rat model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ge, Jing; Yang, Li-na; Xue, Dan; Li, Ju

    2011-08-01

    To investigate protective effects and mechanism of folic acid on brain neural cells in preeclampsia rat model. Adult pregnant Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10 in each group). Rats in model group were injected intraperitoneally with homocysteine (Hcy, 200 mg × kg(-1) × d(-1)) daily and were injected subcutaneously every other day with monosodium glutamate (MSG, 1 g × kg(-1)· 48 h(-1)) from the 10th day of pregnancy to establish the model of preeclampsia. Low-dose folic acid (low dose group 10 mg × kg(-1) × d(-1)) and high-dose folic acid (high dose group 20 mg × kg(-1) × d(-1)) were given intragastric administration with folic acid tablets dissolved in saline daily at the same time of establishing model. Rats in control group were injected or intragastric administration with the same dose of saline as above up to the 20th day of pregnancy. Brain tissue was fixed on the 20th day of pregnancy, so was that plasma folic acid was measured with automatic electro-chemiluminescence. Rats' neural nerve cells apoptosis was observed with tunel. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation was observed with immunohistochemical staining. bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression changes were observed by using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and western blot. (1) Plasma folate concentrations were (39.5 ± 3.4) nmol/L in low dose group and (40.1 ± 5.4) nmol/L in high dose group, which were all significantly higher than (26.9 ± 6.7) nmol/L in model group (P 0.05); (2) Apoptosis cell were 48.2 ± 9.1 in low dose group and 44.7 ± 8.3 in high dose group, which were significantly lower than 75.8 ± 10.1 in model group (P apoptosis cell in low dose and high dose group did not show significant difference (P > 0.05); (3) NF-κB activation were 48 ± 9 in low dose group and 45 ± 8 in high dose group, which were significantly lower 76 ± 10 in model group (P 0.05); (4) bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression were 0.98 ± 0.49 and 0.89 ± 0.52 in low dose group and 0.95 ± 0.38 and

  9. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Menthol by Potassium Bromate in Acidic Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikant na

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No suitable method is available for the estimation of menthol, hence in all kinetic results reported in this chapter, menthol was in excess over potassium bromate and the stoichiometry was also determined under the experimental conditions where menthol (substrate was in excess over potassium bromate (oxidant. Present study was focused on the analysis of kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of neomenthol by potassium bromate in acidic medium. For oxidizing neomenthol, potassium bromate stock solution (5.0×10─2 mol. dm─3 was prepared by dissolving exactly weighed quantity of potassium bromate in doubly distilled water. The suitable reaction mixtures were prepared and left at 313 K for over 24 hours to ensure complete oxidation of neomenthol. The unreacted potassium bromate was determined iodometrically and the results indicate that one mole of potassium bromate is consumed for every three moles of neomenthol and leads to the formation of menthone (ketone.

  10. Investigation on crystalline perfection, mechanical, piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of L-tartaric acid single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugan, G. Senthil, E-mail: nanosen@gmail.com; Ramasamy, P., E-mail: nanosen@gmail.com [Centre for Crystal Growth, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam, Tamilnadu - 603110 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Polar organic nonlinear optical material, L-tartaric acid single crystals have been grown from slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study indicates that the grown crystal crystallized in monoclinic system with space group P2{sub 1}. Crystalline perfection of the crystal has been evaluated by high resolution X-ray diffraction technique and it reveals that the crystal quality is good and free from structural grain boundaries. Mechanical stability of the crystal has been analyzed by Vickers microhardness measurement and it exhibits reverse indentation size effect. Piezoelectric d{sub 33} co-efficient for the crystal has been examined and its value is 47 pC/N. The ferroelectric behaviour of the crystal was analyzed by polarization-electric field hysteresis loop measurement.

  11. Mechanical and thermal properties of polylactic acid composites reinforced with cellulose nanoparticles extracted from kenaf fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketabchi, Mohammad Reza; Khalid, Mohammad; Thevy Ratnam, Chantara; Walvekar, Rashmi

    2016-12-01

    Different approaches have been attempted to use biomass as filler for production of biodegradable polymer composites. In this study, cellulose nanoparticles (CNP) extracted from kenaf fibres were used to produce polylactic acid (PLA) based biodegradable nanocomposites. CNP concentration was varied from 1-5 wt. % and blended with PLA using Brabender twin-screw compounder. Effects of CNP loading on the mechanical, thermal and dynamic properties of PLA were investigated. Studies on the morphological properties and influence of CNP loading on the properties of CNP/PLA nanocomposite were also conducted. The results show an adequate compatibility between CNP and PLA matrix. Moreover, addition of 3 wt. % of CNP improved the PLA tensile strength by 25%.

  12. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2000-03-01

    The interaction of caffeic acid with e{sub aq}{sup -}, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH) CCH{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}, CO{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}, H{sup {center_dot}}, {center_dot}OH and N{sub 3}{sup {center_dot}} radicals were studied by {gamma}-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/{center_dot}OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  13. Physicochemical and mechanical properties of paracetamol cocrystal with 5-nitroisophthalic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiendrawan, Stevanus; Veriansyah, Bambang; Widjojokusumo, Edward; Soewandhi, Sundani Nurono; Wikarsa, Saleh; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R

    2016-01-30

    We report novel pharmaceutical cocrystal of a popular antipyretic drug paracetamol (PCA) with coformer 5-nitroisophhthalic acid (5NIP) to improve its tabletability. The cocrystal (PCA-5NIP at molar ratio of 1:1) was synthesized by solvent evaporation technique using methanol as solvent. The physicochemical properties of cocrystal were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), hot stage polarized microscopy (HSPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Stability of the cocrystal was assessed by storing them at 40°C/75% RH for one month. Compared to PCA, the cocrystal displayed superior tableting performance. PCA-5NIP cocrystal showed a similar dissolution profile as compared to PCA and exhibited good stability. This study showed the utility of PCA-5NIP cocrystal for improving mechanical properties of PCA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanism of Pt(IV) sonochemical reduction in formic acid media and pure water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chave, Tony; Navarro, Nathalie M; Nitsche, Serge; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2012-03-26

    Sonochemical synthesis of platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in formic acid solutions and pure water was investigated using a 20 kHz ultrasonic irradiation. The obtained results gave new insights on the underneath Pt(IV)  reduction mechanism in formic acid media under argon and in pure water under Ar/CO atmosphere. It was shown that in pure water sonochemical reduction of platinum ions occurs by hydrogen issued from homolytic water molecule split. Pt(IV) ion reduction appears to be a very slow process under argon atmosphere in pure water due to formation of oxidizing species like OH radicals and H(2)O(2) leading to reoxidation of intermediate Pt(II)  ions. Sonochemical reduction is accelerated manifold in the presence of formic acid or Ar/CO gas mixture. Solution and gas-phase analyses reveal that both CO and HCOOH act as OH(.) radical scavenger and reducing agent under ultrasonic irradiation. Their ability to reduce platinum ions at room temperature is enhanced due to the local heating in the liquid shell surround the cavitation bubble. An innovative synthesis route for monodispersed Pt NPs in pure water without any templates or capping agents in the presence of Ar/CO gas mixture is then proposed. Obtained Pt NPs within the range of 2-3 nm exhibited a strong stability towards sedimentation in water. Since Ar/CO atmosphere is the only restriction of the process, this procedure can be applied in various media and is also compatible with a large array of experimental conditions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Fracture Mechanisms of Layer-By-Layer Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheng, Eugene R.

    A layer-by-layer(LBL) manufactured material is examined in detail in this thesis. Improvements are made to the method of its manufacture. Efforts are made to understand its fracture mechanisms and take advantage of these fracture mechanisms in the absorption of impact energy. A novel series of experiments has been performed on LBL manufactured thin films to demonstrate their unique fracture mechanisms. Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) (PU/PAA) and PU/PAA/(PU/Clay)5 nanocomposite films readily undergo Interlaminar mode II fracture, because of the relatively weak elctrostatic bonds between monolayers. Tensile tests performed while under observation by a scanning electron microscope demonstrate the tendency of these nanocomposite films to undergo interlaminar mode II fracture even when loads are applied in the plane of nanocomposite film. It is concluded that these mechanisms of energy dissipation are responsible for the enhanced toughness of these films when used as layers between glass blocks in the prevention of impact damage to the glass. A novel automated manufacturing facility has been designed and built to deposit large sheets of Layer-by-Layer nanocomposite film. These large sheets are incorporated into a borosillicate glass composite in order to compare the ballistic characteristics of LBL PU based nanocomposite films to a single cast layer of polyurethane. It is demonstrated that shear fracture is the mode of failure in the blocks containing the nanocomposite film. The shear fracture surface in the nanocomposite after it has undergone a ballistic impact is characterized. Additional experiments are performed to characterize the interlaminar fracture stresses and toughnesses of the nanocomposite LBL layers, to assist in the implementation of a numerical crack band model that describes the nanocomposite film. The computational model predicts the failure of the ballistic nanocomposite samples, and the predicted V50 velocity is found to be in good agreement with

  16. Mechanical properties, morphology, and hydrolytic degradation behavior of polylactic acid / natural rubber blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Y. F.; Aznan, A. N. A.; Anuar, H.

    2018-01-01

    Due to its biodegradability and renewability, polylactic acid (PLA) has been receiving enormous attention as a potential candidate to replace petroleum based polymers. However, PLA has limitation due to its inherent brittleness. In order to overcome this limitation, blending PLA with elastomeric materials such as natural rubber (NR) are commonly reported. In previous, several researches on PLA/NR blend had been reported, with most of them evaluated the mechanical properties. On the other hand, study of degradation behavior is significance of importance, as controlling materials degradation is required in some applications. This research studied the effect of blend composition on mechanical properties, morphology development, and hydrolytic degradation behavior of PLA/NR blends. Various compositions of PLA/NR blends were prepared by melt blending technique. Tensile test and impact test of the blends were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties. Addition of NR improved the elongation at break and impact strength of the blends, but reduced the tensile strength and stiffness of the specimens. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) measurements of the blends displayed two peaks at temperature -70˚C which corresponded to T g of NR and 65˚C which corresponded to T g of PLA. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) micrograph of 70/30 PLA/NR specimen also showed two distinct phases, which lead to indication that PLA/NR blends are immiscible. Hydrolytic degradation behavior was evaluated by measuring the remaining weight of the samples immersed in sodium hydroxide solution for a predetermined times. It was shown that the degradation behavior of PLA/NR blends is affected by composition of the blends, with 100 PLA and 70/30 PLA/NR blend showed the fastest degradation rate and 100 NR displayed the slowest one.

  17. Mechanisms of enhanced total organic carbon elimination from oxalic acid solutions by electro-peroxone process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huijiao; Yuan, Shi; Zhan, Juhong; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) is a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process that combines ozonation and electrolysis process to enhance pollutant degradation during water and wastewater treatment. This enhancement has been mainly attributed to several mechanisms that increase O3 transformation to ·OH in the E-peroxone system, e.g., electro-generation of H2O2 from O2 at a carbon-based cathode and its subsequent peroxone reaction with O3 to ·OH, electro-reduction of O3 to ·OH at the cathode, and O3 decomposition to ·OH at high local pH near the cathode. To get more insight how these mechanisms contribute respectively to the enhancement, this study investigated total organic carbon (TOC) elimination from oxalic acid (OA) solutions by the E-peroxone process. Results show that the E-peroxone process significantly increased TOC elimination rate by 10.2-12.5 times compared with the linear addition of the individual rates of corresponding ozonation and electrolysis process. Kinetic analyses reveal that the electrochemically-driven peroxone reaction is the most important mechanism for the enhanced TOC elimination rate, while the other mechanisms contribute minor to the enhancement by a factor of 1.6-2.5. The results indicate that proper selection of electrodes that can effectively produce H2O2 at the cathode is critical to maximize TOC elimination in the E-peroxone process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antinociceptive Activities and the Mechanisms of Anti-Inflammation of Asiatic Acid in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Shyun Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Asiatic acid (AA, a pentacyclic triterpene compound in the medicinal plant Centella asiatica, was evaluated for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. Treatment of male ICR mice with AA significantly inhibited the numbers of acetic acid-induced writhing responses and the formalin-induced pain in the late phase. In the anti-inflammatory test, AA decreased the paw edema at the 4th and 5th h after λ-carrageenan (Carr administration and increased the activities of catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx in the liver tissue. AA decreased the nitric oxide (NO, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β levels on serum level at the 5th h after Carr injection. Western blotting revealed that AA decreased Carr-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase (COX-2, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB expressions at the 5th h in the edema paw. An intraperitoneal (i.p. injection treatment with AA also diminished neutrophil infiltration into sites of inflammation as did indomethacin (Indo. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of AA might be related to the decrease in the level of MDA, iNOS, COX-2, and NF-κB in the edema paw via increasing the activities of CAT, SOD, and GPx in the liver.

  19. Lipin 2 binds phosphatidic acid by the electrostatic hydrogen bond switch mechanism independent of phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, James M; Takkellapati, Sankeerth; Lawrence, Robert T; McQueeney, Kelley E; Boroda, Salome; Mullins, Garrett R; Sherwood, Samantha G; Finck, Brian N; Villén, Judit; Harris, Thurl E

    2014-06-27

    Lipin 2 is a phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) responsible for the penultimate step of triglyceride synthesis and dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA) to generate diacylglycerol. The lipin family of PA phosphatases is composed of lipins 1-3, which are members of the conserved haloacid dehalogenase superfamily. Although genetic alteration of LPIN2 in humans is known to cause Majeed syndrome, little is known about the biochemical regulation of its PAP activity. Here, in an attempt to gain a better general understanding of the biochemical nature of lipin 2, we have performed kinetic and phosphorylation analyses. We provide evidence that lipin 2, like lipin 1, binds PA via the electrostatic hydrogen bond switch mechanism but has a lower rate of catalysis. Like lipin 1, lipin 2 is highly phosphorylated, and we identified 15 phosphosites. However, unlike lipin 1, the phosphorylation of lipin 2 is not induced by insulin signaling nor is it sensitive to inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin. Importantly, phosphorylation of lipin 2 does not negatively regulate either membrane binding or PAP activity. This suggests that lipin 2 functions as a constitutively active PA phosphatase in stark contrast to the high degree of phosphorylation-mediated regulation of lipin 1. This knowledge of lipin 2 regulation is important for a deeper understanding of how the lipin family functions with respect to lipid synthesis and, more generally, as an example of how the membrane environment around PA can influence its effector proteins. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Citric Acid Metabolism in Resistant Hypertension: Underlying Mechanisms and Metabolic Prediction of Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Martinez, Paula J; Baldan-Martin, Montserrat; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Prado, Jose Carlos; Segura, Julian; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Vivanco, Fernando; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2017-11-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) affects 9% to 12% of hypertensive adults. Prolonged exposure to suboptimal blood pressure control results in end-organ damage and cardiovascular risk. Spironolactone is the most effective drug for treatment, but not all patients respond and side effects are not negligible. Little is known on the mechanisms responsible for RH. We aimed to identify metabolic alterations in urine. In addition, a potential capacity of metabolites to predict response to spironolactone was investigated. Urine was collected from 29 patients with RH and from a group of 13 subjects with pseudo-RH. For patients, samples were collected before and after spironolactone administration and were classified in responders (n=19) and nonresponders (n=10). Nuclear magnetic resonance was applied to identify altered metabolites and pathways. Metabolites were confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Citric acid cycle was the pathway most significantly altered (Pcitric acid cycle and deregulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis control continue its activation after hypertension was developed. A metabolic panel showing alteration before spironolactone treatment and predicting future response of patients is shown. These molecular indicators will contribute optimizing the rate of control of RH patients with spironolactone. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Multibubble sonoluminescence as a tool to study the mechanism of formic acid sonolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Nathalie M; Pflieger, Rachel; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2014-05-01

    Sonoluminescence spectra collected from 0.1 to 3.0M aqueous solutions of formic acid sparged with argon show the OH(A(2)Σ(+)-X(2)Πi) and C2(d(3)Πg → a(3)Πu) emission bands and a broad continuum typical for multibubble sonoluminescence. The overall intensity of sonoluminescence and the sonochemical yield of HCOOH degradation vary in opposite directions: the sonoluminescence is quenched while the sonochemical yield increases with HCOOH concentration. By contrast, the concentration of formic acid has a relatively small effect on the intensity of C2 Swan band. It is concluded that C2 emission originates from CO produced by HCOOH degradation rather than from direct sonochemical degradation of HCOOH. The intensity of C2 band is much stronger at high ultrasonic frequency compared to 20 kHz ultrasound which is in line with higher yields of CO at high frequency. Another product of HCOOH sonolysis, carbon dioxide, strongly quenches sonoluminescence, most probably via collisional non-radiative mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Biologic plausibility, cellular effects, and molecular mechanisms of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borow, Kenneth M; Nelson, John R; Mason, R Preston

    2015-09-01

    Residual cardiovascular (CV) risk remains in dyslipidemic patients despite intensive statin therapy, underscoring the need for additional intervention. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is incorporated into membrane phospholipids and atherosclerotic plaques and exerts beneficial effects on the pathophysiologic cascade from onset of plaque formation through rupture. Specific salutary actions have been reported relating to endothelial function, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, inflammation, plaque formation/progression, platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, and plaque rupture. EPA also improves atherogenic dyslipidemia characterized by reduction of triglycerides without raising low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Other beneficial effects of EPA include vasodilation, resulting in blood pressure reductions, as well as improved membrane fluidity. EPA's effects are at least additive to those of statins when given as adjunctive therapy. In this review, we present data supporting the biologic plausibility of EPA as an anti-atherosclerotic agent with potential clinical benefit for prevention of CV events, as well as its cellular effects and molecular mechanisms of action. REDUCE-IT is an ongoing, randomized, controlled study evaluating whether the high-purity ethyl ester of EPA (icosapent ethyl) at 4 g/day combined with statin therapy is superior to statin therapy alone for reducing CV events in high-risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia. The results from this study are expected to clarify the role of EPA as adjunctive therapy to a statin for reduction of residual CV risk. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sung You

    Full Text Available Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  4. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae Sung; Frey, John W; Hornberger, Troy A

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA) may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k) T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  5. [Research of mechanism of secondary metabolites of phenolic acids in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root induced by jasmonate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyuan; Gao, Wei; Zhao, Jing; Cui, Guanghong; Shao, Aijuan; Huang, Luqi

    2012-01-01

    To study the mechanism of secondary metabolites of some phenolic acids in the hairy roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza induced by methyl jasmonate. The hairy roots of S. miltiorrhiza were induced with methyl jasmonate (100 micromol x L(-1)) and collected at 0, 12, 24, 36 h after treatment. Real-time quantitative PCR was used for detecting the mRNA expression level of the key enzyme genes on the secondary metabolites pathway of rosmarinic acid, while a LC-MS method was developed to determine the content of rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid and salvianolic acid B. The concentration of phenolic acids grew up and accumulated quickly in the hairy roots with exogenous signal molecule MJ induced, and it was showed that the content of CA and RA reached the maximum after 24 h and the content of LAB reached the maximum in 36 h by MJ induced. The induction mechanism may be activated with different levels of RA synthesis in PAL, 4CL, C4H genes on the key enzyme phenylalanine pathway and TAT, HPPR genes on tyrosine pathway. The time of gene expression was different, among them, 4CL and PAL genes were more important. In a word, the result can provide some basis data about the mechanism of secondary metabolites of phenolic acids for further research.

  6. Green tea catechins: Proposed mechanisms of action in breast cancer focusing on the interplay between survival and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannakopoulou, Eugenia Ch

    2014-02-01

    Recent data have shown strong chemopreventive and possibly cancer chemotherapeutic effects of green tea polyphenols against cancer. Despite advances in breast cancer treatment, mortality from breast cancer is still high. Undoubtedly novel treatment strategies are needed for chemoprevention of high risk women and for the treatment of receptor negative breast cancer. Green tea catechins have been shown to inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells and to block carcinogenesis. This review attempts a critical presentation of the mechanisms of action of green tea catechins in breast cancer. Several mechanisms of action of green tea catechins in breast cancer have been proposed including modulation of extracellular signalling, induction of apoptosis through redox regulation, or through modulation of epigenetic alterations. A number of molecular targets of green tea catechins have been suggested i.e molecular chaperones, telomerase, apoptotic cascade. Although the molecular links among the proposed mechanisms of action of green tea catechins are often missing, it must be emphasized that all the proposed mechanisms indicate that green tea catechins inhibit growth and /or promote apoptosis. It would be interesting if future experimental trials could take into account that green tea catechins are multi-target agents and attempt to link every novel proposed target with the other already proposed targets of green tea catechins.

  7. Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage in Multiple Sclerosis and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Therapeutic Modulation via Fumaric Acid Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Gold

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in many neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s as well as Huntington’s disease. Inflammation and oxidative stress are also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent data point at an important role of anti-oxidative pathways for tissue protection in chronic-progressive MS, particularly involving the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. Thus, novel therapeutics enhancing cellular resistance to free radicals could prove useful for MS treatment. Here, fumaric acid esters (FAE are a new, orally available treatment option which had already been tested in phase II/III MS trials demonstrating beneficial effects on relapse rates and magnetic resonance imaging markers. In vitro, application of dimethylfumarate (DMF leads to stabilization of Nrf2, activation of Nrf2-dependent transcriptional activity and abundant synthesis of detoxifying proteins. Furthermore, application of FAE involves direct modification of the inhibitor of Nrf2, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1. On cellular levels, the application of FAE enhances neuronal survival and protects astrocytes against oxidative stress. Increased levels of Nrf2 are detected in the central nervous system of DMF treated mice suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of MS. In EAE, DMF ameliorates the disease course and improves preservation of myelin, axons and neurons. Finally, Nrf2 is also up-regulated in the spinal cord of autopsy specimens from untreated patients with MS, probably as part of a naturally occurring anti-oxidative response. In summary, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative pathways are important players in MS pathophysiology and constitute a promising target for future MS therapies like FAE.

  8. Survival of brown trout during spring flood in DOC-rich streams in northern Sweden: the effect of present acid deposition and modelled pre-industrial water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudon, Hjalmar; Poléo, Antonio B S; Vøllestad, Leif Asbjørn; Bishop, Kevin

    2005-05-01

    Mortality and physiological responses in brown trout (Salmo trutta) were studied during spring snow melt in six streams in northern Sweden that differed in concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH declines. Data from these streams were used to create an empirical model for predicting fish responses (mortality and physiological disturbances) in DOC-rich streams using readily accessible water chemistry parameters. The results suggest that fish in these systems can tolerate higher acidity and inorganic aluminium levels than fish in low DOC streams. But even with the relatively low contemporary deposition load, anthropogenic deposition can cause fish mortality in the most acid-sensitive surface waters in northern Sweden during spring flood. However, the results suggests that it is only in streams with high levels of organically complexed aluminium in combination with a natural pH decline to below 5.0 during the spring where current sulphur deposition can cause irreversible damage to brown trout in the region. This study support earlier studies suggesting that DOC has an ameliorating effect on physiological disturbances in humic waters but the study also shows that surviving fish recover physiologically when the water quality returns to less toxic conditions following a toxic high flow period. The physiological response under natural, pre-industrial conditions was also estimated.

  9. Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria: from health-promoting benefits to stress tolerance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggianiello, Graziano; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Spano, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is able to produce capsular or extracellular polysaccharides, with various chemical compositions and properties. Polysaccharides produced by LAB alter the rheological properties of the matrix in which they are dispersed, leading to typically viscous and "ropy" products. Polysaccharides are involved in several mechanisms such as prebiosis and probiosis, tolerance to stress associated to food process, and technological properties of food. In this paper, we summarize the beneficial properties of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by LAB with particular attention to prebiotic properties and to the effect of exopolysaccharides on the LAB-host interaction mechanisms, such as bacterial tolerance to gastrointestinal tract conditions, ability of ESP-producing probiotics to adhere to intestinal epithelium, their immune-modulatory activity, and their role in biofilm formation. The pro-technological aspect of exopolysaccharides is discussed, focusing on advantageous applications of EPS in the food industry, i.e., yogurt and gluten-free bakery products, since it was found that these microbial biopolymers positively affect the texture of foods. Finally, the involvement of EPS in tolerance to stress conditions that are commonly encountered in fermented beverages such as wine is discussed.

  10. Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of poly(lactic acid)/ethylene-butyl acrylate copolymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacharawichanant, S.; Hoysang, P.; Ratchawong, S.

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports a melt blend of poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/ethylene-butyl acrylate copolymer (EBAC) with organoclay content at 3 phr. The mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of PLA/EBAC blends and nanocomposites were investigated. The morphological analysis revealed EBAC phase dispersed as a spherical domain in PLA matrix and the domain size of EBAC dispersed phase increased with increasing EBAC content. The addition of organoclay could improve the miscibility of PLA/EBAC blends due to the decrease of domain size of EBAC dispersed phase. The mechanical properties indicated that the strain at break and impact strength of PLA increased when added EBAC, but Young’s modulus and tensile strength decreased. Storage modulus increased with the addition of organoclay to the PLA/EBAC blends. The thermal properties found that the incorporation of organoclay in the PLA/EBAC blends did not effect on the glass transition temperature and melting temperature values relative to PLA. The degradation temperature of PLA improved with the addition of EBAC. This indicated that EBAC has more thermal stability and degradation temperature than PLA. From X-ray diffraction patterns displayed the characteristic peak in PLA/EBAC/organoclay nanocomposites appeared at the lower angle, which indicated the dispersed clay is intercalated in the polymer matrix. However, second-order diffraction peak appeared at the higher angle indicated that there was partially the conventional composite.

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals the Metabolic Mechanism of L-Ascorbic Acid in Ziziphus jujuba Mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunmei; Huang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) is the most economically important member of the Rhamnaceae family and contains a high concentration of ascorbic acid (AsA). To explore the metabolic mechanism of AsA accumulation, we investigated the abundance of AsA in the fruit development stages, the leaf and flower of Z. jujuba cv Junzao, and the mature fruit of one type of wild jujube (Z. jujuba var. spinosa Hu, Yanchuan sour jujube). And the expression patterns of genes involved in AsA biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling were analyzed. The result showed that AsA biosynthesis during early fruit development (the enlargement stage) is the main reason for jujube high accumulation. The L-galactose pathway plays a predominant role in the biosynthesis of AsA during jujube fruit development, and the genes GMP1, GME1, GGP, and GaLDH involved in the determination of AsA concentration during fruit development and in different genotypes; the myo-inositol pathway along with the genes GME2 and GMP2 in the L-galactose pathway play a compensatory role in maintaining AsA accumulation during the ripening stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism in regulating AsA accumulation for jujube. PMID:26913041

  12. The effects of sucrose on the mechanical properties of acid milk proteins-kappa-carrageenan gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sabadini

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties have been widely correlated with textural characteristics to determine the interactions during the process formation of dairy gel. These interactions are strongly affected by process conditions and system composition. In the present study, the rheological of acid-induced protein dairy gels with (2(7-3 and without (2(6-2 sucrose and subjected to small and large deformations were studied using an experimental design. The independent variables were the sodium caseinate, whey protein concentrate (WPC, carrageenan and sucrose concentrations as well as stirring speed and heat treatment time and temperature. Mechanical deformation tests were performed at 0.1, 1, 5, and 9 mm/s up to 80% of initial height. A heavy dependence of rupture stress on increasing crosshead speed and the formation of harder gels with the addition of sucrose were observed. Moreover the elastic and viscous moduli, obtained by fitting the Maxwell model to stress relaxation data, increased with increasing addition of sucrose. These results can be explained by preferential hydration of the casein with sucrose, causing an induction of casein-polysaccharide and casein-casein interactions.

  13. Studies on the mechanical properties of woven jute fabric reinforced poly(l-lactic acid composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Arifuzzaman Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of ecofriendly biocomposites to replace non-biodegradable synthetic fiber composites is the main objective of this study. To highlight the biocomposites as a perfect replacement, the plain woven jute fabric (WJF reinforced poly(l-lactic acid (PLLA composites were prepared by the hot press molding method. The influence of woven structure and direction on the mechanical properties i.e. tensile, flexural and impact properties was investigated. The average tensile strength (TS, tensile modulus (TM, flexural strength (FS, flexural modulus (FM, and impact strength (IS of untreated woven jute composite (in warp direction were improved about 103%, 211%, 95.2%, 42.4% and 85.9%, respectively and strain at maximum tensile stress for composite samples was enhanced by 11.7%. It was also found that the strengths and modulus of composites in warp direction are higher than those in weft direction. WJF composites in warp and weft directions presented superior mechanical properties than non-woven jute fabric (NWJF composites. Chemical treatment of jute fabric through benzoylation showed a positive effect on the properties of composites. Morphological studies by SEM demonstrated that better adhesion between the treated fabric and PLLA was achieved.

  14. Mechanism and Kinetics Study for Photocatalytic Oxidation Degradation: A Case Study for Phenoxyacetic Acid Organic Pollutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian Mun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalysis is a rapidly expanding technology for wastewater treatment, including a wide range of organic pollutants. Thus, understanding the kinetics and mechanism of the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO for degradation of phenoxyacetic acid (PAA is an indispensable component of risk assessment. In this study, we demonstrated that the central composite design (CCD coupled with response surface methodology (RSM was successfully employed to probe the kinetics and mechanism of PCO degradation for PAA using an efficient zinc oxide (ZnO photocatalyst. In our current case study, four independent factors such as ZnO dosage, initial concentration of PAA, solution pH, and reaction time on the PCO degradation for PAA were examined in detail. Based on our results obtained from RSM analyses, an efficient pathway leading to the high degradation rate (>90% was applying 0.4 g/L of ZnO dosage with 16 mg/L of concentration of PAA at pH 6.73 for 40 minutes. The experimental results were fitted well with the derived response model with R2 = 0.9922. This study offers a cost-effective way for probing our global environmental water pollution issue.

  15. Transcriptomic analysis reveals the metabolic mechanism of L-ascorbic acid in Ziziphus jujuba Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei eZhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. is the most economically important member of the Rhamnaceae family and contains a high concentration of ascorbic acid (AsA. To explore the metabolic mechanism of AsA accumulation, we investigated the abundance of AsA in the fruit development stages, the leaf and flower of Z. jujuba cv Junzao, and the mature fruit of one type of wild jujube (Z. jujuba var. spinosa Hu, Yanchuan sour jujube. And the expression patterns of genes involved in AsA biosynthesis, degradation and recycling were analyzed. The result showed that AsA biosynthesis during early fruit development (the enlargement stage is the main reason for jujube high accumulation. The L-galactose pathway plays a predominant role in the biosynthesis of AsA during jujube fruit development, and the genes GMP1, GME1, GGP, and GaLDH involved in the determination of AsA concentration during fruit development and in different genotypes; the myo-inositol pathway along with the genes GME2 and GMP2 in the L-galactose pathway play a compensatory role in maintaining AsA accumulation during the ripening stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism in regulating AsA accumulation for jujube.

  16. Osmotic Engine: Translating Osmotic Pressure into Macroscopic Mechanical Force via Poly(Acrylic Acid) Based Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Lukas; Weißenfeld, Felix; Klein, Christopher O.; Schlag, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Poly(acrylic acid)‐based hydrogels can swell up to 100–1000 times their own weight in desalinated water due to osmotic forces. As the swelling is about a factor of 2–12 lower in seawater‐like saline solutions (4.3 wt% NaCl) than in deionized water, cyclic swelling, and shrinking can potentially be used to move a piston in an osmotic motor. Consequently, chemical energy is translated into mechanical energy. This conversion is driven by differences in chemical potential and by changes in entropy. This is special, as most thermodynamic engines rely instead on the conversion of heat into mechanical energy. To optimize the efficiency of this process, the degree of neutralization, the degree of crosslinking, and the particle size of the hydrogels are varied. Additionally, different osmotic engine prototypes are constructed. The maximum mean power of 0.23 W kg−1 dry hydrogel is found by using an external load of 6 kPa, a polymer with 1.7 mol% crosslinking, a degree of neutralization of 10 mol%, and a particle size of 370–670 µm. As this is achieved only in the first round of optimization, higher values of the maximum power average over one cycle seem realistic. PMID:28932675

  17. Mechanism of the toxicity induced by natural humic acid on human vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Yusuke; Yustiawati; Tanaka, Masato; Gumiri, Sulmin; Ardianor; Hosokawa, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Shunitz; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2014-08-01

    Humic acid (HA), a group of high-molecular weight organic compounds characterized by an ability to bind heavy metals, is normally found in natural water. Although the impairment of vascular endothelial cells in the presence of humic substances has been reported to be involved in some diseases, the mechanisms responsible for this involvement remain unclear. In this study, we examined the cytotoxicity of HA obtained from peatland in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, to human vascular endothelial cells, as well as the mechanisms behind these effects. It was found that 50 mg/L HA showed cytotoxicity, which we considered to be mediated by apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway because of an increase in the expression of caspases 6 and 9 in response to HA administration. In addition, this cytotoxicity was enhanced when cells in this experimental system were exposed to oxidative stress, while it was decreased by the addition of vitamin C. Thus, we conclude that the apoptosis induced by HA depends upon oxidative stress. Furthermore, an iron chelator, DFO, showed a tendency to decrease HA-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting that iron may potentially mediate HA-induced oxidative stress. In conclusion, long-term consumption of HA-rich water obtained from our study area may cause damage to endothelial cells and subsequent chronic health problems. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  18. Tunable mechanical properties of green solid films based on deoxyribonucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, Hisao; Morimitsu, Yuma; Ohta, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Takahara, Atsushi; Tanaka, Keiji

    Promoting green innovation to establish a worldwide low-carbon society is an urgent priority. We here show that solid films made from deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) can be used as a structural material. The great advantage of DNA films over the ones made from synthetic polymers is that the mechanical properties are controllable, from glassy to rubbery, via semicrystalline by simply regulating the water content in the film. Why such unique mechanical properties can be manifested by the DNA films is determined from structural analyses using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and wide-angle X-ray diffraction measurements. With increasing water content, the conformation of DNA was changed from A-form in an amorphous state to B-form in a partially packed one. DNA in the B-form became densely packed as the film was stretched. Also, DNAs were intermolecularly cross-linked using 2,5-hexanedione based on reductive amination induced by 2-picoline borane in aqueous phase. Cross-linking points were directly observed by atomic force microscopy. The tensile properties of cross-linked films were much better than those of non-cross-linked DNA films.

  19. Salicylic acid-induced abiotic stress tolerance and underlying mechanisms in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Iqbal R.; Fatma, Mehar; Per, Tasir S.; Anjum, Naser A.; Khan, Nafees A.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses (such as metals/metalloids, salinity, ozone, UV-B radiation, extreme temperatures, and drought) are among the most challenging threats to agricultural system and economic yield of crop plants. These stresses (in isolation and/or combination) induce numerous adverse effects in plants, impair biochemical/physiological and molecular processes, and eventually cause severe reductions in plant growth, development and overall productivity. Phytohormones have been recognized as a strong tool for sustainably alleviating adverse effects of abiotic stresses in crop plants. In particular, the significance of salicylic acid (SA) has been increasingly recognized in improved plant abiotic stress-tolerance via SA-mediated control of major plant-metabolic processes. However, the basic biochemical/physiological and molecular mechanisms that potentially underpin SA-induced plant-tolerance to major abiotic stresses remain least discussed. Based on recent reports, this paper: (a) overviews historical background and biosynthesis of SA under both optimal and stressful environments in plants; (b) critically appraises the role of SA in plants exposed to major abiotic stresses; (c) cross-talks potential mechanisms potentially governing SA-induced plant abiotic stress-tolerance; and finally (d) briefly highlights major aspects so far unexplored in the current context. PMID:26175738

  20. Kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest for application of hydrometallurgical processes in a processing of complex sulphide ores and concentrates has increased in recent years. Their application provides better metal recoveries and reduced emission of gaseous and toxic ageneses in the environment. The kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching from complex sulphide concentrate with sulphuric acid and sodium nitrate solution at standard conditions was presented in this paper. The influences of temperature and time on the leaching degree of zinc were investigated and kinetic analysis of the process was accomplished. With temperature increasing from 60 to 90°C, the zinc leaching increased from 25.23% to 71.66% after 2 hours, i.e. from 59.40% to 99.83% after 4 hours. The selected kinetic model indicated that the diffusion through the product layer was the rate-controlling step during the sphalerite leaching. The activation energy was determined to be 55 kJ/mol in the temperature range 60-90°C. XRD, light microscopy and SEM/EDX analyses of the complex concentrate and leach residue confirmed formation of elemental sulphur and diffusion-controlled leaching mechanism.

  1. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Diethyl Ether by Chloramine-T in Acidic Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of diethyl ether (DE with sodium N-chloro-p-toluenesulphonamide (CAT in hydrochloric acid solution has been studied at (313°K.The reaction rate show a first order dependence on [CAT] and fractional order dependence on each [DE] and [H+] .The variation of ionic strength of the medium has no significant effect on the reaction rate , addition of p-toluenesulphonamide (p-TSA affects the reaction rate marginally the rate increased with decreasing dielectric constant of the medium , the stochiometry of the reaction was found to be 1:2 and oxidation products were identified , A Michaelis – Menten type mechanism has been suggested to explain the results.The equilibrium and the decomposition constants of CAT – diethyl ether complex have been evaluated. Thermodynamic parameters were computed by studying reaction at temperatures range ( 308 – 323°K for the rate limiting step and for the observed first order constants by the linear Arrhenius plot. The mechanism proposed and the derived rate law are consistent with observed kinetics.

  2. Pursuing the identification of O(2) deprivation survival mechanisms in plants related to selective mRNA translation, hormone-independent cellular elongation and preparation for the arrival of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingaki-Wells, Rachel N; Huang, Shaobai; Taylor, Nicolas L; Millar, A Harvey

    2011-10-01

    Anoxia can occur in crop fields when flooding forms a physical barrier that reduces oxygen availability. Rice, but not wheat, can germinate and elongate its coleoptile under anoxia, providing an excellent model for understanding mechanisms of anoxia tolerance. We have shown differential molecular responses of rice and wheat coleoptiles to anoxia and discovered novel metabolic adaptations in amino acid metabolism for tissue tolerance. In this addendum, we elaborate on our discussion to speculate on the functions of differentially regulated proteins and their possible roles in selective transcription and translation, alternative elongation strategies and preparedness for exposure to air. In addition, it is thought that rapid growth is a stress avoidance strategy; if adequate coleoptile growth occurs then plants can outgrow floodwaters to resume or begin aerobic respiration. An innate response mechanism to the arrival of air, and the oxidative stress inherent to this, would therefore be necessary in survival beyond the alleviation of anoxia. Thus, we emphasize the importance of recognizing anoxia as a multi-stage stress where responses otherwise considered counter-intuitive may have evolved as preparative defenses for when exposure to air occurs.

  3. Influence of various acids on the physico–mechanical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The changes in weight loss and compressive strength values for each acid solution within the test period were recorded. The acid resistance of mortars made from Portland cement was better than the pozzolanic cement incorporated samples after 120 days of acid attack. Keywords. Pozzolanic cement; hydrochloric acid; ...

  4. Adsorption Mechanisms of Dodecylbenzene Sulfonic Acid by Corn Straw and Poplar Leaf Biochars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biochar is an eco-friendly, renewable, and cost-effective material that can be used as an adsorbent for the remediation of contaminated environments. In this paper, two types of biochar were prepared through corn straw and poplar leaf pyrolysis at 300 °C and 700 °C (C300, C700, P300, P700. Brunaer–Emmett–Teller N2 surface area, scanning electron microscope, elemental analysis, and infrared spectra were used to characterize their structures. These biochars were then used as adsorbents for the adsorption of dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA. The microscopic adsorption mechanisms were studied by using infrared spectra, 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and electron spin resonance spectra. The surface area and pore volume of C700 (375.89 m2/g and 0.2302 cm3/g were the highest among all samples. Elemental analysis results showed that corn straw biochars had a higher aromaticity and carbon to nitrogen (C/N ratio than the poplar leaf biochars. High temperature caused the increase of carbon content and the decrease of oxygen content, which also gave the biochars a higher adsorption rate. Pseudo-second order kinetic provided a better fit with the experimental data. Adsorption isotherm experiments showed that the adsorption isotherm of C300 fit the linear model. For other biochars, the adsorption isotherms fitted Langmuir model. Biochars with high temperatures exhibited enhanced adsorption capacity compared with ones at low temperatures. The qmax values of biochars to DBSA followed the order of P700 > C700 > P300. The adsorption mechanisms were complex, including partition, anion exchange, the formation of H bonds, covalent bonds, and charge transfer. The adsorption by covalent bonding might be the key mechanism determining the adsorption capacity of P700.

  5. Investigation of antimalarial activity, cytotoxicity and action mechanism of piperazine derivatives of betulinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gloria N S; Schuck, Desirée C; Cruz, Laura N; Moraes, Miriam S; Nakabashi, Myna; Gosmann, Grace; Garcia, Célia R S; Gnoatto, Simone C B

    2015-01-01

    To semisynthesise piperazine derivatives of betulinic acid to evaluate antimalarial activity, cytotoxicity and action mechanism. The new derivatives were evaluated against the CQ-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain by flow cytometry (FC) using YOYO-1 as stain. Cytotoxicity of 4a and 4b was performed with HEK293T cells for 24 and 48 h by MTT assay. The capability of compound 4a to modulate Ca(2+) in the trophozoite stage was investigated. The trophozoites were stained with Fluo4-AM and analysed by spectrofluorimetry. Effect on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was tested for 4a by FC with DiOC6 (3) as stain. For β-haematin assay, 4a was incubated for 24 h with reagents such as haemin, and the fluorescence was measured by FlexStation at an absorbance of 405 nm. Antimalarial activity of 4a and 4b was IC50 = 1 and 4 μm, respectively. Compound 4a displayed cytotoxicity with IC50 = 69 and 29 μm for 24 and 48 h, respectively, and 4b was not cytotoxic at the tested concentrations. Addition of 4a leads to an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) . We have measured ΔΨm after treating parasites with the compound. Data on Figure 4a show that mitochondria were not affected. The action mechanism for 4a, inhibition of β-haematin formation (17%), was lower than CQ treatment (83%; IC50 = 3 mm). Compound 4a showed excellent antimalarial activity, and its action mechanism is involved in Ca(2+) pathway(s). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Radical and Non-Radical Mechanisms for Alkane Oxidations by Hydrogen Peroxide-Trifluoroacetic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Bays, J. Timothy; Shaw, Wendy J.; Linehan, John C.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.

    2001-02-01

    The oxidation of cyclohexane by the H2O2-trifluoroacetic acid system is revisited. Consistent with a previous report (Deno, N.; Messer, L. A. Chem. Comm. 1976, 1051), cyclohexanol forms initially but then esterifies to cyclohexyl trifluoroacetate. Small amounts of trans-1,2-cyclohexadiyl bis(trifluoroacetate) also form. Although these products form irrespective of the presence or absence of O2, dual mechanisms are shown to operate. In the absence of O2, the dominant mechanism is a radical chain reaction that is propagated by CF3• abstracting H from C6H12 and SH2 displacement of C6H11• on CF3CO2OH. The intermediacy of C6H11• and CF3• is inferred from production of CHF3 and CO2 along with cyclohexyl trifluoroacetate, or CDF3 when cyclohexane-d12 is used. In the presence of O2, fluoroform and CO2 are suppressed, the reaction rate slows, and the rate law approaches second order (first order in peracid and in C6H12). Trapping of cyclohexyl radicals by quinoxaline is inefficient except at elevated (75 °C) temperatures. Fluoroform and CO2, telltale evidence for the chain pathway, were not produced when quinoxaline was present in room temperature reactions. These observations suggest that a parallel, nonfree radical, oxenoid insertion mechanism dominates when O2 is present. A pathway is discussed in which a biradicaloid-zwiterionic transition state is attained by hydrogen transfer from alkane to peroxide oxygen with synchronous O-O bond scission.

  7. Hyaluronan Mixed Esters of Butyric and Retinoic Acid Affording Myocardial Survival and Repair without Stem Cell Transplantation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Cantoni, Silvia; Cavallini, Claudia; Bianchi, Francesca; Valente, Sabrina; Frascari, Irene; Olivi, Elena; Aquaro, Giovanni D.; Bonavita, Francesca; Scarlata, Ignazio; Maioli, Margherita; Vaccari, Valentina; Tassinari, Riccardo; Bartoli, Antonietta; Recchia, Fabio A.; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Ventura, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Possible cardiac repair by adult stem cell transplantation is currently hampered by poor cell viability and delivery efficiency, uncertain differentiating fate in vivo, the needs of ex vivo cell expansion, and consequent delay in transplantation after the onset of heart attack. By the aid of magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and immunohistochemistry, we show that injection of a hyaluronan mixed ester of butyric and retinoic acid (HBR) into infarcted rat hearts afforded substantial cardiovascular repair and recovery of myocardial performance. HBR restored cardiac [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and increased capillary density and led to the recruitment of endogenous Stro-1-positive stem cells. A terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated that HBR-treated hearts exhibited a decrease in the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes. In isolated rat cardiomyocytes and Stro-1 stem cells, HBR enhanced the transcription of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, kdr, akt, and pim-1. HBR also increased the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor, suggesting that the mixed ester may have recruited both myocardial and Stro-1 cells also. An increase in capillarogenesis was induced in vitro with medium obtained from HBR-exposed cells. In the infarcted myocardium, HBR injection increased histone H4 acetylation significantly. Acetyl-H4 immunoreactivity increased in rat cardiomyocytes and Stro-1 cells exposed to HBR, compared with untreated cells. In conclusion, efficient cardiac regenerative therapy can be afforded by HBR without the need of stem cell transplantation or vector-mediated gene delivery. PMID:20097747

  8. Hyaluronan mixed esters of butyric and retinoic acid affording myocardial survival and repair without stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Cantoni, Silvia; Cavallini, Claudia; Bianchi, Francesca; Valente, Sabrina; Frascari, Irene; Olivi, Elena; Aquaro, Giovanni D; Bonavita, Francesca; Scarlata, Ignazio; Maioli, Margherita; Vaccari, Valentina; Tassinari, Riccardo; Bartoli, Antonietta; Recchia, Fabio A; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Ventura, Carlo

    2010-03-26

    Possible cardiac repair by adult stem cell transplantation is currently hampered by poor cell viability and delivery efficiency, uncertain differentiating fate in vivo, the needs of ex vivo cell expansion, and consequent delay in transplantation after the onset of heart attack. By the aid of magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and immunohistochemistry, we show that injection of a hyaluronan mixed ester of butyric and retinoic acid (HBR) into infarcted rat hearts afforded substantial cardiovascular repair and recovery of myocardial performance. HBR restored cardiac [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and increased capillary density and led to the recruitment of endogenous Stro-1-positive stem cells. A terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated that HBR-treated hearts exhibited a decrease in the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes. In isolated rat cardiomyocytes and Stro-1 stem cells, HBR enhanced the transcription of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, kdr, akt, and pim-1. HBR also increased the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor, suggesting that the mixed ester may have recruited both myocardial and Stro-1 cells also. An increase in capillarogenesis was induced in vitro with medium obtained from HBR-exposed cells. In the infarcted myocardium, HBR injection increased histone H4 acetylation significantly. Acetyl-H4 immunoreactivity increased in rat cardiomyocytes and Stro-1 cells exposed to HBR, compared with untreated cells. In conclusion, efficient cardiac regenerative therapy can be afforded by HBR without the need of stem cell transplantation or vector-mediated gene delivery.

  9. Retention Mechanisms of Citric Acid in Ternary Kaolinite-Fe(III)-Citrate Acid Systems Using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Pan, Weinan; Regier, Tom; Hu, Yongfeng; Rumpel, Cornelia; Bolan, Nanthi; Sparks, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) stability in tropical soils is strongly interlinked with multivalent cation interaction and mineral association. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) represent the readily biodegradable OC. Therefore, investigating retention mechanisms of LMWOAs in mineral-cation-LMWOAs systems is critical to understanding soil C cycling. Given the general acidic conditions and dominance of kaolinite in tropical soils, we investigated the retention mechanisms of citric acid (CA) in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems with various Fe/CA molar ratios at pH ~3.5 using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES techniques. With Fe/CA molar ratios >2, the formed ferrihydrite mainly contributed to CA retention through adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios from 2 to 0.5, ternary complexation of CA to kaolinite via a five-coordinated Fe(III) bridge retained higher CA than ferrihydrite-induced adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios ≤0.5, kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate complexation preferentially occurred, but less CA was retained than via outer-sphere kaolinite-CA complexation. This study highlighted the significant impact of varied Fe/CA molar ratios on CA retention mechanisms in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems under acidic conditions, and clearly showed the important contribution of Fe-bridged ternary complexation on CA retention. These findings will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of CA and other LMWOAs in tropical soils. PMID:27212680

  10. Alteration of oxidative phosphorylation as a possible mechanism of the antifungal action of p-coumaric acid against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, J; Mendoza, L; Cotoras, M

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the mechanism of action of p-coumaric acid against isolate B05·10 of Botrytis cinerea. For this purpose, the effect of this compound on cell membrane, cell wall and oxidative phosphorylation was determined. Induction of oxidative stress triggered by this compound was also studied. p-coumaric acid showed antifungal effect on the mycelial growth. Additionally, the compound was able to retard the germination of Botrytis cinerea conidia. The mechanism of action of this compound was analysed using fluorescent probes. p-Coumaric acid did not affect the integrity of cell wall and plasmatic membrane and neither produced oxidative stress. Finally, it was shown that the compound produced an increase in oxygen consumption. p-coumaric acid performs as a mitochondrial uncoupler in B. cinerea. Its role as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation could be explained to its acidic, nonpolar and planar characteristics. These structural and chemical characteristics would favour ability of p-coumaric acid to pass through cellular membranes. Plant secondary metabolites can be used as an alternative way to control phytopathogenic fungi. The knowledge of the action mechanism of these compounds can contribute to design modified molecules with higher antifungal activity. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Progress in engineering acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the production of a variety of fermented foods, and are considered as probiotic due to their health-promoting effect. However, LAB encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial fermentation and application, among which acid stress is one of the most important survival challenges. Improving the acid stress resistance may contribute to the application and function of probiotic action to the host. Recently, the advent of genomics, functional genomics and high-throughput technologies have allowed for the understanding of acid tolerance mechanisms at a systems level, and many method to improve acid tolerance have been developed. This review describes the current progress in engineering acid stress resistance of LAB. Special emphasis is placed on engineering cellular microenvironment (engineering amino acid metabolism, introduction of exogenous biosynthetic capacity, and overproduction of stress response proteins) and maintaining cell membrane functionality. Moreover, strategies to improve acid tolerance and the related physiological mechanisms are also discussed.

  12. Survival pattern in patients with acute organophosphate poisoning on mechanical ventilation: A retrospective intensive care unit-based study in a tertiary care teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed M; Das, Bikramjit; Nadeem, Abu; Samal, Rajiv K

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) compound poisoning is one of the most common poisonings in India. The aim of the study was to study the outcomes and predictors of mortality in patients with acute OP poisoning requiring mechanical ventilation. A retrospective study was conducted in the intensive care unit and 117 patients were included. Diagnosis was performed from the history taken either from the patient or from the patient's relatives. Demographic data, month of the year, mode of poisoning, common age group, duration of mechanical ventilation, time of starting pralidoxime (PAM), and mortality were recorded. Chi square test, Pearson correlation test, and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was used. Data are presented as mean ± SD. 91.86% (79/86) of cases were suicidal and remaining cases were accidental. Duration of mechanical ventilation varied from less than 48 hours to more than 7 days. Mortality rate was 33.3%, 7.2%, and 100% in those who required mechanical ventilation for more than 7 days, 5 to 7 days, and 2 to 4 days, respectively. Lag time was less than 6 hrs in 13 patients and all of them survived. 17.1% and 28.1% patients died in whom PAM was started 6 to 12 hrs and 13 to 24 hrs after poisoning, respectively. There was statistically significant positive correlation between lag time of starting of PAM with duration of mechanical ventilation and total dose of PAM (P ventilation were independent predictors of death. Overall mortality rate was 18.6%. Mortality from OP compound poisoning is directly proportionate to the severity of poisoning, delay in starting PAM, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Death is not dependent on a single factor, rather contributory to these factors working simultaneously.

  13. Microbial iron management mechanisms in extremely acidic environments: comparative genomics evidence for diversity and versatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieto Pamela A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is an essential nutrient but can be toxic at high intracellular concentrations and organisms have evolved tightly regulated mechanisms for iron uptake and homeostasis. Information on iron management mechanisms is available for organisms living at circumneutral pH. However, very little is known about how acidophilic bacteria, especially those used for industrial copper bioleaching, cope with environmental iron loads that can be 1018 times the concentration found in pH neutral environments. This study was motivated by the need to fill this lacuna in knowledge. An understanding of how microorganisms thrive in acidic ecosystems with high iron loads requires a comprehensive investigation of the strategies to acquire iron and to coordinate this acquisition with utilization, storage and oxidation of iron through metal responsive regulation. In silico prediction of iron management genes and Fur regulation was carried out for three Acidithiobacilli: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (iron and sulfur oxidizer A. thiooxidans and A. caldus (sulfur oxidizers that can live between pH 1 and pH 5 and for three strict iron oxidizers of the Leptospirillum genus that live at pH 1 or below. Results Acidithiobacilli have predicted FeoB-like Fe(II and Nramp-like Fe(II-Mn(II transporters. They also have 14 different TonB dependent ferri-siderophore transporters of diverse siderophore affinity, although they do not produce classical siderophores. Instead they have predicted novel mechanisms for dicitrate synthesis and possibly also for phosphate-chelation mediated iron uptake. It is hypothesized that the unexpectedly large number and diversity of Fe(III-uptake systems confers versatility to this group of acidophiles, especially in higher pH environments (pH 4–5 where soluble iron may not be abundant. In contrast, Leptospirilla have only a FtrI-Fet3P-like permease and three TonB dependent ferri-dicitrate siderophore systems. This paucity of iron

  14. Expanding functional repertoires of fungal peroxisomes: contribution to growth and survival processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-ichi eMARUYAMA; Katsuhiko eKITAMOTO

    2013-01-01

    It has long been regarded that the primary function of fungal peroxisomes is limited to the β-oxidation of fatty acids, as mutants lacking peroxisomal function fail to grow in minimal medium containing fatty acids as the sole carbon source. However, studies in filamentous fungi have revealed that peroxisomes have diverse functional repertoires. This review describes the essential roles of peroxisomes in the growth and survival processes of filamentous fungi. One such survival mechanism involv...

  15. Mechanisms and Origins of Selectivities of the Lewis Acid-Catalyzed Diels-Alder Reactions between Arylallenes and Acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiyuan; Li, Wei; Houk, K N

    2017-06-16

    The mechanisms of recently reported Lewis acid-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions of arylallenes and acrylates were studied using density functional theory calculations. A stepwise mechanism involving short-lived zwitterion intermediates is established. The reaction is endo-selective in the presence of Lewis acid catalyst. The [2 + 2] cycloaddition is not observed because of the greater charge separation in the first step of the [2 + 2] cycloaddition. The origins of chirality transfer in the Diels-Alder reaction using chiral arylallenes are uncovered, and the absolute stereochemistry of the product is predicted.

  16. Recent Advances in Understanding Amino Acid Sensing Mechanisms that Regulate mTORC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liufeng Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is the central regulator of mammalian cell growth, and is essential for the formation of two structurally and functionally distinct complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 can sense multiple cues such as nutrients, energy status, growth factors and hormones to control cell growth and proliferation, angiogenesis, autophagy, and metabolism. As one of the key environmental stimuli, amino acids (AAs, especially leucine, glutamine and arginine, play a crucial role in mTORC1 activation, but where and how AAs are sensed and signal to mTORC1 are not fully understood. Classically, AAs activate mTORC1 by Rag GTPases which recruit mTORC1 to lysosomes, where AA signaling initiates. Plasma membrane transceptor L amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1-4F2hc has dual transporter-receptor function that can sense extracellular AA availability upstream of mTORC1. The lysosomal AA sensors (PAT1 and SLC38A9 and cytoplasmic AA sensors (LRS, Sestrin2 and CASTOR1 also participate in regulating mTORC1 activation. Importantly, AAs can be sensed by plasma membrane receptors, like G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR T1R1/T1R3, and regulate mTORC1 without being transported into the cells. Furthermore, AA-dependent mTORC1 activation also initiates within Golgi, which is regulated by Golgi-localized AA transporter PAT4. This review provides an overview of the research progress of the AA sensing mechanisms that regulate mTORC1 activity.

  17. Final report: Hydraulic mechanisms of survival and mortality during drought in pinon-juniper woodlands of southwestern USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pockman, William [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-23

    The goal of this project was to use rainfall manipulation of an intact pinon-juniper woodland in central New Mexico to understand the mechanisms that control the response of these species to extremes of rainfall. Experimental plots were installed in a pinon-juniper woodland at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge and treatments were imposed in August 2007. Treatments consisted of 1) a Drought treatment imposed by diverting approximately 45% of precipitation away from the plot, 2) and Irrigation treatment imposed by applying six 19 mm simulated rainfall events at regular intervals during the growing season, 3) a Cover Control treatment designed to assess the impact of the plastic troughs constructed on Drought plots without imposing the rainfall diversion, and 4) an untreated control that received no modification. Extensive pinon mortality was observed beginning one year after the start of drought treatment on hillslope plots, while a third drought plot on deeper soils did not exhibit pinon mortality until the fifth year of drought treatment. Pinon mortality occurred in the context of high levels of bark beetle activity, motivating the installation of two additional plots in 2010: a control plot and a drought plot built to the same standards as the original treatments but with bark beetle control maintained by pesticide application to the bole of target trees from 2010 - 2016. Although the drought treatment created similar conditions to those experienced on hillslope drought plots, the drought plot with bark beetle control exhibited no pinon mortality for 5 years even in the presence of high regional bark beetle activity in 2012/13. One of the goals of the research was to identify the mechanism of drought-induced mortality in pinon and juniper: 1) mortality due to catastrophic failure of water transport through plant tissues (hydraulic failure), 2) mortality due to limitations in carbon uptake (carbon starvation) and 3) either of the first two mechanisms with the

  18. Molecular mechanism of the priming by jasmonic acid of specific dehydration stress response genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Avramova, Zoya

    2016-01-01

    Plant genes that provide a different response to a similar dehydration stress illustrate the concept of transcriptional 'dehydration stress memory'. Pre-exposing a plant to a biotic stress or a stress-signaling hormone may increase transcription from response genes in a future stress, a phenomenon known as 'gene priming'. Although known that primed transcription is preceded by accumulation of H3K4me3 marks at primed genes, what mechanism provides for their appearance before the transcription was unclear. How augmented transcription is achieved, whether/how the two memory phenomena are connected at the transcriptional level, and whether similar molecular and/or epigenetic mechanisms regulate them are fundamental questions about the molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression. Although the stress hormone jasmonic acid (JA) was unable to induce transcription of tested dehydration stress response genes, it strongly potentiated transcription from specific ABA-dependent 'memory' genes. We elucidate the molecular mechanism causing their priming, demonstrate that stalled RNA polymerase II and H3K4me3 accumulate as epigenetic marks at the JA-primed ABA-dependent genes before actual transcription, and describe how these events occur mechanistically. The transcription factor MYC2 binds to the genes in response to both dehydration stress and to JA and determines the specificity of the priming. The MEDIATOR subunit MED25 links JA-priming with dehydration stress response pathways at the transcriptional level. Possible biological relevance of primed enhanced transcription from the specific memory genes is discussed. The biotic stress hormone JA potentiated transcription from a specific subset of ABA-response genes, revealing a novel aspect of the JA- and ABA-signaling pathways' interactions. H3K4me3 functions as an epigenetic mark at JA-primed dehydration stress response genes before transcription. We emphasize that histone and epigenetic marks are not synonymous and argue

  19. Effect of milk fermentation by kefir grains and selected single strains of lactic acid bacteria on the survival of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macuamule, C L S; Wiid, I J; van Helden, P D; Tanner, M; Witthuhn, R C

    2016-01-18

    Mycobacterium bovis that causes Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) can be transmitted to humans thought consumption of raw and raw fermented milk products from diseased animals. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) used in popular traditional milk products in Africa produce anti-microbial compounds that inhibit some pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. M. bovis BCG is an attenuated non-pathogenic vaccine strain of M. bovis and the aim of the study was to determine the effect of the fermentation process on the survival of M. bovis BCG in milk. M. bovis BCG at concentrations of 6 log CFU/ml was added to products of kefir fermentation. The survival of M. bovis BCG was monitored at 12-h intervals for 72 h by enumerating viable cells on Middlebrook 7H10 agar plates enriched with 2% BD BACTEC PANTA™. M. bovis BCG was increasingly reduced in sterile kefir that was fermented for a period of 24h and longer. In the milk fermented with kefir grains, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei or Lactobacillus casei, the viability of M. bovis BCG was reduced by 0.4 logs after 24h and by 2 logs after 48 h of fermentation. No viable M. bovis BCG was detected after 60 h of fermentation. Results from this study show that long term fermentation under certain conditions may have the potential to inactivate M. bovis BCG present in the milk. However, to ensure safety of fermented milk in Africa, fermentation should be combined with other hurdle technologies such as boiling and milk pasteurisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. MicroRNA networks regulated by all-trans retinoic acid and Lapatinib control the growth, survival and motility of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosaki, Mami; Paroni, Gabriela; Zanetti, Adriana; Gianni, Maurizio; Bolis, Marco; Lupi, Monica; Tsykin, Anna; Goodall, Gregory J.; Garattini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    SKBR3-cells, characterized by ERBB2/RARA co-amplification, represent a subgroup of HER2+ breast-cancers sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and Lapatinib. In this model, the two agents alone or in combination modulate the expression of 174 microRNAs (miRs). These miRs and predicted target-transcripts are organized in four interconnected modules (Module-1 to -4). Module-1 and Module-3 consist of ATRA/Lapatinib up-regulated and potentially anti-oncogenic miRs, while Module-2 contains ATRA/Lapatinib down-regulated and potentially pro-oncogenic miRs. Consistent with this, the expression levels of Module-1/-3 and Module-2 miRs are higher and lower, respectively, in normal mammary tissues relative to ductal-carcinoma-in-situ, invasive-ductal-carcinoma and metastases. This indicates associations between tumor-progression and the expression profiles of Module-1 to -3 miRs. Similar associations are observed with tumor proliferation-scores, staging, size and overall-survival using TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) data. Forced expression of Module-1 miRs, (miR-29a-3p; miR-874-3p) inhibit SKBR3-cell growth and Module-3 miRs (miR-575; miR-1225-5p) reduce growth and motility. Module-2 miRs (miR-125a; miR-193; miR-210) increase SKBR3 cell growth, survival and motility. Some of these effects are of general significance, being replicated in other breast cancer cell lines representing the heterogeneity of this disease. Finally, our study demonstrates that HIPK2-kinase and the PLCXD1-phospholipase-C are novel targets of miR-193a-5p/miR-210-3p and miR-575/miR-1225-5p, respectively. PMID:25961594

  1. A computational study on the mechanism of ynamide-mediated amide bond formation from carboxylic acids and amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song-Lin; Wan, Hai-Xing; Deng, Zhu-Qin

    2017-08-02

    This paper reports a computational study elucidating the reaction mechanism for ynamide-mediated amide bond formation from carboxylic acids and amines. The mechanisms have been studied in detail for ynamide hydrocarboxylation and the subsequent aminolysis of the resulting adduct by an amine. Ynamide hydrocarboxylation is kinetically favorable and thermodynamically irreversible, resulting in the formation of a key low-lying intermediate CP1 featuring geminal vinylic acyloxy and sulfonamide groups. The aminolysis of CP1 by the amine is proposed to be catalyzed by the carboxylic acid itself that imparts favourable bifunctional effects. In the proposed key transition state TSaminolysis-acid-iso2, the amine undergoes direct nucleophilic substitution at the acyl of CP1 to replace the enolate group in a concerted way, which is promoted by secondary hydrogen bonding of carboxylic acid with both the amine and CP1. These secondary interactions are suggested to increase the nucleophilicity of the amine and to activate the Cacyl-O bond to be cleaved, thereby stabilizing the aminolysis transition state. The concerted aminolysis mechanism is competitive with the classic stepwise nucleophilic acyl substitution mechanism that features sequential amine addition to acyl/intramolecular proton transfer/C-O bond cleavage and a key tetrahedral intermediate. Based on the mechanistic model, the carboxylic acid substrate effect and studies of more acidic CF3SO3H as the catalyst are in good agreement with the experimental observations, lending further support for the mechanistic model. The bifunctional catalytic effect of the carboxylic acid substrate may widely play a role in related amide bond-forming reactions and peptide formation chemistry.

  2. THE EFFECT OF KETAMINE AND ITS COMBINATION WITH INDOL-2-CARBOXYLIC ACID AND CAROVERINE ON SURVIVAL TIME OF MICE WITH EXPERIMENTAL TETANUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Mujezinović

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus, also known as lockjaw, is a very dangerous infectious acute, usually afebrile disease characterized by muscle spasms, affecting humans and various animal species. The causative agent of the disease is bacteria Clostridium tetani. This bacteria produces a specific neurotoxin known as Tetanus toxin, which consists of two components: tetanospasmin and tetanolysin. Light (L chains of tetanospamin cleavage synaptobrevin, an integral membrane component of the synaptic vesicles, which in turn prevent release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA into the synaptic cleft. The α- motor neurons are, therefore, under no inhibitory control as a result of which they undergo sustained excitatory discharge causing the characteristic motor spasms of tetanus. In this research, we attempted to normalize the disorders caused by tetanus toxin by using ketamine, a non-competitive antagonist of aspartate (at doses of 5, 10, 44 and 100 mg/kg of body weight – b.w., alone and in combination with indol-2-carboxylic acid, a competitive antagonist of aspartate (at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. and caroverine, a non-competitive antagonist of glutamate (at a dose of 1.2 mg/kg b.w.. Experiments were conducted on the albino mice of both sexes, weighing around 20-25 g. Experimental tetanus was induced by application of tetanus toxin. The administration of ketamine, alone and in combination with indol-2-carboxylic acid and caroverine was carried out 24 hours after administration of tetanus toxin once per day, until the mice died. It was found that ketamine had an effect only at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w., which slightly prolonged the LD50 periodin experimental group of mice, compared to the control group of mice with experimental tetanus. Thus, it can be concluded that administration of ketamine in this dose proved to be only slightly effective. On the other hand, combination of ketamine with indol-2-carboxylic acid slightly extended the survival time

  3. Spectroscopic studies of the interaction mechanisms between mono-caffeoylquinic acids and transferrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yanqing; Dong, Jing; Chen, Shizhong; Liu, Meixian; Wang, Daidong; Zhang, Xiaotian; Wang, Hong; Lin, Zongtao

    2017-06-01

    Transferrin (Tf) is an important protein responsible for circulating and transporting iron into cytoplasm. Tf can be taken into cells through endocytosis mediated by Tf receptor, which usually overexpresses in cancer cells. The Tf-Tf receptor pathway opens a possible avenue for novel targeted cancer therapy by utilizing Tf-binding active compounds. Among which, anti-cancer active caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) were recently found to be promising Tf-binders by our group. For better understanding the anti-cancer activities of CQAs, it is important to unveil the binding mechanisms between CQAs and Tf. In this study, the fluorescence quenching, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking were used to investigate the interactions between CQA and Tf. The results showed that the calculated apparent association constants of interactions between 1-, 3-, 4- and 5-CQA and Tf at 298 K were 7.97 × 105 M- 1, 4.36 × 107 M- 1, 6.58 × 105 M- 1 and 4.42 × 106 M- 1, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the interaction between 1-, 3-, 5-CQA and Tf is due to H-bonding, and electrostatic interactions were likely involved in the binding of 4-CQA and Tf. The CD results indicated that bindings of 1-CQA, 4-CQA and 5-CQA with Tf resulted in more stretched β-turn and random coil translated from β-sheet. In contrast, 3-CQA led to more stable a-helix conformation. Molecular docking studies of CQAs with Tf further displayed that CQAs were able to interact with residues near Fe3 + binding site. The spectroscopic studies revealed the action mechanisms, thermodynamics and interacting forces between CQAs and Tf, and thus are helpful for future design and discovery of Tf-binders for targeted cancer therapy applying Tf-Tf receptor pathway.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of gallic acid-induced growth inhibition, apoptosis, and necrosis in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shu-Chung; Wu, Chun-Chi; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Yen, Jung-Hsing

    2017-06-15

    To explore the effect and molecular mechanism of gallic acid (GA) on the cytostatic and cytotoxicity of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFs). HSFs were treated with a serial dose of GA for indicated time. The cytostatic and cytotoxicity of GA were evaluated by microscopy, trypan blue exclusion assay and LDH releasing. The mechanisms of GA-induced cytostatic were examined by cell cycle distribution assay and the expression of cell cycle-relative protein. GA-elicited apoptosis were verified by TUNEL assay, mitochondria membrane potential, caspase activity and the expression of apoptosis-relative protein. GA-induced necrosis was confirmed by lysosome rupture using acridine orange stain. Various blockers, including intracellular calcium chelator; BAPTA-AM, IP3R blocker; 2-APB, calpain inhibitor, ALLM and ALLN were used to address the signaling cascade in GA-induced HSF necrosis. GA-induced growth inhibition, apoptosis, and necrosis in HSFs depend on increasing dose. HSFs treated with GA at non-cytotoxic concentrations (50 to 75μM) significant increased both the S- and G2/M-phase HSFs population, and this event was accompanied with down-regulation of cyclin A, cyclin B, CDK1 and CDK2. Incubation of HSFs with 100-150μM of GA induced apoptosis through Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial-dependent pathway. While the concentrations up to 200μM of GA that elicited necrosis via a calcium/calpain I/lysosome rupture signaling axis. Interestingly, GA at 200μM did not harm to keratinocyte. These results revealed that GA might have the potential to be developed as a treatment for patients with hypertrophic scar. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Weibull Statistical Analysis on the Mechanical Properties of SiC by Immersion in Acidic and Alkaline Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Seok-Hwan [Jungwon Univ., Koisan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sang-Cheol; Nam, Ki-Woo [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    A Weibull statistical analysis of the mechanical properties of SiC ceramics was carried out by immersion in acidic and alkaline solutions. The heat treatment was carried out at 1373 K. The corrosion of SiC was carried out in acidic and alkaline solutions under KSL1607. The bending strength of corroded crack-healed specimens decreased 47 % and 70 % compared to those of uncorroded specimens in acidic and alkaline solutions, respectively. The corrosion of SiC ceramics is faster in alkaline solution than in acid solution. The scale and shape parameters were evaluated for the as-received and corroded materials, respectively. The shape parameter of the as-received material corroded in acidic and alkaline solutions was significantly more apparent in the acidic solution. Further, the heat-treated material was large in acidic solution but small in alkaline solution. The shape parameters of the as-received and heat-treated materials were smaller in both acidic and alkaline solutions.

  6. Tumor suppressor p53 induces apoptosis of host lymphocytes experimentally infected by Leishmania major, by activation of Bax and caspase-3: a possible survival mechanism for the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshrefi, Mozhgan; Spotin, Adel; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Mahami-Oskouei, Mahmoud; Baradaran, Behzad; Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Mansoori, Behzad

    2017-08-01

    Apoptosis of infected host macrophages by Leishmania spp. is mainly addressed as one of the survival mechanisms of the parasite. However, there is no eligible data about whether tumor suppressor p53 could induce the apoptosis of host lymphocytes-treated Leishmania major via the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway. In this study, the amastigotes of L. major obtained from ten cutaneous leishmaniases (CL) patients were separately isolated and cultured in N.N.N and RPMI 1640 media. L. major was definitely confirmed by targeting Cyt b gene following sequencing. Subsequently, 2-3 × 106 lymphocytes obtained from ten healthy individuals were isolated and co-cultured with 1-2 × 106 L. major promastigotes. Following 6 h of exposure time, the enzymatic activity of caspase-3 was determined by fluorometric assay in each L. major-treated lymphocytes and cell control (only lymphocyte). The mRNA expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, and caspase-3 genes were assessed by quantitative real-time-PCR analysis following 6 to 9 h of exposure times. The Bcl-2 mRNA expression in L. major-treated lymphocytes was 100-fold down-regulated relative to cell control. The mRNA expressions of p53 and caspase-3 were over-expressed 1.8- and 3.2-fold up-regulated relative to control lymphocytes, respectively. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activity were higher than the control group (Pv major-treated host lymphocytes dependent on p53 tumor suppressor via mitochondrial pathway may probably address as an auxiliary survival mechanism of L. major in CL patients. However, here is much work ahead to figure out the multiple functions played by apoptosis in the evasion of L. major.

  7. Influence of various acids on the physico–mechanical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    After 28 days of hardening, the samples were immersed into four different concentrations of hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid solutions for a period of 120 days. The changes in weight loss and compressive strength values for each acid solution within the test period were recorded. The acid resistance of mortars made ...

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The oxidation of eleven amino acids by tetrabutylammonium tribromide (TBATB) in aqueous acetic acid results in the formation of the corresponding carbonyl compounds and ammonia. The reaction is first order with respect to TBATB. Michaelis-Menten type kinetics is observed with some of the amino acids while others ...

  9. Reaction mechanism of the acidic hydrolysis of highly twisted amides: Rate acceleration caused by the twist of the amide bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Jon I; Formoso, Elena; Mercero, Jose M; Lopez, Xabier

    2006-08-03

    We present an ab initio study of the acid hydrolysis of a highly twisted amide and a planar amide analogue. The aim of these studies is to investigate the effect that the twist of the amide bond has on the reaction barriers and mechanism of acid hydrolysis. Concerted and stepwise mechanisms were investigated using density functional theory and polarizable continuum model calculations. Remarkable differences were observed between the mechanism of twisted and planar amide, due mainly to the preference for N-protonation of the former and O-protonation of the latter. In addition, we were also able to determine that the hydrolytic mechanism of the twisted amide will be pH dependent. Thus, there is a preference for a stepwise mechanism with formation of an intermediate in the acid hydrolysis, whereas the neutral hydrolysis undergoes a concerted-type mechanism. There is a nice agreement between the characterized intermediate and available X-ray data and a good agreement with the kinetically estimated rate acceleration of hydrolysis with respect to analogous undistorted amide compounds. This work, along with previous ab initio calculations, describes a complex and rich chemistry for the hydrolysis of highly twisted amides as a function of pH. The theoretical data provided will allow for a better understanding of the available kinetic data of the rate acceleration of amides upon twisting and the relation of the observed rate acceleration with intrinsic differential reactivity upon loss of amide bond resonance.

  10. Computational and experimental investigation into mechanical performances of Poly-L-Lactide Acid (PLLA) coronary stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Fang, Gang; Zhao, Yinghong; Wang, Guohui; Cai, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Poly-L-lactide Acid (PLLA), as a credible biodegradable polymer-based material, can provide a promising amount of degradation time for vessel remodeling. Served as a sort of reliable intravascular implants, PLLA stents are expected to provide sufficient scaffolding to the target arteries without generating too much recoil after deployment. Besides, the stress and strain distribution should be as homogeneous as possible, and the stent conformability in fitting to the nature curvature of the vessels needs to be guaranteed. In the present study, mechanical performances of a stent made of PLLA material were investigated based on 3-D finite element method (FEM) and experiment verification. Simulations contained several deformation steps: crimping, spring-back after crimping, expanding and spring-back after expanding. The stent's deformation and stress/strain distributions were analyzed. Several indexes including the radial recoil ratio after crimping and expanding to different sizes, the radial properties including radial strength, the radial stiffness and the collapse pressure were established. In vitro static loading experiments of the stent were conducted as the verification of the FEM results, and a good agreement between them was obtained. Moreover, simulation of three-point bending was performed to assess the bending flexibility of the stent, and bending stiffness was defined as a measurement of structure resistance to the bending deformation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The crosslinking degree controls the mechanical, rheological, and swelling properties of hyaluronic acid microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, Andréa Arruda Martins; Pires, Aline Mara Barbosa; Lichy, Rafael; Rodrigues, Ana Amélia; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2015-02-01

    Viscosupplements, used for treating joint and cartilage diseases, restore the rheological properties of synovial fluid, regulate joint homeostasis and act as scaffolds for cell growth and tissue regeneration. Most viscosupplements are hydrogels composed of hyaluronic acid (HA) microparticles suspended in fluid HA. These microparticles are crosslinked with chemicals to assure their stability against enzyme degradation and to prolong the action of the viscosupplement. However, the crosslinking also modifies the mechanical, swelling and rheological properties of the HA microparticle hydrogels, with consequences on the effectiveness of the application. The aim of this study is to correlate the crosslinking degree (CD) with these properties to achieve modulation of HA/DVS microparticles through CD control. Because divinyl sulfone (DVS) is the usual crosslinker of HA in viscosupplements, we examined the effects of CD by preparing HA microparticles at 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, and 5:1 HA/DVS mass ratios. The CD was calculated from inductively coupled plasma spectrometry data. HA microparticles were previously sized to a mean diameter of 87.5 µm. Higher CD increased the viscoelasticity and the extrusion force and reduced the swelling of the HA microparticle hydrogels, which also showed Newtonian pseudoplastic behavior and were classified as covalent weak. The hydrogels were not cytotoxic to fibroblasts according to an MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Biosynthesis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Marine Invertebrates: Recent Advances in Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroig, Óscar; Tocher, Douglas R.; Navarro, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Virtually all polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) originate from primary producers but can be modified by bioconversions as they pass up the food chain in a process termed trophic upgrading. Therefore, although the main primary producers of PUFA in the marine environment are microalgae, higher trophic levels have metabolic pathways that can produce novel and unique PUFA. However, little is known about the pathways of PUFA biosynthesis and metabolism in the levels between primary producers and fish that are largely filled by invertebrates. It has become increasingly apparent that, in addition to trophic upgrading, de novo synthesis of PUFA is possible in some lower animals. The unequivocal identification of PUFA biosynthetic pathways in many invertebrates is complicated by the presence of other organisms within them. These organisms include bacteria and algae with PUFA biosynthesis pathways, and range from intestinal flora to symbiotic relationships that can involve PUFA translocation to host organisms. This emphasizes the importance of studying biosynthetic pathways at a molecular level, and the continual expansion of genomic resources and advances in molecular analysis is facilitating this. The present paper highlights recent research into the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of PUFA biosynthesis in marine invertebrates, particularly focusing on cephalopod molluscs. PMID:24152561

  13. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten

    2009-12-03

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved ?-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Photodegradation of selected β-blockers in aqueous fulvic acid solutions: kinetics, mechanism, and product analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Li, Hong; Wang, Zongping; Li, Huijie; Tao, Tao; Zuo, Yuegang

    2012-06-01

    The photodegradation of the widely used β-blockers atenolol and metoprolol were investigated in the presence of fulvic acid (FA) under simulated sunlight. Both atenolol and metoprolol undergo indirect photodegradation in the FA solutions. The triplet excited state of FA ((3)FA(∗)) was verified to be main reactive species responsible for the photosensitized degradation of β-blockers. An electron transfer mechanism for the interaction between β-blockers and (3)FA(∗) was proposed on the basis of a series of experiments. Magnetic property of metal ions exhibited significant impact on photosensitized degradation. Diamagnetic metal ions such as Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), and Al(3+) negligibly affected the degradation. In contrast, paramagnetic metal ions including Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and Cr(3+) markedly inhibited the reactions in the order of Cr(3+) < Fe(3+) < Cu(2+) < Mn(2+). The inhibition was related to the complexation ability with FA. By LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis, deisopropyl-atenolol (metoprolol) was identified as the main photosensitized product. The degradation pathways of β-blockers involving electron transfer processes were proposed. This finding strongly suggests that (3)FA(∗) was important reactive species for the degradation of β-blockers in natural waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanism of Growth Inhibition of Prostate Cancer Xenografts by Valproic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Sidana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproic Acid (VPA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, has been demonstrated to cause a marked decrease in proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa cells in vitro and a significant reduction in tumor volume in vivo. The goal of this study is to better understand the VPA-induced growth inhibition in vivo, by studying expression of various markers in PCa xenografts. Methods. For in vitro experiments, PCa cells were treated with 0, 0.6, and 1.2 mM VPA for 14 days. For in vivo models, experimental animals received 0.4% VPA in drinking water for 35 days. Tissue microarray was generated using cell pellets and excised xenografts. Results. VPA treatment causes cell cycle arrest in PCa cells in vivo, as determined by increase in p21 and p27 and decrease in cyclin D1 expression. Increased expression of cytokeratin18 was also seen in xenografts. LNCaP xenografts in treated animals had reduced androgen receptor (AR expression. While decreased proliferation was found in vitro, increase in apoptosis was found to be the reason for decreased tumor growth in vivo. Also, an anti-angiogenic effect was observed after VPA treatment. Conclusion. VPA inhibits tumor growth by multiple mechanisms including cell cycle arrest, induction of differentiation, and inhibition of growth of tumor vasculature.

  16. Chemical stability and degradation mechanisms of ferulic acid (F.A) within various cosmetic formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu-Jing; Gao, Xiang; Gong, Hui; Lin, Xin-Rong; Saint-Leger, Didier; Senee, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Ferulic acid (F.A) receives significant interest in the beauty industry with regard to its skin-whitening and anti-oxidant properties. However, its use in cosmetics is limited due to pH- and temperature-related instabilities. In this study, we investigated the stability of F.A in eight different prototype formulae. The results confirmed that in our conditions the stability of F.A is pH- and temperature-related. Additionally, the nature of the solvent dipropylene glycol (DPPG) showed a capacity to stabilize F.A. A series of experiments was further planned for studying the mechanism of degradation of F.A. In a prototype of a cosmetic medium, F.A degrades first through a decarboxylation step, leading to 4-hydroxy-3-methoxystyrene (PVG). Further, F.A and PVG are both involved in an additional reaction, resulting in the trans-conjugation dimer of PVG. The consequences of these results in formulating F.A are discussed.

  17. Morphology, thermal, mechanical, and barrier properties of graphene oxide/poly(lactic acid) nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Woo; Choi, Hyun Muk [Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To improve the physical and gas barrier properties of biodegradable poly(lactic acid) (PLA) film, two graphene nanosheets of highly functionalized graphene oxide (0.3 wt% to 0.7 wt%) and low-functionalized graphene oxide (0.5 wt%) were incorporated into PLA resin via solution blending method. Subsequently, we investigated the effects of material parameters such as loading level and degree of functionalization for the graphene nanosheets on the morphology and properties of the resultant nanocomposites. The highly functionalized graphene oxide (GO) caused more exfoliation and homogeneous dispersion in PLA matrix as well as more sustainable suspensions in THF, compared to low-functionalized graphene oxide (LFGO). When loaded with GO from 0.3 wt% to 0.7 wt%, the glass transition temperature, degree of crystallinity, tensile strength and modulus increased steadily. The GO gave rise to more pronounced effect in the thermal and mechanical reinforcement, relative to LFGO. In addition, the preparation of fairly transparent PLA-based nanocomposite film with noticeably improved barrier performance achieved only when incorporated with GO up to 0.7wt%. As a result, GO may be more compatible with hydrophilic PLA resin, compared to LFGO, resulting in more prominent enhancement of nanocomposites properties.

  18. Bioremoval of humic acid from water by white rot fungi: exploring the removal mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahmatkesh, M; Spanjers, H; Toran, M J; Blánquez, P; van Lier, J B

    2016-12-01

    Twelve white rot fungi (WRF) strains were screened on agar plates for their ability to bleach humic acid (HA). Four fungal strains were selected and tested in liquid media for removal of HA. Bioremediation was investigated by HA color removal and changes in the concentration and molecular size distribution of HA by size exclusion chromatography. Trametes versicolor and Phanerochaete chrysosporium showed the highest HA removal efficiency, reaching about 80%. Laccase and manganese peroxidase were measured as extracellular enzymes and their relation to the HA removal by WRF was investigated. Results indicated that nitrogen limitation could enhance the WRF extracellular enzyme activity, but did not necessarily increase the HA removal by WRF. The mechanism of bioremediation by WRF was shown to involve biosorption of HA by fungal biomass and degradation of HA to smaller molecules. Also, contradicting previous reports, it was shown that the decolorization of HA by WRF could not necessarily be interpreted as degradation of HA. Biosorption experiments revealed that HA removal by fungal biomass is dependent not only on the amount of biomass as the sorbent, but also on the fungal species. The involvement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was confirmed by comparing the HA removal capability of fungi with and without the presence of a CYP inhibitor. The ability of purified laccase from WRF to solely degrade HA was proven and the importance of mediators was also demonstrated.

  19. Photolytic and photocatalytic degradation of tetracycline: Effect of humic acid on degradation kinetics and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-11-15

    The widespread occurrence of tetracycline (TC) in the aquatic environment poses a potential risk to aquatic ecosystem and human health. In this study, elimination of TC by photolysis and TiO2 photocatalysis were investigated by using mercury-free UVA-LED as an alternative light source. Particular emphasis was given to the effect of humic acid (HA) on the reaction kinetics and mechanisms of TC removal. Photolytic degradation of TC was slightly enhanced by HA due to its photosensitization effect, as evidenced by the increased steady-state concentrations of OH. The most abundant transformation product of TC, which was formed by the attack of OH radical, was enhanced during photolytic degradation. During photocatalytic experiments, HA dramatically inhibited TC loss due to the surface deactivation of TiO2 and OH quenching. The steady-state concentration of OH was dramatically decreased in the presence of HA. Identification of transformation products showed that HA could inhibit the oxidation pathways initiated by OH during photocatalysis of TC. These findings provide further insights into the assessment of photolysis and photocatalysis for antibiotics elimination in natural waters where HA exists ubiquitously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biosynthesis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Marine Invertebrates: Recent Advances in Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Navarro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtually all polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA originate from primary producers but can be modified by bioconversions as they pass up the food chain in a process termed trophic upgrading. Therefore, although the main primary producers of PUFA in the marine environment are microalgae, higher trophic levels have metabolic pathways that can produce novel and unique PUFA. However, little is known about the pathways of PUFA biosynthesis and metabolism in the levels between primary producers and fish that are largely filled by invertebrates. It has become increasingly apparent that, in addition to trophic upgrading, de novo synthesis of PUFA is possible in some lower animals. The unequivocal identification of PUFA biosynthetic pathways in many invertebrates is complicated by the presence of other organisms within them. These organisms include bacteria and algae with PUFA biosynthesis pathways, and range from intestinal flora to symbiotic relationships that can involve PUFA translocation to host organisms. This emphasizes the importance of studying biosynthetic pathways at a molecular level, and the continual expansion of genomic resources and advances in molecular analysis is facilitating this. The present paper highlights recent research into the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of PUFA biosynthesis in marine invertebrates, particularly focusing on cephalopod molluscs.

  1. The vasorelaxant effect of gallic acid involves endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Lais Moraes; de Oliveira, Thiago Sardinha; da Costa, Rafael Menezes; de Souza Gil, Eric; Costa, Elson Alves; Passaglia, Rita de Cassia Aleixo Tostes; Filgueira, Fernando Paranaíba; Ghedini, Paulo César

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms of action involved in the vasorelaxant effect of gallic acid (GA) were examined in the isolated rat thoracic aorta. GA exerted a relaxant effect in the highest concentrations (0.4-10mM) in both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings. Pre-incubation with L-NAME, ODQ, calmidazolium, TEA, 4-aminopyridine, and barium chloride significantly reduced the pEC50 values. Moreover, this effect was not modified by indomethacin, wortmannin, PP2, glibenclamide, or paxillin. Pre-incubation of GA (1, 3, and 10mM) in a Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution attenuated CaCl2-induced contractions and blocked BAY K8644-induced vascular contractions, but it did not inhibit a contraction induced by the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmatic reticulum stores. In addition, a Western blot analysis showed that GA induces phosphorylation of eNOS in rat thoracic aorta. These results suggest that GA induces relaxation in rat aortic rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, resulting in eNOS phosphorylation and opening potassium channels. Additionally, the relaxant effect by an endothelium-independent pathway involves the blockade of the Ca(2+) influx via L-type Ca(2+) channels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring the mechanism of beta-amyloid toxicity attenuation by multivalent sialic acid polymers through the use of mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Christopher B; Patel, Dhara A; Good, Theresa A

    2009-05-21

    beta-Amyloid peptide (A beta), the primary protein component in senile plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been implicated in neurotoxicity associated with AD. Previous studies have shown that the A beta-neuronal membrane interaction plays a role in the mechanism of A beta toxicity. More specifically, it is thought that A beta interacts with ganglioside rich and sialic acid rich regions of cell surfaces. In light of such evidence, we have used a number of different sialic acid compounds of different valency or number of sialic acid moieties per molecule to attenuate A beta toxicity in a cell culture model. In this work, we proposed various mathematical models of A beta interaction with both the cell membrane and with the multivalent sialic acid compounds, designed to act as membrane mimics. These models allow us to explore the mechanism of action of this class of sialic acid membrane mimics in attenuating the toxicity of A beta. The mathematical models, when compared with experimental data, facilitate the discrimination between different modes of action of these materials. Understanding the mechanism of action of A beta toxicity inhibitors should provide insight into the design of the next generation of molecules that could be used to prevent A beta toxicity associated with AD.

  3. A transcriptomic computational analysis of mastic oil-treated Lewis lung carcinomas reveals molecular mechanisms targeting tumor cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roussos Charis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus variation chia, a blend of bioactive terpenes with recognized medicinal properties, has been recently shown to exert anti-tumor growth activity through inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and inflammatory response. However, no studies have addressed its mechanisms of action at genome-wide gene expression level. Methods To investigate molecular mechanisms triggered by mastic oil, Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells were treated with mastic oil or DMSO and RNA was collected at five distinct time points (3-48 h. Microarray expression profiling was performed using Illumina mouse-6 v1 beadchips, followed by computational analysis. For a number of selected genes, RT-PCR validation was performed in LLC cells as well as in three human cancer cell lines of different origin (A549, HCT116, K562. PTEN specific inhibition by a bisperovanadium compound was applied to validate its contribution to mastic oil-mediated anti-tumor growth effects. Results In this work we demonstrated that exposure of Lewis lung carcinomas to mastic oil caused a time-dependent alteration in the expression of 925 genes. GO analysis associated expression profiles with several biological processes and functions. Among them, modifications on cell cycle/proliferation, survival and NF-κB cascade in conjunction with concomitant regulation of genes encoding for PTEN, E2F7, HMOX1 (up-regulation and NOD1 (down-regulation indicated some important mechanistic links underlying the anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of mastic oil. The expression profiles of Hmox1, Pten and E2f7 genes were similarly altered by mastic oil in the majority of test cancer cell lines. Inhibition of PTEN partially reversed mastic oil effects on tumor cell growth, indicating a multi-target mechanism of action. Finally, k-means clustering, organized the significant gene list in eight clusters demonstrating a similar

  4. Taurolithocholic acid exerts cholestatic effects via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanisms in perfused rat livers and rat hepatocyte couplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Denk, Gerald U; Soroka, Carol J; Wimmer, Ralf; Rust, Christian; Paumgartner, Gustav; Boyer, James L

    2003-05-16

    Taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) is a potent cholestatic agent. Our recent work suggested that TLCA impairs hepatobiliary exocytosis, insertion of transport proteins into apical hepatocyte membranes, and bile flow by protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon)-dependent mechanisms. Products of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) stimulate PKCepsilon. We studied the role of PI3K for TLCA-induced cholestasis in isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL) and isolated rat hepatocyte couplets (IRHC). In IPRL, TLCA (10 micromol/liter) impaired bile flow by 51%, biliary secretion of horseradish peroxidase, a marker of vesicular exocytosis, by 46%, and the Mrp2 substrate, 2,4-dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione, by 95% and stimulated PI3K-dependent protein kinase B, a marker of PI3K activity, by 154% and PKCepsilon membrane binding by 23%. In IRHC, TLCA (2.5 micromol/liter) impaired canalicular secretion of the fluorescent bile acid, cholylglycylamido fluorescein, by 50%. The selective PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin (100 nmol/liter), and the anticholestatic bile acid tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA, 25 micromol/liter) independently and additively reversed the effects of TLCA on bile flow, exocytosis, organic anion secretion, PI3K-dependent protein kinase B activity, and PKCepsilon membrane binding in IPRL. Wortmannin also reversed impaired bile acid secretion in IRHC. These data strongly suggest that TLCA exerts cholestatic effects by PI3K- and PKCepsilon-dependent mechanisms that are reversed by tauroursodeoxycholic acid in a PI3K-independent way.

  5. Quantum mechanical determinations of reaction mechanisms, acid base, and redox properties of nitrogen oxides and their donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Andrew S; Fukuto, Jon M; Houk, K N

    2005-01-01

    This chapter reviews computational methods based on quantum mechanics and commonly used commercial programs for the exploration of chemical phenomena, particularly in the field of nitrogen oxides. Examples from the literature are then used to demonstrate the application of these methods to the chemistry and biochemistry of various nitrogen oxides. These examples include determining reaction mechanisms using computed reaction energies, predicting rates of reactions using transition state theory, and determining chemical properties such as hydration equilibria, pKa's, and reduction potentials.

  6. An evaluation of possible mechanisms for conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfuric acid and sulfate aerosols in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack G. Calvert

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms and rates of conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide, sulfuric acid, and other "sulfate" aerosol precursors are considered in view of current knowledge related to atmospheric reactions and chemical kinetics. Several heterogeneous pathways exist for SO2 oxidation promoted on solid catalyst particles and in aqueous...

  7. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid exerts anticholestatic effects by a cooperative cPKC alpha-/PKA-dependent mechanism in rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimmer, R.; Hohenester, S.; Pusl, T.; Denk, G. U.; Rust, C.; Beuers, U.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) exerts anticholestatic effects in part by protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent mechanisms. Its taurine conjugate, TUDCA, is a cPKC alpha agonist. We tested whether protein kinase A (PKA) might contribute to the anticholestatic action of TUDCA via cooperative cPKC

  8. Inhibition of snowshoe hare succinate dehydrogenase activity as a mechanism of deterrence for papyriferic acid in birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Sorensen Forbey; Xinzhu Pu; Dong Xu; Knut Kielland; John. Bryant

    2011-01-01

    The plant secondary metabolite papyriferic acid (PA) deters browsing by snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) on the juvenile developmental stage of the Alaska paper birch (Betula neoalaskana). However, the physiological mechanism that reduces browsing remains unknown. We used pharmacological assays and molecular modeling to test the...

  9. Cholesterol-lowering effects and mechanisms in view of bile acid pathway of resveratrol and resveratrol-glucuronides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resveratrol (Res) was previously reported to be capable of lowering plasma TC and LDL-C. The mechanism behind Res is not clearly understood, although it is presumed to have an effect on bile acid metabolism in the liver: a significant way in eliminating cholesterol from the body. As one of the major...

  10. Survival of Unstressed and Acid-, Cold-, and Starvation-Stress-Adapted Listeria monocytogenes in Ham Extract with Hops Beta Acids and Consumer Acceptability of HBA on Ready-to-Eat Ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of hops beta acids (HBA against unstressed and stress-adapted Listeria monocytogenes in ham extract and the consumers’ acceptability of HBA on ready-to-eat (RTE hams were investigated. Unstressed or acid-, cold-, or starvation-stress-adapted L. monocytogenes was inoculated (1.3–1.5 log CFU/mL into 10% ham extract, without (control or with HBA (4.44 or 10.0 µg/mL. Survival/growth of the pathogen during storage (7.2°C, 26 days was monitored periodically. Sensory evaluation (30 participants, 9-point hedonic scale was performed with hams dipped into 0.05, 0.11, and 0.23% HBA solution. Ham extracts without HBA supported rapid growth of unstressed and stress-adapted cells with growth rates of 0.39–0.71 log CFU/mL/day and lag phases of 0–3.26 days. HBA inhibited growth of unstressed L. monocytogenes by slowing (P0.05 affect sensory attributes of RTE ham. These results are useful for RTE meat processors to develop operational protocols using HBA to control L. monocytogenes.

  11. Survival of Unstressed and Acid-, Cold-, and Starvation-Stress-Adapted Listeria monocytogenes in Ham Extract with Hops Beta Acids and Consumer Acceptability of HBA on Ready-to-Eat Ham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Shen, Cangliang

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of hops beta acids (HBA) against unstressed and stress-adapted Listeria monocytogenes in ham extract and the consumers' acceptability of HBA on ready-to-eat (RTE) hams were investigated. Unstressed or acid-, cold-, or starvation-stress-adapted L. monocytogenes was inoculated (1.3–1.5 log CFU/mL) into 10% ham extract, without (control) or with HBA (4.44 or 10.0 µg/mL). Survival/growth of the pathogen during storage (7.2°C, 26 days) was monitored periodically. Sensory evaluation (30 participants, 9-point hedonic scale) was performed with hams dipped into 0.05, 0.11, and 0.23% HBA solution. Ham extracts without HBA supported rapid growth of unstressed and stress-adapted cells with growth rates of 0.39–0.71 log CFU/mL/day and lag phases of 0–3.26 days. HBA inhibited growth of unstressed L. monocytogenes by slowing (P 0.05) affect sensory attributes of RTE ham. These results are useful for RTE meat processors to develop operational protocols using HBA to control L. monocytogenes. PMID:26539527

  12. Effect of sole or combined administration of nitrate and 3-nitro-1-propionic acid on fermentation and Salmonella survivability in alfalfa-fed rumen cultures in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Alejandro Castañeda; Trachsel, Julian; Allen, Heather K; Corral-Luna, Agustin; Gutierrez-Bañuelos, Hector; Ochoa-Garcia, Pedro Antonia; Ruiz-Barrera, Oscar; Hume, Michael E; Callaway, Todd R; Harvey, Roger B; Beier, Ross C; Anderson, Robin C; Nisbet, David J

    2017-04-01

    Ruminal methanogenesis is a digestive inefficiency resulting in the loss of dietary energy consumed by the host and contributing to environmental methane emission. Nitrate is being investigated as a feed supplement to reduce rumen methane emissions but safety and efficacy concerns persist. To assess potential synergies of co-administering sub-toxic amounts of nitrate and 3-nitro-1-propionate (NPA) on fermentation and Salmonella survivability with an alfalfa-based diet, ruminal microbes were cultured with additions of 8 or 16mM nitrate, 4 or 12mM NPA or their combinations. All treatments decreased methanogenesis compared to untreated controls but volatile fatty acid production and fermentation of hexose were also decreased. Nitrate was converted to nitrite, which accumulated to levels inhibitory to digestion. Salmonella populations were enriched in nitrate only-treated cultures but not in cultures co- or solely treated with NPA. These results reveal a need for dose optimization to safely reduce methane production with forage-based diets. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Absorbability, Mechanism and Structure-Property Relationship of Three Phenolic Acids from the Flowers of Trollius chinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Wen Wu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The absorption properties, mechanism of action, and structure-property relationship of three phenolic acids isolated from the flowers of Trollius chinensis Bunge, namely, proglobeflowery acid (PA, globeflowery acid (GA and trolloside (TS, were investigated using the human Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The results showed that these three phenolic acids were transported across the Caco-2 cell monolayer in a time and concentration dependent manner at the Papp level of 10−5 cm/s, and their extent of absorption correlated with their polarity and molecular weight. In conclusion, all three of these compounds were easily absorbed through passive diffusion, which implied their high bioavailability and significant contribution to the effectiveness of T. chinensis.

  14. A Novel Antibiotic Mechanism of l-Cyclopropylalanine Blocking the Biosynthetic Pathway of Essential Amino Acid l-Leucine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bingji; Shen, Jinwen; Yindeeyoungyeon, Wandee; Ruan, Yuan

    2017-12-14

    The unusual amino acid l-cyclopropylalanine was isolated from the mushroom Amanita virgineoides after detection in an anti-fungal screening test. l-Cyclopropylalanine was found to exhibit broad-spectrum inhibition against fungi and bacteria. The anti-fungal activity was found to be abolished in the presence of the amino acid l-leucine, but not any other amino acids, indicating that l-cyclopropylalanine may block the biosynthesis of the essential amino acid l-leucine, thereby inhibiting fungal and bacteria growth. Further biochemical studies found l-cyclopropylalanine indeed inhibits α-isopropylmalate synthase (α-IMPS), the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthetic pathway of l-leucine. Inhibition of essential l-leucine synthesis in fungal and bacteria organisms, a pathway absent in host organisms such as humans, may represent a novel antibiotic mechanism to counter the ever-increasing problem of drug resistance to existing antibiotics.

  15. Promoter Analysis of the Human Ascorbic Acid Transporters SVCT1 & 2: Mechanisms of Adaptive Regulation in Liver Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidling, Jack C.; Rubin, Stanley A.

    2010-01-01

    Ascorbic acid, the active form of vitamin C, is a vital antioxidant in the human liver, yet the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ascorbic acid transporters (hSVCT1 and hSVCT2) in liver cells are poorly understood. Therefore, we characterized the minimal promoter regions of hSVCT1 & 2 in cultured human liver epithelial cells (HepG2) and examined the effects of ascorbic acid deprivation and supplementation on activity and regulation of the transport systems. Identified minimal promoters required for basal activity were found to include multiple cis-regulatory elements, whereas mutational analysis demonstrated that HNF-1 sites in the hSVCT1 promoter and KLF/Sp1 sites in the hSVCT2 promoter were essential for activities. When cultured in ascorbic acid deficient or supplemented media, HepG2 cells demonstrated significant (P Ascorbic acid uptake, and in hSVCT1 mRNA and protein levels as well as hSVCT1 promoter activity. However, no significant changes in hSVCT2 expression or promoter activity were observed during ascorbic acid deficient or supplemented conditions. We mapped the ascorbic acid responsive region in the hSVCT1 promoter and determined that HNF-1 sites are important for the adaptive regulation response. The results of these studies further characterize the hSVCT1 and 2 promoters, establish that ascorbic acid uptake by human liver epithelial cells is adaptively regulated, and show that transcriptional mechanisms via HNF-1 in the hSVCT1 promoter may, in part, be involved in this regulation. PMID:20471816

  16. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  17. Effect of Enriched Artemia sp. by EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid; C20:5n-3 and DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid; C22:6n-3 on Survival Rate of Swimming Crab Portunus pelagicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Agus Suprayudi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient content of natural food is one of the main factors for determining the successful of marine fish fry production.  EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid and DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid are two essential fatty acids for marine fish larvae.   Low levels of EPA and DHA content in natural food is major problem in marine fish larval production.  Rotifers fed by Nannochloropsis contained EPA about 0.94%-1.46% and DHA was limited, while in Artemia was 0.27%-0.39% EPA and DHA was undetected (Suprayudi et al., 2002a.  Feeding on supplemented Artemia with EPA 28G and DHA 70G in ratio of 1:1 could not significantly improved its survival rate and larval development time, while growth by length and carapas width at first crab were higher  than  that of fed with unenriched Artemia. Keywords: EPA, DHA, Artemia, swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus   ABSTRAK Kandungan nutrisi dalam pakan alami merupakan salah satu faktor utama yang menentukan keberhasilan produksi benih spesies akuatik laut.  EPA (asam ekosapentanat dan DHA (asam dokosaheksanat merupakan 2 asam lemak esensil bagi larva ikan laut.  Kandungan EPA dan DHA yang rendah pada pakan alami merupakan masalah utama dalam produksi larva ikan laut.  Rotifer yang diberi pakan Nannochloropsis mengandung EPA 0,94%-1,46% dan DHA dengan jumlah yang sangat kecil, sementara Artemia EPA mengandung 0,27%-0,39% dan DHA tidak terdeteksi (Suprayudi et al., 2002a. Pemberian Artemia yang diperkaya dengan EPA 28G dan DHA 70G dengan perbandingan 1:1 tidak memberikan hasil yang signifikan pada tingkat kelangsungan hidup dan waktu perkembangan larva rajungan, sementara pertumbuhan panjang dan lebar karapas lebih baik pada crab 1 dibandingkan dengan yang diberi Artemia tidak diperkaya. Kata kunci: EPA, DHA, Artemia, rajungan, Portunus pelagicus

  18. The loss of function of PhaC1 is a survival mechanism that counteracts the stress caused by the overproduction of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates in Pseudomonas putidaΔfadBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, José I; Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M; Olivera, Elías R; Luengo, José M

    2015-09-01

    The poly-3-hydroxylkanoate (PHA)-overproducing mutant Pseudomonas putida U ΔfadBA (PpΔfadBA) lacks the genes encoding the main β-oxidation pathway (FadBA). This strain accumulates enormous amounts of bioplastics when cultured in chemically defined media containing PHA precursors (different n-alkanoic or n-aryl-alkanoic acids) and an additional carbon source. In medium containing glucose or 4-hydroxy-phenylacetate, the mutant does not accumulate PHAs and grows just as the wild type (P. putida U). However, when the carbon source is octanoate, growth is severely impaired, suggesting that in PpΔfadBA, the metabolic imbalance resulting from a lower rate of β-oxidation, together with the accumulation of bioplastics, causes severe physiological stress. Here, we show that PpΔfadBA efficiently counteracts this latter effect via a survival mechanism involving the introduction of spontaneous mutations that block PHA accumulation. Surprisingly, genetic analyses of the whole pha cluster revealed that these mutations occurred only in the gene encoding one of the polymerases (phaC1) and that the loss of PhaC1 function was enough to prevent PHA synthesis. The influence of these mutations on the structure of PhaC1 and the existence of a protein-protein (PhaC1-PhaC2) interaction that explains the functionality of the polymerization system are discussed herein. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect and mechanism of dioscin from Dioscorea spongiosa on uric acid excretion in animal model of hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Jin, Lijun; Liu, Jinchang; Wang, Wei; Yu, Haiyang; Li, Jian; Chen, Qian; Wang, Tao

    2018-03-25

    Dioscin, a spirostane glycoside, the rhizoma of Dioscorea septemloba (Diocoreacea) is used for diuresis, rheumatism, and joints pain. Given the poor solubility and stability of Dioscin, we proposed a hypothesis that Dioscin's metabolite(s) are the active substance(s) in vivo to contribute to the reducing effects on serum uric acid levels. The aim of this study is to identify the active metabolite(s) of Dioscin in vivo and to explore the mechanism of its antihyperuricemic activity. After oral administration of Dioscin in potassium oxonate (PO) induced hyperuricemia rats and adenine-PO induced hyperuricemia mice models, serum uric acid and creatinine levels, clearance of uric acid and creatinine, fractional excretion of uric acid, and renal pathological lesions were determined were used to evaluate the antihyperuricemic effects. Renal glucose transporter-9 (GLUT-9) and organic anion transporter-1 (OAT-1) expressions were analyzed by western blotting method. Renal uric acid excretion was evaluated using stably urate transporter-1 (URAT-1) transfected human epithelial kidney cell line. Intestinal uric acid excretion was evaluated by measuring the transcellular transport of uric acid in HCT116 cells. In hyperuricemia rats, both 25 and 50mg/kg of oral Dioscin decreased serum uric acid levels over 4h. In the hyperuricemia mice, two weeks treatment of Dioscin significantly decreased serum uric acid and creatinine levels, increased clearance of uric acid and creatinine, increased fractional excretion of uric acid, and reduced renal pathological lesions caused by hyperuricemia. In addition, renal GLUT -9 was significantly down-regulated and OAT-1 was up-regulated in Dioscin treated hyperuricemia mice. Dioscin's metabolite Tigogenin significantly inhibited uric acid re-absorption via URAT1 from 10 to 100μM. Diosgenin and Tigogenin increased uric acid excretion via ATP binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2). Decreasing effect of Dioscin on serum uric acid level and

  20. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damodaran, T.V., E-mail: tdamodar@nccu.edu [Dept of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Dept of Biology, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707 (United States); Attia, M.K. [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Abou-Donia, M.B., E-mail: donia@mc.duke.edu [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Organophosphorus-ester induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia progressing to paralysis with a concomitant central and peripheral, distal axonapathy. Diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) produces OPIDN in the chicken that results in mild ataxia in 7-14 days and severe paralysis as the disease progresses with a single dose. White leghorn layer hens were treated with DFP (1.7 mg/kg, sc) after prophylactic treatment with atropine (1 mg/kg, sc) in normal saline and eserine (1 mg/kg, sc) in dimethyl sulfoxide. Control groups were treated with vehicle propylene glycol (0.1 ml/kg, sc), atropine in normal saline and eserine in dimethyl sulfoxide. The hens were euthanized at different time points such as 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 days, and the tissues from cerebrum, midbrain, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord were quickly dissected and frozen for mRNA (northern) studies. Northern blots were probed with BCL2, GADD45, beta actin, and 28S RNA to investigate their expression pattern. Another set of hens was treated for a series of time points and perfused with phosphate buffered saline and fixative for histological studies. Various staining protocols such as Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E); Sevier-Munger; Cresyl echt Violet for Nissl substance; and Gallocynin stain for Nissl granules were used to assess various patterns of cell death and degenerative changes. Complex cell death mechanisms may be involved in the neuronal and axonal degeneration. These data indicate altered and differential mRNA expressions of BCL2 (anti apoptotic gene) and GADD45 (DNA damage inducible gene) in various tissues. Increased cell death and other degenerative changes noted in the susceptible regions (spinal cord and cerebellum) than the resistant region (cerebrum), may indicate complex molecular pathways via altered BCL2 and GADD45 gene expression, causing the homeostatic imbalance between cell survival and cell death mechanisms. Semi quantitative

  1. Fatty-acid-binding protein inhibition produces analgesic effects through peripheral and central mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoxue; Studholme, Keith; Kanjiya, Martha P; Luk, Jennifer; Bogdan, Diane; Elmes, Matthew W; Carbonetti, Gregory; Tong, Simon; Gary Teng, Yu-Han; Rizzo, Robert C; Li, Huilin; Deutsch, Dale G; Ojima, Iwao; Rebecchi, Mario J; Puopolo, Michelino; Kaczocha, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular carriers for endocannabinoids, N-acylethanolamines, and related lipids. Previous work indicates that systemically administered FABP5 inhibitors produce analgesia in models of inflammatory pain. It is currently not known whether FABP inhibitors exert their effects through peripheral or central mechanisms. Here, we examined FABP5 distribution in dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord and examined the analgesic effects of peripherally and centrally administered FABP5 inhibitors. Results Immunofluorescence revealed robust expression of FABP5 in lumbar dorsal root ganglia. FABP5 was distributed in peptidergic calcitonin gene-related peptide-expressing dorsal root ganglia and non-peptidergic isolectin B4-expressing dorsal root ganglia. In addition, the majority of dorsal root ganglia expressing FABP5 also expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and peripherin, a marker of nociceptive fibers. Intraplantar administration of FABP5 inhibitors reduced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of chronic inflammatory pain. In contrast to its robust expression in dorsal root ganglia, FABP5 was sparsely distributed in the lumbar spinal cord and intrathecal administration of FABP inhibitor did not confer analgesic effects. Administration of FABP inhibitor via the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) route reduced thermal hyperalgesia. Antagonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha blocked the analgesic effects of peripherally and i.c.v. administered FABP inhibitor while antagonism of cannabinoid receptor 1 blocked the effects of peripheral FABP inhibition and a TRPV1 antagonist blocked the effects of i.c.v. administered inhibitor. Although FABP5 and TRPV1 were co-expressed in the periaqueductal gray region of the brain, which is known to modulate pain, knockdown of FABP5 in the periaqueductal gray using adeno-associated viruses and pharmacological FABP5

  2. Mechanical and moisture barrier properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and halloysite nanotubes reinforced polylactic acid (PLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberton, J.; Martelli, S. M.; Fakhouri, F. M.; Soldi, V.

    2014-08-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) has been larger used in biomedical field due to its low toxicity and biodegradability. The aim of this study was to produce PLLA nanocomposites, by melt extrusion, containing Halloysite nanotubes (HNT) and/or titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. Immediately after drying, PLLA was mechanically homogenized with the nanofillers and then melt blended using a single screw extruder (L/D = 30) at a speed of 110 rpm, with three heating zones in which the following temperatures were maintained: 150, 150 and 160°C (AX Plasticos model AX14 LD30). The film samples were obtained by compression molding in a press with a temperature profile of 235 ± 5°C for 2.5 min, after pressing, films were cooled up to room temperature. The mechanical tests were performed according to ASTM D882-09 and the water vapor permeability (WVP) was measured according to ASTM E-96, in triplicate. The tensile properties indicated that the modulus was improved with increased TiO2 content up to 1g/100g PLLA. The Young's modulus (YM) of the PLA was increased from 3047 MPa to 3222 MPa with the addition of 1g TiO2/100g PLLA. The tensile strength (TS) of films increases with the TiO2 content. In both cases, the YM and TS are achieved at the 1% content of TiO2 and is due to the reinforcing effect of nanoparticles. Pristine PLA showed a strain at break (SB) of 3.56%, while the SB of nanocomposites were significant lower, for instance the SB of composite containing 7.5 g HNT/100g PLLA was around 1.90 %. The WVP of samples was increased by increasing the nano filler content. It should be expected that an increase of nanofiller content would decrease the mass transfer of water molecules throughout the samples due to the increase in the way water molecules will have to cross to permeate the material. However, this was not observed. Therefore, this result can be explained considering the molecular structure of both fillers, which contain several hydroxyl groups in the surface, making the

  3. Cytotoxicity and comparative binding mechanism of piperine with human serum albumin and α-1-acid glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeggoni, Daniel Pushparaju; Rachamallu, Aparna; Kallubai, Monika; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2015-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) and α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) (acute phase protein) are the plasma proteins in blood system which transports many drugs. To understand the pharmacological importance of piperine molecule, here, we studied the anti-inflammatory activity of piperine on mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7) cell lines, which reveals that piperine caused an increase in inhibition growth of inflammated macrophages. Further, the fluorescence maximum quenching of proteins were observed upon binding of piperine to HSA and AGP through a static quenching mechanism. The binding constants obtained from fluorescence emission were found to be K(piperine) = 5.7 ± .2 × 10(5) M(-1) and K(piperine) = 9.3± .25 × 10(4) M(-1) which correspond to the free energy of -7.8 and -6.71 kcal M(-1)at 25 °C for HSA and AGP, respectively. Further, circular dichrosim studies revealed that there is a marginal change in the secondary structural content of HSA due to partial destabilization of HSA-piperine complexes. Consequently, inference drawn from the site-specific markers (phenylbutazone, site I marker) studies to identify the binding site of HSA noticed that piperine binds at site I (IIA), which was further authenticated by molecular docking and molecular dynamic (MD) studies. The binding constants and free energy corresponding to experimental and computational analysis suggest that there are hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions when piperine binds to HSA. Additionally, the MD studies have showed that HSA-piperine complex reaches equilibration state at around 3 ns, which prove that the HSA-piperine complex is stable in nature.

  4. Preparation of crosslinked poly (acryloyloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) microsphere and its adsorption and mechanism towards shikimic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Jiying; Wang, Ruixin; Li, Huan; Li, Xinyan; Yang, Shanshan; Liu, Haisi; Gao, Baojiao

    2017-02-01

    Shikimic acid (SA) is a key raw material for the synthesis of the antiviral drug, but its extraction and separation from plants is still limited. Crosslinked poly (acryloyloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride, DAC) microspheres were synthesized via inverse-phase suspension polymerization. In the synthesizing, N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (MBA) was used as crosslinker, cyclohexane as dispersed medium and span-60 as dispersants, obtaining CPDAC gel microspheres. The effect of polymerization condition on balling performance and the characteristics of CPDAC were examined. The adsorption properties of CPDAC towards SA were mainly explored and the data of adsorption isotherm were analyzed by using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Sips and Toth models. Furthermore, the adsorption mechanism was analyzed in depth, and the adsorption thermodynamics was also investigated. The results show that in order to prepare CPDAC, water phase must be added dropwise to oil phase, and the volume ratio of oil-water is more than 2:1. The mean diameter of CPDAC decreases with increasing span-60 and accelerating agitating rate. The strong electrostatic interaction is formed between quaternary ammonium nitrogen of CPDAC and COO - of SA. The adsorption kinetic data is fitted well with pseudo-first-order model. The adsorption ability is higher in aqueous water than ethanol, reaching 108mg/g, and Toth model is more suitable for describing the actual adsorption process. The adsorption of CPDAC towards SA is dependent on the pH value of the medium. The adsorption process is exothermic, the adsorption amount decreases with the increase of temperature, and the process is driven by enthalpy. The adsorption amount decreases with the increase of salinity. The reusability of CPDAC towards SA can keep 86.1% at the sixth cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of N-chlorosaccharin oxidation of malic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Kumar Singh; Hari D. Gupta; Mohammad U. Khan; Santosh S. Baghel

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic study of N-chlorosaccharin (NCSA) oxidation of malic acid (MA) in aqueous acetic acid medium in presence of perchloric acid has been investigated. The reactions exhibit first-order dependency in oxidant and HClO4 while order varies from one to zero in substrate. The reactions are acid catalyzed and retarded by the addition of saccharin, a byproduct of reaction. The rate of oxidation decreases with decrease in dielectric constant of the medium. The effect of temperature on the reaction...

  6. DFT study on the ionic cyclization mechanism of copolymers of acrylonitrile-itaconic acid: Direct or autocatalytic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qiuhan; Shi, Zhijun; Li, Dingxiong; Zhu, Caizhen; Wang, Mingliang

    2017-11-01

    The direct and autocatalytic ionic cyclization mechanism of copolymers of acrylonitrile-itaconic acid P(AN-IA) have been studied using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31+G (d, p) level, respectively. By comparing the direct mechanism with autocatalytic mechanism, it was found that the free energy barriers of the cyclization reaction were hugely lowered by including a nearby P(AN-IA) copolymer serving as a catalyst. The calculated free energy barrier of cyclization is about 22.74 kcal mol-1, which is in good agreement with the experimental activation barrier of 26.1 kcal mol-1. The cyclization of P(AN-IA) would proceed by rather an autocatalytic mechanism than a direct mechanism.

  7. Association of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony with survival benefit from revascularization: a study of gated positron emission tomography in patients with ischemic LV dysfunction and narrow QRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlJaroudi, Wael [Imaging Institute, Heart and Vascular, Cleveland, OH (United States); Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute, Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Alraies, M.C. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hachamovitch, Rory; Jaber, Wael A.; Brunken, Richard; Cerqueira, Manuel D.; Marwick, Thomas [Imaging Institute, Heart and Vascular, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-10-15

    LV mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) is a risk marker in narrow QRS cardiomyopathy, but its association with treatment outcome is not well defined. We determined the incremental prognostic value of LVMD in ischemic cardiomyopathy, and assessed its interaction with scar, myocardium in jeopardy and subsequent revascularization. Stress and rest {sup 82}Rb gated PET were performed in 486 consecutive patients (66 {+-} 11 years of age, 82 % men, LV ejection fraction 26 {+-} 6 %) with ischemic cardiomyopathy and QRS <120 ms. LVMD was determined as the standard deviation (SD) of the regional time to minimum volume on phase analysis of the gated PET scan. A propensity score was determined to adjust for nonrandomized referral after imaging to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In a Cox proportional hazards model used to determine the association between measures of LVMD and survival time, CABG was included as a time-dependent covariate and the use of an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) after imaging was modeled as a stratification factor. Over 1.9 {+-} 1.4 years, 96 patients (20 %) underwent CABG and 108 (22 %) died. LVMD was a predictor of mortality (HR 1.16. 95 % CI 1.03;1.30, per 10 increase in phase SD, p = 0.02) after adjusting for baseline covariates, prior ICD use, the use of postimaging CABG, and other imaging data. There was a significant interaction between phase SD and CABG. Nested Cox models showed that LVMD carried prognostic information incremental to clinical variables, ejection fraction and CABG. LVMD is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in ischemic cardiomyopathy, and may identify patients with a differential survival benefit from CABG versus medical therapy. (orig.)

  8. Trends in the incidence of intensive care unit invasive mechanical ventilation and subsequent 2-year survival in very elderly New Zealanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, D G; Purdie, G; Hicks, P

    2015-01-01

    The number of elderly in the general population is growing. There are therefore implications for the provision of intensive care unit (ICU) care to elderly patients. Our aim was to determine the incidence of ICU invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), long-term outcomes of patients treated with IMV, and trends in these variables over a 10-year period in New Zealand, with a focus on very elderly patients (aged 80 years and over). Analysis of New Zealand public hospital discharge data from July 1999 to June 2010, with linked long-term mortality data. Transfers or readmissions to different hospitals were linked using a national unique patient identifier. There were 58 003 patients treated with IMV in a New Zealand ICU. Of these patients, 6.6% were very elderly. Population rates of ICU IMV declined or were static over all age groups. The 2-year mortality rate ranged from 15% in patients aged 16-39 years to 52% in the very elderly. The 2-year mortality rates for the very elderly were highest for acute medical patients (78%), followed by acute surgical admissions (46%) and elective admissions (35%). The 2-year mortality rate for all patients declined over the study period, and declined or was static for all age groups and admission types. In the very elderly, the standardised mortality ratio of patients surviving at 1 year who survived their second year after admission, compared with the age-matched general population, was lower than all other age groups. For very elderly patients over the period 1999-2009, the population rate of IMV was static and 2-year mortality declined. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  9. The EGFR/ErbB3 Pathway Acts as a Compensatory Survival Mechanism upon c-Met Inhibition in Human c-Met+ Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven N Steinway

    Full Text Available c-Met, a high-affinity receptor for Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, plays a critical role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients with activated HGF/c-Met signaling have a significantly worse prognosis. Targeted therapies using c-Met tyrosine kinase inhibitors are currently in clinical trials for HCC, although receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition in other cancers has demonstrated early success. Unfortunately, therapeutic effect is frequently not durable due to acquired resistance.We utilized the human MHCC97-H c-Met positive (c-Met+ HCC cell line to explore the compensatory survival mechanisms that are acquired after c-Met inhibition. MHCC97-H cells with stable c-Met knockdown (MHCC97-H c-Met KD cells were generated using a c-Met shRNA vector with puromycin selection and stably transfected scrambled shRNA as a control. Gene expression profiling was conducted, and protein expression was analyzed to characterize MHCC97-H cells after blockade of the c-Met oncogene. A high-throughput siRNA screen was performed to find putative compensatory survival proteins, which could drive HCC growth in the absence of c-Met. Findings from this screen were validated through subsequent analyses.We have previously demonstrated that treatment of MHCC97-H cells with a c-Met inhibitor, PHA665752, results in stasis of tumor growth in vivo. MHCC97-H c-Met KD cells demonstrate slower growth kinetics, similar to c-Met inhibitor treated tumors. Using gene expression profiling and siRNA screening against 873 kinases and phosphatases, we identified ErbB3 and TGF-α as compensatory survival factors that are upregulated after c-Met inhibition. Suppressing these factors in c-Met KD MHCC97-H cells suppresses tumor growth in vitro. In addition, we found that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway serves as a negative feedback signal responsible for the ErbB3 upregulation after c-Met inhibition. Furthermore, in vitro studies demonstrate that

  10. Mechanisms of action and resistance to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (As2O 3) in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Akihiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2013-06-01

    Since the introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the overall survival rate has improved dramatically. However, relapse/refractory patients showing resistance to ATRA and/or As2O3 are recognized as a clinically significant problem. Genetic mutations resulting in amino acid substitution in the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) ligand binding domain (LBD) and the PML-B2 domain of PML-RARα, respectively, have been reported as molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to ATRA and As2O3. In the LBD mutation, ATRA binding with LBD is generally impaired, and ligand-dependent co-repressor dissociation and degradation of PML-RARα by the proteasome pathway, leading to cell differentiation, are inhibited. The PML-B2 mutation interferes with the direct binding of As2O3 with PML-B2, and PML-RARα SUMOylation with As2O3 followed by multimerization and degradation is impaired. To overcome ATRA resistance, utilization of As2O3 provides a preferable outcome, and recently, a synthetic retinoid Am80, which has a higher binding affinity with PML-RARα than ATRA, has been tested in the clinical setting. However, no strategy attempted to date has been successful in overcoming As2O3 resistance. Detailed genomic analyses using patient samples harvested repeatedly may help in predicting the prognosis, selecting the effective targeting drugs, and designing new sophisticated strategies for the treatment of APL.

  11. Systemic administration of valproic acid and zonisamide promotes the survival and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cell–derived dopaminergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya eYoshikawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell replacement therapy using embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs is a promising strategy for the treatment of neurologic diseases such as Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, a limiting factor for effective cell transplantation is the low survival rate of grafted cells, especially neurons. In this study, we modified the host environment and investigated whether the simultaneous administration of soluble factors can improve the survival and differentiation of murine iPSC-derived dopaminergic (DA neurons in host brains. With the goal of applying this technology in clinical settings in the near future, we selected drugs that were already approved for clinical use. The drugs included two commonly used anticonvulsants, valproic acid (VPA and zonisamide (ZNS, and estradiol (E2, also known as biologically active estrogen. Following neural induction of murine iPSCs, we collected neural progenitor cells by sorting PSA-NCAM+ cells, then treated the PSA-NCAM+ cells with drugs for four days. An immunofluorescence study revealed that 0.01 mM and 0.1 mM of VPA and 10 nM of E2 increased the percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase+ (TH: a DA neuron marker cells in vitro. Furthermore, 0.1 mM of VPA increased the percentage of TH+ cells that simultaneously express the midbrain markers FOXA2 and NURR1. Next, in order to determine the effects of the drugs in vivo, the iPSC-derived NPCs were transplanted into the striata of intact SD rats. The animals received intraperitoneal injections of one of the drugs for four weeks, then were subjected to an immunofluorescence study. VPA administration (150 mg/kg/daily increased the number of NeuN+ postmitotic neurons and TH+ DA neurons in the grafts. Furthermore, VPA (150 mg/kg/daily and ZNS (30 mg/kg/daily increased the number of TH+FOXA2+ midbrain DA neurons. These results suggest that the systemic administration of VPA and ZNS may improve the efficiency of cell replacement therapy using i

  12. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid exerts anticholestatic effects by a cooperative cPKC alpha-/PKA-dependent mechanism in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, R; Hohenester, S; Pusl, T; Denk, G U; Rust, C; Beuers, U

    2008-10-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) exerts anticholestatic effects in part by protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent mechanisms. Its taurine conjugate, TUDCA, is a cPKC alpha agonist. We tested whether protein kinase A (PKA) might contribute to the anticholestatic action of TUDCA via cooperative cPKC alpha-/PKA-dependent mechanisms in taurolithocholic acid (TLCA)-induced cholestasis. In perfused rat liver, bile flow was determined gravimetrically, organic anion secretion spectrophotometrically, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release enzymatically, cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation by immunoblotting, and cAMP by immunoassay. PKC/PKA inhibitors were tested radiochemically. In vitro phosphorylation of the conjugate export pump, Mrp2/Abcc2, was studied in rat hepatocytes and human Hep-G2 hepatoma cells. In livers treated with TLCA (10 micromol/l)+TUDCA (25 micromol/l), combined inhibition of cPKC by the cPKC-selective inhibitor Gö6976 (100 nmol/l) or the non-selective PKC inhibitor staurosporine (10 nmol/l) and of PKA by H89 (100 nmol/l) reduced bile flow by 36% (pTLCA+taurocholic acid. Inhibition of cPKC or PKA alone did not affect the anticholestatic action of TUDCA. Hepatic cAMP levels and CREB phosphorylation as readout of PKA activity were unaffected by the bile acids tested, suggesting a permissive effect of PKA for the anticholestatic action of TUDCA. Rat and human hepatocellular Mrp2 were phosphorylated by phorbol ester pretreatment and recombinant cPKC alpha, nPKC epsilon, and PKA, respectively, in a staurosporine-sensitive manner. UDCA conjugates exert their anticholestatic action in bile acid-induced cholestasis in part via cooperative post-translational cPKC alpha-/PKA-dependent mechanisms. Hepatocellular Mrp2 may be one target of bile acid-induced kinase activation.

  13. The mechanism of ascorbic acid-induced differentiation of ATDC5 chondrogenic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temu, Tecla M.; Wu, Ke-Ying; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    The ATDC5 cell line exhibits a multistep process of chondrogenic differentiation analogous to that observed during endochondral bone formation. Previous investigators have induced ATDC5 cells to differentiate by exposing them to insulin at high concentrations. We have observed spontaneous differentiation of ATDC5 cells maintained in ascorbic acid-containing α-MEM. A comparison of the differentiation events in response to high-dose insulin vs. ascorbic acid showed similar expression patterns of key genes, including collagen II, Runx2, Sox9, Indian hedgehog, and collagen X. We took advantage of the action of ascorbic acid to examine signaling events associated with differentiation. In contrast to high-dose insulin, which downregulates both IGF-I and insulin receptors, there were only minimal changes in the abundance of these receptors during ascorbic acid-induced differentiation. Furthermore, ascorbic acid exposure was associated with ERK activation, and ERK inhibition attenuated ascorbic acid-induced differentiation. This was in contrast to the inhibitory effect of ERK activation during IGF-I-induced differentiation. Inhibition of collagen formation with a proline analog markedly attenuated the differentiating effect of ascorbic acid on ATDC5 cells. When plates were conditioned with ATDC5 cells exposed to ascorbic acid, ATDC5 cells were able to differentiate in the absence of ascorbic acid. Our results indicate that matrix formation early in the differentiation process is essential for ascorbic acid-induced ATDC5 differentiation. We conclude that ascorbic acid can promote the differentiation of ATDC5 cells by promoting the formation of collagenous matrix and that matrix formation mediates activation of the ERK signaling pathway, which promotes the differentiation program. PMID:20530736

  14. Uric acid therapy improves the outcomes of stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and mechanical thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Ángel; Amaro, Sergio; Castellanos, Mar; Gomis, Meritxell; Urra, Xabier; Blasco, Jordi; Arenillas, Juan F; Román, Luis S; Muñoz, Roberto; Macho, Juan; Cánovas, David; Marti-Fabregas, Joan; Leira, Enrique C; Planas, Anna M

    2017-06-01

    Background Numerous neuroprotective drugs have failed to show benefit in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, making the search for new treatments imperative. Uric acid is an endogenous antioxidant making it a drug candidate to improve stroke outcomes. Aim To report the effects of uric acid therapy in stroke patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. Methods Forty-five patients with proximal vessel occlusions enrolled in the URICO-ICTUS trial received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 4.5 h after stroke onset and randomized to intravenous 1000 mg uric acid or placebo (NCT00860366). These patients also received mechanical thrombectomy because a brain computed tomogaphy angiography confirmed the lack of proximal recanalization at the end of systemic thrombolysis. The primary outcome was good functional outcome at 90 days (modified Rankin Score 0-2). Safety outcomes included mortality, symptomatic intracerebral bleeding, and gout attacks. Results The rate of successful revascularization was >80% in the uric acid and the placebo groups but good functional outcome was observed in 16 out of 24 (67%) patients treated with uric acid and 10 out of 21 (48%) treated with placebo (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.12 (95% CI 1.08-34.56)). Mortality was observed in two out of 24 (8.3%) patients treated with uric acid and one out of 21 (4.8%) treated with placebo (adjusted Odds Ratio, 3.74 (95% CI 0.06-226.29)). Symptomatic cerebral bleeding and gout attacks were similar in both groups. Conclusions Uric acid therapy was safe and improved stroke outcomes in stroke patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis followed by thrombectomy. Validation of this simple strategy in a larger trial is urgent.

  15. Structural evidence for a fatty acid-independent myotoxic mechanism for a phospholipase A2-like toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Guilherme H M; Dos Santos, Juliana I; Borges, Rafael J; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2018-03-01

    The myotoxic mechanism for PLA2-like toxins has been proposed recently to be initiated by an allosteric change induced by a fatty acid binding to the protein, leading to the alignment of the membrane docking site (MDoS) and membrane disrupting site (MDiS). Previous structural studies performed by us demonstrated that MjTX-II, a PLA2-like toxin isolated from Bothrops moojeni, presents a different mode of ligand-interaction caused by natural amino acid substitutions and an insertion. Herein, we present four crystal structures of MjTX-II, in its apo state and complexed with fatty acids of different lengths. Analyses of these structures revealed slightly different oligomeric conformations but with both MDoSs in an arrangement that resembles an active-state PLA2-like structure. To explore the structural transitions between apo protein and fatty-acid complexes, we performed Normal Mode Molecular Dynamics simulations, revealing that oligomeric conformations of MjTX-II/fatty acid complexes may be reached in solution by the apo structure. Similar simulations with typical PLA2-like structures demonstrated that this transition is not possible without the presence of fatty acids. Thus, we hypothesize that MjTX-II does not require fatty acids to be active, although these ligands may eventually help in its stabilization by the formation of hydrogen bonds. Therefore, these results complement previous findings for MjTX-II and help us understand its particular ligand-binding properties and, more importantly, its particular mechanism of action, with a possible impact on the design of structure-based inhibitors for PLA2-like toxins in general. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Unidirectional growth, linear and nonlinear optical, dielectric and mechanical properties of organic adduct of L-tartaric acid nicotinamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rameshkumar, P. [Department of Physics, Aringar Anna Government Arts and Science College, Musiri 621201, Trichirappalli (India); Gunaseelan, R. [Department of Physics, Loyola College, Chennai 600034 (India); Kumararaman, S. [Department of Physics, Nehru Memorial College, Puthanampatti 621007, Trichirappalli (India); Baghavannarayana, G. [Materials Characterization Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sagayaraj, P., E-mail: psagayaraj@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, Loyola College, Chennai 600034 (India)

    2011-03-15

    An attempt has been made to grow L-tartaric acid nicotinamide (LTN); a complex of tartaric acid, by employing a modified unidirectional method. The crystalline structure and quality are investigated by single crystal XRD and rocking curve studies. The linear and nonlinear optical properties are studied by UV-vis-NIR spectral analysis, SHG test, phase matching and laser induced damage threshold measurement. For comparison, parallel growth of the crystal was carried out by conventional method and the properties of the LTN samples grown by the conventional and unidirectional methods are investigated. The mechanical, photoconductivity and dielectric behavior of LTN crystals are also investigated.

  17. Biological effects of propionic acid in humans; metabolism, potential applications and underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Lahham, S.H.; Peppelenbosch, M.P.; Roelofsen, H.; Vonk, R.J.; Venema, K.

    2010-01-01

    Undigested food is fermented in the colon by the microbiota and gives rise to various microbial metabolites. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), including acetic, propionic and butyric acid, are the principal metabolites produced. However, most of the literature focuses on butyrate and to a lesser

  18. Biological effects of propionic acid in humans; metabolism, potential applications and underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Lahham, Sa'ad H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Roelofsen, Han; Vonk, Roel J.; Venema, Koen

    2010-01-01

    Undigested food is fermented in the colon by the microbiota and gives rise to various microbial metabolites. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), including acetic, propionic and butyric acid, are the principal metabolites produced However, most of the literature focuses on butyrate and to a lesser extent

  19. Inhibitory mechanism of l-glutamic acid on spawning of the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Masatoshi

    2017-03-01

    l-Glutamic acid was previously identified as an inhibitor of spawning in the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera; this study examined how l-glutamic acid works. Oocyte release from ovaries of P. pectinifera occurred after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and follicular envelope breakdown (FEBD) when gonads were incubated ex vivo with either relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) or 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde). l-Glutamic acid blocked this spawning phenotype, causing the mature oocytes to remain within the ovaries. Neither RGP-induced 1-MeAde production in ovarian follicle cells nor 1-MeAde-induced GVBD and FEBD was affected by l-glutamic acid. l-Glutamic acid may act through metabotropic receptors in the ovaries to inhibit spawning, as l-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, an agonist for metabotropic glutamate receptors, also inhibited spawning induced by 1-MeAde. Application of acetylcholine (ACH) to ovaries under inhibitory conditions with l-glutamic acid, however, brought about spawning, possibly by inducing contraction of the ovarian wall to discharge mature oocytes from the ovaries concurrently with GVBD and FEBD. Thus, l-glutamic acid may inhibit ACH secretion from gonadal nerve cells in the ovary. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 84: 246-256, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-07-07

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research.

  1. Naringenin inhibits seed germination and seedling root growth through a salicylic acid-independent mechanism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Iker; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2012-12-01

    Flavonoids fulfill an enormous range of biological functions in plants. In seeds, these compounds play several roles; for instance proanthocyanidins protect them from moisture, pathogen attacks, mechanical stress, UV radiation, etc., and flavonols have been suggested to protect the embryo from oxidative stress. The present study aimed at determining the role of flavonoids in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) seed germination, and the involvement of salicylic acid (SA) and auxin (indole-3-acetic acid), two phytohormones with the same biosynthetic origin as flavonoids, the shikimate pathway, in such a putative role. We show that naringenin, a flavanone, strongly inhibits the germination of A. thaliana seeds in a dose-dependent and SA-independent manner. Altered auxin levels do not affect seed germination in Arabidopsis, but impaired auxin transport does, although to a minor extent. Naringenin and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) impair auxin transport through the same mechanisms, so the inhibition of germination by naringenin might involve impaired auxin transport among other mechanisms. From the present study it is concluded that naringenin inhibits the germination of Arabidopsis seeds in a dose-dependent and SA-independent manner, and the results also suggest that such effects are exerted, at least to some extent, through impaired auxin transport, although additional mechanisms seem to operate as well. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Photo-induced oxidative damage to dissolved free amino acids by the photosensitizer polycyclic musk tonalide: Transformation kinetics and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hansun; Gao, Yanpeng; Wang, Honghong; Yin, Hongliang; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng

    2017-05-15

    Residue from the polycyclic musks (PCMs) in household and personal care products may harm human beings through skin exposure. To understand the health effects of PCMs when exposed to sunlight at molecular level, both experimental and computational methods were employed to investigate the photosensitized oxidation performance of 19 natural amino acids, the most basic unit of life. Results showed that a typical PCM, tonalide, acts as a photosensitizer to significantly increase photo-induced oxidative damage to amino acids. Both common and exceptional transformation pathways occurred during the photosensitization damage of amino acids. Experimental tests further identified the different mechanisms involved. The common transformation pathway occurred through the electron transfer from α amino-group of amino acids, accompanying with the formation of O 2 •- . This pathway was controlled by the electronic density of N atom in α amino-group. The exceptional transformation pathway was identified only for five amino acids, mainly due to the reactions with reactive oxygen species, e.g. 1 O 2 and excited triplet state molecules. Additionally, tonalide photo-induced transformation products could further accelerate the photosensitization of all amino acids with the common pathway. This study may support the protection of human health, and suggests the possible need to further restrict polycyclic musks use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In silico approach to investigating the adsorption mechanisms of short chain perfluorinated sulfonic acids and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid on hydrated hematite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hongru; Lin, Yuan; Sun, Yuzhen; Cao, Huiming; Fu, Jianjie; Gao, Ke; Zhang, Aiqian

    2017-05-01

    Short chain perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs) that were introduced as alternatives for perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) have been widely produced and used. However, few studies have investigated the environmental process of short chain PFSAs, and the related adsorption mechanisms still need to be uncovered. The water-oxide interface is one of the major environmental interfaces that plays an important role in affecting the adsorption behaviour and transport potential of the environmental pollutant. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemistry calculations to investigate the adsorption mechanisms of five PFSAs and their adsorption on hydrated hematite surface as well. Different to the vertical configuration reported for PFOS on titanium oxide, all PFSAs share the same adsorption configuration as the long carbon chains parallel to the surface. The formation of hydrogen bonds between F and inter-surface H helps to stabilize the unique configuration. As a result, the sorption capacity increases with increasing C-F chain length. Moreover, both calculated adsorption energy and partial density of states (PDOS) analysis demonstrate a PFSAs adsorption mechanism in between physical and chemical adsorption because the hydrogen bonds formed by the overlap of F (p) orbital and H (s) orbital are weak intermolecular interactions while the physical adsorption are mainly ascribed to the electrostatic interactions. This massive calculation provides a new insight into the pollutant adsorption behaviour, and in particular, may help to evaluate the environmental influence of pollutants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Folic acid supplementation during high-fat diet feeding restores AMPK activation via an AMP-LKB1-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sid, Victoria; Wu, Nan; Sarna, Lindsei K.; Siow, Yaw L.; House, James D.

    2015-01-01

    AMPK is an endogenous energy sensor that regulates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is regarded as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome with impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and increased oxidative stress. Our recent study showed that folic acid supplementation attenuated hepatic oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of folic acid on hepatic AMPK during high-fat diet feeding and the mechanisms involved. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet (10% kcal fat), a high-fat diet (60% kcal fat), or a high-fat diet supplemented with folic acid (26 mg/kg diet) for 5 wk. Mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited hyperglycemia, hepatic cholesterol accumulation, and reduced hepatic AMPK phosphorylation. Folic acid supplementation restored AMPK phosphorylation (activation) and reduced blood glucose and hepatic cholesterol levels. Activation of AMPK by folic acid was mediated through an elevation of its allosteric activator AMP and activation of its upstream kinase, namely, liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in the liver. Consistent with in vivo findings, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (bioactive form of folate) restored phosphorylation (activation) of both AMPK and LKB1 in palmitic acid-treated HepG2 cells. Activation of AMPK by folic acid might be responsible for AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of HMG-CoA reductase, leading to reduced hepatic cholesterol synthesis during high-fat diet feeding. These results suggest that folic acid supplementation may improve cholesterol and glucose metabolism by restoration of AMPK activation in the liver. PMID:26400185

  5. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Min Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; (2 Methods: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D proteomic analysis; (3 Results: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid–treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4 Conclusion: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research.

  6. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-07-25

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair.

  7. Synergistic mechanism between SDBS and oleic acid in anionic flotation of rhodochrosite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yong-jie; Liu, Run-qing; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yue-hua

    2015-05-01

    Pure mineral flotation experiments, zeta potential testing, and infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the interfacial reactions of oleic acid (collector), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS, synergist), and rhodochrosite in an anionic system. The pure mineral test shows that oleic acid has a strong ability to collect products on rhodochrosite. Under neutral to moderately alkaline conditions, low temperature (e.g., 10°C) adversely affects the flotation performance of oleic acid; the addition of SDBS significantly improves the dispersion and solubility of oleic acid, enhancing its collecting ability and flotation recovery. The zeta potential test shows that rhodochrosite interacts with oleic acid and SDBS, resulting in a more negative zeta potential and the co-adsorption of the collector and synergist at the mineral surface. Infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that when oleic acid and SDBS are used as a mixed collector, oleates along with -COO- and -COOH functional groups are formed on the mineral surface, indicating chemical adsorption on rhodochrosite. The results demonstrate that oleic acid and SDBS co-adsorb chemically on the surface of rhodochrosite, thereby improving the flotation performance of the collector.

  8. Study on the interaction mechanism between aromatic amino acids and quercetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Xingxing; Pu, Xiaohua; Li, Zongxiao

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we selected quercetin and aromatic amino acids (tryptophan, tyrosine, phenylalanine) as the research objects to investigate the change rules in the reaction process. The thermodynamic functions (Ka, Δ G, and Δ S) of the interactions between quercetin and aromatic amino acids (tryptophan, tyrosine, phenylalanine) were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry. The values of binding constant (Ka) reached maximum at 25°C; the entropies and Gibbs free energies were both negative at different temperatures. The kinetic parameters of quercetin and amino acids in the interaction process was determined by microcalorimetry. The results inferred that the driving force of the reaction was hydrogen bond or van der Waals force.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of cis-urocanic acid and permethrin-induced alterations in cutaneous immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, M R; Blaylock, B L; Holladay, S D

    2003-12-01

    Cutaneous cis-urocanic acid (cUCA) or ultraviolet B exposure has been shown to cause diminished cutaneous contact hypersensitivity (CH) and to induce systemic tolerance (increased regulatory T lymphocytes) in mice. Permethrin is also a known CH inhibitor, but the molecular mechanisms are currently poorly understood. In this study, CH was evaluated in four strains of mice: an immunosensitive strain (C57BL/6N), an immunoresistant strain (SvImJ), a strain developed from C57BL/6N mice but genetically altered at both the tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptors (TNFalphap55R and p75R), and a strain developed from C57BL/6N but genetically deleted at the interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) locus. CH was evaluated in each group via oxazolone challenge following a 5-day exposure to intradermal (ID) cUCA or a single exposure to topical permethrin, or co-exposure to both chemicals in 5-week-old female C57BL/6N, SvImJ, and C57BL/6N mice genetically altered at the TNFalpha or IFNgamma locus. A 5-day exposure to ID cUCA or a single exposure to topical permethrin resulted in diminished CH response in C57BL/6N mice, and this effect was exacerbated with concurrent exposure to both chemicals. CH in SvImJ was both cUCA- and permethrin-resistant relative to C57BL/6N mice, as 5-day cUCA or a single exposure to permethrin did not diminish CH, nor did concurrent exposure to cUCA and permethrin. Mice deleted at both TNFalphaR loci displayed similar but somewhat blunted diminished CH responses to cUCA or permethrin. This trend became significant with combined chemical exposure. IFNgamma knockout mice displayed similar diminished CH responses to cUCA or permethrin alone. Unlike C57BL/6N mice, the IFNgamma knockout mice did not show a further reduction in CH with combined chemical exposure. These results suggest the following: (1)Mouse strains show variable susceptibility to permethrin- and cUCA-induced immunomodulation. (2)TNFalpha may be involved in the immunomodulatory effects of cUCA and permethrin

  10. Mechanism of photostabilization of poly(methy methacrylate films by 2-thioacetic acid benzothiazol complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Yousif

    2014-07-01

    According to the experimental results obtained, several mechanisms were suggested depending on the structure of the additive. Among them UV absorption, peroxide decomposer and radical scavenger for photostabilizer additives mechanisms were suggested.