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Sample records for acids modulate resistance

  1. Abscisic acid-cytokinin antagonism modulates resistance against pseudomonas syringae in Tobacco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas Georg

    2014-01-01

    Phytohormones are known as essential regulators of plant defenses, with ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid as the central immunity backbone, while other phytohormones have been demonstrated to interact with this. Only recently, a function of the classic phytohormone cytokinin in plant...... immunity has been described in Arabidopsis, rice, and tobacco. Although interactions of cytokinins with salicylic acid and auxin have been indicated, the complete network of cytokinin interactions with other immunity-relevant phytohormones is not yet understood. Therefore, we studied the interaction...... of kinetin and abscisic acid as a negative regulator of plant immunity to modulate resistance in tobacco against Pseudomonas syringae. By analyzing infection symptoms, pathogen proliferation, and accumulation of the phytoalexin scopoletin as a key mediator of kinetin-induced resistance in tobacco...

  2. Tannic Acid as a Potential Modulator of Norfloxacin Resistance in Staphylococcus Aureus Overexpressing norA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz-Silva, Helena Taina; Cirino, Isis Caroline da Silva; Falcão-Silva, Vivyanne Dos Santos; Magnani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite; Siqueira-Júnior, José P

    2016-01-01

    Tannins have shown inhibitory effects against pathogenic bacteria, and these properties make tannins potential modifying agents in bacterial resistance. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of tannic acid (TA), gallic acid (GA) and norfloxacin (Nor) against Staphylococcus aureus SA-1119 (NorA-effluxing strain) was determined using broth microdilution tests. To assess the modulation of antibiotic resistance, the MIC of Nor was determined in growth media with or without TA or GA at a subinhibitory concentration (1/4 MIC). The checkerboard method was performed to obtain the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) for the combined application of TA and Nor. TA displayed a weak inhibitory effect (MIC 512 μg/ml) against S. aureus SA-1119, while no inhibitory effect was displayed by GA (MIC >512 μg/ml). However, when TA was tested at a subinhibitory concentration in combination with Nor, the MIC of Nor against S. aureus SA-1119 decreased from 128 to 4 μg/ml (32-fold); this effect was not observed for GA. In the checkerboard assay, the MIC of TA and Nor decreased from 512 to 128 μg/ml (4-fold) and from 128 to 8 μg/ml (16-fold), respectively. The combination of TA and Nor presented an FICI as low as 0.31, which indicates a synergistic interaction. TA is a potential agent for increasing the clinical efficacy of Nor to control resistant S. aureus. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Nutritional Modulation of Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin O. Weickert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance has been proposed as the strongest single predictor for the development of Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM. Chronic oversupply of energy from food, together with inadequate physical activity, have been recognized as the most relevant factors leading to overweight, abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and finally T2DM. Conversely, energy reduced diets almost invariably to facilitate weight loss and reduce abdominal fat mass and insulin resistance. However, sustained weight loss is generally difficult to achieve, and distinct metabolic characteristics in patients with T2DM further compromise success. Therefore, investigating the effects of modulating the macronutrient composition of isoenergetic diets is an interesting concept that may lead to additional important insights. Metabolic effects of various different dietary concepts and strategies have been claimed, but results from randomized controlled studies and particularly from longer-term-controlled interventions in humans are often lacking. However, some of these concepts are supported by recent research, at least in animal models and short-term studies in humans. This paper provides an update of the current literature regarding the role of nutrition in the modulation of insulin resistance, which includes the discussion of weight-loss-independent metabolic effects of commonly used dietary concepts.

  4. Caffeic acid phenethylester increases stress resistance and enhances lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans by modulation of the insulin-like DAF-16 signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermann, Susannah; Chovolou, Yvonni; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Wätjen, Wim

    2014-01-01

    CAPE is an active constituent of propolis which is widely used in traditional medicine. This hydroxycinnamic acid derivate is a known activator of the redox-active Nrf2 signalling pathway in mammalian cells. We used C. elegans to investigate the effects of this compound on accumulation of reactive oxygen species and the modulation of the pivotal redox-active pathways SKN-1 and DAF-16 (homologues of Nrf2 and FoxO, respectively) in this model organism; these results were compared to the effects in Hct116 human colon carcinoma cells. CAPE exerts a strong antioxidative effect in C. elegans: The increase of reactive oxygen species induced by thermal stress was diminished by about 50%. CAPE caused a nuclear translocation of DAF-16, but not SKN-1. CAPE increased stress resistance of the nematode against thermal stress and finally a prolongation of the median and maximum lifespan by 9 and 17%, respectively. This increase in stress resistance and lifespan was dependent on DAF-16 as shown in experiments using a DAF-16 loss of function mutant strain. Life prolongation was retained under SKN-1 RNAi conditions showing that the effect is SKN-1 independent. The results of CAPE obtained in C. elegans differed from the results obtained in Hct116 colon carcinoma cells: CAPE also caused strong antioxidative effects in the mammalian cells, but no activation of the FoxO4 signalling pathway was detectable. Instead, an activation of the Nrf2 signalling pathway was shown by luciferase assay and western blots. CAPE activates the insulin-like DAF-16, but not the SKN-1 signalling pathway in C. elegans and therefore enhances the stress resistance and lifespan of this organism. Since modulation of the DAF-16 pathway was found to be a pivotal effect of CAPE in C. elegans, this has to be taken into account for the investigation of the molecular mechanisms of the traditional use of propolis.

  5. T3SS-dependent differential modulations of the jasmonic acid pathway in susceptible and resistant genotypes of Malus spp. challenged with Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugé De Bernonville, Thomas; Gaucher, Matthieu; Flors, Victor; Gaillard, Sylvain; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Dat, James F; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2012-06-01

    Fire blight is a bacterial disease of Maloideae caused by Erwinia amylovora (Ea). This necrogenic enterobacterium uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject type III effectors into the plant cells to cause disease on its susceptible hosts, including economically important crops like apple and pear. The expressions of marker genes of the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense regulation pathways were monitored by RT-qPCR in leaves of two apple genotypes, one susceptible and one resistant, challenged with a wild type strain, a T3SS-deficient strain or water. The transcriptional data taken together with hormone level measurements indicated that the SA pathway was similarly induced in both apple genotypes during infection by Ea. On the contrary, the data clearly showed a strong T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway in leaves of the susceptible genotype but not in those of the resistant one. Accordingly, methyl-jasmonate treated susceptible plants displayed an increased resistance to Ea. Bacterial mutant analysis indicated that JA manipulation by Ea mainly relies on the type III effector DspA/E. Taken together, our data suggest that the T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway is a critical step in the infection process of Malus spp. by Ea. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MITF Modulates Therapeutic Resistance through EGFR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhenyu; Erin Chen, Yiyin; Kumar, Raj; Taylor, Michael; Jenny Njauw, Ching-Ni; Miao, Benchun; Frederick, Dennie T; Wargo, Jennifer A; Flaherty, Keith T; Jönsson, Göran; Tsao, Hensin

    2015-07-01

    Response to targeted therapies varies significantly despite shared oncogenic mutations. Nowhere is this more apparent than in BRAF (V600E)-mutated melanomas where initial drug response can be striking and yet relapse is commonplace. Resistance to BRAF inhibitors have been attributed to the activation of various receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), although the underlying mechanisms have been largely uncharacterized. Here, we found that EGFR-induced vemurafenib resistance is ligand dependent. We employed whole-genome expression analysis and discovered that vemurafenib resistance correlated with the loss of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), along with its melanocyte lineage program, and with the activation of EGFR signaling. An inverse relationship between MITF, vemurafenib resistance, and EGFR was then observed in patient samples of recurrent melanoma and was conserved across melanoma cell lines and patients' tumor specimens. Functional studies revealed that MITF depletion activated EGFR signaling and consequently recapitulated the resistance phenotype. In contrast, forced expression of MITF in melanoma and colon cancer cells inhibited EGFR and conferred sensitivity to BRAF/MEK inhibitors. These findings indicate that an "autocrine drug resistance loop" is suppressed by melanocyte lineage signal(s), such as MITF. This resistance loop modulates drug response and could explain the unique sensitivity of melanomas to BRAF inhibition.

  7. Antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bulajić Snežana; Mijačević Zora; Savić-Radovanović Radoslava

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge on the antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria is still limited, possibly because of the large numbers of genera and species encountered in this group, as well as variances in their resistance spectra. The EFSA considers antibiotic resistances, especially transferable resistances, an important decision criterion for determining a strain's QPS status. There are no approved standards for the phenotypic or genotypic evaluation of antibiotic resistances in food isolat...

  8. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Modulates Trichomonas vaginalis Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosh, Travis; Jordan, Kelsey D; Wu, Ja-Shin; Yarlett, Nigel; Upmacis, Rita K

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted parasite and, while it is often asymptomatic in males, the parasite is associated with disease in both sexes. Metronidazole is an effective treatment for trichomoniasis, but resistant strains have evolved and, thus, it has become necessary to investigate other possible therapies. In this study, we examined the effects of native and oxidized forms of the sodium salts of eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, and arachidonic acids on T. vaginalis activity. Eicosapentaenoic acid was the most toxic with 190 and 380 μM causing approximately 90% cell death in Casu2 and ATCC 50142 strains, respectively. In contrast, oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid was the least toxic, requiring > 3 mM to inhibit activity, while low levels (10 μM) were associated with increased parasite density. Mass spectrometric analysis of oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid revealed C20 products containing one to six additional oxygen atoms and various degrees of bond saturation. These results indicate that eicosapentaenoic acid has different effects on T. vaginalis survival, depending on whether it is present in the native or oxidized form. A better understanding of lipid metabolism in T. vaginalis may facilitate the design of synthetic fatty acids that are effective for the treatment of metronidazole-resistant T. vaginalis. © 2015 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  9. Extraction of temperature dependent interfacial resistance of thermoelectric modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...... on the interfacial resistance. The extracted results represent useful data to investigating the characteristics of thermoelectric module resistance and comparing performance of various modules.......This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...

  10. Progress in engineering acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the production of a variety of fermented foods, and are considered as probiotic due to their health-promoting effect. However, LAB encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial fermentation and application, among which acid stress is one of the most important survival challenges. Improving the acid stress resistance may contribute to the application and function of probiotic action to the host. Recently, the advent of genomics, functional genomics and high-throughput technologies have allowed for the understanding of acid tolerance mechanisms at a systems level, and many method to improve acid tolerance have been developed. This review describes the current progress in engineering acid stress resistance of LAB. Special emphasis is placed on engineering cellular microenvironment (engineering amino acid metabolism, introduction of exogenous biosynthetic capacity, and overproduction of stress response proteins) and maintaining cell membrane functionality. Moreover, strategies to improve acid tolerance and the related physiological mechanisms are also discussed.

  11. Mechanisms and improvement of acid resistance in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Cui, Yanhua; Qu, Xiaojun

    2018-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can take advantage of fermentable carbohydrates to produce lactic acid. They are proverbially applied in industry, agricultural production, animal husbandry, food enterprise, pharmaceutical engineering and some other important fields, which are closely related to human life. For performing the probiotic functions, LAB have to face the low pH environment of the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, acid resistance of LAB is of great importance not only for their own growth, but also for fermentation and preparation of probiotic products. Recent research studies on acid resistance mechanisms of LAB are mainly focused on neutralization process, biofilm and cell density, proton pump, protection of macromolecules, pre-adaptation and cross-protection, and effect of solutes. In this context, biotechnological strategies such as synthetic biology, genome shuffling, high pressure homogenization and adaptive laboratory evolution were also used to improve the acid resistance of LAB to respond to constantly changing low pH environment.

  12. Options for modulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, HJG; Van der Zee, AGJ; De Jong, S; De Vries, EGE

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an update of mechanisms responsible for drug resistance in ovarian cancer and the possible therapeutic options to modulate this resistance using literature review with emphasis on data acquired in studies comprising ovarian tumor samples. The classic

  13. Acid resistance of sewer pipe concrete mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, M. G.; Fourie, C. [Cape Town Univ., Dept. of Civil Engineering (South Africa)

    2000-07-01

    Using hydrochloric acid in a test method developed at the University of Cape Town, six different sets of concrete materials were measured for acid resistance. One of the six mixtures was a standard mix used for the preparation of sewer pipes by the roller suspension method; the other five were variations of the standard mix, modified by the partial replacement of the standard cement with slag, fly ash, condensed silica fume or metakaolin. In one test mixture, normal portland cement was replaced by a calcium aluminate cement. At 28 days the physical properties of concrete with admixtures of silica fume and metakaolin were superior to the other concretes, although the acid resistance of metakaolin concrete showed no improvement despite otherwise superior quality. The concrete containing condensed silica fume showed marked improvement in acid resistance It showed a lower percentage of mass loss and hydrogen ion consumption than other concretes. This concrete also compacted well, indicating its high suitability for the production of sewer pipes with the roller suspension method. Slag and fly ash concretes did not gain strength rapidly enough and calcium aluminate also showed limited capacity to protect the sewer pipes from bacterial attack, despite its reputed toxicity to the Thiobacillus bacteria, which is the principal agent of acid attack in sewer pipes. 8 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs.

  14. COMBINED INVITRO MODULATION OF ADRIAMYCIN RESISTANCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIJER, C; MULDER, NH; TIMMERBOSSCHA, H; PETERS, WHM; DEVRIES, EGE

    1991-01-01

    In a P-glycoprotein-negative cell line, GLC4-Adr90, a 75-fold acquired Adriamycin (Adr) resistance coincided with a reduced cellular Adr level, an increased detoxifying capacity (glutathione (GSH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) elevated), and a reduced topoisomerase-II (topo-II) activity

  15. Degradation by acetic acid for crystalline Si photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Naomi; Hara, Yukiko

    2015-04-01

    The degradation of crystalline Si photovoltaic modules during damp-heat test was studied using some test modules with and without polymer film insertion by observing electrical and electroluminescence properties and by chemical analyses. Acetic acid generated by the hydrolysis decomposition of ethylene vinyl acetate used as an encapsulant is the main origin of degradation. The change in electroluminescence images is explained on the basis of the corrosion of electrodes by acetic acid. On the other hand, little change was observed at the pn junction even after damp-heat test for a long time. Therefore, carrier generation occurs even after degradation; however, such generated carriers cannot be collected owing to corrosion of electrodes. The guiding principle that module structure and module materials without saving acetic acid into the modules was obtained.

  16. NMSBA - Twist Resist - Rotational Exercise Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Aaron [Twist Resist, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reece, Blake D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Berger, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guido, Steven Frank [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Linker, Taylor [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report contains a summary of the work completed to develop a modular, rotational exercise device. In the report are images, diagrams, and explanations of the efforts contributed to the project since its inception. The purpose of this document is to provide a walk-through of the progress on this project, from the initial design concepts to the final design and work done, so that the customer (Twist Resist), or individuals/firms who work on this project in the future will have a springboard of ideas/concepts to work from.

  17. A plasma membrane association module in yeast amino acid transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in

  18. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, António; Duarte, Ana M.; Azevedo, Flávio; Sousa, Maria J.; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Chaves, Susana R.

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria. PMID:28357256

  19. Unsaturated fatty acids and insulin resistance in childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Karen; Aranda, Mario; Asenjo, Sylvia; Sáez, Katia; Bustos, Paulina

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is characterized by increased levels of plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) that interfere with insulin signaling. The aim of our study was to assess the FFA profile in obese children and adolescents and to determine their relation with different degrees of insulin resistance. A transversal study was conducted of 51 children and adolescents (mean age, 11.7±1.6 years; 47% males) with obesity (body mass index ≥95 percentile). Anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters were assessed. Insulin resistance was determined using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. Plasma fatty acids were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography with heptadecanoic acid as the internal standard. The mean concentration of myristic acid, linoleic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, stearic acid, and total fatty acids was 9.3±2.2, 86.5±38.3, 93.0±35.5, 177.0±83.6, 48.5±14.9, and 414.3±160.9 μmol/L, respectively. Total fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid and linoleic acid showed an inverse significant correlation with insulin resistance. Children with high insulin resistance (HOMA-IR >2.5) showed a decrease in unsaturated fatty acids compared with children having a HOMA-IR of fatty acid concentrations between those groups. A decrease in unsaturated fatty acids was correlated with insulin resistance in childhood obesity.

  20. Multidrug resistance in cancer: its mechanism and its modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ernest K J; Erba, Paula; Mariani, Giuliano; Gomes, Célia M F

    2007-01-01

    One of the major problems related with the curative treatment of cancer patients is resistance against anticancer drugs. This resistance, which may occur from the beginning or is evident only later as an acquired phenomenon, is due to the action of drug transporters. These transmembrane proteins belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which reduce bioavailability of drugs, but also determine the elimination of xenobiotics into bile, urine and feces. The present review summarizes recent knowledge in this area, highlighting the mechanism of action of these transporters, its clinical significance and its possible modulation. Novel approaches to overcome multidrug resistance include agents which inhibit or circumvent this efflux mechanism. For the latter category developments in nanomedicine may be of consequence. However, in spite of considerable progress in research regarding multidrug resistance, the phase of efficacious clinical use of this knowledge has not been reached yet. (c) 2007 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  1. Fatty Acids, Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Arner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although elevated free fatty acid (FFA levels in obesity have been considered to be of importance for insulin resistance, a recent meta-analysis suggested normal FFA levels in obese subjects. We investigated fasting circulating FFA and glycerol levels in a large cohort of non-obese and obese subjects. Methods: Subjects recruited for a study on obesity genetics were investigated in the morning after an overnight fast (n = 3,888. Serum FFA (n = 3,306, plasma glycerol (n = 3,776, and insulin sensitivity index (HOMA-IR,n = 3,469 were determined. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 and insulin resistance as HOMA-IR ≥ 2.21. Results: In obese subjects, circulating FFA and glycerol levels were higher than in non-obese individuals (by 26% and 47%, respectively; both p Conclusion: Circulating FFA and glycerol levels are markedly elevated in obesity but only marginally influenced by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Whether these differences persist during diurnal variations in circulating FFA/glycerol, remains to be established.

  2. [Regulating acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-07-04

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, pharmaceutical and other industries. Acid stress is one the important survival challenges encountered by lactic acid bacteria both in fermentation process and in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, the development of systems biology and metabolic engineering brings unprecedented opportunity for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and improving the acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria. This review addresses physiological mechanisms of lactic acid bacteria during acid stress. Moreover, strategies to improve the acid stress resistance of lactic acid were proposed.

  3. Different mechanisms of resistance modulate sulfite tolerance in wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadai, Chiara; Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    From a technological point of view, yeast resistance to sulfite is of great interest and represents an important technological character for winemaking. Several mechanisms are involved, and strain-dependent strategies to obtain SO2 resistance can deeply influence wine quality, although this choice is less relevant in determining the technological performance of the strain during fermentation. In this study, to better understand the strain-specific mechanisms of resistance, 11 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, whose genomes have been previously sequenced, were selected. Their attitude towards sulfites, in terms of resistance and production, was evaluated, and RNA-sequencing of four selected strains was performed during fermentation process in synthetic grape must in the presence of SO2. Results demonstrated that at molecular level, the physical effect of SO2 triggered multiple stress responses in the cell and high tolerance to general enological stressing condition increased SO2 resistance. Adaptation mechanism due to high basal gene expression level rather than specific gene induction in the presence of sulfite seemed to be responsible in modulating strain resistance. This mechanism involved higher basal gene expression level of specific cell wall proteins, enzymes for lipid biosynthesis, and enzymes directly involved in SO2 assimilation pathway and efflux.

  4. Modulating the electronic structure of amino acids: interaction of model lewis acids with anthranilic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tareq Irshaidat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of theoretical B3LYP calculations, Yáñez and co-workers (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 2293 illustrated that beryllium ions are capable of significantly modulating (changing the electronic structures of imidazole. In this computational organic chemistry study, the interaction of this β-amino acid and five model Lewis acids (BeF1+, Be2+, AlF2(1+, AlF2+, and Al3+ were investigated. Several aspects were addressed: natural bond orbitals, including second order perturbation analysis of intra-molecular charge delocalization and the natural population analysis atomic charges; molecular geometries; selected infrared stretching frequencies (C-N, C-O, and N-H, and selected ¹H-NMR chemical shifts. The data illustrate that this interaction can weaken the H-O bond and goes beyond strengthening the intra-molecular hydrogen bond (N...H-O to cause a spontaneous transfer of the proton to the nitrogen atom in five cases generating zwitterion structures. Many new features are observed. Most importantly, the zwitterion structures include a stabilizing hydrogen bond (N-H...O that varies in relative strength according to the Lewis acid. These findings explain the experimental observations of α-amino acids (for example: J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3577 and are the first reported fundamental electronic structure characterization of β-amino acids in zwitterion form.

  5. AtWRKY22 promotes susceptibility to aphids and modulates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, Karen J; Wiegers, Gerrie L; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; van Haarst, Jan C; Kruijer, Willem; Bouwmeester, Harro J; Dicke, Marcel; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2016-05-01

    Aphids induce many transcriptional perturbations in their host plants, but the signalling cascades responsible and the effects on plant resistance are largely unknown. Through a genome-wide association (GWA) mapping study in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified WRKY22 as a candidate gene associated with feeding behaviour of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae The transcription factor WRKY22 is known to be involved in pathogen-triggered immunity, and WRKY22 gene expression has been shown to be induced by aphids. Assessment of aphid population development and feeding behaviour on knockout mutants and overexpression lines showed that WRKY22 increases susceptibility to M. persicae via a mesophyll-located mechanism. mRNA sequencing analysis of aphid-infested wrky22 knockout plants revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in salicylic acid (SA) signalling and down-regulation of genes involved in plant growth and cell-wall loosening. In addition, mechanostimulation of knockout plants by clip cages up-regulated jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes, resulting in substantial negative JA-SA crosstalk. Based on this and previous studies, WRKY22 is considered to modulate the interplay between the SA and JA pathways in response to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Its induction by aphids and its role in suppressing SA and JA signalling make WRKY22 a potential target for aphids to manipulate host plant defences. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Modulating gene function with peptide nucleic acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2008-01-01

    A review on peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers as modulators of gene expression ranging from gene silencing at the mRNAor the dsDNA (antigene) level, and redirection of mRNA splicing to gene activation through transcription bubble mimicking. PNA chem., anti-infective agents, cellular delivery...

  7. Omega 3 fatty acids chemosensitize multidrug resistant colon cancer cells by down-regulating cholesterol synthesis and altering detergent resistant membranes composition.

    OpenAIRE

    Gelsomino, G; Gazzano, E

    2013-01-01

    Background The activity of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance related protein 1 (MRP1), two membrane transporters involved in multidrug resistance of colon cancer, is increased by high amounts of cholesterol in plasma membrane and detergent resistant membranes (DRMs). It has never been investigated whether omega 3 polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs), which modulate cholesterol homeostasis in dyslipidemic syndromes and have chemopreventive effects in colon cancer, may affect the respo...

  8. Allosteric modulation of retinal GABA receptors by ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Cecilia I.; Vickers, Evan; Moraga Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.; von Gersdorff, Henrique; Calvo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA and GABAC) belong to the cys-loop receptor family of ligand-gated ion channels. GABAC receptors are highly expressed in the retina, mainly localized at the axon terminals of bipolar cells. Ascorbic acid, an endogenous redox agent, modulates the function of diverse proteins, and basal levels of ascorbic acid in the retina are very high. However, the effect of ascorbic acid on retinal GABA receptors has not been studied. Here we show that the function of GABAC and GABAA receptors is regulated by ascorbic acid. Patch-clamp recordings from bipolar cell terminals in goldfish retinal slices revealed that GABAC receptor-mediated currents activated by tonic background levels of extracellular GABA, and GABAC currents elicited by local GABA puffs, are both significantly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, a significant rundown of GABA-puff evoked currents was observed in the absence of ascorbic acid. GABA-evoked Cl- currents mediated by homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were also potentiated by ascorbic acid in a concentration-dependent, stereospecific, reversible, and voltage-independent manner. Studies involving the chemical modification of sulfhydryl groups showed that the two cys-loop cysteines and histidine 141, all located in the ρ1 subunit extracellular domain, each play a key role in the modulation of GABAC receptors by ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that retinal GABAA IPSCs and heterologously expressed GABAA receptor currents are similarly augmented by ascorbic acid. Our results suggest that ascorbic acid may act as an endogenous agent capable of potentiating GABAergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:21715633

  9. 30 CFR 7.48 - Acid resistance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acid resistance test. 7.48 Section 7.48 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.48 Acid resistance test. (a...

  10. Salicylic acid signaling in disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhirendra

    2014-11-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key plant hormone that mediates host responses against microbial pathogens. Identification and characterization of SA-interacting/binding proteins is a topic which has always excited scientists studying microbial defense response in plants. It is likely that discovery of a true receptor for SA may greatly advance understanding of this important signaling pathway. SABP2 with its high affinity for SA was previously considered to be a SA receptor. Despite a great deal work we may still not have true a receptor for SA. It is also entirely possible that there may be more than one receptor for SA. This scenario is more likely given the diverse role of SA in various physiological processes in plants including, modulation of opening and closing of stomatal aperture, flowering, seedling germination, thermotolerance, photosynthesis, and drought tolerance. Recent identification of NPR3, NPR4 and NPR1 as potential SA receptors and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHE2), several glutathione S transferases (GSTF) such as SA binding proteins have generated more interest in this field. Some of these SA binding proteins may have direct/indirect role in plant processes other than pathogen defense signaling. Development and use of new techniques with higher specificity to identify SA-interacting proteins have shown great promise and have resulted in the identification of several new SA interactors. This review focuses on SA interaction/binding proteins identified so far and their likely role in mediating plant defenses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  12. Vanillin selectively modulates the action of antibiotics against resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Camila Fonseca; Camilo, Cicera Janaine; do Nascimento Silva, Maria Karollyna; de Freitas, Thiago Sampaio; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo

    2017-12-01

    The treatment of infections caused by microorganisms that are resistant to antibiotics represent one of the main challenges of medicine today, especially due to the inefficacy of long-term drug therapy. In the search for new alternatives to treat these infections, many researchers have been looking for new substances derived from natural products to replace, or be used in combination with conventional antibiotics. Vanillin is a phenolic compound whose antimicrobial activity has been used in the elimination of pathogens present in fruits and vegetables. However, its antibacterial and modulating properties remain to be characterized. Therefore, this work aimed to evaluate the antibacterial activity and analyze the modulator activity of vanillin in association with conventional antibiotics. The antimicrobial activity of vanillin was evaluated using the microdilution method to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Standard strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and multi-resistant strains of Escherichia coli 06, Staphylococcus aureus 10, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 24 were used in this study. The antibiotic modulating effect was analyzed by combining vanillin with Norfloxacin, Imipenem, Gentamicin, Erythromycin and Tetracycline against the following multiresistant bacteria strains: Escherichia coli 06, Staphylococcus aureus 10 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 24. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA test of two tracks followed by the post hoc Bonferroni test. Vanillin presented CIMs ≥1024μg/mL against all tested strains demonstrating that it did not present significant antibacterial activity. However, modulated the activity of gentamicin and imipenem against S. aureus and E. coli, causing a synergistic effect, but did not affect the activity of norfloxacin, tetracycline and erythromycin against these same microorganisms. A synergistic effect was also obtained from the association of vanillin with norfloxacin against P

  13. Strontium titanate resistance modulation by ferroelectric field effect

    CERN Document Server

    Marré, D; Bellingeri, E; Pallecchi, I; Pellegrino, L; Siri, A S

    2003-01-01

    Among perovskite oxides strontium titanate (STO) SrTiO sub 3 undergoes a metal-insulator transition at very low carrier concentration and exhibits high mobility values at low temperature. We exploited such electrical properties and the structural compatibility of perovskite oxide materials in realizing ferroelectric field effect epitaxial heterostructures. By pulsed laser deposition, we grew patterned field effect devices, consisting of lanthanum doped STO and Pb(Zr,Ti)O sub 3. Such devices showed a resistance modulation up to 20%, consistent with geometrical parameters and carrier concentration of the semiconducting channel.

  14. The role of fatty acids in insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Barry; Perry, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a multi-faceted disruption of the communication between insulin and the interior of a target cell. The underlying cause of insulin resistance appears to be inflammation that can either be increased or decreased by the fatty acid composition of the diet. However, the molecular basis for insulin resistance can be quite different in various organs. This review deals with various types of inflammatory inputs mediated by fatty acids, which affect the extent of insulin resista...

  15. Arachidonic acid: an evolutionarily conserved signaling molecule modulates plant stress signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, Tatyana; Walley, Justin W; Chehab, E Wassim; Xiao, Yanmei; Kaspi, Roy; Pye, Matthew F; Mohamed, Maged E; Lazarus, Colin M; Bostock, Richard M; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2010-10-01

    Fatty acid structure affects cellular activities through changes in membrane lipid composition and the generation of a diversity of bioactive derivatives. Eicosapolyenoic acids are released into plants upon infection by oomycete pathogens, suggesting they may elicit plant defenses. We exploited transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants (designated EP) producing eicosadienoic, eicosatrienoic, and arachidonic acid (AA), aimed at mimicking pathogen release of these compounds. We also examined their effect on biotic stress resistance by challenging EP plants with fungal, oomycete, and bacterial pathogens and an insect pest. EP plants exhibited enhanced resistance to all biotic challenges, except they were more susceptible to bacteria than the wild type. Levels of jasmonic acid (JA) were elevated and levels of salicylic acid (SA) were reduced in EP plants. Altered expression of JA and SA pathway genes in EP plants shows that eicosapolyenoic acids effectively modulate stress-responsive transcriptional networks. Exogenous application of various fatty acids to wild-type and JA-deficient mutants confirmed AA as the signaling molecule. Moreover, AA treatment elicited heightened expression of general stress-responsive genes. Importantly, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves treated with AA exhibited reduced susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea infection, confirming AA signaling in other plants. These studies support the role of AA, an ancient metazoan signaling molecule, in eliciting plant stress and defense signaling networks.

  16. Baroreflex gain and vasomotor sympathetic modulation in resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Isabelle Magalhães Guedes; de Almeida, Leonardo Barbosa; Pereira, Natália Portela; Mira, Pedro Augusto de Carvalho; de Paula, Rogério Baumgratz; Martinez, Daniel Godoy; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Laterza, Mateus Camaroti

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the gain and latency of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate in patients with resistant hypertension compared to patients with essential hypertension and normotensive subjects. Eighteen patients with resistant hypertension (56 ± 10 years, mean of four antihypertensive drugs), 17 patients with essential hypertension (56 ± 11 years, mean of two antihypertensive drugs), and 17 untreated normotensive controls (50 ± 15 years) were evaluated by spectral analysis of the spontaneous fluctuations of arterial pressure (beat-to-beat) and heart rate (ECG). This analysis estimated vasomotor and cardiac autonomic modulations, respectively. The transfer function analysis quantified the gain and latency of the response of output signal (RR interval) per unit of spontaneous change of input signal (systolic arterial pressure). The gain was similarly lower in patients with resistant hypertension and patients with essential hypertension in relation to normotensive subjects (4.67 ± 2.96 vs. 6.60 ± 3.30 vs. 12.56 ± 8.81 ms/mmHg; P baroreflex control of heart rate was significantly higher only in patients with resistant hypertension when compared to patients with essential hypertension and normotensive subjects (-4.01 ± 3.19 vs. -2.91 ± 2.10 vs. -1.82 ± 1.09 s; P = 0.04, respectively). In addition, the index of vasomotor sympathetic modulation was significantly increased only in patients with resistant hypertension when compared to patients with essential hypertension and normotensive subjects (4.04 ± 2.86 vs. 2.65 ± 1.88 vs. 2.06 ± 1.70 mmHg 2 ; P baroreflex control of heart rate. These patients also have increased vasomotor sympathetic modulation.

  17. Specific fatty acids as metabolic modulators in the dairy cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.A. Pires

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent developments on the utilization of specific fatty acids to modulate bovine energy metabolism, with emphasis on the periparturient dairy cow. A number of experiments have assessed the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids on bovine hepatic energy metabolism using in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment of hepatocytes with specific fatty acids altered energy metabolism in vitro. For example, linolenic acid seemed to decrease hepatocyte triacylglycerol accumulation. This effect was confirmed in vivo, using parenteral infusions of emulsions derived from different fat sources to feed-restricted non-lactating cows. Additionally, polyunsaturated fatty acids can increase whole body response to insulin, potentially enhancing antilipolytic effects of insulin and muscle protein anabolism in the bovine. There is limited literature on the effects of feeding fat sources rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as fish oil and linseed oil, on metabolism of periparturient dairy cows. Available research has yielded conflicting results which need further clarification. On the other hand, specific isomers of conjugated linoleic acid consistently induce milk fat depression and are able to decrease energy export in milk by periparturient dairy cows. Nonetheless, research is still needed to assess whether these effects will ultimately benefit productivity and health status of periparturient dairy cows. Limitations of available methods to protect fatty acids from ruminal biohydrogenation are also addressed.

  18. Retinoic Acid and Its Role in Modulating Intestinal Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnewski, Paulo; Das, Srustidhar; Parigi, Sara M; Villablanca, Eduardo J

    2017-01-13

    Vitamin A (VA) is amongst the most well characterized food-derived nutrients with diverse immune modulatory roles. Deficiency in dietary VA has not only been associated with immune dysfunctions in the gut, but also with several systemic immune disorders. In particular, VA metabolite all-trans retinoic acid ( at RA) has been shown to be crucial in inducing gut tropism in lymphocytes and modulating T helper differentiation. In addition to the widely recognized role in adaptive immunity, increasing evidence identifies at RA as an important modulator of innate immune cells, such as tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Here, we focus on the role of retinoic acid in differentiation, trafficking and the functions of innate immune cells in health and inflammation associated disorders. Lastly, we discuss the potential involvement of at RA during the plausible crosstalk between DCs and ILCs.

  19. Fatty acid-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Marchand-Brustel, Y; Gual, P; Grémeaux, T

    2003-01-01

    Insulin resistance, when combined with impaired insulin secretion, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is characterized by a decrease in the insulin effect on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tissue. Tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 (insulin receptor subs...

  20. Ligands of histamine receptors modulate acid-sensing ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteinikov, V Y; Korosteleva, A S; Tikhonova, T B; Potapieva, N N; Tikhonov, D B

    2017-09-02

    Recently we found that synthetic compounds containing amino group linked to hydrophobic or aromatic moiety are potent modulators of the proton-gated channels (ASICs). These structures have clear similarity with ligands of histamine receptors. We have also demonstrated that histamine potentiates homomeric ASIC1a by shifting its activation dependence to less acidic conditions. In the present work the action of a series of histamine receptors ligands on recombinant ASIC1a and ASIC2a was characterized. Two types of action were found for ASIC1a. 1-methylhistamine, N-alpha-methylhistamine, dimaprit and thioperamide caused significant potentiation, which was pH-dependent and voltage-independent. The H4R antagonist A943931 caused inhibition, which is likely due to voltage-dependent pore block. ASIC2a were virtually insensitive to the drugs tested. We conclude that ligands of histamine receptors should also be considered as ASIC modulators. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. PHAGE RESISTANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL MUTANTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    Method of obtaining mutated lactic acid bacteria having a reduced susceptibility towards attack by bacteriophages, the method comprising mutating a gene involved in the pyrimidine metabolism, including pyrG encoding CTP synthetase. Such lactic acid bacteria are useful in starter cultures...

  2. Cholic acid resistance and the adherence ability of Bifidobacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 55% respectively, depending on pH, time and strain. The adaptation of Bifidobacterium strains to cholic acid was shown to be increased with time. It was concluded that the acquisition of cholic acid resistance by those Bifidobacterium strains promoted changes in the adhesion ability on HT-29 human epithelium cell line.

  3. Acid resistance, bile tolerance and antimicrobial properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, including food spoilage and pathogenic organisms such ... Key words: Baobab seeds, maari, fermentation, lactic acid bacteria, acid resistance, bile tolerance, antimicrobial .... cells was estimated by microscope using a counting chamber. (Neubauer ...

  4. Associations of erythrocyte fatty acid patterns with insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Synergistic and/or additive effects on cardiometabolic risk may be missed by examining individual fatty acids (FA). A pattern analysis may be a more useful approach. As well, it remains unclear whether erythrocyte fatty acid composition relates to insulin resistance among Hispanic/Latino...

  5. Ketogenic essential amino acids modulate lipid synthetic pathways and prevent hepatic steatosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yasushi; Nishikata, Natsumi; Shikata, Nahoko; Kimura, Yoshiko; Aleman, Jose O; Young, Jamey D; Koyama, Naoto; Kelleher, Joanne K; Takahashi, Michio; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2010-08-10

    Although dietary ketogenic essential amino acid (KAA) content modifies accumulation of hepatic lipids, the molecular interactions between KAAs and lipid metabolism are yet to be fully elucidated. We designed a diet with a high ratio (E/N) of essential amino acids (EAAs) to non-EAAs by partially replacing dietary protein with 5 major free KAAs (Leu, Ile, Val, Lys and Thr) without altering carbohydrate and fat content. This high-KAA diet was assessed for its preventive effects on diet-induced hepatic steatosis and whole-animal insulin resistance. C57B6 mice were fed with a high-fat diet, and hyperinsulinemic ob/ob mice were fed with a high-fat or high-sucrose diet. The high-KAA diet improved hepatic steatosis with decreased de novo lipogenesis (DNL) fluxes as well as reduced expressions of lipogenic genes. In C57B6 mice, the high-KAA diet lowered postprandial insulin secretion and improved glucose tolerance, in association with restored expression of muscle insulin signaling proteins repressed by the high-fat diet. Lipotoxic metabolites and their synthetic fluxes were also evaluated with reference to insulin resistance. The high-KAA diet lowered muscle and liver ceramides, both by reducing dietary lipid incorporation into muscular ceramides and preventing incorporation of DNL-derived fatty acids into hepatic ceramides. Our results indicate that dietary KAA intake improves hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by modulating lipid synthetic pathways.

  6. Ketogenic essential amino acids modulate lipid synthetic pathways and prevent hepatic steatosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Noguchi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although dietary ketogenic essential amino acid (KAA content modifies accumulation of hepatic lipids, the molecular interactions between KAAs and lipid metabolism are yet to be fully elucidated.We designed a diet with a high ratio (E/N of essential amino acids (EAAs to non-EAAs by partially replacing dietary protein with 5 major free KAAs (Leu, Ile, Val, Lys and Thr without altering carbohydrate and fat content. This high-KAA diet was assessed for its preventive effects on diet-induced hepatic steatosis and whole-animal insulin resistance. C57B6 mice were fed with a high-fat diet, and hyperinsulinemic ob/ob mice were fed with a high-fat or high-sucrose diet. The high-KAA diet improved hepatic steatosis with decreased de novo lipogenesis (DNL fluxes as well as reduced expressions of lipogenic genes. In C57B6 mice, the high-KAA diet lowered postprandial insulin secretion and improved glucose tolerance, in association with restored expression of muscle insulin signaling proteins repressed by the high-fat diet. Lipotoxic metabolites and their synthetic fluxes were also evaluated with reference to insulin resistance. The high-KAA diet lowered muscle and liver ceramides, both by reducing dietary lipid incorporation into muscular ceramides and preventing incorporation of DNL-derived fatty acids into hepatic ceramides.Our results indicate that dietary KAA intake improves hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by modulating lipid synthetic pathways.

  7. Altered cultivar resistance of kimchi cabbage seedlings mediated by salicylic Acid, jasmonic Acid and ethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Sang Hee; Yun, Byung-Wook; Hong, Jeum Kyu

    2014-09-01

    Two cultivars Buram-3-ho (susceptible) and CR-Hagwang (moderate resistant) of kimchi cabbage seedlings showed differential defense responses to anthracnose (Colletotrichum higginsianum), black spot (Alternaria brassicicola) and black rot (Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Xcc) diseases in our previous study. Defense-related hormones salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene led to different transcriptional regulation of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression in both cultivars. In this study, exogenous application of SA suppressed basal defenses to C. higginsianum in the 1st leaves of the susceptible cultivar and cultivar resistance of the 2nd leaves of the resistant cultivar. SA also enhanced susceptibility of the susceptible cultivar to A. brassicicola. By contrast, SA elevated disease resistance to Xcc in the resistant cultivar, but not in the susceptible cultivar. Methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatment did not affect the disease resistance to C. higginsianum and Xcc in either cultivar, but it compromised the disease resistance to A. brassicicola in the resistant cultivar. Treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) ethylene precursor did not change resistance of the either cultivar to C. higginsianum and Xcc. Effect of ACC pretreatment on the resistance to A. brassicicola was not distinguished between susceptible and resistant cultivars, because cultivar resistance of the resistant cultivar was lost by prolonged moist dark conditions. Taken together, exogenously applied SA, JA and ethylene altered defense signaling crosstalk to three diseases of anthracnose, black spot and black rot in a cultivar-dependent manner.

  8. Altered Cultivar Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage Seedlings Mediated by Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Ethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Hee Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two cultivars Buram-3-ho (susceptible and CR-Hagwang (moderate resistant of kimchi cabbage seedlings showed differential defense responses to anthracnose (Colletotrichum higginsianum, black spot (Alternaria brassicicola and black rot (Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Xcc diseases in our previous study. Defense-related hormones salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA and ethylene led to different transcriptional regulation of pathogenesis-related (PR gene expression in both cultivars. In this study, exogenous application of SA suppressed basal defenses to C. higginsianum in the 1st leaves of the susceptible cultivar and cultivar resistance of the 2nd leaves of the resistant cultivar. SA also enhanced susceptibility of the susceptible cultivar to A. brassicicola. By contrast, SA elevated disease resistance to Xcc in the resistant cultivar, but not in the susceptible cultivar. Methyl jasmonate (MJ treatment did not affect the disease resistance to C. higginsianum and Xcc in either cultivar, but it compromised the disease resistance to A. brassicicola in the resistant cultivar. Treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC ethylene precursor did not change resistance of the either cultivar to C. higginsianum and Xcc. Effect of ACC pretreatment on the resistance to A. brassicicola was not distinguished between susceptible and resistant cultivars, because cultivar resistance of the resistant cultivar was lost by prolonged moist dark conditions. Taken together, exogenously applied SA, JA and ethylene altered defense signaling crosstalk to three diseases of anthracnose, black spot and black rot in a cultivar-dependent manner.

  9. Small noncoding RNA GcvB is a novel regulator of acid resistance in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ye

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The low pH environment of the human stomach is lethal for most microorganisms; but not Escherichia coli, which can tolerate extreme acid stress. Acid resistance in E. coli is hierarchically controlled by numerous regulators among which are small noncoding RNAs (sncRNA. Results In this study, we individually deleted seventy-nine sncRNA genes from the E. coli K12-MG1655 chromosome, and established a single-sncRNA gene knockout library. By systematically screening the sncRNA mutant library, we show that the sncRNA GcvB is a novel regulator of acid resistance in E. coli. We demonstrate that GcvB enhances the ability of E. coli to survive low pH by upregulating the levels of the alternate sigma factor RpoS. Conclusion GcvB positively regulates acid resistance by affecting RpoS expression. These data advance our understanding of the sncRNA regulatory network involved in modulating acid resistance in E. coli.

  10. Carnosic acid is an efflux pumps modulator by dissipation of the membrane potential in Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-Sana, Adriana M; Repetto, Victoria; Moreno, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has become a serious problem of public health. Along with the controlled permeability by the cell-wall, active efflux systems can provide resistance by extruding antibiotics. Carnosic acid is capable to potentiate the antimicrobial activity of several antibiotics. However, the underlying molecular mechanism governing this effect remains unclear. The present study aims to investigate the effect of carnosic acid on the transport of ethidium bromide, on the permeability or the membrane potential in Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. By using fluorimetric assays it was demonstrated that in E. faecalis, carnosic acid is a modulator of the uptake and efflux of ethidium bromide which does not induce cell membrane permeabilization phenomena. Such effect was sensitive to the inhibition caused by both the proton-motive force carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and the calcium antagonist verapamil, but not to vanadate, an ATPase inhibitor. In this work it was demonstrated, for the first time, that the activity of carnosic acid on the uptake/efflux of ethidium bromide is correlated with its capacity to change the membrane potential gradient in S. aureus and E. faecalis. In conclusion, carnosic acid is a natural compound, structurally unrelated to known antibiotics, which can function as an efflux pump modulator by dissipation of the membrane potential. Therefore, carnosic acid would be a good candidate to be employed as a novel therapeutic agent to be used in combination therapies against drug-resistant enterococci and S. aureus infections.

  11. Resistance of yeasts to weak organic acid food preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Carboxylate weak acids are invaluable for large-scale food and beverage preservation. However, in response to safety concerns, there is now desire to reduce the use of these additives. The resistance to these compounds displayed by spoilage yeasts and fungi is a major reason why these preservatives often have to be used in millimolar levels. This chapter summarizes the mechanisms whereby yeasts are rendered resistant to acetate, propionate, sorbate, and benzoate. In baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), resistance to high acetic acid is acquired partly by loss of the plasma membrane aquaglyceroporin that facilitates the passive diffusional entry of undissociated acid into cells (Fps1), and partly through a transcriptional response mediated by the transcription factor Haa1. Other carboxylate preservatives are too large to enter cells through the Fps1 channel but instead penetrate at appreciable rates by passive diffusion across the plasma membrane. In Saccharomyces and Candida albicans though not, it seems, in the Zygosaccharomyces, resistance to the latter acids involves activation of the War1 transcription factor, which in turn generates strong induction of a specific plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporter (Pdr12). The latter actively pumps the preservative anion from the cell. Other contributors to weak acid resistance include enzymes that allow preservative degradation, members of the Tpo family of major facilitator superfamily transporters, and changes to the cell envelope that minimize the diffusional entry of the preservative into the cell. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mixed species biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes and Lactobacillus plantarum show enhanced resistance to benzalkonium chloride and peracetic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der S.; Abee, T.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the formation of single and mixed species biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes strains EGD-e and LR-991, with Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 as secondary species, and their resistance to the disinfectants benzalkonium chloride and peracetic acid. Modulation of growth, biofilm formation,

  13. Conjugated linoleic acid modulation of risk factors associated with atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flintoff-Dye Nichole

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA has been the subject of extensive investigation regarding its possible benefits on a variety of human diseases. In some animal studies, CLA has been shown to have a beneficial effect on sclerotic lesions associated with atherosclerosis, be a possible anti-carcinogen, increase feed efficiency, and act as a lean body mass supplement. However, the results have been inconsistent, and the effects of CLA on atherogenesis appear to be dose-, isomer-, tissue-, and species-specific. Similarly, CLA trials in humans have resulted in conflicting findings. Both the human and animal study results may be attributed to contrasting doses of CLA, isomers, the coexistence of other dietary fatty acids, length of study, and inter-and/or intra-species diversities. Recent research advances have suggested the importance of CLA isomers in modulating gene expression involved in oxidative damage, fatty acid metabolism, immune/inflammatory responses, and ultimately atherosclerosis. Although the possible mechanisms of action of CLA have been suggested, they have yet to be determined.

  14. Sphingolipids contribute to acetic acid resistance in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Lina; Genheden, Samuel; Eriksson, Leif A; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Lignocellulosic raw material plays a crucial role in the development of sustainable processes for the production of fuels and chemicals. Weak acids such as acetic acid and formic acid are troublesome inhibitors restricting efficient microbial conversion of the biomass to desired products. To improve our understanding of weak acid inhibition and to identify engineering strategies to reduce acetic acid toxicity, the highly acetic-acid-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii was studied. The impact of acetic acid membrane permeability on acetic acid tolerance in Z. bailii was investigated with particular focus on how the previously demonstrated high sphingolipid content in the plasma membrane influences acetic acid tolerance and membrane permeability. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we concluded that membranes with a high content of sphingolipids are thicker and more dense, increasing the free energy barrier for the permeation of acetic acid through the membrane. Z. bailii cultured with the drug myriocin, known to decrease cellular sphingo-lipid levels, exhibited significant growth inhibition in the presence of acetic acid, while growth in medium without acetic acid was unaffected by the myriocin addition. Furthermore, following an acetic acid pulse, the intracellular pH decreased more in myriocin-treated cells than in control cells. This indicates a higher inflow rate of acetic acid and confirms that the reduction in growth of cells cultured with myriocin in the medium with acetic acid was due to an increase in membrane permeability, thereby demonstrating the importance of a high fraction of sphingolipids in the membrane of Z. bailii to facilitate acetic acid resistance; a property potentially transferable to desired production organisms suffering from weak acid stress. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The fatty acid profile of rainbow trout liver cells modulates their tolerance to methylmercury and cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferain, Aline, E-mail: aline.ferain@uclouvain.be [Institute of Life Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Bonnineau, Chloé [Institute of Life Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Irstea, UR MALY, Centre de Lyon-Villeurbanne, rue de la Doua 5/32108, F-69616 Villeurbanne (France); Neefs, Ineke; Rees, Jean François; Larondelle, Yvan [Institute of Life Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Schamphelaere, Karel A.C.De [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Aquatic Ecology, Environmental Toxicology Unit, Ghent University, J. Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Debier, Cathy [Institute of Life Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • The phospholipid composition of rainbow trout liver cells was successfully changed. • Cell phospholipids influenced methylmercury (MeHg) and cadmium (Cd) toxicity. • Cells enriched in 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3 or 22:5n-6 were more resistant to MeHg and Cd. • Cell enrichment in 22:6n-3 increased resistance to Cd but not MeHg. - Abstract: The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of fish tissues, which generally reflects that of the diet, affects various cellular properties such as membrane structure and fluidity, energy metabolism and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Since these cellular parameters can play an important role in the cellular response to organic and inorganic pollutants, a variation of the PUFA supply might modify the toxicity induced by such xenobiotics. In this work, we investigated whether the cellular fatty acid profile has an impact on the in vitro cell sensitivity to two environmental pollutants: methylmercury and cadmium. Firstly, the fatty acid composition of the rainbow trout liver cell line RTL-W1 was modified by enriching the growth medium with either alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) or docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-6). These modified cells and their control (no PUFA enrichment) were then challenged for 24 h with increasing concentrations of methylmercury or cadmium. We observed that (i) the phospholipid composition of the RTL-W1 cells was profoundly modulated by changing the PUFA content of the growth medium: major modifications were a high incorporation of the supplemented PUFA in the cellular phospholipids, the appearance of direct elongation and desaturation metabolites in the cellular phospholipids as well as a change in the gross phospholipid composition (PUFA and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) levels and n-3/n-6 ratio); (ii) ALA, EPA and DPA enrichment significantly

  16. Role of insulin resistance in uric acid nephrolithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hanhan; Klett, Dane E; Littleton, Raymond; Elder, Jack S; Sammon, Jesse D

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of uric acid stones. Although not completely understood, its role is supported by many studies demonstrating increased prevalence of uric acid stones in patients with metabolic syndrome and in particular insulin resistance, a major component of metabolic syndrome. This review presents epidemiologic studies demonstrating the association between metabolic syndrome and nephrolithiasis in general as well as the relationship between insuli...

  17. Retinoic acid modulates chondrogenesis in the developing mouse cranial base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Jong-Min; Cho, Kyoung-Won; Lee, Min-Jung; Cho, Sung-Won; Jung, Han-Sung

    2011-12-15

    The retinoic acid (RA) signaling pathway is known to play important roles during craniofacial development and skeletogenesis. However, the specific mechanism involving RA in cranial base development has not yet been clearly described. This study investigated how RA modulates endochondral bone development of the cranial base by monitoring the RA receptor RARγ, BMP4, and markers of proliferation, programmed cell death, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. We first examined the dynamic morphological and molecular changes in the sphenooccipital synchondrosis-forming region in the mouse embryo cranial bases at E12-E16. In vitro organ cultures employing beads soaked in RA and retinoid-signaling inhibitor citral were compared. In the RA study, the sphenooccipital synchondrosis showed reduced cartilage matrix and lower BMP4 expression while hypertrophic chondrocytes were replaced with proliferating chondrocytes. Retardation of chondrocyte hypertrophy was exhibited in citral-treated specimens, while BMP4 expression was slightly increased and programmed cell death was induced within the sphenooccipital synchondrosis. Our results demonstrate that RA modulates chondrocytes to proliferate, differentiate, or undergo programmed cell death during endochondral bone formation in the developing cranial base. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  18. Hydrogenase-3 contributes to anaerobic acid resistance of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Noguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hydrogen production by fermenting bacteria such as Escherichia coli offers a potential source of hydrogen biofuel. Because H(2 production involves consumption of 2H(+, hydrogenase expression is likely to involve pH response and regulation. Hydrogenase consumption of protons in E. coli has been implicated in acid resistance, the ability to survive exposure to acid levels (pH 2-2.5 that are three pH units lower than the pH limit of growth (pH 5-6. Enhanced survival in acid enables a larger infective inoculum to pass through the stomach and colonize the intestine. Most acid resistance mechanisms have been defined using aerobic cultures, but the use of anaerobic cultures will reveal novel acid resistance mechanisms. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed the pH regulation of bacterial hydrogenases in live cultures of E. coli K-12 W3110. During anaerobic growth in the range of pH 5 to 6.5, E. coli expresses three hydrogenase isoenzymes that reversibly oxidize H(2 to 2H(+. Anoxic conditions were used to determine which of the hydrogenase complexes contribute to acid resistance, measured as the survival of cultures grown at pH 5.5 without aeration and exposed for 2 hours at pH 2 or at pH 2.5. Survival of all strains in extreme acid was significantly lower in low oxygen than for aerated cultures. Deletion of hyc (Hyd-3 decreased anoxic acid survival 3-fold at pH 2.5, and 20-fold at pH 2, but had no effect on acid survival with aeration. Deletion of hyb (Hyd-2 did not significantly affect acid survival. The pH-dependence of H(2 production and consumption was tested using a H(2-specific Clark-type electrode. Hyd-3-dependent H(2 production was increased 70-fold from pH 6.5 to 5.5, whereas Hyd-2-dependent H(2 consumption was maximal at alkaline pH. H(2 production, was unaffected by a shift in external or internal pH. H(2 production was associated with hycE expression levels as a function of external pH. CONCLUSIONS: Anaerobic growing

  19. Hydrogenase-3 contributes to anaerobic acid resistance of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Ken; Riggins, Daniel P; Eldahan, Khalid C; Kitko, Ryan D; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2010-04-12

    Hydrogen production by fermenting bacteria such as Escherichia coli offers a potential source of hydrogen biofuel. Because H(2) production involves consumption of 2H(+), hydrogenase expression is likely to involve pH response and regulation. Hydrogenase consumption of protons in E. coli has been implicated in acid resistance, the ability to survive exposure to acid levels (pH 2-2.5) that are three pH units lower than the pH limit of growth (pH 5-6). Enhanced survival in acid enables a larger infective inoculum to pass through the stomach and colonize the intestine. Most acid resistance mechanisms have been defined using aerobic cultures, but the use of anaerobic cultures will reveal novel acid resistance mechanisms. We analyzed the pH regulation of bacterial hydrogenases in live cultures of E. coli K-12 W3110. During anaerobic growth in the range of pH 5 to 6.5, E. coli expresses three hydrogenase isoenzymes that reversibly oxidize H(2) to 2H(+). Anoxic conditions were used to determine which of the hydrogenase complexes contribute to acid resistance, measured as the survival of cultures grown at pH 5.5 without aeration and exposed for 2 hours at pH 2 or at pH 2.5. Survival of all strains in extreme acid was significantly lower in low oxygen than for aerated cultures. Deletion of hyc (Hyd-3) decreased anoxic acid survival 3-fold at pH 2.5, and 20-fold at pH 2, but had no effect on acid survival with aeration. Deletion of hyb (Hyd-2) did not significantly affect acid survival. The pH-dependence of H(2) production and consumption was tested using a H(2)-specific Clark-type electrode. Hyd-3-dependent H(2) production was increased 70-fold from pH 6.5 to 5.5, whereas Hyd-2-dependent H(2) consumption was maximal at alkaline pH. H(2) production, was unaffected by a shift in external or internal pH. H(2) production was associated with hycE expression levels as a function of external pH. Anaerobic growing cultures of E. coli generate H(2) via Hyd-3 at low external pH, and

  20. Acid resistance, bile tolerance and antimicrobial properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maari is a fermented food condiment obtained by spontaneous fermentation of seeds from the baobab tree (Adansonia digitata). Nine dominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains, isolated from traditional maari fermentation were examined for their resistance to pH 2.5, their tolerance to 0.3% bile and their antimicrobial ...

  1. Investigation and Treatment of Fusidic Acid Resistance Among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcal Isolates from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelfetouh, Alaa; Kassem, Mervat; Naguib, Marwa; El-Nakeeb, Moustafa

    2017-01-01

    Methicillin resistance among staphylococci isolated from patients in northern Egypt has escalated alarmingly in the past decade. Data about the prevalence of fusidic acid (FA) resistance in Egyptian clinical isolates are limited. This work investigates the prevalence and mechanism of FA resistance among 81 methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates from major hospitals of Alexandria, Egypt. Some combinations for treating infections due to resistant isolates were studied. Twenty-six isolates (32.1%) were FA resistant (minimum inhibitory concentrations [MICs] = 2-1,024 μg/ml), and fusB and fusC genes coding for FA resistance were detected in 30.77% and 34.62% of the FA-resistant strains, respectively. One highly resistant isolate, S502 (MIC = 1,024 μg/ml), possessed both genes. Plasmid curing resulted in fusB loss and MIC decrease by 16-64 folds. Conjugation caused acquisition of FA resistance among susceptible isolates. Serial passages in subinhibitory FA concentrations produced mutants with increased MIC by 4-32 folds. The combination of FA with rifampin, gentamicin, or ampicillin/sulbactam, in a subinhibitory concentration, was synergistic against the isolates, including serial passage mutants, decreasing number of survivors by an average of 2-4 logs. A relatively moderate rate of FA resistance was detected in Alexandria hospitals. Combination therapy with gentamicin, rifampin, or ampicillin/sulbactam is crucial to preserve the effectiveness of FA.

  2. Investigation of Radiation Resistant Materials for Developing Space-Hardened Polymer Modulators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Edward

    2004-01-01

    An investigation of the radiation resistance of polymer based electro-optic modulators was conducted by the International Photonics Consultants for the Air Force Research Laboratory Photonics Technology Branch (SNDP...

  3. Microbial Resistance Mechanisms to the Antibiotic and Phytotoxin Fusaric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutcher, Frankie K; Puckhaber, Lorraine S; Stipanovic, Robert D; Bell, Alois A; Nichols, Robert L; Lawrence, Katheryn S; Liu, Jinggao

    2017-10-01

    Fusaric acid (FA) produced by Fusarium oxysporum plays an important role in disease development in plants, including cotton. This non-specific toxin also has antibiotic effects on microorganisms. Thus, one expects a potential pool of diverse detoxification mechanisms of FA in nature. Bacteria and fungi from soils infested with Fusarium and from laboratory sources were evaluated for their ability to grow in the presence of FA and to alter the structure of FA into less toxic compounds. None of the bacterial strains were able to chemically modify FA. Highly FA-resistant strains were found only in Gram-negative bacteria, mainly in the genus of Pseudomonas. The FA resistance of the Gram-negative bacteria was positively correlated with the number of predicted genes for FA efflux pumps present in the genome. Phylogenetic analysis of predicted FA resistance proteins (FUSC, an inner membrane transporter component of the efflux pump) revealed that FUSC proteins having high sequence identities with the functionally characterized FA resistance protein FusC or Fdt might be the major contributors of FA resistance. In contrast, most fungi converted FA to less toxic compounds regardless of the level of FA resistance they exhibited. Five derivatives were detected, and the detoxification of FA involved either oxidative reactions on the butyl side chain or reductive reactions on the carboxylic acid group. The production of these metabolites from widely different phyla indicates that resistance to FA by altering its structure is highly conserved. A few FA resistant saprophytic or biocontrol strains of fungi were incapable of altering FA, indicating a possible involvement of efflux transporters. Deployment of both efflux and derivatization mechanisms may be a common feature of fungal FA resistance.

  4. Acidic Attack Resistance of Cement Mortar Treated with Alkaline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Nazhat Sabeeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The negative effect of acidic attack on the properties of concrete and cement mortar is a topic of increasing significance in the recent years. Many attempts has occurred to mitigate this negative impact by improving the properties of concrete and increase resistance to acids by using additives. The present study includes treatment of sand by alkaline material and examine the effect of treatment on cement mortar resistance towards hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. Results show that sand treatment by alkaline material significantly enhance mortar ability to resist acids. In terms of loss weight, the maximum weight rate gain was 25.54% for specimens immersed in Hydrochloric acid with water cement ratio 40%. For specimens immersed in HCl, the average gain in compressive strength is (20.15-19.433% for w/c (40-45% respectively. The average gain in modulus of rupture toward the influence of H2SO4 is (18.37–17.99% for w/c (40-45%, respectively.

  5. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    prostate cancer patients have abnormalities in the AKT signaling pathway. These abnormalities are driven by mutations in the PTEN and AKT proteins as...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0560 TITLE: Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase

  6. Insulin resistance and circadian rhythm of cardiac autonomic modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Jianwen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance (IR has been associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD. Heart rate variability (HRV, an index of cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM, is also associated with CVD mortality and CVD morbidity. Currently, there are limited data about the impairment of IR on the circadian pattern of CAM. Therefore, we conducted this investigation to exam the association between IR and the circadian oscillations of CAM in a community-dwelling middle-aged sample. Method Homeostasis models of IR (HOMA-IR, insulin, and glucose were used to assess IR. CAM was measured by HRV analysis from a 24-hour electrocardiogram. Two stage modeling was used in the analysis. In stage one, for each individual we fit a cosine periodic model based on the 48 segments of HRV data. We obtained three individual-level cosine parameters that quantity the circadian pattern: mean (M, measures the overall average of a HRV index; amplitude (Â, measures the amplitude of the oscillation of a HRV index; and acrophase time (θ, measures the timing of the highest oscillation. At the second stage, we used a random-effects-meta-analysis to summarize the effects of IR variables on the three circadian parameters of HRV indices obtained in stage one of the analysis. Results In persons without type diabetes, the multivariate adjusted β (SE of log HOMA-IR and M variable for HRV were -0.251 (0.093, -0.245 (0.078, -0.19 (0.06, -4.89 (1.76, -3.35 (1.31, and 2.14 (0.995, for log HF, log LF, log VLF, SDNN, RMSSD and HR, respectively (all P Conclusion Elevated IR, among non-diabetics significantly impairs the overall mean levels of CAM. However, the  or θ of CAM were not significantly affected by IR, suggesting that the circadian mechanisms of CAM are not impaired. However, among persons with type 2 diabetes, a group clinically has more severe form of IR, the adverse effects of increased IR on all three HRV circadian parameters are much larger.

  7. Acetylsalicylic acid resistance risk factors in patients with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarek, Wioleta; Kasprzak, Michał; Obońska, Karolina; Ostrowska, Małgorzata; Wiciński, Michał; Kubica, Aldona; Kubica, Jacek; Grześk, Grzegorz

    2015-10-01

    Despite its commonly recognized benefits in the cardiovascular disease setting, an issue of resistance to this drug has lately emerged. The aim of this research was assessment of the phenomenon of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) resistance and its risk factors in patients treated for myocardial infarction. This study is a post-hoc analysis of a previous prospective study with approximately 200 patients treated for myocardial infarction with a coated formulation of ASA. The population was divided into two subgroups according to the response to ASA. ASA responsiveness was assessed using the arachidonic acid-dependent platelet aggregation (ASPI-test). The measurements were performed using the technique of impedance aggregometry. The prevalence of aspirin resistance among the study population was 6.2%. All analyzed aggregometric parameters (including ASPI-test, adenosine diphosphate dependent platelet aggregation - ADP-test, bleeding time measurement) showed significant differences between both subgroups. ASA resistant patients had higher concentrations of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), leukocytes (WBC) and platelets (PLT) but lower concentrations of hemoglobin (HGB). The temporal point analysis for both subgroups showed aspirin resistance incidence peak in patients at 9 months after myocardial infarction. The prevalence of aspirin resistance in our study population is comparable with rates reported in literature among patients with cardiovascular diseases. There is a possible relation between aspirin resistance and clopidogrel resistance. Presence did not affect the incidence of the clinical end-points. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. A branched-chain amino acid metabolite drives vascular fatty acid transport and causes insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Cholsoon; Oh, Sungwhan F; Wada, Shogo; Rowe, Glenn C; Liu, Laura; Chan, Mun Chun; Rhee, James; Hoshino, Atsushi; Kim, Boa; Ibrahim, Ayon; Baca, Luisa G; Kim, Esl; Ghosh, Chandra C; Parikh, Samir M; Jiang, Aihua; Chu, Qingwei; Forman, Daniel E; Lecker, Stewart H; Krishnaiah, Saikumari; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Weljie, Aalim M; Baur, Joseph A; Kasper, Dennis L; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data implicate branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the development of insulin resistance, but the mechanisms that underlie this link remain unclear. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle stems from the excess accumulation of lipid species, a process that requires blood-borne lipids to initially traverse the blood vessel wall. How this trans-endothelial transport occurs and how it is regulated are not well understood. Here we leveraged PPARGC1a (also known as PGC-1α; encoded by Ppargc1a), a transcriptional coactivator that regulates broad programs of fatty acid consumption, to identify 3-hydroxyisobutyrate (3-HIB), a catabolic intermediate of the BCAA valine, as a new paracrine regulator of trans-endothelial fatty acid transport. We found that 3-HIB is secreted from muscle cells, activates endothelial fatty acid transport, stimulates muscle fatty acid uptake in vivo and promotes lipid accumulation in muscle, leading to insulin resistance in mice. Conversely, inhibiting the synthesis of 3-HIB in muscle cells blocks the ability of PGC-1α to promote endothelial fatty acid uptake. 3-HIB levels are elevated in muscle from db/db mice with diabetes and from human subjects with diabetes, as compared to those without diabetes. These data unveil a mechanism in which the metabolite 3-HIB, by regulating the trans-endothelial flux of fatty acids, links the regulation of fatty acid flux to BCAA catabolism, providing a mechanistic explanation for how increased BCAA catabolic flux can cause diabetes.

  9. Teacher Skill Guide for Combatting Sexism. Module 3: Dealing with Resistance to Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulkin, Sunny; And Others

    This workshop module is designed to increase teachers' understanding of the resistance they are likely to encounter from their students when introducing emotionally laden content (e.g., issues of stereotyping and sex bias), and to provide them with strategies for preventing, dealing with, and reacting to student resistance. A booklet for use in…

  10. Modulation of expression and activity of intestinal multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 by xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Mottino, Aldo Domingo

    2016-07-15

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2) is a transporter that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. In the intestine, it is localized to the apical membrane of the enterocyte and plays a key role in limiting the absorption of xenobiotics incorporated orally. MRP2 may also play a role in systemic clearance of xenobiotics available from the serosal side of the intestine. MRP2 transports a wide range of substrates, mainly organic anions conjugated with glucuronic acid, glutathione and sulfate and its expression can be modulated by xenobiotics at transcriptional- and post-transcriptional levels. Transcriptional regulation is usually mediated by a group of nuclear receptors. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a major member of this group. Relevant drugs described to up-regulate intestinal MRP2 via PXR are rifampicin, spironolactone and carbamazepine, among others. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) was also reported to modulate MRP2 expression, phenobarbital being a typical activator. Dietary compounds, including micronutrients and other natural products, are also capable of regulating intestinal MRP2 expression transcriptionally. We have given them particular attention since the composition of the food ingested daily is not necessarily supervised and may result in interactions with therapeutic drugs. Post-transcriptional regulation of MRP2 activity by xenobiotics, e.g. as a consequence of inhibitory actions, is also described in this review. Unfortunately, only few studies report on drug-drug or nutrient-drug interactions as a consequence of modulation of intestinal MRP2 activity by xenobiotics. Future clinical studies are expected to identify additional interactions resulting in changes in efficacy or safety of therapeutic drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidation-resistant acidic resins prepared by partial carbonization as cocatalysts in synthesis of adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huijuan; Li, Hongbian; Liu, Yangqing; Jin, Peng; Wang, Xiangyu; Li, Baojun

    2012-08-01

    The oxidation-resistant acidic resins are of great importance for the catalytic oxidation systems. In this paper, the oxidatively stable acidic resins are obtained from the cation ion exchange resins (CIERs) through the thermal treatment in N(2) atmosphere. The structure and properties of the thermally treated CIERs were characterized by chemical analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, acid capacity measurement and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The thermally treated CIERs possess high acid capacity up to 4.09 mmol g(-1). A partial carbonization is observed in the thermal treatment process of CIERs, but the morphology of resin spheres maintains well. The as-prepared CIERs are used as solid acids to assist the hydrogen peroxide oxidation of cyclohexene to adipic acid (ADA) with tungstic acid as the catalyst precursor. The improved yields of ADA in the recycling reaction are obtained in the presence of acidic CIERs. Meanwhile, the unproductive decomposition of H(2)O(2) is effectively suppressed. The high yields of ADA (about 81%) are kept by the thermally treated CIERs even after the fifth cycle. The thermally treated CIERs exhibit excellent acid-catalytic performance and possess remarkable oxidation-resistant capability.

  12. Corrosion resistance of zirconium: general mechanisms, behaviour in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of zirconium results from the strong affinity of this metal for oxygen; as a result a thin protective oxide film is spontaneously formed in air or aqueous media, its thickness and properties depending on the physicochemical conditions at the interface. This film passivates the underlying metal but obviously if the passive film is partially or completely removed, localised or generalised corrosion phenomena will occur. In nitric acid, this depassivation may be chemical (fluorides) or mechanical (straining, creep, fretting). In these cases it is useful to determine the physicochemical conditions (concentration, temperature, potential, stress) which will have to be observed to use safely zirconium and its alloys in nitric acid solutions [fr

  13. Circumvention of inherent or acquired cytotoxic drug resistance in vitro using combinations of modulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadagan, David; Merry, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    Modulating agents are used to circumvent drug resistance in the clinical setting. However achievable serum concentrations are often lower than those which are optimal in vitro. Combination of modulating agents with non-overlapping toxicities may overcome this obstacle. We have investigated combinations of three modulating agents (quinine, verapamil, and cinnarizine) to circumvent inherent or acquired resistance to the cytotoxic drugs doxorubicin, vincristine and paclitaxel. Dose-response curves to cytotoxic drugs in the presence/absence of modulating agents were determined using colony formation and cell proliferation assays. Doxorubicin accumulation into cell monolayers was measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry. Greater (1.9-fold) sensitisation to particular cytotoxic drugs was observed for certain combinations of modulating agents compared to individual effects. The most effective combination was quinine-plus-verapamil with the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin. This increase in sensitivity was associated with increased doxorubicin accumulation. Such enhanced activity was, however, not observed for all combinations of modulating agents or for all studied cytotoxic drugs. The findings of the present study suggest certain combinations of modulating agents to have a clinical role in circumventing drug resistance. Particular combinations of modulating agents must be carefully chosen to suit particular cytotoxic drug treatments.

  14. Fusidic acid resistance among staphylococci strains isolated from clinical specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan Deveci

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate in vitrosusceptibility of fusidic acid to clinic isolates of staphylococci.Materials and methods: The forty-one coagulase negativestaphylococci (CNS and 18 Staphylococcus aureusstrains isolated from various clinical specimens were includedin this study. Staphylococci isolates were identifiedby conventional methods such as colony morphologyonto medium, gram staining, catalase and coagulasetests. According to “Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute(CLSI” criteria, antimicrobial susceptibility testingof isolates was performed by Kirby-Bauer’s disk diffusionmethod.Results: The seventy-two percent of the isolated S.aureuswere defined as methicillin sensitive-S.aureus (MSSA,28% of the isolated S.aureus were defined as methicillinresistant-S.aureus (MRSA. The difference among fusidicacid susceptibility rates of MSSA and MRSA strains wasnot statistically significant (p=0.305. The twenty-nine percentof the isolated CNS were defined as methicillin sensitive-CNS (MS-CNS, 71% of the isolated CNS were definedas methicillin resistant-CNS (MR-CNS. There wasno statistically significant difference between MS-CNSand MR-CNS strains for fusidic acid susceptibility rates(p=0.490. But the difference among fusidic acid susceptibilityrates of CNS and S.aureus strains was statisticallysignificant (p<0.001. CNS strains were found more resistancethan S.aureus strains for fusidic acid.Conclusion: In this study, the resistance rates weredetected to increase for fusidic acid along with methicillinresistance. Among CNS isolates, fusidic acid resistancerates were significantly more elevated than that forS.aureus. Fusidic acid remains as an alternative in thetreatment of infections due to staphylococci.

  15. Laser Surface Alloying of Aluminum for Improving Acid Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay Gutu; Sankar, Mamilla Ravi; Dixit, Uday Shanker

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, laser surface alloying of aluminum with magnesium, manganese, titanium and zinc, respectively, was carried out to improve acid corrosion resistance. Laser surface alloying was conducted using 1600 and 1800 W power source using CO2 laser. Acid corrosion resistance was tested by dipping the samples in a solution of 2.5% H2SO4 for 200 h. The weight loss due to acid corrosion was reduced by 55% for AlTi, 41% for AlMg alloy, 36% for AlZn and 22% for AlMn alloy. Laser surface alloyed samples offered greater corrosion resistance than the aluminum substrate. It was observed that localized pitting corrosion was the major factor to damage the surface when exposed for a long time. The hardness after laser surface alloying was increased by a factor of 8.7, 3.4, 2.7 and 2 by alloying with Mn, Mg, Ti and Zn, respectively. After corrosion test, hardness was reduced by 51% for AlTi sample, 40% for AlMg sample, 41.4% for AlMn sample and 33% for AlZn sample.

  16. Acid resistance variability among isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk, P.A.; Jonge, de R.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.; Kieboom, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: Acid resistance could be an indicator of virulence since acid resistant strains are able to better survive the human stomach passage and in macrophages. We studied the acid resistance of several Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 strains isolated from food and humans and identified cellular

  17. Overview on mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are a group of gram-negative or gram-variable bacteria which possess an obligate aerobic property with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, meanwhile transform ethanol and sugar to corresponding aldehydes, ketones and organic acids. Since the first genus Acetobacter of AAB was established in 1898, 16 AAB genera have been recorded so far. As the main producer of a world-wide condiment, vinegar, AAB have evolved an elegant adaptive system that enables them to survive and produce a high concentration of acetic acid. Some researches and reviews focused on mechanisms of acid resistance in enteric bacteria and made the mechanisms thoroughly understood, while a few investigations did in AAB. As the related technologies with proteome, transcriptome and genome were rapidly developed and applied to AAB research, some plausible mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in some AAB strains have been published. In this review, the related mechanisms of AAB against acetic acid with acetic acid assimilation, transportation systems, cell morphology and membrane compositions, adaptation response, and fermentation conditions will be described. Finally, a framework for future research for anti-acid AAB will be provided.

  18. Oxidation Resistance of the Sulfur Amino Acids: Methionine and Cysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur amino acids are a kind of amino acids which contain sulfhydryl, and they play a crucial role in protein structure, metabolism, immunity, and oxidation. Our review demonstrates the oxidation resistance effect of methionine and cysteine, two of the most representative sulfur amino acids, and their metabolites. Methionine and cysteine are extremely sensitive to almost all forms of reactive oxygen species, which makes them antioxidative. Moreover, methionine and cysteine are precursors of S-adenosylmethionine, hydrogen sulfide, taurine, and glutathione. These products are reported to alleviate oxidant stress induced by various oxidants and protect the tissue from the damage. However, the deficiency and excess of methionine and cysteine in diet affect the normal growth of animals; thereby a new study about defining adequate levels of methionine and cysteine intake is important.

  19. Facile preparation of acid-resistant magnetite particles for removal of Sb(?) from strong acidic solution

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dong; Guan, Kaiwen; Bai, Zhiping; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new facile coating strategy based on the hydrophobicity of methyl groups was developed to prevent nano-sized magnetite particles from strong acid corrosion. In this method, three steps of hydrolysis led to three layers of protection shell coating Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Filled with hydrophobic methyl groups, the middle layer mainly prevented the magnetic core from strong acid corrosion. These magnetite particles managed to resist 1 M HCl solution and 2.5 M H2SO4 solution. The acid res...

  20. Resistance to antibiotics in Lacid acid bacteria - strain Lactococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipić Brankica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are widely used in the food industry, especially in the production of fermented dairy products and meat. The most studied species among Lis Lactococcus lactis. L. lactis strains are of great importance in the production of fermented dairy products such as yogurt, butter, fresh cheese and some kind of semi-hard cheese. Although L. lactis acquired the „Generally Regarded As Safe“ (GRAS status, many investigations indicated that lactococci may act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which could be transferred to other bacterial species in human gastrointestinal tract includ­ing pathogens. The genome analysis of L. lactis indicated the presence of at least 40 putative drug transporter genes, and only four multidrug resistance (MDR transporters are functionally characterized: LmrA, LmrP, LmrCD i CmbT. LmrA is the first described MDR transporter in prokaryotes. LmrCD is responsible for resistance to cholate, which is an integral part of human bile and LmrCD is important for intestinal survival of lactococci that are used as probiotics. Secondary multidrug transporter LmrP confers resistance to lincosamides, macrolides, streptogramins and tetracyclines. CmbT protein has an effect on the host cell resistance to lincomycin, sulfadiazine, streptomycin, rifampicin, puromycin and sulfametox­azole. Since the food chain is an important way of transmitting resistance genes in human and animal population, it is of great importance to study the mechanisms of resistance in lactococci and other LAB, intended for the food industry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173019: Izučavanje gena i molekularnih mehanizama u osnovi probiotičke aktivnosti bakterija mlečne kiseline izolovanih sa područja Zapadnog Balkana

  1. Dietary modulation of the resistance to intestinal infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee-Oudenhoven, I.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections are still a major health problem, not only in developing countries. Even in Europe and the United States about 10-15 % of the population contracts an intestinal infection each year, mostly of foodborne origin. The growing resistance of pathogens to antibiotics

  2. MODULATION OF CIS-DIAMMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM(II) RESISTANCE - A REVIEW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIMMERBOSSCHA, H; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE

    In this review an inventory is made of agents used to circumvent cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) resistance in vitro and in vivo. Agents that affect CDDP accumulation and membrane related systems, cytoplasmic defense mechanisms, as well as DNA accessibility and repair are reviewed. In

  3. Modulation of drug resistance and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the oral cavity of Tunisian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Zmantar

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: LPE may be considered to have resistance-modifying activity. A more detailed investigation is necessary to determine the active compound responsible for therapeutic and disinfectant modulation.

  4. Ameliorative effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids against palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance in L6 skeletal muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawada Keisuke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose uptake activity in muscle cells are fundamental events in the development of type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia. There is an increasing demand for compounds including drugs and functional foods that can prevent myocellular insulin resistance. Methods In this study, we established a high-throughput assay to screen for compounds that can improve myocellular insulin resistance, which was based on a previously reported non-radioisotope 2-deoxyglucose (2DG uptake assay. Insulin-resistant muscle cells were prepared by treating rat L6 skeletal muscle cells with 750 μM palmitic acid for 14 h. Using the established assay, the impacts of several fatty acids on myocellular insulin resistance were determined. Results In normal L6 cells, treatment with saturated palmitic or stearic acid alone decreased 2DG uptake, whereas unsaturated fatty acids did not. Moreover, co-treatment with oleic acid canceled the palmitic acid-induced decrease in 2DG uptake activity. Using the developed assay with palmitic acid-induced insulin-resistant L6 cells, we determined the effects of other unsaturated fatty acids. We found that arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids improved palmitic acid-decreased 2DG uptake at lower concentrations than the other unsaturated fatty acids, including oleic acid, as 10 μM arachidonic acid showed similar effects to 750 μM oleic acid. Conclusions We have found that polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids prevent palmitic acid-induced myocellular insulin resistance.

  5. Chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle improves hepatic lipid dysregulation and modulates hepatic fatty acid composition in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Ruan, Zheng; Wen, Yanmei; Yang, Yuhui; Mi, Shumei; Zhou, Lili; Wu, Xin; Ding, Sheng; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    Chlorogenic acid as a natural hydroxycinnamic acid has protective effect for liver. Endotoxin induced metabolic disorder, such as lipid dysregulation and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of chlorogenic acid in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion. The Sprague-Dawley rats with lipid metabolic disorder (LD group) were intraperitoneally injected endotoxin. And the rats of chlorogenic acid-LD group were daily received chlorogenic acid by intragastric administration. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, the area of visceral adipocyte was decreased and liver injury was ameliorated, as compared to LD group. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, serum triglycerides, free fatty acids, hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol were decreased, the proportion of C20:1, C24:1 and C18:3n-6, Δ9-18 and Δ6-desaturase activity index in the liver were decreased, and the proportion of C18:3n-3 acid was increased, compared to the LD group. Moreover, levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I, and fatty acid β-oxidation were increased in chlorogenic acid-LD group compared to LD rats, whereas levels of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were decreased. These findings demonstrate that chlorogenic acid effectively improves hepatic lipid dysregulation in rats by regulating fatty acid metabolism enzymes, stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase activation, and modulating levels of hepatic fatty acids.

  6. Organic Isothiocyanates: Dietary Modulators of Doxorubicin Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Angerler, J.;Fiegl, M.;Zojer, N.;Raderer, M.;Haberl, I.;Andreeff, M. ; Huber , H. Blood 1996 88, 1747- 1754. 69. Kusuhara, H.;Suzuki, H. ;Sugiyama, Y. J Pharm...Mallia, F. H. Gartner, M. D. Provenzano, E. K. Fujimoto , N. M. Goeke, B. J. Olson, and D. C. Klenk. Measurement of protein using bicinchoninic acid. Anal

  7. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spartaru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen; Terwilliger, Kent

    2015-12-03

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60 degrees C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 order of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when the RH was increased over this RH range. Arizona road dust showed reduced sheet resistance at lower RH, but with less humidity sensitivity over the range tested. The soot sample did not show significant resistivity change compared to the unsoiled control. Photovoltaic modules with sea salt on their faces were step-stressed between 25% and 95% RH at 60 degrees C applying -1000 V bias to the active cell circuit. Leakage current from the cell circuit to ground ranged between two and ten times higher than that of the unsoiled controls. Degradation rate of modules with salt on the surface increased with increasing RH and time.

  8. Cardiac Insulin Resistance and MicroRNA Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Pulakat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac insulin resistance is a metabolic and functional disorder that is often associated with obesity and/or the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS, and this disorder may be accentuated by chronic alcohol consumption. In conditions of over-nutrition, increased insulin (INS and angiotensin II (Ang II activate mammalian target for rapamycin (mTOR/p70 S6 kinase (S6K1 signaling, whereas chronic alcohol consumption inhibits mTOR/S6K1 activation in cardiac tissue. Although excessive activation of mTOR/S6K1 induces cardiac INS resistance via serine phosphorylation of INS receptor substrates (IRS-1/2, it also renders cardioprotection via increased Ang II receptor 2 (AT2R upregulation and adaptive hypertrophy. In the INS-resistant and hyperinsulinemic Zucker obese (ZO rat, a rodent model for CRS, activation of mTOR/S6K1signaling in cardiac tissue is regulated by protective feed-back mechanisms involving mTOR↔AT2R signaling loop and profile changes of microRNA that target S6K1. Such regulation may play a role in attenuating progressive heart failure. Conversely, alcohol-mediated inhibition of mTOR/S6K1, down-regulation of INS receptor and growth-inhibitory mir-200 family, and upregulation of mir-212 that promotes fetal gene program may exacerbate CRS-related cardiomyopathy.

  9. Development of acid-resistant HEPA filter components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, K.; Woodard, R.W.; Buttedahl, O.I.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory and in-service tests of various HEPA filter media and separators were conducted to establish their relative resistances to HNO 3 -HF vapors. Filter medium of glass fiber with Nomex additive and aluminum separators with an epoxy-vinyl coating have performed quite well in the acid environment in the laboratory, and in prototype-filters placed in service in a plenum at Rocky Flats. Proprietary filters with new design and/or components were also tested in service with generally good results

  10. Resistance to valproic acid as predictor of treatment resistance in genetic generalized epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gesche, Joanna; Khanevski, Marina; Solberg, Carl

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at defining clinical predictors of drug resistance in adults with genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE) who were treated with a broad spectrum of antiepileptic drugs. Of a cohort of 137 unselected adult GGE patients with long-term follow up, clinical and demographic data, putative...... prognostic factors (e.g., psychiatric comorbidities, electroencephalography [EEG]), treatment response, and data indicative of social status were collected. Fifty-eight patients had seizures within the past year. Thirty-three patients met the definition of "drug-resistant epilepsy" according...... to the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) definition. Psychiatric comorbidities, age at first diagnosis, and absences were associated with worse seizure control, whereas focal changes in EEG remained without prognostic impact. Resistance to valproic acid was the most important prognostic factor...

  11. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Treatment on Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Insulin resistance (IR is a common pathogenic factor of several diseases: diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, etc. There are many therapeutic factors involved in decreasing IR. Among them we mention metformin, pioglitazone, physical activity, weight loss, diet, etc. In the last decade, there are more observations of the influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids on IR. The most powerful seem to be omega-3 fatty acids. In our study, we wanted to asses if the administration of omega-3 fatty acids is involved in modifying IR. Materials and methods: We evaluated 126 diabetic patients with IR from January 2011 until July 2014. The study was open-label and non-randomized. For the determination of IR we used the HOMA-IR method. Results: For both males and females there was a regression of HOMA-IR during the 4 weeks of treatment with omega-3 and also after 2 weeks after stopping the administration of these fatty acids. The decrease of HOMA-IR was statistically significant (p<0.05. The statistic result observed in the next 2 weeks after stopping administration of omega-3 was also significant (p<0.05.

  12. Large resistivity modulation in mixed-phase metallic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeonbae; Liu, Z Q; Heron, J T; Clarkson, J D; Hong, J; Ko, C; Biegalski, M D; Aschauer, U; Hsu, S L; Nowakowski, M E; Wu, J; Christen, H M; Salahuddin, S; Bokor, J B; Spaldin, N A; Schlom, D G; Ramesh, R

    2015-01-07

    In numerous systems, giant physical responses have been discovered when two phases coexist; for example, near a phase transition. An intermetallic FeRh system undergoes a first-order antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition above room temperature and shows two-phase coexistence near the transition. Here we have investigated the effect of an electric field to FeRh/PMN-PT heterostructures and report 8% change in the electrical resistivity of FeRh films. Such a 'giant' electroresistance (GER) response is striking in metallic systems, in which external electric fields are screened, and thus only weakly influence the carrier concentrations and mobilities. We show that our FeRh films comprise coexisting ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases with different resistivities and the origin of the GER effect is the strain-mediated change in their relative proportions. The observed behaviour is reminiscent of colossal magnetoresistance in perovskite manganites and illustrates the role of mixed-phase coexistence in achieving large changes in physical properties with low-energy external perturbation.

  13. Modulation of HIV-1 Gag NC/p1 cleavage efficiency affects protease inhibitor resistance and viral replicative capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Maarseveen Noortje M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the substrate of HIV-1 protease, especially changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site, can directly contribute to protease inhibitor (PI resistance and also compensate for defects in viral replicative capacity (RC due to a drug resistant protease. These NC/p1 changes are known to enhance processing of the Gag protein. To investigate the capacity of HIV-1 to modulate Gag cleavage and its consequences for PI resistance and RC, we performed a detailed enzymatic and virological analysis using a set of PI resistant NC/p1 variants (HXB2431V, HXB2436E+437T, HXB2437T and HXB2437V. Results Here, we demonstrate that single NC/p1 mutants, which displayed only a slight increase in PI resistance did not show an obvious change in RC. In contrast, the double NC/p1 mutant, which displayed a clear increase in processing efficiency and PI resistance, demonstrated a clear reduction in RC. Cleavage analysis showed that a tridecameric NC/p1 peptide representing the double NC/p1 mutant was cleaved in two specific ways instead of one. The observed decrease in RC for the double NC/p1 mutant (HXB2436E+437T could (partially be restored by either reversion of the 436E change or by acquisition of additional changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site at codon 435 or 438 as was revealed during in vitro evolution experiments. These changes not only restored RC but also reduced PI resistance levels. Furthermore these changes normalized Gag processing efficiency and obstructed the novel secondary cleavage site observed for the double NC/p1 mutant. Conclusions The results of this study clearly demonstrate that HIV-1 can modulate Gag processing and thereby PI resistance. Distinct increases in Gag cleavage and PI resistance result in a reduced RC that can only be restored by amino acid changes in NC/p1 which reduce Gag processing to an optimal rate.

  14. Acid resistance and response to pH-induced stress in two Lactobacillus plantarum strains with probiotic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šeme, H; Gjuračić, K; Kos, B; Fujs, Š; Štempelj, M; Petković, H; Šušković, J; Bogovič Matijašić, B; Kosec, G

    2015-01-01

    Two new Lactobacillus plantarum strains, KR6-DSM 28780 and M5 isolated from sour turnip and traditional dried fresh cheese, respectively, were evaluated for species identity, antibiotic susceptibility, resistance to gastrointestinal conditions and adaptive response to low pH. Resistance mechanisms involved in the adaptation to acid-induced stress in these two strains were investigated by quantitative PCR of the atpA, cfa1, mleS and hisD genes. In addition to absence of antibiotic resistance, the two L. plantarum strains showed excellent survival rates at pH values as low as 2.4. Adaptive response to low pH was clearly observed in both strains; strain KR6 was superior to M5, as demonstrated by its ability to survive during 3 h incubation at pH 2.0 upon adaptation to moderately acidic conditions. In contrast, acid adaptation did not significantly affect the survival rate during simulated passage through the gastrointestinal tract. In both strains, induction of histidine biosynthesis (hisD) was upregulated during the acid adaptation response. In addition, significant upregulation of the cfa1 gene, involved in modulation of membrane fatty acid composition, was observed during the adaptation phase in strain KR6 but not in strain M5. Cells adapted to moderately acidic conditions also showed a significantly increased viability after the lyophilisation procedure, a cross-protection phenomenon providing additional advantage in probiotic application.

  15. Combined amino acids modulation with H 2 O 2 stress for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strategies of amino acids addition coupled with H2O2 stresses were developed for glutathione (GSH) overproduction in high cell density (HCD) cultivation of Candida utilis. Based on the fact that glycine shows two functions of promoting cells growth as well as GSH production, precursor amino acids modulations of feeding ...

  16. Extreme resistance to weak-acid preservatives in the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Malcolm; Steels, Hazel; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard; Novodvorska, Michaela; Hayer, Kimran; Archer, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Weak-acid preservatives, such as sorbic acid and acetic acid, are used in many low pH foods to prevent spoilage by fungi. The spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is notorious for its extreme resistance to preservatives and ability to grow in excess of legally-permitted concentrations of preservatives. Extreme resistance was confirmed in 38 strains of Z. bailii to several weak-acid preservatives. Using the brewing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a control, tests showed that Z. bailii was ~ 3-fold more resistant to a variety of weak-acids but was not more resistant to alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, ketones, or hydrophilic chelating acids. The weak acids were chemically very diverse in structure, making it improbable that the universal resistance was caused by degradation or metabolism. Examination of Z. bailii cell populations showed that extreme resistance to sorbic acid, benzoic acid and acetic acid was limited to a few cells within the population, numbers decreasing with concentration of weak acid to bailii is due to population heterogeneity, with a small proportion of cells having a lower intracellular pH. This reduces the level of accumulation of any weak acid in the cytoplasm, thus conferring resistance to all weak acids, but not to other inhibitors. PMID:23856006

  17. Extreme resistance to weak-acid preservatives in the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Malcolm; Steels, Hazel; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard; Novodvorska, Michaela; Hayer, Kimran; Archer, David B

    2013-08-16

    Weak-acid preservatives, such as sorbic acid and acetic acid, are used in many low pH foods to prevent spoilage by fungi. The spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is notorious for its extreme resistance to preservatives and ability to grow in excess of legally-permitted concentrations of preservatives. Extreme resistance was confirmed in 38 strains of Z. bailii to several weak-acid preservatives. Using the brewing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a control, tests showed that Z. bailii was ~3-fold more resistant to a variety of weak-acids but was not more resistant to alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, ketones, or hydrophilic chelating acids. The weak acids were chemically very diverse in structure, making it improbable that the universal resistance was caused by degradation or metabolism. Examination of Z. bailii cell populations showed that extreme resistance to sorbic acid, benzoic acid and acetic acid was limited to a few cells within the population, numbers decreasing with concentration of weak acid to bailii is due to population heterogeneity, with a small proportion of cells having a lower intracellular pH. This reduces the level of accumulation of any weak acid in the cytoplasm, thus conferring resistance to all weak acids, but not to other inhibitors. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Overexpression of a soybean salicylic acid methyltransferase gene confers resistance to soybean cyst nematode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicylic acid plays a critical role in activating plant defence responses after pathogen attack. Salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) modulates the level of salicylic acid by converting salicylic acid to methyl salicylate. Here, we report that a SAMT gene from soybean (GmSAMT1) plays a role in s...

  19. Does Branched-Chain Amino Acids Supplementation Modulate Skeletal Muscle Remodeling through Inflammation Modulation? Possible Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Nicastro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle protein turnover is modulated by intracellular signaling pathways involved in protein synthesis, degradation, and inflammation. The proinflammatory status of muscle cells, observed in pathological conditions such as cancer, aging, and sepsis, can directly modulate protein translation initiation and muscle proteolysis, contributing to negative protein turnover. In this context, branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs, especially leucine, have been described as a strong nutritional stimulus able to enhance protein translation initiation and attenuate proteolysis. Furthermore, under inflammatory conditions, BCAA can be transaminated to glutamate in order to increase glutamine synthesis, which is a substrate highly consumed by inflammatory cells such as macrophages. The present paper describes the role of inflammation on muscle remodeling and the possible metabolic and cellular effects of BCAA supplementation in the modulation of inflammatory status of skeletal muscle and the consequences on protein synthesis and degradation.

  20. Fatty acids modulate the expression levels of key proteins for cholesterol absorption in Caco-2 monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Chen, Guoxun; Ma, Meihu; Qiu, Ning; Zhu, Lingjiao; Li, Jing

    2018-02-20

    Fatty acids have been shown to modulate intestinal cholesterol absorption in cells and animals, a process that is mediated by several transporter proteins. Of these proteins, Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) is a major contributor to this process. The current study investigates the unknown mechanism by which fatty acids modulate cholesterol absorption. We evaluated the effects of six fatty acids palmitic acid (PAM), oleic acid (OLA), linoleic acid (LNA), arachidonic acid (ARA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on cholesterol uptake and transport in human enterocytes Caco-2 cells, and on the mRNA expression levels of NPC1L1, others proteins (ABCG5, ABCG8, ABCA1, ACAT2, MTP, Caveolin 1, Annexin-2) involved in cholesterol absorption, and SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 that are responsible for lipid metabolism. The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially for EPA and DHA, dose-dependently inhibited cholesterol uptake and transport in Caco-2 monolayer, while saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) had no inhibitory effects. EPA and DHA inhibited cholesterol absorption in Caco-2 monolayer might be caused by down-regulating NPC1L1 mRNA and protein levels, which were associated with inhibition of SREBP-1/- 2 mRNA expression levels. Results from this study indicate that functional food containing high PUFAs may have potential therapeutic benefit to reduce cholesterol absorption. Further studies on this topic may provide approaches to control lipid metabolism and to promote health.

  1. Lipoteichoic acid synthesis inhibition in combination with antibiotics abrogates growth of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paganelli, Fernanda L.; van de Kamer, Tim; Brouwer, Ellen C.; Leavis, Helen L.; Woodford, Neil; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; Hendrickx, Antoni P A

    Enterococcus faecium is a multidrug-resistant (MDR) nosocomial pathogen causing significant morbidity in debilitated patients. New antimicrobials are needed to treat antibiotic-resistant E. faecium infections in hospitalised patients. E. faecium incorporates lipoteichoic acid (LTA)

  2. Pipecolic Acid Orchestrates Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance and Defense Priming via Salicylic Acid-Dependent and -Independent Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernsdorff, Friederike; Döring, Anne-Christin; Gruner, Katrin; Schuck, Stefan; Bräutigam, Andrea; Zeier, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationships of the two immune-regulatory plant metabolites, salicylic acid (SA) and pipecolic acid (Pip), in the establishment of plant systemic acquired resistance (SAR), SAR-associated defense priming, and basal immunity. Using SA-deficient sid2, Pip-deficient ald1, and sid2 ald1 plants deficient in both SA and Pip, we show that SA and Pip act both independently from each other and synergistically in Arabidopsis thaliana basal immunity to Pseudomonas syringae. Transcriptome analyses reveal that SAR establishment in Arabidopsis is characterized by a strong transcriptional response systemically induced in the foliage that prepares plants for future pathogen attack by preactivating multiple stages of defense signaling and that SA accumulation upon SAR activation leads to the downregulation of photosynthesis and attenuated jasmonate responses systemically within the plant. Whereas systemic Pip elevations are indispensable for SAR and necessary for virtually the whole transcriptional SAR response, a moderate but significant SA-independent component of SAR activation and SAR gene expression is revealed. During SAR, Pip orchestrates SA-dependent and SA-independent priming of pathogen responses in a FLAVIN-DEPENDENT-MONOOXYGENASE1 (FMO1)-dependent manner. We conclude that a Pip/FMO1 signaling module acts as an indispensable switch for the activation of SAR and associated defense priming events and that SA amplifies Pip-triggered responses to different degrees in the distal tissue of SAR-activated plants. PMID:26672068

  3. Pipecolic Acid Orchestrates Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance and Defense Priming via Salicylic Acid-Dependent and -Independent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernsdorff, Friederike; Döring, Anne-Christin; Gruner, Katrin; Schuck, Stefan; Bräutigam, Andrea; Zeier, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationships of the two immune-regulatory plant metabolites, salicylic acid (SA) and pipecolic acid (Pip), in the establishment of plant systemic acquired resistance (SAR), SAR-associated defense priming, and basal immunity. Using SA-deficient sid2, Pip-deficient ald1, and sid2 ald1 plants deficient in both SA and Pip, we show that SA and Pip act both independently from each other and synergistically in Arabidopsis thaliana basal immunity to Pseudomonas syringae. Transcriptome analyses reveal that SAR establishment in Arabidopsis is characterized by a strong transcriptional response systemically induced in the foliage that prepares plants for future pathogen attack by preactivating multiple stages of defense signaling and that SA accumulation upon SAR activation leads to the downregulation of photosynthesis and attenuated jasmonate responses systemically within the plant. Whereas systemic Pip elevations are indispensable for SAR and necessary for virtually the whole transcriptional SAR response, a moderate but significant SA-independent component of SAR activation and SAR gene expression is revealed. During SAR, Pip orchestrates SA-dependent and SA-independent priming of pathogen responses in a FLAVIN-DEPENDENT-MONOOXYGENASE1 (FMO1)-dependent manner. We conclude that a Pip/FMO1 signaling module acts as an indispensable switch for the activation of SAR and associated defense priming events and that SA amplifies Pip-triggered responses to different degrees in the distal tissue of SAR-activated plants. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Overexpression of Poplar Pyrabactin Resistance-Like Abscisic Acid Receptors Promotes Abscisic Acid Sensitivity and Drought Resistance in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingling Yu

    Full Text Available Drought stress is an important environmental factor limiting productivity of plants, especially fast growing species with high water consumption like poplar. Abscisic acid (ABA is a phytohormone that positively regulates seed dormancy and drought resistance. The PYR1 (Pyrabactin Resistance 1/ PYRL (PYR-Like/ RCAR (Regulatory Component of ABA Receptor (PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family has been identified and widely characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, their functions in poplars remain unknown. Here, we report that 2 of 14 PYR/PYL/RCAR orthologues in poplar (Populus trichocarpa (PtPYRLs function as a positive regulator of the ABA signal transduction pathway. The Arabidopsis transient expression and yeast two-hybrid assays showed the interaction among PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5, a clade A protein phosphatase 2C, and a SnRK2, suggesting that a core signalling complex for ABA signaling pathway exists in poplars. Phenotypic analysis of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5 transgenic Arabidopsis showed that these two genes positively regulated the ABA responses during the seed germination. More importantly, the overexpression of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5 substantially improved ABA sensitivity and drought stress tolerance in transgenic plants. In summary, we comprehensively uncovered the properties of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5, which might be good target genes to genetically engineer drought-Resistant plants.

  5. Molecular mechanism of free fatty acids-induced insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-zhe CAO

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is a complex metabolic disorder related to several diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2DM, hypertension and dyslipidemia. These diseases are all independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Lipid metabolism disorder has toxic effects on cells and may cause or aggravate IR in performance of elevated plasma levels of triglyceride (TG and free fatty acids (FFA, the last one is an independent risk factor for IR. It has been clear that FFA may induce IR by endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation, although the specific mechanisms remained unknown. The present paper summarizes the related molecules involved in the pathogenic process of IR and its mechanism, might provide a theoretical basis for the molecular mechanism of IR caused by FFA, and therapeutic reference for clinical treatment of IR and prevention of T2DM. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.16

  6. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2016-06-06

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Antibiotic resistance modulation and modes of action of (--α-pinene in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Kovač

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the mode of action of (--α-pinene in terms of its modulation of antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter jejuni. Broth microdilution and ethidium bromide accumulation assays were used to evaluate the (--α-pinene antimicrobial activity, modulation of antimicrobial resistance, and inhibition of antimicrobial efflux. The target antimicrobial efflux systems were identified using an insertion mutagenesis approach, and C. jejuni adaptation to (--α-pinene was evaluated using DNA microarrays. Knock-out mutants of the key up-regulated transcriptional regulators hspR and hrcA were constructed to investigate their roles in C. jejuni adaptation to several stress factors, including osmolytes, and pH, using Biolog phenotypical microarrays. Our data demonstrate that (--α-pinene efficiently modulates antibiotic resistance in C. jejuni by decreasing the minimum inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, erythromycin and triclosan by up to 512-fold. Furthermore, (--α-pinene promotes increased expression of cmeABC and another putative antimicrobial efflux gene, Cj1687. The ethidium bromide accumulation was greater in the wild-type strain than in the antimicrobial efflux mutant strains, which indicates that these antimicrobial efflux systems are a target of action of (--α-pinene. Additionally, (--α-pinene decreases membrane integrity, which suggests that enhanced microbial influx is a secondary mode of action of (--α-pinene. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that (--α-pinene disrupts multiple metabolic pathways, and particularly those involved in heat-shock responses. Thus, (--α-pinene has significant activity in the modulation of antibiotic resistance in C. jejuni, which appears to be mediated by multiple mechanisms that include inhibition of microbial efflux, decreased membrane integrity, and metabolic disruption. These data warrant further studies on (--α-pinene to develop its use in the control of antibiotic

  8. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems...... of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut....

  9. Sulfur and adenine metabolisms are linked, and both modulate sulfite resistance in wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Agustín; Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia; Del Olmo, Marcellí

    2006-08-09

    Sulfite treatment is the most common way to prevent grape must spoilage in winemaking because the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is particularly resistant to this chemical. In this paper we report that sulfite resistance depends on sulfur and adenine metabolism. The amount of adenine and methionine in a chemically defined growth medium modulates sulfite resistance of wine yeasts. Mutations in the adenine biosynthetic pathway or the presence of adenine in a synthetic minimal culture medium increase sulfite resistance. The presence of methionine has the opposite effect, inducing a higher sensitivity to SO(2). The concentration of methionine, adenine, and sulfite in a synthetic grape must influences the progress of fermentation and at the transcriptional level the expression of genes involved in sulfur (MET16), adenine (ADE4), and acetaldehyde (ALD6) metabolism. Sulfite alters the pattern of expression of all these genes. This fact indicates that the response to this stress is complex and involves several metabolic pathways.

  10. Monomeric tartrate resistant acid phosphatase induces insulin sensitive obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Lång

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer.Using mice over expressing TRAP, we show that over-expression of monomeric, but not the dimeric form in adipose tissue leads to early onset spontaneous hyperplastic obesity i.e. many small fat cells. In vitro, recombinant monomeric, but not proteolytically processed TRAP induced proliferation and differentiation of mouse and human adipocyte precursor cells. In humans, monomeric TRAP was highly expressed in the adipose tissue of obese individuals. In both the mouse model and in the obese humans the source of TRAP in adipose tissue was macrophages. In addition, the obese TRAP over expressing mice exhibited signs of a low-grade inflammatory reaction in adipose tissue without evidence of abnormal adipocyte lipolysis, lipogenesis or insulin sensitivity.Monomeric TRAP, most likely secreted from adipose tissue macrophages, induces hyperplastic obesity with normal adipocyte lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

  11. Adenosine and its Related Nucleotides may Modulate Gastric Acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on lumen-perfused rat isolated stomachs showed that adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) inhibited histamine-induced gastric acid secretion. The inhibitions and the calcium levels of the serosal solution exhibited inverse relationship. Adenosine ...

  12. Modulation of folate production in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegkamp, H.B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Food fortification has proven to be very useful in reducing health problems associated with mal-intake of essential nutrients, such as the B-vitamin folate. Folate is used as one-carbon donor/acceptor in several biochemical processes like synthesis of DNA, RNA and some amino acids. Sufficient intake

  13. Guiding principle for crystalline Si photovoltaic modules with high tolerance to acetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Atsushi; Hara, Yukiko

    2018-04-01

    A guiding principle for highly reliable crystalline Si photovoltaic modules, especially those with high tolerance to acetic acid generated by hydrolysis reaction between water vapor and an ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant, is proposed. Degradation behavior evaluated by the damp heat test strongly depends on Ag finger electrodes and also EVA encapsulants. The acetic acid concentration in EVA on the glass side directly determines the degradation behavior. The most important factor for high tolerance is the type of Ag finger electrode materials when using an EVA encapsulant. Photovoltaic modules using newly developed crystalline Si cells with improved Ag finger electrode materials keep their maximum power of 80% of the initial value even after the damp heat test at 85 °C and 85% relative humidity for 10000 h. The pattern of dark regions in electroluminescence images is also discussed on the basis of the dynamics of acetic acid in the modules.

  14. Levels of eicosapentaenoic acid in obese schoolchildren with and without insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Meza, Karmina; Tene Pérez, Carlos Enrique; Sánchez Ramírez, Carmen Alicia; Muñiz Valencia, Roberto; Del Toro Equihua, Mario

    2014-09-12

    Obesity in children is now an increasing health risk worldwide in which the insulin-resistance can be present. Studies have linked a diet rich in n-3 fatty acids with a lower prevalence of insulin-resistance. To compare the levels of eicosapentaenoic acid among obese children with and without insulin-resistance. In 56 randomly school-age children with obesity, insulin-resistance was determined by the homeostasis model assessment for insulin-resistance index and the serum levels of eicosapentaenoic acid were determined by gas chromatography. Insulin-resistance was established when the index was >6.0, non- insulin- resistance when that index was within the range of 1.4-5.9. The serum levels of eicosapentaenoic acid were compared with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests, as needed. No differences in age or sex were identified among the groups studied. The anthropometric parameters were significantly higher in the group of children with insulin-resistance than in the other two groups. The children with insulin- resistance had significantly lower levels of eicosapentaenoic acid than the non- insulin-resistance group [12.4% area under the curve vs. 37.4%, p = 0.031], respectively. Obese primary school-aged children with insulin-resistance had lower plasma levels of eicosapentaenoic acid. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of fatty acid uptake and fatty acid beta-oxidation in mediating insulin resistance in heart and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyan; Keung, Wendy; Samokhvalov, Victor; Wang, Wei; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acids are a major fuel source used to sustain contractile function in heart and oxidative skeletal muscle. To meet the energy demands of these muscles, the uptake and beta-oxidation of fatty acids must be coordinately regulated in order to ensure an adequate, but not excessive, supply for mitochondrial beta-oxidation. However, imbalance between fatty acid uptake and beta-oxidation has the potential to contribute to muscle insulin resistance. The action of insulin is initiated by binding to its receptor and activation of the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity of the receptor, resulting in the initiation of an intracellular signaling cascade that eventually leads to insulin-mediated alterations in a number of cellular processes, including an increase in glucose transport. Accumulation of fatty acids and lipid metabolites (such as long chain acyl CoA, diacylglycerol, triacylglycerol, and/or ceramide) can lead to alterations in this insulin signaling pathway. An imbalance between fatty acid uptake and oxidation is believed to be responsible for this lipid accumulation, and is thought to be a major cause of insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes, due to lipid accumulation and inhibition of one or more steps in the insulin-signaling cascade. As a result, decreasing muscle fatty acid uptake can improve insulin sensitivity. However, the potential role of increasing fatty acid beta-oxidation in the heart or skeletal muscle in order to prevent cytoplasmic lipid accumulation and decrease insulin resistance is controversial. While increased fatty acid beta-oxidation may lower cytoplasmic lipid accumulation, increasing fatty acid beta-oxidation can decrease muscle glucose metabolism, and incomplete fatty acid oxidation has the potential to also contribute to insulin resistance. In this review, we discuss the proposed mechanisms by which alterations in fatty acid uptake and oxidation contribute to insulin resistance, and how targeting fatty acid uptake and

  16. Modulation of hepatic steatosis by dietary fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Zara, Vincenzo

    2014-02-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) describes a range of conditions caused by fat deposition within liver cells. Liver fat content reflects the equilibrium between several metabolic pathways involved in triglyceride synthesis and disposal, such as lipolysis in adipose tissue and de novo lipogenesis, triglyceride esterification, fatty acid oxidation and very-low-density lipoprotein synthesis/secretion in hepatic tissue. In particular, it has been demonstrated that hepatic de novo lipogenesis plays a significant role in NAFLD pathogenesis. It is widely known that the fatty acid composition of the diet influences hepatic lipogenesis along with other metabolic pathways. Therefore, dietary fat may not only be involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis, but may also prevent and/or reverse hepatic fat accumulation. In this review, major data from the literature about the role of some dietary fats as a potential cause of hepatic fat accumulation or as a potential treatment for NAFLD are described. Moreover, biochemical mechanisms responsible for an increase or decrease in hepatic lipid content are critically analyzed. It is noteworthy that both quantitative and qualitative aspects of dietary fat influence triglyceride deposition in the liver. A high-fat diet or the dietary administration of conjugated linoleic acids induced hepatic steatosis. In contrast, supplementation of the diet with krill oil or pine nut oil helped in the prevention and/or in the treatment of steatotic liver. Quite interesting is the "case" of olive oil, since several studies have often provided different and/or conflicting results in animal models.

  17. Induced resistance by cresotic acid (3-hydroxy-4-methyl methylbenzoic acid) against wilt disease of melon and cotton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, H.; Li, Z.; Zhang, D.; Li, W.; Tang, W.

    2004-01-01

    Cresotic acid (3-hydroxy-4-methylbenzoic acid) was proved be active in controlling wilt diseases of melon and cotton plants grown in the house. Soil drench with 200-1000 ppm cresotic acid induced 62-77 %, 69-79 % and 50-60 % protection against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp melonis (FOM) in melon, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp vasinfectum (FOV) and Verticillium dahliae in cotton, respectively. Since no inhibitory effect of cresotic acid on mycelial growth of these three fungual pathogens was observed in vitro, it is suggested that control of these wilt diseases with cresotic acid resulted from induced resistance. Cresotic acid induced resistance in melon plants not only against race 0, race 1, race 2 and race 1,2, but also against a mixture of these four races of FOM, suggesting a non-race- specific resistance. Level of induced resistance by cresotic acid against FOM depended on inoculum pressure applied to melon plants. At 25 day after inoculation with FOM, percentage protection induced by cresotic acid under low inoculum pressure retained a level of 51 %, while under high inoculum pressure percentage protection decreased to only 10 %. High concentrations of cresotic acid significantly reduced plant growth. Reduction in fresh weight of melon (36-51%) and cotton (42-71%) was obtained with 500-1000 ppm cresotic acid, while only less than 8% reduction occurred with 100-200 ppm. (author)

  18. Increased resistance to biotrophic pathogens in the Arabidopsis constitutive induced resistance 1 mutant is EDS1 and PAD4-dependent and modulated by environmental temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryke Carstens

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis constitutive induced resistance 1 (cir1 mutant displays salicylic acid (SA-dependent constitutive expression of defence genes and enhanced resistance to biotrophic pathogens. To further characterise the role of CIR1 in plant immunity we conducted epistasis analyses with two key components of the SA-signalling branch of the defence network, ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1 and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4. We demonstrate that the constitutive defence phenotypes of cir1 require both EDS1 and PAD4, indicating that CIR1 lies upstream of the EDS1-PAD4 regulatory node in the immune signalling network. In light of this finding we examined EDS1 expression in cir1 and observed increased protein, but not mRNA levels in this mutant, suggesting that CIR1 might act as a negative regulator of EDS1 via a post-transcriptional mechanism. Finally, as environmental temperature is known to influence the outcome of plant-pathogen interactions, we analysed cir1 plants grown at 18, 22 or 25°C. We found that susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 is modulated by temperature in cir1. Greatest resistance to this pathogen (relative to PR-1:LUC control plants was observed at 18°C, while at 25°C no difference in susceptibility between cir1 and control plants was apparent. The increase in resistance to Pst DC3000 at 18°C correlated with a stunted growth phenotype, suggesting that activation of defence responses may be enhanced at lower temperatures in the cir1 mutant.

  19. Resin glycosides from Ipomoea wolcottiana as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Castañeda, Berenice; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Castañeda-Gómez, Jhon; Aparicio-Cuevas, Manuel Alejandro; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2016-03-01

    Recycling liquid chromatography was used for the isolation and purification of resin glycosides from the CHCl3-soluble extracts prepared using flowers of Ipomoea wolcottiana Rose var. wolcottiana. Bioassay-guided fractionation, using modulation of both antibiotic activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Gram-negative bacteria and vinblastine susceptibility in breast carcinoma cells, was used to isolate the active glycolipids as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype. An ester-type dimer, wolcottine I, one tetra- and three pentasaccharides, wolcottinosides I-IV, in addition to the known intrapilosin VII, were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In vitro assays established that none of these metabolites displayed antibacterial activity (MIC>512 μg/mL) against multidrug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, and two nosocomial pathogens: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri; however, when tested (25 μg/mL) in combination with tetracycline, kanamycin or chloramphenicol, they exerted a potentiation effect of the antibiotic susceptibility up to eightfold (64 μg/mL from 512 μg/mL). It was also determined that these non-cytotoxic (CI50>8.68 μM) agents modulated vinblastine susceptibility at 25 μg/mL in MFC-7/Vin(+) cells with a reversal factor (RFMCF-7/Vin(+)) of 2-130 fold. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a High Fidelity Dynamic Module of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Using Adams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, B. T.; Thompson, W. K.; Lewandowski, B. E.; Cadwell, E. E.; Newby, N. J.; Fincke, R. S.; Sheehan, C.; Mulugeta, L.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) implements well-vetted computational models to predict and assess spaceflight health and performance risks, and enhance countermeasure development. DAP provides expertise and computation tools to its research customers for model development, integration, or analysis. DAP is currently supporting the NASA Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures (ExPC) project by integrating their biomechanical models of specific exercise movements with dynamic models of the devices on which the exercises were performed. This presentation focuses on the development of a high fidelity dynamic module of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on board the ISS. The ARED module, illustrated in the figure below, was developed using the Adams (MSC Santa Ana, California) simulation package. The Adams package provides the capabilities to perform multi rigid body, flexible body, and mixed dynamic analyses of complex mechanisms. These capabilities were applied to accurately simulate: Inertial and mass properties of the device such as the vibration isolation system (VIS) effects and other ARED components, Non-linear joint friction effects, The gas law dynamics of the vacuum cylinders and VIS components using custom written differential state equations, The ARED flywheel dynamics, including torque limiting clutch. Design data from the JSC ARED Engineering team was utilized in developing the model. This included solid modeling geometry files, component/system specifications, engineering reports and available data sets. The Adams ARED module is importable into LifeMOD (Life Modeler, Inc., San Clemente, CA) for biomechanical analyses of different resistive exercises such as squat and dead-lift. Using motion capture data from ground test subjects, the ExPC developed biomechanical exercise models in LifeMOD. The Adams ARED device module was then integrated with the exercise subject model into one integrated dynamic model. This presentation will describe the

  1. Putative ABC transporter responsible for acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of the membrane fraction of Acetobacter aceti revealed the presence of several proteins that were produced in response to acetic acid. A 60-kDa protein, named AatA, which was mostly induced by acetic acid, was prepared; aatA was cloned on the basis of its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. AatA, consisting of 591 amino acids and containing ATP-binding cassette (ABC) sequences and ABC signature sequences, belonged to the ABC transporter superfamily. The aatA mutation with an insertion of the neomycin resistance gene within the aatA coding region showed reduced resistance to acetic acid, formic acid, propionic acid, and lactic acid, whereas the aatA mutation exerted no effects on resistance to various drugs, growth at low pH (adjusted with HCl), assimilation of acetic acid, or resistance to citric acid. Introduction of plasmid pABC101 containing aatA under the control of the Escherichia coli lac promoter into the aatA mutant restored the defect in acetic acid resistance. In addition, pABC101 conferred acetic acid resistance on E. coli. These findings showed that AatA was a putative ABC transporter conferring acetic acid resistance on the host cell. Southern blot analysis and subsequent nucleotide sequencing predicted the presence of aatA orthologues in a variety of acetic acid bacteria belonging to the genera Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The fermentation with A. aceti containing aatA on a multicopy plasmid resulted in an increase in the final yield of acetic acid.

  2. Modulation of cytochrome biosynthesis in yeast by antimetabolite action of levulinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud, D R; Borralho, L M; Panek, A D; Mattoon, J R

    1979-01-01

    Levulinic acid, a competitive inhibitor of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, was used to inhibit cytochrome biosynthesis in growing yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the antimetabolite acts by inhibiting delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase in vivo, causing an accumulation of intracellular delta-aminolevulinic acid and simultaneous decreases in all classes of mitochondrial cytochromes. Changes in cellular cytochrome content with increasing levulinic acid concentration suggested the existence of different regulatory patterns in S. cerevisiae and Candida utilis. In C. utilis, cytochrome a.a3 formation is very resistant to the antimetabolite action of levulinic acid. In this aerobic yeast, cytochrome c+c1 is the most sensitive to levulinic acid, and cytochrome b exhibits intermediate sensitivity. PMID:378939

  3. Mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by fatty acids: importance of the mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Amanda R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Insulin resistance condition is associated to the development of several syndromes, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. Although the factors linking insulin resistance to these syndromes are not precisely defined yet, evidence suggests that the elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA level plays an important role in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Accordantly, in vivo and in vitro exposure of skeletal muscle and myocytes to physiological concentrations of saturated fatty acids is associated with insulin resistance condition. Several mechanisms have been postulated to account for fatty acids-induced muscle insulin resistance, including Randle cycle, oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we reviewed experimental evidence supporting the involvement of each of these propositions in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by saturated fatty acids and propose an integrative model placing mitochondrial dysfunction as an important and common factor to the other mechanisms.

  4. Contact Resistance of Tantalum Coatings in Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers using Acidic Electrolytes at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik; Barner, Jens H. Von

    2014-01-01

    Tantalum has so far been found to be the only construction material with sufficient corrosion resistance for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzers using acidic electrolytes above 100◦C. In this work the interfacial contact resistances of tantalum plates and tantalum coated...... stainless steel were found to be far below the US Department of Energy target value of 10mcm2. The good contact resistance of tantalum was demonstrated by simulating high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis conditions by anodization performed in 85% phosphoric acid at 130◦C, followed...... by contact resistance measurements. Upon anodization the contact resistances remained unchanged....

  5. Valproic acid modulates platelet and coagulation function ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E; Halaweish, Ihab

    2017-01-01

    of coagulopathy, it remains unknown whether this is a direct effect of the drug, or the establishment of an overall prosurvival phenotype. We thus conducted an ex-vivo experiment to determine if VPA has an effect on coagulation and platelet function. Ten swine were subjected to traumatic brain injury (TBI......) and hemorrhagic shock (HS). Blood samples were drawn prior to TBI+HS insult (Healthy group) and 2 h following TBI+HS (Shock group). Samples were incubated with VPA or vehicle controls for 1 h. Platelet aggregation was analyzed via impedance aggregometry and coagulation was measured using thromboelastography....... Addition of VPA to the healthy blood did not affect platelet aggregation or coagulation parameters. In shock blood, incubation with VPA significantly reduced collagen-(P = 0.050), arachidonic acid-(P = 0.005), and adenosine diphosphate-(P = 0.023) induced platelet aggregation. VPA also significantly...

  6. Noise analysis due to strip resistance in the ATLAS SCT silicon strip module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipnis, I.

    1996-08-01

    The module is made out of four 6 cm x 6 cm single sided Si microstrip detectors. Two detectors are butt glued to form a 12 cm long mechanical unit and strips of the two detectors are electrically connected to form 12 cm long strips. The butt gluing is followed by a back to back attachment. The module in this note is the Rφ module where the electronics is oriented parallel to the strip direction and bonded directly to the strips. This module concept provides the maximum signal-to-noise ratio, particularly when the front-end electronics is placed near the middle rather than at the end. From the noise analysis, it is concluded that the worst-case ΔENC (far-end injection) between end- and center-tapped modules will be 120 to 210 el. rms (9 to 15%) for a non-irradiated detector and 75 to 130 el. rms (5 to 9%) for an irradiated detector, for a metal strip resistance of 10 to 20 Ω/cm

  7. Modulation of human multidrug-resistance MDR-1 gene by natural curcuminoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limtrakul, Pornngarm; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Buddhasukh, Duang

    2004-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon that is often associated with decreased intracellular drug accumulation in patient's tumor cells resulting from enhanced drug efflux. It is related to the overexpression of a membrane protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp-170), thereby reducing drug cytotoxicity. A variety of studies have tried to find MDR modulators which increase drug accumulation in cancer cells. In this study, natural curcuminoids, pure curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn), were compared for their potential ability to modulate the human MDR-1 gene expression in multidrug resistant human cervical carcinoma cell line, KB-V1 by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR. Western blot analysis and RT-PCR showed that all the three curcuminoids inhibited MDR-1 gene expression, and bisdemethoxycurcumin produced maximum effect. In additional studies we found that commercial grade curcuminoid (approximately 77% curcumin, 17% demethoxycurcumin and 3% bisdemthoxycurcumin) decreased MDR-1 gene expression in a dose dependent manner and had about the same potent inhibitory effect on MDR-1 gene expression as our natural curcuminoid mixtures. These results indicate that bisdemethoxycurcumin is the most active of the curcuminoids present in turmeric for modulation of MDR-1 gene. Treatment of drug resistant KB-V1 cells with curcumin increased their sensitivity to vinblastine, which was consistent with a decreased MDR-1 gene product, a P-glycoprotein, on the cell plasma membrane. Although many drugs that prevent the P-glycoprotein function have been reported, this report describes the inhibition of MDR-1 expression by a phytochemical. The modulation of MDR-1 expression may be an attractive target for new chemosensitizing agents

  8. Contribution of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus reuteri to acid resistance and persistence in sourdough fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Marcia S; Schlicht, Sabine; G?nzle, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Acid stress impacts the persistence of lactobacilli in industrial sourdough fermentations, and in intestinal ecosystems. However, the contribution of glutamate to acid resistance in lactobacilli has not been demonstrated experimentally, and evidence for the contribution of acid resistance to the competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough is lacking. It was therefore the aim of this study to investigate the ecological role of glutamate decarboxylase in L. reuteri. Results...

  9. Fatty acid metabolism, energy expenditure and insulin resistance in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nigel; Cooney, Gregory J; Kraegen, Edward W; Bruce, Clinton R

    2014-02-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are essential elements of all cells and have significant roles as energy substrates, components of cellular structure and signalling molecules. The storage of excess energy intake as fat in adipose tissue is an evolutionary advantage aimed at protecting against starvation, but in much of today's world, humans are faced with an unlimited availability of food, and the excessive accumulation of fat is now a major risk for human health, especially the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Since the first recognition of the association between fat accumulation, reduced insulin action and increased risk of T2D, several mechanisms have been proposed to link excess FA availability to reduced insulin action, with some of them being competing or contradictory. This review summarises the evidence for these mechanisms in the context of excess dietary FAs generating insulin resistance in muscle, the major tissue involved in insulin-stimulated disposal of blood glucose. It also outlines potential problems with models and measurements that may hinder as well as help improve our understanding of the links between FAs and insulin action.

  10. Resistance to ursodeoxycholic acid-induced growth arrest can also result in resistance to deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis and increased tumorgenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Ashley A; Akare, Sandeep; Qi, Wenqing; Herzer, Pascal; Jean-Louis, Samira; Feldman, Rebecca A; Martinez, Jesse D

    2006-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence which suggests that bile acids increase the risk of colon cancer and act as tumor promoters, however, the mechanism(s) of bile acids mediated tumorigenesis is not clear. Previously we showed that deoxycholic acid (DCA), a tumorogenic bile acid, and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a putative chemopreventive agent, exhibited distinct biological effects, yet appeared to act on some of the same signaling molecules. The present study was carried out to determine whether there is overlap in signaling pathways activated by tumorogenic bile acid DCA and chemopreventive bile acid UDCA. To determine whether there was an overlap in activation of signaling pathways by DCA and UDCA, we mutagenized HCT116 cells and then isolated cell lines resistant to UDCA induced growth arrest. These lines were then tested for their response to DCA induced apoptosis. We found that a majority of the cell lines resistant to UDCA-induced growth arrest were also resistant to DCA-induced apoptosis, implying an overlap in DCA and UDCA mediated signaling. Moreover, the cell lines which were the most resistant to DCA-induced apoptosis also exhibited a greater capacity for anchorage independent growth. We conclude that UDCA and DCA have overlapping signaling activities and that disregulation of these pathways can lead to a more advanced neoplastic phenotype

  11. MexT functions as a redox-responsive regulator modulating disulfide stress resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargier, Emilie; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; Mooij, Marlies J; Woods, David F; Morrissey, John P; Dobson, Alan D W; Adams, Claire; O'Gara, Fergal

    2012-07-01

    MexT is a global LysR transcriptional regulator known to modulate antibiotic resistance and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, a novel role for MexT in mediating intrinsic disulfide stress resistance was demonstrated, representing the first identified phenotype associated with inactivation of this regulator in wild-type cells. Disruption of mexT resulted in increased susceptibility to the disulfide stress elicitor diamide [diazenedicarboxylic acid bis(N,N,-di-methylamide)]. This compound is known to elicit a specific stress response via depletion of reduced glutathione and alteration of the cellular redox environment, implicating MexT in redox control. In support of this, MexT-regulated targets, including the MexEF-OprN multidrug efflux system, were induced by subinhibitory concentrations of diamide. A mexF insertion mutant also exhibited increased diamide susceptibility, implicating the MexEF-OprN efflux system in MexT-associated disulfide stress resistance. Purified MexT protein was observed to form an oligomeric complex in the presence of oxidized glutathione, with a calculated redox potential of -189 mV. This value far exceeds the thiol-disulfide redox potential of the bacterial cytoplasm, ensuring that MexT remains reduced under normal physiological conditions. MexT is activated by mutational disruption of the predicted quinone oxidoreductase encoded by mexS. Alterations in the cellular redox state were observed in a mexS mutant (PA14nfxC), supporting a model whereby the perception of MexS-associated redox signals by MexT leads to the induction of the MexEF-OprN efflux system, which, in turn, may mediate disulfide stress resistance via efflux of electrophilic compounds.

  12. Fabrication of four-point biped robot foot module based on contact-resistance force sensor and its evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyun Joon; Kim, Jong Ho; Kim, Dong Ki [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young Ha [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents the design of robot foot module of four-point biped walking robot and its fabrication. The foot module has four sensor units based on contact-resistance force sensor. The thin-film-type force sensor is fabricated by coating resistive ink on thin polyimide film using silk screening technique. The simple structure is devised and fabricated to assemble the thin force sensor rigidly. The unit force sensor module is evaluated by the calibration setup to obtain the characteristics of repeatability and hysteresis. The sensor module presents hysteresis error of about 5% and repeatability error of about 0.37%. The calculated zero moment point (ZMP) of the foot module is also compared with the measured position using static load of 50 N. The maximum location error of ZMP is less than 10%. The robot foot module shows the possibility of applying it to humanoid walking.

  13. Fabrication of four-point biped robot foot module based on contact-resistance force sensor and its evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyun Joon; Kim, Jong Ho; Kim, Dong Ki; Kwon, Young Ha

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of robot foot module of four-point biped walking robot and its fabrication. The foot module has four sensor units based on contact-resistance force sensor. The thin-film-type force sensor is fabricated by coating resistive ink on thin polyimide film using silk screening technique. The simple structure is devised and fabricated to assemble the thin force sensor rigidly. The unit force sensor module is evaluated by the calibration setup to obtain the characteristics of repeatability and hysteresis. The sensor module presents hysteresis error of about 5% and repeatability error of about 0.37%. The calculated zero moment point (ZMP) of the foot module is also compared with the measured position using static load of 50 N. The maximum location error of ZMP is less than 10%. The robot foot module shows the possibility of applying it to humanoid walking

  14. Pre-cold stress increases acid stress resistance and induces amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pre-cold stress increases acid stress resistance and induces amino acid homeostasis in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000. ... Compared to exposure to acid stress only, pre-adaptation to cold stress decreased the redox balance ratio and the formation of hydroxyl radicals, indicating a change in aerobic respiration and oxidative ...

  15. Plant adaptation to acid soils: the molecular basis for crop aluminum resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity on acid soils is a significant limitation to crop production worldwide, as approximately 50% of the world’s potentially arable soils are acidic. Because acid soils are such an important constraint to agriculture, understanding the mechanisms and genes conferring resistance to ...

  16. Overexpression of ESBP6 improves lactic acid resistance and production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Minetaka; Akase, Shin-Pei; Nakanishi, Ryota; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Harashima, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Polylactic acid plastics are receiving increasing attention for the control of atmospheric CO2 emissions. Lactic acid, the building block for polylactic acid, is produced by fermentation technology from renewable carbon sources. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, harboring the lactate dehydrogenases gene (LDH), produces lactic acid at a large scale due to its strong acid resistance, to its simple nutritional requirements and to its ease of genetic engineering. Since improvement of lactic acid resistance is correlated with an increase of lactic acid production under non-neutralizing condition, we isolated a novel gene that enhances lactic acid resistance using a multi-copy yeast genomic DNA library. In this study, we identified the ESBP6 gene, which increases lactic acid resistance when overexpressed and which encodes a protein with similarity to monocarboxylate permeases. Although ESBP6 was not induced in response to lactic acid stress, it caused weak but reproducible sensitivity to lactic acid when disrupted. Furthermore, intracellular pH in the ESBP6 overexpressing strain was higher than that in the wild-type strain under lactic acid stressed condition, suggesting that Esbp6 plays some roles in lactic acid adaptation response. The ESBP6 overexpressing strain carrying the LDH gene induced 20% increase in lactic acid production compared with the wild-type strain carrying the LDH gene under non-neutralizing conditions. These results indicate that overexpression of ESBP6 provides a novel and useful tool to improve lactic acid resistance and lactic acid production in yeast. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ferulic acid reverses ABCB1-mediated paclitaxel resistance in MDR cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, Ganesan; Balupillai, Agilan; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Gunaseelan, Srithar; Mary, Beaulah; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2016-09-05

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. The use of the dietary phytochemicals as chemosensitizing agents to enhance the efficacy of conventional cytostatic drugs has recently gained the attention as a plausible approach for overcoming the drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a naturally occurring diet-based phenolic acid, ferulic acid, could sensitize paclitaxel efficacy in ABCB1 overexpressing (P-glycoprotein) colchicine selected KB Ch(R)8-5 cell line. In vitro drug efflux assays demonstrated that ferulic acid inhibits P-glycoprotein transport function in drug resistant KB Ch(R)8-5 cell lines. However, ferulic acid significantly downregulates ABCB1 expression in a concentration dependent manner. Cytotoxicity assay reveals that ferulic acid decreased paclitaxel resistance in KBCh(R)8-5 and HEK293/ABCB1 cells, which indicates its chemosensitizing potential. Clonogenic cell survival assay and apoptotic morphological staining further confirm the chemosensitizing potential of ferulic acid in drug resistant KB Ch(R)8-5 cell lines. Ferulic acid treatment enhances paclitaxel mediated cell cycle arrest and upregulates paclitaxel-induced apoptotic signaling in KB resistant cells. Hence, it has been concluded that downregulation of ABCB1 and subsequent induction of paclitaxel-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptotic signaling may be the cause for the chemosensitizing potential of ferulic acid in P-gp overexpressing cell lines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The acid-base resistant zone in three dentin bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2009-11-01

    An acid-base resistant zone has been found to exist after acid-base challenge adjacent to the hybrid layer using SEM. The aim of this study was to examine the acid-base resistant zone using three different bonding systems. Dentin disks were applied with three different bonding systems, and then a resin composite was light-cured to make dentin disk sandwiches. After acid-base challenge, the polished surfaces were observed using SEM. For both one- and two-step self-etching primer systems, an acid-base resistant zone was clearly observed adjacent to the hybrid layer - but with differing appearances. For the wet bonding system, the presence of an acid-base resistant zone was unclear. This was because the self-etching primer systems etched the dentin surface mildly, such that the remaining mineral phase of dentin and the bonding agent yielded clear acid-base resistant zones. In conclusion, the acid-base resistant zone was clearly observed when self-etching primer systems were used, but not so for the wet bonding system.

  19. Modulation of arachidonic and linoleic acid metabolites in myeloperoxidase deficient mice during acute inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, Lukas; Schmelzer, Kara R.; Klinke, Anna; Kolarova, Hana; Baldus, Stephan; Hammock, Bruce D.; Eiserich, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    Acute inflammation is a common feature of many life-threatening pathologies, including septic shock. One hallmark of acute inflammation is the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids forming bioactive products, which regulate inflammation. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an abundant phagocyte-derived hemoprotein released during phagocyte activation. Here, we investigated the role of MPO in modulating biologically active arachidonic acid (AA) and linoleic acid (LA) metabolites during acute inflammation. Wild-type and MPO-knockout (KO) mice were exposed to intraperitoneally injected endotoxin for 24 h, and plasma LA and AA oxidation products were comprehensively analyzed using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Compared to wild-type mice, MPO-KO mice had significantly lower plasma levels of LA epoxides and corresponding LA- and AA-derived fatty acid diols. AA and LA hydroxy intermediates (hydroxyeicosatetraenoic and hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids) were also significantly lower in MPO-KO mice. Conversely, MPO-deficient mice had significantly higher plasma levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes with well-known pro-inflammatory properties. In vitro experiments revealed significantly lower amounts of AA and LA epoxides, LA- and AA-derived fatty acid diols, and AA and LA hydroxy intermediates in stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils isolated from MPO-KO mice. Our results demonstrate that MPO modulates the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators during acute inflammation. In this way, may control acute inflammatory diseases. PMID:20156554

  20. Modulation of arachidonic and linoleic acid metabolites in myeloperoxidase-deficient mice during acute inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, Lukas; Schmelzer, Kara R; Klinke, Anna; Kolarova, Hana; Baldus, Stephan; Hammock, Bruce D; Eiserich, Jason P

    2010-05-15

    Acute inflammation is a common feature of many life-threatening pathologies, including septic shock. One hallmark of acute inflammation is the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids forming bioactive products that regulate inflammation. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an abundant phagocyte-derived hemoprotein released during phagocyte activation. Here, we investigated the role of MPO in modulating biologically active arachidonic acid (AA) and linoleic acid (LA) metabolites during acute inflammation. Wild-type and MPO-knockout (KO) mice were exposed to intraperitoneally injected endotoxin for 24 h, and plasma LA and AA oxidation products were comprehensively analyzed using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Compared to wild-type mice, MPO-KO mice had significantly lower plasma levels of LA epoxides and corresponding LA- and AA-derived fatty acid diols. AA and LA hydroxy intermediates (hydroxyeicosatetraenoic and hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids) were also significantly lower in MPO-KO mice. Conversely, MPO-deficient mice had significantly higher plasma levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes with well-known proinflammatory properties. In vitro experiments revealed significantly lower amounts of AA and LA epoxides, LA- and AA-derived fatty acid diols, and AA and LA hydroxy intermediates in stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils isolated from MPO-KO mice. Our results demonstrate that MPO modulates the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators during acute inflammation and, in this way, may control acute inflammatory diseases. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acid Diffusion Length in Line-and-Space Resist Patterns Fabricated by Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Santillan, Julius Joseph; Itani, Toshiro

    2013-07-01

    Acids generated upon exposure to radiation induce the polarity change of the polymer through catalytic chain reactions in chemically amplified resists. With the reduction of feature size, the acid diffusion length increasingly becomes an important issue. In this study, we investigated the acid diffusion length in line-and-space patterns fabricated using a small field exposure tool for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography and the EIDEC standard resist to clarify the acid diffusion length in a state-of-the-art resist. The acid diffusion length depended on the nominal line width and exposure dose. Upon exposure to EUV radiation with an exposure dose of 16 mJ cm-2, the acid diffusion length (three-dimensional) in a line-and-space pattern with 21 nm nominal line width was 9.5 nm.

  2. Speed Sensorless Direct Torque Control of a PMSM Drive using Space Vector Modulation Based MRAS and Stator Resistance Estimator

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ameur; B. Mokhtari; N. Essounbouli; L. Mokrani

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a speed sensorless direct torque control scheme using space vector modulation (DTC-SVM) for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) drive based a Model Reference Adaptive System (MRAS) algorithm and stator resistance estimator. The MRAS is utilized to estimate speed and stator resistance and compensate the effects of parameter variation on stator resistance, which makes flux and torque estimation more accurate and insensitive to parameter variation. ...

  3. Skin Commensal Staphylococci May Act as Reservoir for Fusidic Acid Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Wei-Chun; Chen, Hsiao-Jan; Lin, Yu-Tzu; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Chen, Chiao-Wei; Lu, Hsiao-Hung; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Jheng, Yao-Yu; Leong, Kin Hong; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the occurrence and mechanisms of fusidic acid resistance present in staphylococci isolated from 59 healthy volunteers. The fingers of the volunteers were screened for the presence of staphylococci, and the collected isolates were tested for resistance to fusidic acid. A total of 34 fusidic acid resistant staphylococcal strains (all were coagulase-negative) were isolated from 22 individuals (22/59, 37.3%). Examination of the resistance genes revealed that acquired fusB or fusC was present in Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus capitis subsp. urealyticus, Staphylococcus hominis subsp. hominis, Staphylococcus warneri and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Resistance islands (RIs) carrying fusB were found in S. epidermidis and S. capitis subsp. urealyticus, while staphylococcal chromosome cassette (SCC)-related structures harboring fusC were found in S. hominis subsp. hominis. Genotypic analysis of S. epidermidis and S. hominis subsp. hominis indicated that the fus elements were disseminated in diverse genetic strain backgrounds. The fusC elements in S. hominis subsp. hominis strains were highly homologous to SCCfusC in the epidemic sequence type (ST) 239/SCCmecIII methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) or the pseudo SCCmec in ST779 MRSA. The presence of acquired fusidic acid resistance genes and their genetic environment in commensal staphylococci suggested that the skin commensal staphylococci may act as reservoir for fusidic acid resistance genes.

  4. Skin Commensal Staphylococci May Act as Reservoir for Fusidic Acid Resistance Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Hung

    Full Text Available We analyzed the occurrence and mechanisms of fusidic acid resistance present in staphylococci isolated from 59 healthy volunteers. The fingers of the volunteers were screened for the presence of staphylococci, and the collected isolates were tested for resistance to fusidic acid. A total of 34 fusidic acid resistant staphylococcal strains (all were coagulase-negative were isolated from 22 individuals (22/59, 37.3%. Examination of the resistance genes revealed that acquired fusB or fusC was present in Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus capitis subsp. urealyticus, Staphylococcus hominis subsp. hominis, Staphylococcus warneri and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Resistance islands (RIs carrying fusB were found in S. epidermidis and S. capitis subsp. urealyticus, while staphylococcal chromosome cassette (SCC-related structures harboring fusC were found in S. hominis subsp. hominis. Genotypic analysis of S. epidermidis and S. hominis subsp. hominis indicated that the fus elements were disseminated in diverse genetic strain backgrounds. The fusC elements in S. hominis subsp. hominis strains were highly homologous to SCCfusC in the epidemic sequence type (ST 239/SCCmecIII methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA or the pseudo SCCmec in ST779 MRSA. The presence of acquired fusidic acid resistance genes and their genetic environment in commensal staphylococci suggested that the skin commensal staphylococci may act as reservoir for fusidic acid resistance genes.

  5. Identification of Chlorogenic Acid as a Resistance Factor for Thrips in Chrysanthemum[C][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiss, Kirsten A.; Maltese, Federica; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Klinkhamer, Peter G.L.

    2009-01-01

    Western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) has become a key insect pest of agricultural and horticultural crops worldwide. Little is known about host plant resistance to thrips. In this study, we investigated thrips resistance in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora). We identified thrips-resistant chrysanthemums applying bioassays. Subsequently, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics was applied to compare the metabolome of thrips-resistant and -susceptible chrysanthemums. NMR facilitates wide-range coverage of the metabolome. We show that thrips-resistant and -susceptible chrysanthemums can be discriminated on basis of their metabolomic profiles. Thrips-resistant chrysanthemums contained higher amounts of the phenylpropanoids chlorogenic acid and feruloyl quinic acid. Both phenylpropanoids are known for their inhibitory effect on herbivores as well as pathogens. Thus, chlorogenic and feruloyl quinic acid are the compounds of choice to improve host plants resistance to thrips in ornamentals and crops. The effect of chlorogenic acid on thrips was further studied in bioassays with artificial diets. These experiments confirmed the negative effects on thrips. Our results prove NMR to be an important tool to identify different metabolites involved in herbivore resistance. It constitutes a significant advance in the study of plant-insect relationships, providing key information on the implementation of herbivore resistance breeding strategies in plants. PMID:19448039

  6. Effects of organic acid pickling on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Blawert, C.; Scharnagl, N.

    2010-01-01

    Organic acids were used to clean AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet and the effect of the cleaning processes on the surface condition and corrosion performance of the alloy was investigated. Organic acid cleanings reduced the surface impurities and enhanced the corrosion resistance. Removal of at least 4...... mu m of the contaminated surface was required to reach corrosion rates less than 1 mm/year in salt spray condition. Among the three organic acids examined, acetic acid is the best choice. Oxalic acid can be an alternative while citric acid is not suitable for cleaning AZ31 sheet, because...

  7. The gut microbiota modulates host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Shoaie, Saeed; Bergentall, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been proposed as an environmental factor that promotes the progression of metabolic diseases. Here, we investigated how the gut microbiota modulates the global metabolic differences in duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, liver, and two white adipose tissue depots obtained from......, liver, and adipose tissues. We used these functional models to determine the global metabolic differences between CONV-R and GF mice. Based on gene expression data, we found that the gut microbiota affects the host amino acid (AA) metabolism, which leads to modifications in glutathione metabolism....... Our analyses revealed that the gut microbiota influences host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice....

  8. Crosslinked and Dyed Chitosan Fiber Presenting Enhanced Acid Resistance and Bioactivities

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Qiong Li; Ren-Cheng Tang

    2016-01-01

    The application of biodegradable chitosan fiber for healthy and hygienic textiles is limited due to its poor acid resistance in wet processing and poor antioxidant activity. In order to prepare chitosan fiber with good acid resistance and high antioxidant activity, chitosan fiber was first crosslinked by a water-soluble aziridine crosslinker, and then dyed with natural lac dye consisting of polyphenolic anthraquinone compounds. The main application conditions and crosslinking mechanism of the...

  9. Nalidixic acid inhibition of post-ultraviolet recovery by nalidixic acid sensitive and resistant strains of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarachek, A.; Lee, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    Nalidixic acid (Nal) can kill Candida albicans directly or suppress the organism's recovery from ultraviolet irradiation. Mutants selected for resistance to inactivation by Nal alone have generally enhanced DNA repair proficiencies evidenced by their coincident increased resistances to ultraviolet radiation, ethylmethane sulfonate, and nitrous acid. The effects of Nal, erythromycin, and inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation on survivals of mutant and wild type strains following ultraviolet exposure indicate that different mechanisms underly the direct lethality of Nal and its ability to inhibit post-irradiation recovery. (author)

  10. Influence of inorganic acid pickling on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Blawert, C.; Scharnagl, N.

    2009-01-01

    Surface contaminants as a result of thermo-mechanical processing of magnesium alloys, e.g. sheet rolling, can have a negative effect on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. Especially contaminants such as Fe, Ni and Cu, left on the surface of magnesium alloys result in the formation...... of micro-galvanic couples and can therefore increase corrosion attack on these alloys. Due to this influence they should be removed to obtain good corrosion resistance. In this study, the effect of inorganic acid pickling on the corrosion behaviour of a commercial AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet...... the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The cleaning efficiency of the three acids used and the corrosion protection mechanisms were found to be remarkably different. Best corrosion results were obtained with nitric acid, followed closely by phosphoric acid. Only the sulphuric acid failed more or less when...

  11. Impetigo in a population over 8.5 years: incidence, fusidic acid resistance and molecular characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rørtveit, Sverre; Skutlaberg, Dag Harald; Langeland, Nina; Rortveit, Guri

    2011-06-01

    From around year 2000, impetigo caused by fusidic acid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was observed in countries of Northern Europe. The bacteria were found to represent a clone, the epidemic European fusidic acid-resistant impetigo clone (EEFIC). This study reports longitudinal data on the incidence and bacteriology of impetigo in a Norwegian island community during the years 2001-09. All encounters with general practitioners regarding impetigo were registered. Bacterial swabs were taken in a high percentage of cases. Annual incidence was calculated. Phenotypic characteristics of the bacteria were determined for the whole period, and in 2008 and 2009 we also performed PFGE and spa typing. Outbreaks of impetigo were observed in 2002, 2003 and 2004, but since then the incidence decreased greatly. S. aureus was cultured from the impetigo site in the majority of cases. The proportion of S. aureus isolates resistant to fusidic acid decreased from 80% in 2002-04 to 45% in 2008-09. For 28 S. aureus isolates analysed by molecular methods in 2008-09, we found that nearly all cases of fusidic acid resistance were due to the presence of the EEFIC. S. aureus resistance to fusidic acid in relation to impetigo is now less frequent in this population than at the start of the century. At present, most S. aureus bacteria resistant to fusidic acid in impetigo belong to the EEFIC.

  12. Fatty acid and amino acid modulation of glucose cycling in isolated rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustafson, L. A.; Neeft, M.; Reijngoud, D. J.; Kuipers, F.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.; Herling, A. W.; Burger, H. J.; Meijer, A. J.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the influence of glucose/glucose 6-phosphate cycling on glycogen deposition from glucose in fasted-rat hepatocytes using S4048 and CP320626, specific inhibitors of glucose-6-phosphate translocase and glycogen phosphorylase respectively. The effect of amino acids and oleate was also

  13. THE COMBINATION OF α-LIPOIC ACID INTAKE WITH ECCENTRIC EXERCISE MODULATES ERYTHROPOIETIN RELEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Morawin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The generation of reactive nitrogen/oxygen species (RN/OS represents an important mechanism in erythropoietin (EPO expression and skeletal muscle adaptation to physical and metabolic stress. RN/OS generation can be modulated by intense exercise and nutrition supplements such as α-lipoic acid, which demonstrates both anti- and pro-oxidative action. The study was designed to show the changes in the haematological response through the combination of α-lipoic acid intake with running eccentric exercise. Sixteen healthy young males participated in the randomised and placebo-controlled study. The exercise trial involved a 90-min run followed by a 15-min eccentric phase at 65% VO2max (-10% gradient. It significantly increased serum concentrations of nitric oxide (NO, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and pro-oxidative products such as 8-isoprostanes (8-iso, lipid peroxides (LPO and protein carbonyls (PC. α-Lipoic acid intake (Thiogamma: 1200 mg daily for 10 days prior to exercise resulted in a 2-fold elevation of serum H2O2 concentration before exercise, but it prevented the generation of NO, 8-iso, LPO and PC at 20 min, 24 h, and 48 h after exercise. α-Lipoic acid also elevated serum EPO level, which highly correlated with NO/H2O2 ratio (r=0.718, P<0.01. Serum total creatine kinase (CK activity, as a marker of muscle damage, reached a peak at 24 h after exercise (placebo 732 ± 207 IU · L-1, α-lipoic acid 481 ± 103 IU · L-1, and correlated with EPO (r = 0.478, P<0.01 in the α-lipoic acid group. In conclusion, the intake of high α-lipoic acid modulates RN/OS generation, enhances EPO release and reduces muscle damage after running eccentric exercise.

  14. Detection of expression and modulation of multidrug-resistance (MDR) and establishment of a new bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, W.

    1993-08-01

    The present thesis deals with the resistance of human malignant cells against cellular toxicity of anticancer drugs, a phenomenon representing one of the major obstacles to successful chemotherapy. One mechanism underlying a cross-resistance to different drugs called multidrug resistance (MDR) is characterized by the expression of an active transport protein (P-glycoprotein), causing decreased intracellular drug retention and cytotoxicity. The main subjects of the present work were to establish different detection methods for MDR and its modulation (by substances blocking activity of P-glycoprotein) including immunological methods (immunocytochemistry, radioimmunoassay), molecular biology (slot-blot analysis, in-situ hybridization) and functional assays (drug-accumulation analysis, drug-cytotoxicity analysis). The methods were evaluated and compared using human and mouse MDR control cell lines and human tumor cell lines established in our laboratory. In cell lines derived from human melanoma - a malignancy insensitive to chemotherapy - expression of P-glycoprotein of relatively low transporting activity was detected by different methods in 8 of 33 cases. Furthermore a new sensitive in vitro assay for the functional detection of MDR was established using the biological features of cytochalasins, a microfilament disrupting substance group. These compounds were shown to be substrates for the P-glycoprotein efflux pump and their effects on cell division (blockade of cytokinesis resulting in multinucleate cells) correlated with MDR-activity of the tested cells. With this new assay P-glycoprotein activity can be demonstrated and analysed over a wide range of resistance against different cytotoxic drugs. Therefore it may by a suitable tool for research and diagnosis in the field of drug resistance

  15. Gut microbiota is a key modulator of insulin resistance in TLR 2 knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa M Caricilli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental factors and host genetics interact to control the gut microbiota, which may have a role in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. TLR2-deficient mice, under germ-free conditions, are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance. It is possible that the presence of gut microbiota could reverse the phenotype of an animal, inducing insulin resistance in an animal genetically determined to have increased insulin sensitivity, such as the TLR2 KO mice. In the present study, we investigated the influence of gut microbiota on metabolic parameters, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and signaling of TLR2-deficient mice. We investigated the gut microbiota (by metagenomics, the metabolic characteristics, and insulin signaling in TLR2 knockout (KO mice in a non-germ free facility. Results showed that the loss of TLR2 in conventionalized mice results in a phenotype reminiscent of metabolic syndrome, characterized by differences in the gut microbiota, with a 3-fold increase in Firmicutes and a slight increase in Bacteroidetes compared with controls. These changes in gut microbiota were accompanied by an increase in LPS absorption, subclinical inflammation, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and later, obesity. In addition, this sequence of events was reproduced in WT mice by microbiota transplantation and was also reversed by antibiotics. At the molecular level the mechanism was unique, with activation of TLR4 associated with ER stress and JNK activation, but no activation of the IKKβ-IκB-NFκB pathway. Our data also showed that in TLR2 KO mice there was a reduction in regulatory T cell in visceral fat, suggesting that this modulation may also contribute to the insulin resistance of these animals. Our results emphasize the role of microbiota in the complex network of molecular and cellular interactions that link genotype to phenotype and have potential implications for common human disorders involving obesity, diabetes

  16. Mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by fatty acids: importance of the mitochondrial function

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Amanda R; Nachbar, Renato T; Gorjao, Renata; Vinolo, Marco A; Festuccia, William T; Lambertucci, Rafael H; Cury-Boaventura, Maria F; Silveira, Leonardo R; Curi, Rui; Hirabara, Sandro M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Insulin resistance condition is associated to the development of several syndromes, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. Although the factors linking insulin resistance to these syndromes are not precisely defined yet, evidence suggests that the elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) level plays an important role in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Accordantly, in vivo and in vitro exposure of skeletal muscle and myocytes to physiolog...

  17. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Differentially Modulate Cell Proliferation and Endocannabinoid System in Two Human Cancer Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastón, Repossi; María Eugenia, Pasqualini; Das, Undurti N; Eynard, Aldo R

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that quantity and quality of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) play a role in the development of cancer. However, the mechanisms involved in this interaction(s) are not clear. Endocannabinoids are lipid metabolites known to have growth modulatory actions. We studied the effect of supplementation with PUFAs ω-6 and ω-3 (essential fatty acids, EFAs), saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (non-EFAs) on the growth of tumor cells and modifications in their endocannabinoid content. Cell cultures of human glioblastoma (T98G) and breast cancer (MCF7) were supplemented with 50 or 100 mmol EFAs and non-EFAs for 72 h. Cell proliferation was then determined by MTT, anandamide (AEA) levels by HPLC, total fatty acids profiles by GLC, CB1 receptor expression by WB and FAAH activity by spectrophotometric method. Fatty acids profile reflected the incorporation of the lipids supplemented in each assay. Arachidonic acid (EFA ω-6) supplementation increased AEA levels and inhibited the growth of T98G, whereas palmitic acid (non-EFA) enhanced their proliferation. In breast cancer (MCF7) cells, eicosapentaenoic acid (EFA ω-3) reduced and oleic acid (non-EFA) enhanced their proliferation. CB1 expression was higher in T98G and no differences were observed in FAAH activity. The growth of tumor cells can be differentially modulated by fatty acids and, at least in part, can be attributed to their ability to act on the components of the endocannabinoid system. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Organochloride pesticides modulated gut microbiota and influenced bile acid metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Shao, Wentao; Zhang, Chunlan; Xu, Cheng; Wang, Qihan; Liu, Hui; Sun, Haidong; Jiang, Zhaoyan; Gu, Aihua

    2017-07-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) can persistently accumulate in body and threaten human health. Bile acids and intestinal microbial metabolism have emerged as important signaling molecules in the host. However, knowledge on which intestinal microbiota and bile acids are modified by OCPs remains unclear. In this study, adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p, p'-DDE) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) for 8 weeks. The relative abundance and composition of various bacterial species were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bile acid composition was analyzed by metabolomic analysis using UPLC-MS. The expression of genes involved in hepatic and enteric bile acids metabolism was measured by real-time PCR. Expression of genes in bile acids synthesis and transportation were measured in HepG2 cells incubated with p, p'-DDE and β-HCH. Our findings showed OCPs changed relative abundance and composition of intestinal microbiota, especially in enhanced Lactobacillus with bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity. OCPs affected bile acid composition, enhanced hydrophobicity, decreased expression of genes on bile acid reabsorption in the terminal ileum and compensatory increased expression of genes on synthesis of bile acids in the liver. We demonstrated that chronic exposure of OCPs could impair intestinal microbiota; as a result, hepatic and enteric bile acid profiles and metabolism were influenced. The findings in this study draw our attention to the hazards of chronic OCPs exposure in modulating bile acid metabolism that might cause metabolic disorders and their potential to cause related diseases in human. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A mixture of apple pomace and rosemary extract improves fructose consumption-induced insulin resistance in rats: modulation of sarcolemmal CD36 and glucose transporter-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peng; Yao, Ling; Lin, Xuemei; Gu, Tieguang; Rong, Xianglu; Batey, Robert; Yamahara, Johji; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yuhao

    2016-01-01

    Apple pomace is a by-product of the processing of apple for juice, cider or wine preparation. Rosemary is a herb commonly used as spice and flavoring agent in food processing. Evidence suggests that both apple pomace and rosemary have rich bioactive molecules with numerous metabolic effects. To provide more information for using apple pomace and rosemary as functional foods for management of metabolism-associated disorders, the present study investigated the insulin-sensitizing effect of a mixture of apple pomace and rosemary extract (AR). The results showed that treatment with AR (500 mg/kg, daily, by gavage) for 5 weeks attenuated chronic liquid fructose consumption-induced increases in fasting plasma insulin concentration, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index and the adipose tissue insulin resistance index in rats. Mechanistically, AR suppressed fructose-induced acceleration of the clearance of plasma non-esterified fatty acids during oral glucose tolerance test, and decreased excessive triglyceride accumulation and the increased Oil Red O staining area in the gastrocnemius. Furthermore, AR restored fructose-induced overexpression of sarcolemmal CD36 that is known to contribute to etiology of insulin resistance by facilitating fatty acid uptake, and downregulation of sarcolemmal glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 that is the insulin-responsive glucose transporter. Thus, these results demonstrate that AR improves fructose-induced insulin resistance in rats via modulation of sarcolemmal CD36 and GLUT-4.

  20. Impact of the rpoS genotype for acid resistance patterns of pathogenic and probiotic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Dorothea S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC, a subgroup of Shiga toxin (Stx producing E. coli (STEC, may cause severe enteritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and is transmitted orally via contaminated foods or from person to person. The infectious dose is known to be very low, which requires most of the bacteria to survive the gastric acid barrier. Acid resistance therefore is an important mechanism of EHEC virulence. It should also be a relevant characteristic of E. coli strains used for therapeutic purposes such as the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 (EcN. In E. coli and related enteric bacteria it has been extensively demonstrated, that the alternative sigma factor σS, encoded by the rpoS gene, acts as a master regulator mediating resistance to various environmental stress factors. Methods Using rpoS deletion mutants of a highly virulent EHEC O26:H11 patient isolate and the sequenced prototype EHEC EDL933 (ATCC 700927 of serotype O157:H7 we investigated the impact of a functional rpoS gene for orchestrating a satisfactory response to acid stress in these strains. We then functionally characterized rpoS of probiotic EcN and five rpoS genes selected from STEC isolates pre-investigated for acid resistance. Results First, we found out that ATCC isolate 700927 of EHEC EDL933 has a point mutation in rpoS, not present in the published sequence, leading to a premature stop codon. Moreover, to our surprise, one STEC strain as well as EcN was acid sensitive in our test environment, although their cloned rpoS genes could effectively complement acid sensitivity of an rpoS deletion mutant. Conclusion The attenuation of sequenced EHEC EDL933 might be of importance for anyone planning to do either in vitro or in vivo studies with this prototype strain. Furthermore our data supports recently published observations, that individual E. coli isolates are able to significantly modulate their acid resistance phenotype independent of their rpo

  1. Arginine-dependent acid resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J.; Abee, T.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium does not survive a pH 2.5 acid challenge under conditions similar to those used for Escherichia coli (J. W. Foster, Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2:898-907, 2004). Here, we provide evidence that S. enterica serovar Typhimurium can display arginine-dependent acid

  2. Role of sialic acid in insulin action and the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salhanick, A.I.; Amatruda, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Adipocytes treated with neuraminidase show markedly reduced responsiveness to insulin without any alteration in insulin binding. In addition, several studies have separately demonstrated both insulin resistance and decreases in membrane sialic acid content and associated biosynthetic enzymes in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, the authors investigated the role that sialic acid residues may play in insulin action and in the hepatic insulin resistance associated with nonketotic diabetes. Primary cultures of hepatocytes from normal rats treated with neuraminidase demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in insulin-stimulated lipogenesis. At a concentration of neuraminidase that decreases insulin action by 50%, 23% of total cellular sialic acid content was released. Neuraminidase-releasable sialic acid was significantly decreased in hepatocytes from diabetic rats and this was associated with significant insulin resistance. Treatment of hepatocytes from diabetic rats with cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NANA) enhanced insulin responsiveness 39%. The enhanced insulin responsiveness induced by CMP-NANA was blocked by cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) suggesting that the CMP-NANA effect was catalyzed by a cell surface sialyl-transferase. CMP reduced neuraminidase-releasable [ 14 C]sialic acid incorporation into hepatocytes by 43%. The data demonstrate a role for cell surface sialic acid residues in hepatic insulin action and support a role for decreased cell surface sialic acid residues in the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus

  3. Effect of salt addition on acid resistance response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 against acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Sun-Young

    2017-08-01

    A combination of salt and acid is commonly used in the production of many foods, such as pickles and fermented foods. However, in our previous studies, addition of salt significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of acetic acid against E. coli O157:H7 in laboratory media and pickled cucumbers. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effect of salt addition on the acid resistance (AR) response of E. coli O157:H7 after treatment with acetic acid. The combined effect of acetic acid and salt showed different results depending on media tested. Organic compounds such as yeast extract and tryptone were required to observe the antagonistic effect of salt and acetic acid in combination. However, use of an rpoS mutant or addition of chloramphenicol resulted in no changes in the antagonistic effect of acetic acid and salt. The addition of glutamate to phosphate buffer significantly increased the survival levels of E. coli O157:H7 after the acetic acid treatment; however, the survival levels were lower than those after the treatment with acetic acid alone. Thus, the addition of salt may increase the AR response of E. coli O157:H7; however, these survival mechanisms were not proven clearly. Therefore, further studies need to be performed to better understand the antagonism of acetic acid salt against E. coli O157:H7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [The role of uric acid in the insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, Josiane Aparecida; Almeida, Guilherme Gomide; Martins, Raissa Isabelle Leão; Cunha, Mariana Botrel; Belo, Vanessa Almeida; dos Santos, José Eduardo Tanus; Mourão-Júnior, Carlos Alberto; Lanna, Carla Márcia Moreira

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the association between serum uric acid levels and insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity. Cross-sectional study with 245 children and adolescents (134 obese and 111 controls), aged 8 to 18 years. The anthropometric variables (weight, height and waist circumference), blood pressure and biochemical parameters were collected. The clinical characteristics of the groups were analyzed by t-test or chi-square test. To evaluate the association between uric acid levels and insulin resistance the Pearson's test and logistic regression were applied. The prevalence of insulin resistance was 26.9%. The anthropometric variables, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and biochemical variables were significantly higher in the obese group (p<0.001), except for the high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. There was a positive and significant correlation between anthropometric variables and uric acid with HOMA-IR in the obese and in the control groups, which was higher in the obese group and in the total sample. The logistic regression model that included age, gender and obesity, showed an odds ratio of uric acid as a variable associated with insulin resistance of 1.91 (95%CI 1.40 to 2.62; p<-0.001). The increase in serum uric acid showed a positive statistical correlation with insulin resistance and it is associated with and increased risk of insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced insulin sensitivity associated with provision of mono and polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscle cells involves counter modulation of PP2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Nardi

    Full Text Available Reduced skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity is a feature associated with sustained exposure to excess saturated fatty acids (SFA, whereas mono and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA not only improve insulin sensitivity but blunt SFA-induced insulin resistance. The mechanisms by which MUFAs and PUFAs institute these favourable changes remain unclear, but may involve stimulating insulin signalling by counter-modulation/repression of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. This study investigated the effects of oleic acid (OA; a MUFA, linoleic acid (LOA; a PUFA and palmitate (PA; a SFA in cultured myotubes and determined whether changes in insulin signalling can be attributed to PP2A regulation.We treated cultured skeletal myotubes with unsaturated and saturated fatty acids and evaluated insulin signalling, phosphorylation and methylation status of the catalytic subunit of PP2A. Unlike PA, sustained incubation of rat or human myotubes with OA or LOA significantly enhanced Akt- and ERK1/2-directed insulin signalling. This was not due to heightened upstream IRS1 or PI3K signalling nor to changes in expression of proteins involved in proximal insulin signalling, but was associated with reduced dephosphorylation/inactivation of Akt and ERK1/2. Consistent with this, PA reduced PP2Ac demethylation and tyrosine307phosphorylation - events associated with PP2A activation. In contrast, OA and LOA strongly opposed these PA-induced changes in PP2Ac thus exerting a repressive effect on PP2A.Beneficial gains in insulin sensitivity and the ability of unsaturated fatty acids to oppose palmitate-induced insulin resistance in muscle cells may partly be accounted for by counter-modulation of PP2A.

  6. Collateral Resistance and Sensitivity Modulate Evolution of High-Level Resistance to Drug Combination Treatment in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Evgrafov, Mari Cristina Rodriguez; Gumpert, Heidi; Munck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    -type levels. All drug combinations, irrespective of interaction types, effectively limited resistance evolution compared with monotreatment. Cross-resistance and collateral sensitivity were found to be important factors in the extent of resistance evolution toward a combination. Comparative genomic analyses...

  7. Chemical Acidic Attack Resistance of Lightweight Concrete with Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa H. Ahmed

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available  This research was studied the effect of H2SO4(8% , HCl (8% acidic and wastewaterpH= 5.1, SO4= = 850mg/L, Cl-=750 mg/L , TDS = 2500 mg/L( on the lightweight concrete by using limestone as lightweight aggregate and using the foam material (LightCrete. Super plasticizers (SP also used to enhance the properties of the lightweight concrete. Studying the effect of acidic solution and wastewater was done by calculating the percentage of decrease in weight and compressive strength of concrete prisms (100 * 100 * 400 mm, where the small portion of the flexural modulus test was submerged completely in the above solutions,  and the salt rising was observed by immersion (100 mm depth from the second portion of the prism in the above solutions. اظهرت نتائج الفحوصات ان H 2 SO 4 يكون تأثيره اكثر من HCl بالنسبة للنقصان بالوزن على الخرسانة الاعتيادية  بينما يكون تأثير HCl كبير على الخرسانة خفيفة الوزن بأستخدام الركام خفيف الوزن (Limestone وتأثيره اقل من H 2 SO 4 بالنسبة للخرسانة خفيفة الوزن باستخدام المادة الرغوية . Results show that the H2SO4 have influence larger than HCl for the decrease of weight on the normal concrete while the effect of HCl was larger than H2SO4  on lightweight concrete with limestone and its effect was less than H2SO4 on the lightweight concrete with foam. وكذلك تبين ان تأثير H 2 SO 4 على الخرسانة الاعتيادية بالنسبة للنقصان بالمقاومة يكون اقل من تاثير HCl بينما يكون تاثير H 2 SO 4 كبير على الخرسانة خفيفة الوزن الحاوية على المادة الرغوية وتاثيره اقل على الخرسانة خفيفة الوزن الحاوية على SP و Limestone . The results also shown that the effect of H2SO4 on the normal

  8. Enhanced expression of aconitase raises acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2004-06-15

    Acetobacter spp. are used for industrial vinegar production because of their high ability to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid and high resistance to acetic acid. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of a soluble fraction of Acetobacter aceti revealed the presence of several proteins whose production was enhanced, to various extents, in response to acetic acid in the medium. A protein with an apparent molecular mass of 100 kDa was significantly enhanced in amount by acetic acid and identified to be aconitase by NH2-terminal amino acid sequencing and subsequent gene cloning. Amplification of the aconitase gene by use of a multicopy plasmid in A. aceti enhanced the enzymatic activity and acetic acid resistance. These results showed that aconitase is concerned with acetic acid resistance. Enhancement of the aconitase activity turned out to be practically useful for acetic acid fermentation, because the A. aceti transformant harboring multiple copies of the aconitase gene produced a higher concentration of acetic acid with a reduced growth lag-time.

  9. Phosphoenolpyruvate-supply module in Escherichia coli improves N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Deqiang; Wu, Jianrong; Zhan, Xiaobei; Zhu, Li; Zheng, Zhiyong; Gao, Minjie

    2017-02-01

    N-Acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) is often synthesized from exogenous N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and excess pyruvate. We have previously constructed a recombinant Escherichia coli strain for Neu5Ac production using GlcNAc and intracellular phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) as substrates (Zhu et al. Biotechnol Lett 38:1-9, 2016). PEP synthesis-related genes, pck and ppsA, were overexpressed within different modes to construct PEP-supply modules, and their effects on Neu5Ac production were investigated. All the PEP-supply modules enhanced Neu5Ac production. For the best module, pCDF-pck-ppsA increased Neu5Ac production to 8.6 ± 0.15 g l -1 , compared with 3.6 ± 0.15 g l -1 of the original strain. Neu5Ac production was further increased to 15 ± 0.33 g l -1 in a 1 l fermenter. The PEP-supply module can improve the intracellular PEP supply and enhance Neu5Ac production, which benefited industrial Neu5Ac production.

  10. Valproic acid reduces insulin-resistance, fat deposition and FOXO1-mediated gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sabbir; Kumar, Sandeep; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in insulin-resistance, gluconeogenesis and islet function. HDACs can modulate the expression of various genes, which directly or indirectly affect glucose metabolism. This study was aimed to evaluate the role of valproic acid (VPA) on fat deposition, insulin-resistance and gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat. Diabetes was developed in Sprague-Dawley rats by the combination of high-fat diet and low dose streptozotocin. VPA at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg/day and metformin (positive control) 150 mg/kg twice daily for 10 weeks were administered by oral gavage. Insulin-resistance, dyslipidemia and glycemia were evaluated by biochemical estimations, while fat accumulation and structural alteration were assessed by histopathology. Protein expression and insulin signaling were evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry. VPA treatment significantly reduced the plasma glucose, HbA1c, insulin-resistance, fat deposition in brown adipose tissue, white adipose tissue and liver, which are comparable to metformin treatment. Further, VPA inhibited the gluconeogenesis and glucagon expression as well as restored the histopathological alterations in pancreas and liver. Our findings provide new insights on the anti-diabetic role of VPA in type-2 diabetes mellitus by the modulation of insulin signaling and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1)-mediated gluconeogenesis. Since VPA is a well established clinical drug, the detailed molecular mechanisms of the present findings can be further investigated for possible clinical use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Pulse width and height modulation for multi-level resistance in bi-layer TaOx based RRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Zahiruddin; Beckmann, Karsten; Holt, Joshua; Cady, Nathaniel C.

    2017-08-01

    Mutli-level switching in resistive memory devices enables a wide range of computational paradigms, including neuromorphic and cognitive computing. To this end, we have developed a bi-layer tantalum oxide based resistive random access memory device using Hf as the oxygen exchange layer. Multiple, discrete resistance levels were achieved by modulating the RESET pulse width and height, ranging from 2 kΩ to several MΩ. For a fixed pulse height, OFF state resistance was found to increase gradually with the increase in the pulse width, whereas for a fixed pulse width, the increase in the pulse height resulted in drastic changes in resistance. Resistive switching in these devices transitioned from Schottky emission in the OFF state to tunneling based conduction in the ON state, based on I-V curve fitting and temperature dependent current measurements. These devices also demonstrated endurance of more than 108 cycles with a satisfactory Roff/Ron ratio and retention greater than 104 s.

  12. Fallopia japonica, a Natural Modulator, Can Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa Yehia Eid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy is controlled by the decrease of intracellular drug accumulation, increase of detoxification, and diminished propensity of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. ATP-binding cassette (ABC membrane transporters with intracellular metabolic enzymes contribute to the complex and unresolved phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR. Natural products as alternative medicine have great potential to discover new MDR inhibitors with diverse modes of action. In this study, we characterized several extracts of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM plants (N = 16 for their interaction with ABC transporters, cytochrome P3A4 (CYP3A4, and glutathione-S-transferase (GST activities and their cytotoxic effect on different cancer cell lines. Fallopia japonica (FJ (Polygonaceae shows potent inhibitory effect on CYP3A4 P-glycoprotein activity about 1.8-fold when compared to verapamil as positive control. FJ shows significant inhibitory effect (39.81% compared with the known inhibitor ketoconazole and 100 μg/mL inhibited GST activity to 14 μmol/min/mL. FJ shows moderate cytotoxicity in human Caco-2, HepG-2, and HeLa cell lines; IC50 values were 630.98, 198.80, and 317.37 µg/mL, respectively. LC-ESI-MS were used to identify and quantify the most abundant compounds, emodin, polydatin, and resveratrol, in the most active extract of FJ. Here, we present the prospect of using Fallopia japonica as natural products to modulate the function of ABC drug transporters. We are conducting future study to evaluate the ability of the major active secondary metabolites of Fallopia japonica to modulate MDR and their impact in case of failure of chemotherapy.

  13. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation.

  14. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation

  15. Chlorogenic acid alleviates autophagy and insulin resistance by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    49

    with hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes (Lim et al, 2015). A prevalent hypothesis for NAFLD development points out that insulin resistance, as the. “first-hit” to the liver, elicits the onset of second hits, such as oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and autophagy (Polyzos et al, 2012). Indeed, insulin.

  16. Chlorogenic acid alleviates autophagy and insulin resistance by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    49

    diet-fed rats exhibited an increase in body weight, glucose tolerance, liver injury, insulin resistance, as well as autophagy and C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. Nevertheless, all these effects were alleviated by CG treatment. Moreover, angiotensin treatment in CG group activated the JNK pathway, and promoted.

  17. Temperature-modulated graphene oxide resistive humidity sensor for indoor air quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, A.; Santra, S.; Ghosh, R.; Ali, S. Z.; Gardner, J. W.; Guha, P. K.; Udrea, F.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) micro-hotplate technology for the monitoring and control of indoor air quality (IAQ). GO powder is obtained by chemical exfoliation, dispersed in water and deposited via ink-jet printing onto a low power micro-hotplate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show the typical layered and wrinkled morphology of the GO. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that the GO flakes possess a significant number of oxygen containing functional groups (epoxy, carbonyl, hydroxyl) extremely attractive for humidity detection. Electro-thermal characterisation of the micro-hotplates shows a thermal efficiency of 0.11 mW per °C, resulting in a sensor DC power consumption of only 2.75 mW at 50 °C. When operated in an isothermal mode, the sensor response is detrimentally affected by significant drift, hysteretic behaviour, slow response/recovery times and hence poor RH level discrimination. Conversely, a temperature modulation technique coupled with a differential readout methodology results in a significant reduction of the sensor drift, improved linear response with a sensitivity of 0.14 mV per %, resolution below 5%, and a maximum hysteresis of +/-5% response and recovery times equal to 189 +/- 49 s and 89 +/- 5 s, respectively. These performance parameters satisfy current IAQ monitoring requirements. We have thus demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating GO on a micro-hotplate CMOS-compatible platform enabling temperature modulation schemes to be easily applied in order to achieve compact, low power, low cost humidity IAQ monitoring.In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary

  18. Fabrication of robot head module using contact resistance force sensor for human robot interaction and its evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Jong Ho [Korea Reserch Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyun Joon [Univ. of Maryland, Maryland (United States); Kwon, Young Ha [Kyung Hee Univ., Gyunggi Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    This paper presents a design of a robot head module with touch sensing algorithms that can simultaneously detect contact force and location. The module is constructed with a hemisphere and three sensor units that are fabricated using contact resistance force sensors. The surface part is designed with the hemisphere that measures 300 mm in diameter and 150 mm in height. Placed at the bottom of the robot head module are three sensor units fabricated using a simple screen printing technique. The contact force and the location of the model are evaluated through the calibration setup. The experiment showed that the calculated contact positions almost coincided with the applied load points as the contact location changed with a location error of about {+-}8.67 mm. The force responses of the module were evaluated at two points under loading and unloading conditions from 0 N to 5 N. The robot head module showed almost the same force responses at the two points.

  19. Low-intensity resistance exercise does not affect cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with peripheral artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aluísio H.R. Andrade Lima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of a single bout of resistance exercise on cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with peripheral artery disease. METHODS: Fifteen patients with peripheral artery disease (age: 58.3±4.0 years underwent the following sessions in a random order: resistance exercise (three sets of 10 repetitions of the six resistance exercises with a workload of 5-7 in the OMNI-RES scale and control (similar to the resistance session; however, the resistance exercises were performed with no load. The frequency domain (low frequency, high frequency and sympathovagal balance and symbolic analysis (0V, 1V and 2V patterns of heart rate variability were obtained before and until one hour after the interventions. RESULTS: After the resistance exercise and control sessions, similar increases were observed in the consecutive heartbeat intervals (control: 720.8±28.6 vs. 790.9±34.4 ms; resistance exercise: 712.9±30.1 vs. 756.8±37.9 ms; p0.05. CONCLUSION: A single bout of resistance exercise did not alter cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with peripheral artery disease.

  20. How Does Amino Acid Ligand Modulate Au Core Structure and Characteristics in Peptide Coated Au Nanocluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Li, Xu; Zhao, Hongkang; Zhao, Lina

    2018-03-01

    The atomic structures and the corresponding physicochemical properties of peptide coated Au nanoclusters determine their distinctive biological targeting applications. To learn the modulation of amino acid ligand on the atomic structure and electronic characteristics of coated Au core is the fundamental knowledge for peptide coated Au nanocluster design and construction. Based on our recent coated Au nanocluster configuration study (Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 11454), we built the typically simplified Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) system to more clearly learn the basic modulation information of amino acid ligand on Au core by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. There are two isomers as ligand adjacent bonding (Iso1) and diagonal bonding (Iso2) to Au13 cores. The geometry optimizations indicate the adjacent bonding Iso1 is more stable than Iso2. More important, the Au13 core of Iso1 distorts much more significantly than that of Iso2 by Cys-Au-Cys bonding through the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) analysis, which modulate their electronic characteristics in different ways. In addition, the frontier molecular orbital results of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) isomers confirm that the Au cores mainly determine the blue shifts of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) systems versus the original Au13 core in their UV-visible absorption spectrum studies. The configuration of Au13 core performs deformation under Cys-Au-Cys ligand modulation to reach new stability with distinct atomic structure and electronic properties, which could be the theory basis for peptide coated AuNCs design and construction.

  1. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-07-07

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research.

  2. Ability of TEP1 in intestinal flora to modulate natural resistance of Anopheles dirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyan; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Jingru; Xu, Wenyue; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Fu Sheng

    2013-08-01

    Blocking transmission of malaria is a reliable way to control and eliminate infection. However, in-depth knowledge of the interaction between Plasmodium and mosquito is needed. Studies suggest that innate immunity is the main mechanism inhibiting development of malaria parasites in the mosquito. Recent studies have found that use of antibiotics that inhibit the mosquito gut flora can reduce the immune response of Anopheles gambiae, thereby contributing to the development of malaria parasites. In our study, we used the non susceptible model of Anopheles dirus-Plasmodium yoelii to explore the effect of Anopheles intestinal flora on the natural resistance of A. dirus to P. yoelii. We found that in mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium, the intestinal flora can regulate expression of thioester-containing protein (TEP1) via an RNAi gene-silencing approach. Our results suggest that in the absence of TEP1, the natural microbiota cannot suppress the development of P. yoelii in A. dirus. This suggests that AdTEP1 plays an important role in the resistance of A. dirus to P. yoelii. The intestinal flora may modulate the development of P. yoelii in A. dirus by regulating TEP1 expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Modulation of intestinal and liver fatty acid-binding proteins in Caco-2 cells by lipids, hormones and cytokines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dube, N.; Delvin, E.; Yotov, W.; Garofalo, C.; Bendayan, M.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Levy, E.

    2001-01-01

    Intestinal and liver fatty acid binding proteins (I- and L-FABP) are thought to play a role in enterocyte fatty acid (FA) trafficking. Their modulation by cell differentiation and various potential effectors was investigated in the human Caco-2 cell line. With the acquisition of enterocytic

  4. Acid hydrolysis of the biomass of resistant cellulose of thistle ''Onopordum nervosum boiss''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, C.; Diaz Palma, A.; Paz Saa, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrolysis of resistant cellulose of ''Onopordum nervosum boiss'' (thistle) to reduce sugar in diluted sulfuric acid in glass ampoules and long residence times have been studied and kinetic parameters determined. The rate of hydrolysis is similar to that of the cellulose of Douglas fir, but comparatively the effect of the acid is more pronounced than temperature. From kinetic data the yield can be predicted and since it can be obtained at least 45% of the potential glucose (48% as reducing sugars) at 190 deg C, 1.6% acid and 6.1 min. residence time, it indicates that the continuous acid hydrolysis of thistle may be a process of commercial interest. (author)

  5. Stress resistance of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis is modulated by auxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repar, J; Šućurović, S; Zahradka, K; Zahradka, D; Ćurković-Perica, M

    2013-11-01

    Two bacterial species, Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, were exposed to different auxins to examine possible effects of these substances on bacterial stress tolerance. Bacterial resistance to UV irradiation, heat shock, and streptomycin was assessed with and without previous exposure to the following auxins: indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), and 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). Escherichia coli and B. subtilis cultures pretreated with any of the 3 auxins survived UV irradiation better than the untreated cultures. Also, B. subtilis cultures pretreated with IBA or NAA survived prolonged heat exposure better than the untreated cultures, while IAA pretreatment had no effect on heat shock survival. In contrast, auxin pretreatment rendered E. coli more sensitive to heat shock. Escherichia coli cultures pretreated with auxins were also more sensitive to streptomycin, while auxin pretreatment had no effect on sensitivity of B. subtilis to streptomycin. These results show that auxins may either enhance or reduce bacterial tolerance to different stressors, depending on the bacterial species and the type and level of the stress. Auxins usually had similar effects on the same bacterial species in cases when the same type and level of stress were applied.

  6. Burkholderia sp. KCTC 11096BP modulates pepper growth and resistance against Phytophthora capsici

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S.M.; Hamayun, M.; Shinwari, Z.K.

    2016-01-01

    Biological control of crop diseases is desirable for sustainable agriculture as it minimizes chemical inputs in the agricultural system and promotes eco-friendly environment. We analyzed the favorable role of Burkholderia sp. KCTC 11096BP against the pathogen Phytophthora capsici in pepper. We screen thirty rhizobateria for their anti-pathogen activity, and found that Burkholderia sp. KCTC 11096BP exhibits maximum growth inhibition of the pathogen P. capsici. The bacterium inoculation to pepper plants significantly enhanced growth attributes of pepper in infected and control treatments. The total proteins (10.9%), and the amino acids viz. glycine (4.08 ug/g), leucine (3.3 ug/g), and alanine (3.26 ug/g) were preset in considerably higher quantities in Burkholderia sp. applied treatments as compare to control. The systemic acquired resistance (SAR) of the host plant was up-regulated by Burkholderia sp. KCTC, as endogenous salicylic acid (235.5 ng/g) and jasmonic acid (22.8 ng/g) levels were found higher in such treatments. It was concluded that Burkholderia sp. KCTC 11096BP mitigates the adverse effects of P. capsici on pepper crop and can improve crop productivity at the field level. (author)

  7. Exogenous ascorbic acid increases resistance to salt of Silybum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, irrigation with salt water enhanced carotenoids and antioxidant enzyme activities. The detrimental effects of salt water were ameliorated by application of 100 ppm ascorbic acid (vitamin C). The inductive role of vitamin was associated with the improvement of seed germination, growth, plant water status, ...

  8. Resilience versus Resistance: Affectively Modulating Contemporary Diagrams of Social Resilience, Social Sustainability, and Social Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hroch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article critically interrogates the twin notions of social sustainability and activities grouped under the term social innovation in order to argue that sustainability and innovation are schizoid modes of representing what Deleuze calls “the cliché” (the authority of the same as “the new” (difference that short-circuit any real possibility of social transformation. I argue that the kinds of solutions presented by social innovation to the problems of social sustainability in the context of a neoliberal governmentality are sustainable only in the sense that they are a model for a more collective mode of existence in an individualized realm that reciprocally supports a realm in which collective responsibility is individualized. In other words, this neo-liberal diagram catches and captures creative energies in service to the status quo. To illustrate these ideas I turn to Dutch filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak’s 2010 documentary, California Dreaming, in which she compares the popular response to the 2008 financial crisis by focusing on several families across the transatlantic transcontinental divide. She interviews Europeans who blame the state as the source of the economic problem, and thus expect the state to fix it. And she interviews Americans who, reflecting on the “American dream,” reveal their faith in meritocracy, blame themselves, and thus look to their own families and communities for solutions. Their respective stories tell us how different neo-liberal diagrams structure and modulate subjectivity and its relation to the social, as well as the emerging ways in which this relation is being framed. If, as Deleuze writes, “there is no diagram that does not also include, besides the points which it connects up, certain relatively free points, points of creativity, change and resistance,” how can analysis of these shifty subjective-social structures point us to points of resistance" (Foucault? And why is it crucial that

  9. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Iuliana V; Walker, Louise A; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P

    2015-07-28

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. The C. albicans cell wall is the first line of defense against external insults, the site of immune recognition by the host, and an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Its tensile strength is conferred by

  10. High short-term effectiveness of modulated dry bed training in adolescents and young adults with treatment-resistant enuresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, I.; Cobussen-Boekhorst, J.G.L.; Kortmann, B.B.M.; Mulder, Z.; Steffens, M.G.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Van Capelle, J.W.; Blanker, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION & OBJECTIVES: Two percent of adolescents and young adults suffer from therapy-resistant enuresis, with considerable negative impact on self-esteem and relationships. We evaluated the effect of a Modulated Dry Bed Training (MDBT) in a previously therapyresistant group of adolescents with

  11. High short-term effectiveness of modulated dry bed training in adolescents and young adults with treatment-resistant enuresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, I.; Cobussen-Boekhorst, J.G.L.; Kortmann, B.B.M.; Mulder, Z.; Steffens, M.G.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Van Capelle, J.W.; Blanker, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis/aims of study Two percent of adolescents and adults suffers from enuresis. In this age group, social problems can arise. We evaluated the effect of a Modulated Dry Bed Training (MDBT) in a previously therapy-resistant group of adolescents and adults with enuresis, provided by a

  12. High uric acid directly inhibits insulin signalling and induces insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuzhang; Hu, Yaqiu; Huang, Tianliang; Zhang, Yongneng; Li, Zhi; Luo, Chaohuan; Luo, Yinfeng; Yuan, Huier; Hisatome, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Cheng, Jidong

    2014-05-16

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that hyperuricemia is strongly associated with abnormal glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. However, how high uric acid (HUA) level causes insulin resistance remains unclear. We aimed to determine the direct role of HUA in insulin resistance in vitro and in vivo in mice. An acute hyperuricemia mouse model was created by potassium oxonate treatment, and the impact of HUA level on insulin resistance was investigated by glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test and insulin signalling, including phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and Akt. HepG2 cells were exposed to HUA treatment and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), reactive oxygen species scavenger; IRS1 and Akt phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analysis after insulin treatment. Hyperuricemic mice showed impaired glucose tolerance with insulin resistance. Hyperuricemia inhibited phospho-Akt (Ser473) response to insulin and increased phosphor-IRS1 (Ser307) in liver, muscle and fat tissues. HUA induced oxidative stress, and the antioxidant NAC blocked HUA-induced IRS1 activation and Akt inhibition in HepG2 cells. This study supplies the first evidence of HUA directly inducing insulin resistance in vivo and in vitro. Increased uric acid level may inhibit IRS1 and Akt insulin signalling and induce insulin resistance. The reactive oxygen species pathway plays a key role in HUA-induced insulin resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Relationship of resistance to diseases and water-soluble amino acids in Konjac leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongbo; Jiang, Qiaolong

    2008-05-01

    Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography was used to analyze water-soluble amino acids in the normal Amorphophallus Konjac, Amorphophallus albus, Amorphophallus bulbifer, and the soft rot Amorphophallus Konjac, to determine the relationship of the different soft-rot resistant Konjac varieties and the proportion and content of the multiple water-soluble amino acids. The results showed that there are remarkable differences in the content and proportion of water-soluble amino acids in different resistant varieties and the same variety of normal and diseased leaves of Amorphophallus. In this study, the bank of fingerprint 15 chromatogram was established and can be used to analyze the related characteristic peaks and the resistance of Amorphophallus.

  14. Effect of phytic acid on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Ni coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Guozhe, E-mail: mengguozhe@hrbeu.edu.c [Corrosion and Protection Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Harbin Engineering University, Ministry of Education, Harbin 150001 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Sun Feilong [Corrosion and Protection Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Harbin Engineering University, Ministry of Education, Harbin 150001 (China); Shaoa Yawei [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang Tao; Wang Fuhui [Corrosion and Protection Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Harbin Engineering University, Ministry of Education, Harbin 150001 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Dong Chaofang [Corrosion and Protection Center, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Xiaogang [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)] [Corrosion and Protection Center, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-08-01

    In this work, the pure Ni coatings were synthesized on Q235 steel by using reverse pulsed electrodeposition technique in sulphate-based baths with 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 g/L phytic acid additive. The effect of phytic acid on the microstructure and micro-morphology of the sample was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. And the effect of phytic acid on the corrosion resistance of the sample was studied by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The results demonstrated that the addition of phytic acid was in favor of the growth of nano-scale twins (NT) in the interior of grains, which was due to the lowered stacking fault energies of Ni during the electrodeposition, and the typical morphology of pyramidal islands on the surface. The results also demonstrated that the effect of phytic acid was not monotonous with increasing concentration: the passive current density i{sub p} was minimum and the charge transfer resistance R{sub t} was maximum for the sample obtained from the bath with 0.2 g/L phytic acid, indicating that the sample obtained from the bath with 0.2 g/L phytic acid showed the best corrosion resistance.

  15. Saturated and Unsaturated Fatty Acids Differently Modulate Colonic Goblet Cells In Vitro and in Rat Pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Bérengère; Bruno, Jérémie; Kayal, Fanny; Estienne, Monique; Debard, Cyrille; Ducroc, Robert; Plaisancié, Pascale

    2015-08-01

    High-fat diets induce intestinal barrier alterations and promote intestinal diseases. Little is known about the effects of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) on mucin 2 (MUC2) production by goblet cells, which are crucial for intestinal protection. We investigated the effects of LCFAs on the differentiation of colonic goblet cells, MUC2 expression, and colonic barrier function. Upon reaching confluence, human colonic mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells were stimulated (21 d) with a saturated LCFA (palmitic or stearic acid), a monounsaturated LCFA (oleic acid), or a polyunsaturated LCFA (linoleic, γ-linolenic, α-linolenic, or eicosapentaenoic acid). In addition, rat pups underwent oral administration of oil (palm, rapeseed, or sunflower oil) or water (10 μL/g body weight, postnatal days 10-15). Subsequently, colon goblet cells were studied by Western blotting, reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry and colonic transmucosal electrical resistance was measured by using Ussing chambers. In vitro, palmitic acid enhanced MUC2 production (140% of control) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α expression, whereas oleic, linoleic, γ-linolenic, α-linolenic, and eicosapentaenoic acids reduced MUC2 expression (at least -50% of control). All unsaturated LCFAs decreased the expression of human atonal homolog 1, a transcription factor controlling goblet cell differentiation (at least -31% vs. control). In vivo, rats fed palm oil had higher palmitic acid concentrations (3-fold) in their colonic contents and increased mucus granule surfaces in their goblet cells (>2-fold) than did all other groups. Palm oil also increased colonic transmucosal electrical resistance (245% of control), yet had no effect on occludin and zonula occludens-1 expression. In contrast, sunflower and rapeseed oils decreased goblet cell number when compared with control (at least -10%) and palm oil (at least -14%) groups. Palm oil in rat pups and palmitic acid in HT29-MTX

  16. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.

  17. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3 Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Min Woo

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3 and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3. Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3 expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1 into n-heptanoic acid (5 and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4. This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.

  18. Glutamine, glutamate, and arginine-based acid resistance in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Januana S; Seeras, Arisha; Sanchez-Maldonado, Alma Fernanda; Zhang, Chonggang; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine whether glutamine deamidation improves acid resistance of Lactobacillus reuteri, and to assess whether arginine, glutamine, and glutamate-mediated acid resistance are redundant or complementary mechanisms of acid resistance. Three putative glutaminase genes, gls1, gls2, and gls3, were identified in L. reuteri 100-23. All three genes were expressed during growth in mMRS and wheat sourdough. L. reuteri consistently over-expressed gls3 and the glutamate decarboxylase gadB. L. reuteri 100-23ΔgadB over-expressed gls3 and the arginine deiminase gene adi. Analysis of the survival of L. reuteri in acidic conditions revealed that arginine conversion is effective at pH of 3.5 while glutamine or glutamate conversion were effective at pH of 2.5. Arginine conversion increased the pHin but not ΔΨ; glutamate decarboxylation had only a minor effect on the pHin but increased the ΔΨ. This study demonstrates that glutamine deamidation increases the acid resistance of L. reuteri independent of glutamate decarboxylase activity. Arginine and glutamine/glutamate conversions confer resistance to lactate at pH of 3.5 and phosphate at pH of 2.5, respectively. Knowledge of L. reuteri's acid resistance improves the understanding of the adaptation of L. reuteri to intestinal ecosystems, and facilitates the selection of probiotic and starter cultures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dietary omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate hepatic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadge, Saraswoti; Sharp, John Graham; Thiele, Geoffrey M; McGuire, Timothy R; Klassen, Lynell W; Duryee, Michael J; Britton, Holly C; Dafferner, Alicia J; Beck, Jordan; Black, Paul N; DiRusso, Concetta C; Talmadge, James

    2018-02-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) modulate inflammation; however, few studies have focused on the pathobiology of PUFA using isocaloric and isolipidic diets and it is unclear if the associated pathologies are due to dietary PUFA composition, lipid metabolism or obesity, as most studies compare diets fed ad libitum. Our studies used isocaloric and isolipidic liquid diets (35% of calories from fat), with differing compositions of omega (ω)-6 or long chain (Lc) ω-3 PUFA that were pair-fed and assessed hepatic pathology, inflammation and lipid metabolism. Consistent with an isocaloric, pair-fed model we observed no significant difference in diet consumption between the groups. In contrast, the body and liver weight, total lipid level and abdominal fat deposits were significantly higher in mice fed an ω-6 diet. An analysis of the fatty acid profile in plasma and liver showed that mice on the ω-6 diet had significantly more arachidonic acid (AA) in the plasma and liver, whereas, in these mice ω-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) were not detected and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was significantly lower. Histopathologic analyses documented that mice on the ω-6 diet had a significant increase in macrovesicular steatosis, extramedullary myelopoiesis (EMM), apoptotic hepatocytes and decreased glycogen storage in lobular hepatocytes, and hepatocyte proliferation relative to mice fed the Lc ω-3 diet. Together, these results support PUFA dietary regulation of hepatic pathology and inflammation with implications for enteral feeding regulation of steatosis and other hepatic lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antimicrobial resistance of coagulase-negative staphylococci and lactic acid bacteria from industrially produced dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevijo Zdolec

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the susceptibility to clindamycin, tetracycline, amikacin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, enrofloxacine, vancomycin, trimethoprim + sulphametoxazol, tobramycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, penicillin and trimethoprim was tested in coagulase-negative staphylococci (n=78 and lactic acid bacteria (n=30 by means of disk diffusion test and E-test. The isolates were collected from soft and hard cheeses, butter and brine. All isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci were susceptible to clindamycin, amikacin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, enrofloxacine, vancomycin, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin according to CLSI breakpoints. A total of 30 staphylococci isolates (38.46 % were resistant to erythromycin, 18 to penicillin (23.07 %, 4 to tetracycline (5.12 %, and one isolate to trimethoprim, tobramicin and trimethoprim + sulphametoxazol (1.28 %. Among 78 tested staphylococci, 35 of them were resistant to at least one antimicrobial substance (44.87 %. The rate of resistant isolates of different soft cheese types ranged from 22 to 70 %, while resistant staphylococci were absent in hard cheese and brine. The growth of lactic acid bacteria was not influenced by trimethoprim + sulphametoxazol (n=29, vancomycin (n=29, trimethoprim (n=28, amikacin (n=10 and tobramycin (n=10. The results show that significant part of apathogenic microbiota in different dairy products is phenotypically resistant to antimicrobial agents.

  1. Characterization of the Epidemic European Fusidic Acid-Resistant Impetigo Clone of Staphylococcus aureus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, A. J.; Larsen, A. R.; Skov, R.; Henriksen, A. S.; Chopra, I.

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid in European strains of Staphylococcus aureus causing impetigo has increased in recent years. This increase appears to have resulted from clonal expansion of a strain we have designated the epidemic European fusidic acid-resistant impetigo clone (EEFIC), which carries the fusidic acid resistance determinant fusB on its chromosome. To understand better the properties of the EEFIC responsible for its success, we have performed detailed phenotypic and genotypic characterization of this clone. Molecular typing revealed the EEFIC to be ST123, spa type t171, and agr type IV and therefore unrelated to earlier prevalent fusB+ strains found in the United Kingdom. EEFIC strains exhibited resistance to fusidic acid, penicillin, and, in some cases, erythromycin, which are all used in the treatment of impetigo. PCR analysis of the EEFIC and complete DNA sequencing of the 39.3 Kb plasmid it harbors identified genes encoding several toxins previously implicated in impetigo (exfoliative toxins A and B and EDIN-C). The location of fusB was mapped on the chromosome and found to be associated with a novel 16.6-kb genomic island integrated downstream of groEL. Although this element is related to classical staphylococcal pathogenicity islands, it does not encode any known virulence factors and consequently has been designated SaRIfusB (for “S. aureus resistance island carrying fusB”). PMID:17344365

  2. Acid-resistant organic coatings for the chemical industry: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Victor Buhl; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Frankær, Sarah Maria Grundahl

    2017-01-01

    Industries that work with acidic chemicals in their processes need to make choices on how to properly contain the substances and avoid rapid corrosion of equipment. Certain organic coatings and linings can be used in such environments, either to protect vulnerable construction materials, or......, in combination with fiber reinforcement, to replace them. However, degradation mechanisms of organic coatings in acid service are not thoroughly understood and relevant quantitative investigations are scarce. This review describes the uses and limitations of acid-resistant coatings in the chemical industry......, with a comparison to alternative resistant materials based on metals or ceramics. In addition, coating degradation phenomena, caused by acid exposure, are mapped to the extent possible, and analysis methods for detecting coating degradation type and severity are listed and discussed. It is concluded that more...

  3. Fatty acid composition analyses of the DCMU resistant mutants of Nannochloropsis oculata (eustigmatophyceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimin, Zhang; Shuang, Liu; Xue, Sun; Guanpin, Yang; Xuecheng, Zhang; Zhenhui, Gao

    2003-04-01

    Ultraviolet mutagenesis was applied to Nannochloropsis oculata and three mutants resistant to 3-(3, 4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) were isolated. The cellular chlorophyll a and total lipid content of the wild are higher in the medium supplemented with DCMU than in the control without DCMU. Without DCMU, the growth rates and chlorophyll a contents of the mutants are similar to those of the wild. Significant changes of fatty acid content and composition have occurred in DCMU-resistant mutants growing in the medium supplemented with DCMU. The total lipid, palmitic acid (16:0), palmitoleic acid (16:1ω9) and oleic (18:1ω9) contents decrease significantly, while the vaccenic acid (18:1ω11) increases significantly and the EPA content of dried powder increases slightly in the mutants. The study may provide a basis to improve EPA content in Nannochloropsis oculata in the future.

  4. Tetradecylthioacetic acid prevents high fat diet induced adiposity and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Guerre-Millo, Michéle; Flindt, Esben N

    2002-01-01

    Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) is a non-beta-oxidizable fatty acid analog, which potently regulates lipid homeostasis. Here we evaluate the ability of TTA to prevent diet-induced and genetically determined adiposity and insulin resistance. In Wistar rats fed a high fat diet, TTA administration...... completely prevented diet-induced insulin resistance and adiposity. In genetically obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats TTA treatment reduced the epididymal adipose tissue mass and improved insulin sensitivity. All three rodent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes were activated by TTA...... that a TTA-induced increase in hepatic fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis drains fatty acids from blood and extrahepatic tissues and that this contributes significantly to the beneficial effects of TTA on fat mass accumulation and peripheral insulin sensitivity....

  5. Tetradecylthioacetic acid prevents high fat diet induced adiposity and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Guerre-Millo, Michéle; Flindt, Esben N

    2002-01-01

    completely prevented diet-induced insulin resistance and adiposity. In genetically obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats TTA treatment reduced the epididymal adipose tissue mass and improved insulin sensitivity. All three rodent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes were activated by TTA......Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) is a non-beta-oxidizable fatty acid analog, which potently regulates lipid homeostasis. Here we evaluate the ability of TTA to prevent diet-induced and genetically determined adiposity and insulin resistance. In Wistar rats fed a high fat diet, TTA administration...... that a TTA-induced increase in hepatic fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis drains fatty acids from blood and extrahepatic tissues and that this contributes significantly to the beneficial effects of TTA on fat mass accumulation and peripheral insulin sensitivity....

  6. Modulating the inflammatory properties of activated microglia with Docosahexaenoic acid and Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Microglia are considered the “resident macrophages” of the brain. When in their resting state, microglia perform routine maintenance and immune surveillance. Once activated, either by injury or an immune stimulus, microglia secrete a variety of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as Nitric Oxide, superoxide, and inflammatory cytokines. Up-regulation of pro-inflammatory molecules is transient, and does not cause neurodegeneration. However, if up-regulation lasts for an extended period of time, neurodegeneration ensues. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation due to microglial activation. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) have been proposed as possible preventative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, due to their anti-inflammatory properties. Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that has potent anti-inflammatory properties.This research work sought to elucidate whether microglial activation can be modulated by combining Aspirin, a classical NSAID, with Docosahexaenoic Acid, a natural anti-inflammatory agent. The combined ability of Aspirin and DHA to modulate microglial activation was determined in the context of pro-inflammatory cytokines, Nitric Oxide levels, as well as total Glutathione levels. Results Docosahexaenoic Acid increased total Glutathione levels in microglia cells and enhanced their anti-oxidative capacity. It reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 induced through TLR-3 and TLR-4 activation. Furthermore, it reduced production of Nitric Oxide. Aspirin showed similar anti-inflammatory effects with respect to TNF-α during TLR-3 and TLR-7 stimulation. Aspirin did not show any redection in terms of Nitric Oxide production. Combination of Aspirin and Docosahexaenoic Acid showed augmentation in total Glutathione production during TLR-7 stimulation as well as a reduction in IL-6, TNF-α and Nitric Oxide. Conclusions

  7. Segregation of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Esters Mediating Sweetpotato Weevil Resistance in Storage Roots of Sweetpotato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanga, Milton O.; Yada, Benard; Yencho, G. C.; Ssemakula, Gorrettie N.; Alajo, Agnes; Farman, Dudley I.; Mwanga, Robert O. M.; Stevenson, Philip C.

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to sweetpotato weevils (Cylas spp.) has been identified in several sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) landraces from East Africa and shown to be conferred by hydroxycinnamic acids that occur on the surface of storage roots. The segregation of resistance in this crop is unknown and could be monitored using these chemical traits as markers for resistance in F1 offspring from breeding programs. For the first time in a segregating population, we quantified the plant chemicals that confer resistance and evaluated levels of insect colonization of the same progeny in field and laboratory studies. We used a bi-parental mapping population of 287 progenies from a cross between I. batatas ‘New Kawogo,’ a weevil resistant Ugandan landrace and I. batatas ‘Beauregard’ a North American orange-fleshed and weevil susceptible cultivar. The progenies were evaluated for resistance to sweetpotato weevil, Cylas puncticollis at three field locations that varied climatically and across two seasons to determine how environment and location influenced resistance. To augment our field open-choice resistance screening, each clone was also evaluated in a no choice experiment with weevils reared in the laboratory. Chemical analysis was used to determine whether differences in resistance to weevils were associated with plant compounds previously identified as conferring resistance. We established linkage between field and laboratory resistance to Cylas spp. and sweetpotato root chemistry. The data also showed that resistance in sweetpotato was mediated by root chemicals in most but not all cases. Multi-location trials especially from Serere data provided evidence that the hydroxycinnamic acid esters are produced constitutively within the plants in different clonal genotypes and that the ecological interaction of these chemicals in sweetpotato with weevils confers resistance. Our data suggest that these chemical traits are controlled quantitatively and that ultimately a knowledge of

  8. Syzygium jambos Displayed Antibacterial and Antibiotic-Modulating Activities against Resistant Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice E. N. Wamba

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the antibacterial activities of methanol extracts of bark and leaves of Syzygium jambos, as well as their synergistic effects with selected antibiotics against drug-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The crude extracts were subjected to qualitative phytochemical screening; broth microdilution method was used for antibacterial assays. Phytochemical studies indicate that leaves and bark extracts contained polyphenols, anthraquinones, tannins, and steroids. Extract of the leaves was active against all the 26 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and all the 21 strains of Gram-negative bacteria tested, within the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC range of 32–512 μg/mL. The lowest MIC value of 32 μg/mL was obtained with extract of the leaves against Staphylococcus aureus MRSA9 strain. In Gram-negative bacteria, the lowest MIC value of 64 μg/mL was also obtained against Enterobacter aerogenes EA294 and Klebsiella pneumoniae K24 strains. Against S. aureus strains, antibiotic-modulating activity of extracts at MIC/2 towards more than 70% of the tested strains was obtained when leaves and bark extracts were tested in association with chloramphenicol (CHL. This was also the case when leaves extract was combined with CHL, kanamycin (KAN, tetracycline (TET, and erythromycin (ERY and when bark extract was combined with ciprofloxacin (CIP, TET, and ERY against Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that Syzygium jambos has antibacterial and antibiotic-modulating activities.

  9. Chemical Changes Associated with Increased Acid Resistance of Er:YAG Laser Irradiated Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Mejía, Oscar Fernando; García-Fabila, María Magdalena; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura Emma; Sánchez-Flores, Ignacio; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background. An increase in the acid resistance of dental enamel, as well as morphological and structural changes produced by Er:YAG laser irradiation, has been reported. Purpose. To evaluate the chemical changes associated with acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser. Methods. Forty-eight enamel samples were divided into 4 groups (n = 12). Group I (control); Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with Er:YAG at 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2), 200 mJ (25.5 J/cm2), and 300 mJ (38.2 J/cm2), respectively. Results. There were significant differences in composition of irradiated groups (with the exception of chlorine) and in the amount of calcium released. Conclusions. Chemical changes associated with an increase in acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser showed a clear postirradiation pattern characterized by a decrease in C at.% and an increase in O, P, and Ca at.% and no changes in Cl at.%. An increased Ca/P ratio after Er:YAG laser irradiation was associated with the use of higher laser energy densities. Chemical changes produced by acid dissolution showed a similar trend among experimental groups. Stable or increased Ca/P ratio after acid dissolution was observed in the irradiated groups, with reduction of Ca released into the acid solution. PMID:24600327

  10. Chemical Changes Associated with Increased Acid Resistance of Er:YAG Laser Irradiated Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Manuela Díaz-Monroy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. An increase in the acid resistance of dental enamel, as well as morphological and structural changes produced by Er:YAG laser irradiation, has been reported. Purpose. To evaluate the chemical changes associated with acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser. Methods. Forty-eight enamel samples were divided into 4 groups (n=12. Group I (control; Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with Er:YAG at 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2, 200 mJ (25.5 J/cm2, and 300 mJ (38.2 J/cm2, respectively. Results. There were significant differences in composition of irradiated groups (with the exception of chlorine and in the amount of calcium released. Conclusions. Chemical changes associated with an increase in acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser showed a clear postirradiation pattern characterized by a decrease in C at.% and an increase in O, P, and Ca at.% and no changes in Cl at.%. An increased Ca/P ratio after Er:YAG laser irradiation was associated with the use of higher laser energy densities. Chemical changes produced by acid dissolution showed a similar trend among experimental groups. Stable or increased Ca/P ratio after acid dissolution was observed in the irradiated groups, with reduction of Ca released into the acid solution.

  11. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  12. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production. PMID:26826231

  13. Antibacterial activity of mupirocin (pseudomonic Acid A) against, clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, M.; Abbasi, S.A.; Butt, T.; Arain, M.A

    2010-01-01

    Colonized patients and health care workers are the main source of spread of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals. The elimination of nasal colonized MRSA plays a crucial role in infection control protocols. Mupirocin (pseudomonic acid A) is used for eradication of MRSA nasal carriage. Increasing use of pseudomonic acid A (mupirocin) has led to emergence of resistance. Objective To determine low and high level resistance of MRSA isolates from clinical specimens against mupirocin. Place and duration of study: Study was conducted at Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi from July 2006 to June 2007. Material and methods Three hundred methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were studied. All clinical specimens were processed for culture and sensitivity. Staphylococcus aureus isolates were tested for methicillin resistance using 1 micro g oxacillin disk. The isolates were further tested by PCR for the presence of mecA gene. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of mupirocin against MRSA isolates was determined using agar dilution technique. Results Out of 300 MRSA isolates, 98% were found to have MlC against mupirocin as smaller than 4 micro g/mL. Remaining 2% isolates revealed low level resistance (MIC greater than 8 micro g/mL to 256 micro g/mL), no high level resistance (MIC greater than 512 micro g/mL) against mupirocin was detected. Conclusions: High level mupirocin resistance has not emerged so far in our setup. Due to increasing use of mupirocin, emergence of resistance against mupirocin among MRSA is a strong possibility. Strategy encompassing rational use of antimicrobials, hospital infection control, surveillance for the detection of mupirocin resistance and judicious use of this agent is required. (author)

  14. Study on the Thermal Resistance of Multi-chip Module High Power LED Packaging Heat Dissipation System

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    Kailin Pan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal resistance is a key technical index which indicates the thermal management of multi-chip module high power LED (MCM-LED packaging heat dissipation system. In this paper, the prototype structure of MCM-LED packaging heat dissipation system is proposed to study the reliable thermal resistance calculation method. In order to analyze the total thermal resistance of the MCM-LED packaging heat dissipation system, three kinds of thermal resistance calculation method including theoretical calculation, experimental testing and finite element simulation are developed respectively. Firstly, based on the thermal resistance network model and the principle of steady state heat transfer, the theoretical value of total thermal resistance is 6.111 K/W through sum of the thermal resistance of every material layer in the major direction of heat flow. Secondly, the thermal resistance experiment is carried out by T3Ster to obtain the experimental result of total thermal resistance, and the value is 6.729 K/W. Thirdly, a three-dimensional finite element model of MCM-LED packaging heat dissipation system is established, and the junction temperature experiment is also performed to calculated the finite element simulated result of total thermal resistance, the value is 6.99 K/W. Finally, by comparing the error of all the three kinds of result, the error of total thermal resistance between the theoretical value and experimental result is 9.2 %, and the error of total thermal resistance between the experimental result and finite element simulation is only about -3.9 %, meanwhile, the main reason of each error is discussed respectively.

  15. Acid-resistant organic coatings for the chemical industry: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Victor Buhl; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Frankær, Sarah Maria Grundahl

    2017-01-01

    Industries that work with acidic chemicals in their processes need to make choices on how to properly contain the substances and avoid rapid corrosion of equipment. Certain organic coatings and linings can be used in such environments, either to protect vulnerable construction materials, or......, in combination with fiber reinforcement, to replace them. However, degradation mechanisms of organic coatings in acid service are not thoroughly understood and relevant quantitative investigations are scarce. This review describes the uses and limitations of acid-resistant coatings in the chemical industry...

  16. Endogenous cytokinin overproduction modulates ROS homeostasis and decreases salt stress resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Yanping eWang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cytokinins in plants are crucial for numerous biological processes, including seed germination, cell division and differentiation, floral initiation and adaptation to abiotic stresses. The salt stress can promote reactive oxygen species (ROS production in plants which are highly toxic and ultimately results in oxidative stress. However, the correlation between endogenous cytokinin production and ROS homeostasis in responding to salt stress is poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the correlation of overexpressing the cytokinin biosynthetic gene AtIPT8 (adenosine phosphate-isopentenyl transferase 8 and the response of salt stress in Arabidopsis. Overproduction of cytokinins, which was resulted by the inducible overexpression of AtIPT8, significantly inhibited the primary root growth and true leaf emergence, especially under the conditions of exogenous salt, glucose and mannitol treatments. Upon cytokinin overproduction, the salt stress resistance was declined, and resulted in less survival rates and chlorophyll content. Interestingly, ROS production was obviously increased with the salt treatment, accompanied by endogenously overproduced cytokinins. The activities of CAT and SOD, which are responsible for scavenging ROS, were also affected. Transcription profiling revealed that the differential expressions of ROS-producing and scavenging related genes, the photosynthesis-related genes and stress responsive genes were existed in transgenic plants of overproducing cytokinins. Our results suggested that broken in the homeostasis of cytokinins in plant cells could modulate the salt stress responses through a ROS-mediated regulation in Arabidopsis.

  17. Melatonin Modulates Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress under Insulin Resistance Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juhyun; Kim, Oh Yoen

    2017-06-10

    Insulin resistance (IR) is an important stress factor in the central nervous system, thereby aggravating neuropathogenesis and triggering cognitive decline. Melatonin, which is an antioxidant phytochemical and synthesized by the pineal gland, has multiple functions in cellular responses such as apoptosis and survival against stress. This study investigated whether melatonin modulates the signaling of neuronal cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress under IR condition using SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Apoptosis cell death signaling markers (cleaved Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP), p53, and Bax) and ER stress markers (phosphorylated eIF2α (p-eIF2α), ATF4, CHOP, p-IRE1 , and spliced XBP1 (sXBP1)) were measured using reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative PCR, and western blottings. Immunofluorescence staining was also performed for p-ASK1 and p-IRE1 . The mRNA or protein expressions of cell death signaling markers and ER stress markers were increased under IR condition, but significantly attenuated by melatonin treatment. Insulin-induced activation of ASK1 ( p-ASK1 ) was also dose dependently attenuated by melatonin treatment. The regulatory effect of melatonin on neuronal cells under IR condition was associated with ASK1 signaling. In conclusion, the result suggested that melatonin may alleviate ER stress under IR condition, thereby regulating neuronal cell death signaling.

  18. Melatonin Modulates Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress under Insulin Resistance Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Song

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is an important stress factor in the central nervous system, thereby aggravating neuropathogenesis and triggering cognitive decline. Melatonin, which is an antioxidant phytochemical and synthesized by the pineal gland, has multiple functions in cellular responses such as apoptosis and survival against stress. This study investigated whether melatonin modulates the signaling of neuronal cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress under IR condition using SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Apoptosis cell death signaling markers (cleaved Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP, p53, and Bax and ER stress markers (phosphorylated eIF2α (p-eIF2α, ATF4, CHOP, p-IRE1, and spliced XBP1 (sXBP1 were measured using reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative PCR, and western blottings. Immunofluorescence staining was also performed for p-ASK1 and p-IRE1. The mRNA or protein expressions of cell death signaling markers and ER stress markers were increased under IR condition, but significantly attenuated by melatonin treatment. Insulin-induced activation of ASK1 (p-ASK1 was also dose dependently attenuated by melatonin treatment. The regulatory effect of melatonin on neuronal cells under IR condition was associated with ASK1 signaling. In conclusion, the result suggested that melatonin may alleviate ER stress under IR condition, thereby regulating neuronal cell death signaling.

  19. The role of energy & fatty acid metabolism in obesity and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, Mattijs Maria

    2015-01-01

    In today’s world, more people die from complications of overweight than from underweight. But not all individuals are equally prone to develop metabolic complications, such as obesity and insulin resistance. This thesis focuses on the differences in the energy and fatty acid metabolism that play a

  20. A Potent Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase Inhibitor to Study the Function of TRAP in Alveolar Macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, Carian E; van der Veen, T. Anienke; Putri, Kurnia S S; de Almeida, Andreia; Draijer, Christina; Mauad, Thais; Fejer, Gyorgy; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; van den Berge, Maarten; Bossé, Yohan; Sin, Don; Hao, Ke; Reithmeier, Anja; Andersson, Göran; Olinga, Peter; Timens, Wim; Casini, Angela; Melgert, Barbro N

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, two isoforms 5a and 5b) is highly expressed in alveolar macrophages, but its function there is unclear and potent selective inhibitors of TRAP are required to assess functional aspects of the protein. We found higher TRAP activity/expression in

  1. [Biological profile of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase as a marker of bone resorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, H; Iritia, M; Arribas, I; Revilla, M

    1990-12-01

    Tartrate-resistant serum acid phosphatase was measured in 123 subjects, 80 of which were normal and the rest pathologic, in order to define the profile and value of this parameter as a biological marker of osteoclastic activity. Normal subjects were divided into age groups based on the period where skeletal growth ends (under 20 years), at the age of menopause in women (50 years, between 20 and 50 years) and those over 50 years. There was an increase in tartrate-resistant serum acid phosphatase coinciding with puberty and no sex differences were observed after the 50 year mark, when women showed higher values than men (p less than 0.001). Such tartrate-resistant serum acid phosphatase increase, is reflected as higher values in the 50 year group than in the 20 to 50 year group (p less than 0.001), the only age limit where a negative significant correlation between tartrate-resistant serum acid phosphatase values and age could be observed (p less than 0.05). Values were higher up to the age of 20 years (p less than 0.001) than in any other older age group. Levels increased significantly (p less than 0.001 for both groups) in post-menopausal osteoporosis (n = 20) and in Paget's disease of bone (n = 15), and decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) in imperfect osteogenesis (n = 8), thus revealing its value as a biological marker of osteoclastic activity.

  2. Acidic Barren Slope Profiling using Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) at Ayer Hitam area Johor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, A. T. S.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Aziman, M.; Haimi, D. S.; Hafiz, Z. M.

    2016-04-01

    Recently, non-destructive method such as the electrical resistivity technique has become increasingly popular in engineering, environmental, mining and archeological studies nowadays. This method was popular in subsurface profiling due to its ability to replicate the images of the subsurface indirectly. The soil slope found in Batu Pahat, specifically in Ayer Hitam, is known to be problematic due to its barren condition. This location is believed to contain futile soil due to its difficulty in supporting the growth of vegetations. In the past, acidic barren slope assessment using non-destructive method was rarely being used due to several reasons related to the equipment and knowledge constraints. Hence, this study performed an electrical resistivity imaging using ABEM Terrameter LS in order to investigate the acidic barren slope conditions. Field data acquisition was based on Schlumberger and Wenner arrays while RES2DINV software was used to analyze and generate a 2-D model of the problematic subsurface profile. Based on electrical resistivity results, it was found that the acidic barren slope studied consists of two main zones representing residual soil (electrical resistivity value = 10 - 600 Ωm) and shale (electrical resistivity value = 20 - 2000 Ωm). The results of resistivity value were correlated with the physical mapping and the in situ mackintosh probe test for verification purposes. It was found that the maximum depth of the mackintosh probe test was 1.8 m due to its ground penetration limitation. However, the results of the resistivity section managed to achieve greater depth up to 40 m. Hence, the correlation between electrical resistivity and mackintosh probe results can only be performed at certain depth of the acidic barren slope profile in contrast with the physical mapping which able to define the whole section of the barren soil slope structure. Finally, a good match of electrical resistivity results calibrated with mackintosh and physical

  3. Effects of Arabinoxylan and Resistant Starch on Intestinal Microbiota and Short-Chain Fatty Acids in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomised Crossover Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Hald

    Full Text Available Recently, the intestinal microbiota has been emphasised as an important contributor to the development of metabolic syndrome. Dietary fibre may exert beneficial effects through modulation of the intestinal microbiota and metabolic end products. We investigated the effects of a diet enriched with two different dietary fibres, arabinoxylan and resistant starch type 2, on the gut microbiome and faecal short-chain fatty acids. Nineteen adults with metabolic syndrome completed this randomised crossover study with two 4-week interventions of a diet enriched with arabinoxylan and resistant starch and a low-fibre Western-style diet. Faecal samples were collected before and at the end of the interventions for fermentative end-product analysis and 16S ribosomal RNA bacterial gene amplification for identification of bacterial taxa. Faecal carbohydrate residues were used to verify compliance. The diet enriched with arabinoxylan and resistant starch resulted in significant reductions in the total species diversity of the faecal-associated intestinal microbiota but also increased the heterogeneity of bacterial communities both between and within subjects. The proportion of Bifidobacterium was increased by arabinoxylan and resistant starch consumption (P<0.001, whereas the proportions of certain bacterial genera associated with dysbiotic intestinal communities were reduced. Furthermore, the total short-chain fatty acids (P<0.01, acetate (P<0.01 and butyrate concentrations (P<0.01 were higher by the end of the diet enriched with arabinoxylan and resistant starch compared with those resulting from the Western-style diet. The concentrations of isobutyrate (P = 0.05 and isovalerate (P = 0.03 decreased in response to the arabinoxylan and resistant starch enriched diet, indicating reduced protein fermentation. In conclusion, arabinoxylan and resistant starch intake changes the microbiome and short-chain fatty acid compositions, with potential beneficial effects on

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 induction in macrophages is modulated by docosahexaenoic acid via interactions with free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinzhi; Yu, Ying; Funk, Colin D

    2013-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandins are implicated in numerous inflammatory disorders. The purpose of these studies was to examine previously unexplored interactions between COX-2 induction and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) via the free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4) signaling pathway in murine RAW 264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). DHA dose (IC50=18 μM)- and time-dependently reduced COX-2 expression, without affecting COX-1. DHA (25 μM for 24 h) decreased LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis by 81%, primarily through reducing COX-2 (60%), as well as down-regulating microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (46%), but independently of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. FFA4 knockdown abrogated DHA effects on COX-2 induction, PGE2 production, and interleukin 6 (IL-6) gene expression. In the presence of inhibitors of eicosanoid metabolism via COX-2, 12/15-lipoxygenase and CYP450s (rofecoxib (1 μM), PD146176 (2 μM), or MS-PPOH (20 μM)), DHA was still effective in attenuating COX-2 induction. Moreover, Toll-like receptor 4 signaling via Akt/JNK phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation was repressed by DHA-activated FFA4 coupling with β-arrestin 2, which was reversed by FFA4 knockdown. These data support DHA modulation of COX-2 expression and activity, in part, via FFA4, which provides a new mechanistic explanation for some of the anti-inflammatory effects of DHA.

  5. Relationships between Composition of Major Fatty Acids and Fat Distribution and Insulin Resistance in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Chikako; Kawai, Toshihide; Azuma, Koichiro; Oguma, Yuko; Katsukawa, Fuminori; Hirose, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kumiko; Meguro, Shu; Matsumoto, Hideo; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective . The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between the composition of free fatty acids (FFAs) and metabolic parameters, including body fat distribution, in Japanese. Methods . The study subjects were 111 Japanese patients (54 males, 57 females). Metabolic parameters and visceral and subcutaneous fat areas as determined by CT scanning at the umbilical level were measured. Glucose tolerance test (GTT) was performed by administering 75 g glucose orally. Results . The percentage of linoleic acid (C18:2), the greatest constituent among FFAs, was negatively correlated with visceral fat area ( r = -0.411, p acid percentage was also significantly negatively correlated with HOMA-IR ( r = -0.416, p acid in diabetic subjects was significantly lower than that in normal subjects. Conclusion . We conclude that serum linoleic acid level is negatively correlated with the accumulation of visceral fat in relation to a reduction of insulin resistance in Japanese subjects.

  6. Protecting cell walls from binding aluminum by organic acids contributes to aluminum resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Ying; Zhang, Yue-Jiao; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Jian-Li; Zheng, Shao-Jian

    2009-06-01

    Aluminum-induced secretion of organic acids from the root apex has been demonstrated to be one major Al resistance mechanism in plants. However, whether the organic acid concentration is high enough to detoxify Al in the growth medium is frequently questioned. The genotypes of Al-resistant wheat, Cassia tora L. and buckwheat secrete malate, citrate and oxalate, respectively. In the present study we found that at a 35% inhibition of root elongation, the Al activities in the solution were 10, 20, and 50 muM with the corresponding malate, citrate, and oxalate exudation at the rates of 15, 20 and 21 nmol/cm(2) per 12 h, respectively, for the above three plant species. When exogenous organic acids were added to ameliorate Al toxicity, twofold and eightfold higher oxalate and malate concentrations were required to produce the equal effect by citrate. After the root apical cell walls were isolated and preincubated in 1 mM malate, oxalate or citrate solution overnight, the total amount of Al adsorbed to the cell walls all decreased significantly to a similar level, implying that these organic acids own an equal ability to protect the cell walls from binding Al. These findings suggest that protection of cell walls from binding Al by organic acids may contribute significantly to Al resistance.

  7. Where to from here? The treatment of impetigo in children as resistance to fusidic acid emerges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alison; Lennon, Diana; Best, Emma; Leversha, Alison

    2016-10-14

    Admissions for skin and soft-tissue infections have been increasing steadily in children and in the general population. Concerns have been raised recently about the increasing widespread use of topical fusidic acid and concurrent increase of fusidic acid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Fusidic acid resistance and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are both more prevalent in youngest age group (<5 year-olds) and particularly in the North island. In New Zealand, fusidic acid is recommended for treatment of minor impetigo and is the only fully-funded topical antibiotic. The evidence base for alternative treatment strategies for mild impetigo is limited. Most children with impetigo in the current Counties Manukau skin and sore throat schools programme received care with wound management with only a few requiring escalation. An upcoming randomised controlled trial comparing topical hydrogen peroxide cream, topical fusidic acid and wound management only (clean and cover) will help provide evidence about the effectiveness of alternative treatments in the New Zealand setting.

  8. Crosslinked and Dyed Chitosan Fiber Presenting Enhanced Acid Resistance and Bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qiong Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of biodegradable chitosan fiber for healthy and hygienic textiles is limited due to its poor acid resistance in wet processing and poor antioxidant activity. In order to prepare chitosan fiber with good acid resistance and high antioxidant activity, chitosan fiber was first crosslinked by a water-soluble aziridine crosslinker, and then dyed with natural lac dye consisting of polyphenolic anthraquinone compounds. The main application conditions and crosslinking mechanism of the aziridine crosslinker, the adsorption mechanism and building-up property of lac dye on the crosslinked fiber, and the effects of crosslinking and dyeing on the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of chitosan fiber were studied. The crosslinked fiber exhibited greatly reduced weight loss in acidic solution, and possessed excellent acid resistance. Lac dye displayed a very high adsorption capability on the crosslinked fiber and a high utilization rate under weakly acidic medium. The Langmuir–Nernst isotherm was the best model to describe the adsorption behavior of lac dye, and Langmuir adsorption had great contribution to total adsorption. Lac dyeing imparted good antioxidant activity to chitosan fiber. Crosslinking and dyeing had no impact on the good inherent antibacterial activity of chitosan fiber.

  9. Fusidic acid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in impetigo contagiosa and secondarily infected atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsterholm, Mikael; Flytström, Ingela; Bergbrant, Ing-Marie; Faergemann, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Fusidic acid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (FRSA) has been identified as a causative agent in outbreaks of impetigo and its emergence has been associated with increased use of topical fusidic acid. The frequency of FRSA in atopic dermatitis (AD) has been less extensively investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial spectrum and frequency of FRSA in patients with impetigo or secondarily infected AD. A prospective study in our clinic in 2004 to 2008 included 38 patients with impetigo and 37 with secondarily infected AD. S. aureus was the predominant finding in all groups (bullous impetigo 92% (12/13), impetigo 76% (19/25) and secondarily infected AD 89% (33/37)). Seventy-five percent of S. aureus were fusidic acid resistant in bullous impetigo, 32% in impetigo and 6.1% in secondarily infected AD (bullous impetigo vs. AD p impetigo vs. AD p impetigo or secondarily infected AD seen at the clinic during the first and last year of the prospective study. In the first year 33% (19/58) of the S. aureus isolates were fusidic acid-resistant in impetigo and 12% (5/43) in secondarily infected AD (p impetigo and 2.2% (1/45) for AD (p impetigo than in AD. FRSA levels were persistently low in AD. Continued restrictive use of topical fusidic acid is advised to limit an increase in FRSA levels in dermatology patients.

  10. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid resistance in fecal Enterobacteriaceae from patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duytschaever, Gwen; Huys, Geert; Boulanger, Linda; De Boeck, Kris; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The present study set out to detect and identify amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC)-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in fecal samples of two patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and their respective siblings. Fecal Enterobacteriaceae were enumerated onto EMB agar containing amoxicillin (AMX). A total of 173 CF isolates and 41 sibling isolates were grouped into seven Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) clusters and identified through 16S rRNA and rpoB sequence analysis. The fecal microbiota of patients with CF revealed a higher prevalence of AMX resistant Enterobacteriaceae compared to that of their healthy siblings. Whereas all selected isolates of healthy siblings were assigned to Escherichia coli, isolates of patients with CF belonged to Klebsiella oxytoca (58.4%), E. coli (28.3%), Klebsiella variicola (7.5%) or Citrobacter sp. (5.8%). All tested CF isolates showed a high resistance rate to AMX, and a lower level of resistance to the combination with clavulanic acid. In contrast, all tested sibling isolates were susceptible for both AMX and AMC. The higher abundance of AMX resistance in the investigated patients with CF suggests that frequent AMC administration may be one of the major contributing factors in the proliferation of Enterobacteriaceae and the development of resistant strains in the gastrointestinal tract. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  11. A human model of dietary saturated fatty acid induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Juraj; Ozias, Marlies K; Deer, James; Kurtz, Julie; Salbe, Arline D; Harman, S Mitchell; Reaven, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    Increased consumption of high-fat diets is associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Current models to study the mechanisms of high-fat diet-induced IR in humans are limited by their long duration or low efficacy. In the present study we developed and characterized an acute dietary model of saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induced insulin resistance. High caloric diets enriched with saturated fatty acids (SFA) or carbohydrates (CARB) were evaluated in subjects with normal and impaired glucose tolerance (NGT or IGT). Both diets were compared to a standard eucaloric American Heart Association (AHA) control diet in a series of crossover studies. Whole body insulin resistance was estimated as steady state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentrations during the last 30min of a 3-h insulin suppression test. SSPG was increased after a 24-h SFA diet (by 83±74% vs. control, n=38) in the entire cohort, which was comprised of participants with NGT (92±82%, n=22) or IGT (65±55%, n=16) (all pinsulin resistance in both NGT and IGT subjects. Insulin resistance persisted overnight after the last SFA meal and was attenuated by one day of a healthy diet. This model offers opportunities for identifying early mechanisms and potential treatments of dietary saturated fat induced insulin resistance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Free fatty acid-induced hepatic insulin resistance is attenuated following lifestyle intervention in obese individuals with impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas; Marchetti, Christine M

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effects of an exercise/diet lifestyle intervention on free fatty acid (FFA)-induced hepatic insulin resistance in obese humans.......The objective of the study was to examine the effects of an exercise/diet lifestyle intervention on free fatty acid (FFA)-induced hepatic insulin resistance in obese humans....

  13. Modulation of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in K562 leukemic cells by indole-3-carbinol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Annu; Seth, Kavita; Kalra, Neetu; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2005-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is one of the major problems in the treatment of cancer. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the mdr gene is a highly conserved protein, acts as a multidrug transporter, and has a major role in multiple drug resistance (MDR). Targeting of P-gp by naturally occurring compounds is an effective strategy to overcome MDR. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a glucosinolates present in cruciferous vegetables, is a promising chemopreventive agent as it is reported to possess antimutagenic, antitumorigenic, and antiestrogenic properties in experimental studies. In the present investigation, the potential of I3C to modulate P-gp expression was evaluated in vinblastine (VBL)-resistant K562 human leukemic cells. The resistant K562 cells (K562/R10) were found to be cross-resistant to vincristine (VCR), doxorubicin (DXR), and other antineoplastic agents. I3C at a nontoxic dose (10 x 10 -3 M) enhanced the cytotoxic effects of VBL time dependently in VBL-resistant human leukemia (K562/R10) cells but had no effect on parent-sensitive cells (K562/S). The Western blot analysis of K 562/R 10 cells showed that I3C downregulates the induced levels of P-gp in resistant cells near to normal levels. The quantitation of immunocytochemically stained K562/R10 cells showed 24%, 48%, and 80% decrease in the levels of P-gp by I3C for 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation. The above features thus indicate that I3C could be used as a novel modulator of P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro and may be effective as a dietary adjuvant in the treatment of MDR cancers

  14. Excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity and modulation of glutamate receptor expression in organotypic brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, J; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Jakobsen, B

    2000-01-01

    Using organotypic slice cultures of hippocampus and cortex-striatum from newborn to 7 day old rats, we are currently studying the excitotoxic effects of kainic acid (KA), AMPA and NMDA and the neuroprotective effects of glutamate receptor blockers, like NBQX. For detection and quantitation......-induced excitotoxicity and KA-glutamate receptor subunit mRNA expression after long-term exposure to low, non-toxic doses of KA and NBQX. We conclude that organotypic brain slice cultures, combined with standardized procedures for quantitation of cell damage and receptor subunit changes is of great potential use...... for studies of excitotoxic, glutamate receptor-induced neuronal cell death, receptor modulation and related neuroprotection....

  15. Aerobic versus resistance exercise training in modulation of insulin resistance, adipocytokines and inflammatory cytokine levels in obese type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehab M. Abd El-Kader

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that adipocytokines secreted by adipose tissue play a role in the development of obesity-related complications and diabetes. Regular aerobic exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of metabolic complications in obese type 2 diabetic subjects. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of aerobic versus resistance training on insulin resistance, adipocytokines and inflammatory cytokine in obese type 2 diabetic patients. Forty obese type 2 diabetic patients of both sexes with body mass index (BMI ranging from 31 to 35 kg/m2, non smokers, and free from respiratory, kidney, liver, metabolic and neurological disorders, were selected for this study. Their ages ranged from 34 to 56 years. The subjects were divided into two equal groups: the first group received aerobic exercise training. The second group (B received resisted exercise training three times a week for three months. The mean values of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6, Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA index for insulin sensitivity and glycosylated hemoglobin (HBA1c, were significantly decreased in both groups. Also, there was a significant difference between the groups after treatment on all measured variables. It is suggested that in obese type 2 diabetic patients aerobic exercise is more appropriate for modulating insulin resistance, adipocytokines and inflammatory cytokine levels than is resisted exercise training.

  16. miR-193b Modulates Resistance to Doxorubicin in Human Breast Cancer Cells by Downregulating MCL-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingpei Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs family, which is involved in cancer development, proliferation, apoptosis, and drug resistance, is a group of noncoding RNAs that modulate the expression of oncogenes and antioncogenes. Doxorubicin is an active cytotoxic agent for breast cancer treatment, but the acquisition of doxorubicin resistance is a common and critical limitation to cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether miR-193b mediated the resistance of breast cancer cells to doxorubicin by targeting myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1. In this study, we found that miR-193b levels were significantly lower in doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/DOXR cells than in the parental MCF-7 cells. We observed that exogenous miR-193b significantly suppressed the ability of MCF-7/DOXR cells to resist doxorubicin. It demonstrated that miR-193b directly targeted MCL-1 3′-UTR (3′-Untranslated Regions. Further studies indicated that miR-193b sensitized MCF-7/DOXR cells to doxorubicin through a mechanism involving the downregulation of MCL-1. Together, our findings provide evidence that the modulation of miR-193b may represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  17. Antimicrobial 2-hydroxyisocaproic acid and chlorhexidine resist inactivation by dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakko, M; Tjäderhane, L; Sorsa, T; Hietala, P; Rautemaa, R

    2016-04-01

    To compare the antibacterial activity of 2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) with currently used root canal medicaments and to examine their interactions with potential inhibitors in nutrient-deficient and nutrient-rich conditions. First, the antibacterial activity of single concentrations of HICA, calcium hydroxide solution or slurry, chlorhexidine digluconate or acetate was tested against Enterococcus faecalis with and without potential inhibitors: dentine powder (DP), hydroxyapatite or bovine serum albumin, in a low concentration of peptone water. Relative viable counts were determined by culture at 1, 24 and 48 h. In the second set of experiments, the activity of three concentrations of HICA was evaluated against two isolates of E. faecalis with and without potential inhibitors in nutrient-rich thioglycollate broth using a modification of a standard microdilution method. The minimum bactericidal concentration was determined by culture at 1, 24 and 48 h. Concentrations of ≥33 mg mL(-1) of HICA were found to be bactericidal against E. faecalis in both nutrient-deficient and nutrient-rich environments at 24- to 48-h incubation, whereas the initial activity of Ca(OH)2 slurry was lost at 48-h incubation. HICA tolerated well all tested potential inhibitors up to 19 mg mL(-1) . DP concentrations higher than this inhibited its activity in a dose-dependent manner in both environments. DP demonstrated moderate antibacterial activity, and it enhanced the otherwise limited activity of Ca(OH)2 slurry and solution. DP did not impact on the activity of chlorhexidine. These results support the long-term antibacterial activity of HICA and indicate its tolerance to clinically relevant concentrations of dentine and other inhibitors commonly present in the root canal system. Therefore, HICA may have potential as an interappointment medication in the treatment of root canal infections. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Hexanoic acid-induced resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicedo, Begonya; Flors, Víctor; de la O Leyva, María; Finiti, Ivan; Kravchuk, Zhana; Real, María Dolores; García-Agustín, Pilar; González-Bosch, Carmen

    2009-11-01

    We have demonstrated that root treatment with hexanoic acid protects tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea. Hexanoic acid-induced resistance (Hx-IR) was blocked in the jasmonic acid (JA)-insensitive mutant jai1 (a coi1 homolog) and in the abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutant flacca (flc). Upon infection, the LoxD gene as well as the oxylipin 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid and the bioactive molecule JA-Ile were clearly induced in treated plants. However, the basal ABA levels were not altered. Hexanoic acid primed callose deposition against B. cinerea in a cultivar-dependent manner. Treated plants from Ailsa Craig, Moneymaker, and Rheinlands Ruhm showed increased callose deposition but not from Castlemart. Hexanoic acid did not prime callose accumulation in flc plants upon B. cinerea infection; therefore, ABA could act as a positive regulator of Hx-IR by enhancing callose deposition. Furthermore, although hexanoic acid protected the JA-deficient mutant defensless1 (def1), the priming for callose was higher than in the wild type. This suggests a link between JA and callose deposition in tomato. Hence, the obtained results support the idea that callose, oxylipins, and the JA-signaling pathway are involved in Hx-IR against B. cinerea. Moreover our data support the relevance of JA-signaling for basal defense against this necrotroph in tomato. Hexanoic acid also protected against Pseudomonas syringae, indicating a broad-spectrum effect for this new inducer.

  19. Atrazine biodegradation modulated by clays and clay/humic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Alekseeva, Tatiana; Sancelme, Martine; Delort, Anne-Marie; Forano, Claude

    2009-01-01

    The fate of pesticides in the environment is strongly related to the soil sorption processes that control not only their transfer but also their bioavailability. Cationic (Ca-bentonite) and anionic (Layered Double Hydroxide) clays behave towards the ionisable pesticide atrazine (AT) sorption with opposite tendencies: a noticeable sorption capacity for the first whereas the highly hydrophilic LDH showed no interactions with AT. These clays were modified with different humic acid (HA) contents. HA sorbed on the clay surface and increased AT interactions. The sorption effect on AT biodegradation and on its metabolite formation was studied with Pseudomonas sp. ADP. The biodegradation rate was greatly modulated by the material's sorption capacity and was clearly limited by the desorption rate. More surprisingly, it increased dramatically with LDH. Adsorption of bacterial cells on clay particles facilitates the degradation of non-sorbed chemical, and should be considered for predicting pesticide fate in the environment. - The biodegradation rate of atrazine was greatly modulated by adsorption of the pesticide and also bacterial cells on clay particles.

  20. Protein degradation mechanisms modulate abscisic acid signaling and responses during abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkiewicz, Pawel; Batoko, Henri

    2018-02-01

    Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, high temperature or freezing can be perceived, in part, as a transient or permanent hyperosmotic stress by the plant cell. As sessile organisms, the detrimental effects of these environmental insults limit plants productivity but also their geographical distribution. Sensing and signaling events that detect the hyperosmotic (or simply osmotic) stress involve the cellular increase of active abscisic acid (ABA). The stress phytohormone ABA regulates fundamental growth and developmental processes in the plant by marshalling metabolic and gene-expression reprogramming. Among the ABA-responsive genes, some are strictly ABA-dependent in that their expression is almost undetectable in absence of elevated levels of cellular ABA, thus their physiological role may be required only transiently. In addition, ABA-dependent modulation of some of the signaling effectors can be irreversible. In this review, without any pretention to being exhaustive, we use specific examples to illustrate how mechanistically conserved eukaryotic cell proteolytic pathways affect ABA-dependent signaling. We describe how defined proteolysis mechanisms in the plant cell, including Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis (RIP), the Ubiquitin 26S Proteasomal System (UPS), the endocytic and autophagy pathways, contribute to regulate the spatiotemporal level and activity of PP2Cs (protein phosphatases 2C), and how an intriguing ABA-induced protein, the plant Translocator protein (TSPO), is targeted for degradation. Degradation of regulatory or effector molecules modulates or desensitizes ABA-dependent signaling and reestablishes cellular homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of autonomic modulation after an acute session of resistance exercise at different intensities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolino, Juliana; Ramos, Dionei; Leite, Marceli Rocha; Rodrigues, Fernanda Maria Machado; de Alencar Silva, Bruna Spolador; Tacao, Guilherme Yassuyuki; de Toledo, Alessandra Choqueta; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercises are employed as part of the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however information regarding cardiac autonomic modulation after an acute session of resistance exercise (RE) is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cardiac autonomic modulation, via heart rate variability after an acute session of RE applied at different intensities in COPD patients. Twelve COPD patients underwent an acute session of RE with an intensity of 60% and another of 90% of the one repetition maximum test. For analysis of autonomic modulation, heart rate was recorded beat-by-beat for 20 minutes at rest and after the training session. Heart rate variability indexes were obtained in the time and frequency domains for the assessment of autonomic modulation. Regardless of exercise intensity, RE acute sessions influenced the autonomic modulation when the recovery period was compared with the baseline. An increase in standard deviation of normal to normal RR intervals was observed throughout recovery time after the RE, as compared to baseline in both protocols: 60% and 90% of the one repetition maximum test. The spectral component of low frequency index (ms) was higher throughout recovery when compared to baseline in both protocols. The same was also observed in the spectral component of high frequency index (ms) for the protocols of 60% and 90%. RE sessions impact on the autonomic modulation of COPD patients by promoting differences in the recovery period compared to baseline, regardless of the intensity of the exercise performed.

  2. Azole resistance profile of amino acid changes in Aspergillus fumigatus CYP51A based on protein homology modeling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelders, E.; Karawajczyk, A.; Schaftenaar, G.; Verweij, P.E.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular studies have shown that the majority of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with amino acid substitutions in the cyp51A gene. To obtain insight into azole resistance mutations, the cyp51A gene of 130 resistant and 76 susceptible A. fumigatus isolates was sequenced. Out

  3. Protein source in a high-protein diet modulates reductions in insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in fa/fa Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Jennifer L; Devassy, Jessay G; Wu, Yinghong; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Aukema, Harold M

    2016-01-01

    High-protein diets are being promoted to reduce insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the effect of protein source in high-protein diets on reducing insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis was examined. Fa/fa Zucker rats were provided normal-protein (15% of energy) casein, high-protein (35% of energy) casein, high-protein soy, or high-protein mixed diets with animal and plant proteins. The high-protein mixed diet reduced area under the curve for insulin during glucose tolerance testing, fasting serum insulin and free fatty acid concentrations, homeostatic model assessment index, insulin to glucose ratio, and pancreatic islet cell area. The high-protein mixed and the high-protein soy diets reduced hepatic lipid concentrations, liver to body weight ratio, and hepatic steatosis rating. These improvements were observed despite no differences in body weight, feed intake, or adiposity among high-protein diet groups. The high-protein casein diet had minimal benefits. A high-protein mixed diet was the most effective for modulating reductions in insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis independent of weight loss, indicating that the source of protein within a high-protein diet is critical for the management of these metabolic syndrome parameters. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  4. The Autotaxin–Lysophosphatidic Acid Axis Modulates Histone Acetylation and Gene Expression during Oligodendrocyte Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Natalie A.; Lister, James A.

    2015-01-01

    During development, oligodendrocytes (OLGs), the myelinating cells of the CNS, undergo a stepwise progression during which OLG progenitors, specified from neural stem/progenitor cells, differentiate into fully mature myelinating OLGs. This progression along the OLG lineage is characterized by well synchronized changes in morphology and gene expression patterns. The latter have been found to be particularly critical during the early stages of the lineage, and they have been well described to be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, especially by the activity of the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2. The data presented here identify the extracellular factor autotaxin (ATX) as a novel upstream signal modulating HDAC1/2 activity and gene expression in cells of the OLG lineage. Using the zebrafish as an in vivo model system as well as rodent primary OLG cultures, this functional property of ATX was found to be mediated by its lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which has been well characterized to generate the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). More specifically, the lysoPLD activity of ATX was found to modulate HDAC1/2 regulated gene expression during a time window coinciding with the transition from OLG progenitor to early differentiating OLG. In contrast, HDAC1/2 regulated gene expression during the transition from neural stem/progenitor to OLG progenitor appeared unaffected by ATX and its lysoPLD activity. Thus, together, our data suggest that an ATX–LPA–HDAC1/2 axis regulates OLG differentiation specifically during the transition from OLG progenitor to early differentiating OLG and via a molecular mechanism that is evolutionarily conserved from at least zebrafish to rodent. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The formation of the axon insulating and supporting myelin sheath by differentiating oligodendrocytes (OLGs) in the CNS is considered an essential step during vertebrate development. In addition, loss and/or dysfunction of the myelin sheath has

  5. Oleanolic acid supplement attenuates liquid fructose-induced adipose tissue insulin resistance through the insulin receptor substrate-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Jianwei, E-mail: wangjianwei1968@gmail.com [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Gu, Tieguang [Endocrinology and Metabolism Group, Sydney Institute of Health Sciences, Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia (Australia); Yamahara, Johji [Pharmafood Institute, Kyoto 602-8136 (Japan); Li, Yuhao, E-mail: yuhao@sitcm.edu.au [Endocrinology and Metabolism Group, Sydney Institute of Health Sciences, Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Oleanolic acid, a triterpenoid contained in more than 1620 plants including various fruits and foodstuffs, has numerous metabolic effects, such as hepatoprotection. However, its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Adipose tissue insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) may contribute to the development and progress of metabolic abnormalities through release of excessive free fatty acids from adipose tissue. This study investigated the effect of oleanolic acid on Adipo-IR. The results showed that supplement with oleanolic acid (25 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 10 weeks attenuated liquid fructose-induced increase in plasma insulin concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index in rats. Simultaneously, oleanolic acid reversed the increase in the Adipo-IR index and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations during the oral glucose tolerance test assessment. In white adipose tissue, oleanolic acid enhanced mRNA expression of the genes encoding insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. At the protein level, oleanolic acid upregulated total IRS-1 expression, suppressed the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 at serine-307, and restored the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 to total IRS-1 ratio. In contrast, phosphorylated Akt to total Akt ratio was increased. Furthermore, oleanolic acid reversed fructose-induced decrease in phosphorylated-Akt/Akt protein to plasma insulin concentration ratio. However, oleanolic acid did not affect IRS-2 mRNA expression. Therefore, these results suggest that oleanolic acid supplement ameliorates fructose-induced Adipo-IR in rats via the IRS-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Our findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of metabolic actions of oleanolic acid. - Highlights: • Adipose insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) contributes to metabolic abnormalities. • We investigated the effect of oleanolic acid (OA) on adipo-IR in

  6. Oleanolic acid supplement attenuates liquid fructose-induced adipose tissue insulin resistance through the insulin receptor substrate-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Jianwei; Gu, Tieguang; Yamahara, Johji; Li, Yuhao

    2014-01-01

    Oleanolic acid, a triterpenoid contained in more than 1620 plants including various fruits and foodstuffs, has numerous metabolic effects, such as hepatoprotection. However, its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Adipose tissue insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) may contribute to the development and progress of metabolic abnormalities through release of excessive free fatty acids from adipose tissue. This study investigated the effect of oleanolic acid on Adipo-IR. The results showed that supplement with oleanolic acid (25 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 10 weeks attenuated liquid fructose-induced increase in plasma insulin concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index in rats. Simultaneously, oleanolic acid reversed the increase in the Adipo-IR index and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations during the oral glucose tolerance test assessment. In white adipose tissue, oleanolic acid enhanced mRNA expression of the genes encoding insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. At the protein level, oleanolic acid upregulated total IRS-1 expression, suppressed the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 at serine-307, and restored the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 to total IRS-1 ratio. In contrast, phosphorylated Akt to total Akt ratio was increased. Furthermore, oleanolic acid reversed fructose-induced decrease in phosphorylated-Akt/Akt protein to plasma insulin concentration ratio. However, oleanolic acid did not affect IRS-2 mRNA expression. Therefore, these results suggest that oleanolic acid supplement ameliorates fructose-induced Adipo-IR in rats via the IRS-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Our findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of metabolic actions of oleanolic acid. - Highlights: • Adipose insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) contributes to metabolic abnormalities. • We investigated the effect of oleanolic acid (OA) on adipo-IR in

  7. Increased Nitric Oxide Bioavailability and Decreased Sympathetic Modulation Are Involved in Vascular Adjustments Induced by Low-Intensity Resistance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Fabrício N.; Mesquita, Thassio R. R.; Melo, Vitor U.; Mota, Marcelo M.; Silva, Tharciano L. T. B.; Santana, Michael N.; Oliveira, Larissa R.; Santos, Robervan V.; Miguel dos Santos, Rodrigo; Lauton-Santos, Sandra; Santos, Marcio R. V.; Barreto, Andre S.; Santana-Filho, Valter J.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance training is one of the most common kind of exercise used nowadays. Long-term high-intensity resistance training are associated with deleterious effects on vascular adjustments. On the other hand, is unclear whether low-intensity resistance training (LI-RT) is able to induce systemic changes in vascular tone. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the effects of chronic LI-RT on endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability of mesenteric artery and cardiovascular autonomic modulation in healthy rats. Wistar animals were divided into two groups: exercised (Ex) and sedentary (SED) rats submitted to the resistance (40% of 1RM) or fictitious training for 8 weeks, respectively. After LI-RT, hemodynamic measurements and cardiovascular autonomic modulation by spectral analysis were evaluated. Vascular reactivity, NO production and protein expression of endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthase isoforms (eNOS and nNOS, respectively) were evaluated in mesenteric artery. In addition, cardiac superoxide anion production and ventricle morphological changes were also assessed. In vivo measurements revealed a reduction in mean arterial pressure and heart rate after 8 weeks of LI-RT. In vitro studies showed an increased acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasorelaxation and greater NOS dependence in Ex than SED rats. Hence, decreased phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was found in Ex rats. Accordingly, LI-RT increased the NO bioavailability under basal and ACh stimulation conditions, associated with upregulation of eNOS and nNOS protein expression in mesenteric artery. Regarding autonomic control, LI-RT increased spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity, which was associated to reduction in both, cardiac and vascular sympathetic modulation. No changes in cardiac superoxide anion or left ventricle morphometric parameters after LI-RT were observed. In summary, these results suggest that RT promotes beneficial vascular adjustments favoring augmented endothelial NO bioavailability and

  8. ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM FERMENTED DAIRY PRODUCTS AND BOZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Başbülbül

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the resistance of 83 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Turkish cheese, yogurt, kefir and boza samples to 6 antibiotics (gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, vancomycin and ciprofloxacin was evaluated. The 83 isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and according to BLAST comparisons with sequences in the data banks, those strains showing the highest similarities with the isolates were Enterococcus faecium (10, Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis (10, Lactobacillus fermentum (6, Lactobacillus plantarum (6, Lactobacillus coryniformis (7, Lactobacillus casei (13, Leuconostoc mesenteroides (14, Pediococcus pentosaceus (10, Weisella confusa (7. Antimicrobial resistance of strains to 6 antibiotics was determined using the agar dilution method. The antibiotic resistance among all the isolates was detected against chloramphenicol (31,3 % of the isolates, tetracycline (30,1 %, erythromycin (2,4 %, ciprofloxacin (2,41%, vancomycin (73,5 %, intrinsic resistance. Overall 19,3 % of the isolates showed resistance against multiple antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance genes were studied by PCR and the following genes were detected; tet(M gene in Lactobacillus fermentum (1, Lactobacillus plantarum (1, Pediococcus pentosaceus (5, Enterococcus faecium (2, Weisella confusa (4 and the vancomycin resistance gene van(A in one Weisella confusa strain.

  9. New insights into the mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter pasteurianus using iTRAQ-dependent quantitative proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kai; Zang, Ning; Zhang, Junmei; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yudong; Liu, Ye; Feng, Wei; Liang, Xinle

    2016-12-05

    Acetobacter pasteurianus is the main starter in rice vinegar manufacturing due to its remarkable abilities to resist and produce acetic acid. Although several mechanisms of acetic acid resistance have been proposed and only a few effector proteins have been identified, a comprehensive depiction of the biological processes involved in acetic acid resistance is needed. In this study, iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis was adopted to investigate the whole proteome of different acidic titers (3.6, 7.1 and 9.3%, w/v) of Acetobacter pasteurianus Ab3 during the vinegar fermentation process. Consequently, 1386 proteins, including 318 differentially expressed proteins (pacetic acid stress, where >150 proteins were differentially expressed. Specifically, proteins involved in amino acid metabolic processes and fatty acid biosynthesis were differentially expressed, which may contribute to the acetic acid resistance of Acetobacter. Transcription factors, two component systems and toxin-antitoxin systems were implicated in the modulatory network at multiple levels. In addition, the identification of proteins involved in redox homeostasis, protein metabolism, and the cell envelope suggested that the whole cellular system is mobilized in response to acid stress. These findings provide a differential proteomic profile of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter pasteurianus and have potential application to highly acidic rice vinegar manufacturing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Corrosion resistance of aluminum-magnesium alloys in glacial acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitseva, L.V.; Romaniv, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Vessels for the storage and conveyance of glacial acetic acid are produced from ADO and AD1 aluminum, which are distinguished by corrosion resistance, weldability and workability in the hot and cold conditions but have low tensile strength. Aluminum-magnesium alloys are stronger materials close in corrosion resistance to technical purity aluminum. An investigation was made of the basic alloying components on the corrosion resistance of these alloys in glacial acetic acid. Both the base metal and the weld joints were tested. With an increase in temperature the corrosion rate of all of the tested materials increases by tens of times. The metals with higher magnesium content show more pitting damage. The relationship of the corrosion resistance of the alloys to magnesium content is confirmed by the similar intensity of failure of the joint metal of all of the investigated alloys and by electrochemical investigations. The data shows that AMg3 alloy is close to technically pure ADO aluminum. However, the susceptibility of even this material to local corrosion eliminates the possibility of the use of aluminum-magnesium alloys as reliable constructional materials in glacial acetic acid

  11. Modulation of endothelial cell migration by ER stress and insulin resistance: a role during maternal obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo José Sáez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Adverse microenvironmental stimuli can trigger the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress pathway, which initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR, to restore protein-folding homeostasis. Several studies show induction of ER stress during obesity. Chronic UPR has been linked to different mechanisms of disease in obese and diabetic individuals, including insulin resistance (IR and impaired angiogenesis. Endothelial cell (EC migration is an initial step for angiogenesis, which is associated with remodeling of existing blood vessels. EC migration occurs according to the leader-follower model, involving coordinated processes of chemotaxis, haptotaxis, and mechanotaxis. Thus, a fine-tuning of EC migration is necessary to provide the right timing to form the required vessels during angiogenesis. ER stress modulates EC migration at different levels, usually impairing migration and angiogenesis, although different effects may be observed depending on the tissue and/or microenvironment. In the context of pregnancy, maternal obesity (MO induces IR in the offspring. Interestingly, several proteins associated with obesity-induced IR are also involved in EC migration, providing a potential link with the ER stress-dependent alterations observed in obese individuals. Different signaling cascades that converge on cytoskeleton regulation directly impact EC migration, including the Akt and/or RhoA pathways. In addition, ER is the main intracellular reservoir for Ca2+, which plays a pivotal role during EC migration. Therefore, ER stress-related alterations in Ca2+ signaling or Ca2+ levels might also produce distorted EC migration. However, the above findings have been studied in the context of adult obesity, and no information has been reported regarding the effect of MO on fetal EC migration. Here we summarize the state of knowledge about the possible mechanisms by which ER stress and IR might impact EC migration and angiogenesis in fetal endothelium exposed to MO

  12. Precision microbiome reconstitution restores bile acid mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R.; McKenney, Peter T.; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin R.; Toussaint, Nora C.; Xavier, Joao B.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhoea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. Here we correlate loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection, by treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile. Mathematical modelling augmented by analyses of the microbiota of hospitalized patients identifies resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determine that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses, and mathematical modelling, we identify a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for the rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk of C. difficile infection.

  13. Ascorbic acid accumulates as a defense response to Turnip mosaic virus in resistant Brassica rapa cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ayaka; Togawa, Satoko; Hikawa, Takahiro; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Masuta, Chikara; Inukai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    We initially observed that Brassica rapa cultivars containing the Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) resistance gene, Rnt1-1, accumulated a high level of endogenous ascorbic acid (AS) and dehydroascobic acid (DHA) when infected with TuMV. We here hypothesized a possible contribution of an elevated level of AS+DHA (TAA) to the Rnt1-1-mediated resistance, and conducted a series of experiments using B. rapa and Arabidopsis plants. The application of l-galactose (the key substrate in AS synthesis) to a susceptible cultivar could increase the TAA level ~2-fold, and simultaneously lead to some degree of enhanced viral resistance. To confirm some positive correlation between TAA levels and viral resistance, we analyzed two Arabidopsis knockout mutants (ao and vtc1) in the AS pathways; the TAA levels were significantly increased and decreased in ao and vtc1 plants, respectively. While the ao plants showed enhanced resistance to TuMV, vtc1 plants were more susceptible than the control, supporting our hypothesis. When we analyzed the expression profiles of the genes involved in the AS pathways upon TuMV infection, we found that the observed TAA increase was mainly brought about by the reduction of AS oxidation and activation of AS recycling. We then investigated the secondary signals that regulate endogenous TAA levels in response to viral infection, and found that jasmonic acid (JA) might play an important role in TAA accumulation. In conclusion, we reason that the elevated TAA accumulation in B. rapa plants would be at least partly mediated by the JA-dependent signaling pathway and may significantly contribute to viral resistance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  14. Cloning of genes responsible for acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, M; Takemura, H; Okumura, H; Kawamura, Y; Horinouchi, S; Beppu, T

    1990-04-01

    Five acetic acid-sensitive mutants of Acetobacter aceti subsp. aceti no. 1023 were isolated by mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Three recombinant plasmids that complemented the mutations were isolated from a gene bank of the chromosome DNA of the parental strain constructed in Escherichia coli by using cosmid vector pMVC1. One of these plasmids (pAR1611), carrying about a 30-kilobase-pair (kb) fragment that conferred acetic acid resistance to all five mutants, was further analyzed. Subcloning experiments indicated that a 8.3-kb fragment was sufficient to complement all five mutations. To identify the mutation loci and genes involved in acetic acid resistance, insertional inactivation was performed by insertion of the kanamycin resistance gene derived from E. coli plasmid pACYC177 into the cloned 8.3-kb fragment and successive integration into the chromosome of the parental strain. The results suggested that three genes, designated aarA, aarB, and aarC, were responsible for expression of acetic acid resistance. Gene products of these genes were detected by means of overproduction in E. coli by use of the lac promoter. The amino acid sequence of the aarA gene product deduced from the nucleotide sequence was significantly similar to those of the citrate synthases (CSs) of E. coli and other bacteria. The A. aceti mutants defective in the aarA gene were found to lack CS activity, which was restored by introduction of a plasmid containing the aarA gene. A mutation in the CS gene of E. coli was also complemented by the aarA gene. These results indicate that aarA is the CS gene.

  15. Involvement of miR-326 in chemotherapy resistance of breast cancer through modulating expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhongxing; Wu, Hui; Xia, James; Li, Yuhua; Zhang, Yawei; Huang, Ke; Wagar, Nicholas; Yoon, Younghyoun; Cho, Heidi T; Scala, Stefania; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2010-03-15

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP-1/ABCC1) transports a wide range of therapeutic agents and may play a critical role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells. However, the regulation of MRP-1 remains controversial. To explore whether miRNAs are involved in the regulation of MRP-1 expression and modulate the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents, we analyzed miRNA expression levels in VP-16-resistant MDR cell line, MCF-7/VP, in comparison with its parent cell line, MCF-7, using a miRNA microarray. MCF-7/VP overexpressed MRP-1 mRNA and protein not MDR-1 and BCRP. miR-326 was downregulated in MCF-7/VP compared to MCF-7. Additionally, miR-326 was downregulated in a panel of advanced breast cancer tissues and consistent reversely with expression levels of MRP-1. Furthermore, the elevated levels of miR-326 in the mimics-transfected VP-16-resistant cell line, MCF-7/VP, downregulated MRP-1 expression and sensitized these cells to VP-16 and doxorubicin. These findings demonstrate for the first time the involvement of miRNAs in multidrug resistance mediated by MRP-1 and suggest that miR-326 may be an efficient agent for preventing and reversing MDR in tumor cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Ippolito

    Full Text Available Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1, was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies.

  17. Inhibition of glycolysis modulates prednisolone resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulleman, Esther; Kazemier, Karin M.; Holleman, Amy; VanderWeele, David J.; Rudin, Charles M.; Broekhuis, Mathilde J. C.; Evans, William E.; Pieters, Rob; Den Boer, Monique L.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment failure in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is related to cellular resistance to glucocorticoids (eg, prednisolone). Recently, we demonstrated that genes associated with glucose metabolism are differentially expressed between prednisolone-sensitive and prednisolone-resistant

  18. [The modulating role of essential and non-essential amino acids in organotypic tissue culture in rats of different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalisova, N I; Penniiaĭnen, V A

    2003-05-01

    The effect of amino acids L-lysin, L-asparagin, L-arginin, L-glutamate was investigated in organotypic tissue culture of spleen, liver and brain cortex of rats at different age. The amino acids in concentration 0.05 ng/ml are active inducing a less intensive growth zone, as compared to control, in 1-day and in older rats--an intensive growth zone, as compared to control in 21-day rats. The data obtained suggest a modulating role of amino acids in the tissues at different stages of maturation.

  19. Superhydrophobic copper surfaces fabricated by fatty acid soaps in aqueous solution for excellent corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenlong; Hu, Yuanyuan; Bao, Wenda; Xie, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yiran; Song, Aixin, E-mail: songaixin@sdu.edu.cn; Hao, Jingcheng

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • The superhydrophobic property can be realized in a much quicker process (7.5 min) in aqueous solution than in ethanol. • The fabrication process of superhydrophobic metal surfaces greatly increases the safety in industrial manufacture in commercial scale. • The superhydrophobic copper surfaces show excellent corrosion resistance. - Abstract: A simple and safe one-step immersion method was developed to obtain the stable superhydrophobic copper surfaces with excellent corrosion resistance ability using fatty acids in water-medium instead of ethanol. An organic alkali, N,N-dimethylcyclohexylamine (DMCHA), was chosen to solve the poor solubility of fatty acids in water and the high Krafft point of carboxylate salts with inorganic counterions. The superhydrophobic property can be realized in a much quicker process (7.5 min) in aqueous solution than in ethanol (more than 2 d), which is universally feasible for the fabrication of superhydrophobic metal surfaces in industry scale, thereby greatly increasing the safety in industrial manufacture.

  20. Corrosion resistant Ti alloy for sulphuric acid medium: Suitability of Ti-Mo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balusamy, T.; Jamesh, M.; Kumar, Satendra; Narayanan, T.S.N. Sankara [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Madras Centre, CSIR Complex, Taramani, Chennai 600 113 (India)

    2012-09-15

    The corrosion resistance of Ti-Mo (5, 10, 15 and 25 wt% molybdenum) alloys in 5-25% sulphuric acid was evaluated. The Ti-Mo alloys offered a better corrosion resistance than commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). The higher impedance values, higher phase angle maximum, ability to reach the phase angle maximum at relatively lower frequencies, ability to exhibit a constant phase angle maximum over a wider range of frequencies, higher phase angle values at 0.01 Hz, have confirmed the formation of a stable passive oxide film on Ti-Mo alloys. The study recommends the use of Ti-Mo alloys, particularly Ti-25Mo alloy, as a suitable material of construction for sulphuric acid medium. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Fatty acid desaturase (FADS gene polymorphisms and insulin resistance in association with serum phospholipid polyunsaturated fatty acid composition in healthy Korean men: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Long In

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the relationship between fatty acid desaturase (FADS gene polymorphisms and insulin resistance (IR in association with serum phospholipid polyunsaturated fatty acid (FA composition in healthy Korean men. Methods Healthy men (n = 576, 30 ~ 79 years old were genotyped for rs174537 near FADS1 (FEN1-10154G>T, FADS2 (rs174575C>G, rs2727270C>T, and FADS3 (rs1000778C>T SNPs. Dietary intake, serum phospholipid FA composition and HOMA-IR were measured. Results Fasting insulin and HOMA-IR were significantly higher in the rs174575G allele carriers than the CC homozygotes, but lower in the rs2727270T allele carriers than the CC homozygotes. The proportion of linoleic acid (18:2ω-6, LA was higher in the minor allele carriers of FEN1-10154G>T, rs174575C>G and rs2727270C>T than the major homozygotes, respectively. On the other hand, the proportions of dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (20:3ω-6, DGLA and arachidonic acid (20:4ω-6, AA in serum phospholipids were significantly lower in the minor allele carriers of FEN1-10154 G>T carriers and rs2727270C>T than the major homozygotes respectively. AA was also significantly lower in the rs1000778T allele carriers than the CC homozygotes. HOMA-IR positively correlated with LA and DGLA and negatively with AA/DGLA in total subjects. Interestingly, rs174575G allele carriers showed remarkably higher HOMA-IR than the CC homozygotes when subjects had higher proportions of DLGA (≥1.412% in total serum phospholipid FA composition (P for interaction = 0.009 or of AA (≥4.573% (P for interaction = 0.047. Conclusion HOMA-IR is associated with FADS gene cluster as well as with FA composition in serum phospholipids. Additionally, HOMA-IR may be modulated by the interaction between rs174575C>G and the proportion of DGLA or AA in serum phospholipids.

  2. Trihydroxybenzoic acid glucoside as a global skin color modulator and photo-protectant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chajra H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hanane Chajra,1 Gérard Redziniak,2 Daniel Auriol,3 Kuno Schweikert,1 Fabrice Lefevre1 1Induchem AG, Volkestwil, Switzerland; 2Cosmetic Invention, Antony, 3Libragen SA, Toulouse, France Background: 3,4,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid glucoside (THBG, a molecule produced by an original biocatalysis-based technology, was assessed in this study with respect to its skin photoprotective capacity and its skin color control property on Asian-type skin at a clinical level and on skin explant culture models. Methods: The double-blinded clinical study was done in comparison to a vehicle by the determination of objective color parameters thanks to recognized quantitative and qualitative analysis tools, including Chroma-Meter, VISIA-CR™, and SIAscope™. Determination of L* (brightness, a* and b* (green–red and blue–yellow chromaticity coordinates, individual typology angle, and C* (chroma and h* (hue angle parameters using a Chroma-Meter demonstrated that THBG is able to modify skin color while quantification of ultraviolet (UV spots by VISIA-CR™ confirmed its photoprotective effect. The mechanism of action of THBG molecule was determined using explant skin culture model coupled to histological analysis (epidermis melanin content staining. Results: We have demonstrated that THBG was able to modulate significantly several critical parameters involved in skin color control such as L* (brightness, a* (redness, individual typology angle (pigmentation, and hue angle (yellowness in this study, whereas no modification occurs on b* and C* parameters. We have demonstrated using histological staining that THBG decrease epidermis melanin content under unirradiated and irradiated condition. We also confirmed that THBG molecule is not a sunscreen agent. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that THBG controls skin tone via the inhibition of melanin synthesis as well as the modulation of skin brightness, yellowness, and redness. Keywords: skin color, UV spots

  3. Trihydroxybenzoic acid glucoside as a global skin color modulator and photo-protectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chajra, Hanane; Redziniak, Gérard; Auriol, Daniel; Schweikert, Kuno; Lefevre, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    3,4,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid glucoside (THBG), a molecule produced by an original biocatalysis-based technology, was assessed in this study with respect to its skin photoprotective capacity and its skin color control property on Asian-type skin at a clinical level and on skin explant culture models. The double-blinded clinical study was done in comparison to a vehicle by the determination of objective color parameters thanks to recognized quantitative and qualitative analysis tools, including Chroma-Meter, VISIA-CR™, and SIAscope™. Determination of L* (brightness), a* and b* (green-red and blue-yellow chromaticity coordinates), individual typology angle, and C* (chroma) and h* (hue angle) parameters using a Chroma-Meter demonstrated that THBG is able to modify skin color while quantification of ultraviolet (UV) spots by VISIA-CR™ confirmed its photoprotective effect. The mechanism of action of THBG molecule was determined using explant skin culture model coupled to histological analysis (epidermis melanin content staining). We have demonstrated that THBG was able to modulate significantly several critical parameters involved in skin color control such as L* (brightness), a* (redness), individual typology angle (pigmentation), and hue angle (yellowness in this study), whereas no modification occurs on b* and C* parameters. We have demonstrated using histological staining that THBG decrease epidermis melanin content under unirradiated and irradiated condition. We also confirmed that THBG molecule is not a sunscreen agent. This study demonstrated that THBG controls skin tone via the inhibition of melanin synthesis as well as the modulation of skin brightness, yellowness, and redness.

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, free fatty acids, and insulin resistance in patients with myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruzdeva O

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Olga Gruzdeva, Evgenya Uchasova, Yulia Dyleva, Ekaterina Belik, Ekaterina Shurygina, Olga Barbarash Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases under the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Kemerovo, Russian Federation Background: Insulin resistance is known to be a common feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus and is regarded as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of this disease. The key pathogenetic mechanisms of insulin resistance progression are free fatty acids metabolism impairment and enhanced activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Both free fatty acids and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 are recognized as risk factors for coronary heart disease. Methods: The patients were divided into two groups: group 1 included 65 non-diabetic myocardial infarction patients and group 2 enrolled 60 diabetic myocardial infarction patients. The control group consisted of 30 sex- and age-matched volunteers. The concentration of serum free fatty acids, glucose, C-peptide, and insulin were measured on the 1st and 12th days of the study. All the patients had their postprandial glycemia, insulin, and C-peptide concentrations measured 2 hours after a standard carbohydrate breakfast containing 360 kcal (protein 20 g, carbohydrate 57 g, and fat 9 g. Results: Free fatty acids levels in group 1 and in group 2 exceeded the control group values by 7-fold and 11-fold, respectively. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 concentration was 2.5-fold higher in group 1 and 4.6-fold higher in group 2 compared to the control group on the 1st day from the myocardial infarction onset. In addition, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 concentration was significantly reduced in both groups on the 12th day from the myocardial infarction onset; however, it did not achieve the control group values. Conclusion: Increased postprandial glucose level, insulinemia, and elevated levels of free fatty acids and plasminogen activator

  5. Branched-chain amino acids in metabolic signalling and insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Christopher J.; Adams, Sean H.

    2014-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are important nutrient signals that have direct and indirect effects. Frequently, BCAAs have been reported to mediate antiobesity effects, especially in rodent models. However, circulating levels of BCAAs tend to be increased in individuals with obesity and are associated with worse metabolic health and future insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A hypothesized mechanism linking increased levels of BCAAs and T2DM involves leucine-mediated a...

  6. Three and six grams supplementation of d-aspartic acid in resistance trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Geoffrey W; Siegler, Jason C; Marshall, Paul Wm

    2015-01-01

    Although abundant research has investigated the hormonal effects of d-aspartic acid in rat models, to date there is limited research on humans. Previous research has demonstrated increased total testosterone levels in sedentary men and no significant changes in hormonal levels in resistance trained men. It was hypothesised that a higher dosage may be required for experienced lifters, thus this study investigated the effects of two different dosages of d-aspartic acid on basal hormonal levels in resistance trained men and explored responsiveness to d-aspartic acid based on initial testosterone levels. Twenty-four males, with a minimum of two years' experience in resistance training, (age, 24.5 ± 3.2 y; training experience, 3.4 ± 1.4 y; height, 178.5 ± 6.5 cm; weight, 84.7 ± 7.2 kg; bench press 1-RM, 105.3 ± 15.2 kg) were randomised into one of three groups: 6 g.d(-1) plain flour (D0); 3 g.d(-1) of d-aspartic acid (D3); and 6 g.d(-1) of d-aspartic acid (D6). Participants performed a two-week washout period, training four days per week. This continued through the experimental period (14 days), with participants consuming the supplement in the morning. Serum was analysed for levels of testosterone, estradiol, sex hormone binding globulin, albumin and free testosterone was determined by calculation. D-aspartic acid supplementation revealed no main effect for group in: estradiol; sex-hormone-binding-globulin; and albumin. Total testosterone was significantly reduced in D6 (P = 0.03). Analysis of free testosterone showed that D6 was significantly reduced as compared to D0 (P = 0.005), but not significantly different to D3. Analysis did not reveal any significant differences between D3 and D0. No significant correlation between initial total testosterone levels and responsiveness to d-aspartic acid was observed (r = 0.10, P = 0.70). The present study demonstrated that a daily dose of six grams of d-aspartic acid decreased

  7. Study on corrosion resistance of high - entropy alloy in medium acid liquid and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florea, I; Buluc, G; Florea, R M; Carcea, I; Soare, V

    2015-01-01

    High-entropy alloy is a new alloy which is different from traditional alloys. The high entropy alloys were started in Tsing Hua University of Taiwan since 1995 by Yeh et al. Consisting of a variety of elements, each element occupying a similar compared with other alloy elements to form a high entropy. We could define high entropy alloys as having approximately equal concentrations, made up of a group of 5 to 11 major elements. In general, the content of each element is not more than 35% by weight of the alloy. During the investigation it turned out that this alloy has a high hardness and is also corrosion proof and also strength and good thermal stability. In the experimental area, scientists used different tools, including traditional casting, mechanical alloying, sputtering, splat-quenching to obtain the high entropy alloys with different alloying elements and then to investigate the corresponding microstructures and mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electronic performances. The present study is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance in a different medium acid and try to put in evidence the mechanical properties. Forasmuch of the wide composition range and the enormous number of alloy systems in high entropy alloys, the mechanical properties of high entropy alloys can vary significantly. In terms of hardness, the most critical factors are: hardness/strength of each composing phase in the alloy, distribution of the composing phases. The corrosion resistance of an high entropy alloy was made in acid liquid such as 10%HNO 3 -3%HF, 10%H 2 SO 4 , 5%HCl and then was investigated, respectively with weight loss experiment. Weight loss test was carried out by put the samples into the acid solution for corrosion. The solution was maintained at a constant room temperature. The liquid formulations used for tests were 3% hydrofluoric acid with 10% nitric acid, 10% sulphuric acid, 5% hydrochloric acid. Weight loss of the samples was measured by electronic scale. (paper)

  8. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of phytic acid conversion coatings for magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Xiufang [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li Qingfen [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Li Ying; Wang Fuhui [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Jin Guo [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)], E-mail: jg97721@yahoo.com.cn; Ding Minghui [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2008-12-30

    In this paper, a new innoxious and pollution-free chemical protective coating for magnesium alloys, phytic acid conversion coating, was prepared. The conversion coatings are found to have high cover ratio and no cracks are found by atomic force microscopes (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The main elements of the conversion coatings are Mg, Al, O, P and C by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The chemical state of the elements in the coatings was also investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). AES depth profile analysis suggests that the thickness of the conversion coating is about 340 nm. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by polarization curves. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance for the conversion coated AZ91D magnesium alloys in 3.5% NaCl solution increases markedly. The mechanisms of corrosion resistance and coatings formation are also discussed.

  9. Genetic evidence of a causal effect of insulin resistance on branched-chain amino acid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahendran, Yuvaraj; Jonsson, Anna; Have, Christian T.

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Fasting plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are associated with insulin resistance, but it remains unclear whether there is a causal relation between the two. We aimed to disentangle the causal relations by performing a Mendelian randomisation study using genetic...... variants associated with circulating BCAA levels and insulin resistance as instrumental variables. METHODS: We measured circulating BCAA levels in blood plasma by NMR spectroscopy in 1,321 individuals from the ADDITION-PRO cohort. We complemented our analyses by using previously published genome...... variable for insulin resistance. A GRS of three variants increasing circulating BCAA levels was used as an instrumental variable for circulating BCAA levels. RESULTS: Fasting plasma BCAA levels were associated with higher HOMA-IR in ADDITION-PRO (β 0.137 [95% CI 0.08, 0.19] p = 6 × 10(-7)). However...

  10. β-Amino-n-butyric Acid Regulates Seedling Growth and Disease Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong Chae; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Sang Woo; Chae, Yun-Soek; Kang, Hyun-Kyung; Yun, Byung-Wook; Hong, Jeum Kyu

    2013-09-01

    Non-protein amino acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA), has been involved in diverse physiological processes including seedling growth, stress tolerance and disease resistance of many plant species. In the current study, treatment of kimchi cabbage seedlings with BABA significantly reduced primary root elongation and cotyledon development in a dose-dependent manner, which adverse effects were similar to the plant response to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) application. BABA was synergistically contributing ABA-induced growth arrest during the early seedling development. Kimchi cabbage leaves were highly damaged and seedling growth was delayed by foliar spraying with high concentrations of BABA (10 to 20 mM). BABA played roles differentially in in vitro fungal conidial germination, mycelial growth and conidation of necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola causing black spot disease and hemibiotroph Colletotrichum higginsianum causing anthracnose. Pretreatment with BABA conferred induced resistance of the kimchi cabbage against challenges by the two different classes of fungal pathogens in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that BABA is involved in plant development, fungal development as well as induced fungal disease resistance of kimchi cabbage plant.

  11. β-Amino-n-butyric Acid Regulates Seedling Growth and Disease Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Chae Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-protein amino acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA, has been involved in diverse physiological processes including seedling growth, stress tolerance and disease resistance of many plant species. In the current study, treatment of kimchi cabbage seedlings with BABA significantly reduced primary root elongation and cotyledon development in a dose-dependent manner, which adverse effects were similar to the plant response to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA application. BABA was synergistically contributing ABA-induced growth arrest during the early seedling development. Kimchi cabbage leaves were highly damaged and seedling growth was delayed by foliar spraying with high concentrations of BABA (10 to 20 mM. BABA played roles differentially in in vitro fungal conidial germination, mycelial growth and conidation of necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola causing black spot disease and hemibiotroph Colletotrichum higginsianum causing anthracnose. Pretreatment with BABA conferred induced resistance of the kimchi cabbage against challenges by the two different classes of fungal pathogens in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that BABA is involved in plant development, fungal development as well as induced fungal disease resistance of kimchi cabbage plant.

  12. Acid-Alkali Resistance of New Reclaimed Tiles Containing Sewage Sludge Ash and Waste Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deng-Fong; Lin, Kuo-Liang; Luo, Huan-Lin; Xu, Jia-Qin

    2016-07-07

    In this study, properties of newly developed reclaimed tiles in a harmful environment were investigated. A portion of clay used to manufacture tiles was replaced with sewage sludge ash (SSA) and waste glass to produce the new reclaimed tiles. To investigate the effects of SSA and waste glass on the properties of the tiles, different specimens were blended and placed in acid-alkali solutions. The reclaimed tile specimens were manufactured by clay, 10% SSA, and five different mixes of waste glass replacement, namely, 0%, 10%, 20%, 40%, and 60%. These specimens were calcined at 1000 °C and subsequently underwent a series of tests, including TGA/DTA (thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis), SEM (scanning electron microscopy), XRD (X-ray diffraction), bending strength, weight loss, and porosity. Test results show that shortcomings associated with the introduction of the sludge ash were improved by the admixture of waste glass, especially in the aspects of shrinkage and bending strength. The study showed that the new reclaimed tiles performed relatively well in acid-alkali resistance tests but appeared to have better alkali resistance than acid resistance. It was also found that the optimal mix of such reclaimed tiles was 10% SSA, 10% waste glass, and 80% clay.

  13. Corrosion resistance of different nickel-titanium archwires in acidic fluoride-containing artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzu-Hsin; Huang, Ta-Ko; Lin, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Li-Kai; Chou, Ming-Yung; Huang, Her-Hsiung

    2010-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that different nickel-titanium (NiTi) archwires may have dissimilar corrosion resistance in a fluoride-containing oral environment. Linear polarization test, a fast electrochemical technique, was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance, in terms of polarization resistance (R(p)), of four different commercial NiTi archwires in artificial saliva (pH 6.5) with various NaF concentrations (0%, 0.01%, 0.1%, 0.25%, and 0.5%). Two-way analysis of variance was used to analyze R(p) with the factors of archwire manufacturer and NaF concentration. Surface characterizations of archwires were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Both archwire manufacturer and NaF concentration had a significant influence on R(p) of NiTi archwires. Different surface topography was present on the test NiTi archwires that contained the similar surface chemical structure (TiO(2) and trace NiO). The surface topography did not correspond to the difference in corrosion resistance of the NiTi archwires. Increasing the NaF concentration in artificial saliva resulted in a decrease in R(p), or corrosion resistance, of all test NiTi archwires. The NiTi archwires severely corroded and showed similar corrosion resistance in 0.5% NaF-containing environment. Different NiTi archwires had dissimilar corrosion resistance in acidic fluoride-containing artificial saliva, which did not correspond to the variation in the surface topography of the archwires. The presence of fluoride in artificial saliva was detrimental to the corrosion resistance of the test NiTi archwires, especially at a 0.5% NaF concentration.

  14. FOLIC ACID METABOLISM IN ANTIFOLIC-RESISTANT MUTANTS OF STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JOHNSON, A H; HUTCHISON, D J

    1964-04-01

    Johnson, Alva H. (Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Rye, N.Y.), and Dorris J. Hutchison. Folic acid metabolism in antifolic-resistant mutants of Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 87:786-791. 1964.-Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 8043 and three of its mutants resistant to amethopterin were compared for their quantitative requirements for serine, purines, and thymine; for their quantitative requirements of folic acid (FA) for the synthesis de novo of serine, purines, and thymine; for the susceptibility to amethopterin of each pathway; and for the relative capacity of resting cells of each culture to synthesize N(5)-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-CHOFAH(4)) from FA and serine or FA and formate. The mutants were found to be both qualitatively and quantitatively different from one another and from the wild strain. The growth conditions, specifically the composition of the medium in which each mutant strain was selected, had a marked effect on the metabolic capacities of the mutants. The ability to synthesize serine, purines, and thymine, as observed from the FA requirements, directly reflected the level of resistance of each pathway to amethopterin. The resistant mutants were more efficient than the wild strain in the formation of 5-CHOFAH(4) from FA and formate and, furthermore, this formate activation paralleled their capacities in the synthesis de novo of serine. Alterations in purine and thymine biosyntheses were also observed.

  15. Priming of plant resistance by natural compounds. Hexanoic acid as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz eAranega Bou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Some alternative control strategies of currently emerging plant diseases are based on the use of resistance inducers. This review highlights the recent advances made in the characterization of natural compounds that induce resistance by a priming mechanism. These include vitamins, chitosans, oligogalacturonides, volatile organic compounds, azelaic and pipecolic acid, among others. Overall, other than providing novel disease control strategies that meet environmental regulations, natural priming agents are valuable tools to help unravel the complex mechanisms underlying the induced resistance phenomenon. The data presented in this review reflect the novel contributions made from studying these natural plant inducers, with special emphasis placed on hexanoic acid (Hx, proposed herein as a model tool for this research field. Hx is a potent natural priming agent of proven efficiency in a wide range of host plants and pathogens. It can early activate broad-spectrum defenses by inducing callose deposition and the SA and JA pathways. Later it can prime pathogen-specific responses according to the pathogen’s lifestyle. Interestingly, Hx primes redox-related genes to produce an anti-oxidant protective effect, which might be critical for limiting the infection of necrotrophs. Our Hx-induced resistance (Hx-IR findings also strongly suggest that it is an attractive tool for the molecular characterization of the plant alarmed state, with the added advantage of it being a natural compound.

  16. Searching for factors associated with resistance to acetylsalicylic acid used for secondary prevention of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łabuz-Roszak, Beata; Pierzchała, Krystyna; Niewiadomska, Ewa; Skrzypek, Michał; Machowska-Majchrzak, Agnieszka

    2015-03-16

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of resistance to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), used for secondary prevention of stroke, including the assessment of risk factors associated with the lack of ASA anti-aggregatory action. Patients after a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or ischaemic stroke in the acute (n = 111) and chronic phase (n = 87) were enrolled in the study. The assessment of platelet function was performed by whole blood impedance aggregometry using a multi-channel platelet function analyser (Multiplate). A proper response to ASA was found in 121 patients (61.1%) (ASA responders), a partial response to ASA in 59 patients (29.8%) (ASA partial responders), and ASA resistance in 18 patients (9.1%) (ASA non-responders). Acetylsalicylic acid resistance was observed more frequently in the chronic phase. The mean low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentration was higher in ASA non-responders (p = 0.02). The mean heart rate (p = 0.03) and the mean haematocrit (p = 0.03) were higher in the group of ASA partial responders and ASA non-responders. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists were more often used in the group of ASA partial responders and ASA non-responders (p = 0.04). Diuretics were more rarely used by ASA non-responders, whereas fibrates were more rarely used by ASA partial responders. The method enabled the detection of ASA resistance in some patients with cerebrovascular disease. The study revealed some possible risk factors of ASA resistance: long ASA therapy, increased heart rate, higher LDL concentration, and higher haematocrit value. The relationship between the effect of ASA and other medications (angiotensin II receptor blockers, fibrates, diuretics) requires further study. Platelet function monitoring should be considered in patients at a greater risk of ASA resistance.

  17. Phenylacetic Acid Is ISR Determinant Produced by Bacillus fortis IAGS162, Which Involves Extensive Re-modulation in Metabolomics of Tomato to Protect against Fusarium Wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Waheed; Anjum, Tehmina; Ali, Basharat

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus fortis IAGS162 has been previously shown to induce systemic resistance in tomato plants against Fusarium wilt disease. In the first phase of current study, the ISR determinant was isolated from extracellular metabolites of this bacterium. ISR bioassays combined with solvent extraction, column chromatography and GC/MS analysis proved that phenylacetic acid (PAA) was the potential ISR determinant that significantly ameliorated Fusarium wilt disease of tomato at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. In the second phase, the biochemical basis of the induced systemic resistance (ISR) under influence of PAA was elucidated by performing non-targeted whole metabolomics through GC/MS analysis. Tomato plants were treated with PAA and fungal pathogen in various combinations. Exposure to PAA and subsequent pathogen challenge extensively re-modulated tomato metabolic networks along with defense related pathways. In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors were significantly up-regulated in treatments receiving PAA. This work suggests that ISR elicitor released from B. fortis IAGS162 contributes to resistance against fungal pathogens through dynamic reprogramming of plant pathways that are functionally correlated with defense responses.

  18. Salicylic Acid Alleviates Aluminum Toxicity in Soybean Roots through Modulation of Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As an important signal molecule, salicylic acid (SA improves plant tolerance to aluminum (Al stress. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of exogenous SA application on the dynamics of endogenous SA and reactive oxygen species in soybean (Glycine max L. exposed to Al stress. The roots of soybean seedlings were exposed to a combination of AlCl3 (30 μM and SA (10 μM/PAC (100 μM, paclobutrazol, SA biosynthesis inhibitor for 3, 6, 9, and 12 h. Al stress induced an increase in endogenous SA concentration in a time-dependent manner, also verified by the up-regulated expression of GmNPR1, an SA-responsive gene. Al stress increased the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase (BA2H, and the contents of SA, O2- and malondialdehyde (MDA in the root apex. The application of exogenous SA increased PAL and BA2H, and reduced O2- and MDA contents in soybean roots under Al stress. PAC inhibited the SA induced increase in BA2H activity. In addition, the SA application resulted in a rapid increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentration under Al stress, followed by a sharp decrease. Compared with the plants exposed to Al alone, Al+SA plants possessed higher activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and ascorbate peroxidase, and lower catalase activity, indicating that SA alleviated Al-induced oxidative damage. These results suggested that PAL and BA2H were involved in Al-induced SA production and showed that SA alleviated the adverse effects of Al toxicity by modulating the cellular H2O2 level and the antioxidant enzyme activities in the soybean root apex.

  19. [ACID-BASE MODULATION OF LYSOZYME ACTIVITY IN MEDIUM FOR CULTIVATION OF ENTEROBACTERIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andryuschenko, S V; Perunova, N B

    2015-01-01

    Determination of modulating effect of acid-base state of medium for cultivation of enterobacteria on activity of C-type lysozyme. Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain for protein expression, Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 model strain, Escherichia coli No. 242 strain, isolated from intestine biotope; 2 Klebsiella pneumoniae strains, one of those contained plasmid homologue of periplasmatic lysozyme inhibitor gene pliC; 1 typical Salmonella enterica ATCC 14028 strain and a Micrococcus luteus ATCC 15307 strain as a control--served as material for the study. The bacteria were cultivated for 24 hours in 2 ml of liquid medium LB at 37 degrees C, 250 rpm. Determination of antilysozyme activity (ALA) was carried out by a photonepehlometrical method according to O.V. Bukharin et al. (1999) with alterations. All the studied microorganisms, including Micrococcus luteus, at the specified conditions 24 hours after cultivation were established to change the pH of the liquid nutrient medium LB from the initial value of 6.6 ± 0.1 to 8.2 ± 0.2 units. ALA determination in the cultivation medium without buffer correction was accompanied by a decline of lysozyme activity at an order of magnitude. The effect was absent during ALA measurement by a standard technique. The local shift of acid-base state of biotope under the conditions of buffer system insufficiency results in a reversible alteration of antimicrobial activity of muramidase, that among other non-specific factors of the environment determines the background of interactions on the level of associative symbiosis. This aspect should be taken into consideration during development of models, that are close to real conditions of microsymbiocenotical interactions.

  20. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE Modulates Canonical Transient Receptor Potential-6 (TRPC6 Channels in Podocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Roshanravan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The arachidonic acid metabolite 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE regulates renal function, including changes in glomerular function evoked during tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF. This study describes the cellular actions of 20-HETE on cultured podocytes, assessed by whole-cell recordings from cultured podocytes combined with pharmacological and cell-biological manipulations of cells. Bath superfusion of 20-HETE activates cationic currents that are blocked by the pan-TRP blocker SKF-96365 and by 50 μM La3+, and which are attenuated after siRNA knockdown of TRPC6 subunits. Similar currents are evoked by a membrane-permeable analog of diacylgycerol (OAG, but OAG does not occlude responses to maximally-activating concentrations of 20-HETE (20 μM. Exposure to 20-HETE also increased steady-state surface abundance of TRPC6 subunits in podocytes as assessed by cell-surface biotinylation assays, and increased cytosolic concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS. TRPC6 activation by 20-HETE was eliminated in cells pretreated with TEMPOL, a membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimic. Activation of TRPC6 by 20-HETE was also blocked when whole-cell recording pipettes contained GDP-βS, indicating a role for either small or heterotrimeric G proteins in the transduction cascade. Responses to 20-HETE were eliminated by siRNA knockdown of podocin, a protein that organizes NADPH oxidase complexes with TRPC6 subunits in this cell type. In summary, modulation of ionic channels in podocytes may contribute to glomerular actions of 20-HETE.

  1. Synthesis of 3-oxalinolenic acid and beta-oxidation-resistant 3-oxa-oxylipins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberg, Mats; Chechetkin, Ivan R; Grechkin, Alexander N; Ponce de León, Inés; Castresana, Carmen; Bannenberg, Gerard

    2006-05-01

    3-Oxalinolenic acid (3-oxa-9(Z),12(Z),15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid or (6(Z),9(Z),12(Z)-pentadecatrienyloxy)acetic acid) was synthesized from 5(Z),8(Z),11(Z),14(Z),17(Z)-eicosapentaenoic acid by a sequence involving the C15 aldehyde 3(Z),6(Z),9(Z),12(Z)-pentadecatetraenal as a key intermediate. Conversion of the aldehyde by isomerization and two steps of reduction afforded 6(Z),9(Z),12(Z)-pentadecatrienol, which was coupled to bromoacetate to afford after purification by HPLC >99%-pure 3-oxalinolenic acid in 10-15% overall yield. 3-Oxalinolenic acid was efficiently oxygenated by soybean lipoxygenase-1 into 3-oxa-13(S)-hydroperoxy-9(Z),11(E),15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid, and this hydroperoxide could be further converted chemically into 3-oxa-13(S)-hydroxy-9(Z),11 (E),15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid and 3-oxa-13-oxo-9(Z),11 (E),15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid. The 3-oxa-hydroperoxide also served as the substrate for the plant enzymes allene oxide synthase, divinyl ether synthase, and hydroperoxide lyase to produce 3-oxa-12-oxo-10,15(Z)-phytodienoic acid and other 3-oxa-oxylipins that were characterized by MS. 3-Oxalinolenic acid was not oxygenated by 9-lipoxygenase from tomato but was converted at a slow rate into 3-oxa-9(S)-hydroperoxy-10(E),12(Z),15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid by recombinant maize 9-lipoxygenase. Recombinant alpha-dioxygenase-1 from Arabidopsis thaliana catalyzed the conversion of 3-oxalinolenic acid into a 2-hydroperoxide, which underwent spontaneous degradation into a mixture of 6,9,12-pentadecatrienol and 6,9,12-pentadecatrienyl formate. A novel alpha-dioxygenase from the moss Physcomitrella patens was cloned and expressed and was found to display the same activity with 3-oxalinolenic acid as Arabidopsis thaliana alpha-dioxygenase-1. Lipoxygenase-generated 3-oxa-oxylipins are resistant toward beta-oxidation and have the potential for displaying enhanced biological activity in situations where activity is limited by metabolic degradation.

  2. Glutamate decarboxylase-dependent acid resistance in Brucella spp.: distribution and contribution to fitness under extremely acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Maria Alessandra; Bastianelli, Daniela; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Köhler, Stephan; Cloeckaert, Axel; De Biase, Daniela; Occhialini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an expanding genus of major zoonotic pathogens, including at least 10 genetically very close species occupying a wide range of niches from soil to wildlife, livestock, and humans. Recently, we have shown that in the new species Brucella microti, the glutamate decarboxylase (Gad)-dependent system (GAD system) contributes to survival at a pH of 2.5 and also to infection in mice by the oral route. In order to study the functionality of the GAD system in the genus Brucella, 47 isolates, representative of all known species and strains of this genus, and 16 strains of the closest neighbor genus, Ochrobactrum, were studied using microbiological, biochemical, and genetic approaches. In agreement with the genome sequences, the GAD system of classical species was not functional, unlike that of most strains of Brucella ceti, Brucella pinnipedialis, and newly described species (B. microti, Brucella inopinata BO1, B. inopinata-like BO2, and Brucella sp. isolated from bullfrogs). In the presence of glutamate, these species were more acid resistant in vitro than classical terrestrial brucellae. Expression in trans of the gad locus from representative Brucella species in the Escherichia coli MG1655 mutant strain lacking the GAD system restored the acid-resistant phenotype. The highly conserved GAD system of the newly described or atypical Brucella species may play an important role in their adaptation to acidic external and host environments. Furthermore, the GAD phenotype was shown to be a useful diagnostic tool to distinguish these latter Brucella strains from Ochrobactrum and from classical terrestrial pathogenic Brucella species, which are GAD negative. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Basic Electricity and Electronics Individualized Learning System. CANTRAC A-100-0010. Module Fourteen: Parallel AC Resistive-Reactive Circuits. Study Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chief of Naval Education and Training Support, Pensacola, FL.

    This individualized learning module on parallel alternating current resistive-reaction circuits is one in a series of modules for a course in basic electricity and electronics. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instructional and curriculum development in a civilian…

  4. Resistance-nodulation-division efflux pump acrAB is modulated by florfenicol and contributes to drug resistance in the fish pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Rodrigo; Oliver, Cristian; Valdivia, Sharin; Valenzuela, Karla; Haro, Ronie E; Sánchez, Patricio; Olavarría, Víctor H; Valenzuela, Paulina; Avendaño-Herrera, Rubén; Romero, Alex; Cárcamo, Juan G; Figueroa, Jaime E; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-06-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is a fastidious intracellular pathogen responsible for high mortality rates in farmed salmonids, with serious economic consequences for the Chilean aquaculture industry. Oxytetracycline and florfenicol are the most frequently used antibiotics against P. salmonis, but routine use could contribute to drug resistance. This study identified differentiated florfenicol susceptibilities in two P. salmonis strains, LF-89 and AUSTRAL-005. The less susceptible isolate, AUSTRAL-005, also showed a high ethidium bromide efflux rate, indicating a higher activity of general efflux pump genes than LF-89. The P. salmonis genome presented resistance nodulation division (RND) family members, a family containing typical multidrug resistance-related efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. Additionally, efflux pump acrAB genes were overexpressed in AUSTRAL-005 following exposure to the tolerated maximal concentration of florfenicol, in contrast to LF-89. These results indicate that tolerated maximum concentrations of florfenicol can modulate RND gene expression and increase efflux pump activity. We propose that the acrAB efflux pump is essential for P. salmonis survival at critical florfenicol concentrations and for the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Environmental and genetic modulation of the phenotypic expression of antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Dan I

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Antibiotic resistance can be acquired by mutation or horizontal transfer of a resistance gene, and generally an acquired mechanism results in a predictable increase in phenotypic resistance. However, recent findings suggest that the environment and/or the genetic context can modify the phenotypic expression of specific resistance genes/mutations. An important implication from these findings is that a given genotype does not always result in the expected phenotype. This dissociation of genotype and phenotype has important consequences for clinical bacteriology and for our ability to predict resistance phenotypes from genetics and DNA sequences. A related problem concerns the degree to which the genes/mutations currently identified in vitro can fully explain the in vivo resistance phenotype, or whether there is a significant additional amount of presently unknown mutations/genes (genetic ‘dark matter’) that could contribute to resistance in clinical isolates. Finally, a very important question is whether/how we can identify the genetic features that contribute to making a successful pathogen, and predict why some resistant clones are very successful and spread globally? In this review, we describe different environmental and genetic factors that influence phenotypic expression of antibiotic resistance genes/mutations and how this information is needed to understand why particular resistant clones spread worldwide and to what extent we can use DNA sequences to predict evolutionary success. PMID:28333270

  6. A review of mechanisms of circumvention and modulation of chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, R

    2009-05-01

    Drug resistance is a serious limitation to the effective treatment of a number of common malignancies. Thirty years of laboratory and clinical research have greatly defined the molecular alterations underlying many drug resistance processes in cancer. Based on this knowledge, strategies to overcome the impact of resistance and increase the efficacy of cancer treatment have been translated from laboratory models to clinical trials. This article reviews laboratory and, in particular, clinical attempts at drug resistance circumvention from early forays in the inhibition of cellular efflux pump-mediated drug resistance through to more selective circumvention agent strategies and into inhibition of the other important mechanisms which can allow cancer cells to survive therapy, such as apoptosis resistance. Despite some promising results to date, resistance inhibition strategies have largely failed due to poor understanding of the pharmacology, dynamics and complexity of the resistance phenotype. With the realisation that new molecularly-targeted agents can also be rendered ineffectual by the actions of resistance mechanisms, a major focus is once again emerging on identifying new strategies/pharmaceuticals which can augment the activity of the arsenal of more conventional cytotoxics and newer targeted anti-cancer drugs. Future tactical directions where old and new resistance strategies may merge to overcome this challenge are discussed.

  7. Eubacterium rangiferina, a novel usnic acid-resistant bacterium from the reindeer rumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundset, Monica A.; Kohn, Alexandra; Mathiesen, Svein D.; Præsteng, Kirsti E.

    2008-08-01

    Reindeer are able to eat and utilize lichens as an important source of energy and nutrients. In the current study, the activities of antibiotic secondary metabolites including usnic, antranoric, fumarprotocetraric, and lobaric acid commonly found in lichens were tested against a collection of 26 anaerobic rumen bacterial isolates from reindeer ( Rangifer tarandus tarandus) using the agar diffusion method. The isolates were identified based on their 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequences. Usnic acid had a potent antimicrobial effect against 25 of the isolates, belonging to Clostridiales, Enterococci, and Streptococci. Isolates of Clostridia and Streptococci were also susceptible to atranoric and lobaric acid. However, one isolate (R3_91_1) was found to be resistant to usnic, antranoric, fumarprotocetraric, and lobaric acid. R3_91_1 was also seen invading and adhering to lichen particles when grown in a liquid anaerobic culture as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. This was a Gram-negative, nonmotile rod (0.2-0.7 × 2.0-3.5 μm) with a deoxyribonucleic acid G + C content of 47.0 mol% and main cellular fatty acids including 15:0 anteiso-dimethyl acetal (DMA), 16:0 iso-fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), 13:0 iso-3OH FAME, and 17:0 anteiso-FAME, not matching any of the presently known profiles in the MIDI database. Combined, the phenotypic and genotypic traits including the 16S rRNA gene sequence show that R3_91_1 is a novel species inside the order Clostridiales within the family Lachnospiraceae, for which we propose the name Eubacterium rangiferina. This is the first record of a rumen bacterium able to tolerate and grow in the presence of usnic acid, indicating that the rumen microorganisms in these animals have adapted mechanisms to deal with lichen secondary metabolites, well known for their antimicrobial and toxic effects.

  8. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Glutamate- and Arginine-dependent Acid Resistance Systems Protect Against Oxidative Stress During Extreme Acid Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the protection that several known Escherichia coli O157:H7 acid resistance systems provide against oxidative stress, the addition of diamide or hydrogen peroxide were used concomitant with acid challenge at pH 2.5 to determine bacterial survival. Diamide and hydrogen peroxide both de...

  9. Emerging nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin resistance in non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from patients having acute diarrhoeal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panhotra, B.R.; Saxena, A.K.; Al-Arabi, Ali M.

    2004-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella are one of the key etiological agents of diarrhoeal disease. The appearence of multiple drung resistance along with resistance to quinolones in this bacterium poses a serious therapeutic problem. We determined the prevalence of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin resistance in non-typhodial Salmonella isolated from faecal samples of patients with acute diarroheal disease attending the outpatient and inpatient department of a hospital in Saudi Arabia during the years 1999 to 2002. Non-typhodial Salmonella were isolated from faecal samples. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by the disc diffusion test. MICs to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacinwere determined by the agar dilution method. During the study period , 524 strains of non-typhoidal Salmonella were isolated. Strains belonging to serogroup C1were the commonest (41.4%) followed by serogroups B and D (15.6% and 14.5%, respectively). Resistance to ampicillin was observed in 22.9% and to trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole in 18.5%of the strains. Nalidixic acid resistance was encounterd in 9.9% and ciprofloxacin esistance in 2.3% of the strains. Resistance to nalidixic acid significantly increased from 0.1% in 1999 to 5.51% in 2002 ( p=0.0007)and ciprofloxacin resistance increased significantly from 0.1% in 1999 to 0.9% in 2002( p=0.0001). MICs to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin were determined among 29 nalidixic acid-resistant strains of non-typhoidal salmonella isolated during 2002. The MIC was >256 ug /ml to nalidixic acid and 8 to 16 ug/ml to ciprofloxacin. The increasing rate of antimicrobial resistance encountered among non-tyophoidal Salmonella necessiate the judicious use of these drugs in humans. Moreover, these findings support the concern that the use of quinolones in animal feed may lead to an increasein resistance and should should be restricted. (author)

  10. Emerging Perspectives on Essential Amino Acid Metabolism in Obesity and the Insulin-Resistant State12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sean H.

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of insulin action is most often considered in the context of impaired glucose homeostasis, with the defining feature of diabetes mellitus being elevated blood glucose concentration. Complications arising from the hyperglycemia accompanying frank diabetes are well known and epidemiological studies point to higher risk toward development of metabolic disease in persons with impaired glucose tolerance. Although the central role of proper blood sugar control in maintaining metabolic health is well established, recent developments have begun to shed light on associations between compromised insulin action [obesity, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)] and altered intermediary metabolism of fats and amino acids. For amino acids, changes in blood concentrations of select essential amino acids and their derivatives, in particular BCAA, sulfur amino acids, tyrosine, and phenylalanine, are apparent with obesity and insulin resistance, often before the onset of clinically diagnosed T2DM. This review provides an overview of these changes and places recent observations from metabolomics research into the context of historical reports in the areas of biochemistry and nutritional biology. Based on this synthesis, a model is proposed that links the FFA-rich environment of obesity/insulin resistance and T2DM with diminution of BCAA catabolic enzyme activity, changes in methionine oxidation and cysteine/cystine generation, and tissue redox balance (NADH/NAD+). PMID:22332087

  11. Stearidonic and γ-linolenic acids in echium oil improves glucose disposal in insulin resistant monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, K; Flynn, D M; Jenkins, K A; Wilson, M D; Chilton, F H

    2013-07-01

    Echium oil (EO) contains stearidonic acid (18:4), a n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and gamma-linolenic acids (18:3), a n-6 PUFA that can be converted to long chain (LC)-PUFAs. We aimed to compare a safflower oil (SO)-enriched diet to EO- and fish oil (FO)-enriched diets on circulating and tissue PUFAs levels and glycemic, inflammatory, and cardiovascular health biomarkers in insulin resistant African green monkeys. In a Latin-square cross-over study, eight monkeys consumed matched diets for 6 weeks with 3-week washout periods. Monkeys consuming FO had significantly higher levels of n-3 LC-PUFAs and EO supplementation resulted in higher levels of circulating n-3 LC-PUFAs and a significant increase in dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA) in red blood cells and muscle. Glucose disposal was improved after EO consumption. These data suggest that PUFAs in EO supplementation have the capacity to alter circulating, RBC and muscle LC-PUFA levels and improve glucose tolerance in insulin-resistant monkeys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel Identification Method of Thermal Resistances of Thermoelectric Modules Combining Electrical Characterization Under Constant Temperature and Heat Flow Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Siouane

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of a Thermoelectric Module (TEM is not only influenced by the material properties, but also by the heat losses due to the internal and contact thermal resistances. In the literature, the material properties are mostly discussed, mainly to increase the well-known thermoelectric figure of merit ZT. Nevertheless, when a TEM is considered, the separate characterization of the materials of the p and n elements is not enough to have a suitable TEM electrical model and evaluate more precisely its efficiency. Only a few recent papers deal with thermal resistances and their influence on the TEM efficiency; mostly, the minimization of these resistances is recommended, without giving a way to determine their values. The aim of the present paper is to identify the internal and contact thermal resistances of a TEM by electrical characterization. Depending on the applications, the TEM can be used either under constant temperature gradient or constant heat flow conditions. The proposed identification approach is based on the theoretical electrical modeling of the TEM, in both conditions. It is simple to implement, because it is based only on open circuit test conditions. A single electrical measurement under both conditions (constant-temperature and constant-heat is needed. Based on the theoretical electrical models, one can identify the internal and thermal resistances.

  13. Lactic Acid Bacteria May Impact Intestinal Barrier Function by Modulating Goblet Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chengcheng; Dokter-Fokkens, Jelleke; Figueroa Lozano, Susana; Zhang, Qiuxiang; de Haan, Bart J; Zhang, Hao; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2018-01-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are recognized to promote gastrointestinal health by mechanisms that are not fully understood. LABs might modulate the mucus and thereby enhance intestinal barrier function. Herein, we investigate effects of different LAB strains and species on goblet cell genes involved in mucus synthesis. Gene expression profiles of goblet-cell-associated products (mucin MUC2, trefoil factor 3, resistin-like molecule β, carbohydrate sulfotransferase 5, and galactose-3-O-sulfotransferase 2) induced by LAB or their derived conditioned medium in human goblet cell line LS174T are studied. Effects of LAB on gene transcription are assessed with or without exposure to TNF-α, IL-13, or the mucus damaging agent tunicamycin. LAB do impact the related genes in a species- and strain-specific fashion and their effects are different in the presence of the cytokines and tunicamycin. Bioactive factors secreted by some strains are also found to regulate goblet cell-related genes. Our findings provide novel insights in differences in modulatory efficacy on mucus genes between LAB species and strains. This study further unravels direct interactions between LAB and intestinal goblet cells, and highlights the importance of rationally selecting appropriate LAB candidates to achieve specific benefits in the gut. © 2018 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP: modulation by growth factors and its implication in astrocyte differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C.A. Gomes

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filament (IF proteins constitute an extremely large multigene family of developmentally and tissue-regulated cytoskeleton proteins abundant in most vertebrate cell types. Astrocyte precursors of the CNS usually express vimentin as the major IF. Astrocyte maturation is followed by a switch between vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP expression, with the latter being recognized as an astrocyte maturation marker. Levels of GFAP are regulated under developmental and pathological conditions. Upregulation of GFAP expression is one of the main characteristics of the astrocytic reaction commonly observed after CNS lesion. In this way, studies on GFAP regulation have been shown to be useful to understand not only brain physiology but also neurological disease. Modulators of GFAP expression include several hormones such as thyroid hormone, glucocorticoids and several growth factors such as FGF, CNTF and TGFß, among others. Studies of the GFAP gene have already identified several putative growth factor binding domains in its promoter region. Data obtained from transgenic and knockout mice have provided new insights into IF protein functions. This review highlights the most recent studies on the regulation of IF function by growth factors and hormones.

  15. Role of abscisic acid (aba) in modulating the responses of two apple rootstocks to drought stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Li, X.; Li, B.; Han, M.; Liu, F.; Zhang, L.; Zheng, P.

    2014-01-01

    Drought stress is considered as the main limiting factor for apple (Malus domestica L.) production in some semi-arid areas of China. In this study, we investigated the modulation role of abscisic acid (ABA) and fluridone (ABA synthesis inhibitor) on water relations and antioxidant enzyme system in 2-year-old seedlings of two apple rootstocks i.e. Malus sieversii (Ledeb.) Roem. (MS) and Malus hupehensis (Pamp.) Rehd. (MH). Drought stress induced ion leakage, accumulation of malondiadehyde (MDA) and decreases in leaf water potential and relative water content (RWC) in both rootstocks, which were significantly alleviated by exogenous ABA application. Drought stress also induced markedly increases in endogenous ABA content and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), and glutathione reductase (GR), to a greater magnitude in MS as compared to MH rootstock. Concentration of 100 mol/L and 50 mol/L ABA had the most positive effects on drought-stressed rootstocks of MS and MH, respectively. Spraying optimum exogenous ABA contributed to enhancement in most of the above antioxidant enzymes activities but reduction in content of MDA and maintained the appropriate leaf water potential and RWC in both rootstocks. Pretreatment with fluridone aggravated ion leakage and the accumulation of MDA in two apple rootstocks under drought stress, which was overcome by exogenous ABA application to some extent. In conclusion, the endogenous ABA was probably involved in the regulation of two apple rootstocks in responses to drought stress. (author)

  16. Azithromycin Modulates 3',5'-cyclic Diguanylic Acid Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Soichiro; Mori, Nobuaki; Kai, Toshihiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2017-08-01

    Macrolides have been reported to exert a variety of effects on both host immunomodulation and repression of bacterial pathogenicity. In this study, we report that the 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) signaling system, which regulates virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is affected by the macrolide azithromycin. Using DNA microarray analysis, we selected a gene encoding PA2567 related to c-di-GMP metabolism that was significantly affected by azithromycin treatment. Expression of the PA2567 gene was significantly repressed by azithromycin in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas no difference in PA2567 gene expression was observed in the absence of azithromycin. In-frame deletion of the PA2567 gene affected both virulence factors and the quorum-sensing system, and significantly decreased total bacteria in a mouse pneumonia model compared to the wild-type strain (P < 0.05). These results suggest that macrolides possess the ability to modulate c-di-GMP intracellular signaling in P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of the fatty acid composition of acclimated oenological Lactobacillus plantarum on the resistance to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Ferrada, B M; Gómez-Zavaglia, A; Semorile, L; Tymczyszyn, E E

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the changes due to acclimation to ethanol on the fatty acid composition of three oenological Lactobacillus plantarum strains and their effect on the resistance to ethanol and malic acid consumption (MAC). Lactobacillus plantarum UNQLp 133, UNQLp 65.3 and UNQLp 155 were acclimated in the presence of 6 or 10% v/v ethanol, for 48 h at 28°C. Lipids were extracted to obtain fatty acid methyl esters and analysed by gas chromatography interfaced with mass spectroscopy. The influence of change in fatty acid composition on the viability and MAC in synthetic wine was analysed by determining the Pearson correlation coefficient. Acclimated strains showed a significant change in the fatty composition with regard to the nonacclimated strains. Adaptation to ethanol led to a decrease in the unsaturated/saturated ratio, mainly resulting from an increase in the contribution of short-length fatty acid C12:0 and a decrease of C18:1. The content of C12:0 was related to a higher viability after inoculation of synthetic wine. The MAC increased at higher contents in saturated fatty acid, but its efficiency was strain dependent. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Resistance exercise combined with essential amino acid supplementation improved walking ability in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Shigeo; Okamoto, Y; Ogasahara, K; Yanagisawa, S; Ohtani, M; Kobayashi, K

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of resistance exercise combined with essential amino acid supplementation on psoas major muscle (PMM) hypertrophy and walking ability in elderly individuals. Twenty-nine healthy elderly individuals were assigned to 3 groups: (1) E (exercise), (2) A3 (exercise combined with 3.0 g of essential amino acid supplementation), and (3) A6 (exercise combined with 6.0 g of essential amino acid supplementation). To evaluate walking ability, the participants underwent the following 3 types of tests: the (1) 10-meter walk (10-W), (2) 10-meter walk involving crossing of obstacles (10-W + O), and (3) 6-minute walk (6M-W) tests. The 6-month training program resulted in significant PMM hypertrophy in all groups independent of amino acid supplementation. The extent of hypertrophy in the participants who took amino acids was dose-dependent, although the differences were not significant. Groups A3 and A6 demonstrated improvements in the 10-W and 10-W + O tests, whereas no improvement was observed in group E, regardless of PMM hypertrophy. Furthermore, group A6 showed an improvement in the 6M-W test. These results suggest that our training program causes PMM hypertrophy, whereas the training program combined with essential amino acid supplementation improves walking ability.

  19. Resistance to ursolic acid-induced apoptosis through involvement of melanogenesis and COX-2/PGE2 pathways in human M4Beu melanoma cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Lama; Pinon, Aline; Limami, Youness; Seeman, Josiane; Fidanzi-Dugas, Chloe; Martin, Frederique; Badran, Bassam; Simon, Alain; Liagre, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer with a continuously growing incidence worldwide and is usually resistant to chemotherapy agents, which is due in part to a strong resistance to apoptosis. Previously, we had showed that B16-F0 murine melanoma cells undergoing apoptosis are able to delay their own death induced by ursolic acid (UA), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid compound. We had demonstrated that tyrosinase and TRP-1 up-regulation in apoptotic cells and the subsequent production of melanin were implicated in an apoptosis resistance mechanism. Several resistance mechanisms to apoptosis have been characterized in melanoma such as hyperactivation of DNA repair mechanisms, drug efflux systems, and reinforcement of survival signals (PI3K/Akt, NF-κB and Raf/MAPK pathways). Otherwise, other mechanisms of apoptosis resistance involving different proteins, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), have been described in many cancer types. By using a strategy of specific inhibition of each ways, we suggested that there was an interaction between melanogenesis and COX-2/PGE 2 pathway. This was characterized by analyzing the COX-2 expression and activity, the expression of tyrosinase and melanin production. Furthermore, we showed that anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effects of UA were mediated through modulation of multiple signaling pathways including Akt and ERK-1/2 proteins. Our study not only uncovers underlying molecular mechanisms of UA action in human melanoma cancer cells but also suggest its great potential as an adjuvant in treatment and cancer prevention.

  20. Resistance to ursolic acid-induced apoptosis through involvement of melanogenesis and COX-2/PGE{sub 2} pathways in human M4Beu melanoma cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Lama; Pinon, Aline [Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Substances, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Limoges, FR 3503 GEIST, EA1069, Limoges (France); Limami, Youness [Laboratoire National de Référence (LNR), Université Mohammed VI des Sciences de la Santé, Casablanca (Morocco); Seeman, Josiane; Fidanzi-Dugas, Chloe; Martin, Frederique [Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Substances, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Limoges, FR 3503 GEIST, EA1069, Limoges (France); Badran, Bassam [Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Molecular Immunology, Faculty of Sciences, Lebanese University, Beirut (Lebanon); Simon, Alain [Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Substances, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Limoges, FR 3503 GEIST, EA1069, Limoges (France); Liagre, Bertrand, E-mail: bertrand.liagre@unilim.fr [Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Substances, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Limoges, FR 3503 GEIST, EA1069, Limoges (France)

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer with a continuously growing incidence worldwide and is usually resistant to chemotherapy agents, which is due in part to a strong resistance to apoptosis. Previously, we had showed that B16-F0 murine melanoma cells undergoing apoptosis are able to delay their own death induced by ursolic acid (UA), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid compound. We had demonstrated that tyrosinase and TRP-1 up-regulation in apoptotic cells and the subsequent production of melanin were implicated in an apoptosis resistance mechanism. Several resistance mechanisms to apoptosis have been characterized in melanoma such as hyperactivation of DNA repair mechanisms, drug efflux systems, and reinforcement of survival signals (PI3K/Akt, NF-κB and Raf/MAPK pathways). Otherwise, other mechanisms of apoptosis resistance involving different proteins, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), have been described in many cancer types. By using a strategy of specific inhibition of each ways, we suggested that there was an interaction between melanogenesis and COX-2/PGE{sub 2} pathway. This was characterized by analyzing the COX-2 expression and activity, the expression of tyrosinase and melanin production. Furthermore, we showed that anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effects of UA were mediated through modulation of multiple signaling pathways including Akt and ERK-1/2 proteins. Our study not only uncovers underlying molecular mechanisms of UA action in human melanoma cancer cells but also suggest its great potential as an adjuvant in treatment and cancer prevention.

  1. Bile Acid Malabsorption After Pelvic and Prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: An Uncommon but Treatable Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Victoria [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Benton, Barbara [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Sohaib, Aslam [Department of Radiology, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Andreyev, H. Jervoise N., E-mail: j@andreyev.demon.co.uk [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of <15%, and patients' symptoms unequivocally responded to a bile acid sequestrant. The TI was identified on the original radiation therapy plan, and the radiation dose delivered was calculated and compared with accepted dose-volume constraints. Results: Five of 423 men treated in a prospective series of high-dose prostate and pelvic IMRT were identified with new onset BAM (median age, 65 years old). All reported having normal bowel habits before RT. The volume of TI ranged from 26-141 cc. The radiation dose received by the TI varied between 11.4 Gy and 62.1 Gy (uncorrected). Three of 5 patients had TI treated in excess of 45 Gy (equivalent dose calculated in 2-Gy fractions, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3) with volumes ranging from 1.6 cc-49.0 cc. One patient had mild BAM (SeHCAT retention, 10%-15%), 2 had moderate BAM (SeHCAT retention, 5%-10%), and 2 had severe BAM (SeHCAT retention, <5%). The 3 patients whose TI received {>=}45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Conclusions: Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede

  2. Structure of a NADH-insensitive hexameric citrate synthase that resists acid inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Julie A; Starks, Courtney M; Sivanuntakorn, Sasitorn; Jiang, Hong; Ransome, Aaron E; Nam, Jeong-Won; Constantine, Charles Z; Kappock, T Joseph

    2006-11-14

    Acetobacter aceti converts ethanol to acetic acid, and strains highly resistant to both are used to make vinegar. A. aceti survives acetic acid exposure by tolerating cytoplasmic acidification, which implies an unusual adaptation of cytoplasmic components to acidic conditions. A. aceti citrate synthase (AaCS), a hexameric type II citrate synthase, is required for acetic acid resistance and, therefore, would be expected to function at low pH. Recombinant AaCS has intrinsic acid stability that may be a consequence of strong selective pressure to function at low pH, and unexpectedly high thermal stability for a protein that has evolved to function at approximately 30 degrees C. The crystal structure of AaCS, complexed with oxaloacetate (OAA) and the inhibitor carboxymethyldethia-coenzyme A (CMX), was determined to 1.85 A resolution using protein purified by a tandem affinity purification procedure. This is the first crystal structure of a "closed" type II CS, and its active site residues interact with OAA and CMX in the same manner observed in the corresponding type I chicken CS.OAA.CMX complex. While AaCS is not regulated by NADH, it retains many of the residues used by Escherichia coli CS (EcCS) for NADH binding. The surface of AaCS is abundantly decorated with basic side chains and has many fewer uncompensated acidic charges than EcCS; this constellation of charged residues is stable in varied pH environments and may be advantageous in the A. aceti cytoplasm.

  3. An amino acid substitution (L925V associated with resistance to pyrethroids in Varroa destructor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The Varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is an important pest of honeybees and has played a prominent role in the decline in bee colony numbers over recent years. Although pyrethroids such as tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin can be highly effective in removing the mites from hives, their intensive use has led to many reports of resistance. To investigate the mechanism of resistance in UK Varroa samples, the transmembrane domain regions of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel (the main target site for pyrethroids were PCR amplified and sequenced from pyrethroid treated/untreated mites collected at several locations in Central/Southern England. A novel amino acid substitution, L925V, was identified that maps to a known hot spot for resistance within the domain IIS5 helix of the channel protein; a region that has also been proposed to form part of the pyrethroid binding site. Using a high throughput diagnostic assay capable of detecting the mutation in individual mites, the L925V substitution was found to correlate well with resistance, being present in all mites that had survived tau-fluvalinate treatment but in only 8 % of control, untreated samples. The potential for using this assay to detect and manage resistance in Varroa-infected hives is discussed.

  4. An amino acid substitution (L925V) associated with resistance to pyrethroids in Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Davies, T G Emyr; Field, Linda M; Kennedy, Peter J; Williamson, Martin S

    2013-01-01

    The Varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is an important pest of honeybees and has played a prominent role in the decline in bee colony numbers over recent years. Although pyrethroids such as tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin can be highly effective in removing the mites from hives, their intensive use has led to many reports of resistance. To investigate the mechanism of resistance in UK Varroa samples, the transmembrane domain regions of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel (the main target site for pyrethroids) were PCR amplified and sequenced from pyrethroid treated/untreated mites collected at several locations in Central/Southern England. A novel amino acid substitution, L925V, was identified that maps to a known hot spot for resistance within the domain IIS5 helix of the channel protein; a region that has also been proposed to form part of the pyrethroid binding site. Using a high throughput diagnostic assay capable of detecting the mutation in individual mites, the L925V substitution was found to correlate well with resistance, being present in all mites that had survived tau-fluvalinate treatment but in only 8 % of control, untreated samples. The potential for using this assay to detect and manage resistance in Varroa-infected hives is discussed.

  5. Disease resistance to Pectobacterium carotovorum is negatively modulated by the Arabidopsis Lectin Receptor Kinase LecRK-V.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Dominique; Desclos-Theveniau, Marie; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2012-09-01

    Plant stomata function in disease resistance by restricting bacteria entry inside leaves. During plant-bacteria interactions, stomatal closure is initiated by the recognition of Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns (MAMPs). Recently, we have shown that the Lectin Receptor Kinase V.5 (LecRK-V.5) negatively regulates bacterium- and MAMP-induced stomatal closure upstream of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production mediated by abscisic acid signaling. Closed stomata in lecrk-V.5 mutants are correlated with constitutive high level of ROS in guard cells. Consequently, lecrk-V.5 mutants are more resistant to hemi-biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). In this report, we further investigate the role of LecRK-V.5 in resistance against necrotrophic bacteria Pectobacterium carotovorum ssp. carotovorum (Pcc). Upon surface-inoculation lecrk-V.5 mutants exhibited enhanced resistance against Pcc whereas a wild-type level of resistance was observed using infiltration-inoculation, an inoculation method that bypasses the epidermal barrier. Enhanced resistance of dip-inoculated lecrk-V.5 mutants against necrotrophic bacteria, that induce different defense responses than hemi-biotrophic bacteria, further suggests a possible role for LecRK-V.5 in stomatal immunity.

  6. Organic acids enhance bioavailability of tetracycline in water to Escherichia coli for uptake and expression of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Tiedje, James M; Li, Hui

    2014-11-15

    Tetracyclines are a large class of antimicrobials used most extensively in livestock feeding operations. A large portion of tetracyclines administered to livestock is excreted in manure and urine which is collected in waste lagoons. Subsequent land application of these wastes introduces tetracyclines into the soil environment, where they could exert selective pressure for the development of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria. Tetracyclines form metal-complexes in natural waters, which could reduce their bioavailability for bacterial uptake. We hypothesized that many naturally-occurring organic acids could effectively compete with tetracyclines as ligands for metal cations, hence altering the bioavailability of tetracyclines to bacteria in a manner that could enhance the selective pressure. In this study, we investigated the influence of acetic acid, succinic acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid and citric acid on tetracycline uptake from water by Escherichia coli bioreporter construct containing a tetracycline resistance gene which induces the emission of green fluorescence when activated. The presence of the added organic acid ligands altered tetracycline speciation in a manner that enhanced tetracycline uptake by E. coli. Increased bacterial uptake of tetracycline and concomitant enhanced antibiotic resistance response were quantified, and shown to be positively related to the degree of organic acid ligand complexation of metal cations in the order of citric acid > oxalic acid > malonic acid > succinic acid > acetic acid. The magnitude of the bioresponse increased with increasing aqueous organic acid concentration. Apparent positive relation between intracellular tetracycline concentration and zwitterionic tetracycline species in aqueous solution indicates that (net) neutral tetracycline is the species which most readily enters E. coli cells. Understanding how naturally-occurring organic acid ligands affect tetracycline speciation in solution, and how speciation

  7. Reprogramming of fatty acid and oxylipin synthesis in rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariutto, Martin; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Ongena, Marc; Laloux, Morgan; Wathelet, Jean-Paul; du Jardin, Patrick; Thonart, Philippe; Dommes, Jacques

    2014-03-01

    The rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BTP1 stimulates induced systemic resistance (ISR) in tomato. A previous work showed that the resistance is associated in leaves with the induction of the first enzyme of the oxylipin pathway, the lipoxygenase (LOX), leading to a faster accumulation of its product, the free 13-hydroperoxy octadecatrienoic acid (13-HPOT), 2 days after Botrytis cinerea inoculation. In the present study, we further investigated the stimulation of the oxylipin pathway: metabolites and enzymes of the pathway were analyzed to understand the fate of the 13-HPOT in ISR. Actually the stimulation began upstream the LOX: free linolenic acid accumulated faster in P. putida BTP1-treated plants than in control. Downstream, the LOX products 13-fatty acid hydroperoxides esterified to galactolipids and phospholipids were more abundant in bacterized plants than in control before infection. These metabolites could constitute a pool that will be used after pathogen attack to produce free fungitoxic metabolites through the action of phospholipase A2, which is enhanced in bacterized plants upon infection. Enzymatic branches which can use as substrate the fatty acid hydroperoxides were differentially regulated in bacterized plants in comparison to control plants, so as to lead to the accumulation of the most fungitoxic compounds against B. cinerea. Our study, which is the first to demonstrate the accumulation of an esterified defense metabolite during rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance, showed that the oxylipin pathway is differentially regulated. It suggests that this allows the plant to prepare to a future infection, and to respond faster and in a more effective way to B. cinerea invasion.

  8. Resistance Training in Type 2 Diabetic Patients Improves Uric Acid Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sousa Moisés S.S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance training (RT can provide several benefits for individuals with Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance training on the strength levels and uric acid (UA concentration in individuals with Type 2 diabetes. The study included 68 patients (57.7±9.0 years that participated in an organized program of RT for 12 weeks. The volunteers were divided into two groups: an experimental group (EG; n=34 that performed the resistance training program consisting of seven exercises executed in an alternating order based on segments; and a control group (CG; n=34 that maintained their normal daily life activities. Muscle strength and uric acid were measured both pre- and post-experiment. The results showed a significant increase in strength of the subjects in the EG for all exercises included in the study (p<0.001. Comparing the strength levels of the post-test, intergroup differences were found in supine sitting (p<0.001, leg extension (p<0.001, shoulder press (p<0.001, leg curl (p=0.001, seated row (p<0.001, leg press (p=0.001 and high pulley (p<0.001. The measured uric acid was significantly increased in both experimental and control groups (p<0.001 and p=0.001, respectively. The intergroup comparison showed a significant increase for the EG (p=0.024. We conclude that the training program was effective for strength gains despite an increase in uric acid in Type 2 diabetics.

  9. Rapid Molecular Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis by PCR-Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphee, Hatairat; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Prammananan, Therdsak; Wiriyachaiporn, Natpapas; Kanchanatavee, Airin; Dharakul, Tararaj

    2015-01-01

    Several existing molecular tests for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are limited by complexity and cost, hindering their widespread application. The objective of this proof of concept study was to develop a simple Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow (NALF) immunoassay as a potential diagnostic alternative, to complement conventional PCR, for the rapid molecular detection of MDR-TB. The NALF device was designed using antibodies for the indirect detection of labeled PCR amplification products. Multiplex PCR was optimized to permit the simultaneous detection of the drug resistant determining mutations in the 81-bp hot spot region of the rpoB gene (rifampicin resistance), while semi-nested PCR was optimized for the S315T mutation detection in the katG gene (isoniazid resistance). The amplification process additionally targeted a conserved region of the genes as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) DNA control. The optimized conditions were validated with the H37Rv wild-type (WT) Mtb isolate and Mtb isolates with known mutations (MT) within the rpoB and katG genes. Results indicate the correct identification of WT (drug susceptible) and MT (drug resistant) Mtb isolates, with the least limit of detection (LOD) being 104 genomic copies per PCR reaction. NALF is a simple, rapid and low-cost device suitable for low resource settings where conventional PCR is already employed on a regular basis. Moreover, the use of antibody-based NALF to target primer-labels, without the requirement for DNA hybridization, renders the device generic, which could easily be adapted for the molecular diagnosis of other infectious and non-infectious diseases requiring nucleic acid detection. PMID:26355296

  10. Rapid Molecular Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis by PCR-Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Immunoassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatairat Kamphee

    Full Text Available Several existing molecular tests for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB are limited by complexity and cost, hindering their widespread application. The objective of this proof of concept study was to develop a simple Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow (NALF immunoassay as a potential diagnostic alternative, to complement conventional PCR, for the rapid molecular detection of MDR-TB. The NALF device was designed using antibodies for the indirect detection of labeled PCR amplification products. Multiplex PCR was optimized to permit the simultaneous detection of the drug resistant determining mutations in the 81-bp hot spot region of the rpoB gene (rifampicin resistance, while semi-nested PCR was optimized for the S315T mutation detection in the katG gene (isoniazid resistance. The amplification process additionally targeted a conserved region of the genes as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb DNA control. The optimized conditions were validated with the H37Rv wild-type (WT Mtb isolate and Mtb isolates with known mutations (MT within the rpoB and katG genes. Results indicate the correct identification of WT (drug susceptible and MT (drug resistant Mtb isolates, with the least limit of detection (LOD being 104 genomic copies per PCR reaction. NALF is a simple, rapid and low-cost device suitable for low resource settings where conventional PCR is already employed on a regular basis. Moreover, the use of antibody-based NALF to target primer-labels, without the requirement for DNA hybridization, renders the device generic, which could easily be adapted for the molecular diagnosis of other infectious and non-infectious diseases requiring nucleic acid detection.

  11. Effects of photovoltaic module soiling on glass surface resistance and potential-induced degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60°C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 orders of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when ...

  12. Modulation of salt (NaCl)-induced effects on oil composition and fatty acid profile of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by exogenous application of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Sibgha; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2010-12-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a potential endogenous plant hormone that plays an important role in plant growth and development. Since sunflower yield and its seed oil yield are adversely affected by salinity, in this study the role of SA in modulating salt (NaCl)-induced effects on various yield and oil characteristics of sunflower was investigated. For this purpose a greenhouse experiment comprising two sunflower hybrid lines (Hysun-33 and SF-187), two NaCl levels (0 and 120 mmol L(-1)) and four SA levels (0, 100, 200 and 300 mg L(-1)) was conducted. Salt stress markedly reduced yield, oil content, linoleic acid and δ-tocopherol in both sunflower lines, while it increased linolenic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid and α- and γ-tocopherols. However, increasing levels of foliar-applied SA resulted in improved achene yield and hundred-achene weight in both lines. Foliar-applied SA caused a significant decrease in oil stearic acid and α- and γ-tocopherols in both lines under non-saline and saline conditions. Salt-induced harmful effects on achene yield and oil characteristics of sunflower could be alleviated by exogenous application of SA. High doses of SA caused a marked increase in sunflower achene oil content as well as some key fatty acids. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Modulation of Tamoxifen Cytotoxicity by Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek K. Motawi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Tamoxifen (TAM is one of the most widely used drugs in managing breast cancer, many women still relapse after long-term therapy. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE is a polyphenolic compound present in many medicinal plants and in propolis. The present study examined the effect of CAPE on TAM cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. MCF-7 cells were treated with different concentrations of TAM and/or CAPE for 48 h. This novel combination exerted synergistic cytotoxic effects against MCF-7 cells via induction of apoptotic machinery with activation of caspases and DNA fragmentation, along with downregulation of Bcl-2 and Beclin 1 expression levels. However, the mammalian microtubule-associated protein light chain LC 3-II level was unchanged. Vascular endothelial growth factor level was also decreased, whereas levels of glutathione and nitric oxide were increased. In conclusion, CAPE augmented TAM cytotoxicity via multiple mechanisms, providing a novel therapeutic approach for breast cancer treatment that can overcome resistance and lower toxicity. This effect provides a rationale for further investigation of this combination.

  14. Differential modulation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor growth by omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashour, George A; Drissel, Stephanie N; Frahm, Silke; Farassati, Faris; Martuza, Robert L; Mautner, Victor-F; Kindler-Röhrborn, Andrea; Kurtz, Andreas

    2005-03-31

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder of the nervous system resulting in neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). In this study, we report the modulation of murine and human MPNST cell growth by the fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA). DHA demonstrated a tendency to stimulate cell growth at low doses and induce apoptosis at high doses, paralleled by the activation of ERK and caspase-3. Furthermore, high-dose DHA reversed the stimulation of MPNST cell growth by a number of growth factors suggested to have a pathogenic effect in NF1 and inhibited MPNST growth in vivo. AA was found to have a reciprocal activity in vitro, stimulating MPNST cell growth at comparable concentrations and reducing DHA activation of ERK. These findings introduce fatty acids as a possible regulator of MPNST development in NF1 patients.

  15. Installation for measurement of the Hall emf and magnetoresistance in low-resistance materials by the amplitude modulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolla, E.V.; Luk'yanova, L.N.

    1979-01-01

    An installation is described for measuring the Hall electromotive force and the magnetorsistance ΔR(B)/R of low-resistance materials by means of the amplitude modulation method with double synchronous detection. An active filter, synchronous detectors, a phase shifter, rejector filter, scale amplifier and squarelaw generator are the basic units of the installation. The installation permits to record ΔR(B)/R approximately 10 -5 and the minimum Hall electromotive force of 10 -9 . Measurement results of the resistivity temperature dependencies, of the Hall coefficient and of the magnetoresistance of a Bisub(2)Tesub(2,7)Sesub(0.3) sample in the temperature range of 77-300 K are given

  16. The Emerging Role of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Insulin Resistance and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mee-Sup

    2016-07-01

    Insulin is required for maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Despite the importance of insulin sensitivity to metabolic health, the mechanisms that induce insulin resistance remain unclear. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) belong to the essential amino acids, which are both direct and indirect nutrient signals. Even though BCAAs have been reported to improve metabolic health, an increased BCAA plasma level is associated with a high risk of metabolic disorder and future insulin resistance, or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) by BCAAs has been suggested to cause insulin resistance. In addition, defective BCAA oxidative metabolism might occur in obesity, leading to a further accumulation of BCAAs and toxic intermediates. This review provides the current understanding of the mechanism of BCAA-induced mTORC1 activation, as well as the effect of mTOR activation on metabolic health in terms of insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the effects of impaired BCAA metabolism will be discussed in detail.

  17. Optimal level of Purple Acid Phosphatase5 is required for maintaining complete resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar eRavichandran

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants possess an exceedingly complex innate immune system to defend against most pathogens. However, a relative proportion of the pathogens overcome host’s innate immunity and impair plant growth and productivity. We previously showed that mutation in purple acid phosphatase (PAP5 lead to enhanced susceptibility of Arabidopsis to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000. Here, we report that an optimal level of PAP5 is crucial for mounting complete basal resistance. Overexpression of PAP5 impaired ICS1, PR1 expression and salicylic acid (SA accumulation similar to pap5 knockout mutant plants. Moreover, plant overexpressing PAP5 was impaired in H2O2 accumulation in response to Pst DC3000. PAP5 is localized in to peroxisomes, a known site of generation of reactive oxygen species for activation of defense responses. Taken together, our results demonstrate that optimal levels of PAP5 is required for mounting resistance against Pst DC3000 as both knockout and overexpression of PAP5 lead to compromised basal resistance.

  18. The Emerging Role of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Insulin Resistance and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mee-Sup Yoon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Insulin is required for maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Despite the importance of insulin sensitivity to metabolic health, the mechanisms that induce insulin resistance remain unclear. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs belong to the essential amino acids, which are both direct and indirect nutrient signals. Even though BCAAs have been reported to improve metabolic health, an increased BCAA plasma level is associated with a high risk of metabolic disorder and future insulin resistance, or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 by BCAAs has been suggested to cause insulin resistance. In addition, defective BCAA oxidative metabolism might occur in obesity, leading to a further accumulation of BCAAs and toxic intermediates. This review provides the current understanding of the mechanism of BCAA-induced mTORC1 activation, as well as the effect of mTOR activation on metabolic health in terms of insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the effects of impaired BCAA metabolism will be discussed in detail.

  19. Gastric-resistant isoniazid pellets reduced degradation of rifampicin in acidic medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Duarte Freire

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Isoniazid and rifampicin are considered the first-line medication for preventing and treating tuberculosis. Rifampicin is degraded in the stomach acidic environment, especially when combined with isoniazid, factor contributing to treatment failure. In this study, gastric-resistant isoniazid pellets were obtained to physical contact of this drug with rifampicin and to bypass the stomach´s acidic environment. The pellets were fabricated using the extrusion-spheronization technique. The coating process was conducted in a fluid spray coater using Acrycoat L 100(r solution as the coating agent. The pellets obtained were submitted to a dissolution test in HCl 0.1 N and phosphate buffer media. The results indicated that optimum gastric-resistance was only attained with the highest amount of coating material, with isoniazid almost fully released in phosphate buffer. The amount of rifampicin released from its mixture with non-coated isoniazid pellets in HCl 0.1 N was less than that released from its mixture with the enteric-coated pellets. Acrycoat L 100(r was shown to be an effective enteric/gastric-resistant coating since the stability of rifampicin appeared to be enhanced when physical contact of this drug with isoniazid was prevented at low pH.

  20. Shunt and series resistance of photovoltaic module evaluated from the I-V curve; I-V tokusei kara hyokashita taiyo denchi no shunt teiko to chokuretsu teiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, K.; Kawamura, H.; Yamanaka, S.; Kawamura, H.; Ono, H. [Meijo University, Nagoya (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    With an objective of discussing I-V characteristics when a shadow has appeared on part of a photovoltaic module, evaluations were given as a first stage of the study on saturation current, shunt resistance and series resistance for the solar cell module. As a result of measuring change in amount of power generated in a sunny day with a shadow appearing over the solar cell module, reduction in power generation capability of about 23% was verified. In other words, the I-V characteristics of the solar cell module change largely because of existence of the shadow caused on the module. The I-V characteristics curve may be expressed and calculated as a function of the shunt resistance and series resistance. By curve-fitting measurement data for a case of changing insolation without existence of partial shadow, values of the shunt resistance and series resistance were derived. As a result, it was found that the calculations agree well with measurements. It was made also clear that each parameter shows temperature dependence. 6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Lack of transgene and glyphosate effects on yield, and mineral and amino acid content of glyphosate-resistant soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been controversy as to whether the glyphosate resistance gene and/or glyphosate applied to glyphosate-resistant (GR) soybean affect mineral content (especially Mg, Mn, and Fe), yield and amino acid content of GR soybean. A two-year field study (2013 and 2014) examined these questions at si...

  2. Pomegranate seed oil, a rich source of punicic acid, prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroegrijk, I.O.; Diepen, J.A. van; Berg, S.; Westbroek, I.; Keizer, H.; Gambelli, L.; Hontecillas, R.; Bassaganya-Riera, J.; Zondag, G.C.; Romijn, J.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Voshol, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pomegranate seed oil has been shown to protect against diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the metabolic effects of punicic acid on high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. DESIGN: High-fat diet or high-fat diet with 1% Pomegranate seed

  3. Pomegranate seed oil, a rich source of punicic acid, prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroegrijk, Irene O. C. M.; van Diepen, Janna A.; van den Berg, Sjoerd; Westbroek, Irene; Keizer, Hiskias; Gambelli, Luisa; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Zondag, Gerben C. M.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Voshol, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Pomegranate seed oil has been shown to protect against diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. To characterize the metabolic effects of punicic acid on high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. High-fat diet or high-fat diet with 1% Pomegranate seed oil (PUA) was fed for 12weeks to

  4. Probe-Dependent Negative Allosteric Modulators of the Long-Chain Free Fatty Acid Receptor FFA4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watterson, Kenneth R; Hansen, Steffen V F; Hudson, Brian D

    2017-01-01

    High-affinity and selective antagonists that are able to block the actions of both endogenous and synthetic agonists of G protein-coupled receptors are integral to analysis of receptor function and to support suggestions of therapeutic potential. Although there is great interest in the potential...... of endogenous and synthetic agonists, clear agonist probe dependence in the nature of allosteric modulation was apparent. Although AH-7614 did not antagonize the second long-chain free fatty acid receptor, free fatty acid receptor 1, the simple chemical structure of AH-7614 containing features found in many...

  5. Validity and Practitality of Acid-Base Module Based on Guided Discovery Learning for Senior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerimadesi; Bayharti; Jannah, S. M.; Lufri; Festiyed; Kiram, Y.

    2018-04-01

    This Research and Development(R&D) aims to produce guided discovery learning based module on topic of acid-base and determine its validity and practicality in learning. Module development used Four D (4-D) model (define, design, develop and disseminate).This research was performed until development stage. Research’s instruments were validity and practicality questionnaires. Module was validated by five experts (three chemistry lecturers of Universitas Negeri Padang and two chemistry teachers of SMAN 9 Padang). Practicality test was done by two chemistry teachers and 30 students of SMAN 9 Padang. Kappa Cohen’s was used to analyze validity and practicality. The average moment kappa was 0.86 for validity and those for practicality were 0.85 by teachers and 0.76 by students revealing high category. It can be concluded that validity and practicality was proven for high school chemistry learning.

  6. TNF-α stimulates endothelial palmitic acid transcytosis and promotes insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Tao; Xing, Shasha; Wu, Yaogong; Bian, Fang; Wu, Guangjie; Li, Ye; Li, Juyi; Bai, Xiangli; Wu, Dan; Jia, Xiong; Wang, Ling; Zhu, Lin; Jin, Si

    2017-01-01

    Persistent elevation of plasma TNF-α is a marker of low grade systemic inflammation. Palmitic acid (PA) is the most abundant type of saturated fatty acid in human body. PA is bound with albumin in plasma and could not pass through endothelial barrier freely. Albumin-bound PA has to be transported across monolayer endothelial cells through intracellular transcytosis, but not intercellular diffusion. In the present study, we discovered that TNF-α might stimulate PA transcytosis across cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, which further impaired the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by cardiomyocytes and promoted insulin resistance. In this process, TNF-α-stimulated endothelial autophagy and NF-κB signaling crosstalk with each other and orchestrate the whole event, ultimately result in increased expression of fatty acid transporter protein 4 (FATP4) in endothelial cells and mediate the increased PA transcytosis across microvascular endothelial cells. Hopefully the present study discovered a novel missing link between low grade systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:28304381

  7. Evaluation of resistance to Al toxicity in wild graminae of acid meadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Poozesh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In acid soils, aluminium toxicity is the primary factor limiting crop and forage production. At soil pH < 5.0, Al solubility increases and Al appears to be rhizotoxic. The objectives of the present study were to compare Al tolerance among wild graminae of acid meadows and to evaluate the relation between a plant functional trait and the Al resistance, in nutrient solution. In addition, a sensitive Lolium perenne variety was included as a control. There was a great difference among the graminaceous species tested, when compared by relative root elongation and critical Al activity corresponding to 50% root elongation reduction. The {Al 3+}50 activities were 3, 13 , 14 et 26 µM for Lolium perenne, Molinia coerulea, Holcus lanatus and Danthonia decumbens, respectively. No relation was found between the functional trait leaf dry matter content (LDMC and Al resistance. Holcus lanatus, tolerant to Al toxicity, with a low LDMC, would deserve a further study of its nutritional qualities for cattle. The very tolerant D. decumbens, with a high LDMC, would present an interest for a later study of the mechanisms of tolerance to Al and possibly, for other applications like the protection of the very acid soils against erosion.

  8. Modulation of resistive switching characteristics for individual BaTiO3 microfiber by surface oxygen vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhilei; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Fang; Wang, Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Different from traditional thin-film BaTiO3 (BTO) RRAM device with planar structure, individual microfiber-shaped RRAM device, showing promising application potentials in the micro-sized non-volatile memory system, has not been investigated so far to demonstrate resistive switching behavior. In this work, individual sol-gel BTO microfiber has been formed using the draw-bench method, followed by annealing in different atmospheres of air and argon, respectively. The resistive switching characteristics of the individual BTO microfiber have been investigated by employing double-probe SEM measurement system, which shows great convenience to test local electrical properties by modulating the contact sites between the W probes and the BTO microfiber. For the sample annealed in air, the average resistive ON/OFF ratio is as high as 108, enhanced about four orders in comparison with the counterpart that annealed in Argon. For the sample annealed in argon ambience, the weakened resistive ON/OFF ratio can be attributed to the increased presence of oxygen vacancies in the surface of BTO fibers, and the underlying electrical conduction mechanisms are also discussed.

  9. Inspiratory high frequency airway oscillation attenuates resistive loaded dyspnea and modulates respiratory function in young healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Theresa; Sumners, David Paul; Green, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT). We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO), a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20) compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT) device (n = 15) in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20-36 yrs). HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2 × 30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week). Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003) and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005) groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O) was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; prespiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT) in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT.

  10. Mice Lacking Free Fatty Acid Receptor 1 (GPR40/FFAR1) are Protected Against Conjugated Linoleic Acid-Induced Fatty Liver but Develop Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tina; Drescher, Andrea; Panse, Madhura; Lastovicka, Petr; Peter, Andreas; Weigert, Cora; Kostenis, Evi; Ullrich, Susanne; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) affect body fat distribution, induce insulin resistance and stimulate insulin secretion. The latter effect is mediated through the free fatty acid receptor-1 (GPR40/FFAR1). This study examines whether GPR40/FFAR1 interacts with tissue specific metabolic changes induced by CLAs. After chronic application of CLAs C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and GPR40/FFAR1 (Ffar1(-/-)) knockout mice developed insulin resistance. Although CLAs accumulated in liver up to 46-fold genotype-independently, hepatic triglycerides augmented only in WT mice. This triglyceride deposition was not associated with increased inflammation. In contrast, in brain of CLA fed Ffar1(-/-) mice mRNA levels of TNF-α were 2-fold higher than in brain of WT mice although CLAs accumulated genotype-independently in brain up to 4-fold. Concomitantly, Ffar1(-/-) mice did not respond to intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) insulin injection with an increase in cortical activity while WT mice reacted as assessed by radiotelemetric electrocorticography (ECoG) measurements. In vitro incubation of primary murine astrocytes confirmed that CLAs stimulate neuronal inflammation independent of GPR40/FFAR1. This study discloses that GPR40/FFAR1 indirectly modulates organ-specific effects of CLAs: the expression of functional GPR40/FFAR1 counteracts CLA-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in the brain, but favors the development of fatty liver. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Effect of acidic environment on dislocation resistance of endosequence root repair material and mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Shokouhinejad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of an acidic environment on dislocation resistance (push-out bond strength of EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM putty and ERRM paste, a new bioceramic-based material, to that of mineral tri-oxide aggregate (MTA.One-hundred twenty root dentin slices with standardized canal spaces were divided into 6 groups (n = 20 each and filled with tooth-colored ProRoot MTA (groups 1 and 2, ERRM putty (groups 3 and 4, or ERRM paste (groups 5 and 6. The specimens of groups 1, 3, and 5 were exposed to phosphate buffered saline (PBS solution (pH=7.4 and those of groups 2, 4, and 6 were exposed to butyric acid (pH= 4.4. The specimens were then incubated for 4 days at 37°C. The push-out bond strength was then measured using a universal testing machine. Failure modes after the push-out test were examined under a light microscope at ×40 magnification. The data for dislocation resistance were analyzed using the t-test and one-way analysis of variance.In PBS environment (pH=7.4, there were no significant differences among materials (P=0.30; but the mean push-out bond strength of ERRM putty was significantly higher than that of other materials in an acidic environment (P<0.001. Push-out bond strength of MTA and ERRM paste decreased after exposure to an acidic environment; whereas ERRM putty was not affected by acidic pH. The bond failure mode was predominantly cohesive for all groups except for MTA in an acidic environment; which showed mixed bond failure in most of the specimens.The force needed for dislocation of MTA and ERRM paste was significantly lower in samples stored in acidic pH; however, push-out bond strength of ERRM putty was not influenced by acidity.

  12. Comparative transcriptional profiling of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis in response to salicylic acid- and methyl jasmonate-mediated heat resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Wang

    Full Text Available Culturing the economically important macroalga Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (Rhodophyta is limited due to the high temperatures in the summertime on the southern Chinese coast. Previous studies have demonstrated that two phytohormones, salicylic acid (SA and methyl jasmonate (MJ, can alleviate the adverse effects of high-temperature stress on Gp. lemaneiformis. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying SA- and MJ-mediated heat tolerance, we performed comprehensive analyses of transcriptome-wide gene expression profiles using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq technology. A total of 14,644 unigenes were assembled, and 10,501 unigenes (71.71% were annotated to the reference databases. In the SA, MJ and SA/MJ treatment groups, 519, 830, and 974 differentially expressed unigenes were detected, respectively. Unigenes related to photosynthesis and glycometabolism were enriched by SA, while unigenes associated with glycometabolism, protein synthesis, heat shock and signal transduction were increased by MJ. A crosstalk analysis revealed that 216 genes were synergistically regulated, while 18 genes were antagonistically regulated by SA and MJ. The results indicated that the two phytohormones could mitigate the adverse effects of heat on multiple pathways, and they predominantly acted synergistically to resist heat stress. These results will provide new insights into how SA and MJ modulate the molecular mechanisms that counteract heat stress in algae.

  13. Contribution of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus reuteri to acid resistance and persistence in sourdough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Marcia S; Schlicht, Sabine; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-08-30

    Acid stress impacts the persistence of lactobacilli in industrial sourdough fermentations, and in intestinal ecosystems. However, the contribution of glutamate to acid resistance in lactobacilli has not been demonstrated experimentally, and evidence for the contribution of acid resistance to the competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough is lacking. It was therefore the aim of this study to investigate the ecological role of glutamate decarboxylase in L. reuteri. A gene coding for a putative glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was identified in the genome of L. reuteri 100-23. Different from the organization of genetic loci coding for glutamate decarboxylase in other lactic acid bacteria, gadB was located adjacent to a putative glutaminase gene, gls3. An isogenic deletion mutant, L. reuteri ∆gadB, was generated by a double crossover method. L. reuteri 100-23 but not L. reuteri ∆gadB converted glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) in phosphate butter (pH 2.5). In sourdough, both strains converted glutamine to glutamate but only L. reuteri 100-23 accumulated GABA. Glutamate addition to phosphate buffer, pH 2.5, improved survival of L. reuteri 100-23 100-fold. However, survival of L. reuteri ∆gadB remained essentially unchanged. The disruption of gadB did not affect growth of L. reuteri in mMRS or in sourdough. However, the wild type strain L. reuteri 100-23 displaced L. reuteri ∆gadB after 5 cycles of fermentation in back-slopped sourdough fermentations. The conversion of glutamate to GABA by L. reuteri 100-23 contributes to acid resistance and to competitiveness in industrial sourdough fermentations. The organization of the gene cluster for glutamate conversion, and the availability of amino acids in cereals imply that glutamine rather than glutamate functions as the substrate for GABA formation. The exceptional coupling of glutamine deamidation to glutamate decarboxylation in L. reuteri likely reflects adaptation to cereal substrates.

  14. Contribution of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus reuteri to acid resistance and persistence in sourdough fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gänzle Michael G

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid stress impacts the persistence of lactobacilli in industrial sourdough fermentations, and in intestinal ecosystems. However, the contribution of glutamate to acid resistance in lactobacilli has not been demonstrated experimentally, and evidence for the contribution of acid resistance to the competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough is lacking. It was therefore the aim of this study to investigate the ecological role of glutamate decarboxylase in L. reuteri. Results A gene coding for a putative glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was identified in the genome of L. reuteri 100-23. Different from the organization of genetic loci coding for glutamate decarboxylase in other lactic acid bacteria, gadB was located adjacent to a putative glutaminase gene, gls3. An isogenic deletion mutant, L. reuteri ∆gadB, was generated by a double crossover method. L. reuteri 100-23 but not L. reuteri ∆gadB converted glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA in phosphate butter (pH 2.5. In sourdough, both strains converted glutamine to glutamate but only L. reuteri 100-23 accumulated GABA. Glutamate addition to phosphate buffer, pH 2.5, improved survival of L. reuteri 100-23 100-fold. However, survival of L. reuteri ∆gadB remained essentially unchanged. The disruption of gadB did not affect growth of L. reuteri in mMRS or in sourdough. However, the wild type strain L. reuteri 100-23 displaced L. reuteri ∆gadB after 5 cycles of fermentation in back-slopped sourdough fermentations. Conclusions The conversion of glutamate to GABA by L. reuteri 100-23 contributes to acid resistance and to competitiveness in industrial sourdough fermentations. The organization of the gene cluster for glutamate conversion, and the availability of amino acids in cereals imply that glutamine rather than glutamate functions as the substrate for GABA formation. The exceptional coupling of glutamine deamidation to glutamate decarboxylation in L. reuteri likely

  15. Contribution of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus reuteri to acid resistance and persistence in sourdough fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Acid stress impacts the persistence of lactobacilli in industrial sourdough fermentations, and in intestinal ecosystems. However, the contribution of glutamate to acid resistance in lactobacilli has not been demonstrated experimentally, and evidence for the contribution of acid resistance to the competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough is lacking. It was therefore the aim of this study to investigate the ecological role of glutamate decarboxylase in L. reuteri. Results A gene coding for a putative glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was identified in the genome of L. reuteri 100-23. Different from the organization of genetic loci coding for glutamate decarboxylase in other lactic acid bacteria, gadB was located adjacent to a putative glutaminase gene, gls3. An isogenic deletion mutant, L. reuteri ∆gadB, was generated by a double crossover method. L. reuteri 100-23 but not L. reuteri ∆gadB converted glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) in phosphate butter (pH 2.5). In sourdough, both strains converted glutamine to glutamate but only L. reuteri 100-23 accumulated GABA. Glutamate addition to phosphate buffer, pH 2.5, improved survival of L. reuteri 100-23 100-fold. However, survival of L. reuteri ∆gadB remained essentially unchanged. The disruption of gadB did not affect growth of L. reuteri in mMRS or in sourdough. However, the wild type strain L. reuteri 100-23 displaced L. reuteri ∆gadB after 5 cycles of fermentation in back-slopped sourdough fermentations. Conclusions The conversion of glutamate to GABA by L. reuteri 100-23 contributes to acid resistance and to competitiveness in industrial sourdough fermentations. The organization of the gene cluster for glutamate conversion, and the availability of amino acids in cereals imply that glutamine rather than glutamate functions as the substrate for GABA formation. The exceptional coupling of glutamine deamidation to glutamate decarboxylation in L. reuteri likely reflects adaptation to cereal

  16. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Joseph R.; Kline, La’Kesha C.; Kenyon, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth. PMID:27682115

  17. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Pittman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance. To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C, low pH (pH 2.8, and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2. In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth.

  18. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Wang

    Full Text Available Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals.

  19. Amino acid profiles of young adults differ by sex, body mass index and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Cruz, M; Vargas-Morales, J M; Méndez-García, A L; López-Barradas, A M; Granados-Portillo, O; Ordaz-Nava, G; Rocha-Viggiano, A K; Gutierrez-Leyte, C A; Medina-Cerda, E; Rosado, J L; Morales, J C; Torres, N; Tovar, A R; Noriega, L G

    2018-04-01

    An increase in plasma branched-chain amino acids is associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about the basal plasma amino acid concentrations in young adults. Our aim was to determine the plasma amino acid profiles of young adults and to evaluate how these profiles were modified by sex, body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance (IR). We performed a transversal study with 608 Mexican young adults aged 19.9 ± 2.4 years who were applicants to the Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí. The subjects underwent a physical examination and provided a clinical history and a blood sample for biochemical, hormonal and amino acid analyses. The women had higher levels of arginine, aspartate and serine and lower levels of α-aminoadipic acid, cysteine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, proline, tryptophan, tyrosine, urea and valine than the men. The obese subjects had higher levels of alanine, aspartate, cysteine, ornithine, phenylalanine, proline and tyrosine and lower levels of glycine, ornithine and serine than the normal weight subjects. Subjects with IR (defined as HOMA > 2.5) had higher levels of arginine, alanine, aspartate, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, proline, tyrosine, taurine and valine than the subjects without IR. Furthermore, we identified two main groups in the subjects with obesity and/or IR; one group was composed of amino acids that positively correlated with the clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters, whereas the second group exhibited negative correlations. This study demonstrates that young adults with obesity or IR have altered amino acid profiles characterized by an increase in alanine, aspartate, proline and tyrosine and a decrease in glycine. Copyright © 2018 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II

  20. Excitatory amino acid transporters: recent insights into molecular mechanisms, novel modes of modulation and new therapeutic possibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Fahlke, Christoph; Bjørn-Yoshimoto, Walden Emil

    2015-01-01

    The five excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT1–5) mediating the synaptic uptake of the major excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate are differently expressed throughout the CNS and at the synaptic level. Although EAATs are crucial for normal excitatory neurotransmission, explorations into the ...... of EAATs and their intricate transport process, the novel approaches to pharmacological modulation of the transporters that have emerged, and interesting new perspectives in EAAT as drug targets proposed in recent years....

  1. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chaplin, Alice; Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute...

  2. Krebs cycle intermediates modulate thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) production in rat brain in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntel, Robson L; Nogueira, Cristina W; Rocha, João B T

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Krebs cycle intermediates on basal and quinolinic acid (QA)- or iron-induced TBARS production in brain membranes. Oxaloacetate, citrate, succinate and malate reduced significantly the basal and QA-induced TBARS production. The potency for basal TBARS inhibition was in the order (IC50 is given in parenthesis as mM) citrate (0.37) > oxaloacetate (1.33) = succinate (1.91) > > malate (12.74). alpha-Ketoglutarate caused an increase in TBARS production without modifying the QA-induced TBARS production. Cyanide (CN-) did not modify the basal or QA-induced TBARS production; however, CN- abolished the antioxidant effects of succinate. QA-induced TBARS production was enhanced by iron ions, and abolished by desferrioxamine (DFO). The intermediates used in this study, except for alpha-ketoglutarate, prevented iron-induced TBARS production. Oxaloacetate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate and malate, but no succinate and QA, exhibited significantly iron-chelating properties. Only alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced deoxyribose degradation, while succinate and malate showed a modest effect against Fe2+/H2O2-induced deoxyribose degradation. Using heat-treated preparations citrate, malate and oxaloacetate protected against basal or QA-induced TBARS production, whereas alpha-ketoglutarate induced TBARS production. Succinate did not offer protection against basal or QA-induced TBARS production. These results suggest that oxaloacetate, malate, succinate, and citrate are effective antioxidants against basal and iron or QA-induced TBARS production, while alpha-ketoglutarate stimulates TBARS production. The mechanism through which Krebs cycle intermediates offer protection against TBARS production is distinct depending on the intermediate used. Thus, under pathological conditions such as ischemia, where citrate concentrations vary it can assume an important role as a modulator of oxidative

  3. All-trans-retinoic Acid Modulates the Plasticity and Inhibits the Motility of Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Adriana; Affatato, Roberta; Centritto, Floriana; Fratelli, Maddalena; Kurosaki, Mami; Barzago, Maria Monica; Bolis, Marco; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Paroni, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is a natural compound proposed for the treatment/chemoprevention of breast cancer. Increasing evidence indicates that aberrant regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a determinant of the cancer cell invasive and metastatic behavior. The effects of ATRA on EMT are largely unknown. In HER2-positive SKBR3 and UACC812 cells, showing co-amplification of the ERBB2 and RARA genes, ATRA activates a RARα-dependent epithelial differentiation program. In SKBR3 cells, this causes the formation/reorganization of adherens and tight junctions. Epithelial differentiation and augmented cell-cell contacts underlie the anti-migratory action exerted by the retinoid in cells exposed to the EMT-inducing factors EGF and heregulin-β1. Down-regulation of NOTCH1, an emerging EMT modulator, is involved in the inhibition of motility by ATRA. Indeed, the retinoid blocks NOTCH1 up-regulation by EGF and/or heregulin-β1. Pharmacological inhibition of γ-secretase and NOTCH1 processing also abrogates SKBR3 cell migration. Stimulation of TGFβ contributes to the anti-migratory effect of ATRA. The retinoid switches TGFβ from an EMT-inducing and pro-migratory determinant to an anti-migratory mediator. Inhibition of the NOTCH1 pathway not only plays a role in the anti-migratory action of ATRA; it is relevant also for the anti-proliferative activity of the retinoid in HCC1599 breast cancer cells, which are addicted to NOTCH1 for growth/viability. This effect is enhanced by the combination of ATRA and the γ-secretase inhibitor N-(N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl)-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester, supporting the concept that the two compounds act at the transcriptional and post-translational levels along the NOTCH1 pathway. PMID:26018078

  4. The effect of acetylsalicylic acid resistance on prognosis of patients who have developed acute coronary syndrome during acetylsalicylic acid therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobikoglu, Gultekin F; Norgaz, Tugrul; Aksu, Huseyin; Ozer, Orhan; Erturk, Mehmet; Destegul, Evren; Akyuz, Umit; Dai, Sennur Unal; Narin, Ahmet

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The relationships between clinical events and acetylsalicylic acid resistance (AR), as well as its frequency, have been established in stable patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Although acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients taking acetylsalicylic acid have been accepted as a high-risk population, the role of AR has not been investigated in these patient groups. Thus, in the present study, the impact of AR was investigated in patients with ACS who were taking acetylsalicylic acid. METHODS: Between January 2001 and February 2003, 140 ACS patients were included in the present prospective study. All patients had ACS while taking acetylsalicylic acid. Coronary angiographic scores for severity and extent of CAD were determined for all patients. The effect of acetylsalicylic acid on platelet function was assessed by the platelet function analyzer PFA-100 (Dade Behring, USA). The primary end point was the composite of death, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident and revascularization. The mean follow-up period was 20 months. RESULTS: Patients with AR were older than patients without AR (63.8±10.8 years versus 58.3±11.2 years; P=0.005). Moreover, myocardial damage was higher in patients with AR according to cardiac troponin T values (1.11±1.3 μg/L versus 0.41±0.5 μg/L; P=0.01). The composite end point of death, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident or revascularization was present in 16 of 45 patients (35%) with AR and in 13 of 79 patients (16%) without AR (hazard ratio 2.46, 95% CI 1.18 to 5.13; P=0.016). After adjustment for age, platelet count, cardiac troponin T value and CAD severity score, AR remained an independent predictor for long-term adverse events (hazard ratio 3.03, 95% CI 1.06 to 8.62; P=0.038). CONCLUSIONS: The clinical event rate was found to be higher in ACS patients with AR than in those without AR. Thus, it may be concluded that there is a strong correlation between a worse prognosis and AR in these patients

  5. Atomic Scale Modulation of Self-Rectifying Resistive Switching by Interfacial Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Xing

    2018-04-14

    Higher memory density and faster computational performance of resistive switching cells require reliable array‐accessible architecture. However, selecting a designated cell within a crossbar array without interference from sneak path currents through neighboring cells is a general problem. Here, a highly doped n++ Si as the bottom electrode with Ni‐electrode/HfOx/SiO2 asymmetric self‐rectifying resistive switching device is fabricated. The interfacial defects in the HfOx/SiO2 junction and n++ Si substrate result in the reproducible rectifying behavior. In situ transmission electron microscopy is used to quantitatively study the properties of the morphology, chemistry, and dynamic nucleation–dissolution evolution of the chains of defects at the atomic scale. The spatial and temporal correlation between the concentration of oxygen vacancies and Ni‐rich conductive filament modifies the resistive switching effect. This study has important implications at the array‐level performance of high density resistive switching memories.

  6. Amino Acid Profiling of Zinc Resistant Prostate Cancer Cell Lines: Associations With Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvilova, Monika; Raudenska, Martina; Heger, Zbynek; Richtera, Lukas; Cernei, Natalia; Adam, Vojtech; Babula, Petr; Novakova, Marie; Masarik, Michal; Gumulec, Jaromir

    2017-05-01

    Failure in intracellular zinc accumulation is a key process in prostate carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, epidemiological studies of zinc administration have provided contradicting results. In order to examine the impact of the artificial intracellular increase of zinc(II) ions on prostate cancer metabolism, PNT1A, 22Rv1, and PC-3 prostatic cell lines-depicting different stages of cancer progression-and their zinc-resistant counterparts were used. To determine "benign" and "malignant" metabolic profiles, amino acid patterns, gene expression, and antioxidant capacity of these cell lines were assessed. Amino acid profiles were examined using an ion-exchange liquid chromatography. Intracellular zinc content was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Metallothionein was quantified using differential pulse voltammetry. The content of reduced glutathione was determined using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with an electrochemical detector. Cellular antioxidant capacity was determined by the ABTS test and gene expression analysis was performed by qRT-PCR. Long-term zinc treatment was shown to reroute cell metabolism from benign to more malignant type. Long-term application of high concentration of zinc(II) significantly enhanced cisplatin resistance, invasiveness, cellular antioxidant capacity, synthesis of glutathione, and expression of treatment resistance- and stemness-associated genes (SOX2, POU5F1, BIRC5). Tumorous cell lines universally displayed high accumulation of aspartate and sarcosine and depletion of essential amino acids. Increased aspartate/threonine, aspartate/methionine, and sarcosine/serine ratios were associated with cancer phenotype with high levels of sensitivity and specificity. Prostate 77: 604-616, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. New Insights into the Role of Macrophages in Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Fatty Liver Disease: Modulation by Endogenous Omega-3 Fatty Acid-derived Lipid Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan eClària

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is causally linked to a chronic state of low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue. Prolonged, unremitting inflammation in this tissue has a direct impact on insulin-sensitive tissues (i.e. liver and its timely resolution is a critical step toward reducing the prevalence of related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This article describes the current state-of-the-art knowledge and novel insights into the role of macrophages in adipose tissue inflammation, with special emphasis on the progressive changes in macrophage polarization observed over the course of obesity. In addition, this article extends the discussion to the contribution of Kupffer cells, the liver resident macrophages, to metabolic liver disease. Special attention is given to the modulation of macrophage responses by omega-3-PUFAs, and more importantly by resolvins, which are potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving autacoids generated from docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids. In fact, resolvins have been shown to work as endogenous stop signals in inflamed adipose tissue and to return this tissue to homeostasis by inducing a phenotypic switch in macrophage polarization toward a pro-resolving phenotype. Collectively, this article offers new views on the role of macrophages in metabolic disease and their modulation by endogenously-generated omega-3-PUFA-derived lipid mediators.

  8. Gene Networks in the Wild: Identifying Transcriptional Modules that Mediate Coral Resistance to Experimental Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Noah H; Seneca, Francois O; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2015-12-28

    Organisms respond to environmental variation partly through changes in gene expression, which underlie both homeostatic and acclimatory responses to environmental stress. In some cases, so many genes change in expression in response to different influences that understanding expression patterns for all these individual genes becomes difficult. To reduce this problem, we use a systems genetics approach to show that variation in the expression of thousands of genes of reef-building corals can be explained as variation in the expression of a small number of coexpressed "modules." Modules were often enriched for specific cellular functions and varied predictably among individuals, experimental treatments, and physiological state. We describe two transcriptional modules for which expression levels immediately after heat stress predict bleaching a day later. One of these early "bleaching modules" is enriched for sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, particularly E26 transformation-specific (ETS)-family transcription factors. The other module is enriched for extracellular matrix proteins. These classes of bleaching response genes are clear in the modular gene expression analysis we conduct but are much more difficult to discern in single gene analyses. Furthermore, the ETS-family module shows repeated differences in expression among coral colonies grown in the same common garden environment, suggesting a heritable genetic or epigenetic basis for these expression polymorphisms. This finding suggests that these corals harbor high levels of gene-network variation, which could facilitate rapid evolution in the face of environmental change. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Modulates Resistance to Cisplatin in the A549/DDP Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lili; Du, Chunjuan; Wu, Lei; Yu, Jinpu; An, Xiumei; Yu, Wenwen; Cao, Shui; Li, Hui; Ren, Xiubao

    2017-01-01

    Background Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells can potentially enhance the tumor-killing activity of chemotherapy. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of CIK cells on cisplatin (DDP) resistance in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549/DDP. Methods The detect resistance index, drug resistance related-genes and cytokine secretion of A549/DDP co-cultured with CIK cells were assayed in vitro . Results After A549/DDP co-culture with CIK cells, the DDP resistance of A549/DDP significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner. The DDP resistance of A549/DDP co-cultured with CIK cells for 20 h decreased 4.93-fold compared with that of A549/DDP cells cultured alone ( P A549/DDP significantly decreased after co-culture with CIK cells ( P A549/DDP with CIK cells. The expression of GST-π was restored by adding the neutralizing IFN-γ. Conclusion CIK cells can reverse the drug resistance of A549/DDP in a time-dependent manner by reducing GST-π expression to increase the accumulation of DDP. The effect of CIK cells on re-sensitizing lung cancer cells to the chemotherapy drug was partially dependent on the secretion of IFN-γ.

  10. BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE1 Modulates Arabidopsis Resistance to Green Peach Aphids via PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT41[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jiaxin; A. Finlayson, Scott; Salzman, Ron A.; Shan, Libo; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2014-01-01

    BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE1 (BIK1) plays important roles in induced defense against fungal and bacterial pathogens in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Its tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) homolog is required for host plant resistance to a chewing insect herbivore. However, it remains unknown whether BIK1 functions in plant defense against aphids, a group of insects with a specialized phloem sap-feeding style. In this study, the potential role of BIK1 was investigated in Arabidopsis infested with the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae). In contrast to the previously reported positive role of intact BIK1 in defense response, loss of BIK1 function adversely impacted aphid settling, feeding, and reproduction. Relative to wild-type plants, bik1 displayed higher aphid-induced hydrogen peroxide accumulation and more severe lesions, resembling a hypersensitive response (HR) against pathogens. These symptoms were limited to the infested leaves. The bik1 mutant showed elevated basal as well as induced salicylic acid and ethylene accumulation. Intriguingly, elevated salicylic acid levels did not contribute to the HR-like symptoms or to the heightened aphid resistance associated with the bik1 mutant. Elevated ethylene levels in bik1 accounted for an initial, short-term repellence. Introducing a loss-of-function mutation in the aphid resistance and senescence-promoting gene PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4) into the bik1 background blocked both aphid resistance and HR-like symptoms, indicating bik1-mediated resistance to aphids is PAD4 dependent. Taken together, Arabidopsis BIK1 confers susceptibility to aphid infestation through its suppression of PAD4 expression. Furthermore, the results underscore the role of reactive oxygen species and cell death in plant defense against phloem sap-feeding insects. PMID:24963070

  11. Interferon modulation of c-myc expression in cloned Daudi cells: relationship to the phenotype of interferon resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, M; Modjtahedi, N; Brison, O; Tovey, M G

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of interferon-sensitive Daudi cell with electrophoretically pure human interferon alpha markedly reduced the level of c-myc mRNA, increased the level of class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA) mRNA, and did not affect the level of actin mRNA within the same cells. In contrast, the level of c-myc mRNA or HLA mRNA did not change significantly following interferon treatment in different clones of Daudi cells selected for resistance to the antiproliferative action of interferon. These cells possessed interferon receptors, however, and responded to interferon modulation of other genes, including 2',5' oligoisoadenylate synthetase (M. G. Tovey, M. Dron, K. E. Mogensen, B. Lebleu, N. Metchi, and J. Begon-Lours, Guymarho, J. Gen. Virol., 64:2649-2653, 1983; M. Dron, M. G. Tovey, and P. Eid, J. Gen. Virol., 66:787-795, 1985). A clone of interferon-resistant Daudi cells which had reverted to almost complete sensitivity to both the antiproliferative action of interferon and the interferon-enhanced expression of HLA mRNA remained refractory, however, to interferon modulation of c-myc expression, suggesting that a reduced level of c-myc mRNA may not be a prerequisite for inhibition of cell proliferation in interferon-treated cells. Our results do not exclude the possibility, however, that posttranscriptional modification(s) of c-myc expression may precede an inhibition of cell proliferation in interferon-treated cells.

  12. Tetradecylthioacetic acid prevents high fat diet induced adiposity and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Guerre-Millo, Michéle; Flindt, Esben N

    2002-01-01

    completely prevented diet-induced insulin resistance and adiposity. In genetically obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats TTA treatment reduced the epididymal adipose tissue mass and improved insulin sensitivity. All three rodent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes were activated by TTA...... in the ranking order PPARalpha > PPARdelta > PPARgamma. Expression of PPARgamma target genes in adipose tissue was unaffected by TTA treatment, whereas the hepatic expression of PPARalpha-responsive genes encoding enzymes involved in fatty acid uptake, transport, and oxidation was induced. This was accompanied...

  13. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND SULFURIC ACID RESISTANCE OF HIGH VOLUME CLASS C FLY ASH CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit YAZICI

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, some physical and mechanical properties of concrete mixtures containing high volume Class C fly ash have been investigated. Two different curing conditions, standard curing in water and curing in air were applied to the specimens in which 40 to 70 % cement was replaced with fly ash. Compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and sulfuric acid resistance of concrete mixes, the volume stability of mortar bar specimens and setting times of pastes were investigated. Test results are presented comparatively with control specimens which have only Portland cement as a binder.

  14. Effect of light-load resistance exercise on postprandial amino acid transporter expression in elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jakob; Bülow, Jacob; Jensen, Jacob K

    2017-01-01

    An impaired amino acid sensing is associated with age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass. We tested whether light-load resistance exercise (LL-RE) affects postprandial amino acid transporter (AAT) expression in aging skeletal muscle. Untrained, healthy men (age: +65 years) were subjected to 13 h...... and 12 g at 7 h) (BOLUS, N = 10), or hourly isocaloric maltodextrin drinks (placebo, N = 10). Quadriceps muscle biopsies were taken at 0, 3, 7, and 10 h postexercise from both the resting and exercised leg, from which the membrane protein and mRNA expression of select AATs were analyzed by Western Blot...... decrease in SNAT2 mRNA expression was observed. LL-RE increased membrane-associated AAT protein expression and mRNA expression. Altered AAT protein expression was only seen in groups that ingested whey protein, with the greatest effect observed after hourly feeding. This points toward an importance of AATs...

  15. Modulation of hepatic biotransformation and biliary excretion of bile acid by age and sinusoidal bile acid load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, U.; Miyai, K.; Hardison, W.G.M.

    1987-01-01

    Pericentral hepatocytes excrete bile acids more slowly and biotransform them more than periportal cells. This may reflect adaptation to low pericentral bile acid concentration or may be intrinsic. The authors studied two models in which pericentral bile acid concentrations are high: the 72-h choledocho-caval shunt (CCS) rat and the 3- to 4-wk-old rat. Livers were perfused forward or backward to assess periportal or pericentral hepatocyte function. Taurodeoxycholate (TDC) was infused at 32 nmol x min -1 x g liver -1 , and a bolus of [ 3 H]TDC was given to assess metabolism and excretion of bile acids. In CCS livers perfused backward, pericentral cells resembled periportal cells of controls in that time to excrete 50% of administered [ 3 H]-TDC (t 50 ) was reduced by two-thirds and [ 3 H]TDC biotransformation was reduced by about half. In young livers t 50 was half that of adult livers when perfused backward. Biotransformation, however, was not reduced. Young livers biotransformed more than adult controls for any given residence time of bile acid in the liver. They conclude that the difference between pericentral and perioportal cells as regards bile acid processing is adaptive. Livers from young rats biotransform more bile acid than those from controls under similar conditions

  16. Analysis of the membrane proteome of ciprofloxacin-resistant macrophages by stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Caceres

    Full Text Available Overexpression of multidrug transporters is a well-established mechanism of resistance to chemotherapy, but other changes may be co-selected upon exposure to drugs that contribute to resistance. Using a model of J774 macrophages made resistant to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin and comparing it with the wild-type parent cell line, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis using the stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture technology coupled with liquid chromatography electrospray ionization Fourier transform tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-FT-MS/MS on 2 samples enriched in membrane proteins (fractions F1 and F2 collected from discontinuous sucrose gradient. Nine hundred proteins were identified with at least 3 unique peptides in these 2 pooled fractions among which 61 (F1 and 69 (F2 showed a significantly modified abundance among the 2 cell lines. The multidrug resistance associated protein Abcc4, known as the ciprofloxacin efflux transporter in these cells, was the most upregulated, together with Dnajc3, a protein encoded by a gene located downstream of Abcc4. The other modulated proteins are involved in transport functions, cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization, immune response, signal transduction, and metabolism. This indicates that the antibiotic ciprofloxacin is able to trigger a pleiotropic adaptative response in macrophages that includes the overexpression of its efflux transporter.

  17. Imaging Preferential Flow Pathways of Contaminants from Passive Acid Mine Drainage Mitigation Sites Using Electrical Resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, N.; Mount, G.; Terry, N.; Herndon, E.; Singer, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Critical Zone represents the surficial and shallow layer of rock, air, water, and soil where most interactions between living organisms and the Earth occur. Acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting from coal extraction can influence both biological and geochemical processes across this zone. Conservative estimates suggest that more than 300 million gallons of AMD are released daily, making this acidic solution of water and contaminants a common issue in areas with legacy or current coal extraction. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) provides a rapid and minimally invasive method to identify and monitor contaminant pathways from AMD remediation systems in the subsurface of the Critical Zone. The technique yields spatially continuous data of subsurface resistivity that can be inverted to determine electrical conductivity as a function of depth. Since elevated concentrations of heavy metals can directly influence soil conductivity, ERI data can be used to trace the flow pathways or perhaps unknown mine conduits and transport of heavy metals through the subsurface near acid mine drainage sources. This study aims to examine preferential contaminant migration from those sources through substrate pores, fractures, and shallow mine workings in the near subsurface surrounding AMD sites in eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania. We utilize time lapse ERI measures during different hydrologic conditions to better understand the variability of preferential flow pathways in relation to changes in stage and discharge within the remediation systems. To confirm ERI findings, and provide constraint to geochemical reactions occurring in the shallow subsurface, we conducted Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrometry analysis of groundwater samples from boreholes along the survey transects. Through these combined methods, we can provide insight into the ability of engineered systems to contain and isolate metals in passive acid mine drainage treatment systems.

  18. Polyphyllin VII increases sensitivity to gefitinib by modulating the elevation of P21 in acquired gefitinib resistant non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honggang Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Blockade of EGFR with reversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs is considered the frontline strategy for advanced NSCLC with EGFR mutations. However, acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI has been observed, resulting in disease progression and limited clinical benefit. Polyphyllin VII is the main member of polyphyllin family, which has been demonstrated to show strong anticancer activity against carcinomas. The sensitizing effect and underlying mechanism of Polyphyllin VII against acquired EGFR-TKI resistant NSCLC are still unexplored. In the present study, we aim to examined the sensitizing effect of Polyphyllin VII to gefitinib by modulating P21 signaling pathway in gefitinib acquired resistant NSCLC in vitro and in vivo. Gefitinib sensitive PC-9 cells and gefitinib acquired resistant H1975 cells were used. Cell proliferation and Clonogenic assay, Cell cycle analysis, Western blotting analysis and xenograft treatment were carried out. Polyphyllin VII enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of gefitinib and gefitinib-induced G1 phase arrest by modulation of P21 signaling pathway in acquired gefitinib resistant cells in vitro and in vivo. Polyphyllin VII elevated sensitization of gefitinib acquired resistant NSCLC cells to gefitinib through G1 phase arrest and modulation of P21 signaling pathway. It provides a potential new strategy to overcome gefitinib acquired resistance for EGFR-TKI resistant NSCLC.

  19. Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage in Multiple Sclerosis and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Therapeutic Modulation via Fumaric Acid Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Gold

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in many neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s as well as Huntington’s disease. Inflammation and oxidative stress are also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent data point at an important role of anti-oxidative pathways for tissue protection in chronic-progressive MS, particularly involving the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. Thus, novel therapeutics enhancing cellular resistance to free radicals could prove useful for MS treatment. Here, fumaric acid esters (FAE are a new, orally available treatment option which had already been tested in phase II/III MS trials demonstrating beneficial effects on relapse rates and magnetic resonance imaging markers. In vitro, application of dimethylfumarate (DMF leads to stabilization of Nrf2, activation of Nrf2-dependent transcriptional activity and abundant synthesis of detoxifying proteins. Furthermore, application of FAE involves direct modification of the inhibitor of Nrf2, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1. On cellular levels, the application of FAE enhances neuronal survival and protects astrocytes against oxidative stress. Increased levels of Nrf2 are detected in the central nervous system of DMF treated mice suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of MS. In EAE, DMF ameliorates the disease course and improves preservation of myelin, axons and neurons. Finally, Nrf2 is also up-regulated in the spinal cord of autopsy specimens from untreated patients with MS, probably as part of a naturally occurring anti-oxidative response. In summary, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative pathways are important players in MS pathophysiology and constitute a promising target for future MS therapies like FAE.

  20. Polyoxometalate ionic liquids as self-repairing acid-resistant corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Sven; Kostrzewa, Monika; Wierschem, Andreas; Streb, Carsten

    2014-12-01

    Corrosion is a global problem for any metallic structure or material. Herein we show how metals can easily be protected against acid corrosion using hydrophobic polyoxometalate-based ionic liquids (POM-ILs). Copper metal disks were coated with room-temperature POM-ILs composed of transition-metal functionalized Keggin anions [SiW11 O39 TM(H2 O)](n-) (TM=Cu(II) , Fe(III) ) and quaternary alkylammonium cations (Cn H2 n+1 )4 N(+) (n=7-8). The corrosion resistance against acetic acid vapors and simulated "acid rain" was significantly improved compared with commercial ionic liquids or solid polyoxometalate coatings. Mechanical damage to the POM-IL coating is self-repaired in less than one minute with full retention of the acid protection properties. The coating can easily be removed and recovered by rinsing with organic solvents. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Partial characterization of chayotextle starch-based films added with ascorbic acid encapsulated in resistant starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ortiz, Miguel A; Vargas-Torres, Apolonio; Román-Gutiérrez, Alma D; Chavarría-Hernández, Norberto; Zamudio-Flores, Paul B; Meza-Nieto, Martín; Palma-Rodríguez, Heidi M

    2017-05-01

    Chayotextle starch was modified by subjecting it to a dual treatment with acid and heating-cooling cycles. This caused a decrease in the content of amylose, which showed values of 30.22%, 4.80%, 3.27% and 3.57% for native chayotextle starch (NCS), starch modified by acid hydrolysis (CMS), and CMS with one (CMS1AC) and three autoclave cycles (CMS3AC), respectively. The percentage of crystallinity showed an increase of 36.9%-62% for NCS and CMS3AC. The highest content of resistant starch (RS) was observed in CMS3AC (37.05%). The microcapsules were made with CMS3AC due to its higher RS content; the total content of ascorbic acid of the microcapsules was 82.3%. The addition of different concentrations of CMS3AC microcapsules (0%, 2.5%, 6.255% and 12.5%) to chayotextle starch-based films (CSF) increased their tensile strength and elastic modulus. The content of ascorbic acid and RS in CSF was ranged from 0% to 59.4% and from 4.84% to 37.05% in the control film and in the film mixed with CMS3AC microcapsules, respectively. Water vapor permeability (WVP) values decreased with increasing concentrations of microcapsules in the films. Microscopy observations showed that higher concentrations of microcapsules caused agglomerations due their poor distribution in the matrix of the films. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inspiratory High Frequency Airway Oscillation Attenuates Resistive Loaded Dyspnea and Modulates Respiratory Function in Young Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Theresa; Sumners, David Paul; Green, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT). We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO), a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20) compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT) device (n = 15) in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20–36 yrs). HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2×30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week). Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003) and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005) groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O) was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; pinspiratory dynamic pressure was increased by training in both the HFAO (vs. PRE; pinspiratory flow rate (L.s−1) achieved during the maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure manoeuvre increased significantly POST (vs. PRE; p = 0.001) in the HFAO group only. HFAO reduced inspiratory resistive loading–induced dyspnoea and augments static and dynamic maximal respiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT) in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT. PMID:24651392

  3. Inspiratory high frequency airway oscillation attenuates resistive loaded dyspnea and modulates respiratory function in young healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Morris

    Full Text Available Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT. We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO, a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20 compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT device (n = 15 in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20-36 yrs. HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2 × 30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week. Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003 and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005 groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; p<0.001. Maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure was increased by training in both the HFAO (vs. PRE; p<0.001 and SHAM-RMT (vs. PRE; p = 0.021 groups. Peak inspiratory flow rate (L.s(-1 achieved during the maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure manoeuvre increased significantly POST (vs. PRE; p = 0.001 in the HFAO group only. HFAO reduced inspiratory resistive loading-induced dyspnoea and augments static and dynamic maximal respiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT.

  4. Modulation of Multidrug Resistance Gene Expression by Coumarin Derivatives in Human Leukemic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrak, Tomasz; Bogucki, Jacek; Galkowski, Dariusz; Kaczmarczyk, Robert; Feldo, Marcin; Cioch, Maria; Kocki, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    The presence of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells is considered as the major cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. The mechanism responsible for the phenomenon of multidrug resistance is explained, among others, as overexpression of membrane transporters primarily from the ABC family which actively remove cytostatics from the tumor cell. The effect of 20 coumarin derivatives on the cytotoxicity and expression of MDR1, MRP1, BCRP, and LRP genes (encoding proteins responsible for multidrug resistance) in cancer cells was analyzed in the study. The aim of this research included determination of IC10 and IC50 values of selected coumarin derivatives in the presence and absence of mitoxantrone in leukemia cells and analysis of changes in the expression of genes involved in multidrug resistance: MDR1, MRP, LRP, and BCRP after 24-hour exposure of the investigated cell lines to selected coumarins in the presence and absence of mitoxantrone in IC10 and IC50 concentrations. The designed research was conducted on 5 cell lines derived from the human hematopoietic system: CCRF/CEM, CEM/C1, HL-60, HL-60/MX1, and HL-60/MX2. Cell lines CEM/C1, HL-60/MX1, and HL-60/MX2 exhibit a multidrug resistance phenotype. PMID:29387293

  5. Gefitinib circumvents hypoxia-induced drug resistance by the modulation of HIF-1alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Jin Kyung; Choi, Yun Jung; Lee, Jin Kyung; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Na, Im Ii; Yang, Sung Hyun; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Yoo, Young Do; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2009-03-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is a transcriptional factor which is activated by hypoxia and associated with cell survival, proliferation and drug resistance. Recent studies have shown that the down-stream molecules of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal are involved in the hypoxia-dependent or -independent HIF-1alpha protein accumulation. Thus, we hypothesized that an EGFR-TK inhibitor, gefitinib, might circumvent the hypoxia-induced drug resistance via the regulation of HIF-1alpha expression. In our data, treatment of gefitinib suppressed induced HIF-1alpha by hypoxia. This action of gefitinib was caused by reduced protein stability without any change in the level of HIF-1alpha mRNA. The effect of gefitinib on down-regulation of HIF-1alpha was reversed by transfection of constitutively active form of Akt. The cellular response to gefitinib was similar in both normoxia and hypoxia condition. However, the response to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs decreased >50% under hypoxia condition and they did not change HIF-1alpha expression. In addition, the suppression of HIF-1alpha using siRNA overcame partially hypoxia-induced drug resistance. In conclusion, gefitinib was able to circumvent hypoxia-induced drug resistance suggesting that the effective suppression of HIF-1alpha by the inhibition of EGFR-Akt pathway may overcome the hypoxia-induced drug resistance.

  6. Salicylic acid confers enhanced resistance to Glomerella leaf spot in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Shi, Xiangpeng; Li, Baohua; Zhang, Qingming; Liang, Wenxing; Wang, Caixia

    2016-09-01

    Glomerella leaf spot (GLS) caused by Glomerella cingulata is a newly emergent disease that results in severe defoliation and fruit spots in apple. Currently, there are no effective means to control this disease except for the traditional fungicide sprays. Induced resistance by elicitors against pathogens infection is a widely accepted eco-friendly strategy. In the present study, we investigated whether exogenous application of salicylic acid (SA) could improve resistance to GLS in a highly susceptible apple cultivar (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. 'Gala') and the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with SA, at 0.1-1.0 mM, induced strong resistance against GLS in 'Gala' apple leaves, with SA treated leaves showing significant reduction in lesion numbers and disease index. Concurrent with the enhanced disease resistance, SA treatment markedly increased the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and defence-related enzyme activities, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). As expected, SA treatment also induced the expression levels of five pathogenesis-related (PR) genes including PR1, PR5, PR8, Chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase. Furthermore, the most pronounced and/or rapid increase was observed in leaves treated with SA and subsequently inoculated with G. cingulata compared to the treatment with SA or inoculation with the pathogen. Together, these results suggest that exogenous SA triggered increase in reactive oxygen species levels and the antioxidant system might be responsible for enhanced resistance against G. cingulata in 'Gala' apple leaves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Fatty acid profiles from the plasma membrane and detergent resistant membranes of two plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Salazar, Laura; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Gutiérrez-Nájera, Nora; Noyola-Martínez, Liliana; González-Solís, Ariadna; Gavilanes-Ruíz, Marina

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to establish the composition of the plant plasma membrane in order to understand its organization and behavior under continually changing environments. Knowledge of the lipid phase, in particular the fatty acid (FA) complex repertoire, is important since FAs determine many of the physical-chemical membrane properties. FAs are constituents of the membrane glycerolipid and sphingolipid backbones and can also be linked to some sterols. In addition, FAs are components of complex lipids that can constitute membrane micro-domains, and the use of detergent-resistant membranes is a common approach to study their composition. The diversity and cellular allocation of the membrane lipids containing FAs are very diverse and the approaches to analyze them provide only general information. In this work, a detailed FA analysis was performed using highly purified plasma membranes from bean leaves and germinating maize embryos and their respective detergent-resistant membrane preparations. The analyses showed the presence of a significant amount of very long chain FAs (containing 28C, 30C and 32C), in both plasma membrane preparations from bean and maize, that have not been previously reported. Herein is demonstrated that a significant enrichment of very long chain saturated FAs and saturated FAs can occur in detergent-resistant membrane preparations, as compared to the plasma membranes from both plant species. Considering that a thorough analysis of FAs is rarely performed in purified plasma membranes and detergent-resistant membranes, this work provides qualitative and quantitative evidence on the contributions of the length and saturation of FAs to the organization of the plant plasma membrane and detergent-resistant membranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface flow and reactive transport simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of subsurface electrical conductivity changes, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from river stage fluctuations and associated river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev.

  9. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of changes subsurface electrical conductivity, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from water table changes and from river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev .

  10. The Therapeutic Potential of Resistant Starch in Modulation of Insulin Resistance, Endotoxemia, Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Biomarkers in Women with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, P; Farhangi, M Abbasalizad; Sarmadi, B; Gargari, B P; Zare Javid, A; Pouraghaei, M; Dehghan, P

    2016-01-01

    This trial aims to determine the effects of resistant starch (RS) subtype 2 (RS2) on glycemic status, metabolic endotoxemia and markers of oxidative stress. A randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial group of 56 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was divided to 2 groups. The intervention group (n = 28) and control group (n = 28) received 10 g/day RS2 or placebo for 8 weeks, respectively. Fasting blood samples were taken to determine glycemic status, endotoxin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), antioxidant enzymes concentrations as well as uric acid at baseline and after the intervention. After 8 weeks, RS2 caused a significant decrease in the levels of MDA (-34.10%), glycosylated hemoglobin (-9.40%), insulin (-29.36%), homeostasis model of insulin resistance (-32.85%) and endotoxin (-25.00%), a significant increase in TAC (18.10%) and glutathione peroxidase (11.60%) as compared with control. No significant changes were observed in fasting plasma glucose, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, hs-CRP, superoxide dismutase, catalase and uric acid in the RS2 group as compared with the control group. Supplementation with RS2 may be improved glycemic status, endotoxemia and markers of oxidative stress in patients with T2DM. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Drug-resistant Drosophila indicate glutamate-gated chloride channels are targets for the antiparasitics nodulisporic acid and ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, N S; Hirschberg, B; Qian, S; Hunt, D; Thomas, B; Brochu, R; Ludmerer, S W; Zheng, Y; Smith, M; Arena, J P; Cohen, C J; Schmatz, D; Warmke, J; Cully, D F

    2000-12-05

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster was used to examine the mode of action of the novel insecticide and acaricide nodulisporic acid. Flies resistant to nodulisporic acid were selected by stepwise increasing the dose of drug in the culture media. The resistant strain, glc(1), is at least 20-fold resistant to nodulisporic acid and 3-fold cross-resistant to the parasiticide ivermectin, and exhibited decreased brood size, decreased locomotion, and bang sensitivity. Binding assays using glc(1) head membranes showed a marked decrease in the affinity for nodulisporic acid and ivermectin. A combination of genetics and sequencing identified a proline to serine mutation (P299S) in the gene coding for the glutamate-gated chloride channel subunit DmGluClalpha. To examine the effect of this mutation on the biophysical properties of DmGluClalpha channels, it was introduced into a recombinant DmGluClalpha, and RNA encoding wild-type and mutant subunits was injected into Xenopus oocytes. Nodulisporic acid directly activated wild-type and mutant DmGluClalpha channels. However, mutant channels were approximately 10-fold less sensitive to activation by nodulisporic acid, as well as ivermectin and the endogenous ligand glutamate, providing direct evidence that nodulisporic acid and ivermectin act on DmGluClalpha channels.

  12. Rage induces hepatocellular carcinoma proliferation and sorafenib resistance by modulating autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Wu, Peng-Wen; Zhou, Yuan; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Hen; Liu, Yang; Shi, Xiao-Lei

    2018-02-14

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (Rage) is involved in the development of various tumors and acts as an oncogenic protein. Rage is overexpressed in tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecular mechanism of Rage in HCC progression and sorafenib resistance remains unclear. In this study, enhanced Rage expression is highly associated proliferation and contributes to sorafenib resistance. Rage deficiency contributed to autophagy induction through activating AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway, which is important for sorafenib response. Moreover, the interactions between Rage and Rage ligands such as high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and s100a4 positively increased Rage expression. Our data indicate that Rage may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in HCC and biomarker for sorafenib resistance.

  13. Isolation and gut microbiota modulation of antibiotic-resistant probiotics from human feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Xu, Bo; Sun, Hanxiao; Li, Xiuying; Li, Zhi; Wei, Pijin

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotic-resistant probiotics may be advantageous for antibiotic-induced gut microbiota imbalance. In this article, we aimed to isolate antibiotic-resistant bacteria as potential probiotics. Feces from 3 healthy adults and 2 infants were used to isolate the antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Then we established gut microbiota imbalance mice model by antibiotics treatment and used it to assess the effect of the probiotics. Finally, we identified 8 isolates, and 6 of them were used as probiotics cocktail. Number of anaerobe, lactobacilli, and Bifidobacterium in feces were higher in the probiotic group (9.47±0.35 log10CFU/g, 8.74±0.18 log10CFU/g, 7.24±0.38 log10CFU/g, respectively) compared with model group (Pgut microbiota imbalance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Collusion-Resistant Audio Fingerprinting System in the Modulated Complex Lapped Transform Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hernandez, Jose Juan; Feregrino-Uribe, Claudia; Cumplido, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Collusion-resistant fingerprinting paradigm seems to be a practical solution to the piracy problem as it allows media owners to detect any unauthorized copy and trace it back to the dishonest users. Despite the billionaire losses in the music industry, most of the collusion-resistant fingerprinting systems are devoted to digital images and very few to audio signals. In this paper, state-of-the-art collusion-resistant fingerprinting ideas are extended to audio signals and the corresponding parameters and operation conditions are proposed. Moreover, in order to carry out fingerprint detection using just a fraction of the pirate audio clip, block-based embedding and its corresponding detector is proposed. Extensive simulations show the robustness of the proposed system against average collusion attack. Moreover, by using an efficient Fast Fourier Transform core and standard computer machines it is shown that the proposed system is suitable for real-world scenarios. PMID:23762455

  15. Collusion-resistant audio fingerprinting system in the modulated complex lapped transform domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Juan Garcia-Hernandez

    Full Text Available Collusion-resistant fingerprinting paradigm seems to be a practical solution to the piracy problem as it allows media owners to detect any unauthorized copy and trace it back to the dishonest users. Despite the billionaire losses in the music industry, most of the collusion-resistant fingerprinting systems are devoted to digital images and very few to audio signals. In this paper, state-of-the-art collusion-resistant fingerprinting ideas are extended to audio signals and the corresponding parameters and operation conditions are proposed. Moreover, in order to carry out fingerprint detection using just a fraction of the pirate audio clip, block-based embedding and its corresponding detector is proposed. Extensive simulations show the robustness of the proposed system against average collusion attack. Moreover, by using an efficient Fast Fourier Transform core and standard computer machines it is shown that the proposed system is suitable for real-world scenarios.

  16. Photovoltaic module diagnostics by series resistance monitoring and temperature and rated power estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sera, Dezso; Teodorescu, Remus; Rodriguez, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important parameters, which characterize a photovoltaic panel health state, is its series resistance. An increase of this normally indicates bad contacts between cells or panels. Another important property, which characterizes the aging of the panel is the reduction of its MPP power...... in Standard Test Conditions (STC1). Simulation and experimental measurements regarding the determination of a PV panel series resistance, its MPP power in STC, as well as its temperature, are presented in this paper. It is shown that the panel series resistance can be determined experimentally without needing...... to perform an entire I-V curve scan. The panel MPP power in STC and its temperature - given the irradiance is measured - can be well approximated using the measured I-V curve, and a simple model of the PV panel....

  17. Investigation of carbon storage regulation network (csr genes) and phenotypic differences between acid sensitive and resistant Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Escherichia coli O157:H7 and related serotype strains have previously been shown to vary in acid resistance, however, little is known about strain specific mechanisms of acid resistance. We examined sensitive and resistant E. coli strains to determine the effects of growth in minimal and...

  18. Glucose modulation induces reactive oxygen species and increases P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance to chemotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, N A; Richardson, D R; Jansson, P J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cancer cells develop resistance to stress induced by chemotherapy. In tumours, a considerable glucose gradient exists, resulting in stress. Notably, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that regulates P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a crucial drug-efflux transporter involved in multidrug resistance (MDR). Here, we investigated how glucose levels regulate Pgp-mediated drug transport and resistance. Experimental Approach Human tumour cells (KB31, KBV1, A549 and DMS-53) were incubated under glucose starvation to hyperglycaemic conditions. Flow cytometry assessed reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Pgp activity. HIF-1α, NF-κB and Pgp expression were assessed by reverse transcriptase-PCR and Western blotting. Fluorescence microscopy examined p65 distribution and a luciferase-reporter assay assessed HIF-1 promoter-binding activity. The effect of glucose-induced stress on Pgp-mediated drug resistance was examined after incubating cells with the chemotherapeutic and Pgp substrate, doxorubicin (DOX), and performing MTT assays validated by viable cell counts. Key Results Changes in glucose levels markedly enhanced cellular ROS and conferred Pgp-mediated drug resistance. Low and high glucose levels increased (i) ROS generation via NADPH oxidase 4 and mitochondrial membrane destabilization; (ii) HIF-1 activity; (iii) nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit; and (iv) HIF-1α mRNA and protein levels. Increased HIF-1α could also be due to decreased prolyl hydroxylase protein under these conditions. The HIF-1α target, Pgp, was up-regulated at low and high glucose levels, which led to lower cellular accumulation of Pgp substrate, rhodamine123, and greater resistance to DOX. Conclusions and Implications As tumour cells become glucose-deprived or exposed to high glucose levels, this increases stress, leading to a more aggressive MDR phenotype via up-regulation of Pgp. PMID:25586174

  19. Baicalein modulates stress-resistance and life span in C. elegans via SKN-1 but not DAF-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermann, Susannah; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Wätjen, Wim

    2016-09-01

    The flavonoid baicalein has been demonstrated to be an activator of the transcription factor Nrf2 in mammalian cell lines. We show that it further modulates the Nrf2 homolog SKN-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans and by this pathway mediates beneficial effects in the nematode: baicalein enhances the resistance of C. elegans against lethal thermal and sodium arsenite stress and dose-dependently prolongs the life span of the nematode. Using RNA interference against SKN-1 we were able to show that the induction of longevity and the enhanced stress-resistance were dependent on this transcription factor. DAF-16 (homolog to mammalian FOXO) is another pivotal aging-related transcription factor in the nematode. We demonstrate that DAF-16 does not participate in the beneficial effects of baicalein: since baicalein causes no increase in the nuclear translocation of DAF-16 (DAF-16::GFP expressing strain, incubation time: 1h) and it still induces longevity even in a DAF-16 loss-of-function strain, we conclude, that baicalein increases stress-resistance and life span in C. elegans via SKN-1 but not DAF-16. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sorafenib modulates the gene expression of multi-drug resistance mediating ATP-binding cassette proteins in experimental hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Katrin; Franz, Clemens; Xiao, Zhi; Mohr, Elvira; Serba, Susanne; Büchler, Markus W; Schemmer, Peter

    2010-11-01

    High ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein expression leads to intrinsic drug resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the potential chemosensitizing effects of sorafenib on the multi-drug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The ABC-protein gene expression and the cellular survival were determined by RT-PCR analysis and MTT assay in HUH7 cells. Sorafenib inhibits MDR. The ABC-protein mRNA expression decreased by up to 51% (p ≤ 0.01). Addition of sorafenib to conventional chemotherapy restored the chemosensitivity. Combination of gemcitabine plus sorafenib decreased the ABC-protein mRNA levels by up to 77%, compared to gemcitabine monotherapy (p ≤ 0.001). Doxorubicin plus sorafenib decreased the ABC-protein mRNA levels up to 74% compared to doxorubicin monotherapy (p ≤ 0.001). This study provides evidence that the MDR phenotype of HCC cells can be modulated by the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib and consequentially may lead towards personalized therapies in patients with highly resistant tumors.

  1. Arachidonic acid can function as a signaling modulator by activating the TRPM5 cation channel in taste receptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oike, Hideaki; Wakamori, Minoru; Mori, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Taguchi, Ryo; Misaka, Takumi; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko

    2006-09-01

    Vertebrate sensory cells such as vomeronasal neurons and Drosophila photoreceptor cells use TRP channels to respond to exogenous stimuli. In mammalian taste cells, bitter and sweet substances as well as some amino acids are received by G protein-coupled receptors (T2Rs or T1Rs). As a result of activation of G protein and phospholipase Cbeta2, the TRPM5 channel is activated. Intracellular Ca(2+) is known to be a TRPM5 activator, but the participation of lipid activators remains unreported. To clarify the effect of arachidonic acid on TRPM5 in taste cells, we investigated the expression profile of a series of enzymes involved in controlling the intracellular free arachidonic acid level, with the result that in a subset of taste bud cells, monoglyceride lipase (MGL) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are expressed as well as the previously reported group IIA phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)-IIA). Double-labeling analysis revealed that MGL, COX-2 and PLA(2)-IIA are co-expressed in some cells that express TRPM5. We then investigated whether arachidonic acid activates TRPM5 via a heterologous expression system in HEK293 cells, and found that its activation occurred at 10 microM arachidonic acid. These results strongly suggest the possibility that arachidonic acid acts as a modulator of TRPM5 in taste signaling pathways.

  2. Acid resistance of palm oil fuel ash and metakaolin ternary blend cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamilu Usman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects of blend of Palm Oil fuel ash (POFA and Metakaolin (MK on the resistance of cement mortar to sulphuric acid (H2SO4 attack. Tests were conducted on POFA and MK ternary blended cement mortar immersed in a 3% H2SO4 solution for up 180 d. Binaries of POFA/cement and MK/cement as well as plain ordinary Portland cement (OPC mortar was also tested for comparison. The parameters measured include residual compressive strength and residual mass. Additionally, the microstructures of the specimens were analysed using the X-ray diffraction and Fourier transformed infrared techniques. The residual compressive strengths of the mortar specimens for plain OPC, binary blend of POFA and cement, binary blend of MK and cement, and ternary blend of POFA, MK and cement after 180 d of immersion in the acid solution were 25, 30, 33, and 32%, respectively. Moreover, the corresponding residual masses of the specimens were 39, 52, 58, and 54%. Accordingly, the ternary blended mortar performed better in resisting H2SO4 attack than the plain OPC and binary blend of POFA/cement mortars.

  3. Straining electrode behavior and corrosion resistance of nickel base alloys in high temperature acidic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kazuo

    1992-01-01

    Repassivation behavior and IGA resistance of nickel base alloys containing 0∼30 wt% chromium was investigated in high temperature acid sulfate solution. (1) The repassivation rate was increased with increasing chromium content. And so the amounts of charge caused by the metal dissolution were decreased with increasing chromium content. (2) Mill-annealed Alloy 600 suffered IGA at low pH environment below about 3.5 at the fixed potentials above the corrosion potential in 10%Na 2 SO 4 +H 2 SO 4 solution at 598K. On the other hand, thermally-treated Alloy 690 was hard to occur IGA at low pH environments which mill-annealed Alloy 600 occurred IGA. (3) It was considered that the reason, why nickel base alloys containing high chromium content such as Alloy 690 (60%Ni-30%Cr-10%Fe) had high IGA/SCC resistance in high temperature acidic solution containing sulfate ion, is due to both the promotion of the repassivation and the suppression of the film dissolution by the formation of the dense chromium oxide film

  4. Abscisic Acid-Cytokinin Antagonism Modulates Resistance Against Pseudomonas syringae in Tobacco

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grosskinsky, D. K.; van der Graaff, E.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 12 (2015), s. 1283-1288 ISSN 0031-949X Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Nicotiana tabacum * plant-pathogen interaction Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.011, year: 2015

  5. Analysis of autonomic modulation after an acute session of resistance exercise at different intensities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolino J

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juliana Nicolino,1 Dionei Ramos,1 Marceli Rocha Leite,1 Fernanda Maria Machado Rodrigues,1 Bruna Spolador de Alencar Silva,1 Guilherme Yassuyuki Tacao,1 Alessandra Choqueta de Toledo,2 Luiz Carlos Marques Vanderlei,1 Ercy Mara Cipulo Ramos1 1Department of Physiotherapy, Paulista State University (UNESP, Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Pathology, School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Purpose: Physical exercises are employed as part of the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; however information regarding cardiac autonomic modulation after an acute session of resistance exercise (RE is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cardiac autonomic modulation, via heart rate variability after an acute session of RE applied at different intensities in COPD patients. Patients and methods: Twelve COPD patients underwent an acute session of RE with an intensity of 60% and another of 90% of the one repetition maximum test. For analysis of autonomic modulation, heart rate was recorded beat-by-beat for 20 minutes at rest and after the training session. Heart rate variability indexes were obtained in the time and frequency domains for the assessment of autonomic modulation. Results: Regardless of exercise intensity, RE acute sessions influenced the autonomic modulation when the recovery period was compared with the baseline. An increase in standard deviation of normal to normal RR intervals was observed throughout recovery time after the RE, as compared to baseline in both protocols: 60% and 90% of the one repetition maximum test. The spectral component of low frequency index (ms was higher throughout recovery when compared to baseline in both protocols. The same was also observed in the spectral component of high frequency index (ms for the protocols of 60% and 90%. Conclusion: RE sessions impact on the autonomic modulation of COPD patients by promoting

  6. Jatrophanes as promising multidrug resistance modulators: Advances of structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Wang, Wen-Qiong; Tang, Shuai; Song, Wei-Bin; Xuan, Li-Jiang

    2018-02-12

    The phytochemical study of Euphorbia helioscopia afforded euphornin (1) in a large amount. Alkaline hydrolysis of 1 using potassium carbonate yielded the main product monodeacetyleuphornin (2), whose structural modification at 14-OH gave rise to 21 acylated derivatives euphornoate A-U (3-23). Thus, a mini compound library of jatrophanes was established to screen for MDR modulators. Biological studies clearly demonstrated the effect of C-14 pattern modification in MDR reversal activity and several compounds with RF values over 300 fold at 20 μM (6, 16, 20, 22, 23) were thought to be promising MDR modulators. The SARs are discussed, which reveal that introduction of an alkyl acyl group bearing 4 carbons at C-14 or an aryl acyl group with electron donating groups is favorable for the activity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Salicylic acid-induced glutathione status in tomato crop and resistance to root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White Chitwood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari C. Meher

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Salicylic acid-(SA is a plant defense stimulator. Exogenous application of SA might influence the status of glutathione-(GSH. GSH activates and SA alters the expression of defense genes to modulate plant resistance against pathogens. The fate of GSH in a crop following SA treatment is largely unknown. The SA-induced profiles of free reduced-, free oxidized-(GSSG and protein bound-(PSSG glutathione in tomato crop following foliar treatment of transplant at 5.0-10.0 μg mL–1 were measured by liquid chromatography. Resistance to root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita damaging tomato and crop performance were also evaluated. SA treatment at 5.0-10.0 μg mL–1 to tomato transplants increased GSH, GSSG and PSSG in plant leaf and root, more so in leaf, during crop growth and development. As the fruits ripened, GSH and PSSG increased and GSSG declined. SA reduced the root infection by M. incognita, nematode reproduction and thus, improved the resistance of tomato var. Pusa Ruby, but reduced crop growth and redox status. SA at 5.0 μg mL–1 improved yield and fruit quality. The study firstly linked SA with activation of glutathione metabolism and provided an additional dimension to the mechanism of induced resistance against obligate nematode pathogen. SA increased glutathione status in tomato crop, imparted resistance against M. incognita, augmented crop yield and functional food quality. SA can be applied at 5.0 μg mL–1 for metabolic engineering of tomato at transplanting to combine host-plant resistance and health benefits in formulating a strategic nematode management decision.

  8. IQGAP1 Protein Binds Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) and Modulates Trastuzumab Resistance*

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Colin D.; Li, Zhigang; Dillon, Deborah A.; Sacks, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 20–25% of breast cancers. Increased HER2 expression is an adverse prognostic factor and correlates with decreased patient survival. HER2-positive (HER2(+)) breast cancer is treated with trastuzumab. Unfortunately, some patients are intrinsically refractory to therapy, and many who do respond initially become resistant within 1 year. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying HER2 signaling and trastuzumab resistance is essential to reduce breast cancer mortality. IQGAP1 is a ubiquitously expressed scaffold protein that contains multiple protein interaction domains. By regulating its binding partners IQGAP1 integrates signaling pathways, several of which contribute to breast tumorigenesis. We show here that IQGAP1 is overexpressed in HER2(+) breast cancer tissue and binds directly to HER2. Knockdown of IQGAP1 decreases HER2 expression, phosphorylation, signaling, and HER2-stimulated cell proliferation, effects that are all reversed by reconstituting cells with IQGAP1. Reducing IQGAP1 up-regulates p27, and blocking this increase attenuates the growth inhibitory effects of IQGAP1 knockdown. Importantly, IQGAP1 is overexpressed in trastuzumab-resistant breast epithelial cells, and reducing IQGAP1 both augments the inhibitory effects of trastuzumab and restores trastuzumab sensitivity to trastuzumab-resistant SkBR3 cells. These data suggest that inhibiting IQGAP1 function may represent a rational strategy for treating HER2(+) breast carcinoma. PMID:21724847

  9. LAMP3 is involved in tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells through the modulation of autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nagelkerke (Anika); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); J. Bussink (Johan); F.C. Sweep (Fred); M.P. Look (Maxime); J.A. Foekens (John); J.W.M. Martens (John); P.N. Span (Paul)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractLysosome-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) is a member of the LAMP-family of proteins, which are involved in the process of autophagy. Autophagy is induced by tamoxifen in breast cancer cells and may contribute to tamoxifen resistance. In this study, the significance of LAMP3 for

  10. Pulse-modulated multilevel data storage in an organic ferroelectric resistive memory diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, J.; Breemen, A.J.J.M. van; Khikhlovskyi, V.; Kemerink, M.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Gelinck, G.H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate multilevel data storage in organic ferroelectric resistive memory diodes consisting of a phase-separated blend of P(VDF-TrFE) and a semiconducting polymer. The dynamic behaviour of the organic ferroelectric memory diode can be described in terms of the inhomogeneous field mechanism

  11. Epigallocatechin gallate as a modulator of Campylobacter resistance to macrolide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurinčič, Marija; Klančnik, Anja; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive therapeutic use of macrolides in humans and animals is important in the selection of macrolide-resistant Campylobacter isolates. This study shows high co-resistance to erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, dirithromycin and tylosin, with contributions from the 23S rRNA gene and drug efflux systems. The CmeABC efflux pump plays an important role in reduced macrolide susceptibility, accompanied by contributions from the CmeDEF efflux pump and potentially a third efflux pump. To improve clinical performance of licensed antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents, it is important to understand the factors in Campylobacter that affect susceptibility to macrolide antibiotics. Using mutants that lack the functional genes coding for the CmeB and CmeF efflux pump proteins and the CmeR transcriptional repressor, we show that these efflux pumps are potential targets for the development of therapeutic strategies that use a combination of a macrolide with an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) to restore macrolide efficacy. The natural phenolic compound epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has good modulatory activity over the extrusion across the outer membrane of the macrolides tested, both in sensitive and resistant Campylobacter isolates. Comparing EGCG with known chemical EPIs, correlations in the effects on the particular macrolide antibiotics were seen. EGCG modifies Campylobacter multidrug efflux systems and thus could have an impact on restoring macrolide efficacy in resistant strains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Series Resistance Monitoring for Photovoltaic Modules in the Vicinity of MPP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sera, Dezso

    2010-01-01

    the time period with reduced power production. This paper focuses on the estimation of series resistance of flat silicone PV panels or arrays during operation, in the vicinity of their MPP. The method presented in this paper helps to detect failures by monitoring changes in the panel’s or array’s series...

  13. LAMP3 is involved in tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells through the modulation of autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerke, A.P.; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Bussink, J.; Sweep, F.C.; Look, M.P.; Foekens, J.A.; Martens, J.W.; Span, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) is a member of the LAMP-family of proteins, which are involved in the process of autophagy. Autophagy is induced by tamoxifen in breast cancer cells and may contribute to tamoxifen resistance. In this study, the significance of LAMP3 for tamoxifen

  14. Insulin resistance is associated with altered amino acid metabolism and adipose tissue dysfunction in normoglycemic women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund, Petri; Zhang, Xiaobo; Pekkala, Satu; Autio, Reija; Kong, Lingjia; Yang, Yifan; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Alen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated adiposity, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to identify early metabolic alterations associated with insulin resistance in normoglycemic women with varying degree of adiposity. One-hundred and ten young and middle-aged women were divided into low and high IR groups based on their median HOMA-IR (0.9 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 1.2). Body composition was assessed using DXA, skeletal muscle and liver fat by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, serum metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and adipose tissue and skeletal muscle gene expression by microarrays. High HOMA-IR subjects had higher serum branched-chain amino acid concentrations (BCAA) (p HOMA-IR subjects (p < 0.05 for all), but no differentially expressed genes in skeletal muscle were found. In conclusion, in normoglycemic women insulin resistance was associated with increased serum BCAA concentrations, down-regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism and increased expression of inflammation-related genes in the adipose tissue. PMID:27080554

  15. The necrotic signal induced by mycophenolic acid overcomes apoptosis-resistance in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendaline Guidicelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amount of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a pivotal enzyme for the biosynthesis of the guanosine tri-phosphate (GTP, is frequently increased in tumor cells. The anti-viral agent ribavirin and the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid (MPA are potent inhibitors of IMPDH. We recently showed that IMPDH inhibition led to a necrotic signal requiring the activation of Cdc42. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we strengthened the essential role played by this small GTPase in the necrotic signal by silencing Cdc42 and by the ectopic expression of a constitutive active mutant of Cdc42. Since resistance to apoptosis is an essential step for the tumorigenesis process, we next examined the effect of the MPA-mediated necrotic signal on different tumor cells demonstrating various mechanisms of resistance to apoptosis (Bcl2-, HSP70-, Lyn-, BCR-ABL-overexpressing cells. All tested cells remained sensitive to MPA-mediated necrotic signal. Furthermore, inhibition of IMPDH activity in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia cells was significantly more efficient at eliminating malignant cells than apoptotic inducers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings indicate that necrosis and apoptosis are split signals that share few if any common hub of signaling. In addition, the necrotic signaling pathway induced by depletion of the cellular amount of GTP/GDP would be of great interest to eliminate apoptotic-resistant tumor cells.

  16. Assessment of corrosion resistance of cast cobalt- and nickel-chromium dental alloys in acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercieca, Sven; Caligari Conti, Malcolm; Buhagiar, Joseph; Camilleri, Josette

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the degradation resistance of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys used as a base material for partial dentures in contact with saliva. Wiron® 99 and Wironit Extra-Hard® were selected as representative casting alloys for Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys, respectively. The alloys were tested in contact with deionized water, artificial saliva and acidified artificial saliva. Material characterization was performed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and microhardness and nanohardness testing. The corrosion properties of the materials were then analyzed using open circuit potential analysis and potentiodynamic analysis. Alloy leaching in solution was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. Co-Cr alloy was more stable than the Ni-Cr alloy in all solutions tested. Leaching of nickel and corrosion attack was higher in Ni-Cr alloy in artificial saliva compared with the acidified saliva. The corrosion resistance of the Co-Cr alloy was seen to be superior to that of the Ni-Cr alloy, with the former exhibiting a lower corrosion current in all test solutions. Microstructural topographical changes were observed for Ni-Cr alloy in contact with artificial saliva. The Ni-Cr alloy exhibited microstructural changes and lower corrosion resistance in artificial saliva. The acidic changes did not enhance the alloy degradation. Ni-Cr alloys are unstable in solution and leach nickel. Co-Cr alloys should be preferred for clinical use.

  17. High corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel alloyed with nitrogen in an acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metikos-Hukovic, M., E-mail: mmetik@fkit.h [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Babic, R. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Grubac, Z. [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, University of Split, 21000 Split (Croatia); Petrovic, Z. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Lajci, N. [Faculty of Mine and Metallurgy, University of Prishtina, 10000 Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} ASS alloyed with nitrogen treated at 1150 {sup o}C exhibits microstructure homogeneity. {yields} Passivation peak of ASS corresponds to oxidation of metal and absorbed hydrogen. {yields} Transfer phenomena and conductivity depend on the film formation potential. {yields} Electronic structure of the passive film and its corrosion resistance correlate well. {yields} Passive film on ASS with nitrogen is low disordered and high corrosion resistant. - Abstract: Passivity of austenitic stainless steel containing nitrogen (ASS N25) was investigated in comparison with AISI 316L in deareated acid solution, pH 0.4. A peculiar nature of the passivation peak in a potentiodynamic curve and the kinetic parameters of formation and growth of the oxide film have been discussed. The electronic-semiconducting properties of the passive films have been correlated with their corrosion resistance. Alloying austenitic stainless steel with nitrogen increases its microstructure homogeneity and decreases the concentration of charge carriers, which beneficially affects the protecting and electronic properties of the passive oxide film.

  18. Significant effect of Ca2+ on improving the heat resistance of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2013-07-01

    The heat resistance of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been extensively investigated due to its highly practical significance. Reconstituted skim milk (RSM) has been found to be one of the most effective protectant wall materials for microencapsulating microorganisms during convective drying, such as spray drying. In addition to proteins and carbohydrate, RSM is rich in calcium. It is not clear which component is critical in the RSM protection mechanism. This study investigated the independent effect of calcium. Ca(2+) was added to lactose solution to examine its influence on the heat resistance of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ZY, Lactobacillus casei Zhang, Lactobacillus plantarum P8 and Streptococcus thermophilus ND03. The results showed that certain Ca(2+) concentrations enhanced the heat resistance of the LAB strains to different extents, that is produced higher survival and shorter regrowth lag times of the bacterial cells. In some cases, the improvements were dramatic. More scientifically insightful and more intensive instrumental study of the Ca(2+) behavior around and in the cells should be carried out in the near future. In the meantime, this work may lead to the development of more cost-effective wall materials with Ca(2+) added as a prime factor. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Extracellular Fatty Acid Synthase: A Possible Surrogate Biomarker of Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Real, Jose Manuel; Menendez, Javier A.; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose Maria; Blüher, Matthias; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Vázquez, María Jesús; Ortega, Francisco; Diéguez, Carlos; Frühbeck, Gema; Ricart, Wifredo; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT Circulating fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a biomarker of metabolically demanding human diseases. The aim of this study was to determine whether circulating FASN could be a biomarker of overnutrition-induced metabolic stress and insulin resistance in common metabolic disorders. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Circulating FASN was evaluated in two cross-sectional studies in association with insulin sensitivity and in four longitudinal studies investigating the effect of diet- and surgery-induced weight loss, physical training, and adipose tissue expansion using peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor agonist rosiglitazone on circulating FASN. RESULTS Age- and BMI-adjusted FASN concentrations were significantly increased in association with obesity-induced insulin resistance in two independent cohorts. Both visceral and subcutaneous FASN expression and protein levels correlated inversely with extracellular circulating FASN (P = −0.63; P < 0.0001), suggesting that circulating FASN is linked to depletion of intracellular FASN. Improved insulin sensitivity induced by therapeutic strategies that decreased fat mass (diet induced, surgery induced, or physical training) all led to decreased FASN levels in blood (P values between 0.02 and 0.04). To discriminate whether this was an effect related to insulin sensitization, we also investigated the effects of rosiglitazone. Rosiglitazone did not lead to significant changes in circulating FASN concentration. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that circulating FASN is a biomarker of overnutrition-induced insulin resistance that could provide diagnostic and prognostic advantages by providing insights on the individualized metabolic stress. PMID:20299470

  20. Ascorbic acid deficiency activates cell death and disease resistance responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavet, Valeria; Olmos, Enrique; Kiddle, Guy; Mowla, Shaheen; Kumar, Sanjay; Antoniw, John; Alvarez, María E; Foyer, Christine H

    2005-11-01

    Programmed cell death, developmental senescence, and responses to pathogens are linked through complex genetic controls that are influenced by redox regulation. Here we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low vitamin C mutants, vtc1 and vtc2, which have between 10% and 25% of wild-type ascorbic acid, exhibit microlesions, express pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, and have enhanced basal resistance against infections caused by Pseudomonas syringae. The mutants have a delayed senescence phenotype with smaller leaf cells than the wild type at maturity. The vtc leaves have more glutathione than the wild type, with higher ratios of reduced glutathione to glutathione disulfide. Expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) fused to the nonexpressor of PR protein 1 (GFP-NPR1) was used to detect the presence of NPR1 in the nuclei of transformed plants. Fluorescence was observed in the nuclei of 6- to 8-week-old GFP-NPR1 vtc1 plants, but not in the nuclei of transformed GFP-NPR1 wild-type plants at any developmental stage. The absence of senescence-associated gene 12 (SAG12) mRNA at the time when constitutive cell death and basal resistance were detected confirms that elaboration of innate immune responses in vtc plants does not result from activation of early senescence. Moreover, H2O2-sensitive genes are not induced at the time of systemic acquired resistance execution. These results demonstrate that ascorbic acid abundance modifies the threshold for activation of plant innate defense responses via redox mechanisms that are independent of the natural senescence program.

  1. Preparation of Phytic Acid/Silane Hybrid Coating on Magnesium Alloy and Its Corrosion Resistance in Simulated Body Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengwu; Cai, Shu; Shen, Sibo; Yu, Nian; Zhang, Feiyang; Ling, Rui; Li, Yue; Xu, Guohua

    2017-09-01

    In order to decrease the corrosion rate and improve the bioactivity of magnesium alloy, phytic acid/saline hybrid coatings were synthesized on AZ31 magnesium alloys by sol-gel dip-coating method. It was found that the mole ratio of phytic acid to γ-APS had a great influence on coating morphology and the corresponding corrosion resistance of the coated magnesium alloys. When the mole ratio of phytic acid to γ-APS was 1:1, the obtained hybrid coating was integral and without cracks, which was ascribed to the strong chelate capability of phytic acid and Si-O-Si network derived from silane. Electrochemical test result indicated that the corrosion resistance of the coated magnesium alloy was about 27 times larger than that of the naked counterpart. In parallel, immersion test showed that the phytic acid/silane hybrid coating could induce CaP-mineralized product deposition, which offered another protection for magnesium alloy.

  2. Characterization of the ecological role of genes mediating acid resistance in Lactobacillus reuteri during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumbeck, Janina A; Marsteller, Nathan L; Frese, Steven A; Peterson, Daniel A; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Hutkins, Robert W; Walter, Jens

    2016-07-01

    Rodent-derived strains of Lactobacillus reuteri densely colonize the forestomach of mice and possess several genes whose predicted functions constitute adaptations towards an acidic environment. The objective of this study was to systematically determine which genes of L. reuteri 100-23 contribute to tolerance towards host gastric acid secretion. Genes predicted to be involved in acid resistance were inactivated, and their contribution to survival under acidic conditions was confirmed in model gastric juice. Fitness of five mutants that showed impaired in vitro acid resistance were then compared through competition experiments in ex-germ-free mice that were either treated with omeprazole, a proton-pump inhibitor that suppresses acid secretion in the stomach, or left untreated. This analysis revealed that the urease cluster was the predominant factor in mediating resistance to gastric acid production. Population levels of the mutant, which were substantially decreased in untreated mice, were almost completely restored through omeprazole, demonstrating that urease production in L. reuteri is mainly devoted to overcome gastric acid. The findings provide novel information on the mechanisms by which L. reuteri colonizes its gastric niche and demonstrate that in silico gene predictions and in vitro tests have limitations for predicting the ecological functions of colonization factors in bacterial symbionts. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Impact of restricted amoxicillin/clavulanic acid use on Escherichia coli resistance--antibiotic DU90% profiles with bacterial resistance rates: a visual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimica Matanovic, Suzana; Bergman, Ulf; Vukovic, Dubravka; Wettermark, Björn; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera

    2010-10-01

    High use of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC) at the University Hospital Osijek (Croatia) contributed to high rates of resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, in particular Escherichia coli (50%). Thus, in order to decrease bacterial resistance, AMC use was restricted. We present results of the restriction on resistance amongst antibiotics accounting for 90% of antibiotic use [drug utilisation 90% (DU90%)]. Data were analysed on antibiotic use and microbiological susceptibility of E. coli during two 9-month periods, before and after the restriction of AMC use. Drug use was presented as numbers of defined daily doses (DDDs) and DDDs/100 bed-days. Resistance of E. coli to antibiotics was presented as percentages of isolated strains in the DU90% segment. Use of AMC was 16 DDDs/100 bed-days or 30% of all antibiotics before the intervention. Use of AMC fell to 2 DDDs/100 bed-days or 4% after the intervention, and resistance of E. coli fell from 37% to 11%. In conclusion, restricted use of AMC resulted in a significant decrease of E. coli resistance. DU90% resistance profiles are simple and useful tools in highlighting problems in antibiotic use and resistance but may also be useful in long-term follow-up of antibiotic policy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasma uric acid and tumor volume are highly predictive of outcome in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients receiving intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hui; Lin, Huan-Xin; Ge, Nan; Wang, Hong-Zhi; Sun, Rui; Hu, Wei-Han

    2013-01-01

    The combined predictive value of plasma uric acid and primary tumor volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has not yet been determined. In this retrospective study, plasma uric acid level was measured after treatment in 130 histologically-proven NPC patients treated with IMRT. Tumor volume was calculated from treatment planning CT scans. Overall (OS), progression-free (PFS) and distant metastasis-free (DMFS) survival were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log rank test, and Cox multivariate and univariate regression models were created. Patients with a small tumor volume (<27 mL) had a significantly better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a large tumor volume. Patients with a high post-treatment plasma uric acid level (>301 μmol/L) had a better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a low post-treatment plasma uric acid level. Patients with a small tumor volume and high post-treatment plasma uric acid level had a favorable prognosis compared to patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level (7-year overall OS, 100% vs. 48.7%, P <0.001 and PFS, 100% vs. 69.5%, P <0.001). Post-treatment plasma uric acid level and pre-treatment tumor volume have predictive value for outcome in NPC patients receiving IMRT. NPC patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level may benefit from additional aggressive treatment after IMRT

  5. Arginine supplementation modulates pig plasma lipids, but not hepatic fatty acids, depending on dietary protein level with or without leucine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Marta Sofia Morgado Dos Santos; Rolo, Eva Sofia Alves; Pires, Virgínia Maria Rico; Alfaia, Cristina Maria Riscado Pereira Mateus; Coelho, Diogo Francisco Maurício; Lopes, Paula Alexandra Antunes Brás; Martins, Susana Isabel Vargas; Pinto, Rui Manuel Amaro; Prates, José António Mestre

    2017-05-30

    In the present study, the effect of arginine and leucine supplementation, and dietary protein level, were investigated in commercial crossbred pigs to clarify their individual or combined impact on plasma metabolites, hepatic fatty acid composition and mRNA levels of lipid sensitive factors. The experiment was conducted on fifty-four entire male pigs (Duroc × Pietrain × Large White × Landrace crossbred) from 59 to 92 kg of live weight. Each pig was randomly assigned to one of six experimental treatments (n = 9). The treatments followed a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement, providing two levels of arginine supplementation (0 vs. 1%) and three levels of basal diet (normal protein diet, NPD; reduced protein diet, RPD; reduced protein diet with 2% of leucine, RPDL). Significant interactions between arginine supplementation and protein level were observed across plasma lipids. While dietary arginine increased total lipids, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol and triacylglycerols in NPD, the inverse effect was observed in RPD. Overall, dietary treatments had a minor impact on hepatic fatty acid composition. RPD increased 18:1c9 fatty acid while the combination of leucine and RPD reduced 18:0 fatty acid. Arginine supplementation increased the gene expression of FABP1, which contributes for triacylglycerols synthesis without affecting hepatic fatty acids content. RPD, with or without leucine addition, upregulated the lipogenic gene CEBPA but downregulated the fat oxidation gene LPIN1. Arginine supplementation was responsible for a modulated effect on plasma lipids, which is dependent on dietary protein level. It consistently increased lipaemia in NPD, while reducing the correspondent metabolites in RPD. In contrast, arginine had no major impact, neither on hepatic fatty acids content nor on fatty acid composition. Likewise, leucine supplementation of RPD, regardless the presence of arginine, promoted no changes on total fatty acids in

  6. Synergistic action of fatty acids, sulphides and stilbene against acaricide-resistant Rhipicephalus microplus ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arceo-Medina, G N; Rosado-Aguilar, J A; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Borges-Argaez, R

    2016-09-15

    Six compounds in a methanolic extract of Petiveria alliacea stem (cis-stilbene; benzyl disulphide; benzyl trisulphide; and methyl esters of hexadecanoic acid, octadecadienoic acid and octadecenoic acid) are known to exercise acaricide activity against cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus larvae and adults. The synergistic effect of 57 combinations of these six compounds on acaricide activity against R. microplus was evaluated. Larvae immersion tests produced the lethal concentrations needed to kill 50% (LC 50 ) and 99% (LC 99 ) of the population. Adult immersion tests produced rates (%) for mortality, oviposition inhibition and eclosion inhibition. Individually, none of the compounds (1% concentration) exhibited acaricide activity (mortality ≤2.3%). When combined, however, nine mixtures exhibited a synergistic increase in activity, with high mortality rates (≥92%) in larvae. Values for LC 50 ranged from 0.07 to 0.51% and those for LC 99 from 0.66 to 5.16%. Thirty six compound mixtures had no significant activity (mortality ≤30%) against larvae. Two mixtures exhibited synergism against adults, with high rates (≥92%) of oviposition inhibition. The mixtures based on the benzyl disulphide+benzyl trisulphide pairing produced a synergistic effect against acaricide-resistant R. microplus larva and adults, and are therefore the most promising combination for controlling this ubiquitous ectoparasite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biochar amendment changes jasmonic acid levels in two rice varieties and alters their resistance to herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Muhammad; Shahzad, Raheem; Hamayun, Muhammad; Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Kang, Sang-Mo; Yun, Sopheap; Kim, Kyung-Min; Lee, In-Jung

    2018-01-01

    Biochar addition to soil not only sequesters carbon for the long-term but enhances agricultural productivity. Several well-known benefits arise from biochar amendment, including constant provision of nutrients, increased soil moisture retention, decreased soil bulk density, and sometimes the induction of systemic resistance against foliar and soil borne plant pathogens. However, no research has investigated the potential of biochar to increase resistance against herbivory. The white-backed plant hopper (WBPH) (Sogatella furcifera Horváth) is a serious agricultural pest that targets rice (Oryza sativa L.), a staple crop that feeds half of the world's human population. Therefore, we investigated the (1) optimization of biochar amendment levels for two rice varieties ('Cheongcheong' and 'Nagdong') and (2) subsequent effects of different biochar amendments on resistance and susceptibility of these two varieties to WBPH infestation. Initial screening results for the optimization level revealed that the application of biochar 10% (w/w) to the rooting media significantly improved plant physiological characteristics of both rice varieties. However, levels of biochar amendment, mainly 1, 2, 3, and 20%, resulted in negative effects on plant growth characteristics. Cheongcheong and Nagdong rice plants grown with the optimum biochar level showed contrasting reactions to WBPH infestation. Specifically, biochar application significantly increased plant growth characteristics of Nagdong when exposed to WBPH infestation and significantly decreased these characteristics in Cheongcheong. The amount of WBPH-induced damage to plants was significantly lower and higher in Nagdong and Cheongcheong, respectively, compared to that in the controls. Higher levels of jasmonic acid caused by the biochar priming effect could have accumulated in response to WBPH infestation, resulting in a maladaptive response to stress, negatively affecting growth and resistance to WBPH in Cheongcheong. This

  8. Resistive switching and voltage induced modulation of tunneling magnetoresistance in nanosized perpendicular organic spin valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Göckeritz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale multifunctional perpendicular organic spin valves have been fabricated. The devices based on an La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Alq3/Co trilayer show resistive switching of up to 4-5 orders of magnitude and magnetoresistance as high as -70% the latter even changing sign when voltage pulses are applied. This combination of phenomena is typically observed in multiferroic tunnel junctions where it is attributed to magnetoelectric coupling between a ferromagnet and a ferroelectric material. Modeling indicates that here the switching originates from a modification of the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 surface. This modification influences the tunneling of charge carriers and thus both the electrical resistance and the tunneling magnetoresistance which occurs at pinholes in the organic layer.

  9. Resistive switching and voltage induced modulation of tunneling magnetoresistance in nanosized perpendicular organic spin valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Göckeritz, Robert; Homonnay, Nico; Müller, Alexander [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Fuhrmann, Bodo [Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Materialwissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Schmidt, Georg, E-mail: georg.schmidt@physik.uni-halle.de [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Materialwissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Nanoscale multifunctional perpendicular organic spin valves have been fabricated. The devices based on an La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/Alq3/Co trilayer show resistive switching of up to 4-5 orders of magnitude and magnetoresistance as high as -70% the latter even changing sign when voltage pulses are applied. This combination of phenomena is typically observed in multiferroic tunnel junctions where it is attributed to magnetoelectric coupling between a ferromagnet and a ferroelectric material. Modeling indicates that here the switching originates from a modification of the La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} surface. This modification influences the tunneling of charge carriers and thus both the electrical resistance and the tunneling magnetoresistance which occurs at pinholes in the organic layer.

  10. Hyperbilirubinemia modulates myocardial function, aortic ejection, and ischemic stress resistance in the Gunn rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakrania, Bhavisha; Du Toit, Eugene F; Ashton, Kevin J; Kiessling, Can J; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Headrick, John P; Bulmer, Andrew C

    2014-10-15

    Mildly elevated circulating unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) is associated with protection against hypertension and ischemic heart disease. We assessed whether endogenously elevated bilirubin in Gunn rats modifies cardiovascular function and resistance to ischemic insult. Hearts were assessed ex vivo (Langendorff perfusion) and in vivo (Millar catheterization and echocardiography), and left ventricular myocardial gene expression was measured via quantitative real-time PCR. Ex vivo analysis revealed reduced intrinsic contractility in the Gunn myocardium (+dP/dt: 1,976 ± 622 vs. 2,907 ± 334 mmHg/s, P hearts exhibited improved ventricular function after 35 min of ischemia and 90 min of reperfusion (63 ± 14 vs. 35 ± 12%, P stress resistance in association with beneficial transcriptional changes. These effects may contribute to protection from cardiovascular disease with elevated bilirubin. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Heat-resistance of Hamigera avellanea and Thermoascus crustaceus isolated from pasteurized acid products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzza, Nicoletta; Berni, Elettra

    2014-01-03

    Products containing sugar or fruit derivatives are usually subjected to a pasteurization process that can anyway be ineffective to kill ascospores from heat-resistant molds. Although the most occurring and economically relevant heat-resistant species belong to Byssochlamys, Neosartorya, Talaromyces, and Eupenicillium genera, an increasing number of uncommon heat-resistant isolates have been recently detected as spoiling microorganisms in such products. Since Hamigera spp. and Thermoascus spp. were those more frequently isolated at SSICA, heat resistance of Hamigera avellanea and Thermoascus crustaceus strains from pasteurized acid products was studied in apple juice, in blueberry and grape juice and in a buffered glucose solution. Data obtained from thermal death curves and statistical elaboration of raw data showed that D values of H. avellanea may vary between 11.11 and 66.67 min at 87°C, between 4.67 and 13.51 at 90°C, and between 0.43 and 1.52 min at 95°C. Similarly, D values of T. crustaceus may vary between 18.52 and 90.91 min at 90°C, between 2.79 and 19.23 at 93°C, and between 1.11 and 2.53 min at 95°C. For both strains studied, the z-values calculated from the decimal reduction time curves did not prove to be significantly influenced by the heating medium, that being 4.35°C, 5.39°C or 5.27°C for H. avellanea and 4.42°C, 3.69°C or 3.37°C for T. crustaceus, respectively in apple juice, in blueberry and grape juice or in the buffered glucose solution. Considering the pasteurization treatments industrially applied to fruit-based foods, the variation of thermal parameters does not seem to be a possible way to avoid product spoilage by these two species and only good practices applied to reduce the original load of heat-resistant fungi can help producers to prevent losses in contaminated finished products, as usually happens for other heat resistant molds. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Is glucose/amino acid supplementation after exercise an aid to strength training?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, A. G.; van den Oord, M.; Sharma, A.; Jones, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The precise timing of carbohydrate and amino acid ingestion relative to a bout of resistance exercise may modulate the training effect of the resistance exercise. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether regular glucose/amino acid supplementation immediately after resistance exercise could enhance

  13. The RIM101 pathway has a role in Saccharomyces cerevisiae adaptive response and resistance to propionic acid and other weak acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Nuno P; Lourenço, Artur B; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Becker, Jorg D; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2009-03-01

    The physiological function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RIM101 signaling pathway is extended in this study beyond alkaline pH-induced responses. The transcription factor Rim101p is demonstrated to be required for maximal tolerance to weak acid-induced stress, at pH 4.0, but does not exert protection against low pH itself (range 4.5-2.5), when a strong acid is used as the acidulant. The Rim101p-dependent alterations of the yeast transcriptome following exposure to propionic acid stress (at pH 4.0) include genes of the previously described Rim101p regulon but also new target genes, in particular KNH1, involved in cell wall beta-1,6-glucan synthesis and the uncharacterized ORF YIL029c, both required for maximal propionic acid resistance. Clustering of the genes that provide resistance to propionic acid reveals the enrichment of those involved in protein catabolism through the multivesicular body pathway and in the homeostasis of internal pH and vacuolar function. The analysis of the network of interactions established among all the identified propionic acid resistance determinants shows an enrichment of interactions around the RIM101 gene and highlights the role of proteins involved in Rim101p proteolytic processing. RIM101 expression is shown to be required to counteract propionic acid-induced cytosolic acidification and for proper vacuolar acidification and cell wall structure, these having positive implications for a robust adaptive response and resistance to stress promoted by this food preservative.

  14. Microbiota-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids Modulate Expression of Campylobacter jejuni Determinants Required for Commensalism and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luethy, Paul M; Huynh, Steven; Ribardo, Deborah A; Winter, Sebastian E; Parker, Craig T; Hendrixson, David R

    2017-05-09

    Campylobacter jejuni promotes commensalism in the intestinal tracts of avian hosts and diarrheal disease in humans, yet components of intestinal environments recognized as spatial cues specific for different intestinal regions by the bacterium to initiate interactions in either host are mostly unknown. By analyzing a C. jejuni acetogenesis mutant defective in converting acetyl coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) to acetate and commensal colonization of young chicks, we discovered evidence for in vivo microbiota-derived short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and organic acids as cues recognized by C. jejuni that modulate expression of determinants required for commensalism. We identified a set of C. jejuni genes encoding catabolic enzymes and transport systems for amino acids required for in vivo growth whose expression was modulated by SCFAs. Transcription of these genes was reduced in the acetogenesis mutant but was restored upon supplementation with physiological concentrations of the SCFAs acetate and butyrate present in the lower intestinal tracts of avian and human hosts. Conversely, the organic acid lactate, which is abundant in the upper intestinal tract where C. jejuni colonizes less efficiently, reduced expression of these genes. We propose that microbiota-generated SCFAs and lactate are cues for C. jejuni to discriminate between different intestinal regions. Spatial gradients of these metabolites likely allow C. jejuni to locate preferred niches in the lower intestinal tract and induce expression of factors required for intestinal growth and commensal colonization. Our findings provide insights into the types of cues C. jejuni monitors in the avian host for commensalism and likely in humans to promote diarrheal disease. IMPORTANCE Campylobacter jejuni is a commensal of the intestinal tracts of avian species and other animals and a leading cause of diarrheal disease in humans. The types of cues sensed by C. jejuni to influence responses to promote commensalism or

  15. Modulation of cardiopulmonary depressor reflex in nucleus ambiguus by electroacupuncture: roles of opioids and γ-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Li, Peng; Li, Min; Longhurst, John C

    2012-04-01

    Stimulation of cardiopulmonary receptors with phenylbiguanide (PBG) elicits depressor cardiovascular reflex responses, including decreases in blood pressure and heart rate mediated in part by the brain stem parasympathetic cardiac neurons in the nucleus ambiguus (NAmb). The present study examined NAmb neurotransmitter mechanisms underlying the influence of electroacupuncture (EA) on the PBG-induced hypotension and bradycardia. We hypothesized that somatic stimulation during EA modulates PBG responses through opioid and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) modulation in the NAmb. Anesthetized and ventilated cats were studied during repeated stimulation with PBG or cardiac vagal afferents while low-frequency EA (2 Hz) was applied at P5-6 acupoints overlying the median nerve for 30 min and NAmb neuronal activity, heart rate, and blood pressure were recorded. Microinjection of kainic acid into the NAmb attenuated the PBG-induced bradycardia from -60 ± 11 to -36 ± 11 beats/min. Likewise, EA reduced the PBG-induced depressor and bradycardia reflex by 52 and 61%, respectively. Cardiac vagal afferent evoked preganglionic cellular activity in the NAmb was reduced by EA for about 60 min. Blockade of opioid or GABA(A) receptors using naloxone and gabazine reversed the EA-related modulation of the evoked cardiac vagal activity by 73 and 53%, respectively. Similarly, naloxone and gabazine reversed EA modulation of the negative chronotropic responses from -11 ± 5 to -23 ± 6 and -13 ± 4 to -24 ± 3 beats/min, respectively. Thus EA at P5-6 decreases PBG evoked hypotension and bradycardia as well as the NAmb PBG-sensitive preganglionic cardiac vagal outflow through opioid and GABA neurotransmitter systems.

  16. Fatty Acid-Modified Gapmer Antisense Oligonucleotide and Serum Albumin Constructs for Pharmacokinetic Modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Michael Lykke; Cai, Yunpeng; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    oligonucleotides (ASOs)/albumin constructs. We show by an electrophoretic mobility assay that fatty acid-modified gapmer and human serum albumin (HSA) can self-assemble into constructs that offer favorable pharmacokinetics. The interaction was dependent on fatty acid type (either palmitic or myristic acid), number......, and position within the gapmer ASO sequence, as well as phosphorothioate (PS) backbone modifications. Binding correlated with increased blood circulation in mice (t1/2 increased from 23 to 49 min for phosphodiester [PO] gapmer ASOs and from 28 to 66 min for PS gapmer ASOs with 2× palmitic acid modification...

  17. Fungal biotransformation of chlorogenic and caffeic acids by Fusarium graminearum: New insights in the contribution of phenolic acids to resistance to deoxynivalenol accumulation in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Léa; Bonnin-Verdal, Marie-Noelle; Marchegay, Gisèle; Pinson-Gadais, Laetitia; Ducos, Christine; Richard-Forget, Florence; Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela

    2016-03-16

    Fusarium Head Blight and Gibberella Ear Rot, mainly caused by the fungi Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, are two of the most devastating diseases of small-grain cereals and maize. In addition to yield loss, these diseases frequently result in contamination of kernels with toxic type B trichothecenes. The potential involvement of chlorogenic acid in cereal resistance to Fusarium Head Blight and Gibberella Ear Rot and to trichothecene accumulation was the focus of this study. The effects of chlorogenic acid and one of its hydrolyzed products, caffeic acid, on fungal growth and type B trichothecenes biosynthesis were studied using concentrations close to physiological amounts quantified in kernels and a set of F. graminearum and F. culmorum strains. Both chlorogenic and caffeic acids negatively impact fungal growth and mycotoxin production, with caffeic acid being significantly more toxic. Inhibitory efficiencies of both phenolic acids were strain-dependent. To further investigate the antifungal and anti "mycotoxin" effect of chlorogenic and caffeic acids, the metabolic fate of these two phenolic acids was characterized in supplemented F. graminearum broths. For the first time, our results demonstrated the ability of F. graminearum to degrade chlorogenic acid into caffeic, hydroxychlorogenic and protocatechuic acids and caffeic acid into protocatechuic and hydroxycaffeic acids. Some of these metabolic products can contribute to the inhibitory efficiency of chlorogenic acid that, therefore, can be compared as a "pro-drug". As a whole, our data corroborate the contribution of chlorogenic acid to the chemical defense that cereals employ to counteract F. graminearum and its production of mycotoxins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modulation of P-glycoprotein by Stemona alkaloids in human multidrug resistance leukemic cells and structural relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umsumarng, Sonthaya; Pitchakarn, Pornsiri; Yodkeeree, Supachai; Punfa, Wanisa; Mapoung, Sariya; Ramli, Rosdayati Alino; Pyne, Stephen G; Limtrakul, Pornngarm

    2017-10-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major reason for the failure of chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer patients. P-gp over-expression in MDR cancer cells is a multifactorial phenomenon with biochemical resistance mechanisms. Stemofoline (STF), isolated from Stemona bukillii, has been reported to be an MDR reversing compound. This study investigated whether other Stemona alkaloids that had been purified from Stemonaceae plants exerted MDR modulation activity. MTT assay was performed to determine the MDR reversing property of the alkaloids. Modulation of P-gp function by these compounds was investigated using cell cycle analysis and P-gp fluorescent substrate accumulation assays. P-gp expression was determined by Western blot analysis. We preliminarily examined the safety of these compounds in normal human fibroblasts and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using the MTT assay, and in red blood cells (human and rat) through in vitro hemolysis assays. Three of the eight alkaloids tested, isostemofoline (ISTF), 11Z -didehydrostemofoline (11Z-DSTF) and 11E-didehydrostemofoline (11E-DSTF), enhanced the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of MDR leukemic K562/Adr cells, which overexpressed P-gp. The P-gp functional studies showed that these three alkaloids increased the accumulation of P-gp substrates, calcein-AM (C-AM) and rhodamine123 (Rho 123) in K562/Adr cells, while this effect was not seen in drug sensitive parental K562 cells. Whereas, the alkaloids did not alter P-gp expression as was determined by Western blotting analysis. The alkaloids reversed MDR via the inhibition of P-gp function. For pharmaceutical safety testing, the alkaloids were found to be not toxic to normal human fibroblasts and PBMCs. Moreover, the effective compounds did not induce hemolysis in either human or rat erythrocytes. These compounds may be introduced as potential candidate molecules for treating cancers exhibiting P-gp-mediated MDR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights

  19. ACID RESISTANCE, ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF THE RED CELLS AMONG THE NEWBORN CHILDREN WITH THE SEVERE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Serebryakova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome is one of the main reasons of the high risk morbidity and lethality among the newborn children in early neonatal period. The aim of the present research is to study the acid resistance and electrophoretic mobility of the red cells among the term infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome. The results of the research showed that among the newborn children with severe respiratory distress sync dome (n = 41 the electrophoretic mobility of the red cells is reduced, while the acid resistance is increased, which speaks of the disorder in the functional activity of the red cells and tension of erythrogenesis in the given group of the newborn children if compared with 44 children without distress syndrome.Key words: newborn children, respiratory distress syndrome, red cells, acid resistance of the red cells, electrophoretic mobility of the red cells.

  20. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Ingestion Stimulates Muscle Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis following Resistance Exercise in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Jackman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ingestion of intact protein or essential amino acids (EAA stimulates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1 signaling and muscle protein synthesis (MPS following resistance exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the response of myofibrillar-MPS to ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs only (i.e., without concurrent ingestion of other EAA, intact protein, or other macronutrients following resistance exercise in humans. Ten young (20.1 ± 1.3 years, resistance-trained men completed two trials, ingesting either 5.6 g BCAA or a placebo (PLA drink immediately after resistance exercise. Myofibrillar-MPS was measured during exercise recovery with a primed, constant infusion of L-[ring13C6] phenylalanine and collection of muscle biopsies pre and 4 h-post drink ingestion. Blood samples were collected at time-points before and after drink ingestion. Western blotting was used to measure the phosphorylation status of mTORC1 signaling proteins in biopsies collected pre, 1-, and 4 h-post drink. The percentage increase from baseline in plasma leucine (300 ± 96%, isoleucine (300 ± 88%, and valine (144 ± 59% concentrations peaked 0.5 h-post drink in BCAA. A greater phosphorylation status of S6K1Thr389 (P = 0.017 and PRAS40 (P = 0.037 was observed in BCAA than PLA at 1 h-post drink ingestion. Myofibrillar-MPS was 22% higher (P = 0.012 in BCAA (0.110 ± 0.009%/h than PLA (0.090 ± 0.006%/h. Phenylalanine Ra was ~6% lower in BCAA (18.00 ± 4.31 μmol·kgBM−1 than PLA (21.75 ± 4.89 μmol·kgBM−1; P = 0.028 after drink ingestion. We conclude that ingesting BCAAs alone increases the post-exercise stimulation of myofibrillar-MPS and phosphorylation status mTORC1 signaling.

  1. Modulations in extracellular Calcium lead to H+-ATPase dependent acid secretion: A clarification of PPI failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitay, Alice Miriam; Schneebacher, Marie-Therese; Schmitt, Anne; Heschl, Katharina; Kopic, Sascha; Alfadda, Tariq I; Alsaihati, Abrar; Link, Alexander; Geibel, John P

    2018-03-08

    The H + ,K + -ATPase was identified as the primary proton secretory pathway in the gastric parietal cell and is the pharmacological target of agents suppressing acid secretion. Recently, we identified a second acid secretory protein expressed in the parietal cell; the vacuolar H + -ATPase (V-type ATPase). The aim of the present study was to further characterize the H + -ATPase activation by modulations in extracellular calcium via the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR). Isolated gastric glands were loaded with the pH indicator dye BCECF [2', 7'-bis-(2- carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein, acetoxymethyl ester to measure intracellular pH. Experiments were conducted in the absence of sodium and potassium to monitor H + -ATPase specific transport activity. CaSR was activated with either the calcimimetic R568 (400nM) and/or by modulations in extracellular Ca 2+ . Elevation in calcium concentrations increased proton extrusion from the gastric parietal cell. Allosteric modification of the CaSR via R568 and calcium increased vacuolar H + -ATPase activity significantly (ΔpH/min lowCa 2+ (0.1mM) = 0.001 {plus minus} 0.001, ΔpH/min normalCa 2+ (1.0mM) = 0.033 {plus minus} 0.004, ΔpH/min highCa 2+ (5.0mM) = 0.051 {plus minus} 0.005). Carbachol significantly suppressed calcium-induced gastric acid secretion via the H + -ATPase under sodium and potassium free conditions. We conclude that the vacuolar H + -ATPase is tightly linked to CaSR activation. We observed that PPI exposure does not modulate H+-ATPase activity. This elevated blood calcium activation if the H + -ATPase could provide an explanation for recurrent reflux symptoms while taking a PPI therapy.

  2. Derivation of optimal design of cockpit module considering vibration and heat-resistance characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jun; Cho, Hoon; Son, Young Tak; Suh, Myung Won; Kim, Hye Kyung; Kim, Hae Ryong

    2010-01-01

    Elimination of noise caused by the permanent deformation of interior plastic parts has been one of the major factors driving the design of automotive interior assemblies. Noise, indeed, is one of the main criteria affecting the perception of vehicle quality. Traditionally, noise issues have been identified and rectified through extensive hardware testing. However, to shorten the product development cycle and minimize the amount of costly hardware manufactured, hardware testing must rely on engineering analysis and upfront simulation in the design cycle. In this paper, an analytical study conducted to reduce permanent deformation in a cockpit module is discussed. The analytical investigation utilized a novel and practical methodology, implemented through the software tools ABAQUS and iSight, for the identification and minimization of permanent deformation. Here, the emphasis was placed on evaluating the software for issues relating to the prediction of permanent deformation. The analytical results were compared with the experimental findings for two types of deformation location, and the qualitative correlation was found to be very good. We also developed a methodology for the determination of the optimal guide and mount locations of the cockpit module that minimizes permanent deformation. To this end, the methodology implements and integrates nonlinear finite element analysis with sensitivity-analysis techniques

  3. Effects of Peracetic Acid on the Corrosion Resistance of Commercially Pure Titanium (grade 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Lariça B; Orsi, Iara A; Kuri, Sebastião E; Rovere, Carlos Alberto D; Busquim, Thaís P; Borie, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the corrosion resistance of pure titanium grade 4 (cp-Ti-4), subjected to disinfection with 0.2% and 2% peracetic acid during different immersion periods using anodic potentiodynamic polarization test in acid and neutral artificial saliva. Cylindrical samples of cp-Ti-4 (5 mm x 5 mm) were used to fabricate 24 working electrodes, which were mechanically polished and divided into eight groups (n=3) for disinfection in 2% and 0.2% peracetic acid for 30 and 120 min. After disinfection, anodic polarization was performed in artificial saliva with pH 4.8 and 6.8 to assess the electrochemical behavior of the electrodes. A conventional electrochemical cell, constituting a reference electrode, a platinum counter electrode, and the working electrode (cp-Ti specimens) were used with a scanning rate of 1 mV/s. Three curves were obtained for each working electrode, and corrosion was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS). Data of corrosion potential (Ecorr) and passive current (Ipass) obtained by the polarization curves were analyzed statistically by Student's t-test (a=0.05). The statistical analysis showed no significant differences (p>0.05) between artificial saliva types at different concentrations and periods of disinfection, as well as between control and experimental groups. No surface changes were observed in all groups evaluated. In conclusion, disinfection with 0.2% and 2% peracetic acid concentrations did not cause corrosion in samples manufactured with cp-Ti-4.

  4. Microwave-induced zero-resistance state in two-dimensional electron systems with unidirectional periodic modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, A. A.; Rodyakina, E. E.; Latyshev, A. V. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Strygin, I. S.; Goran, A. V.; Kalagin, A. K. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-04

    In this study we fabricated lateral superlattices (LSLs) based on the selectively doped GaAs/AlAs heterostructures with a high-mobility two-dimensional (2D) electron gas. The LSLs were formed using the electron-beam lithography and lift-off techniques, which produced a set of metallic strips on top of a heterojunction. The amplitude of the 2D electron gas modulation in the LSL was controlled by the gate voltage applied to the metallic strips. The LSLs with two different periods (a = 200 nm and 500 nm) were used to investigate the influence of microwave radiation with the frequency of 110–150 GHz on the 2D electron transport at the temperature T = 1.6 K in the magnetic field B < 1 T. We have found that zero-resistance states (ZRSs) appear under the microwave radiation in the 2D systems with a unidirectional periodic modulation. These ZRSs are located at the minima of commensurability oscillations.

  5. Standard Test Method for Determining Resistance of Photovoltaic Modules to Hail by Impact with Propelled Ice Balls

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a procedure for determining the ability of photovoltaic modules to withstand impact forces of falling hail. Propelled ice balls are used to simulate falling hailstones. 1.2 This test method defines test specimens and methods for mounting specimens, specifies impact locations on each test specimen, provides an equation for determining the velocity of any size ice ball, provides a method for impacting the test specimens with ice balls, provides a method for determining changes in electrical performance, and specifies parameters that must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable levels of ice ball impact resistance is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.4 The size of the ice ball to be used in conducting this test is not specified. This test method can be used with various sizes of ice balls. 1.5 This test method may be applied to concentrator and nonconcentrator modules. 1.6 The v...

  6. Acetic acid modulates spike rate and spike latency to salt in peripheral gustatory neurons of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breza, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Sour and salt taste interactions are not well understood in the peripheral gustatory system. Therefore, we investigated the interaction of acetic acid and NaCl on taste processing by rat chorda tympani neurons. We recorded multi-unit responses from the severed chorda tympani nerve (CT) and single-cell responses from intact narrowly tuned and broadly tuned salt-sensitive neurons in the geniculate ganglion simultaneously with stimulus-evoked summated potentials to signal when the stimulus contacted the lingual epithelium. Artificial saliva served as the rinse and solvent for all stimuli [0.3 M NH4Cl, 0.5 M sucrose, 0.1 M NaCl, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.02 M quinine hydrochloride (QHCl), 0.1 M KCl, 0.003–0.1 M acetic acid, and 0.003–0.1 M acetic acid mixed with 0.1 M NaCl]. We used benzamil to assess NaCl responses mediated by the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). The CT nerve responses to acetic acid/NaCl mixtures were less than those predicted by summing the component responses. Single-unit analyses revealed that acetic acid activated acid-generalist neurons exclusively in a concentration-dependent manner: increasing acid concentration increased response frequency and decreased response latency in a parallel fashion. Acetic acid suppressed NaCl responses in ENaC-dependent NaCl-specialist neurons, whereas acetic acid-NaCl mixtures were additive in acid-generalist neurons. These data suggest that acetic acid attenuates sodium responses in ENaC-expressing-taste cells in contact with NaCl-specialist neurons, whereas acetic acid-NaCl mixtures activate distinct receptor/cellular mechanisms on taste cells in contact with acid-generalist neurons. We speculate that NaCl-specialist neurons are in contact with type I cells, whereas acid-generalist neurons are in contact with type III cells in fungiform taste buds. PMID:22896718

  7. Applications of electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC): Separations of aromatic amino acids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Li [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1998-03-27

    The research in this thesis explores the separation capabilities of a new technique termed electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC). The thesis begins with a general introduction section which provides a literature review of this technique as well as a brief background discussion of the two research projects in each of the next two chapters. The two papers which follow investigate the application of EMLC to the separation of a mixture of aromatic amino acids and of a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The last section presents general conclusions and summarizes the thesis. References are compiled in the reference section of each chapter. The two papers have been removed for separate processing.

  8. The Endophytic Bacteria, Salicylic Acid, and Their Combination as Inducers of Rice Resistance Against Xanthomonas Oryzae Pv. Oryzae

    OpenAIRE

    Leiwakabessy, Christoffol; Sinaga, Meity Suradji; Mutaqien, Kikin H; Trikoesoemaningtyas, Trikoesoemaningtyas; Giyanto, Giyanto

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial leaf damage or blight brought by bacteria Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (X. oryzae pv. oryzae) is considered as an extremely serious disease of rice worldwide, including Indonesia. Induced resistance using chemical and biological agents was considered as a method to control the disease. The objectives of this research were to analyze of endophytic bacteria (Lysinibacillus sphaericus/L.sphaericus) and salicylic acid as the inducers of rice resistance against X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Thi...

  9. Effect of protein/essential amino acids and resistance training on skeletal muscle hypertrophy: A case for whey protein

    OpenAIRE

    Stout Jeffrey R; Lockwood Christopher M; Hulmi Juha J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Regardless of age or gender, resistance training or provision of adequate amounts of dietary protein (PRO) or essential amino acids (EAA) can increase muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in healthy adults. Combined PRO or EAA ingestion proximal to resistance training, however, can augment the post-exercise MPS response and has been shown to elicit a greater anabolic effect than exercise plus carbohydrate. Unfortunately, chronic/adaptive response data comparing the effects of different pro...

  10. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Lyte

    Full Text Available The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7 or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7 for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001. Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to

  11. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. (Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Nicoletti, G. (Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia)); Holan, G. (CSIRO, Melbourne (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  12. Modulating protein adsorption onto hydroxyapatite particles using different amino acid treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wing-Hin; Loo, Ching-Yee; Van, Kim Linh; Zavgorodniy, Alexander V; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2012-05-07

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a material of choice for bone grafts owing to its chemical and structural similarities to the mineral phase of hard tissues. The combination of osteogenic proteins with HA materials that carry and deliver the proteins to the bone-defective areas will accelerate bone regeneration. The study investigated the treatment of HA particles with different amino acids such as serine (Ser), asparagine (Asn), aspartic acid (Asp) and arginine (Arg) to enhance the adsorption ability of HA carrier for delivering therapeutic proteins to the body. The crystallinity of HA reduced when amino acids were added during HA preparation. Depending on the types of amino acid, the specific surface area of the amino acid-functionalized HA particles varied from 105 to 149 m(2) g(-1). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme were used as model proteins for adsorption study. The protein adsorption onto the surface of amino acid-functionalized HA depended on the polarities of HA particles, whereby, compared with lysozyme, BSA demonstrated higher affinity towards positively charged Arg-HA. Alternatively, the binding affinity of lysozyme onto the negatively charged Asp-HA was higher when compared with BSA. The BSA and lysozyme adsorptions onto the amino acid-functionalized HA fitted better into the Freundlich than Langmuir model. The amino acid-functionalized HA particles that had higher protein adsorption demonstrated a lower protein-release rate.

  13. Hop acid-rich spent craft brewer's yeast modulates gut bacterial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha and beta hop acids (humulones and lupulones) from Humulus lupulus are inhibitors of Gram-positive organisms and important natural antibiotics for beer fermentation and carbohydrate feed stocks for biofuel production. Recent observations (Bryant and Cohen) of high levels of hop acids in spent ...

  14. Bile acids modulate glucocorticoid metabolism and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in obstructive jaundice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNeilly, Alison D; Macfarlane, David P; O'Flaherty, Emmett

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs in cirrhosis and cholestasis and is associated with increased concentrations of bile acids. We investigated whether this was mediated through bile acids acting to impair steroid clearance by inhibiting glucocorticoid metabolism by 5bet...

  15. Potent activity of the lichen antibiotic (+)-usnic acid against clinical isolates of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, Hannu; Matikainen, Jorma; Pelttari, Eila

    2007-06-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and methicillin-resistant staphylococci, most notably methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are serious clinical problems. The antibiotic arsenal available against them is limited, and new mutants worsen the situation. We studied the activity of (+)-usnic acid, an old lichen-derived drug, and its sodium salt against clinical isolates of VRE and MRSA using the agar diffusion and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. The acid and, especially, the sodium salt had potent antimicrobial activity against all clinical isolates of VRE and MRSA studied. The MIC values of the sodium salt against VRE strains ranged between 4 and 16 μg/ml (1-day test) and between 4 and 31 μg/ml (2-day test), being below 8 μg/ml for most strains. The salt had potent activity even against those strains that were not inhibited by ampicillin (125 μg/ml), and it never lost its activity after 24 h, in contrast to ampicillin. Thus, in spite of the fact that usnic acid can in some cases cause serious toxicity, it and its salts may be worth considering in clinical practice in cases where other therapies have failed or the microbe is resistant toward other agents.

  16. A Pseudo-tRNA Modulates Antibiotic Resistance in Bacillus cereus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogers, Theresa E; Ataide, Sandro F; Dare, Kiley

    2012-01-01

    . Deletion of tRNA(Other) led to significant changes in cell wall morphology and antibiotic resistance and was accompanied by changes in the expression of numerous genes involved in oxidative stress responses, several of which contain significant complementarities to sequences surrounding t......RNA(Other). This suggested that tRNA(Other) might be expressed as part of a larger RNA, and RACE analysis subsequently confirmed the existence of several RNA species that significantly extend both the 3' and 5'-ends of tRNA(Other). tRNA(Other) expression levels were found to be responsive to changes in extracellular iron...

  17. Activation of mTORC1 by leucine is potentiated by branched-chain amino acids and even more so by essential amino acids following resistance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Marcus; Apró, William; Ekblom, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis is stimulated by resistance exercise and intake of amino acids, in particular leucine. Moreover, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling by leucine is potentiated by the presence of other essential amino acids (EAA). However, the contribution...... of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to this effect is yet unknown. Here we compare the stimulatory role of leucine, BCAA, and EAA ingestion on anabolic signaling following exercise. Accordingly, eight trained volunteers completed four sessions of resistance exercise during which they ingested either placebo......, leucine, BCAA, or EAA (including the BCAA) in random order. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, immediately after exercise, and following 90 and 180 min of recovery. Following 90 min of recovery the activity of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) was greater than at rest in all four trials (PlaceboLeucine

  18. The association between n-3 fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes and insulin resistance: The Inuit Health in Transition Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseng, Trine; Witte, Daniel R; Vistisen, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the association between the content of n-3 fatty acids and insulin resistance in an Inuit population. Study design. The Inuit Health in Transition Study was carried out between 2003 and 2007 in Greenland as a cross-sectional study. Our preliminary results are based...... adjusted for age, gender, BMI and ethnicity, the association remained statistically significant for C20:5 n-3 (EPA), C22:3 n-3 and C18:3 n-3 cis. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that some types of n-3 fatty acids may have a protective effect against insulin resistance. The role of potential confounders...

  19. Evaluation of antibacterial and antibiofilm mechanisms by usnic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompilio, Arianna; Riviello, Antonella; Crocetta, Valentina; Di Giuseppe, Fabrizio; Pomponio, Stefano; Sulpizio, Marilisa; Di Ilio, Carmine; Angelucci, Stefania; Barone, Luana; Di Giulio, Andrea; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the antibacterial and antibiofilm mechanisms of usnic acid (USN) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from cystic fibrosis patients. The effects exerted by USN at subinhibitory concentrations on S. aureus Sa3 strain was evaluated by proteomic, real-time PCR and electron microscopy analyses. Proteomic analysis showed that USN caused damage in peptidoglycan synthesis, as confirmed by microscopy. Real-time PCR analysis showed that antibiofilm activity of USN is mainly due to impaired adhesion to the host matrix binding proteins, and decreasing lipase and thermonuclease expression. Our data show that USN exerts anti-staphylococcal effects through multitarget inhibitory effects, thus confirming the rationale for considering it 'lead compound' for the treatment of cystic fibrosis infections.

  20. Increasing leaf longevity and disease resistance by altering salicylic acid catabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Susheng; Zhang, Kewei

    2018-01-23

    The present invention relates to a transgenic plant having an altered level of salicylic acid 3-hydroxylase ("S3H") protein, compared to that of a non-transgenic plant, where the transgenic plant displays an altered leaf senescence phenotype, relative to a non-transgenic plant. The present invention relates to a mutant plant comprising an inactivated gene encoding S3H protein, where the mutant plant displays a premature or precocious leaf senescence phenotype, relative to a non-mutant plant. The present invention also relates to methods for promoting premature or precocious leaf senescence in a plant, delaying leaf senescence in a plant, and making a mutant plant having a decreased level of S3H protein compared to that of a non-mutant plant, where the mutant plant displays a premature or precocious leaf senescence phenotype relative to a non-mutant plant. The present invention also relates to inducing or promoting pathogen resistance in plants.

  1. A study on platinum(iv) species containing an estrogen receptor modulator to reverse tamoxifen resistance of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiwei; Zhao, Jian; Hua, Wuyang; Gou, Shaohua

    2018-02-21

    Several dual-action Tam-Pt(iv) complexes derived from tamoxifen (Tam) and platinum(ii) drugs were designed and synthesized for targeting estrogen receptors (ERs) and DNA. These novel compounds not only exhibited potent cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells, but also reversed the tamoxifen resistance of TamR-MCF-7 cancer cells. Computational docking assays together with cellular uptake data demonstrated that the ER ligand portion of these conjugates plays a targeting role in ER-positive tumor cells and promotes the uptake of platinum via an estrogen receptor-mediated pathway. A study on the preliminary mechanism of the typical conjugate, complex 1, revealed that the Tam-Pt(iv) complex induced apoptosis via the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway mediated through the activation of caspase 3 and PARP proteins. These results suggested that the conjugation of estrogen receptor modulators with the platinum moiety could facilitate a selective enrichment of platinum in estrogen-positive tumors and possibly broaden the scope of ER ligand clinical use to resistant breast tumors.

  2. Hyperhomocysteinemia Promotes Insulin Resistance and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in PCOS Mice Through Modulating M2 Macrophage Polarization via Estrogen Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xinyu; Zhang, Bochun; Zhao, Yue; Li, Rong; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Pang, Yanli; Qiao, Jie

    2017-05-01

    It has been shown that serum homocysteine (Hcy) levels are higher in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, the specific role of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) in the development of PCOS has never been reported. Adipose tissue inflammation is featured by the infiltration of macrophages, which plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of glucose and insulin intolerance. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were treated with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and/or a high methionine diet to induce PCOS and HHcy mice models. We showed that DHEA induced a PCOS-like phenotypes, irregular estrous cycles, weight gain, abnormal sex hormone production, glucose and insulin resistance, and polycystic ovaries. HHcy further intensified the effects DHEA on the metabolic, endocrinal, hormonal, and morphological changes in PCOS-like mice. In addition, HHcy attenuated the DHEA-induced increase in serum estrogen levels in mice. Furthermore, HHcy may exacerbate the insulin resistance in PCOS-like mice, most likely through modulating the macrophage M1/M2 polarization pathways via the suppression of estrogen. Most important, our clinical data showed that there were increases in serum Hcy levels in patients with PCOS. These findings deepen our understanding of the pathological roles of HHcy in the development of PCOS and provide a promising target for PCOS therapy in clinical application. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  3. miR-297 modulates multidrug resistance in human colorectal carcinoma by down-regulating MRP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Liang, Xin; Shen, Ke; Cui, Daling; Zheng, Yuanhong; Xu, Jianhua; Fan, Zhongze; Qiu, Yanyan; Li, Qi; Ni, Lei; Liu, Jianwen

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a frequent cause of cancer-related death in men and women. miRNAs (microRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression negatively at the post-transcriptional level. In the present study we investigated the possible role of microRNAs in the development of MDR (multidrug resistance) in colorectal carcinoma cells. We analysed miRNA expression levels between MDR colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116/L-OHP cells and their parent cell line HCT116 using a miRNA microarray. miR-297 showed lower expression in HCT116/L-OHP cells compared with its parental cells. MRP-2 (MDR-associated protein 2) is an important MDR protein in platinum-drug-resistance cells and is a predicted target of miR-297. Additionally miR-297 was down-regulated in a panel of human colorectal carcinoma tissues and negatively correlated with expression levels of MRP-2. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of miR-297 in MDR colorectal carcinoma cells reduced MRP-2 protein level and sensitized these cells to anti-cancer drugs in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-297 could play a role in the development of MDR in colorectal carcinoma cells, at least in part by modulation of MRP-2.

  4. Induction of systemic resistance in tomato against Botrytis cinerea by N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone via jasmonic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhangjian; Shao, Shujun; Zheng, Chenfei; Sun, Zenghui; Shi, Junying; Yu, Jingquan; Qi, Zhenyu; Shi, Kai

    2018-05-01

    N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone activates plant systemic resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato plants, which is largely dependent on jasmonic acid biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways. Rhizosphere bacteria secrete N-acylated-homoserine lactones (AHLs), a type of specialized quorum-sensing signal molecule, to coordinate their population density during communication with their eukaryotic hosts. AHLs behave as low molecular weight ligands that are sensed by plants and promote the host's resistance against foliar pathogens. In this study, we report on N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (DHL), which is a type of AHL that induces systemic immunity in tomato plants and protects the host organism against the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Upon DHL treatment, tomato endogenous jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis (rather than salicylic acid biosynthesis) and signal transduction were significantly activated. Strikingly, the DHL-induced systemic resistance against B. cinerea was blocked in the tomato JA biosynthesis mutant spr2 and JA signaling gene-silenced plants. Our findings highlight the role of DHL in systemic resistance against economically important necrotrophic pathogens and suggest that DHL-induced immunity against B. cinerea is largely dependent on the JA signaling pathway. Manipulation of DHL-induced resistance is an attractive disease management strategy that could potentially be used to enhance disease resistance in diverse plant species.

  5. Cichorium intybus L. promotes intestinal uric acid excretion by modulating ABCG2 in experimental hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Lin, Zhijian; Zhang, Bing; Nie, Anzheng; Bian, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Excessive production and/or reduced excretion of uric acid could lead to hyperuricemia, which could be a major cause of disability. Hyperuricemia has received increasing attention in the last few decades due to its global prevalence. Cichorium intybus L., commonly known as chicory, is a perennial herb of the asteraceae family. It was previously shown to exert potent hypouricemic effects linked with decreasing uric acid formation in the liver by down-regulating the activity of xanthine oxidase, and increasing uric acid excretion by up-regulating the renal OAT3 mRNA expression. The present study aimed to evaluate its extra-renal excretion and possible molecular mechanism underlying the transporter responsible for intestinal uric acid excretion in vivo. Chicory was administered intragastrically to hyperuricemic rats induced by drinking 10% fructose water. The uricosuric effect was evaluated by determining the serum uric acid level as well as the intestinal uric acid excretion by HPLC. The location and expression levels of ATP-binding cassette transporter, sub-family G, member 2 (ABCG2) in jejunum and ileum were analyzed. The administration of chicory decreased the serum uric acid level significantly and increased the intestinal uric acid excretion obviously in hyperuricemic rats induced by 10% fructose drinking. Staining showed that ABCG2 was expressed in the apical membrane of the epithelium and glands of the jejunum and ileum in rats. Further examination showed that chicory enhanced the mRNA and protein expressions of ABCG2 markedly in a dose-dependent manner in jejunum and ileum. These findings indicate that chicory increases uric acid excretion by intestines, which may be related to the stimulation of intestinal uric acid excretion via down-regulating the mRNA and protein expressions of ABCG2.

  6. Modeling and simulation of acid generation in anion-bound chemically amplified resists used for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komuro, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Daisuke; Hirayama, Taku; Ohomori, Katsumi; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the most promising candidate technique for the high-volume production of semiconductor devices with half-pitches of sub-10 nm. An anion-bound polymer, in which the anion part of onium salts is polymerized, has attracted much attention from the viewpoint of the control of acid diffusion. In this study, we modeled the acid generation processes in the anion-bound chemically amplified resists upon exposure to EUV radiation and developed a Monte Carlo simulation code. Using the developed simulation code, the dependence of the quantum efficiency of acid generation on the concentration of acid generator units was calculated. The calculated quantum efficiencies well agreed with the experimental values with a fitting error of less than 10%. The thermalization distance was considered to be approximately 3 nm. The blur of proton distribution intrinsic to the reaction mechanisms of anion-bound chemically amplified resists was roughly estimated to be 4.5-6.5 nm.

  7. Macrophage Akt1 Kinase-Mediated Mitophagy Modulates Apoptosis Resistance and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Deshane, Jessy S; Ryan, Alan J; Thannickal, Victor J; Carter, A Brent

    2016-03-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating lung disorder with increasing incidence. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages is directly linked to pulmonary fibrosis. Mitophagy, the selective engulfment of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagasomes, is important for cellular homeostasis and can be induced by mitochondrial oxidative stress. Here, we show Akt1 induced macrophage mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitophagy. Mice harboring a conditional deletion of Akt1 in macrophages (Akt1(-/-)Lyz2-cre) and Park2(-/-) mice had impaired mitophagy and reduced active transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Although Akt1 increased TGF-β1 expression, mitophagy inhibition in Akt1-overexpressing macrophages abrogated TGF-β1 expression and fibroblast differentiation. Importantly, conditional Akt1(-/-)Lyz2-cre mice and Park2(-/-) mice had increased macrophage apoptosis and were protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, IPF alveolar macrophages had evidence of increased mitophagy and displayed apoptosis resistance. These observations suggest that Akt1-mediated mitophagy contributes to alveolar macrophage apoptosis resistance and is required for pulmonary fibrosis development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The transcriptional regulator CzcR modulates antibiotic resistance and quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieppois, Guennaëlle; Ducret, Véréna; Caille, Olivier; Perron, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa responds to zinc, cadmium and cobalt by way of the CzcRS two-component system. In presence of these metals the regulatory protein CzcR induces the expression of the CzcCBA efflux pump, expelling and thereby inducing resistance to Zn, Cd and Co. Importantly, CzcR co-regulates carbapenem antibiotic resistance by repressing the expression of the OprD porin, the route of entry for these antibiotics. This unexpected co-regulation led us to address the role of CzcR in other cellular processes unrelated to the metal response. We found that CzcR affected the expression of numerous genes directly involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa even in the absence of the inducible metals. Notably the full expression of quorum sensing 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL autoinducer molecules is impaired in the absence of CzcR. In agreement with this, the virulence of the czcRS deletion mutant is affected in a C. elegans animal killing assay. Additionally, chromosome immunoprecipitation experiments allowed us to localize CzcR on the promoter of several regulated genes, suggesting a direct control of target genes such as oprD, phzA1 and lasI. All together our data identify CzcR as a novel regulator involved in the control of several key genes for P. aeruginosa virulence processes.

  9. The transcriptional regulator CzcR modulates antibiotic resistance and quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guennaëlle Dieppois

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa responds to zinc, cadmium and cobalt by way of the CzcRS two-component system. In presence of these metals the regulatory protein CzcR induces the expression of the CzcCBA efflux pump, expelling and thereby inducing resistance to Zn, Cd and Co. Importantly, CzcR co-regulates carbapenem antibiotic resistance by repressing the expression of the OprD porin, the route of entry for these antibiotics. This unexpected co-regulation led us to address the role of CzcR in other cellular processes unrelated to the metal response. We found that CzcR affected the expression of numerous genes directly involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa even in the absence of the inducible metals. Notably the full expression of quorum sensing 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL autoinducer molecules is impaired in the absence of CzcR. In agreement with this, the virulence of the czcRS deletion mutant is affected in a C. elegans animal killing assay. Additionally, chromosome immunoprecipitation experiments allowed us to localize CzcR on the promoter of several regulated genes, suggesting a direct control of target genes such as oprD, phzA1 and lasI. All together our data identify CzcR as a novel regulator involved in the control of several key genes for P. aeruginosa virulence processes.

  10. L-Ascorbic acid can abrogate SVCT-2-dependent cetuximab resistance mediated by mutant KRAS in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soo-A; Lee, Dae-Hee; Moon, Jai-Hee; Hong, Seung-Woo; Shin, Jae-Sik; Hwang, Ih Yeon; Shin, Yu Jin; Kim, Jeong Hee; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Kim, Seung-Mi; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Seul; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jung Shin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, TaeWon; Lee, Wang Jae

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer patients with mutant KRAS are resistant to cetuximab, an antibody directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor, which is an effective clinical therapy for patients with wild-type KRAS. Numerous combinatorial therapies have been tested to overcome the resistance to cetuximab. However, no combinations have been found that can be used as effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we demonstrate that L-ascorbic acid partners with cetuximab to induce killing effects, which are influenced by sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT-2) in human colon cancer cells with a mutant KRAS. L-Ascorbic acid treatment of human colon cancer cells that express a mutant KRAS differentially and synergistically induced cell death with cetuximab in a SVCT-2-dependent manner. The ectopic expression of SVCT-2 induced sensitivity to L-ascorbic acid treatment in human colon cancer cells that do not express SVCT-2, whereas the knockdown of endogenous SVCT-2 induced resistance to L-ascorbic acid treatment in SVCT-2-positive cells. Moreover, tumor regression via the administration of L-ascorbic acid and cetuximab in mice bearing tumor cell xenografts corresponded to SVCT-2 protein levels. Interestingly, cell death induced by the combination of L-ascorbic acid and cetuximab resulted in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. These cell death mechanisms were related to a disruption of the ERK pathway and were represented by the impaired activation of RAFs and the activation of the ASK-1-p38 pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that resistance to cetuximab in human colon cancer patients with a mutant KRAS can be bypassed by L-ascorbic acid in an SVCT-2-dependent manner. Furthermore, SVCT-2 in mutant KRAS colon cancer may act as a potent marker for potentiating L-ascorbic acid co-treatment with cetuximab. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Efficacy of Topical Clindamycin Phosphate and Azelaic Acid on Acne Vulgaris and Emergence of Resistant Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZKAN, Metin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the uses of topical clindamycin phosphate and azelaic acid were compared from point of clinical efficacy and emergence of resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). Each group contained 20 patients. Pre- and post-treatment acne grades and comparison of two groups were evaluated by using the Wilcoxon and Spearman statistical techniques. The sensitivity of CNS to azelaic acid and to clindamycin phosphate were searched by microbroth dilution technique. Azelaic ac...

  12. Resistance to acid attack of portland cement mortars produced with red mud as a pozzolanic additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbino, Thiago Gabriel Ferreira; Fortes, Gustavo Mattos; Lourenco, Rafaela Roberta; Rodrigues, Jose de Anchieta

    2011-01-01

    Portland cement structures are usually exposed to aggressive environments, which requires the knowledge of the performance of these materials under deleterious conditions. In this study, it was evaluated the resistance to acid attack of mortars that contain ordinary (CPI) and compost (CPII-Z) Portland cements, adding to the first red mud (RB) as a pozzolanic additive in different conditions: without calcination, calcined at 400 ° C and at 600 ° C. The specimens were subjected to HCl and H 2 SO 4 solutions, both with concentration of 1.0 Mol L -1 for 28 days, monitoring the weight loss and leached material nature by atomic emission inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The hydration products were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the hydrated cement pastes. It was observed a reduction of portlandite amount in the RB containing cement pastes, indicating a possible pozzolanic activity of the red mud. The mortars prepared with RB were more resistant to HCl, while that ones with calcined RB present a better performance in H 2 SO 4 attack. (author)

  13. Multifunctional hyaluronic acid modified graphene oxide loaded with mitoxantrone for overcoming drug resistance in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lin; Feng, Qianhua; Wang, Yating; Yang, Xiaomin; Ren, Junxiao; Shi, Yuyang; Shan, Xiaoning; Yuan, Yujie; Wang, Yongchao; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional nanosheets (HA-GO/Pluronic) with targeted chemo-photothermal properties were successfully developed for controlled delivery of mitoxantrone (MIT) to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR). In vitro release profiles displayed that both an acidic environment and a NIR laser could trigger and accelerate the release of a drug, which ensured nanosheets were stable in blood circulation and released MIT within tumor cells under laser irradiation. HA-GO/Pluronic nanosheets were taken up into MCF-7/ADR cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis, which further facilitated escapement of P-gp efflux. Compared with MIT solution, MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic showed greater cytotoxicity and increase in cellular MIT accumulation in MCF-7/ADR cells. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest studies also revealed that MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic was more potent than MIT/GO/Pluronic and MIT solution. The anticancer efficacy in vivo was evaluated in MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADR-bearing mice, and inhibition of tumors by MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic with NIR laser irradiation was the most effective among all MIT formulations. In summary, the MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic system had striking functions such as P-gp reversible inhibitor and anticancer efficacy, and could present a promising platform for drug-resistant cancer treatment.

  14. Branched-chain amino acids in metabolic signalling and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christopher J; Adams, Sean H

    2014-12-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are important nutrient signals that have direct and indirect effects. Frequently, BCAAs have been reported to mediate antiobesity effects, especially in rodent models. However, circulating levels of BCAAs tend to be increased in individuals with obesity and are associated with worse metabolic health and future insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A hypothesized mechanism linking increased levels of BCAAs and T2DM involves leucine-mediated activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which results in uncoupling of insulin signalling at an early stage. A BCAA dysmetabolism model proposes that the accumulation of mitotoxic metabolites (and not BCAAs per se) promotes β-cell mitochondrial dysfunction, stress signalling and apoptosis associated with T2DM. Alternatively, insulin resistance might promote aminoacidaemia by increasing the protein degradation that insulin normally suppresses, and/or by eliciting an impairment of efficient BCAA oxidative metabolism in some tissues. Whether and how impaired BCAA metabolism might occur in obesity is discussed in this Review. Research on the role of individual and model-dependent differences in BCAA metabolism is needed, as several genes (BCKDHA, PPM1K, IVD and KLF15) have been designated as candidate genes for obesity and/or T2DM in humans, and distinct phenotypes of tissue-specific branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase complex activity have been detected in animal models of obesity and T2DM.

  15. Lipoteichoic acid synthesis inhibition in combination with antibiotics abrogates growth of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Fernanda L; van de Kamer, Tim; Brouwer, Ellen C; Leavis, Helen L; Woodford, Neil; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; Hendrickx, Antoni P A

    2017-03-01

    Enterococcus faecium is a multidrug-resistant (MDR) nosocomial pathogen causing significant morbidity in debilitated patients. New antimicrobials are needed to treat antibiotic-resistant E. faecium infections in hospitalised patients. E. faecium incorporates lipoteichoic acid (LTA) (1,3-polyglycerol-phosphate linked to glycolipid) in its cell wall. The small-molecule inhibitor 1771 [2-oxo-2-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-ylamino)ethyl 2-naphtho[2,1-b]furan-1-ylacetate] specifically blocks the activity of Staphylococcus aureus LtaS synthase, which polymerises 1,3-glycerolphosphate into LTA polymers. Here we characterised the effects of the small-molecule inhibitor 1771 on the growth of E. faecium isolates, alone (28 strains) or in combination with the antibiotics vancomycin, daptomycin, ampicillin, gentamicin or linezolid (15 strains), and on biofilm formation (16 strains). Inhibition of LTA synthesis at the surface of the cell by compound 1771 in combination with current antibiotic therapy abrogates enterococcal growth in vitro but does not affect mature E. faecium biofilms. Targeting LTA synthesis may provide new possibilities to treat MDR E. faecium infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypochlorous acid via peroxynitrite activates protein kinase Cθ and insulin resistance in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Qilong; Ding, Ye; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2015-02-01

    We recently reported that genetic deletion of myeloperoxidase (MPO) alleviates obesity-related insulin resistance in mice in vivo. How MPO impairs insulin sensitivity in adipocytes is poorly characterized. As hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a principal oxidant product generated by MPO, we evaluated the effects of HOCl on insulin signaling in adipocytes differentiated from 3T3-L1 cells. Exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes to exogenous HOCl (200 μmol/l) attenuated insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake, GLUT4 translocation, and insulin signals, including tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and phosphorylation of Akt. Furthermore, treatment with HOCl induced phosphorylation of IRS1 at serine 307, inhibitor κB kinase (IKK), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), and phosphorylation of PKCθ (PKCθ). In addition, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of IKK and JNK abolished serine phosphorylation of IRS1 and impairment of insulin signaling by HOCl. Furthermore, knockdown of PKCθ using siRNA transfection suppressed phosphorylation of IKK and JNK and consequently attenuated the HOCl-impaired insulin signaling pathway. Moreover, activation of PKCθ by peroxynitrite was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of IKK, JNK, and IRS1-serine 307. In contrast, ONOO(-) inhibitors abolished HOCl-induced phosphorylation of PKCθ, IKK, JNK, and IRS1-serine 307, as well as insulin resistance. Finally, high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance was associated with enhanced phosphorylation of PKCθ, IKK, JNK, and IRS1 at serine 307 in white adipose tissues from WT mice, all of which were not found in Mpo knockout mice fed HFDs. We conclude that HOCl impairs insulin signaling pathway by increasing ONOO(-) mediated phosphorylation of PKCθ, resulting in phosphorylation of IKK/JNK and consequent serine phosphorylation of IRS1 in adipocytes. © 2015 The authors.

  17. Immunomodulation and hormonal disruption without compromised disease resistance in perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) exposed Japanese quail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, Judit E.G.; Nain, Sukhbir

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of oral perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on Japanese quail at concentrations found in American and Belgian workers at PFOA manufacturing facilities. Three arms of the immune system were tested; T cell, B cell, and innate immunity. After 6 weeks exposure, quail were challenged with E. coli infection to test the ultimate measure of immunotoxicity, disease resistance. The T cell response was lower in the high exposure groups. Antibody mediated, and innate immune responses were not different. Growth rate was higher, whereas thyroid hormone levels were lower in PFOA-exposed birds. Morbidity/mortality from disease challenge was not different among the control and PFOA-exposed groups, and no overt PFOA toxicity was observed pre-disease challenge. Although PFOA at ‘worst case scenario’ levels caused T cell immunosuppression, this did not translate into increased disease susceptibility, demonstrating that immunotoxicity testing must be interpreted with caution since disease resistance is the ultimate concern. -- Highlights: •Birds orally exposed to high levels of PFOA for 8 wks showed no signs of toxicity. •PFOA exposure caused immunotoxicity by suppressing the T cell mediated response. •PFOA exposure did not affect antibody mediated, or innate immunity. •PFOA exposure did not cause increased morbidity/mortality after E. coli infection. •PFOA exposed birds showed endocrinological changes that may warrant further study. -- Oral exposure of quail to the pollutant, PFOA, resulted in hormonal and immunological changes, but did not compromise disease resistance after challenge by a common avian pathogen

  18. Gut microbiota alterations and dietary modulation in childhood malnutrition - The role of short chain fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pekmez, Ceyda Tugba; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Brahe, Lena Kirchner

    2018-01-01

    and metabolism through enteroendocrine cell signaling, adipogenesis and insulin-like growth factor-1 production. Elucidating these mechanisms may lead to development of new modulation practices of the gut microbiota as a potential prevention and treatment strategy for childhood malnutrition. The present overview...

  19. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  20. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-22

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  1. Dansyl labeling to modulate the relative affinity of bile acids for the binding sites of human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohacova, Jana; Sastre, German; Marin, M Luisa; Miranda, Miguel A

    2011-09-08

    Binding of natural bile acids to human serum albumin (HSA) is an important step in enterohepatic circulation and provides a measure of liver function. In this article, we report on the use of four dansyl (Dns) derivatives of cholic acid (ChA) to demonstrate a regiodifferentiation in their relative affinity for the two binding sites of HSA. Using both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, formation of Dns-ChA@HSA complexes was confirmed; the corresponding binding constants were determined, and their distribution between bulk solution and HSA microenvironment was estimated. By means of energy transfer from Trp to the Dns moiety, donor-acceptor distances were estimated (21-25 Å) and found to be compatible with both site 1 and site 2 occupancies. Nevertheless, titration using warfarin and ibuprofen as specific displacement probes clearly indicated that 3α- and 3β-Dns-ChA bind to HSA at site 2, whereas their C-7 regioisomers bind to HSA at site 1. Furthermore, the C-3-labeled compounds are displaced by lithocholic acid, whereas they are insensitive to ChA, confirming the assumption that the former binds to HSA at site 2. Thus, Dns labeling provides a useful tool to modulate the relative affinity of ChA to the major binding sites of HSA and, in combination with other fluorescent ChA analogs, to mimic the binding behavior of natural bile acids.

  2. Putrescine production via the ornithine decarboxylation pathway improves the acid stress survival of Lactobacillus brevis and is part of a horizontally transferred acid resistance locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Andrea; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A; Lucas, Patrick M

    2014-04-03

    Decarboxylation pathways are widespread among lactic acid bacteria; their physiological role is related to acid resistance through the regulation of the intracellular pH and to the production of metabolic energy via the generation of a proton motive force and its conversion into ATP. These pathways include, among others, biogenic amine (BA) production pathways. BA accumulation in foodstuffs is a health risk; thus, the study of the factors involved in their production is of major concern. The analysis of several lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from different environments, including fermented foods and beverages, revealed that the genes encoding these pathways are clustered on the chromosome, which suggests that these genes are part of a genetic hotspot related to acid stress resistance. Further attention was devoted to the ornithine decarboxylase pathway, which affords putrescine from ornithine. Studies were performed on three lactic acid bacteria belonging to different species. The ODC pathway was always shown to be involved in cytosolic pH alkalinisation and acid shock survival, which were observed to occur with a concomitant increase in putrescine production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Excluded volume effects caused by high concentration addition of acid generators in chemically amplified resists used for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Komuro, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    The resolution of lithography used for the high-volume production of semiconductor devices has been improved to meet the market demands for highly integrated circuits. With the reduction in feature size, the molecular size becomes non-negligible in the resist material design. In this study, the excluded volume effects caused by adding high-concentration acid generators were investigated for triphenylsulfonium nonaflate. The resist film density was measured by X-ray diffractometry. The dependences of absorption coefficient and protected unit concentration on acid generator weight ratio were calculated from the measured film density. Using these values, the effects on the decomposition yield of acid generators, the protected unit fluctuation, and the line edge roughness (LER) were evaluated by simulation on the basis of sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resists. The positive effects of the increase in acid generator weight ratio on LER were predominant below the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3, while the negative effects became equivalent to the positive effects above the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3 owing to the excluded volume effects.

  4. Changes in Amino Acid Profile in Roots of Glyphosate Resistant and Susceptible Soybean (Glycine max) Induced by Foliar Glyphosate Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldes, Carlos Alberto; Cantarelli, Miguel Angel; Camiña, José Manuel; Tsai, Siu Mui; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes

    2017-10-11

    Amino acid profiles are useful to analyze the responses to glyphosate in susceptible and resistant soybean lines. Comparisons of profiles for 10 amino acids (Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Ser, His, Gly, Thr, Tyr, Leu) by HPLC in soybean roots were performed in two near isogenic pairs (four varieties). Foliar application of glyphosate was made to soybean plants after 5 weeks of seeding. Roots of four varieties were collected at 0 and 72 h after glyphosate application (AGA) for amino acid analysis by HPLC. Univariate analysis showed a significant increase of several amino acids in susceptible as well as resistant soybean lines; however, amino acids from the major pathways of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism, such as Asp, Asn, Glu and Gln, and Ser, increased significantly in susceptible varieties at 72 h AGA. Multivariate analysis using principal component analysis (2D PCA and 3D PCA) allowed different groups to be identified and discriminated based on the soybean genetic origin, showing the amino acid responses on susceptible and resistant varieties. Based on the results, it is possible to infer that the increase of Asn, Asp, Glu, Gln, and Ser in susceptible varieties would be related to the deregulation of C and N metabolism, as well as changes in the growth mechanisms regulated by Ser.

  5. Citric Acid Metabolism in Resistant Hypertension: Underlying Mechanisms and Metabolic Prediction of Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Martinez, Paula J; Baldan-Martin, Montserrat; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Prado, Jose Carlos; Segura, Julian; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Vivanco, Fernando; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2017-11-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) affects 9% to 12% of hypertensive adults. Prolonged exposure to suboptimal blood pressure control results in end-organ damage and cardiovascular risk. Spironolactone is the most effective drug for treatment, but not all patients respond and side effects are not negligible. Little is known on the mechanisms responsible for RH. We aimed to identify metabolic alterations in urine. In addition, a potential capacity of metabolites to predict response to spironolactone was investigated. Urine was collected from 29 patients with RH and from a group of 13 subjects with pseudo-RH. For patients, samples were collected before and after spironolactone administration and were classified in responders (n=19) and nonresponders (n=10). Nuclear magnetic resonance was applied to identify altered metabolites and pathways. Metabolites were confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Citric acid cycle was the pathway most significantly altered ( P citric acid cycle and deregulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis control continue its activation after h