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Sample records for acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria

  1. Auto- and heterotrophic acidophilic bacteria enhance the bioremediation efficiency of sediments contaminated by heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beolchini, Francesca; Dell'Anno, Antonio; De Propris, Luciano; Ubaldini, Stefano; Cerrone, Federico; Danovaro, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    This study deals with bioremediation treatments of dredged sediments contaminated by heavy metals based on the bioaugmentation of different bacterial strains. The efficiency of the following bacterial consortia was compared: (i) acidophilic chemoautotrophic, Fe/S-oxidising bacteria, (ii) acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria able to reduce Fe/Mn fraction, co-respiring oxygen and ferric iron and (iii) the chemoautotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria reported above, pooled together, as it was hypothesised that the two strains could cooperate through a mutual substrate supply. The effect of the bioremediation treatment based on the bioaugmentation of Fe/S-oxidising strains alone was similar to the one based only on Fe-reducing bacteria, and resulted in heavy-metal extraction yields typically ranging from 40% to 50%. The efficiency of the process based only upon autotrophic bacteria was limited by sulphur availability. However, when the treatment was based on the addition of Fe-reducing bacteria and the Fe/S oxidizing bacteria together, their growth rates and efficiency in mobilising heavy metals increased significantly, reaching extraction yields >90% for Cu, Cd, Hg and Zn. The additional advantage of the new bioaugmentation approach proposed here is that it is independent from the availability of sulphur. These results open new perspectives for the bioremediation technology for the removal of heavy metals from highly contaminated sediments.

  2. Leaching of pyrite by acidophilic heterotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria in pure and mixed cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacelar-Nicolau, P.; Johnson, D.B. [Univ. of Wales, Bangor (United Kingdom). School of Biological Sciences

    1999-02-01

    Seven strains of heterotrophic iron-oxidizing acidophilic bacteria were examined to determine their abilities to promote oxidative dissolution of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) when they were grown in pure cultures and in mixed cultures with sulfur-oxidizing Thiobacillus spp. Only one of the isolates (strain T-24) oxidized pyrite when it was grown in pyrite-basal salts medium. However, when pyrite-containing cultures were supplemented with 0.02% (wt/vol) yeast extract, most of the isolates oxidized pyrite, and one (strain T-24) promoted rates of mineral dissolution similar to the rates observed with the iron-oxidizing autotroph Thiobacillus ferroxidans. Pyrite oxidation by another isolate (strain T-21) occurred in cultures containing between 0.005 and 0.05% (wt/vol) yeast extract but was completely inhibited in cultures containing 0.5% yeast extract. Ferrous iron was also needed for mineral dissolution by the iron-oxidizing heterotrophs, indicating that these organisms oxidize pyrite via the indirect mechanism. Mixed cultures of three isolates (strains T-21, T-232, and T-24) and the sulfur-oxidizing autotroph Thiobacillus thiooxidans promoted pyrite dissolution; since neither strains T-21 and T-23 nor T. thiooxidans could oxidize this mineral in yeast extract-free media, this was a novel example of bacterial synergism. Mixed cultures of strains T-21 and T-23 and the sulfur-oxidizing mixotroph Thiobacillus acidophilus also oxidized pyrite but to a lesser extent than did mixed cultures containing T. thiooxidans. Pyrite leaching by strain T -23 grown in an organic compound-rich medium and incubated either shaken or unshaken was also assessed. The potential environmental significance of iron-oxidizing heterotrophs in accelerating pyrite oxidation is discussed.

  3. Bioleaching of metals from electronic scrap by moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyas, Sadia; Anwar, Munir A.; Niazi, Shahida B.; Ghauri, M. Afzal

    2007-01-01

    The present work was aimed at studying the bioleachability of metals from electronic scrap by the selected moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic chemolithotrophic and acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria. These included Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and an unidentified acidophilic hetero

  4. Acidophilic algae isolated from mine-impacted environments and their roles in sustaining heterotrophic acidophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Barrie Johnson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two acidophilic algae, identified as strains of Chlorella protothecoides var. acidicola and Euglena mutabilis, were isolated in pure culture from abandoned copper mines in Spain and Wales and grown in pH- and temperature-controlled bioreactors. The Chlorella isolate grew optimally at pH 2.5 and 30 ˚C, with a corresponding culture doubling time of 9 hours. The isolates displayed similar tolerance (10-50 mM to four transition metals tested. Growth of the algae in liquid media was paralleled with increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC. Glycolic acid was identified as a significant component (12- 14% of total DOC. Protracted incubation resulted in concentrations of glycolic acid declining in both cases, and glycolic acid added to a culture of Chlorella incubated in the dark was taken up by the alga (~100% within three days. Two monosaccharides were identified in cell-free liquors of each algal isolate: fructose and glucose (Chlorella, and mannitol and glucose (Euglena. These were rapidly metabolised by acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria (Acidiphilium and Acidobacterium spp. though only fructose was utilised by the more fastidious heterotroph Acidocella aromatica. The significance of algae in promoting the growth of iron- (and sulfate- reducing heterotrophic acidophiles that are important in remediating mine-impacted waters is discussed.

  5. Heavy metal bioleaching and sludge stabilization in a single-stage reactor using indigenous acidophilic heterotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Akanksha; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2017-01-10

    Simultaneous sludge digestion and metal leaching (SSDML) have been reported at mesophilic temperature. It is generally perceived that while sludge stabilization is effected by heterotrophs at neutral pH, metal bioleaching is done by acidophilic autotrophs. However, little information is available on the microbial communities involved in the process. This study carried out SSDML in a single-stage reactor using sludge indigenous microorganisms and looked at the bacterial communities responsible for the process. Volatile suspended solids were reduced by more than 40%. The concentration of zinc, copper, chromium, cadmium and nickel decreased by more than 45% in the dry sludge. Acidophilic species of Alicyclobacillus genus were the dominant heterotrophs. A few heterotrophic bacteria were detected which can oxidize iron (Alicyclobacillus ferrooxydans, Alicyclobacillus ferripilum and Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum). Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (autotroph) was responsible for the oxidation of both iron and sulfur which lead to a change in the pH from neutral to acidic. The presence of acidophilic heterotrophs, which can oxidize either iron or sulfur, enhanced the efficiency of SSDML process with respect to sludge stabilization and metal leaching. This study shows that it is possible to carry out the SSDML in a single-stage reactor with indigenous microorganisms.

  6. Growth rate characteristics of acidophilic heterotrophic organisms from mine waste rock piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacob, T. W.; Silverstein, J.; Jenkins, J.; Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.

    2010-12-01

    Autotrophic iron oxidizing bacteria play a key role in pyrite oxidation and generation of acid mine drainage AMD. Scarcity of organic substrates in many disturbed sites insures that IOB have sufficient oxygen and other nutrients for growth. It is proposed that addition of organic carbon substrate to waste rock piles will result in enrichment of heterotrophic microorganisms limiting the role of IOB in AMD generation. Previous researchers have used the acidophilic heterotroph Acidiphilium cryptum as a model to study the effects of organic substrate addition on the pyrite oxidation/AMD cycle. In order to develop a quantitative model of effects such as competition for oxygen, it is necessary to use growth and substrate consumption rate expressions, and one approach is to choose a model strain such as A. cryptum for kinetic studies. However we have found that the growth rate characteristics of A. cryptum may not provide an accurate model of the remediation effects of organic addition to subsurface mined sites. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) assays of extracts of mine waste rock enriched with glucose and yeast extract did not produce countable numbers of cells in the Acidiphilium genus, with a detection limit of3 x 104 cells/gram rock, despite evidence of the presence of well established heterotrophic organisms. However, an MPN enrichment produced heterotrophic population estimates of 1x107 and 1x109 cells/gram rock. Growth rate studies of A. cryptum showed that cultures took 120 hours to degrade 50% of an initial glucose concentration of 2,000 mg/L. However a mixed culture enriched from mine waste rock consumed 100% of the same amount of glucose in 24 hours. Substrate consumption data for the mixed culture were fit to a Monod growth model: {dS}/{dt} = μ_{max}S {( {X_0}/{Y} + S_0 -S )}/{(K_s +S)} Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing a non linear regression method coupled with an ODE solver. The maximum specific growth rate of the mixed population with

  7. Viruses, bacteria, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates in Laptev Sea plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, A. I.; Sazhin, A. F.; Zabotkina, E. A.; Romanenko, A. V.; Romanova, N. D.; Makarevich, P. R.; Wenger, M. P.

    2016-11-01

    The paper considers the concentrations and functional characteristics of viruses, bacteria, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates determined for the first time in the Laptev Sea in August-September, 2014. The abundance of bacteria, viruses, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates varied from 110.1 × 103 to 828.4 × 103 cells/mL, from 384.2 × 103 to 2932.8 × 103 particles/mL, and from 108 to 651 cells/mL, respectively. The daily bacterioplankton production varied from 4.2 × 103 to 381.7 × 103 cells/mL, with an average of 117.6 × 103 cells/mL. Electron transmission microscopy has for the first time shown that the frequency of visibly infected bacterial cells varied from 0.2 to 2.0% (0.8% on average) of NB. The average virus-induced mortality of bacteria was 6.3% of bacterioplankton production, with variations ranging from 1.4 to 16.9%. Grazing on bacteria by heterotrophic nanoflagellates contributed more to bacteria mortality than virus-induced bacterial lysis. By grazing on bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates consumed large quantities of viruses located on the surface and inside bacterial cells.

  8. Culture-independent detection of "TM7" bacteria in a streptomycin-resistant acidophilic nitrifying process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurogi, T.; Linh, N. T. T.; Kuroki, T.; Yamada, T.; Hiraishi, A.

    2014-02-01

    Nitrification in biological wastewater treatment processes has been believed for long time to take place under neutral conditions and is inhibited under acidic conditions. However, we previously constructed acidophilic nitrifying sequencing-batch reactors (ANSBRs) being capable of nitrification at level, this study was undertaken to construct streptomycin-resistant acidophilic nitrifying (SRAN) reactors and to demonstrate whether TM7 bacteria are abundant in these reactors. The SRAN reactors were constructed by seeding with nitrifying sludge from an ANSBR and cultivating with ammonium-containing mineral medium (pH 4.0), to which streptomycin at a concentration of 10, 30 and 50 mg L-1 was added. In all reactors, the pH varied between 2.7 and 4.0, and ammonium was completely converted to nitrate in every batch cycle. PCR-aided denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that some major clones assigned to TM7 bacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were constantly present during the overall period of operation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with specific oligonucleotide probes also showed that TM7 bacteria predominated in all SRAN reactors, accounting for 58% of the total bacterial population on average. Although the biological significance of the TM7 bacteria in the SRAN reactors are unknown, our results suggest that these bacteria are possibly streptomycin-resistant and play some important roles in the acidophilic nitrifying process.

  9. Heavy metal resistance strategies of acidophilic bacteria and their acquisition: importance for biomining and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Claudio A; von Bernath, Diego; Jerez, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial solubilizing of metals in acid environments is successfully used in industrial bioleaching of ores or biomining to extract metals such as copper, gold, uranium and others. This is done mainly by acidophilic and other microorganisms that mobilize metals and generate acid mine drainage or AMD, causing serious environmental problems. However, bioremediation or removal of the toxic metals from contaminated soils can be achieved by using the specific properties of the acidophilic microorganisms interacting with these elements. These bacteria resist high levels of metals by using a few "canonical" systems such as active efflux or trapping of the metal ions by metal chaperones. Nonetheless, gene duplications, the presence of genomic islands, the existence of additional mechanisms such as passive instruments for pH and cation homeostasis in acidophiles and an inorganic polyphosphate-driven metal resistance mechanism have also been proposed. Horizontal gene transfer in environmental microorganisms present in natural ecosystems is considered to be an important mechanism in their adaptive evolution. This process is carried out by different mobile genetic elements, including genomic islands (GI), which increase the adaptability and versatility of the microorganism. This mini-review also describes the possible role of GIs in metal resistance of some environmental microorganisms of importance in biomining and bioremediation of metal polluted environments such as Thiomonas arsenitoxydans, a moderate acidophilic microorganism, Acidithiobacillus caldus and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains ATCC 23270 and ATCC 53993, all extreme acidophiles able to tolerate exceptionally high levels of heavy metals. Some of these bacteria contain variable numbers of GIs, most of which code for high numbers of genes related to metal resistance. In some cases there is an apparent correlation between the number of metal resistance genes and the metal tolerance of each of these

  10. Heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water distribution system: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2012-10-01

    The microbiological quality of drinking water in municipal water distribution systems (WDS) depends on several factors. Free residual chlorine and/or chloramines are typically used to minimize bacterial recontamination and/or regrowth in WDS. Despite such preventive measures, regrowth of heterotrophic (HPC) and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms has yet to be controlled completely. No approach has shown complete success in eliminating biofilms or HPC bacteria from bulk water and pipe surfaces. Biofilms can provide shelter for pathogenic bacteria and protect these bacteria from disinfectants. Some HPC bacteria may be associated with aesthetic and non-life threatening diseases. Research to date has achieved important success in understanding occurrence and regrowth of bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. To achieve comprehensive understanding and to provide efficient control against bacteria regrowth, future research on bacteria regrowth dynamics and their implications is warranted. In this study, a review was performed on the literature published in this area. The findings and limitations of these papers are summarized. Occurrences of bacteria in WDS, factors affecting bacteria regrowth in bulk water and biofilms, bacteria control strategies, sources of nutrients, human health risks from bacterial exposure, modelling of bacteria regrowth and methods of bacteria sampling and detection and quantification are investigated. Advances to date are noted, and future research needs are identified. Finally, research directions are proposed to effectively control HPC and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS.

  11. Lessons from the genomes of extremely acidophilic bacteria and archaea with special emphasis on bioleaching microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Valdés, Jorge; Quatrini, Raquel; Duarte, Francisco; Holmes, David S

    2010-10-01

    This mini-review describes the current status of recent genome sequencing projects of extremely acidophilic microorganisms and highlights the most current scientific advances emerging from their analysis. There are now at least 56 draft or completely sequenced genomes of acidophiles including 30 bacteria and 26 archaea. There are also complete sequences for 38 plasmids, 29 viruses, and additional DNA sequence information of acidic environments is available from eight metagenomic projects. A special focus is provided on the genomics of acidophiles from industrial bioleaching operations. It is shown how this initial information provides a rich intellectual resource for microbiologists that has potential to open innovative and efficient research avenues. Examples presented illustrate the use of genomic information to construct preliminary models of metabolism of individual microorganisms. Most importantly, access to multiple genomes allows the prediction of metabolic and genetic interactions between members of the bioleaching microbial community (ecophysiology) and the investigation of major evolutionary trends that shape genome architecture and evolution. Despite these promising beginnings, a major conclusion is that the genome projects help focus attention on the tremendous effort still required to understand the biological principles that support life in extremely acidic environments, including those that might allow engineers to take appropriate action designed to improve the efficiency and rate of bioleaching and to protect the environment.

  12. A comparative effect of 3 disinfectants on heterotrophic bacteria, iron bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The disinfection effect of chlorine dioxide, chlorine and their mixture on heterotrophic bacteria, iron bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria in circulating cooling water was studied. The results of the test indicated that high purity chlorine dioxide was the most effective biocide in the 3 disinfectants, and with a dosage of 0.5mg/L, chlorine dioxide could obtain perfect effect. High purity chloride dioxide could have the excellent effect with the pH value of 6 to 10, and could keep it within 72 h. Chlorine and their mixture couldn't reach the effect of chlorine dioxide.

  13. Characterization of bacteria acidophilic in samples of water coming into a region that suffers influence of uranium mine in Caldas (MG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Michelle B.; Ferrari, Carla R.; Roque, Claudio V.; Ronqui, Leilane B.; Nascimento, Marcos R.L. do; Rodgher, Suzelei; Azevedo, Heliana [Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas (LAPOC-CNEN/MG), MG (Brazil)], e-mail: michelle_borato@hotmail.com, e-mail: carlarolimferrari@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: leilanebio@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: pmarcos@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: surodgher@uol.com.br, e-mail: hgomes@cnen.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The fundamental condition for the bioleaching of the uranium ore is the presence of metallic sulfide such as pyrite associated with the ore, which is found in the ore and in the waste at the Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio (UTM) of Pocos de Caldas, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The present study aims to determine the chemical and microbiological characteristics in effluents of uranium mining from the UTM and in Antas dam, which receives treated effluents from the UTM. Water samples were collected Pit Mine (CM), located within the UTM facilities and from site 41 (Antas dam) in July and October 2008. We verified low pH values in water samples from CM (3.7) in comparison to the ones found at site 41 (6.65). There was a higher medium density value of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and heterotrophic acidophilic bacteria in water samples at site CM compared to the values recorded from samples at site 41. Medium values of Fe{sup 2+}, uranium and zinc in samples from the site CM were higher than at site 41. The concentration of fluoride (68.5 mL{sup -l}) and manganese (2.34 mL{sup -1}) in water samples from site 41 were above the limits fixed for water bodies in Resolution CONAMA 357. The relative seasonal variation of some variables observed at site CM (low pH values, high densities of Acidithiobacillus sp. and heterotrophic acidophilic bacteria) shows that this site is one of the main sites of occurrence of acid mine drainage and action of bioleaching bacteria at UTM. (author)

  14. Degradation of alkenones by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria: Selective or not ?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rontani, J-F.; Harji, R.; Guasco, S.; Prahl, F.G.; Volkman, J.K.; Bhosle, N.B.; Bonin, P.

    of alkenones by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria: selective or not? Jean-François Rontani a *, Ranjita Harji a,b , Sophie Guasco a , Fredrick G. Prahl c , John K. Volkman d , Narayan B. Bhosle b , Patricia Bonin a a Laboratoire de Microbiologie de..., Corvallis, OR 97331-5503, US. d CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia * Corresponding author. Tel.: +33-4-91-82-96-51; fax: +33-4-91-82-96-41. E-mail address: jean-francois.rontani@com.univmed.fr (J...

  15. Interactions of Methylotrophs with Plants and Other Heterotrophic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Iguchi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Methylotrophs, which can utilize methane and/or methanol as sole carbon and energy sources, are key players in the carbon cycle between methane and CO2, the two most important greenhouse gases. This review describes the relationships between methylotrophs and plants, and between methanotrophs (methane-utilizers, a subset of methylotrophs and heterotrophic bacteria. Some plants emit methane and methanol from their leaves, and provide methylotrophs with habitats. Methanol-utilizing methylotrophs in the genus Methylobacterium are abundant in the phyllosphere and have the ability to promote the growth of some plants. Methanotrophs also inhabit the phyllosphere, and methanotrophs with high methane oxidation activities have been found on aquatic plants. Both plant and environmental factors are involved in shaping the methylotroph community on plants. Methanotrophic activity can be enhanced by heterotrophic bacteria that provide growth factors (e.g., cobalamin. Information regarding the biological interaction of methylotrophs with other organisms will facilitate a better understanding of the carbon cycle that is driven by methylotrophs.

  16. Modeling of heterotrophic bacteria counts in a water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisque, Alex; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Miranda-Moreno, Luis F; Sadiq, Rehan; Proulx, François

    2009-03-01

    Heterotrophic plate count (HPC) constitutes a common indicator for monitoring of microbiological water quality in distribution systems (DS). This paper aims to identify factors explaining the spatiotemporal distribution of heterotrophic bacteria and model their occurrence in the distribution system. The case under study is the DS of Quebec City, Canada. The study is based on a robust database resulting from a sampling campaign carried out in about 50 DS locations, monitored bi-weekly over a three-year period. Models for explaining and predicting HPC levels were based on both one-level and multi-level Poisson regression techniques. The latter take into account the nested structure of data, the possible spatiotemporal correlation among HPC observations and the fact that sampling points, months and/or distribution sub-systems may represent clusters. Models show that the best predictors for spatiotemporal occurrence of HPC in the DS are: free residual chlorine that has an inverse relation with the HPC levels, water temperature and water ultraviolet absorbance, both having a positive impact on HPC levels. A sensitivity analysis based on the best performing model (two-level model) allowed for the identification of seasonal-based strategies to reduce HPC levels.

  17. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production potential of heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Uchida, Takahiro; Morohoshi, Jota; Sei, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production potential of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge by genotypic and phenotypic characterizations. A total of 114 bacterial strains were isolated from four activated sludge samples taken from a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor and three wastewater treatment processes of two municipal wastewater treatment plants. PCR detection of the phaC genes encoding class I and II PHA synthase revealed that 15% of the total isolates possessed phaC genes, all of which had the closest similarities to known phaC genes of α- and β-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. PHA production experiments under aerobic and nitrogen-limited conditions showed that 68% of the total isolates were capable of producing PHA from at least one of the six substrates used (acetate, propionate, lactate, butyrate, glucose and glycerol). Genotypic and phenotypic characterizations revealed that 75% of the activated sludge bacteria had PHA production potential. Our results also indicated that short-chain fatty acids would be the preferable substrates for PHA production by activated sludge bacteria, and that there might be a variety of unidentified phaC genes in activated sludge.

  18. BACTERIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF MARINE WATER IN ADRIATIC FISH FARMS: ENUMERATION OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Teskeredžić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquaculture is currently one of the fastest growing food production sectors in the world. Increase in nutrients and organic wastes lead to general deterioration of water quality. The problem of water quality is associated with both physical and chemical factors, as well as microbiological water quality. Heterotrophic bacteria play an important role in the process of decomposition of organic matter in water environment and indicate eutrophication process. Here we present our experience and knowledge on bacterial properties of marine water in the Adriatic fish farms with European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L., 1758, with an emphasis on enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria in marine water. We applied two temperatures of incubation, as well as two methods for enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria: substrate SimPlate® test and spread plate method on conventional artificial media (Marine agar and Tryptic Soy agar with added NaCl. The results of analysis of bacteriological properties of marine water in the Adriatic fish farms showed that enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria in marine water depends on the applied incubation temperature and media for enumeration. At the same time, the incubation temperature of 22C favours more intense growth of marine heterotrophic bacteria, whereas a SimPlate test gives higher values of heterotrophic bacteria. Volatile values of heterotrophic bacteria during this research indicate a possible deterioration of microbiological water quality in the Adriatic fish farms and a need for regular monitoring of marine water quality.

  19. Unicellular cyanobacteria synechocystis accommodate heterotrophic bacteria with varied enzymatic and metal resistance properties

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Sageer, S.; Jasmin, C.; Vijayan, V.; Pavanan, P.; Athiyanathil, S.; Nair, S.

    unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. that came from a heavy metal contaminated region of Cochin estuary, southwest coast of India. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, the heterotrophic bacteria were grouped into three phyla: namely...

  20. HETEROTROPHIC PLATE COUNT BACTERIA - WHAT IS THEIR SIGNIFICANCE IN DRINKING WATER?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The possible health significance of heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria, also know in earlier terminology as standard plate count (SPC) bacteria, in drinking water has been debated for decades. While the literature documents the universal occurrence of HPC bacteria in soil, ...

  1. Molasses as C source for heterotrophic bacteria production on solid fish waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, O.; Sereti, V.; Eding, E.H.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2006-01-01

    The drumfilter effluent from a recirculation aquaculture system (RAS) can be used as substrate for heterotrophic bacteria production. These bacteria can be reused as aquatic feed. In RAS drumfilter effluents are organic carbon deficient for bacteria production. This is due to nitrogen accumulation i

  2. Investigation of energy gene expressions and community structures of free and attached acidophilic bacteria in chalcopyrite bioleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianyu; Jiao, Weifeng; Li, Qian; Liu, Xueduan; Qin, Wenqing; Qiu, Guanzhou; Hu, Yuehua; Chai, Liyuan

    2012-12-01

    In order to better understand the bioleaching mechanism, expression of genes involved in energy conservation and community structure of free and attached acidophilic bacteria in chalcopyrite bioleaching were investigated. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we studied the expression of genes involved in energy conservation in free and attached Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans during bioleaching of chalcopyrite. Sulfur oxidation genes of attached A. ferrooxidans were up-regulated while ferrous iron oxidation genes were down-regulated compared with free A. ferrooxidans in the solution. The up-regulation may be induced by elemental sulfur on the mineral surface. This conclusion was supported by the results of HPLC analysis. Sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and ferrous-oxidizing Leptospirillum ferrooxidans were the members of the mixed culture in chalcopyrite bioleaching. Study of the community structure of free and attached bacteria showed that A. thiooxidans dominated the attached bacteria while L. ferrooxidans dominated the free bacteria. With respect to available energy sources during bioleaching of chalcopyrite, sulfur-oxidizers tend to be on the mineral surfaces whereas ferrous iron-oxidizers tend to be suspended in the aqueous phase. Taken together, these results indicate that the main role of attached acidophilic bacteria was to oxidize elemental sulfur and dissolution of chalcopyrite involved chiefly an indirect bioleaching mechanism.

  3. Heterotrophic bacteria in soils of Larsemann Oasis of East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churilin, Nikita; Soina, Vera

    2015-04-01

    The study of diversity and functional state of microorganisms in subsurface rocks layers, their participation in the biochemical weathering and formation of organic horizons of soils is important for understanding ecology and microorganisms in Antarctic soils. The study of cultured forms of microorganisms and their potential viability is still relevant to characterize the physiological state, biological activity and resilience of microorganisms involved in the initial soil formation. Improvement of isolation techniques of viable bacteria from the extreme habitats has a particular importance for rising the efficiency of environmental monitoring. The aim of the study was to investigate the viable heterotrophic bacteria involved in the formation of soils from wet valleys Larsemann Oasis, which is one of the warmest ice-free space of East Antarctica. Soil samples were taken from the intermountain humid valleys, where silt-gravelly substrates formed moss, algae, lichen cover. We used nutrient solutions (trypticase soy, R2A and glucose-peptone) to isolate cultured bacteria and study their morphological types in the light microscope. The total number of microorganisms was determined by fluorescent microscopy with acridine orange. SEM was used for morphological studies of bacterial communities in situ. To activate the growth processes we added into nutrient solutions various regulatory metabolites that have dose-dependence and operate at the community level. Physiological and functional conditions were determined by the duration of the lag phase and specific growth rate of bacterial communities in nutrient solutions containing various organic substrates. Soils form under protection of «stone pavement» and organisms leave the surface, so the forming organo-mineral horizon occurs inside of rock, thus the microprofile can form on both sides of the organic horizons. UV radiation, lack of moisture and strong wind are main limiting factors for microorganisms' growth in

  4. Study on processing highly effective Acidophilic bacteria starter culture and Acidophilic bacteria milk powder with new technology%新工艺制备高效嗜酸菌发酵剂和嗜酸菌奶粉的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方景泉; 徐欣

    2013-01-01

    Two different strains of acidophilic bacteria were incubated by different methods and through a series contrast tests,we found the best method for incubating.Then concentrated the bacteria with high sPeed centrifuge and put it in 10% skim milk solution with protective agent D,after vacuum freeze drying the viable count of Lactobacillus acidophilus exist in the starter culture were 8.3 ×1010g-1and its survival rate could be 68.8%.We can process Acidophilic bacteria milk powder when mixed it together with milk powder.%分别使两株嗜酸菌在脱脂乳水解液培养基和脱脂乳培养基中生长,通过一系列的对比实验,以及使菌体浓缩,浓菌体悬浮在添加保护剂D质量分数为10%脱脂乳中,经冷冻干燥后,所得高效嗜酸菌发酵剂中的细胞数达8.3×1010 g-1.其在真空冷冻干燥后的存活率最高可达68.8%.将此高效发酵剂与奶粉混合即可制得嗜酸菌奶粉.

  5. Isolation and life-cycle characterization of lytic viruses infecting heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelboe, Mathias; Chan, Amy; Bertelsen, Sif Koldborg

    2010-01-01

    Basic knowledge on viruses infecting heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria is key to future progress in understanding the role of viruses in aquatic systems and the influence of virus–host interactions on microbial mortality, biogeochemical cycles, and genetic exchange. Such studies require......, and discusses the applications and limitations of different isolation procedures. Most work on phage isolation has been carried out with aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria, culturable both on agar plates and in enriched liquid cultures. The procedures presented here are limited to lytic viruses...

  6. Quantifying adhesion of acidophilic bioleaching bacteria to silica and pyrite by atomic force microscopy with a bacterial probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Mengxue; Taran, Elena; Mahler, Stephen; Nguyen, Tuan A H; Nguyen, Anh V

    2014-03-01

    The adhesion of acidophilic bacteria to mineral surfaces is an important phenomenon in bioleaching processes. In this study, functionalized colloidal probes covered by bioleaching bacterial cells (Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans) were developed and used to sense specific adhesion forces to a silica surface and a pyrite surface in various solutions. Experimentally, recorded retraction curves of A. thiooxidans revealed sawtooth features that were in good agreement with the wormlike chain model, while that of L. ferrooxidans exhibited stair-step separation. The magnitudes of adhesion forces and snap-off distances were strongly influenced by the ionic strength and pH. Macroscopic surface properties including hydrophobicity and surface potential for bacterial cells and substrata were measured by a sessile drop method and microelectrophoresis. The ATR-FTIR spectra indicated the presence of different types of biopolymers on two strains of bacteria.

  7. Overestimation of heterotrophic bacteria in the Sargasso Sea: direct evidence by flow and imaging cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieracki, Michael E.; Haugen, Elin M.; Cucci, Terry L.

    1995-08-01

    Accurate measurements of bacterial biomass in the ocean are needed for modeling marine microbial food webs and global biogeochemical cycling. We present direct evidence that previous estimates of heterotrophic bacteria biomass in the oligotrophic ocean are confounded by the presence of the abundant photosynthetic procaryote, Prochlorococcus. The chlorophyll autofluorescence of these photosynthetic bacterial cells is very faint and fades rapidly under epifluorescence microscopy. Detection and enumeration of these cells thus far has almost exclusively been by flow cytometry. Using a cooled, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera we were able to image these cells for direct biovolume measurements. A double-exposed image of DAPI-stained Prochlorococcus cells shows that they are indistinguishable from heterotrophic bacteria in standard slide preparations. At two Sargasso Sea stations Prochlorococcus could cause an overestimation of surface (top 150 m) integrated heterotrophic bacterial biovolume (biomass) of 18 and 22% determined by standard microscope methods. At the subsurface chlorophyll maximum Prochlorococcus was 33 and 43% of the heterotrophic bacterial biovolume (biomass) at these stations. Prochlorococcus cell size increased from 0.05 μm 3 in the surface mixed layer to about 0.2 μm 3 below 100 m, confirming previous interpretations of flow cytometric light scatter measurements. Shifting biomass from the heterotrophic bacteria pool to the primary producer compartment has significant implications for ecosystem structure and trophic transfer in marine food webs.

  8. Incidence of Legionella and heterotrophic bacteria in household rainwater tanks in Azumino, Nagano prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiko; Oana, Kozue; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Many administrative agencies in Japan are encouraging installation of household rainwater-storage tanks for more effective use of natural rainwater. Water samples were collected periodically from 43 rainwater tanks from 40 households and tested for the presence of Legionella species and the extent of heterotrophic bacteria in Azumino city, Nagano prefecture, Japan. PCR assays indicated the presence of Legionella spp. in 12 (30%) of the 43 tank water samples. Attempts were made to identify correlations between PCR positive samples, topography, pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), atmospheric temperature and the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria. Between June and October, 2012, the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria in rainwater tanks and the values of COD positively correlated with the presence of Legionella species. In most of the Legionella-positive cases, heterotrophic bacterial cell counts were >10(4) CFU/mL. Moreover, Legionella species were less frequently detected when the COD value was >5 mg KMnO(4)/L. Therefore, at least in Azumino, Japan between June and October 2012, both heterotrophic bacterial counts and COD values may be considered index parameters for the presence of Legionella cells in rainwater tanks. Much more accumulation of such data is needed to verify the accuracy of these findings.

  9. Isolation and Characteristics of New Heterotrophic Nitrifying Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Jun-feng; MA Fang; WANG Hong-yu; GUO Jing-bo; HOU Ning; LI Wei-guo; WEI Li

    2007-01-01

    The study presented the method for isolating the heterotrophic nitrifiers and the characterization of heterotrophic nitrification. When influent Ammonia nitrogen concentration was 42. 78-73. 62 mg/L. The average ammonia nitrogen removal rate was 81,32% from the bio-ceramics reactor. Sodium acetate and ammonium chloride were used as carbon and nitrogen source. The COD removal rates by microorganisms of strain wgy21 and wgy36 were 56.1% and 45.45%, respectively. The TN removal rates by microorganisms of strain wgy21 and wgy36 were 65.85%and 67. 98%, respectively. At the same time, the concentration of ammonium nitrogen was with the removal rates of 75.25% and 84.96%, and it also had the function of producing NO2-N. Sodium acetate and sodium nitrite were used as carbon and nitrogen source. Through the 12days of the aerobic culture, the COD femoral rates by microorganisms of strain wgy21 and wgy36 were 29.25%and 22.08%, respectively. NO2-N concentration decreased slowly. Comparison, similarity of wgy21 and many Acinetobacter sp. ≥99%, similarity of wgy36 and many Acinetobacter sp. ≥99%. Refer to routine physiological-biochemical characteristic determination, further evidences showed that wgy21 and wgy36 belong to Acinetobacter sp.,respectively.

  10. Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment

    KAUST Repository

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor

    2016-12-06

    Quantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs by 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.

  11. Heterotrophic Bacteria Show Weak Competition for Nitrogen in Mediterranean Coastal Waters (Thau Lagoon) in Autumn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottet, Aurore; Leboulanger, Christophe; Vidussi, Francesca; Pete, Romain; Bouvy, Marc; Fouilland, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The importance of heterotrophic bacteria relative to phytoplankton in the uptake of ammonium and nitrate was studied in Mediterranean coastal waters (Thau Lagoon) during autumn, when the Mediterranean Sea received the greatest allochthonous nutrient loads. Specific inhibitors and size-fractionation methods were used in combination with isotopic (15)N tracers. NO3 (-) and NH4 (+) uptake was dominated by phytoplankton (60 % on average) during the study period, which included a flood event. Despite lower biomass specific NH4 (+) and NO3 uptake rates, free-living heterotrophic bacteria contributed significantly (>30 %) to total microbial NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) uptake rates in low chlorophyll waters. Under these conditions, heterotrophic bacteria may be responsible for more than 50 % of primary production, using very little freshly produced phytoplankton exudates. In low chlorophyll coastal waters as reported during the present 3-month study, the heterotrophic bacteria seemed to depend to a greater extent on allochthonous N and C substrates than on autochthonous substrates derived from phytoplankton.

  12. Acquisition of useful and high ability genes for acidophilic bacteria; Kosansei saikin ni takai noryoku wo fuyosuru idenshi no kakutoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senda, T.; Inoue, C.; Shinbori, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    This effort aims at the development of high-performance bacteria usable in bio-leaching in metal smelting by acquiring genes capable of realizing such. A method is used of choosing some isolated strains exhibiting high-performance traits and acquiring target genes therefrom by use of genetic engineering. Approximately 200 kinds in the aggregate of acidophilic bacteria are currently available for the study, including isolated iron-oxidizing and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, standard species acquired for the study, and strains previously isolated by the laboratory. The bacteria are tested with respect to their Fe{sup 2+}-oxidizing rates, sulfur-oxidizing capabilities, and strength to withstand inhibiting substances (Ag{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, Mo{sup 6+}, etc.), which results in the nomination of 8 strains. The study planned to follow includes processes involving the extraction of chromosome DNAs from the 8 strains and their refinement, gene cloning by the Southern hybridization method, determination of their base sequences, determination of the difference between the strains in point of gene expression, and investigations of the relations that the results of these processes bear toward the said high-performance traits. Also under way is a study about the infuence-exerting factors revealed during the evaluation of the abilities of acidphlic bacteria. 2 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Abundance and Biomass of Benthic Heterotrophic Bacteria in Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The abundance and biomass of benthic heterotrophic bacteria were investigated for the 4 typical sampling stations in the northern muddy part of Jiaozhou Bay, estuary of the Dagu River, raft culturing and nearby areas of Huangdao in March, June, August and December, 2002. The abundance and biomass range from 0 . 98×107 to 16 . 87×107cells g - 1 sediment and 0 . 45 to 7 . 08 μg C g - 1 sediment, respectively. Correlation analysis showed that heterotrophic bacterial abundance and biomass are significantly correlated to water temperature (R=0 . 79 and 0 . 83, respectively, P<0 . 01).

  14. Response of Marine Microalgae, Heterotrophic Bacteria and Their Relationship to Enhanced UV-B Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wenli; TANG Xuexi; XIAO Hui; WANG You; WANG Renjun

    2009-01-01

    Ozone depletion in the stratosphere has enhanced solar UV-B radiation reaching the Earth surface and has brought about significant effects to marine ecosystems. The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on marine microalgae, heterotrophic bacteria and the interaction between them are discussed. The effects on marine microalgae have been proved to occur at molecular, cellular and population levels. Enhanced UV-B radiation increases microalgal flavonoid content but decreases their chlorophyll content and pho-tosynthesis rate; this rachation induces genetic change and results in DNA damage and change of protein content. There have been fewer studies on the effects of UV-B radiation on marine heterotrophic bacteria. Establishment of a nucroalgal ecological dynamic model at population and community levels under UV-B radiation has gradually become a hotspot. The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on microalgae communities, heterotrophic bacterial populations and interaction between them will become a focus in the near future. This paper will make an overview on the studies concerning the effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on marine microal-gae and heterotrophic bacteria and the interaction between them.

  15. Diversity and biosynthetic potential of culturable aerobic heterotrophic bacteria isolated from Magura Cave, Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomova Iva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biocapacity of bacteria inhabiting karstic caves to produce valuable biologically active compounds is still slightly investigated. A total of 46 culturable heterotrophic bacteria were isolated under aerobic conditions from the Gallery with pre-historical drawings in Magura Cave, Bulgaria. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of bacterial isolates aff iliated with Proteobacteria (63%, followed by Actinobacteria (10.9%, Bacteroidetes (10.9%, and Firmicutes (6.5%. A strong domination of Gram-negative bacteria (total 81% belonging to nine genera: Serratia, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Sphingobacterium, Stenotrophomonas, Commamonas, Acinetobacter, Obesumbacterium, and Myroides, was observed. Gram-positive isolates were represented by the genera Bacillus, Arthrobacter, and Micrococcus. One isolate showed a signif icant phylogenetic distance to the closest neighbor and could represent а novel species. Heterotrophic bacterial isolates from Magura Cave were investigated for hydrolytic enzymes production, antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. Predominance of producers of protease (87%, followed by xanthan lyase (64%, lipase (40%, β-glycosidase (40%, and phytase (21% was observed. Over 75% of the isolates demonstrated antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. The results suggest that heterotrophic bacteria isolated from Magura Cave could be a valuable source of industrially relevant psychrotolerant enzymes and bioactive metabolites. This study is a f irst report on the taxonomic composition and biological activity of culturable bacteria inhabiting a cave in Bulgaria.

  16. Distribution Pattern of Photosynthetic Picoplankton and Heterotrophic Bacteria in the Northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Ming Cai; Xiu-Ren Ning; Cheng-Gang Liu; Qiang Hao

    2007-01-01

    The environmental regulation of picoplankton distribution in the northern South China Sea was examined in winter and summer of 2004. The average abundance of Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, and heterotrophic bacteria was lower in winter (30, 21, and 780×103 cells/cm3, respectively) than in summer (53, 85, and 1 090×103 cells/cm3,respectively), but the seasonal pattern was opposite for plcoeukaryotic phytoplankton (4 500 and 3 200 cells/cm3 in winter and summer, respectively). Synechococcus, picoeukaryotes, and bacteria were most abundant in the nutrient-rich coastal zone and continental shelf, but Prochlorococcus was most abundant in the continental slope and open ocean. The vertical distribution of each photosynthetic group and heterotrophic bacteria changed between the two seasons. Synechococcus populations with apparently different phycoerythrobilln content occurred at many stations in the summer. In addition, two different populations of Prochlorococcus were found: (i) small, weakly fluorescing cells in the surface layer; and (ii) larger, strongly fluorescent cells in the deep layer. The distribution pattern of photosynthetic picoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria depends on environmental effects and their ecophysiological differences. The distribution of Synechococcus appeared to be related to nutrient availability,whereas the distribution of Prochlorococcus appeared to be limited by temperature. Synechococcus was the only picophytoplankton with a consistent strong relationship with bacteria.

  17. Oxygen-dependent niche formation of a pyrite-dependent acidophilic consortium built by archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Sibylle; Dolch, Kerstin; Geiger, Katharina; Krause, Susanne; Asskamp, Maximilian; Eusterhues, Karin; Kriews, Michael; Wilhelms-Dick, Dorothee; Goettlicher, Joerg; Majzlan, Juraj; Gescher, Johannes

    2013-09-01

    Biofilms can provide a number of different ecological niches for microorganisms. Here, a multispecies biofilm was studied in which pyrite-oxidizing microbes are the primary producers. Its stability allowed not only detailed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based characterization of the microbial population in different areas of the biofilm but also to integrate these results with oxygen and pH microsensor measurements conducted before. The O2 concentration declined rapidly from the outside to the inside of the biofilm. Hence, part of the population lives under microoxic or anoxic conditions. Leptospirillum ferrooxidans strains dominate the microbial population but are only located in the oxic periphery of the snottite structure. Interestingly, archaea were identified only in the anoxic parts of the biofilm. The archaeal community consists mainly of so far uncultured Thermoplasmatales as well as novel ARMAN (Archaeal Richmond Mine Acidophilic Nanoorganism) species. Inductively coupled plasma analysis and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra provide further insight in the biofilm characteristics but revealed no other major factors than oxygen affecting the distribution of bacteria and archaea. In addition to catalyzed reporter deposition FISH and oxygen microsensor measurements, microautoradiographic FISH was used to identify areas in which active CO2 fixation takes place. Leptospirilla as well as acidithiobacilli were identified as primary producers. Fixation of gaseous CO2 seems to proceed only in the outer rim of the snottite. Archaea inhabiting the snottite core do not seem to contribute to the primary production. This work gives insight in the ecological niches of acidophilic microorganisms and their role in a consortium. The data provided the basis for the enrichment of uncultured archaea.

  18. Ultraviolet reduction of erythromycin and tetracycline resistant heterotrophic bacteria and their resistance genes in municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance in wastewater is becoming a major public health concern, but poorly understood about impact of disinfection on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes. The UV disinfection of antibiotic resistant heterotrophic bacteria and their relevant genes in the wastewater of a municipal wastewater treatment plant has been evaluated. Two commonly used antibiotics, erythromycin and tetracycline were selected because of their wide occurrences in regard to the antibiotic resistance problem. After UV treatment at a fluence of 5mJcm(-2), the log reductions of heterotrophic bacteria resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline in the wastewater were found to be 1.4±0.1 and 1.1±0.1, respectively. The proportion of tetracycline-resistant bacteria (5%) was nearly double of that before UV disinfection (3%). Tetracycline-resistant bacteria exhibited more tolerance to UV irradiation compared to the erythromycin-resistant bacteria (pUV treatment at a fluence of 5mJcm(-2) removed the total erythromycin- and tetracycline-resistance genes by 3.0±0.1 log and 1.9±0.1 log, respectively. UV treatment was effective in reducing antibiotic resistance in the wastewater.

  19. Modeling how soluble microbial products (SMP) support heterotrophic bacteria in autotroph-based biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkey, Brian; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Chopp, David L.

    2009-01-01

    . In this paper, we develop and use a mathematical model to describe a model biofilm system that includes autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and the key products produced by the bacteria. The model combines the methods of earlier multi-species models with a multi-component biofilm model in order to explore......Multi-species biofilm modeling has been used for many years to understand the interactions between species in different biofilm systems, but the complex symbiotic relationship between species is sometimes overlooked, because models do not always include all relevant species and components...

  20. Health concerns of heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria in dental equipment water lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Martin J; Edberg, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    There is an unsubstantiated concern as to the health relevance of HPC (heterotrophic plate count) bacteria in dental equipment waterlines. The American Dental Association (ADA) web site includes guidelines for controlling HPC populations and implies that HPC populations >500 CFU/mL as a "health" benchmark. The world-wide published literature including the United Nations fully examined this situation and concluded that HPC bacteria are not a health risk, but merely a general water quality parameter for all waters including dental water lines. This review provides documentation that the standard measurement of HPC bacteria in waters alone do not pose a health risk and the ADA already provides appropriate practices to minimize HPC bacteria in dental equipment water.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Heterotrophic Bacteria Count in Bottled Waters in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matin MOHAMMADI KOUCHESFAHANI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, due to increased public awareness about water pollution and water borne diseases as well as water network deficiencies, bottled water consumers have increased dramatically worldwide, including Iran. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of causing widespread infections in burn and immune-compromised patients. The aim of this study was to investigate, P. aeruginosa in bottled waters selling in Iranian markets.Methods: One hundred and twenty samples of five unknown (not famous domestic bottled water brands were purchased from Tehran retailers during 2013. The samples were evaluated for the presence of P. aeruginosa. In addition, heterotrophic plate counts were determined by incubation at 37 °C for 24 h.Results: P. aeruginosa was detected in 36.7% (44 samples of all samples examined. In addition, heterotrophic bacteria in 32.5% (39 samples of the samples were higher than 100 CFU/mL, while in 7.5% (9 samples of the samples HPC relied between 20 and 100 CFU/ml.Conclusion: In contrast to public believe, bottled waters are not free of microorganisms, and it is suggested that authorities should provide stricter monitoring and control plan for water resources and plants. Concerning HPC and P. aeruginosa brands B and D were not suitable for drinking. Keywords: Heterotrophic plate count, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bottled water

  2. Occurrence of heterotrophic and coliform bacteria in liquid hand soaps from bulk refillable dispensers in public facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattman, Marisa; Gerba, Sheri L; Maxwell, Charles P

    2011-03-01

    The goal of the study discussed in this article was to determine the occurrence of heterotrophic and coliform bacteria in liquid soap from bulk refillable dispensers, obtained from restrooms in a variety of public facilities. A total of 541 samples was collected from five U.S. cities. Liquid soap from dispensers in public areas was found to contain heterotrophic and coliform bacterial numbers averaging more than 106 CFU/mL in 24.8% of the dispensers.

  3. Use of an acidophilic yeast strain to enable the growth of leaching bacteria on solid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Yi; Yin, Huaqun; Liu, Xueduan

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a Candida digboiensis strain was isolated from a heap leaching plant in Zambia and used in double-layer agar plate to efficiently isolate and purify leaching bacteria. Unlike Acidiphilium sp., the yeast strain was tetrathionate tolerant and could metabolize a great range of organic compounds including organic acids. These properties allowed the yeast strain to enable and fasten the growth of iron and sulfur oxidizers on double-layer agar plate. The isolates were identified as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans FOX1, Leptospirillun ferriphilum BN, and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZMB. These three leaching bacteria were inhibited by organic acids such as acetic and propionic acids; however, their activities were enhanced by Candida digboiensis NB under dissolved organic matter stress.

  4. Production of glycolic acid by chemolithotrophic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and its role in delineating and sustaining acidophilic sulfide mineral-oxidizing consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D Barrie

    2010-01-01

    Glycolic acid was detected as an exudate in actively growing cultures of three chemolithotrophic acidophiles that are important in biomining operations, Leptospirillum ferriphilum, Acidithiobacillus (At.) ferrooxidans, and At. caldus. Although similar concentrations of glycolic acid were found in all cases, the concentrations corresponded to ca. 24% of the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in cultures of L. ferriphilum but only ca. 5% of the total DOC in cultures of the two Acidithiobacillus spp. Rapid acidification (to pH 1.0) of the culture medium of At. caldus resulted in a large increase in the level of DOC, although the concentration of glycolic acid did not change in proportion. The archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum grew in the cell-free spent medium of At. caldus; glycolic acid was not metabolized, although other unidentified compounds in the DOC pool were metabolized. Glycolic acid exhibited levels of toxicity with 21 strains of acidophiles screened similar to those of acetic acid. The most sensitive species were chemolithotrophs (L. ferriphilum and At. ferrivorans), while the most tolerant species were chemoorganotrophs (Acidocella, Acidobacterium, and Ferroplasma species), and the ability to metabolize glycolic acid appeared to be restricted (among acidophiles) to Firmicutes (chiefly Sulfobacillus spp.). Results of this study help explain why Sulfobacillus spp. rather than other acidophiles are the main organic carbon-degrading bacteria in continuously fed stirred tanks used to bioprocess sulfide mineral concentrates and also why temporary cessation of pH control in these systems, resulting in rapid acidification, often results in a plume of the archaeon Ferroplasma.

  5. Genome Sequence of the Acidophilic Bacterium Acidocella sp. Strain MX-AZ02

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E.; Garrett, Roger A.; Amils, Ricardo;

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Acidocella sp. strain MX-AZ02, an acidophilic and heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium isolated from a geothermal lake in western Mexico.......Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Acidocella sp. strain MX-AZ02, an acidophilic and heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium isolated from a geothermal lake in western Mexico....

  6. Killing of total heterotrophic bacteria using the gas diffusion electrode system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W Y; Li, P

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on the disinfection of dual electrodes with a gas diffusion cathode using total heterotrophic bacteria as indicator microorganisms. Batch tests were performed to study the effects of platinum load W(Pt) and the pore-forming agent content WNH4HCO3 in gas diffusion electrodes on the germicidal efficacy eta and H2O2 yield. The results showed that the disinfection improved with W(Pt), but its efficiency at W(Pt) of 3 per thousand was equivalent to W(Pt) of 4 per thousand. The right amount of the pore-forming agent improved disinfection. Continuous tests were performed to study residence times (RTs), pH and oxygen flow rates Qo2 on the germicidal efficacy and H2O2 yield. The results indicated that at the steady state total heterotrophic bacteria in the outlet stream were completely inactivated under our experimental conditions. Disinfection improved with increasing RT. This phenomenon was more significant when RT disinfection shortened with an increasing oxygen flow rate Qo2. The operating costs are high. Further research is required to fully understand all parameters and reduce operating costs.

  7. Diversity and antimicrobial potential of culturable heterotrophic bacteria associated with the endemic marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia P.J. Rua

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are the oldest Metazoa, very often presenting a complex microbial consortium. Such is the case of the marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis, endemic to Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. In this investigation we characterized the diversity of some of the culturable heterotrophic bacteria living in association with A. brasiliensis and determined their antimicrobial activity. The genera Endozoicomonas (N = 32, Bacillus (N = 26, Shewanella (N = 17, Pseudovibrio (N = 12, and Ruegeria (N = 8 were dominant among the recovered isolates, corresponding to 97% of all isolates. Approximately one third of the isolates living in association with A. brasiliensis produced antibiotics that inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that bacteria associated with this sponge play a role in its health.

  8. Leaching of marine manganese nodules by acidophilic bacteria growing on elemental sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Yasuhiro; Asai, Satoru; Sawada, Yuichi

    1997-02-01

    This article describes the bioleaching of manganese nodules by thermophilic and mesophilic sulfuroxidizing bacteria, in which oxidized sulfur compounds are biologically produced from elemental sulfur added to liquid medium and are simultaneously used to leach nodules. The thermophile Acidianus brierleyi solubilized the manganese nodules faster at 65 °C than did the mesophiles Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans at 30 °C. Leaching experiments with A. brierleyi growing on elemental sulfur were used to optimize various process parameters, such as medium pH, initial sulfur-liquid loading ratio, and initial cell concentration. The observed dependencies of the leaching rates at a pH optimum on the initial amounts of elemental sulfur and A. brierleyi cells were qualitatively consistent with model simulations for microbial sulfur oxidation. Under the conditions determined as optimum, the leaching of nodule particles (-330+500 mesh) by A. brierleyi yielded 100 pct extraction of both copper and zinc within 4 days and high extractions of nickel (85 pct), cobalt (70 pct), and manganese (55 pct) for 10 days. However, the iron leaching was practically negligible.

  9. Deep Subsurface Life from North Pond: Enrichment, Isolation, Characterization and Genomes of Heterotrophic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Joseph A; León-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; Biddle, Jennifer F

    2016-01-01

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic water-column west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22°N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sediment column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. The cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface.

  10. Inactivation of Heterotrophic Bacteria in Well Water Using ZVI, TiO2 and ZnO Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Zazuli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: The heterotrophic bacteria are widely used as a water microbial pollution index for drinking water. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of metallic nanoparticles such as Zero Valent Iron (ZVI, Titanium dioxide (TiO2 and Zinc oxide (ZnO on Heterotrophic Bacteria inactivation in well water. Materials & Methods: We performed an experimental-laboratory study that the effect of nanoparticles type Zero valent iron (ZVI, Titanium Dioxide (TiO2 and Zinc oxide (ZnO in constant contact time (30 min and nanoparticles dose (1 g/L was investigated on heterotrophic bacteria inactivation. Results: The results showed that TiO2 was detected more effective than ZnO and ZVI. The HPC inactivation after 30 min of retention time by TiO2, ZnO and ZVI nanoparticles were 71.5, 50 and 36.4 as percent, respectively. The maximum bacteria inactivation was 98.82% in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles. Conclusions: It is concluded that nanoparticles used in this study could be effectively used to increase the efficiency of removing heterotrophic bacteria from water and can be considered for microorganisms’ inactivation.

  11. The acidophilic microorganisms diversity present in lignite and pit coal from Paroseni, Halânga, Turceni mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Madalina CISMASIU

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Pollution from coal combustion is the largest problem in the current use of coal and the biggest constraint on the increased use of coal. When these fossil fuels are combusted, sulphur-di-oxide is released into the atmosphere causing acid rains which dissolves buildings, kills forest. Knowing the physiological groups of microorganisms present in the coal samples has an ecological importance, completing the knowledge in the field of the microorganism’s ecology and a practical importance, being a source of new microorganisms with biotechnological potential. The microbial communities evidenced in such sites include both groups of chemolithotrophic microorganisms involved in the metals biosolubilization processes and groups of heterotrophic microorganisms involved in the processes of bioaccumulation or biofixation of metallic ions. In this context, this paper presents the study regarding the main physiological groups of microorganisms present in the pit coal and lignite samples after the industrial processing of coal. The results revealed that the microorganisms belonging to the following physiological groups: aerobic heterotrophic acidophilic bacteria, strictly anaerobic heterotrophic (sulphur-reducing, nitrifying bacteria (nitrite and nitrate bacteria, denitrifying bacteria and acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacteria on Fe2+, on S0 and on S2O3.

  12. Heterotrophic bacteria from brackish water of the southern Baltic Sea: biochemical and molecular identification and characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Cabaj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Six bacterial strains isolated from the surface water of thesouthern Baltic Sea were described on the basis of their morphological,physiological and biochemical features, and were classified onthe basis of 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Comparative analysesof the 16S rDNA sequences of five of the six bacterial strainsexamined displayed a ≥98% similarity to the sequences availablein the NCBI GenBank. The 16S rDNA sequence of strain 2 sharedonly a 96% similarity with other published sequences, whichsuggests that this is a new, hitherto unknown species. The isolatedheterotrophic bacteria belong to the families Bacillaceae(strain 1, Flexibacteriaceae (strain 2, Sphingomonadaceae(strains 3, 5, Micrococcaceae (strain 4 and Aurantimonadaceae(strain 6.    This is the first study in which the polyphasic approach hasbeen applied to the identification of heterotrophic bacteriafrom the brackish waters of the Gulf of Gdańsk and Gdańsk Deep.

  13. Analysis the Existence of Heterotrophic Bacteria in Active Water Desalination Plant Output of Kashan City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseindoost Gh. MSc,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims One of the consequences of taking ground water into surface is changing its chemical quality, specially increasing the concentration of dissolved salts. This research was performed in order to analyze growth possibility of heterotrophic bacteria in the membrane of active desalination plants in Kashan City, Iran. Instrument & Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was done on water output of 20 active desalination plants in 2013 in Kashan City, Iran and 200 specimens of input and output water was randomly extracted from desalination plants. Awareness and education level of system operators, filter changing intervals, HPC of input and output water and chlorine concentration of input and output water were measured and recorded. Obtained data were analyzed statistically with SPSS 18 software using one-way ANOVA, Chi-square, McNemar and one-sample T tests. Findings There was a significant relation between the interval time and output HPC level of the plants (p0.05. The mean concentration of chlorine in samples of 20 desalination plants was 0.76±0.44mg/l in input water and 0.64±0.52mg/l in output water (p>0.05. Level of awareness had significant relation with the output water pollution with HPC (p0.05. Conclusion The mean level of HPC

  14. Cold-Active, Heterotrophic Bacteria from the Highly Oligotrophic Waters of Lake Vanda, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A. Vander Schaaf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The permanently ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica are distinctive ecosystems that consist strictly of microbial communities. In this study, water samples were collected from Lake Vanda, a stratified Dry Valley lake whose upper waters (from just below the ice cover to nearly 60 m are highly oligotrophic, and used to establish enrichment cultures. Six strains of psychrotolerant, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from lake water samples from a depth of 50 or 55 m. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Lake Vanda strains to be species of Nocardiaceae, Caulobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and Bradyrhizobiaceae. All Lake Vanda strains grew at temperatures near or below 0 °C, but optimal growth occurred from 18 to 24 °C. Some strains showed significant halotolerance, but no strains required NaCl for growth. The isolates described herein include cold-active species not previously reported from Dry Valley lakes, and their physiological and phylogenetic characterization broadens our understanding of these limnologically unique lakes.

  15. Culturable heterotrophic bacteria from Potter Cove, Antarctica, and their hydrolytic enzymes production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tropeano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Affiliations of the dominant culturable bacteria isolated from Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, were investigated together with their production of cold-active hydrolytic enzymes. A total of 189 aerobic heterotrophic bacterial isolates were obtained at 4°C and sorted into 63 phylotypes based on their amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis profiles. The sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of representatives from each phylotype showed that the isolates belong to the phyla Proteobacteria (classes Alpha- and Gamma-proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes (class Flavobacteria, Actinobacteria (class Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (class Bacilli. The predominant culturable group in the site studied belongs to the class Gammaproteobacteria, with 65 isolates affiliated to the genus Pseudoalteromonas and 58 to Psychrobacter. Among the 189 isolates screened, producers of amylases (9.5%, pectinases (22.8%, cellulases (14.8%, CM-cellulases (25.4%, xylanases (20.1% and proteases (44.4% were detected. More than 25% of the isolates produced at least one extracellular enzyme, with some of them producing up to six of the tested extracellular enzymatic activities. These results suggest that a high culturable bacterial diversity is present in Potter Cove and that this place represents a promising source of biomolecules.

  16. Influence of Asellus aquaticus on Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Campylobacter jejuni and naturally occurring heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sarah Christine; Nissen, Erling; Arvin, Erik;

    2012-01-01

    . aquaticus on microbial water quality in non-chlorinated drinking water in controlled laboratory experiments. Pure cultures of the indicator organisms Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and the pathogen Campylobacter jejuni as well as naturally occurring heterotrophic drinking water bacteria...... (measured as heterotrophic plate counts, HPC) were investigated in microcosms at 7 °C, containing non-sterilised drinking water, drinking water sediment and A. aquaticus collected from a non-chlorinated ground water based drinking water supply system. Concentrations of E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni...... grown on R-2A agar and an average of 83% for bacteria grown on yeast extract agar when dead A. aquaticus were present compared to no and living A. aquaticus present. A. aquaticus associated E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni were measured (up to 25 per living and 500 per dead A. aquaticus) and so were...

  17. Contrasting life strategies of viruses that infect photo- and heterotrophic bacteria, as revealed by viral tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Gregory, Ann; Yilmaz, Suzan; Poulos, Bonnie T; Hugenholtz, Philip; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2012-10-30

    Ocean viruses are ubiquitous and abundant and play important roles in global biogeochemical cycles by means of their mortality, horizontal gene transfer, and manipulation of host metabolism. However, the obstacles involved in linking viruses to their hosts in a high-throughput manner bottlenecks our ability to understand virus-host interactions in complex communities. We have developed a method called viral tagging (VT), which combines mixtures of host cells and fluorescent viruses with flow cytometry. We investigated multiple viruses which infect each of two model marine bacteria that represent the slow-growing, photoautotrophic genus Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria) and the fast-growing, heterotrophic genus Pseudoalteromonas (Gammaproteobacteria). Overall, viral tagging results for viral infection were consistent with plaque and liquid infection assays for cyanobacterial myo-, podo- and siphoviruses and some (myo- and podoviruses) but not all (four siphoviruses) heterotrophic bacterial viruses. Virus-tagged Pseudoalteromonas organisms were proportional to the added viruses under varied infection conditions (virus-bacterium ratios), while no more than 50% of the Synechococcus organisms were virus tagged even at viral abundances that exceeded (5 to 10×) that of their hosts. Further, we found that host growth phase minimally impacts the fraction of virus-tagged Synechococcus organisms while greatly affecting phage adsorption to Pseudoalteromonas. Together these findings suggest that at least two contrasting viral life strategies exist in the oceans and that they likely reflect adaptation to their host microbes. Looking forward to the point at which the virus-tagging signature is well understood (e.g., for Synechococcus), application to natural communities should begin to provide population genomic data at the proper scale for predictively modeling two of the most abundant biological entities on Earth. Viral study suffers from an inability to link viruses to hosts en

  18. The Biology of Heterotrophic N2-fixing Bacteria in Marine and Estuarine Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel

    cyanobacterial endosymbionts of diatoms, and recently also unicellular cyanobacteria, have been considered the dominant marine diazotrophs. However, phylogenetic analyses of the functional genes involved in N2 fixation seem to suggest that heterotrophic N2-fixing organisms are present and active in various...... and that a subset of these could be subsequently isolated for further genomic and ecophysiological analyses. Such analyses showed that regulation of N2 fixation in heterotrophs are not straightforward and in many cases it is counterintuitive. Furthermore, they showed that individual heterotrophic strains have...

  19. Ecophysiological properties of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and yeasts dominating in phytocenoses of Galindez Island, maritime Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia; Romanovskaya, Victoria; Gladka, Galina; Gouliamova, Dilnora; Tomova, Iva; Stoilova-Disheva, Margarita; Tashyrev, Oleksandr

    2014-04-01

    Antarctic plants are stable specific microenvironments for microbial colonization that are still less explored. In this study, we investigated cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and yeasts dominating in plant samples collected from different terrestrial biotopes near Ukrainian Antarctic Base on Galindez Island, maritime Antarctica. Phylogenetic analysis revealed affiliation of the bacterial isolates to genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Brevundimonas, Sporosarcina, Dermacoccus, Microbacterium, Rothia and Frondihabitans, and the yeast isolates to genera Rhodosporidium, Cryptococcus, Leucosporidiella, Candida and Exophiala. Some ecophysiological properties of isolated strains were determined that are important in response to different stresses such as psychro- and halotolerance, UV-resistance and production of hydrolytic enzymes. The majority of isolates (88 %) was found to be psychrotolerant; all are halotolerant. Significant differences in survival subsequent to UV-C radiation were observed among the isolates, as measured by culturable counts. For the bacterial isolates, lethal doses in the range 80-600 J m⁻² were determined, and for the yeast isolates--in the range 300-1,000 J m⁻². Dermacoccus profundi U9 and Candida davisiana U6 were found as most UV resistant among the bacterial and yeast isolates, respectively. Producers of caseinase, gelatinase, β-glucosidase, and cellulase were detected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation of UV resistant strain D. profundi, and Frondihabitans strain from Antarctica, and on detection of cellulase activity in Antarctic yeast strain C. davisiana. The results obtained contribute to clarifying adaptation strategies of Antarctic microbiota and its possible role in functional stability of Antarctic biocenoses. Stress tolerant strains were detected that are valuable for ecological and applied studies.

  20. An efficient screening method for the isolation of heterotrophic bacteria influencing growth of diatoms under photoautotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecher, Karsten; Jagmann, Nina; Seemann, Philipp; Philipp, Bodo

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between photoautotrophic diatoms and heterotrophic bacteria are important for the biogeochemical C-cycle in the oceans. Additionally, biofilms formed by diatoms and bacteria are the initiating step of biofouling processes, which causes high costs in shipping. Despite this ecological and economical importance, the knowledge about biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these interkingdom interactions is relatively small. For analyzing these mechanisms, laboratory model systems are required. In this study, an efficient screening method for isolating bacteria influencing photoautotrophic diatom growth was established. First, diatom cultures of Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana were made axenic by applying β-lactam antibiotics. Second, a non-invasive method for measuring growth of multiple parallel diatom cultures by chlorophyll fluorescence was established. This method allowed semi-quantitative chlorophyll determination of cultures with up to 3 μg (chlorophyll) ml(-1). Axenic diatom cultures were then used for enriching bacteria and led to the isolation of 24 strains influencing growth of both diatom strains in various ways. For example, Rheinheimera sp. strain Tn16 inhibited growth of T. pseudonana, while it stimulated growth and cell aggregation of P. tricornutum. Thus, this screening method is appropriate for isolating heterotrophic bacteria showing different interactions with different diatom species ranging from synergistic to antagonistic. In consecutive applications, this method will be useful to screen for bacterial mutants with altered phenotypes regarding the influence on diatom growth.

  1. Influence of Asellus aquaticus on Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Campylobacter jejuni and naturally occurring heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Sarah C B; Nissen, Erling; Arvin, Erik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2012-10-15

    Water lice, Asellus aquaticus (isopoda), frequently occur in drinking water distribution systems where they are a nuisance to consumers and water utilities. Whether they are solely an aesthetic problem or also affect the microbial water quality is a matter of interest. We studied the influence of A. aquaticus on microbial water quality in non-chlorinated drinking water in controlled laboratory experiments. Pure cultures of the indicator organisms Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and the pathogen Campylobacter jejuni as well as naturally occurring heterotrophic drinking water bacteria (measured as heterotrophic plate counts, HPC) were investigated in microcosms at 7 °C, containing non-sterilised drinking water, drinking water sediment and A. aquaticus collected from a non-chlorinated ground water based drinking water supply system. Concentrations of E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni decreased over time, following a first order decay with half lives of 5.3, 18.4 and 1.3 days, respectively. A. aquaticus did not affect survival of indicators and pathogens substantially whereas HPC were influenced by presence of dead A. aquaticus. Growth rates increased with an average of 48% for bacteria grown on R-2A agar and an average of 83% for bacteria grown on yeast extract agar when dead A. aquaticus were present compared to no and living A. aquaticus present. A. aquaticus associated E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni were measured (up to 25 per living and 500 per dead A. aquaticus) and so were A. aquaticus associated heterotrophic bacteria (>1.8*10(4) CFU per living and >6*10(4) CFU per dead A. aquaticus). A. aquaticus did not serve as an optimised habitat that increased survival of indicators and pathogens, since A. aquaticus associated E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni were only measured as long as the bacteria were also present in the water and sediment.

  2. Influence of the root system of the Common Osier (Salix viminalis L.) on abundance of heterotrophic bacteria in the willow sewage treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalke-Porczyk, Elzbieta; Brzezinska, Maria Swiontek; Donderski, Wojciech

    2009-06-01

    The impact of the Common Osier (Salix viminalis L.) root system on number (CFU) of heterotrophic bacteria and their production in a soil-willow filter was examined. The Osier rhizosphere was found to be suitable habitat for growth of the examined microbial group, and the root system stimulated development of heterotrophic bacteria. The rhizosphere bacteria to control soil bacteria (R:C) ratio oscillated between 2.48 and 2.75 depending on the location of sample collection. The highest abundance of bacteria as well as highest bacterial production was observed at location I, near sewage discharge onto the plot. There was a significant positive correlation between the number of heterotrophic bacteria and the bacterial production.

  3. Putative N2-fixing heterotrophic bacteria associated with dinoflagellate-Cyanobacteria consortia in the low-nitrogen Indian Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farnelid, H.; Tarangkoon, Woraporn; Hansen, Gert

    2010-01-01

    that the symbionts fix gaseous nitrogen (N2). Individual heterotrophic dinoflagellates containing cyanobacterial symbionts were isolated from the open Indian Ocean and off Western Australia, and characterized using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nitrogenase (nifH) gene amplification......, cloning, and sequencing. Cyanobacteria, heterotrophic bacteria and eukaryotic algae were recognized as symbionts of the heterotrophic dinoflagellates. nifH gene sequences were obtained from 23 of 37 (62%) specimens of dinoflagellates (Ornithocercus spp. and Amphisolenia spp.). Interestingly, only 2...... specimens contained cyanobacterial nifH sequences, while 21 specimens contained nifH genes related to heterotrophic bacteria. Of the 137 nifH sequences obtained 68% were most similar to Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria, 8% clustered with anaerobic bacteria, and 5% were related to second alternative...

  4. Coupling of heterotrophic bacteria to phytoplankton bloom development at different pCO2 levels: a mesocosm study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thyrhaug

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The predicted rise in anthropogenic CO2 emissions will increase CO2 concentrations and decrease seawater pH in the upper ocean. Recent studies have revealed effects of pCO2 induced changes in seawater chemistry on a variety of marine life forms, in particular calcifying organisms. To test whether the predicted increase in pCO2 will directly or indirectly (via changes in phytoplankton dynamics affect abundance, activities, and community composition of heterotrophic bacteria during phytoplankton bloom development, we have aerated mesocosms with CO2 to obtain triplicates with three different partial pressures of CO2 (pCO2: 350 µatm (1×CO2, 700 µatm (2×CO2 and 1050 µatm (3×CO2. The development of a phytoplankton bloom was initiated by the addition of nitrate and phosphate. In accordance to an elevated carbon to nitrogen drawdown at increasing pCO2, bacterial production (BPP of free-living and attached bacteria as well as cell-specific BPP (csBPP of attached bacteria were related to the C:N ratio of suspended matter. These relationships significantly differed among treatments. However, bacterial abundance and activities were not statistically different among treatments. Solely community structure of free-living bacteria changed with pCO2 whereas that of attached bacteria seemed to be independent of pCO2 but tightly coupled to phytoplankton bloom development. Our findings imply that changes in pCO2, although reflected by changes in community structure of free-living bacteria, do not directly affect bacterial activity. Furthermore, bacterial activity and dynamics of heterotrophic bacteria, especially of attached bacteria, were tightly linked to phytoplankton development and, hence, may also potentially depend on changes in pCO2.

  5. Active nitrogen-fixing heterotrophic bacteria at and below the chemocline of the central Baltic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Farnelid, Hanna; Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Andersson, Anders F.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Jost, Günter; Labrenz, Matthias; Jürgens, Klaus; Riemann, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    The Baltic Sea receives large nitrogen inputs by diazotrophic (N2-fixing) heterocystous cyanobacteria but the significance of heterotrophic N2 fixation has not been studied. Here, the diversity, abundance and transcription of the nifH fragment of the nitrogenase enzyme in two basins of the Baltic Sea proper was examined. N2 fixation was measured at the surface (5 m) and in anoxic water (200 m). Vertical sampling profiles of >10 and

  6. Genomics and ecophysiology of heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from estuarine surface water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Severin, Ina; Hansen, Lars H.;

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen (N 2) to ammonia, known as N 2 fixation, is a widely distributed trait among prokaryotes that accounts for an essential input of new N to a multitude of environments. Nitrogenase reductase gene (nifH) composition suggests that putative N 2-fixing...... heterotrophic organisms are widespread in marine bacterioplankton, but their autecology and ecological significance are unknown. Here, we report genomic and ecophysiology data in relation to N 2 fixation by three environmentally ...

  7. Distribution and enzymatic activity of heterotrophic bacteria decomposing selected macromolecular compounds in a Baltic Sea sandy beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórska, B.; Mudryk, Z. J.

    2003-03-01

    The potential capability to decompose macromolecular compounds, and the level of extracellular enzyme activities were determined in heterotrophic bacteria isolated from a sandy beach in Sopot on the Southern Baltic Sea coast. Individual isolates were capable of hydrolysing a wide spectrum of organic macromolecular compounds. Lipids, gelatine, and DNA were hydrolyzed most efficiently. Only a very small percentage of strains were able to decompose cellulose, and no pectinolytic bacteria were found. Except for starch-hydrolysis, no significant differences in the intensity of organic compound decomposition were recorded between horizontal and vertical profiles of the studied beach. Of all the studied extracellular enzymes, alkaline phosphatase, esterase lipase, and leucine acrylaminidase were most active; in contrast, the activity α-fucosidase, α-galactosidase and β-glucouronidase was the weakest. The level of extracellular enzyme activity was similar in both sand layers.

  8. Recolonization by heterotrophic bacteria after UV irradiation or ozonation of seawater; a simulation of ballast water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess-Erga, Ole-Kristian; Blomvågnes-Bakke, Bente; Vadstein, Olav

    2010-10-01

    Transport of ballast water with ships represents a risk for introduction of foreign species. If ballast water is treated during uptake, there will be a recolonization of the ballast water by heterotrophic bacteria during transport. We investigated survival and succession of heterotrophic bacteria after disinfection of seawater in the laboratory, representing a model system of ballast water treatment and transport. The seawater was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, ozone (2 doses) or no treatment, incubated for 16 days and examined with culture-dependent and -independent methods. The number of colony-forming units (CFU) was reduced below the detection level after disinfection with UV and high ozone dose (700 mV), and 1% of the initial level for the low ozone dose (400 mV). After less than 3 days, the CFU was back or above the starting point for the control, UV and low ozone treatment, whereas it took slightly more than 6 days for the high ozone treatment. Disinfection increased substrate availability and reduced cell densities. Lack of competition and predation induced the recolonization by opportunistic bacteria (r-strategists), with significant increase in bacterial numbers and a low diversity (based on DGGE band pattern). All cultures stabilized after the initial recolonization phase (except Oz700) where competition due to crowding and nutrient limitation favoured bacteria with high substrate affinity (K-strategists), resulting in higher species richness and diversity (based on DGGE band pattern). The bacterial community was significantly altered qualitatively and quantitatively and may have a higher potential as invaders in the recipient depending on disinfection method and the time of release. These results have implications for the treatment strategy used for ballast water.

  9. Occurrence of heterotrophic bacteria and fungi in an aviation fuel handling system and its relationship with fuel fouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, M D; Neirotti, E; Albornoz, C

    1998-01-01

    Clean, dry and contaminant-free fuel is necessary for safe and economical aircraft operation. Microbial growth in aviation fuel handling systems can alter the quality of the product. This paper reports the occurrence of heterotrophic bacteria and fungi in a handling system of jet A-1 aviation turbine fuel. A total of 350 samples were collected during 1990-1996. The aerobic microorganisms in fuel samples were mainly fungi, 85% of samples containing < or = 100 cfu/l (range 0 (< 1 cfu/l) to 2000 cfu/l). The predominant fungi were Cladosporium and Aspergillus. Water was observed mainly in samples extracted from the drainage pipes of two tanks used frequently as intermediate storage tanks. The aerobic heterotrophic microorganisms found in water samples were mostly bacteria, counts varying from 100 to 8.8 x 10(7) cfu/ml, with 85% of samples containing 10(4)-10(7) cfu/ml. There was a preponderance of Pseudomonas spp. Bacterial contaminants belonging to the genus Flavobacterium and Aeromonas were also identified. Sulphate reducing bacteria were detected in 80% of water samples. It was not possible to assign a maximum microbial contamination level above which maintenance is required and it is suggested that analysis of successive samples from the same site are necessary for this purpose. Microbial sludges produced in the laboratory and collected from a contaminated tank bottom were analysed chemically. The data are presented and discussed. Samples collected from the supply pipes of tanks and refueller trucks during the period surveyed always met the standard specifications.

  10. Densities, cellulases, alginate and pectin lyases of luminous and other heterotrophic bacteria associated with marine algae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Chandramohan, D.

    Epiphytic luminous and non-luminous bacteria were determined quantitatively for eight intertidal algal species from rocky beaches of Goa and Lakshadweep coral reef lagoon. Luminous bacteria were present on all eight algal species and contributed 2...

  11. Extracellular polymeric substances mediate bioleaching/biocorrosion via interfacial processes involving iron(III) ions and acidophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Wolfgang; Gehrke, Tilman

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances seem to play a pivotal role in biocorrosion of metals and bioleaching, biocorrosion of metal sulfides for the winning of precious metals as well as acid rock drainage. For better control of both processes, the structure and function of extracellular polymeric substances of corrosion-causing or leaching bacteria are of crucial importance. Our research focused on the extremophilic bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, because of the "simplicity" and knowledge about the interactions of these bacteria with their substrate/substratum and their environment. For this purpose, the composition of the corresponding extracellular polymeric substances and their functions were analyzed. The extracellular polymeric substances of both species consist mainly of neutral sugars and lipids. The functions of the exopolymers seem to be: (i) to mediate attachment to a (metal) sulfide surface, and (ii) to concentrate iron(III) ions by complexation through uronic acids or other residues at the mineral surface, thus, allowing an oxidative attack on the sulfide. Consequently, dissolution of the metal sulfide is enhanced, which may result in an acceleration of 20- to 100-fold of the bioleaching process over chemical leaching. Experiments were performed to elucidate the importance of the iron(III) ions complexed by extracellular polymeric substances for strain-specific differences in oxidative activity for pyrite. Strains of A. ferrooxidans with a high amount of iron(III) ions in their extracellular polymeric substances possess greater oxidation activity than those with fewer iron(III) ions. These data provide insight into the function of and consequently the advantages that extracellular polymeric substances provide to bacteria. The role of extracellular polymeric substances for attachment under the conditions of a space station and resulting effects like biofouling, biocorrosion, malodorous gases, etc. will be discussed.

  12. Abundance of general aerobic heterotrophic bacteria in the Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea and their adaptation to temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈皓文; 高爱国; 孙海青; 矫玉田

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of general aerobic heterotrophic bacteria(GAB) from the water and sediment in the Bering Sea and the Chukchi Sea was determined by using petri dish cultivation and counting method. The abundance of GAB among the different sea areas, sampling sites, layers of sediments surveyed and adaptability to differential temperatures was studied. The result obtained showed that: the occurrence percentage of GAB in the surface water was higher than that in sediment, but the abundance was only 0.17% of sediment. The occurrence percentage of GAB in surficial layer of sediment was higher than that in the other layers. The occurrence percentage of GAB in surficial layer of sediment was higher than that in the other layers. The occurrence percentage, abundance and its variation of GAB in the Bering Sea were higher than that in the Chukchi Sea respectively. The average value of the abundance of GAB in sediment showed a trend: roughly higher in the lower latitudinal area than higher latitude. The results from temperature test mean that: the majority of bacteria tested were cold -adapted ones, minority might be mesophilic bacteria. The results indicated that, Arctic ocean bacteria had a stronger adaptability to environmental temperature.

  13. Relatively high antibiotic resistance among heterotrophic bacteria from arctic fjord sediments than water - Evidence towards better selection pressure in the fjord sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatha, A. A. Mohamed; Neethu, C. S.; Nikhil, S. M.; Rahiman, K. M. Mujeeb; Krishnan, K. P.; Saramma, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and coliform bacteria from water and sediment of Kongsfjord. The study was based on the assumption that arctic fjord environments are relatively pristine and offer very little selection pressure for drug resistant mutants. In order to test the hypothesis, 200 isolates belonging to aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and 114 isolates belonging to coliforms were tested against 15 antibiotics belonging to 5 different classes such as beta lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, sulpha drugs and tetracyclines. Resistance to beta lactam and extended spectrum beta lactam (ESBL) antibiotics was considerably high and they found to vary significantly (p antibiotic resistance against ESBL's extent and diversity of antibiotic resistance (as revealed by multiple antibiotic resistance index and resistance patterns), was high in the aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. Most striking observation was that isolates from fjord sediments (both heterotrophic bacteria and coliforms) in general showed relatively high prevalence of antibiotic resistance against most of the antibiotics tested, indicating to better selection pressure for drug resistance mutants in the fjord sediments.

  14. Photochemical Production and Behavior of Hydroperoxyacids in Heterotrophic Bacteria Attached to Senescent Phytoplanktonic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Vaultier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The photooxidation of cellular monounsaturated fatty acids was investigated in senescent phytoplanktonic cells (Emiliania huxleyi and in their attached bacteria under laboratory controlled conditions. Our results indicated that UV-visible irradiation of phytodetritus induced the photooxidation of oleic (produced by phytoplankton and bacteria and cis-vaccenic (specifically produced by bacteria acids. These experiments confirmed the involvement of a substantial singlet oxygen transfer from senescent phytoplanktonic cells to attached bacteria, and revealed a significant correlation between the concentration of chlorophyll, a photosensitizer, in the phytodetritus and the photodegradation state of bacteria. Hydroperoxyacids (fatty acid photoproducts appeared to be quickly degraded to ketoacids and hydroxyacids in bacteria and in phytoplanktonic cells. This degradation involves homolytic cleavage (most likely induced by UV and/or transition metal ions and peroxygenase activity (yielding epoxy acids.

  15. Interactions between marine snow and heterotrophic bacteria: aggregate formation and microbial dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, H.P.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, K.W.

    2006-01-01

    as well as abundance, colonization behaviour, and community composition of bacteria during the growth of 2 marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Navicula sp.) under axenic and non-axenic conditions. Community composition of free-living and attached bacteria during phytoplankton growth...... bacteria depended on phytoplankton growth and aggregation dynamics. The community composition of especially attached bacteria significantly differed between the 2 algal cultures. Our study suggests that phytoplankton aggregation and vertical fluxes are closely linked to interactions between the marine...... phytoplankton and the ambient microbial community...

  16. Virioplankton in the Kara Sea: The impact of viruses on mortality of heterotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, A. I.; Sazhin, A. F.; Zabotkina, E. A.; Romanova, N. D.

    2015-07-01

    Studies were conducted in shallow and deepwater areas of the Kara Sea. The abundance of bacteria ( N B ) and the abundance of viruses ( N V ) ranged within (19.4-2215.1) × 103 cells/ml and (97.6-5796.8) × 103 particles/ml, respectively. The virus to bacteria ratio varied from 1.4 to 29.1. A positive correlation was found between N B and N V ( R = 0.87, n = 45, p = 0.05. Using electron transmission microscopy it was detected that the frequency of visibly infected cells of bacteria (FVIC) varied from 0.2 to 1.9% of N B . The maximum values of FVIC were recorded in the estuary of the Yenisei River. The infected cells of bacteria contained from 4 to 127 (an average of 12) phages/cell of mature viruses. Virus-mediated mortality of bacteria was 0.5% and varied from 1.4 to 16.1% of the total mortality of bacterioplankton. This indicates a minor role of viruses in the control of overabundance and production of bacterioplankton in the Kara Sea during the surveyed period.

  17. Aquatic heterotrophic bacteria have highly flexible phosphorus content and biomass stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Casey M; Cotner, James B

    2015-10-01

    Bacteria are central to the cycling of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in every ecosystem, yet our understanding of how tightly these cycles are coupled to bacterial biomass composition is based upon data from only a few species. Bacteria are commonly assumed to have high P content, low biomass C:P and N:P ratios, and inflexible stoichiometry. Here, we show that bacterial assemblages from lakes exhibit unprecedented flexibility in their P content (3% to less than 0.01% of dry mass) and stoichiometry (C:N:P of 28: 7: 1 to more than 8500: 1200: 1). The flexibility in C:P and N:P stoichiometry was greater than any species or assemblage, including terrestrial and aquatic autotrophs, and suggests a highly dynamic role for bacteria in coupling multiple element cycles.

  18. Distribution of general aerobic heterotrophic bacteria in sediment core taken from the Canadian basin and the Chukchi Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Aiguo; Chen Haowen

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence percentage and abundance of General Aerobic Heterotrophic Bacteria (GAB) were determined by using the method of MPN for 182 subsamples from 10 sediment cores taken from the Canadian basin and the Chukchi Sea at two different culturing temperatures.The results showed that the general occurrencepercentage of GAB was quite high,average abundances of GAB at cultured temperatures of 4℃ and 25℃ were 4.46 ×107 and 5.47×107 cells·g -1 (wt), respectively.The highest abundance of GAB occurred at 20~22 cm section in the sediment.GAB abundances changed among the section of sediments,but there is a trend: the abundances at the middle or lower sections were lower than those at upper section.Cultivation at 25℃ could improve the occurrence percentage and abundances of GAB,which suggests that the increasing of temperature may change the living circumstances of GAB.The differences of GAB among the latitudes areas indicated thatoccurrence percentage and abundances of GAB in middle latitude areas were higher than those in the higher or lower latitude areas,and were more obvious at 4℃than those at 25℃.The GAB abundances in sediment under the shallower water seemed to be lower than those in sediments under the deeper water and this status was more obvious at 25℃ than that at 4℃.

  19. Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the Arabian Sea - their distribution in relation to thiosulfate-oxidising and heterotrophic bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    0.04 2.70 1.0 2.50 90 ND 0.03 om 1.1 6.50 • Not detected. LOKA BHARATHI AND.CHANDRAMOHA.N: SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FROM THE ARABIAN SEA 625 Table 4. Percentage ofisolates positive to diagnostically useful traits Growth on sulfate plus Pyru· Propio... at, 1988). Hence it is possible that SRB detected in the present study could actively partic ipate in the reductive sulfur cycle. A total of 99 strains of SRB have been isolated and assigned "affinities" to various genera based on diagnostically...

  20. Hexavalent chromium reduction by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria indigenous to chromite mine overburden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey Satarupa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological analysis of overburden samples collected from chromite mining areas of Orissa, India revealed that they are rich in microbial density as well as diversity and dominated by Gramnegative (58% bacteria. The phenotypically distinguishable bacterial isolates (130 showed wide degree of tolerance to chromium (2-8 mM when tested in peptone yeast extract glucose agar medium. Isolates (92 tolerating 2 mM chromium exhibited different degrees of Cr+6 reducing activity in chemically defined Vogel Bonner (VB broth and complex KSC medium. Three potent isolates, two belonging to Arthrobacter spp. and one to Pseudomonas sp. were able to reduce more than 50 and 80% of 2 mM chromium in defined and complex media respectively. Along with Cr+6 (MIC 8.6-17.8 mM, the isolates showed tolerance to Ni+2, Fe+3, Cu+2 and Co+2 but were extremely sensitive to Hg+2 followed by Cd+2, Mn+2 and Zn+2. In addition, they were resistant to antibiotics like penicillin, methicillin, ampicillin, neomycin and polymyxin B. During growth under shake-flask conditions, Arthrobacter SUK 1201 and SUK 1205 showed 100% reduction of 2 mM Cr+6 in KSC medium with simultaneous formation of insoluble precipitates of chromium salts. Both the isolates were also equally capable of completely reducing the Cr+6 present in mine seepage when grown in mine seepage supplemented with VB concentrate.

  1. Self-sustaining, solar-driven bioelectricity generation in micro-sized microbial fuel cell using co-culture of heterotrophic and photosynthetic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Choi, Seokheun

    2017-04-01

    Among many energy harvesting techniques with great potential, microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology is arguably the most underdeveloped. Even so, excitement is building, as microorganisms can harvest electrical power from any biodegradable organic source (e.g. wastewater) that is readily available in resource-limited settings. Nevertheless, the requirement for endless introduction of organic matter imposes a limiting factor to this technology, demanding an active feeding system and additional power. Here, we demonstrated self-sustaining bioelectricity generation from a microliter-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) by using the syntrophic interaction between heterotrophic exoelectrogenic bacteria and phototrophs. The MFC continuously generated light-responsive electricity from the heterotrophic bacterial metabolic respiration with the organic substrates produced by photosynthetic bacteria. Without additional organic fuel, the mixed culture in a 90-μL-chamber MFC generated self-sustained current for more than 13 days, while the heterotrophic culture produced current that decreased dramatically within a few hours. The current from the mixed culture was about 70 times greater than that of the device with only photosynthetic bacteria. The miniaturization provided a short start-up time, a well-controlled environment, and small internal resistance. Those advantages will become the general design platform for micropower generation.

  2. Olivine dissolution in the presence of heterotrophic bacteria (Pseudomonas reactants) extracted from Icelandic groundwater of the CO2 injection pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, Liudmila; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Benezeth, Pascale; Gerard, Emmanuelle; Menez, Benedicte; Alfredsson, Helgi

    2010-05-01

    This work is aimed at experimental modeling of the effect of heterotrophic bacteria on dissolution of important rock-forming mineral, olivine, at the conditions of CO2 storage and sequestration. Heterotrophic aerobic gram-negative bacteria were extracted from deep underground water (HK31, 1700 m deep and, t = 25-30°C) of basaltic aquifer located within the Hellisheidi CO2 injection pilot site (Iceland). Following this sampling, we separated, using culture on nutrient agar plates, four different groups of gram-negative aerobic bacteria. The enzymatic activity of studied species has been evaluated using Biolog Ecoplates and their genetic identification was performed using 18-S RNA analysis. The optimal growth conditions of bacteria on Brain Hearth Broth nutrient have been determined as 5 to 37°C and growth media pH varied from 7.0-8.2. Culturing experiments allowed determining the optimal physico-chemical conditions for bacteria experiments in the presence of basic Ca, Mg-containing silicates. Olivine (Fo92) was chosen as typical mineral of basalt, widely considered in carbon dioxide sequestration mechanisms. Dissolution experiments were performed in constant-pH (7 to 9), bicarbonate-buffered (0.001 to 0.05 M) nutrient-diluted media in batch reactors at 0-30 bars of CO2 in the presence of various biomass of Pseudomonas reactants. The release rate of magnesium, silica and iron was measured as a function of time in the presence of live, actively growing, dead (autoclaved or glutaraldehyde-treated) cells and bacteria exometabolites. Both nutrient media diluted 10 times (to 100 mg DOC/L) and inert electrolyte (NaCl, no DOC) were used. Our preliminary results indicate that the pH and dissolved organic matter are the first-order parameters that control the element release from olivine at far from equilibrium conditions. The SEM investigation of reacted surfaces reveal formation of surface roughness with much stronger mineral alteration in the presence of live bacteria

  3. Heterotrophic bacteria of the Dapeng Bay in the South China Sea: community structure, abundance, and the relationships of culturablity with environmental factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Fajun; HU Zhangli; HU Chaoqun

    2010-01-01

    The community composition,abundance and culturablity of heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the Dapeng Bay of the South China Sea were investigated by morphological method,bacterial cultivation and biochemical methods over an annual cycle.Aeromonas and Pseudomonas were the predominant genera among the Gram-negative bacteria.The bacterioplankton abundance fluctuated from 2.07×10s to 2.44×109 cells/dm3,and culturable bacteria abundance ranged between0.1×106 and 16.07×106 CFU/dm3.The Culturablity of heterotrophic bacteria ranged between0.01% and 1.31%.The relationship between bacterial culturablity and the environmental factors was also studied in different sites of the Dapeng Bay.Throughout the bay,a significantly positive relationship was evidenced between bacterial culturability and temperature,meanswhile bacterial culturability was significantly inversely related with salinity.The positive relationship was shown at the central bay while a negative relationship was observed at the bay mouth and there was no significant correlation at top bay between bacterial culturablity and chlorophyll a of sea water.A positive relationship was found between culturability and DIN all the bay,but DIP showed a significantly negative relationship with bacterial culturability only at the mouth of the bay.

  4. Variation of a benthic heterotrophic bacteria community with different respiratory metabolisms in Coyuca de Benítez coastal lagoon (Guerrero, Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara-Guerrero, María Jesús; Castellanos-Páez, María Elena; Garza-Mouriño, Gabriela

    2007-03-01

    The fluctuations of the number, biomass and composition of the heterotrophic community were studied daily for two days, according to depth, pH, Eh, O2 and organic carbon concentration within a zone of the canal between the Coyuca de Benitez lagoon (Guerrero, Mexico) and the coastal waters. At the three moments of the day studied (6 am, 2 pm and 10 pm), the oxygen concentrations in the overlying water and in the superficial sediment layer were near air-saturation in the diurnal samplings (582 microM at 6 am and 665 microM at 2 pm), and sub-satured during the night (158 microM). In the sediments, the models of vertical distribution of Eh and organic carbon distributions were very irregular due to the bio-perturbation of the benthic, meio- and macrofauna, whose activity allows the superficial organic carbon to migrate towards sediment deeper layers. Vertical distribution of the different viable bacteria populations seems to be related to the hydrodynamic patterns of the communicating canal and sediments heterogeneity. In the sediment column, the heterotrophic bacteria total number varied from 6.8 to 20.3 x 108 cells cm(-3). The highest heterotrophic bacterial biomass values were encountered during the diurnal samplings (39.2 microgC.l(-1) at 6 am and 34.4 microgC.(l(-1) at 2 pm) and the lowest during the night (9.7 microgC.l(-1). The fluctuations of viable heterotrophic bacteria populations with different respiratory metabolisms (aerobic, microaerophilic and anaerobic) can be explained by the existence of suboxic microniches that appear when particles of sediment are resuspended due to the water circulation and the benthic infauna excavating activity, that allows the supernatant water oxygen to penetrate through its galleries towards deeper sediment zones. The statistical analysis (Multiple lineal regression model r2 > or = 0.5) showed that the on the whole, the hydrological parameters are not influence over the bacterial number and bacterial biomass distribution (r2

  5. Cultivation and biochemical characterization of heterotrophic bacteria associated with phytoplankton bloom in the Amundsen sea polynya, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon-Bin; Kim, Jong-Geol; Jung, Man-Young; Kim, So-Jeong; Min, Ui-Gi; Si, Ok-Ja; Park, Soo-Je; Yeon Hwang, Chung; Park, Jisoo; Lee, SangHoon; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Polynyas are a key ecosystem for carbon cycling in the Antarctic Ocean due to the intensive primary production. Most of the knowledge regarding the bacterioplankton community in the Antarctic Ocean that is responsible for re-mineralization of fixed carbon comes from metagenomic analyses. Here, the extinction-dilution method was used to obtain representative heterotrophs from a polynya in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, and their biochemical potential for carbon re-mineralization were assessed. All 23 strains have close relatives belonging to type strains within the following genera (number of strains; % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity): Bizionia (4; >97.8%), Leeuwenhoekiella (1; 96.2%), Pseudoalteromonas (14; >98.5%), Pseudomonas (1; 99.4%) and Sulfitobacter (3; 100%), which were also observed in 454 pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of the polynya. Although sequence reads related to Polaribacter were the most common, Polaribacter strains could only be obtained from colonies cultured on agar plates. The strain of Leeuwenhoekiella showed a prominent ability in hydrolyzing diverse esters, amides, and glycosides while the strains of Pseudoalteromonas, Polaribacter, and Bizionia showed extracellular enzyme activities only on a narrow range of amides. The strains of Leeuwenhoekiella, Pseudoalteromonas, and Sulfitobacter utilized various labile carbon sources: carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, and peptides. The most frequent isolates, strains of Pseudoaltermonas, showed marked differences in terms of their potential to utilize different types of labile carbon sources, which may reflect high genomic diversity. The strains of Bizionia and Pseudomonas did not utilize carbohydrates. Unique biochemical properties associated with extracellular hydrolase activities and labile carbon utilization were revealed for dominant culturable heterotrophs which gives insights into their roles in active re-mineralization of fixed carbons in polynya.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of a Novel Acidophilic Iron-Oxidizing Firmicutes Species, “Acidibacillus ferrooxidans” (SLC66T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ñancucheo, Ivan; Oliveira, Renato; Dall’Agnol, Hivana; Johnson, D. Barrie; Grail, Barry; Holanda, Roseanne; Nunes, Gisele Lopes; Cuadros-Orellana, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the type strain of “Acidibacillus ferrooxidans,” a mesophilic, heterotrophic, and acidophilic bacterium that was isolated from mine spoilage subjected to accelerated weathering in humidity cell tests carried out by the former U.S. Bureau of Mines in Salt Lake City, UT. PMID:27198020

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of a Novel Acidophilic Iron-Oxidizing Firmicutes Species, "Acidibacillus ferrooxidans" (SLC66T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ñancucheo, Ivan; Oliveira, Renato; Dall'Agnol, Hivana; Johnson, D Barrie; Grail, Barry; Holanda, Roseanne; Nunes, Gisele Lopes; Cuadros-Orellana, Sara; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2016-05-19

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the type strain of "Acidibacillus ferrooxidans," a mesophilic, heterotrophic, and acidophilic bacterium that was isolated from mine spoilage subjected to accelerated weathering in humidity cell tests carried out by the former U.S. Bureau of Mines in Salt Lake City, UT.

  8. A decadal (2002-2014 analysis for dynamics of heterotrophic bacteria in an Antarctic coastal ecosystem: variability and physical and biogeochemical forcings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyewon Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the dynamics of heterotrophic bacteria in the coastal western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP, using decadal (2002-2014 time series of two bacterial variables, bacterial production (BP via 3H-leucine incorporation rates and bacterial biomass (BB via bacterial abundance, collected at Palmer Antarctica Long Term Ecological Research (LTER Station B (64.8°S, 64.1°W over a full austral growing season (October-March. Strong seasonal and interannual variability in the degree of bacterial coupling with phytoplankton processes were observed with varying lags. On average, BP was only 4% of primary production (PP, consistent with low BP:PP ratios observed in polar waters. BP was more strongly correlated with chlorophyll (Chl, than with PP, implying that bacteria feed on DOC produced from a variety of trophic levels (e.g. zooplankton sloppy feeding and excretion as well as directly on phytoplankton-derived DOC. The degree of bottom-up control on bacterial abundance was moderate and relatively consistent across entire growing seasons, suggesting that bacteria in the coastal WAP are under consistent DOC limitation. Temperature also influenced BP rates, though its effect was weaker than DOC. We established generalized linear models (GLMs for monthly composites of BP and BB via stepwise regression to explore a set of physical and biogeochemical predictors. Physically, high BP and large BB were shaped by a stratified water-column, similar to forcing mechanisms favoring phytoplankton blooms, but high sea surface temperature (SST also significantly promoted bacterial processes. High BP and large BB were influenced by high PP and bulk DOC concentrations. Based on these findings, we suggest an increasingly important role of marine heterotrophic bacteria in the coastal WAP food-web as climate change introduces a more favorable environmental setting for promoting BP, with increased DOC from retreating glaciers, a more stabilized upper water-column from ice

  9. Phytoplankton, Bacteria and Heterotrophic Nanoflagellate studies using ship and OCM-2 data along a coastal transect in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Matondkar, S.G.P.; Basu, S.; Parab, S.G.; Pednekar, S.; Niyati Hede, N.; Dwivedi, R.M.; Raman, M.; Babu, K.N.; Shukla, A.K.; Shirdhankar, M.M.

    ). This relationship develops primarily when bacteria assimilate dissolved organic matter (DOM) generated from phytoplankton via processes extracellular exudation like rupture and degradation of phytoplankton cells during grazing, viral lysis and/or direct...

  10. Polyphasic approach to characterize heterotrophic bacteria of biofilms and patina on walls of the Suburban Bath of the Herculaneum's archaeological excavations in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventorino, V.; Pepe, O.; Sannino, L.; Blaiotta, G.; Palomba, S.

    2012-04-01

    Built between the walls of Herculaneum excavations, one of the world's most important archaeological sites, and the sea in the early 1st cent. AD, the Suburban Bath is one of the best thermal complexes better preserved in ancient times. The entrance opens onto a large courtyard that leads into a hallway well lit by a skylight, impluvium, with a portrait of "Apollo". From this room you can access various parts of the thermae, all beautifully preserved. A single room, mostly occupied by the pool, serving both apodyterium (dressing room) that frigidarium. Among tepidarium and frigidarium there's a room elegantly decorated with stucco and marble. The vestibule opens to the right, through a corridor, onto a waiting room with a floor in signinum opus and into a praefurnium (oven for heating). A large pool of tepidarium, connected with laconicum, a small circular room for the baths sweat, is also present. The calidarium, as usual, has a small tank for hot water and a basin for washing in cold water. Behind the calidarium is the praefurnium, an environment with the boiler for heating the bath. Although the suburban baths are well preserved, unfortunately in you can observe the development of visible microbial coatings. During the biodeterioration process, secondary colonization of wall is due to heterotrophic bacteria and fungi that induce deterioration cause structural as well as aesthetic damage such as the discoloration of materials, the formation of crusts on surfaces and the loss of material. This investigation was carried out sampling the surfaces of walls of different rooms in the Suburban Thermae according to Italian legal procedures. Depending on the samples typology, sampling was carry out using sterile nitrocellulose membranes pressed on the surface of the walls, sterile swabs or with sterile tweezers by tearing out surface material. The samples were suspended in physiological solution and immediately refrigerated until analysis. Isolated colonies grown on PCA

  11. Calcium carbonate precipitation by heterotrophic bacteria isolated from biofilms formed on deteriorated ignimbrite stones: influence of calcium on EPS production and biofilm formation by these isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, Angélica; Sepúlveda-Sánchez, José David; Mercedes Alonso Guzmán, Elia Mercedes; Le Borgne, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrophic CaCO3-precipitating bacteria were isolated from biofilms on deteriorated ignimbrites, siliceous acidic rocks, from Morelia Cathedral (Mexico) and identified as Enterobacter cancerogenus (22e), Bacillus sp. (32a) and Bacillus subtilis (52g). In solid medium, 22e and 32a precipitated calcite and vaterite while 52g produced calcite. Urease activity was detected in these isolates and CaCO3 precipitation increased in the presence of urea in the liquid medium. In the presence of calcium, EPS production decreased in 22e and 32a and increased in 52g. Under laboratory conditions, ignimbrite colonization by these isolates only occurred in the presence of calcium and no CaCO3 was precipitated. Calcium may therefore be important for biofilm formation on stones. The importance of the type of stone, here a siliceous stone, on biological colonization is emphasized. This calcium effect has not been reported on calcareous materials. The importance of the effect of calcium on EPS production and biofilm formation is discussed in relation to other applications of CaCO3 precipitation by bacteria.

  12. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of iron-sulfur-oxidizing heterotrophic bacteria indigenous to nickel laterite ores of Sulawesi, Indonesia: Implications for biohydrometallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaerun, Siti Khodijah; Hung, Sutina; Mubarok, Mohammad Zaki; Sanwani, Edy

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to isolate and phylogenetically identify the indigenous iron-sulfur-oxidizing heterotrophic bacteria capable of bioleaching nickel from laterite mineral ores. The bacteria were isolated from a nickel laterite mine area in South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. Seven bacterial strains were successfully isolated from laterite mineral ores (strains SKC/S-1 to SKC/S-7) and they were capable of bioleaching of nickel from saprolite and limonite ores. Using EzTaxon-e database, the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the seven bacterial strains were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, resulting in a complete hierarchical classification system, and they were identified as Pseudomonas taiwanensis BCRC 17751 (98.59% similarity), Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum BGSC 3A28 (99.14% and 99.32% similarities), Paenibacillus pasadenensis SAFN-007 (98.95% and 99.33% similarities), Bacillus methylotrophicus CBMB 205 (99.37% similarity), and Bacillus altitudinis 41KF2b (99.37% similarity). It is noteworthy that members of the phylum Firmicutes (in particular the genus Bacillus) predominated in this study, therefore making them to have the high potential to be candidates for the bioleaching of nickel from laterite mineral ores. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the predominance of the phylum Firmicutes in the Sulawesi laterite mineral ores.

  13. Isolation and identification of moderately thermophilic acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium and its bioleaching characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Wei-min; WU Chang-bin; ZHANG Ru-bing; HU Pei-lei; QIU Guan-zhou; GU Guo-hua; ZHOU Hong-bo

    2009-01-01

    A moderately thermophilic acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium ZW-1 was isolated from Dexing mine, Jiangxi Province, China. The morphological, biochemical and physiological characteristics, 16S rRNA sequence and bioleaching characterization of strain ZW-1 were studied. The optimum growth temperature is 48 ℃, and the optimum initial pH is 1.9. The strain can grow autotrophically by using ferrous iron or elemental sulfur as sole energy sources. The strain is also able to grow heterotrophically by using peptone and yeast extract powder, but not glucose. The cell density of strain ZW-1 can reach up to 1.02×108 /mL with addition of 0.4 g/L peptone. A phylogenetic tree was constructed by comparing with the published 16S rRNA sequences of the relative bacteria species. In the phylogenetic tree, strain ZW-1 is closely relative to Sulfobacilus acidophilus with more than 99% sequence similarity. The results of bioleaching experiments indicate that the strain could oxidize Fe2+ efficiently, and the maximum oxidizing rate is 0.295 g/(L·h). It could tolerate high concentration of Fe3+ and Cu2+ (35 g/L and 25 g/L, respectively). After 20 d, 44.6% of copper is extracted from chalcopyrite by using strain ZW-1 as inocula.

  14. Monitoring and spatial distribution of heterotrophic bacteria and fecal coliforms in the Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutterbach Márcia T. S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of heterothrophic bacteria and fecal coliforms was monitored at four sampling stations located near the shore of the Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon, in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Water samples were collected, monthly from October 1994 through September 1998. The highest heterothrophic count (6.5x10 7 CFU/100mL was recorded at stations 2 and 4 during August 1998 and the lowest (10 ³ CFU/100 mL at station 3 during February 1995. With respect to fecal coliforms, the highest and lowest counts were 1.6x10 5 coliforms/100mL at station 3 during March 1997 and <1 coliform/100mL at all the stations during February 1995 and September 1997 as well as station 3 during February 1998. The data indicated a percentage increase of the microorganisms surveyed over time at all the sampling stations studied.

  15. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Jaramillo Riveri, Sebastian I.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.

    2014-12-15

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux in the different oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on equations of state and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the selforganization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals, such as biofuels.

  16. Influence factors on growth of heterotrophic bacteria in water using PESA as water treatment agent%使用聚环氧琥珀酸水处理剂时水中异养菌繁殖的影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅晓萍; 李本高; 刘小平

    2011-01-01

    采用微生物培养菌落计数法研究了使用聚环氧琥珀酸水处理剂时水中PESA,磷、通气量,初始茵数及pH值对异养菌繁殖的影响,结果表明:PESA使用浓度较低时对异养菌繁殖影响较小,浓度增加促进异养菌生长期繁殖;磷酸盐促进异养菌稳定期繁殖;通气对异养菌生长繁殖影响不明显;初始菌数对异养菌繁殖的稳定期影响不明显;pH值对异养菌的生长繁殖影响较大.%The effects of polyepoxysuccinic acid ( PESA ), phosphorus, ventilation, initial amount of heterotrophic bacteria and pH value on the growth of heterotrophic bacteria in the water using PESA as a water treatment agent were studied by the flat-dish numeration method. The results showed that PESA had little influence on the breeding of heterotrophic bacteria at a low concentration, while it promoted the growth rate of heterotrophic bacteria as its concentration increased. The higher the concentration of phosphate, the more the amount of heterotrophic bacteria in the stable breeding period.Ventilation had no effect on the growth of heterotrophic bacteria. The initial amount of heterotrophic bacteria had little influence on the amount during the balance period. The pH value had a significant impact on the breeding of heterotrophic bacteria.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of "Acidibacillus ferrooxidans" ITV01, a Novel Acidophilic Firmicute Isolated from a Chalcopyrite Mine Drainage Site in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Agnol, Hivana; Ñancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D Barrie; Oliveira, Renato; Leite, Laura; Pylro, Victor S; Holanda, Roseanne; Grail, Barry; Carvalho, Nelson; Nunes, Gisele Lopes; Tzotzos, George; Fernandes, Gabriel Rocha; Dutra, Julliane; Orellana, Sara Cuadros; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2016-03-17

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of "Acidibacillus ferrooxidans" strain ITV01, a ferrous iron- and sulfide-mineral-oxidizing, obligate heterotrophic, and acidophilic bacterium affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes. Strain ITV01 was isolated from neutral drainage from a low-grade chalcopyrite from a mine in northern Brazil.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of “Acidibacillus ferrooxidans” ITV01, a Novel Acidophilic Firmicute Isolated from a Chalcopyrite Mine Drainage Site in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall’Agnol, Hivana; Ñancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D. Barrie; Oliveira, Renato; Leite, Laura; Holanda, Roseanne; Grail, Barry; Carvalho, Nelson; Nunes, Gisele Lopes; Tzotzos, George; Fernandes, Gabriel Rocha; Dutra, Julliane; Orellana, Sara Cuadros

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of “Acidibacillus ferrooxidans” strain ITV01, a ferrous iron- and sulfide-mineral-oxidizing, obligate heterotrophic, and acidophilic bacterium affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes. Strain ITV01 was isolated from neutral drainage from a low-grade chalcopyrite from a mine in northern Brazil. PMID:26988062

  19. 黄河三角洲南部潮间带底栖异样细菌的分布特征研究%DISTRIBUTION OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA IN SEDIMENTS IN THE SOUTHERN INTERTIDAL AREA OF YELLOW RIVER DELTA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 邹立; 姚晓; 山口一岩; 郭新宇; 高会旺

    2011-01-01

    2008年4月和7月于黄河三角洲南部潮间带进行了大面站调查,采用DAPI荧光染色荧光显微镜计数法测定了沉积物中异养细菌数量,研究其分布特征,探讨满足其生长繁殖需要的物质来源.结果表明,春季和夏季潮间带沉积物中异养细菌丰度的变化范围分别为4.0~31.9×105 cells/g dw(平均值为11.81×105 cells/g dw)和5.9~53.5×105 cells/g dw(平均值为17.80×105cells/g dw).与世界其它地区相比,本调查区域沉积物中异养细菌丰度处于较低水平,这可能与该区域沉积物中POC含量较低有关(春季平均为0.10%,夏季平均为0.57%).春季和夏季沉积物中BB:PB(Bacteria Biomass,BB;Phytoplankton Biomass,PB)值的变化范围分别为0.02~0.89%(平均为0.26%)和0.09~3.38%(平均为0.55%),都处于较低水平(<5%);该较低水平表明底栖藻类现存量远远超过了异养细茵生长的需求.春季和夏季潮间带沉积物中异养细菌丰度和叶绿素浓度的相关系数均为0.24,显示出不显著相关,说明藻类有机物不是异养细菌食物的主要来源.本研究区域有多条河流输入,沉积物中的异养细菌生长繁殖所需的溶解有机物可能有相当一部分来自陆源径流.%In order to study on the distribution of heterotrophic bacteria in sediments in the southern intertidal area of Yellow River Delta, explore the material supplying for their growth and production, heterotrophic bacteria in sediments were analyzed in April and July 2008, stained with DAPI and counted with fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the heterotrophic bacteria abundance in sediments ranged at 4. 0~31.9 × 105 cells/g dw (averaged at 11.81× 10s cells/g dw) and 5.9~53. 5 × 105 cells/g dw (averaged at 17.80 × 105 cells/g dw) in spring and summer, respectively. Compared to other similar areas all over the world, the heterotrophic bacteria abundance in this area was at a relatively low level. This may be due to the

  20. Variation of a benthic heterotrophic bacteria community with different respiratory metabolisms in Coyuca de Benítez coastal lagoon (Guerrero, Mexico)

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús Ferrara Guerrero, María; Elena Castellanos Páez, María; Garza Mouriño, Gabriela

    2003-01-01

    The fluctuations of the number, biomass and composition of the heterotrophic community were studied daily for two days, according to depth, pH, Eh, O2 and organic carbon concentration within a zone of the canal between the Coyuca de Benítez lagoon (Guerrero, Mexico) and the coastal waters. At the three moments of the day studied (6 am, 2 pm and 10 pm), the oxygen concentrations in the overlying water and in the superficial sediment layer were near air-saturation in the diurnal samplings (582 ...

  1. Variation of a benthic heterotrophic bacteria community with different respiratory metabolisms in Coyuca de Benítez coastal lagoon (Guerrero, México)

    OpenAIRE

    María Jesús Ferrara-Guerrero; María Elena Castellanos-Páez; Gabriela Garza-Mouriño

    2007-01-01

    The fluctuations of the number, biomass and composition of the heterotrophic community were studied daily for two days, according to depth, pH, Eh, O2 and organic carbon concentration within a zone of the canal between the Coyuca de Benítez lagoon (Guerrero, Mexico) and the coastal waters. At the three moments of the day studied (6 am, 2 pm and 10 pm), the oxygen concentrations in the overlying water and in the superficial sediment layer were near air-saturation in the diurnal samplings (582 ...

  2. Iron meteorites can support the growth of acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Toril, Elena; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Gómez Gómez, José María; Rull, Fernando; Amils, Ricardo

    2005-06-01

    Chemolithoautotrophy based on reduced inorganic minerals is considered a primitive energy transduction system. Evidence that a high number of meteorites crashed into the planet during the early period of Earth history led us to test the ability of iron-oxidizing bacteria to grow using iron meteorites as their source of energy. Here we report the growth of two acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, on a piece of the Toluca meteorite as the only source of energy. The alteration of the surface of the exposed piece of meteorite, the solubilization of its oxidized metal constituents, mainly ferric iron, and the formation of goethite precipitates all clearly indicate that iron-meteorite-based chemolithotrophic metabolism is viable.

  3. 低温异养硝化菌的鉴定及对小白鼠的安全性研究%Study on Identify of Low Temperature Heterotrophic Nitvification Bacteria and Safety of ICR Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓飞; 李伟光; 张多英; 潘忠诚; 秦雯; 宿程远

    2012-01-01

    对一株在低温环境中具有较强硝化能力的异养硝化菌经菌落特征观察、革兰氏染色镜检和生化特性进行研究,鉴定该菌为不动杆菌属(Acinetobacter.)成员.同时通过持续饲喂法和腹腔注射法对小白鼠进行安全性试验,结果:通过腹腔注射途径确定的半数致死量LD(50)为5.41×1011 CFU/kg;经口服途径持续饲喂3个月低温异养硝化菌(Acinetobacter.Y20) 1.5×1012 CFU/kg体重以下是安全的,从而表明该菌对哺乳动物是安全的.%In this paper, a strain in low temperature environment with strong nitrification capacity by the colony characteristics of heterotrophic nitrification bacteria, Gram staining and biochemical characteristics were studied, the identification of the bacterium Acinetobacter species ( Acinetobacter. ) members. At the same time through continuous feeding method and intraperitoneal injection on mice for safety tests, results: through intraperitoneal injection of pathways that determine the half lethal dose of LD ( 50) to 5.41 ×101lCFU/kg; by the oral route continued feeding of low temperature for 3 months of heterotrophic nitrification bacteria ( Acinetobacter.Y20 ) 1.5 × 1012CFU/kg body weight following is safe, thereby indicating that the bacteria to mammals is safe.

  4. 脉冲磁场对电厂循环冷却水中异养菌的灭活%Inactivation of heterotrophic bacteria in circulation cooling water system of power plant by pulsed magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武红梅; 刘智安; 薛金英; 刘洋; 周斐博; 王玮

    2012-01-01

    为了控制微生物繁殖对电厂循环冷却水系统造成的危害,研究了脉冲电源发生器与线圈绕组相连产生的脉冲磁场对循环水中异养菌的灭活影响,并对灭活关键因素进行了分析。实验结果表明,脉冲磁场对电厂循环冷却水中的异养菌有灭活作用;灭活率对频率和输出电压有选择性,并且随着作用时间和温度的升高而升高;在扫频范围100~1000 Hz、输出电压3 V、单次作用时间为15 s,温度45℃时,异养菌灭活率达到78.8%。%In order to control the harm caused by microbial growth in circulation cooling water systems,the inactivation of heterotrophic bacteria was investigated with the pulsed magnetic fields generated by DC-pulse generator combining with coil windings.Analyses for key factors of sterilization were carried out.The experimental results revealed that the pulsed magnetic fields have effects on inactivation of heterotrophic bacteria in the circulation cooling water system.The inactivation rates take selectivity for the frequency and output voltage.The inactivation rates increase with the increasing of temperature and time duration for each pulse.When the sweep frequency of pulsed magnetic field ranges from 10 to 1 000 Hz,the output voltage is 3 V,and the time duration for each pulse is 15 s,the inactivation rate is 78.8%.

  5. Heterotrophic activities of bacterioplankton and bacteriobenthos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocair, J A; Albright, L J

    1981-03-01

    Several marine waters and surface sediments of coastal British Columbia were analyzed and compared for bacterial colony forming units (CFU) and numbers of active bacteria (NAB) as indicated by microautoradiography, glucose and alanine heterotrophic activities, and dissolved (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC). Bacteria numbers (CFU, NAB) were usually much greater (by several orders of magnitude) in surface sediments than in overlying waters. DOC and POC were also generally greater in surface sediments than in overlying waters, often by as much as one order of magnitude. Both glucose and alanine heterotrophic potentials were greater in surface sediments; however, on a per active cell (NAB) basis, no significant differences were noted between the glucose-specific activities of the bacteria of the surface sediments and overlying waters. The data suggest that these surface sediments carry greater standing crops of bacteria than overlying waters without significant decreases in glucose-specific activities.

  6. Numerical contribution of phytoplanktonic cells, heterotrophic particles and bacteria to size fractionated POC in the Cananéia estuary (25ºS 48ºW, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda de Souza Lima Mesquita

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidable POC, at two stations in the Cananéia estuary, was found to be largely dependent upon the smallest size POC. The correlation factors between POC and the numerical abundance of cells, heterotrofic particles and bacteria, in each of the size categories studied, were generally low and non-significant for both stations, with a few exceptions. At St. I the number of heterotrophic particles seems to account for some of the POC variation over the year. At St. II, the only significant correlation found was between the number of the largest and intermediate size classes bacteria and the equivalent size classes POC. At this station the importance of the detritus component is suggested. The differences found between the stations, concerning the numerical contribution of cells, particles and bacteria to total POC, have been attributed to the differential hydrodynamic conditions acting upon material coming from land, due to diverse location of the stations. Sampling date and the collection of different water masses have also been considered as factors that may greatly affect the relationships studied.

  7. Genomics and Metagenomics of Extreme Acidophiles in Biomining Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over 160 draft or complete genomes of extreme acidophiles (pH models of the ecophysiology of biomining environments and provide insight into the gene and genome evolution of extreme acidophiles. Additionally, since most of these acidophiles are also chemoautolithotrophs that use minerals as energy sources or electron sinks, their genomes can be plundered for clues about the evolution of cellular metabolism and bioenergetic pathways during the Archaean abiotic/biotic transition on early Earth. Acknowledgements: Fondecyt 1130683.

  8. The effect of Chlorella growth and inorganic nutrients absorption by marine heterotrophic bacteria%海洋异养细菌对小球藻生长和无机营养盐吸收的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白洁; 易齐涛; 李佳霖

    2009-01-01

    The consortium of marine heterotrophic bacteria and Chlorella vulgaris was separated and six strains of bacteria were isolated,purified and analyzed by the DNA fingerprint of DGGE(denature gel gradient electrophoresis).One of the strains was found to promote the growth of the C.vulgaris,while the other five strains had no effects.Meanwhile,all of the separated strains could be observed to grow well on the DOC from the pure culture.Compared with the pure culture of C.vulgaris,the mixed culture of the consortium was observed a more efficiency of removing inorganic nitrogen.Also,the absorption of inorganic nutrients was considerably made by bacteria.%从胶州湾海洋异养细菌同小球藻(Chlorella vulgaris)的共存体系中,分离出6株形态特征差异较大的异养细菌,并做变性凝胶梯度电泳(Denature Gel Gradient Electrophoresis,DGGE)分析.其中一株对小球藻的生长有较大的促进作用,而其余菌株则没有明显的效果.6株细菌能在小球藻产生的胞外溶解有机物(Dissolved Organic Mate rials,DOM)溶液中生长良好,共存细菌对提高菌藻体系对无机营养盐的吸收具有较大的贡献.

  9. Effect of low-frequency pulsed magnetic field on heterotrophic bacteria in circulation cooling water at power plants%低频脉冲磁场对电厂循环冷却水异养菌的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛金英; 刘智安; 武红梅; 乔波波; 周斐博

    2012-01-01

    The bactericidal experiments of low-frequency pulsed magnetic field have been carried out, aiming at two aspects: the change of variable frequency pulse magnetic field direction, and the two directions of fixed frequency and sweep frequency range. The experimental results show that the change of microbiological physiological function took place under the magnetic field effect. The variable-frequency pulsed magnetic field not only can inhibit the growth of heterotrophic bacteria in circulating cooling water, but also can stimulate the reproduction of heterotrophic bacteria. When the direction of magnetic field is parallel and perpendicular with the water flow direction, the bactericidal rate reaches more than 70%. When the direction of magnetic field is parallel with the water flow direction in the range of 11-17 kHz sweep frequency, the bactericidal rate can reach 82.64%. Therefore, the effective sweep frequency range should be determined,when low frequency pulsed magnetic field is made use of. Thus,better bactericidal effect can be obtained.%从变频脉冲磁场方向的变化以及固定频率与扫频范围两个方向进行了低频脉冲磁场的杀菌实验.实验表明微生物生理功能在磁场作用下发生改变,变频脉冲电磁场既能抑制循环水中异养菌的生长,也能刺激异养菌的繁衍;当磁场方向与水流方向平行和垂直时能达到70%以上的杀菌率,其中磁场方向与水流方向平行时在11~17 kHz频率范围内的杀菌率达到82.64%.因此利用低频脉冲磁场进行杀菌时应确定有效的扫频范围,才能达到较好的杀菌效果.

  10. Biotransformation of pharmaceuticals under nitrification, nitratation and heterotrophic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E., E-mail: eduardo.fernandez.fontaina@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gomes, I.B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Aga, D.S. [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Omil, F.; Lema, J.M.; Carballa, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    The effect of nitrification, nitratation and heterotrophic conditions on the biotransformation of several pharmaceuticals in a highly enriched nitrifying activated sludge was evaluated in this study by selective activation of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and heterotrophic bacteria. Nitrifiers displayed a noticeable capacity to process ibuprofen due to hydroxylation by ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) to produce 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen. Naproxen was also biotransformed under nitrifying conditions. On the other hand, heterotrophic bacteria present in the nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) biotransformed sulfamethoxazole. In contrast, both nitrifying and heterotrophic activities were ineffective against diclofenac, diazepam, carbamazepine and trimethoprim. Similar biotransformation rates of erythromycin, roxithromycin and fluoxetine were observed under all conditions tested. Overall, results from this study give more evidence on the role of the different microbial communities present in activated sludge reactors on the biological removal of pharmaceuticals. - Highlights: • The removal of pharmaceuticals in nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) was studied. • Nitrifying activity increases biotransformation rate of ibuprofen and naproxen. • Hydroxylation of ibuprofen by ammonia monooxygenase of ammonia oxidizing bacteriaHeterotrophic activity enhances biotransformation of sulfamethoxazole in NAS. • Recalcitrance of trimethoprim, diclofenac, carbamazepine and diazepam in NAS.

  11. Natural hot spots for gain of multiple resistances: arsenic and antibiotic resistances in heterotrophic, aerobic bacteria from marine hydrothermal vent fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Pedro; Espírito Santo, Christophe; Branco, Rita; Francisco, Romeu; Santos, Susana; Hansen, Lars; Sorensen, Soren; Morais, Paula V

    2015-04-01

    Microorganisms are responsible for multiple antibiotic resistances that have been associated with resistance/tolerance to heavy metals, with consequences to public health. Many genes conferring these resistances are located on mobile genetic elements, easily exchanged among phylogenetically distant bacteria. The objective of the present work was to isolate arsenic-, antimonite-, and antibiotic-resistant strains and to determine the existence of plasmids harboring antibiotic/arsenic/antimonite resistance traits in phenotypically resistant strains, in a nonanthropogenically impacted environment. The hydrothermal Lucky Strike field in the Azores archipelago (North Atlantic, between 11°N and 38°N), at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, protected under the OSPAR Convention, was sampled as a metal-rich pristine environment. A total of 35 strains from 8 different species were isolated in the presence of arsenate, arsenite, and antimonite. ACR3 and arsB genes were amplified from the sediment's total DNA, and 4 isolates also carried ACR3 genes. Phenotypic multiple resistances were found in all strains, and 7 strains had recoverable plasmids. Purified plasmids were sequenced by Illumina and assembled by EDENA V3, and contig annotation was performed using the "Rapid Annotation using the Subsystems Technology" server. Determinants of resistance to copper, zinc, cadmium, cobalt, and chromium as well as to the antibiotics β-lactams and fluoroquinolones were found in the 3 sequenced plasmids. Genes coding for heavy metal resistance and antibiotic resistance in the same mobile element were found, suggesting the possibility of horizontal gene transfer and distribution of theses resistances in the bacterial population.

  12. Antagonistic interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Sarah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and filamentous cyanobacteria. Here, interactions between the filamentous heterotrophic bacteria Fibrella aestuarina (strain BUZ 2 and Fibrisoma limi (BUZ 3 with an axenic strain of the autotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum (SAG 25.82 were studied in mixed cultures under nutrient rich (carbon source present in medium and poor (carbon source absent in medium conditions. Findings F. aestuarina BUZ 2 significantly reduced the cyanobacterial population whereas F. limi BUZ 3 did not. Physical contact between heterotrophs and autotroph was observed and the cyanobacterial cells showed some level of damage and lysis. Therefore, either contact lysis or entrapment with production of extracellular compounds in close vicinity of host cells could be considered as potential modes of action. The supernatants from pure heterotrophic cultures did not have an effect on Nostoc cultures. However, supernatant from mixed cultures of BUZ 2 and Nostoc had a negative effect on cyanobacterial growth, indicating that the lytic compounds were only produced in the presence of Nostoc. The growth and survival of tested heterotrophs was enhanced by the presence of Nostoc or its metabolites, suggesting that the heterotrophs could utilize the autotrophs and its products as a nutrient source. However, the autotroph could withstand and out-compete the heterotrophs under nutrient poor conditions. Conclusions Our results suggest that the nutrients in cultivation media, which boost or reduce the number of heterotrophs, were the important factor influencing the outcome of the interplay between filamentous heterotrophs and autotrophs. For better understanding of these interactions, additional research is needed. In particular, it is necessary to elucidate the mode of action for lysis by heterotrophs, and the possible defense mechanisms of the autotrophs.

  13. Mineral Salt Medium (MSM) for extreme acidophilic microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Medium for growth of extreme acidophilic microorganisms. This medium does not contain trace elements. When not working on mineral, addition of trace element (TE) solution is necessary, see separate protocol. http://www.nature.com/protocolexchange/protocols/3811

  14. 利用嗜酸混合菌从尼日利亚闪锌矿和方铅矿中生物浸出Zn(Ⅱ)和Pb(Ⅱ)%Bioleaching of Zn(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ) from Nigerian sphalerite and galena ores by mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AlafaraA.BABA; Folahan A.ADEKOLA; Rasaq F.ATATA; Risikat N.AHMED; Sandeep PANDA4

    2011-01-01

    Zn(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ) from Nigerian sphalerite and galena ores were bioleached by a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria.The influences ofpH and ferric ion on the bioleaching rates of sphalerite and galena were examined.The result shows that pH 2.1 and 2.7 are favourable for the leaching of Zn(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ) from sphalerite and galena,respectively.It was observed that the use of agarose-simulated media caused cells to excrete exopolymers containing ferric ions which enhanced oxidation.The oxidation equilibrium for sphalerite and galena took 3 and 4 d,respectively.About 38.3% sphalerite and 34.2% galena were leached within 1 d and approximately 92.0% Zn(Ⅱ) and 89.0% Pb(Ⅱ) were recovered in 5 d,respectively.The unleached residual products were examined by X-ray diffraction for sphalerite,revealing the presence of elemental sulphur(S),zinc sulphate (ZnSO4) and few traces of calcium aluminate (Ca3Al2O6).The XRD pattern also indicates the presence of elemental sulphur (S),lead sulphate (PbSO4) and few traces ofitoite [Pb(S,Ge)(O,OH)4] and cobalt lead silicate [Pb8C0(Si2O7)3] in the urdeached galena ore.%利用嗜酸混合菌在尼日利亚闪锌矿和方铅矿中生物浸出Zn(Ⅱ)和Pb(Ⅱ),研究pH值和铁离子对闪锌矿和方铅矿浸出率的影响.结果表明:闪锌矿和方铅矿中Zn(Ⅱ)和Pb(Ⅱ)的氧化物在pH值分别为2.1和2.7时浸出效果最好.用模拟的琼脂糖培养基使细胞分泌出含铁离子的外聚合物,以此加强氧化.闪锌矿和方铅矿达到氧化平衡分别需要3和4d.闪锌矿和方铅矿在ld内的浸出率分别为38.3%和34.2%,5d内zn(Ⅱ)和Pb(Ⅱ)分别还原92.0%和89.0%.使用XRD研究两种矿物的未浸出的剩余产物,闪锌矿的组成为S、ZnSO4和少量Ca3Al2O6,方铅矿的组成为S、PbSO4和少量的Pb(S,Ge)(O,OH)4和Pb8Co(Si2O7)3.

  15. Heterotrophic bacteria abundances in Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Abundância bacteriana heterotrófica na Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas (Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Gonzalez

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon (RJ, Brazil is an important coastal ecosystem that has been submitted to an accelerated degradation process. The aim of this work was to determine the abundance and the spatial distribution of total heterotrophic (by flow cytometry and cultivated bacteria ("pour plate" method on R2A agar. Another objective was to evaluate the lagoon's influence on water quality of Ipanema and Leblon beaches. Physical and chemical data were acquired too. Sub-superficial water samples were taken monthly, from December 1999 to October 2000. On lagoon, the cultivated bacteria abundance varied from 6.9x10(5 to 5.0x10(7 CFU.100 mL-1. On Ipanema and Leblon beaches, this parameter yielded 1.4x10(5 and 2.8x10(6 CFU.100 mL-1, respectively. Total bacterial abundance varied from 2.9x10(7 to 3.2x10(7 cells.mL-1 on lagoon. On Ipanema and Leblon, this parameter yielded 8.7x10(6 and 1.1x10(7 cells.mL-1, respectively. Two sub-groups were determined with dominance of HNA cells. Samples were added latter to better understand the bacteria present on these environments. Bacterial abundance were analyzed only by flow cytometry and the results varied from 8.3x10(6 to 2.5x10(7 cells.mL-1 on lagoon. On the beach, this parameter yielded 6.9x10(6 cells. mL-1. Two bacterial sub-groups were also observed, with dominance of HNA on lagoon and LNA on the beach. The results showed that the Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon is an eutrophic ecosystem where the bacterial populations and the physical and chemical parameters do not differ spatially. The data also confirmed that the outflow of the lagoon's polluted waters affect the sanitary conditions of Ipanema and Leblon beaches.A Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas (RJ, Brasil é um importante ecossistema que vêm sendo submetido a um acelerado processo de degradação. O objetivo desse estudo foi determinar a abundância e a distribuição espacial das bactérias heterotróficas totais (citometria em fluxo e cultivadas ("pour plate

  16. Heterotrophic Bacterial Flora in Aquaculture Area around Xuejiadao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Zongjun; LI Yun; YU Dehua; WANG Xianghong; CHEN Jixiang; Robertson P.A.W.; Austin B.; XU Huaishu

    2002-01-01

    From Oct., 1999 to Oct., 2000, the heterotrophic bacterial flora in the aquaculture area around Xuejiadao wasinvestigated. The result shows that the populations of the heterotrophic bacteria are heavier in summer and autumn thanthose in winter and spring. The average populations in seawater, sediment, the surface of seaweed and the surface of fish are1.4 × 104cfu mL -1, 5.4 × 106cfu g 1, 1.5 × 106cfu g-1 and 1.8 × 103cfu cm 2, respectively. A total of 30l strains were isolated,among them 259 were Gram-negative. All the Gram-negative bacteria belong to 13 genera and some genera of Enterobacteri-aceae. The communities of bacteria are slightly different among the samples. In the body surface of fish, Genus vibrio isdominant. In the remaining samples, dominant genus is Aeromonas.

  17. Factors limiting heterotrophic bacterial production in the southern Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Van Wambeke

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of potential factors limiting bacterial growth was investigated along vertical and longitudinal gradients across the South Eastern Pacific Gyre. The effects of glucose, nitrate, ammonium and phosphate additions on heterotrophic bacterial production (using leucine technique were studied in parallel in unfiltered seawater samples incubated under natural daily irradiance. Longitudinally, the enrichments realized on the subsurface showed three types of responses. From the Marquesas plateau (8° W to approx 125° W, bacteria were not bottom-up controlled, as confirmed by the huge potential of growth in non-enriched seawater (43±24 times in 24 h. Within the Gyre (125° W–95° W, nitrogen alone stimulated leucine incorporation rates by a factor of 5.6±3.6, but rapidly labile carbon (glucose became a second limiting factor (enhancement factor 49±32 when the two elements were added. Finally from the border of the gyre to the Chilean upwelling (95° W–73° W, labile carbon was the only factor stimulating heterotrophic bacterial production. Interaction between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterial communities and the direct versus indirect effect of iron and macronutrients on bacterial production were also investigated in four selected sites: two sites on the vicinity of the Marquesas plateau, the centre of the gyre and the Eastern border of the gyre. Both phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria were limited by availability of nitrogen within the gyre, but not by iron. While iron limited phytoplankton at Marquesas plateau and at the eastern border of the gyre, heterotrophic bacteria were only limited by availability of labile DOC in those environments.

  18. Liquid-nitrogen cryopreservation of three kinds of autotrophicbioleaching bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xue-ling; XIN Xiao-hong; JIANG Ying; LIANG Ren-xing; YUAN Peng; FANG Cheng-xiang

    2008-01-01

    Three kinds of autotrophic bioleaching bacteria strains,including mesophilic and acidophilic ferrous ion-oxidizing bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A.ferrooxidans),mesophilic and acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (A.thiooxidans),and moderately thermophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Acidianus brierleyi,were cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen and their ferrous ion- or sulfur-oxidizing activities were investigated and compared with the original ones.The results revealed that ferrous ion/sulfur oxidation activities of the strains were almost equal before and after cryopreservation.Glycerin was used as cryoprotective agent.In conclusion,liquid-nitrogen cryopreservation is a simple and effective method for autotrophic bioleaching microorganisms.

  19. STUDY ON INACTIVATION OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA IN THE CIRCULATING COOLING WATER SYSTEM OF POWER PLANT BY SWEET PULSED MAGNETIC FIELD%扫频脉冲磁场对电厂循环冷却水中异养菌的灭活研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武红梅; 刘智安; 常英; 薛金英; 刘洋; 周斐博

    2011-01-01

    The effect of sweep pulsed magnetic field on heterotrophic bacteria of power plant circulating cooling water was studied and the inactivation key factors were analyzed.It was found that pulsed magnetic field has an inactivated role in heterotrophic bacteria.The efficiency depends on the frequency and output voltage.The inactivated rate of magnetic field is increased with the increasing of the temperature and the single magnetic treatment time.With the sweep pulse magnetic field 100~1 000 Hz,the single magnetic treatment time 15s,output voltage 3V,temperature 45℃ the inactivated rate is 78.8%.%研究了扫频脉冲磁场对电厂循环冷却水中异养菌的影响,并对灭活关键因素进行了分析。实验结果表明,脉冲磁场对电厂循环冷却水中的异养菌有灭活作用。灭活率对频率和输出电压具有选择性,并且随着作用时间和温度的升高而升高。在扫频范围100~1 000Hz、输出电压3 V、单次作用时间为15 s,温度45℃时,异养菌灭活率可达78.8%。

  20. Grazing on autotrophic and heterotrophic picoplankton by ciliates isolated from Lake Kinneret, Israel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadas, O.; Malinsky-Rushansky, N.; Pinkas, R.; Cappenberg, T.E.

    1998-01-01

    The rates of ingestion of three ciliates (Colpoda steinii, Cyclidium sp. and Stylonichia sp.) on fluorescently labeled heterotrophic bacteria, picocyanobacteria (Synechococcus P, CN) and a picoeukaryote isolated from Lake Kinneret were measured. Uptake values were 930, 35 and 1210 bacteria ciliate (

  1. Z-QS01菌株对小球藻的生态学效应及对UV-B辐射的响应%Quorum Sensing of an Associated Heterotrophic Bacteria-Z-QS01 with Chlorella Vulgaris and Response to Enhanced UV-B Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文礼; 肖慧; 乔秀亭; 孙敬锋; 邢克智; 唐学玺

    2011-01-01

    利用生态毒理学方法研究了小球藻共栖Z-QS01菌株的生态学效应及对U V-B辐射的响应.结果表明:Z-QS01菌株通过分泌化学物质实现自我行为调节和对小球藻的抑制效应,Z-QS01菌株的密度和分泌到培养液中的化学物质的浓度是启动调节机制的必要条件;UV-B辐射增强显著影响Z-QS01菌株的群感效应,随UV-B辐射剂量的增加,Z-QS01菌株对小球藻的抑制效应降低.实验数据可为水产养殖业生态防病提供参考,并为揭示藻菌间相互作用机制提供有价值的参考资料.%An associated heterotrophic dominant single bacteria-Z-QS01 was selected to study its mechanism of quorum sensing and factors that affected quorum sensing using ecotoxicological technique in co-cultural system with Chlorella vulgaris. The results show that self-regulation and inhibitive effect of bacteria-Z-QS01 to Chlorella vulgaris could implement through excreting chemic substance. Density of bacteria-Z-QS01 and concentration of chemic substance excreted by bacteria-Z-QS01 are the necessary conditions, which decide whether the regulation mechanism could be carried out or not. The enhanced UV-B radiation could affect quorum sensing of bacteria-Z-QS01 significantly, and the inhibitive effect to Chlorella vulgaris is decreased gradually with the dose increase of UV-B radiation.

  2. Architecture and gene repertoire of the flexible genome of the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian G Acuña

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acidithiobacillus caldus is a sulfur oxidizing extreme acidophile and the only known mesothermophile within the Acidithiobacillales. As such, it is one of the preferred microbes for mineral bioprocessing at moderately high temperatures. In this study, we explore the genomic diversity of A. caldus strains using a combination of bioinformatic and experimental techniques, thus contributing first insights into the elucidation of the species pangenome. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative sequence analysis of A. caldus ATCC 51756 and SM-1 indicate that, despite sharing a conserved and highly syntenic genomic core, both strains have unique gene complements encompassing nearly 20% of their respective genomes. The differential gene complement of each strain is distributed between the chromosomal compartment, one megaplasmid and a variable number of smaller plasmids, and is directly associated to a diverse pool of mobile genetic elements (MGE. These include integrative conjugative and mobilizable elements, genomic islands and insertion sequences. Some of the accessory functions associated to these MGEs have been linked previously to the flexible gene pool in microorganisms inhabiting completely different econiches. Yet, others had not been unambiguously mapped to the flexible gene pool prior to this report and clearly reflect strain-specific adaption to local environmental conditions. SIGNIFICANCE: For many years, and because of DNA instability at low pH and recurrent failure to genetically transform acidophilic bacteria, gene transfer in acidic environments was considered negligible. Findings presented herein imply that a more or less conserved pool of actively excising MGEs occurs in the A. caldus population and point to a greater frequency of gene exchange in this econiche than previously recognized. Also, the data suggest that these elements endow the species with capacities to withstand the diverse abiotic and biotic stresses of natural

  3. Quantitative proteomic analyses of the response of acidophilic microbial communities to different pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, Christopher P; Pan, Chongle; Denef, Vincent J; Samatova, Nagiza F; Hettich, Robert L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2011-07-01

    Extensive genomic characterization of multi-species acid mine drainage microbial consortia combined with laboratory cultivation has enabled the application of quantitative proteomic analyses at the community level. In this study, quantitative proteomic comparisons were used to functionally characterize laboratory-cultivated acidophilic communities sustained in pH 1.45 or 0.85 conditions. The distributions of all proteins identified for individual organisms indicated biases for either high or low pH, and suggests pH-specific niche partitioning for low abundance bacteria and archaea. Although the proteome of the dominant bacterium, Leptospirillum group II, was largely unaffected by pH treatments, analysis of functional categories indicated proteins involved in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, as well as cell membrane/envelope biogenesis were overrepresented at high pH. Comparison of specific protein abundances indicates higher pH conditions favor Leptospirillum group III, whereas low pH conditions promote the growth of certain archaea. Thus, quantitative proteomic comparisons revealed distinct differences in community composition and metabolic function of individual organisms during different pH treatments. Proteomic analysis revealed other aspects of community function. Different numbers of phage proteins were identified across biological replicates, indicating stochastic spatial heterogeneity of phage outbreaks. Additionally, proteomic data were used to identify a previously unknown genotypic variant of Leptospirillum group II, an indication of selection for a specific Leptospirillum group II population in laboratory communities. Our results confirm the importance of pH and related geochemical factors in fine-tuning acidophilic microbial community structure and function at the species and strain level, and demonstrate the broad utility of proteomics in laboratory community studies.

  4. Indirect Interspecies Regulation: Transcriptional and Physiological Responses of a Cyanobacterium to Heterotrophic Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Ryan S.; Thiel, Vera; Sadler, Natalie C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms by which microbes interact in communities remain poorly understood. Here, we interrogated specific interactions between photoautotrophic and heterotrophic members of a model consortium to infer mechanisms that mediate metabolic coupling and acclimation to partnership. This binary consortium was composed of a cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1, which supported growth of an obligate aerobic heterotroph, Meiothermus ruber strain A, by providing organic carbon, O2, and reduced nitrogen. Species-resolved transcriptomic analyses were used in combination with growth and photosynthesis kinetics to infer interactions and the environmental context under which they occur. We found that the efficiency of biomass production and resistance to stress induced by high levels of dissolved O2 increased, beyond axenic performance, as a result of heterotrophic partnership. Coordinated transcriptional responses transcending both species were observed and used to infer specific interactions resulting from the synthesis and exchange of resources. The cyanobacterium responded to heterotrophic partnership by altering expression of core genes involved with photosynthesis, carbon uptake/fixation, vitamin synthesis, and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). IMPORTANCE This study elucidates how a cyanobacterial primary producer acclimates to heterotrophic partnership by modulating the expression levels of key metabolic genes. Heterotrophic bacteria can indirectly regulate the physiology of the photoautotrophic primary producers, resulting in physiological changes identified here, such as increased intracellular ROS. Some of the interactions inferred from this model system represent putative principles of metabolic coupling in phototrophic-heterotrophic partnerships. PMID:28289730

  5. Heterotrophic free-living and particle-bound bacterial cell size in the river Cauvery and its downstream tributaries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T S Harsha; Sadanand M Yamakanamardi; M Mahadevaswamy

    2007-03-01

    This is the first comprehensive study on planktonic heterotrophic bacterial cell size in the river Cauvery and its important tributaries in Karnataka State, India. The initial hypothesis that the mean cell size of planktonic heterotrophic bacteria in the four tributaries are markedly different from each other and also from that in the main river Cauvery was rejected, because all five watercourses showed similar planktonic heterotrophic bacterial cell size. Examination of the correlation between mean heterotrophic bacterial cell size and environmental variables showed four correlations in the river Arkavathy and two in the river Shimsha. Regression analysis revealed that 18% of the variation in mean heterotrophic free-living bacterial cell size was due to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in the river Arkavathy, 11% due to surface water velocity (SWV) in the river Cauvery and 11% due to temperature in the river Kapila. Heterotrophic particle-bound bacterial cell size variation was 28% due to chloride and BOD in the river Arkavathy, 11% due to conductivity in the river Kapila and 8% due to calcium in the river Cauvery. This type of relationship between heterotrophic bacterial cell size and environmental variables suggests that, though the mean heterotrophic bacterial cell size was similar in all the five water courses, different sets of environmental variables apparently control the heterotrophic bacterial cell size in the various water bodies studied in this investigation. The possible cause for this environmental (bottom–up) control is discussed.

  6. Carbon dynamics in highly heterotrophic subarctic thaw ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Roiha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Global warming has accelerated the formation of permafrost thaw ponds in several subarctic and arctic regions. These ponds are net heterotrophic as evidenced by their greenhouse gas (GHG supersaturation levels (CO2 and CH4, and generally receive large terrestrial carbon inputs from the thawing and eroding permafrost. We measured seasonal and vertical variations in the concentration and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM in five subarctic thaw (thermokarst ponds in northern Quebec, and explored how environmental gradients influenced heterotrophic and phototrophic biomass and productivity. Late winter DOM had low aromaticity indicating reduced inputs of terrestrial carbon, while the high concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC suggests that some production of non-chromophoric dissolved compounds by the microbial food web took place under the ice cover. Summer DOM had a strong terrestrial signature, but was also characterized with significant inputs of algal-derived carbon, especially at the pond surface. During late winter, bacterial production was low (maximum of 0.8 mg C m−3 d−1 and was largely based on free-living bacterioplankton (58 %. Bacterial production in summer was high (up to 58 mg C m−3 d−1, dominated by particle-attached bacteria (67 %, and strongly correlated to the amount of terrestrial carbon. Primary production was restricted to summer surface waters due to strong light limitation deeper in the water column or in winter. The phototrophic biomass was equal to the heterotrophic biomass, but as the algae were mostly composed of mixotrophic species, most probably they used bacteria rather than solar energy in such shaded ponds. According to the δ13C analyses, non-algal carbon supported 51 % of winter and 37 % of summer biomass of the phantom midge larvae, Chaoborus sp., that are at the top of the trophic chain. Our results point to a strong heterotrophic energy pathway in these thaw pond ecosystems, where

  7. Carbon dynamics in highly heterotrophic subarctic thaw ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiha, T.; Laurion, I.; Rautio, M.

    2015-12-01

    Global warming has accelerated the formation of permafrost thaw ponds in several subarctic and arctic regions. These ponds are net heterotrophic as evidenced by their greenhouse gas (GHG) supersaturation levels (CO2 and CH4), and generally receive large terrestrial carbon inputs from the thawing and eroding permafrost. We measured seasonal and vertical variations in the concentration and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in five subarctic thaw (thermokarst) ponds in northern Quebec, and explored how environmental gradients influenced heterotrophic and phototrophic biomass and productivity. Late winter DOM had low aromaticity indicating reduced inputs of terrestrial carbon, while the high concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) suggests that some production of non-chromophoric dissolved compounds by the microbial food web took place under the ice cover. Summer DOM had a strong terrestrial signature, but was also characterized with significant inputs of algal-derived carbon, especially at the pond surface. During late winter, bacterial production was low (maximum of 0.8 mg C m-3 d-1) and was largely based on free-living bacterioplankton (58 %). Bacterial production in summer was high (up to 58 mg C m-3 d-1), dominated by particle-attached bacteria (67 %), and strongly correlated with the amount of terrestrial carbon. Primary production was restricted to summer surface waters due to strong light limitation deeper in the water column or in winter. The phototrophic biomass was equal to the heterotrophic biomass, but as the algae were mostly composed of mixotrophic species, most probably they used bacteria rather than solar energy in such shaded ponds. Our results point to a strong heterotrophic energy pathway in these thaw pond ecosystems, where bacterioplankton dominates the production of new carbon biomass in both summer and winter.

  8. [Endogenous respiration process analysis of heterotrophic biomass and autotrophic biomass based on respiration map ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-hua; Bai, Xu-li; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Yi; He, Chun-bo

    2014-09-01

    The endogenous process is an important metabolic part of the activated sludge, and the understanding of this process is still unclear. Characteristics of endogenous respiration for heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic nitrifiers were analyzed using respirogram. Results showed that both heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria entered the stage of endogenous respiration at almost the same time, but heterotrophic bacteria first entered the stage of dormancy i. e. , they were easier to recover a higher proportion of biomass during the dormancy stage, indicating that heterotrophic bacteria exhibited strong environmental adaptability. Autotrophic bacteria were, however, quite different. This finding confirmed that autotrophic bacteria were more vulnerable from the viewpoint of endogenous respiration. In addition, the study also found that the increase of endogenous respiration rate ratio reflected the decreased sludge activity. And the proportion of endogenous respiration was an important parameter to characterize the activity of activated sludge, which can be used as a quantitative index for the health status of activated sludge. The findings further deepened the understanding of endogenous respiration process and provided a theoretical basis for the operation and management of wastewater treatment plants.

  9. Evaluation on the microbial interactions of anaerobic ammonium oxidizers and heterotrophs in Anammox biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Mael; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) is a cost-effective new process to treat high-strength nitrogenous wastewater. In this work, the microbial interactions of anaerobic ammonium oxidizers and heterotrophs through the exchange of soluble microbial products (SMP) in Anammox biofilm....... Experimental results showed the heterotrophs could grow both on SMP and decay released substrate from the metabolism of the Anammox bacteria. However, heterotrophic growth in Anammox biofilm (23%) was significantly lower than that of nitrifying biofilm (30–50%). The model predictions matched well...... with the experimental observations of the bacterial distribution, as well as the nitrogenous transformations in batch and continuous experiments. The modeling results showed that low nitrogen surface loading resulted in a lower availability of SMP leading to low heterotrophic growth in Anammox biofilm, but high...

  10. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  11. Enrichment of mesophilic acidophiles from the Underground Copper Mine Bor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conić Vesna T.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, autotrophic growth of mesophilic acidophiles from the Underground Copper Mine Bor was performed. Two selected solution samples collected from the 'Tilva Roš' ore body were prepared in a 9K nutrient medium (Silverman and Lundgren, 1959. The first sample TR k-16 was obtained during the hole drilling of the ore body, and the second TR k-31 from the drainage channel. Two samples of 9K media (Silverman and Lundgren, 1959 were inoculated with two selected solution samples from the underground mine Tilva Roš. Inoculated culture media were incubated without prior autoclaving in the period of 6 days at a temperature of 28 ?C with purging air through the system with enough oxygen and carbon dioxide. Oxidation rate of ferrous ions in the first 3 days of incubation was 14.8 and 10.7 wt.% Fe2+/day, the next 3 days 17.3 and 13.6 and for the total period of 6 days 98.3 and 74.8 wt.% for the first and second sample, respectively, i.e. 100 wt.% with initial percentage of ferrous ion in each medium. After centrifugation of enriched samples of culture media at 3000 rpm for 5 min, a plenty of mesophilic acidophiles were determined by microscopic method. According to Karavaiko [6], in the processes of incubition for 9K nutrient solution cells number reach a value of 108 cells/cm3.

  12. Evaluation on factors influencing the heterotrophic growth on the soluble microbial products of autotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Zeng, Raymond J; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Xu, Juan; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Sun, Yu-Jiao; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the heterotrophic growth on the microbial products of autotrophs and the effecting factors were evaluated with both experimental and modeling approaches. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis illustrated that ammonia oxidizers (AOB), nitrite oxidizers (NOB), and heterotrophs accounted for about 65%, 20%, and 15% of the total bacteria, respectively. The mathematical evaluation of experimental data reported in literature indicated that heterotrophic growth in nitrifying biofilm (30-50%) and granules (30%) was significantly higher than that of nitrifying sludge (15%). It was found that low influent ammonium resulted in a lower availability of soluble microbial products (SMP) and a slower heterotrophic growth, but high ammonium (>150 mg N L(-1)) feeding would lead to purely AOB dominated sludge with high biomass-associated products contained effluent, although the absolute heterotrophic growth increased. Meanwhile, the total active biomass concentration increased gradually with the increasing solids retention time, whereas the factions of active AOB, NOB, and heterotrophs varied a lot at different solids retention times. This work could be useful for better understanding of the autotrophic wastewater treatment systems.

  13. Survey on Heterotrophic Bacterial Contamination in Bottled Mineral Water by Culture Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essmaeel Ghorbanalinezhad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: This project focuses on the level of heterotrophic baceria in bottled mineral water which could be a health concern for the elderly, infants, pregnant women and immuno-compromised patients. Materials and Methods: Different brands of bottled water samples were selected randomly and evaluated for their bacteriological quality, using different specific culture media and biochemical tests. Water samples were analyzed within 24 hours of their purchase/collection. Samples were filtered with 0.45 micron and filters were plated in different media. Then media were incubated at 37˚C for 24-48 hours. Results: Morphological study and biochemical tests revealed a number of bacteria in different   brands of  bottled water. Heterotrophic bacteria(Gram positive cocci, Spore forming gram positive bacilli, non spore forming gram positive bacilli, gram negative bacilli, and gram negative coccobacilli; Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas counted in 70% of bottled water samples. There were no cases of fecal contamination or the presence of E.coli. Conclusions: Bottled water is not sterile and contains trace amounts of bacteria naturally present or introduced during processing. Testing drinking water for all possible pathogens is complex, time-consuming, and expensive. If only total coliform bacteria are detected in drinking water, the source is probably environmental. Since the significance of non-pathogenic heterotrophic bacteria in relation to health and diseases is not understood, there is an urgent need to establish a maximum limit for the heterotrophic count in the bottled mineral water. Growth conditions play a critical role in the recovery of heterotrophic bacteria in bottled drinking water.

  14. About the order in aerobic heterotrophic microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    The organizational structure of communities of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria was studied by means of physiological and molecular typing of the members of arbitrary samples of isolates, ASsI. The isolate sample assay (ISA) was applied to three different hydrocarbon-polluted sites: a dry windrow pile

  15. Environmental transcriptome analysis reveals physiological differences between biofilm and planktonic modes of life of the iron oxidizing bacteria Leptospirillum spp. in their natural microbial community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parro Víctor

    2010-06-01

    acidophilic filaments are dynamic structures in which different mechanisms for biofilm formation/dispersion are operating. Specific transcriptomic fingerprints can be inferred for both planktonic and sessile cells, having the former a more active TCA cycle, while the mixed acid fermentation process dominate in the latter. The excretion of acetate may play a relevant ecological role as a source of electron donor for heterotrophic Fe3+ reducers like some Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacterium spp. and Sulfobacillus spp., also present in the biofilm. Additionally, acetate may have a negative effect on bioleaching by inhibiting the growth of chemolithotrophic bacteria.

  16. Sulfur metabolism in the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus caldus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eMangold

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the challenges to life at low pH, an analysis of inorganic sulfur compound oxidation was initiated in the chemolithoautotrophic extremophile Acidithiobacillus caldus. A. caldus is able to metabolize elemental sulfur and a broad range of inorganic sulfur compounds. It has been implicated in the production of environmentally damaging acidic solutions as well as participating in industrial bioleaching operations where it forms part of microbial consortia used for the recovery of metal ions. Based upon the recently published A. caldus type strain genome sequence, a bioinformatic reconstruction of elemental sulfur and inorganic sulfur compound metabolism predicted genes included: sulfide quinone reductase (sqr, tetrathionate hydrolase (tth, two sox gene clusters potentially involved in thiosulfate oxidation (soxABXYZ, sulfur oxygenase reductase (sor, and various electron transport components. RNA transcript profiles by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR suggested up-regulation of sox genes in the presence of tetrathionate. Extensive gel based proteomic comparisons of total soluble and membrane enriched protein fractions during growth on elemental sulfur and tetrathionate identified differential protein levels from the two Sox clusters as well as several chaperone and stress proteins up-regulated in the presence of elemental sulfur. Proteomics results also suggested the involvement of heterodisulfide reductase (HdrABC in A. caldus inorganic sulfur compound metabolism. A putative new function of Hdr in acidophiles is discussed. Additional proteomic analysis evaluated protein expression differences between cells grown attached to solid, elemental sulfur versus planktonic cells. This study has provided insights into sulfur metabolism of this acidophilic chemolithotroph and gene expression during attachment to solid elemental sulfur.

  17. Electricity generation from an inorganic sulfur compound containing mining wastewater by acidophilic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, Gaofeng; Christel, Stephan; Roman, Pawel; Wong, Zhen Lim; Bijmans, Martijn F.M.; Dopson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sulfide mineral processing often produces large quantities of wastewaters containing acid-generating inorganic sulfur compounds. If released untreated, these wastewaters can cause catastrophic environmental damage. In this study, microbial fuel cells were inoculated with acidophilic microorganism

  18. Bioalteration of synthetic Fe(III)-, Fe(II)-bearing basaltic glasses and Fe-free glass in the presence of the heterotrophic bacteria strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Impact of siderophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Anne; Rossano, Stéphanie; Trcera, Nicolas; Huguenot, David; Fourdrin, Chloé; Verney-Carron, Aurélie; van Hullebusch, Eric D.; Guyot, François

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of micro-organisms and their siderophores in the first steps of the alteration processes of basaltic glasses in aqueous media. In this regard, three different types of glasses - with or without iron, in the reduced Fe(II) or oxidized Fe(III) states - were prepared on the basis of a simplified basaltic glass composition. Control and Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated experiments were performed in a buffered (pH 6.5) nutrient depleted medium to stimulate the production of the pyoverdine siderophore. Results show that the presence of P. aeruginosa has an effect on the dissolution kinetics of all glasses as most of the calculated elemental release rates are increased compared to sterile conditions. Reciprocally, the composition of the glass in contact with P. aeruginosa has an impact on the bacterial growth and siderophore production. As an essential nutrient for this microbial strain, Fe notably appears to play a central role during biotic experiments. Its presence in the glass stimulates the bacterial growth and minimizes the synthesis of pyoverdine. Moreover the initial Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in the glasses modulates this synthesis, as pyoverdine is not detected at all in the system in contact with Fe(III)-bearing glass. Finally, the dissolution rates appear to be correlated to siderophore concentrations as they increase with respect to sterile experiments in the order Fe(III)-bearing glass < Fe(II)-bearing glass < Fe-free glass. This increase is attributed to complexation reactions between siderophores and Fe or Al for Fe(II)-bearing glass or Fe-free glass, respectively. The dissolution of an Fe-free glass is significantly improved in the presence of bacteria, as initial dissolution rates are increased by a factor of 3. This study attests to the essential role of siderophores in the P. aeruginosa-promoted dissolution processes of basaltic glasses as well as to the complex relationships between the nutritional potential of the glass and

  19. Culturing bias in marine heterotrophic flagellates analyzed through seawater enrichment incubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, Javier; Balagué, Vanessa; Forn, Irene; Lekunberri, Itziar; Massana, Ramon

    2013-10-01

    The diversity of heterotrophic flagellates is generally based on cultivated strains, on which ultrastructural, physiological, and molecular studies have been performed. However, the relevance of these cultured strains as models of the dominant heterotrophic flagellates in the marine planktonic environment is unclear. In fact, molecular surveys typically recover novel eukaryotic lineages that have refused cultivation so far. This study was designed to directly address the culturing bias in planktonic marine heterotrophic flagellates. Several microcosms were established adding increasing amounts and sources of organic matter to a confined natural microbial community pre-filtered by 3 μm. Growth dynamics were followed by epifluorescence microscopy and showed the expected higher yield of bacteria and heterotrophic flagellates at increased organic matter additions. Moreover, protist diversity analyzed by molecular tools showed a clear substitution in the community, which differed more and more from the initial sample as the organic matter increased. Within this gradient, there was also an increase of sequences related to cultured organisms as well as a decrease in diversity. Culturing bias is partly explained by the use of organic matter in the isolation process, which drives a shift in the community to conditions closer to laboratory cultures. An intensive culturing effort using alternative isolation methods is necessary to allow the access to the missing heterotrophic flagellates that constitute the abundant and active taxa in marine systems.

  20. Distribution of biomass of heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Distribution, variation and impact factors of biomass of bacterioplankton from April to May 1999in Bohai Sea were studied in DAPI method with epifluorescence microscopy. The biomass in surface waters showed a small day-night variation, varying from 0.13 to 2.51 μg/dm3 with an average of 0.84 μg/dm3. The biomass in bottom waters showed, however, a large variation, changing from 0.15 to 4.18 μg/dm3 with an average of 1.36 μg/dm3. The peak values occurred at 5 and 11 a.m. The bottom water biomass showed a significant correlation with particulate organic carbon (r=0.639, P<0.05). Heterotrophic bacterioplankton biomass was high in nearshore waters and low in offshore areas with a high biomass zone around Huanghe (Yellow) River mouth,showing the same distribution of nutrients. In vertical distribution, heterotrophic bacteria biomass in bottom waters was higher than that in surface water.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of a New Heterotrophic Nitrifying Bacillus sp. Strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To characterize the heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria. Methods The bacteria were isolated from membrane bioreactor for treating synthetic wastewater using the method newly introduced in this study. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to validate the nonexistence of autotrophic ammonia oxidizers and nitrite oxidizers. Batch tests were carried out to investigate the capability of heterotrophic nitrification by the pure culture. Phylogenetic analysis of the pure culture was performed. Results A heterotrophic nitrifier, named Bacillus sp. LY, was newly isolated from the membrane bioreactor system in which the efficiency of TN removal was up to 80%. After 24-day, incubation, the removal efficiency of COD by Bacillus sp. LYwas 71.7%. The ammonium nitrogen removal rate after assimilation nearly ceased by Bacillus sp. LYwas 74.7%.The phylogenetic tree of Bacillus sp. LY and the neighbouring nitrifiers were given. Conclusions The batch test results indicate that Bacillus sp. LY can utilize the organic carbon as the source of assimilation when it grows on glucose and ammonium chloride medium accompanying the formation of oxidized-nitrogen. It also can denitrify nitrate while nitrifying. Bacillus sp. LY may become a new bacterial resource for heterotrophic nitrification and play a bioremediation role in nutrient removal.

  2. Role of Heterotrophic Bacteria in Marine Ecological Processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.

    that ubiquitous and self-regulating microbial communities provided the foundation to our understanding on the processes in marine food-web (Landry, 2001). Heterotrophy in the Marine Environment Marine heterotrophy involving all animals and many microbes is a..., distribution, production and, their involvement in nutrient cycling and how they are at the base of microbial food web is essential. Following phytoplankton blooms, the aggregation and sinking flux of organic matter (Takahashi, 1986; Bodungen et al., 1986...

  3. Genetic and metabolic variability in autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decicco, B. T.

    1972-01-01

    The studies to evaluate an organism's ability to maintain normal physiological activities over a long period of time in a bioregenerative system are presented. Studies reviewed include: heat tolerant mutants of Pseudomonas fluoresceins, virulence factors of the Staphylococci, and the effect of mutations on the virulence for man in common and ubiquitous microorganisms.

  4. Fish waste management by conversion into heterotrophic bacteria biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, O.

    2006-01-01

    Just as all other types of animal production, aquaculture produces waste. This waste can be managed outside the production system, comparable to terrestrial husbandry systems. However, particularly recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS) are suited to manage waste within the system. In this case, pr

  5. Metal resistance or tolerance? Acidophiles confront high metal loads via both abiotic and biotic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eDopson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available All metals are toxic at high concentrations and consequently their intracellular concentrations must be regulated. Acidophilic microorganisms have an optimum growth pH < 3 and proliferate in natural and anthropogenic low pH environments. Some acidophiles are involved in the catalysis of sulfide mineral dissolution, resulting in high concentrations of metals in solution. Acidophiles are often described as highly metal resistant via mechanisms such as multiple and/or more efficient active resistance systems than are present in neutrophiles. However, this is not the case for all acidophiles and we contend that their growth in high metal concentrations is partially due to an intrinsic tolerance as a consequence of the environment in which they live. In this perspective, we highlight metal tolerance via complexation of free metals by sulfate ions and passive tolerance to metal influx via an internal positive cytoplasmic transmembrane potential. These tolerance mechanisms have been largely ignored in past studies of acidophile growth in the presence of metals and should be taken into account.

  6. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of heterotrophic nitrobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Jun-feng; MA Fang; GUO Jing-bo; HOU Ning; GAO Shan-shan; WANG Hong-yu

    2008-01-01

    A method about the isolation of heterotrophic nitrosebactria and the characteristics of heterotrophic nitrosobaetria were studied, it can be seen from the fluorescence in situ hybridization results of the bio-mem-brahe sample from the bio-ceramic reactor, the spots of green nitrosobacteria are obviously more than those of orange nitrohaeteria. Two heterotrophic nitrohacteria were isolated from the bio-ceramic reactor. By sequencing 16SrDNA and establishing the phylogenic tree, they were identified physiologically and biochemically as Pseudomonas sp.. After 12 d, the COD removal efficiency of wgy55 and wgy68 were 45.03% and 50.85% , the NH4-N removal efficiency of them were 80.12% and 85.93%, and the TN removal efficiency of them were 69.71% and 64.7%. The final concentration of NO2-N of wgy55 and wgy68 was 0.753 mg/L and 0.601 mg/ L, and that of NO3-N was 3.21 mg/L and 3.38 mg/L. These results show that wgy55 and wgy68 have the ca-pability of nitrification and they are heterotrophic nitrobacteria.

  7. Bacterial pollution, activity and heterotrophic diversity of the northern part of the Aegean Sea, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiftçi Türetken, Pelin S; Altuğ, Gülşen

    2016-02-01

    Isolation and characterization studies of marine heterotrophic bacteria are important to describe and understand eco-metobolism of the marine environments. In this study, diversity and community structures of the culturable heterotrophic bacteria, metabollicaly active bacteria and bacterial pollution in the coastal and offshore areas of Gökçeada Island, in the Northern Aegean Sea, Turkey were investigated from March 2012 to November 2013. The primary hydrographic parameters were recorded in situ. The frequency of the metabolically active bacteria was determined by using a modified staining technique. The indicator bacteria were determined by using membrane filtration technique; 126 bacteria isolates, 24 of them first records for this region, were identified using an automated micro-identification system, VITEK2 Compact30. The results showed that detected bacterial community profiles were significantly different when compared with previous studies conducted in polluted marine areas of Turkey. High frequency of faecal bacteria detected at station 2 indicated that increasing human activities and terrestrial pollution sources are shaping factors for possible risks, regarding recreational uses of this region, in the summer seasons.

  8. A novel acidophile community populating waste ore deposits at an acid mine drainage site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Chun-bo; ZHANG Hong-xun; BAI Zhi-hui; HU Qing; ZHANG Bao-guo

    2007-01-01

    Waste ore samples (pH 3.0) were collected at an acid mine drainage site in Anhui, China. The present acidophilic microbial community in the waste ore was studied with 16S rRNA gene clone library and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Eighteen different clones were identified and affiliated with Actinobacteria, low G + C Gram-positives, Thermomicrobia, Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Candidate division TM7, and Planctomycetes. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a diversity of acidophiles in the samples that were mostly novel. It is unexpected that the moderately thermophilic acidophiles were abundant in the acidic ecosystem and may play a great role in the generation of AMD. The result of DGGE was consistent with that of clone library analysis. These findings help in the better understanding of the generation mechanism of AMD and in developing a more efficient method to control AMD.

  9. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles from two acidophilic strains of Pilimelia columellifera subsp. pallida and their antibacterial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golińska, Patrycja; Wypij, Magdalena; Rathod, Dnyaneshwar; Tikar, Sagar; Dahm, Hanna; Rai, Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is an eco-friendly approach by using different biological sources; for example, plants and microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, and actinobacteria. In this report, we present the biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by acidophilic actinomycetes SL19 and SL24 strains isolated from pine forest soil (pH tracking analysis (NTA), Zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). FTIR analysis revealed the presence of proteins as a capping agent. TEM analysis confirmed the formation of spherical and polydispersed NPs of 12.7 and 15.9 nm sizes. The in vitro antibacterial activity of AgNPs alone and in combination with antibiotics was evaluated against clinical bacteria viz., Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and uropathogens such as Enterobacter, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and E. coli. The lowest MIC (40 μg ml(-1) ) was demonstrated by AgNPs synthesized from SL24 against E. coli. However, the AgNPs of SL19 showed lowest MIC (70 μg ml(-1) ) against S. aureus. The activity of antibiotic was enhanced, when tested in combination with silver nanoparticles synthesized from both actinobacterial strains.

  10. Thermo-acidophillic biohydrogen production from rice bran de-oiled wastewater by Selectively enriched mixed culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishna, D.; Sreekanth, D.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally Hyderabad-500 085 (India); Narasu, M. Lakshmi [Centre for Biotechnology, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally Hyderabad-500 085 (India)

    2010-07-01

    The present study focuses on the biohydrogen production in an anaerobic batch reactor operated at thermophillic (570C) and acidophilic conditions (pH 6) with rice bran de-oiled wastewater (RBOW) as substrate. The hydrogen generating mixed microflora was enriched from slaughter house sludge (SHS) through acid treatment (pH 3-4, for 24h) coupled with heat treatment (1h at 1000C) to eliminate non-spore forming bacteria and to inhibit the growth of methanogenic bacteria (MB) prior to inoculation in the reactor. The hydrogen production rate was maximum at 570C (1861 +- 14ml/L-WW/d) compared to 370C (651 +- 30ml/L-ww/d). The Hydrogen yield increased with temperature from 1.1 to 2.2 molH2/mol of substrate respectively. The optimum pH range for hydrogen production in this system was observed in between 5.5 to 6. Acid-forming pathway with butyric acid as a major metabolite dominated the metabolic flow during the hydrogen production.

  11. Thermo-acidophillic biohydrogen production from rice bran de-oiled wastewater by Selectively enriched mixed culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Sivaramakrishna, D.Sreekanth, V.Himabindu, M.Lakshmi Narasu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the biohydrogen production in an anaerobic batch reactor operated at thermophillic (570C and acidophilic conditions (pH 6 with rice bran de-oiled wastewater (RBOW as substrate. The hydrogen generating mixed microflora was enriched from slaughter house sludge (SHS through acid treatment (pH 3-4, for 24h coupled with heat treatment (1h at 1000C to eliminate non-spore forming bacteria and to inhibit the growth of methanogenic bacteria (MB prior to inoculation in the reactor. The hydrogen production rate was maximum at 570C (1861±14ml/L-WW/d compared to 370C (651±30ml/L-ww/d. The Hydrogen yield increased with temperature from 1.1 to 2.2 molH2/mol of substrate respectively. The optimum pH range for hydrogen production in this system was observed in between 5.5 to 6. Acid-forming pathway with butyric acid as a major metabolite dominated the metabolic flow during the hydrogen production.

  12. Subglacial Lake Vostok (Antarctica accretion ice contains a diverse set of sequences from aquatic, marine and sediment-inhabiting bacteria and eukarya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury M Shtarkman

    Full Text Available Lake Vostok, the 7(th largest (by volume and 4(th deepest lake on Earth, is covered by more than 3,700 m of ice, making it the largest subglacial lake known. The combination of cold, heat (from possible hydrothermal activity, pressure (from the overriding glacier, limited nutrients and complete darkness presents extreme challenges to life. Here, we report metagenomic/metatranscriptomic sequence analyses from four accretion ice sections from the Vostok 5G ice core. Two sections accreted in the vicinity of an embayment on the southwestern end of the lake, and the other two represented part of the southern main basin. We obtained 3,507 unique gene sequences from concentrates of 500 ml of 0.22 µm-filtered accretion ice meltwater. Taxonomic classifications (to genus and/or species were possible for 1,623 of the sequences. Species determinations in combination with mRNA gene sequence results allowed deduction of the metabolic pathways represented in the accretion ice and, by extension, in the lake. Approximately 94% of the sequences were from Bacteria and 6% were from Eukarya. Only two sequences were from Archaea. In general, the taxa were similar to organisms previously described from lakes, brackish water, marine environments, soil, glaciers, ice, lake sediments, deep-sea sediments, deep-sea thermal vents, animals and plants. Sequences from aerobic, anaerobic, psychrophilic, thermophilic, halophilic, alkaliphilic, acidophilic, desiccation-resistant, autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms were present, including a number from multicellular eukaryotes.

  13. Heterotrophic bacterial production and metabolic balance during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wambeke, France; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Barani, Aude; Berthelot, Hugo; Moutin, Thierry; Rodier, Martine; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Bonnet, Sophie

    2016-06-01

    Studies investigating the fate of diazotrophs through the microbial food web are lacking, although N2 fixation can fuel up to 50 % of new production in some oligotrophic oceans. In particular, the role played by heterotrophic prokaryotes in this transfer is largely unknown. In the frame of the VAHINE (VAriability of vertical and tropHIc transfer of diazotroph derived N in the south wEst Pacific) experiment, three replicate large-volume (˜ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed for 23 days in the new Caledonia lagoon and were intentionally fertilized on day 4 with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate N2 fixation. We specifically examined relationships between heterotrophic bacterial production (BP) and N2 fixation or primary production, determined bacterial growth efficiency and established carbon budgets. BP was statistically higher during the second phase of the experiment (P2: days 15-23), when chlorophyll biomass started to increase compared to the first phase (P1: days 5-14). Phosphatase alkaline activity increased drastically during the second phase of the experiment, showing adaptations of microbial populations after utilization of the added DIP. Notably, among autotrophs, Synechococcus abundances increased during P2, possibly related to its capacity to assimilate leucine and to produce alkaline phosphatase. Bacterial growth efficiency based on the carbon budget (27-43 %), was notably higher than generally cited for oligotrophic environments and discussed in links with the presence of abundant species of bacteria expressing proteorhodopsin. The main fates of gross primary production (particulate + dissolved) were respiration (67 %) and export through sedimentation (17 %). BP was highly correlated with particulate primary production and chlorophyll biomass during both phases of the experiment but was slightly correlated, and only during P2 phase, with N2 fixation rates. Heterotrophic bacterial production was strongly stimulated after mineral N enrichment

  14. Effects of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    . The culturable heterotrophic diversity was investigated by colony morphology and colony appearance on solid LB medium. Functional diversity was analysed as sole carbon utilisation patterns in ECOplates. Genetic diversity was measured as bands on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGCE) gels obtained...... analysed by Shannon-Weaver indices, functional diversity was found to increase almost immediately after mercury addition and to remain at a level higher than the control soil for the rest of the experiment. The fraction of culturable heterotrophic bacteria increased from 1% to 10% of the total bacterial...

  15. Enhanced Productivity of a Lutein-Enriched Novel Acidophile Microalga Grown on Urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vilchez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coccomyxa acidophila is an extremophile eukaryotic microalga isolated from the Tinto River mining area in Huelva, Spain. Coccomyxa acidophila accumulates relevant amounts of b-carotene and lutein, well-known carotenoids with many biotechnological applications, especially in food and health-related industries. The acidic culture medium (pH < 2.5 that prevents outdoor cultivation from non-desired microorganism growth is one of the main advantages of acidophile microalgae production. Conversely, acidophile microalgae growth rates are usually very low compared to common microalgae growth rates. In this work, we show that mixotrophic cultivation on urea efficiently enhances growth and productivity of an acidophile microalga up to typical values for common microalgae, therefore approaching acidophile algal production towards suitable conditions for feasible outdoor production. Algal productivity and potential for carotenoid accumulation were analyzed as a function of the nitrogen source supplied. Several nitrogen conditions were assayed: nitrogen starvation, nitrate and/or nitrite, ammonia and urea. Among them, urea clearly led to the best cell growth (~4 ´ 108 cells/mL at the end of log phase. Ammonium led to the maximum chlorophyll and carotenoid content per volume unit (220 mg·mL-1 and 35 mg·mL-1, respectively. Interestingly, no significant differences in growth rates were found in cultures grown on urea as C and N source, with respect to those cultures grown on nitrate and CO2 as nitrogen and carbon sources (control cultures. Lutein accumulated up to 3.55 mg·g-1 in the mixotrophic cultures grown on urea. In addition, algal growth in a shaded culture revealed the first evidence for an active xanthophylls cycle operative in acidophile microalgae.

  16. Rapid methods for detection of bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Andersen, B.Ø.; Miller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional methods for detection of bacteria in drinking water e.g. Heterotrophic Plate Counts (HPC) or Most Probable Number (MNP) take 48-72 hours to give the result. New rapid methods for detection of bacteria are needed to protect the consumers against contaminations. Two rapid methods...

  17. Jania rubens-associated bacteria: molecular identification and antimicrobial activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail-Ben Ali, A.; El Bour, M.; Ktari, L.; Bolhuis, H.; Ahmed, M.; Boudabbous, A.; Stal, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Marine macroalgae surfaces constitute suitable substrata for bacterial colonization which are known to produce bioactive compounds. Thus, hereby we focused on heterotrophic aerobic bacteria species associated with coralline red alga Jania rubens (northern coast of Tunisia, southern Mediterranean Sea

  18. Heterotrophic and autotrophic microbial populations in cold perennial springs of the high arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Nancy N; Greer, Charles W; Andersen, Dale T; Tille, Stefanie; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Whyte, Lyle G

    2008-11-01

    The saline springs of Gypsum Hill in the Canadian high Arctic are a rare example of cold springs originating from deep groundwater and rising to the surface through thick permafrost. The heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (up to 40% of the total microbial community) isolated from the spring waters and sediments were classified into four phyla (Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria) based on 16S rRNA gene analysis; heterotrophic isolates were primarily psychrotolerant, salt-tolerant, facultative anaerobes. Some of the isolates contained genes for thiosulfate oxidation (soxB) and anoxygenic photosynthesis (pufM), possibly enabling the strains to better compete in these sulfur-rich environments subject to long periods of illumination in the Arctic summer. Although leucine uptake by the spring water microbial community was low, CO(2) uptake was relatively high under dark incubation, reinforcing the idea that primary production by chemoautotrophs is an important process in the springs. The small amounts of hydrocarbons in gases exsolving from the springs (0.38 to 0.51% CH(4)) were compositionally and isotopically consistent with microbial methanogenesis and possible methanotrophy. Anaerobic heterotrophic sulfur oxidation and aerobic autotrophic sulfur oxidation activities were demonstrated in sediment slurries. Overall, our results describe an active microbial community capable of sustainability in an extreme environment that experiences prolonged periods of continuous light or darkness, low temperatures, and moderate salinity, where life seems to rely on chemolithoautotrophy.

  19. Metabolites Associated with Adaptation of Microorganisms to an Acidophilic, Metal-Rich Environment Identified by Stable-Isotope-Enabled Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Annika C.; Justice, Nicholas B.; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Baran, Richard; Thomas, Brian C.; Northen, Trent R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microorganisms grow under a remarkable range of extreme conditions. Environmental transcriptomic and proteomic studies have highlighted metabolic pathways active in extremophilic communities. However, metabolites directly linked to their physiology are less well defined because metabolomics methods lag behind other omics technologies due to a wide range of experimental complexities often associated with the environmental matrix. We identified key metabolites associated with acidophilic and metal-tolerant microorganisms using stable isotope labeling coupled with untargeted, high-resolution mass spectrometry. We observed >3,500 metabolic features in biofilms growing in pH ~0.9 acid mine drainage solutions containing millimolar concentrations of iron, sulfate, zinc, copper, and arsenic. Stable isotope labeling improved chemical formula prediction by >50% for larger metabolites (>250 atomic mass units), many of which were unrepresented in metabolic databases and may represent novel compounds. Taurine and hydroxyectoine were identified and likely provide protection from osmotic stress in the biofilms. Community genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data implicate fungi in taurine metabolism. Leptospirillum group II bacteria decrease production of ectoine and hydroxyectoine as biofilms mature, suggesting that biofilm structure provides some resistance to high metal and proton concentrations. The combination of taurine, ectoine, and hydroxyectoine may also constitute a sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon currency in the communities. PMID:23481603

  20. Sorption of ferrous iron by EPS from the acidophilic bacterium Acidiphilium Sp.: A mechanism proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapia, Jaime M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to assess the uptake of Fe(II by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS from the acidophilic bacterium Acidiphillium 3.2Sup(5. These EPS were extracted using EDTA. EPS of A. 3.2Sup(5 loaded in sorption tests with Fe(II, were characterized using the following experimental techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The experimental results indicate that EPS adsorb ferrous iron according to Freundlich model with a metal sorption uptake of K = 1.14 mg1-1/n L1/n g-1 and a sorption intensity of 1/n = 1.26. In addition, ferrous iron sorption by EPS took place by preferential interaction with the carboxyl group which promotes the formation of ferrous iron oxalates (FeC2O4. Since the interaction reaction was reversible (Log K = 0.77 ± 0.33, that means that the cation sorption can be reversed at convenience.El objetivo de este trabajo fue estudiar la absorción de Fe(II por Sustancias Poliméricas Extracelulares (SPE provenientes de la bacteria acidófila Acidiphilium 3.2Sup(5. Las SPE fueron extraídas usando EDTA. SPE de A. 3.2Sup(5 cargadas con Fe(II fueron caracterizadas usando las siguientes técnicas experimentales: microscopia electrónica de barrido (MEB con microanálisis de energía dispersiva de rayos X (EDX, difracción de rayos X (DRX, y espectroscopía infrarojo (IR con transformada de Fourier (EIRTF. Los resultados muestran que las SPE absorben Fe(II según el modelo de Freundlich con un coeficiente de sorción K = 1,14 mg1-1/n g-1 e intensidad 1/n = 1,26. La captación de Fe(II por las SPE ocurre a través de la formación de oxalatos de hierro (FeC2O4, a través de una reacción reversible (Log K = 0,77 ± 0,33, lo cual implica que el hierro captado podría recuperarse si fuera de interés.

  1. [Bacteria ecology in planting-culturing system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fenglian; Xia, Beicheng; Dai, Xin; Chen, Guizhu

    2004-06-01

    Planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone is a new type eco-culturing model. The survey on bacteria biomass and water quality in the designed planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone showed that the mangrove planted in the system improved water quality and made water quality to II-III type, better than the IV and V type in the control pond. Designed ponds made heterotrophic bacteria, vibrio, phosphorus bacteria and enzyme-producing bacteria populations 1-2 order lower than the control pond without mongrove planting. Correlation analyses with CORREL software showed that the biomass of these bacteria was positively related with the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in water of the system, and the correlation coefficient for heterogeneous bacteria and vibrio was up to 0.9205. Heterotrophic bacteria and vibrio could be used as the water-quality monitoring organisms.

  2. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  3. A Description of an Acidophilic, Iron Reducer, Geobacter sp. FeAm09 Isolated from Tropical Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, O.; Souchek, J.; Heithoff, A.; LaMere, B.; Pan, D.; Hollis, G.; Yang, W. H.; Silver, W. L.; Weber, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and plays a significant role controlling the geochemistry in soils, sediments, and aquatic systems. As part of a study to understand microbially-catalysed iron biogeochemical cycling in tropical soils, an iron reducing isolate, strain FeAm09, was obtained. Strain FeAm09 was isolated from acidic, Fe-rich soils collected from a tropical forest (Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico). Strain FeAm09 is a rod-shaped, motile, Gram-negative bacterium. Taxonomic analysis of the near complete 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain FeAm09 is 94.7% similar to Geobacter lovleyi, placing it in the genus Geobacter within the Family Geobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. Characterization of the optimal growth conditions revealed that strain FeAm09 is a moderate acidophile with an optimal growth pH of 5.0. The optimal growth temperature was 37°C. Growth of FeAm09 was coupled to the reduction of soluble Fe(III), Fe(III)-NTA, with H2, fumarate, ethanol, and various organic acids and sugars serving as the electron donor. Insoluble Fe(III), in the form of synthetic ferrihydrite, was reduced by strain FeAm09 using acetate or H2 as the electron donor. The use of H2 as an electron donor in the presence of CO2 and absence of organic carbon and assimilation of 14C-labelled CO2 into biomass indicate that strain FeAm09 is an autotrophic Fe(III)-reducing bacterium. Together, these data describe the first acidophilic, autotrophic Geobacter species. Iron reducing bacteria were previously shown to be as abundant in tropical soils as in saturated sediments (lake-bottoms) and saturated soils (wetlands) where Fe(III) reduction is more commonly recognized as a dominant mode of microbial respiration. Furthermore, Fe(III) reduction was identified as a primary driver of carbon mineralization in these tropical soils (Dubinsky et al. 2010). In addition to mineralizing organic carbon, Geobacter sp. FeAm09 is likely to also

  4. Effects of carbon source on nitrogen removal of heterotrophic nitrifying and aerobic denitrifying bacteria strain qy37%包埋异养硝化好氧反硝化菌株qy37脱氮效果的碳源选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张培玉; 张晨; 孙梦; 吴玉光

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned about the influence of the carbon source on the nitrogen removing rate in case of the heterotrophic nitrifying and aerobic denitrifying bacteria strain qy37. As is known, carbon source and its concentration may have significant effects on the bio-denitrification process. To solve the problem of low nitrogen removing rate due to the shortage of organic carbon, we have made thorough revision of the advances made in the world in recent years and explored the related mechanisms and factors affecting denitrifica-tion along with the analysis of the carbon source choice. Furthermore, we have conducted experiments in testing the potential of immobilized denitrifier of a strain coded as qy37 so as to reduce the nitrate at the presence of five different carbon sources, namely, lactose, sodium citrate, soluble starch, cane sugar and glucose. According to the features of carbon source and the potential influence on the water denitri-fication, we have chosen soluble starch as an available plant carbon source. The results of our study show the order of the nitrogen removal rate turns to be as follows: soluble starch > glucose > cane sugar > sodium citrate > lactose, of which soluble starch comes first. It has also been found that nitrogen removal rate can be made as high as above 85% . Right amount of soluble starch added helps to improve the removing rate while enhancing the mechanical strength of sodium alga acid and PVA ball, reducing the adsorption of PVA and water swelling simultaneously. Besides, the most appropriate concentration of the nitrogen removal has been found by changing different concentrations of the carbon source, for example, concentrations of 3 g/L, 5 g/L, 8 g/L, 10 g/L with soluble starch as carbon source. The results of our study indicate that the optimal concentration of carbon sources should be 8 g/L. Besides, we have also studied the method of embedding carbon source, that is, the denitrification rate by embedding carbon

  5. Functional genomics of the thermo-acidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oost, van der J.; Walther, J.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Werken, van de H.J.G.; Snijders, A.P.L.; Wright, P.C.; Andersson, A.; Bernander, R.; Vos, de W.M.

    2006-01-01

    Archaea and bacteria that optimally grow at temperatures above 60C and 80C are referred to as thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, respectively (Stetter, 1996). Since their discovery in the late 1960s (Brock and Freeze, 1969), attempts were made to reveal the secrets of the thermal resistance of thes

  6. Characterization of the bacteria adsorption on many carbon supports in the framework of an electro-chemical reactor for metallic de-pollution; Caracterisation de l'adsorption de bacteries sur differents supports carbones en vue de la conception d'un reacteur electrochimique de depollution metallique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerino, F.J.; Magnin, J.P.; Gondrexon, N.; Oeil, P. [Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, Lab. d' Electrochimie et de Physicochimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, UMR 5631, 38 - Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2001-07-01

    The bacteria adsorption (acidophilic bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans), on three tested carbon tissues, is governed by the Freundlich sorption model. The sorption equilibrium is quickly established at pH 1,4 in 10-15 minutes. The adsorption capacities of the tissues are function of the bacteria and the used carbon tissue. (A.L.B.)

  7. Heterotrophic potential of Atribacteria from deep marine Antarctic sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, S. A.; Orcutt, B.; Mandernack, K. W.; Spear, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria belonging to the newly classified candidate phylum "Atribacteria" (formerly referred to as "OP9" and "JS1") are common in anoxic methane-rich sediments. However, the metabolic functions and biogeochemical role of these microorganisms in the subsurface remains unrealized due to the lack of pure culture representatives. This study observed a steady increase of Atribacteria-related sequences with increasing sediment depth throughout the methane-rich zone of the Adélie Basin, Antarctica (according to a 16S rRNA gene survey). To explore the functional potential of Atribacteria in this basin, samples from various depths (14, 25 and 97 meters below seafloor), were subjected to metagenomic sequencing. Additionally, individual cells were separated from frozen, unpreserved sediment for whole genome amplification. The successful isolation and sequencing of a single-amplified Atribacteria genome from these unpreserved sediments demonstrates a future use of single cell techniques with previously collected and frozen sediments. Our resulting single-cell amplified genome, combined with metagenomic interpretations, provides our first insights to the functional potential of Atribacteria in deep subsurface settings. As observed for non-marine Atribacteria, genomic analyses suggest a heterotrophic metabolism, with Atribacteria potentially producing fermentation products such as acetate, ethanol and CO2. These products may in turn support methanogens within the sediment microbial community and explain the frequent occurrence of Atribacteria in anoxic methane-rich sediments.

  8. An approach to measure ciliate grazing on living heterotrophic nanoflagellates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, K.; González, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    . Here we present an approach for the assessment of ciliate grazing on living heterotrophic nanoflagellates. Stationary phase cultures of a heterotrophic nanoflagellate (Cafeteria sp.) were live-stained by allowing them to take up fluorescently labelled macromolecules. Controls revealed that this label...

  9. Genome Analysis of the Biotechnologically Relevant Acidophilic Iron Oxidising Strain JA12 Indicates Phylogenetic and Metabolic Diversity within the Novel Genus “Ferrovum”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sophie R.; Poehlein, Anja; Tischler, Judith S.; González, Carolina; Ossandon, Francisco J.; Daniel, Rolf; Holmes, David S.; Schlömann, Michael; Mühling, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Members of the genus “Ferrovum” are ubiquitously distributed in acid mine drainage (AMD) waters which are characterised by their high metal and sulfate loads. So far isolation and microbiological characterisation have only been successful for the designated type strain “Ferrovum myxofaciens” P3G. Thus, knowledge about physiological characteristics and the phylogeny of the genus “Ferrovum” is extremely scarce. Objective In order to access the wider genetic pool of the genus “Ferrovum” we sequenced the genome of a “Ferrovum”-containing mixed culture and successfully assembled the almost complete genome sequence of the novel “Ferrovum” strain JA12. Phylogeny and Lifestyle The genome-based phylogenetic analysis indicates that strain JA12 and the type strain represent two distinct “Ferrovum” species. “Ferrovum” strain JA12 is characterised by an unusually small genome in comparison to the type strain and other iron oxidising bacteria. The prediction of nutrient assimilation pathways suggests that “Ferrovum” strain JA12 maintains a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle utilising carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, ammonium and urea, sulfate, phosphate and ferrous iron as carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorous and energy sources, respectively. Unique Metabolic Features The potential utilisation of urea by “Ferrovum” strain JA12 is moreover remarkable since it may furthermore represent a strategy among extreme acidophiles to cope with the acidic environment. Unlike other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs “Ferrovum” strain JA12 exhibits a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle, a metabolic feature shared with the closer related neutrophilic iron oxidisers among the Betaproteobacteria including Sideroxydans lithotrophicus and Thiobacillus denitrificans. Furthermore, the absence of characteristic redox proteins involved in iron oxidation in the well-studied acidophiles Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (rusticyanin) and Acidithiobacillus

  10. Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by the marine origin bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ADN-42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Tianqi; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Huang, Jianyu; Wang, Aijie

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the existence of some bacteria that are capable of performing heterotrophic nitrification and have a phenomenal ability to denitrify their nitrification products under aerobic conditions. A high-salinity-tolerant strain ADN-42 was isolated from Hymeniacidon perleve and found to display high heterotrophic ammonium removal capability. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp. via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Gene cloning and sequencing analysis indicated that the bacterial genome contains N2O reductase function (nosZ) gene. NH3-N removal rate of ADN-42 was very high. And the highest removal rate was 6.52 mg/L · h in the presence of 40 g/L NaCl. Under the condition of pure oxygen (DO >8 mg/L), NH3-N removal efficiency was 56.9 %. Moreover, 38.4 % of oxygen remained in the upper gas space during 72 h without greenhouse gas N2O production. Keeping continuous and low level of dissolved oxygen (DO <3 mg/L) was helpful for better denitrification performance. All these results indicated that the strain has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, which guarantee future application in wastewater treatment.

  11. Significant N₂ fixation by heterotrophs, photoheterotrophs and heterocystous cyanobacteria in two temperate estuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Traving, Sachia J; Mantikci, Mustafa; Knudsen-Leerbeck, Helle; Hansen, Jørgen L S; Markager, Stiig; Riemann, Lasse

    2015-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation is fueling planktonic production in a multitude of aquatic environments. In meso- and poly-haline estuaries, however, the contribution of N by pelagic N₂ fixation is believed to be insignificant due to the high input of N from land and the presumed absence of active N₂-fixing organisms. Here we report N₂ fixation rates, nifH gene composition and nifH gene transcript abundance for key diazotrophic groups over 1 year in two contrasting, temperate, estuarine systems: Roskilde Fjord (RF) and the Great Belt (GB) strait. Annual pelagic N₂ fixation rates averaged 17 and 61 mmol N m(-2) per year at the two sites, respectively. In RF, N₂ fixation was mainly accompanied by transcripts related to heterotrophic (for example, Pseudomonas sp.) and photoheterotrophic bacteria (for example, unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria group A). In the GB, the first of two N₂ fixation peaks coincided with a similar nifH-expressing community as in RF, whereas the second peak was synchronous with increased nifH expression by an array of diazotrophs, including heterotrophic organisms as well as the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena. Thus, we show for the first time that significant planktonic N₂ fixation takes place in mesohaline, temperate estuaries and that the importance of heterotrophic, photoheterotrophic and photosynthetic diazotrophs is clearly variable in space and time.

  12. Genomic analysis reveals versatile heterotrophic capacity of a potentially symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium in sponge

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Renmao

    2014-08-29

    Sulfur-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) play essential roles in marine sponges. However, the detailed characteristics and physiology of the bacteria are largely unknown. Here, we present and analyse the first genome of sponge-associated SOB using a recently developed metagenomic binning strategy. The loss of transposase and virulence-associated genes and the maintenance of the ancient polyphosphate glucokinase gene suggested a stabilized SOB genome that might have coevolved with the ancient host during establishment of their association. Exclusive distribution in sponge, bacterial detoxification for the host (sulfide oxidation) and the enrichment for symbiotic characteristics (genes-encoding ankyrin) in the SOB genome supported the bacterial role as an intercellular symbiont. Despite possessing complete autotrophic sulfur oxidation pathways, the bacterium developed a much more versatile capacity for carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, in comparison with its closest relatives (Thioalkalivibrio) and to other representative autotrophs from the same order (Chromatiales). The ability to perform both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism likely results from the unstable supply of reduced sulfur in the sponge and is considered critical for the sponge-SOB consortium. Our study provides insights into SOB of sponge-specific clade with thioautotrophic and versatile heterotrophic metabolism relevant to its roles in the micro-environment of the sponge body. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Genomic analysis reveals versatile heterotrophic capacity of a potentially symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium in sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ren-Mao; Wang, Yong; Bougouffa, Salim; Gao, Zhao-Ming; Cai, Lin; Bajic, Vladimir; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Sulfur-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) play essential roles in marine sponges. However, the detailed characteristics and physiology of the bacteria are largely unknown. Here, we present and analyse the first genome of sponge-associated SOB using a recently developed metagenomic binning strategy. The loss of transposase and virulence-associated genes and the maintenance of the ancient polyphosphate glucokinase gene suggested a stabilized SOB genome that might have coevolved with the ancient host during establishment of their association. Exclusive distribution in sponge, bacterial detoxification for the host (sulfide oxidation) and the enrichment for symbiotic characteristics (genes-encoding ankyrin) in the SOB genome supported the bacterial role as an intercellular symbiont. Despite possessing complete autotrophic sulfur oxidation pathways, the bacterium developed a much more versatile capacity for carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, in comparison with its closest relatives (Thioalkalivibrio) and to other representative autotrophs from the same order (Chromatiales). The ability to perform both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism likely results from the unstable supply of reduced sulfur in the sponge and is considered critical for the sponge-SOB consortium. Our study provides insights into SOB of sponge-specific clade with thioautotrophic and versatile heterotrophic metabolism relevant to its roles in the micro-environment of the sponge body.

  14. C isotope fractionation during heterotrophic activity driven carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation induced by environmentally enriched heterotrophic halophilic microorganims was experimentally investigated under various salinity (% 4.5, %8, %15) conditions at 30 °C. Halophilic heterotrophic microorganims were enriched from a hypersaline Lake Acigöl located in SW Turkey (Balci et al.,2015) and later used for the precipitation experiments (solid and liquid medium). The carbonate precipitates had relatively high δ13C values (-4.3 to -16.9 ‰) compared to the δ13C values of the organic compounds that ranged from -27.5 to -25.4 ‰. At salinity of 4.5 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -4.9 ‰ to -10.9 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +20 to +16 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC (-27.5) . At salinity 8 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -16.3 ‰ to -11.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of+11.3 to+15.9 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The respected values for 15 % salinity ranged from -12.3 ‰ to -9.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +15.2 to+16.8 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The carbonate precipitates produced in the solid medium are more enriched in 13C relative to liquid culture experiments. These results suggest that the carbon in the solid was derived from both the bacterial oxidation of organic compounds in the medium and from the atmospheric CO2. A solid medium used in the experiments may have suppressed convective and advective mass transport favouring diffusion-controlled system. This determination suggests that the rate and equilibration of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere is the major control on C isotope composition of carbonate minerals precipitated in the experiments. Key words: Lake Acıgöl, halophilic bacteria, carbonate biomineralization, C isotopes References Nurgul Balci, Meryem Menekşe, Nevin Gül Karagüler, M. Şeref Sönmez,Patrick Meister 2015.Reproducing authigenic carbonate

  15. Proteogenomic and functional analysis of chromate reduction in Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5, an Fe(III)-respiring acidophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Timothy S; Swenson, Michael W; Paszczynski, Andrzej J; Deobald, Lee A; Kerk, David; Cummings, David E

    2010-12-01

    Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5, an acidophilic iron-respiring Alphaproteobacterium, has the ability to reduce chromate under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, making it an intriguing and useful model organism for the study of extremophilic bacteria in bioremediation applications. Genome sequence annotation suggested two potential mechanisms of Cr(VI) reduction, namely, a number of c-type cytochromes, and a predicted NADPH-dependent Cr(VI) reductase. In laboratory studies using pure cultures of JF-5, an NADPH-dependent chromate reductase activity was detected primarily in soluble protein fractions, and a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (ApcA) was also present, representing two potential means of Cr(VI) reduction. Upon further examination, it was determined that the NADPH-dependent activity was not specific for Cr(VI), and the predicted proteins were not detected in Cr(VI)-grown cultures. Proteomic data did show measureable amounts of ApcA in cells grown with Cr(VI). Purified ApcA is reducible by menadiol, and in turn can reduce Cr(VI), suggesting a means to obtain electrons from the respiratory chain and divert them to Cr(VI). Electrochemical measurements confirm that Cr reduction by ApcA is pH dependent, with low pH being favored. Homology modeling of ApcA and comparison to a known Cr(VI)-reducing c-type cytochrome structure revealed basic amino acids which could interact with chromate ion. From these studies, it can be concluded that A. cryptum has the physiologic and genomic capability to reduce Cr(VI) to the less toxic Cr(III). However, the expected chromate reductase mechanism may not be the primary means of Cr(VI) reduction in this organism.

  16. Heterotrophic denitrification of aquaculture effluent using fluidized sand biofilters

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability to consistently and cost-effectively reduce nitrate-nitrogen loads in effluent from recirculating aquaculture systems would enhance the industry's environmental stewardship and allow improved facility proximity to large markets in sensitive watersheds. Heterotrophic denitrification techn...

  17. Life at acidic pH imposes an increased energetic cost for a eukaryotic acidophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Mark A; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Zettler, Erik; Jung, Sung-Kwon; Smith, Peter J S; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2005-07-01

    Organisms growing in acidic environments, pHpH. We begin to investigate this premise by determining the magnitude of the transmembrane electrochemical H+ gradient in an acidophilic Chlamydomonas sp. (ATCC PRA-125) isolated from the Rio Tinto, a heavy metal laden, acidic river (pH 1.7-2.5). This acidophile grows most rapidly at pH 2 but is capable of growth over a wide pH range (1.5-7.0), while Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is restricted to growth at pH>or=3 with optimal growth between pH 5.5 and 8.5. With the fluorescent H+ indicator, 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), we show that the acidophilic Chlamydomonas maintains an average cytosolic pH of 6.6 in culture medium at both pH 2 and pH 7 while Chlamydomonas reinhardtii maintains an average cytosolic pH of 7.1 in pH 7 culture medium. The transmembrane electric potential difference of Chlamydomonas sp., measured using intracellular electrodes at both pH 2 and 7, is close to 0 mV, a rare value for plants, animals and protists. The 40,000-fold difference in [H+] could be the result of either active or passive mechanisms. Evidence for active maintenance was detected by monitoring the rate of ATP consumption. At the peak, cells consume about 7% more ATP per second in medium at pH 2 than at pH 7. This increased rate of consumption is sufficient to account for removal of H+ entering the cytosol across a membrane with relatively high permeability to H+ (7x10(-8) cm s-1). Our results indicate that the small increase in the rate of ATP consumption can account for maintenance of the transmembrane H+ gradient without the imposition of cell surface H+ barriers.

  18. Autotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics in a polluted tropical estuarine complex

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, Neelam; Ramaiah, N.; Chandramohan, D.; Nair, V.R.

    . Scheiwer et al. (1991) emphasized that microbial heterotrophic activity and primary production play very important roles in the formation and turnover of organic matter in eutrophic estuaries. 0272-7714/95/010045+ 11 $08.00/0 © 1995 Academic Press... production were invariably very low. The in situ heterotrophic activity, particularly in the southern region, appears to be adversely affected by the input of industrial effluents which may bring about metabolic stress and inhibit growth. We believe...

  19. [Preparation of Copper and Nickel from Metallurgical Waste Products with the Use of Acidophilic Chemolithotrophic Microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomchenko, N V; Murav'ev, M I

    2015-01-01

    The study concerns the leaching of copper, nickel, and cobalt from metallurgical production slag with trivalent iron sulphates prepared in the process of oxidation of bivalent iron ions with the use of associations of acidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganisms. At the same time, copper extraction in the solution reached 91.2%, nickel reached 74.9%, and cobalt reached 90.1%. Copper was extracted by cementation, and nickel as sulphate was extracted by electrolysis. Associations of microorganisms can then completely bioregenerate the solution obtained after leaching.

  20. Transfer of IncP Plasmids to Extremely Acidophilic Thiobacillus thiooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, S. M.; Yan, W. M.; Wang, Z. N.

    1992-01-01

    The broad-host-range IncP plasmids RP4, R68.45, RP1::Tn501, and and pUB307 were transferred directly to extremely acidophilic Thiobacillus thiooxidans from Escherichia coli by conjugation at frequencies of 10-5 to 10-7 per recipient. The ability of T. thiooxidans to receive and express the antibiotic resistance markers was examined. The plasmid RP4 was transferred back to E. coli from T. thiooxidans at a frequency of 1.0 × 10-3 per recipient.

  1. Transfer of IncP Plasmids to Extremely Acidophilic Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S M; Yan, W M; Wang, Z N

    1992-01-01

    The broad-host-range IncP plasmids RP4, R68.45, RP1::Tn501, and and pUB307 were transferred directly to extremely acidophilic Thiobacillus thiooxidans from Escherichia coli by conjugation at frequencies of 10 to 10 per recipient. The ability of T. thiooxidans to receive and express the antibiotic resistance markers was examined. The plasmid RP4 was transferred back to E. coli from T. thiooxidans at a frequency of 1.0 x 10 per recipient.

  2. Exploration and prediction of interactions between methanotrophs and heterotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michiel; Hoefman, Sven; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Boon, Nico; De Vos, Paul; De Baets, Bernard; Heylen, Kim; Waegeman, Willem

    2013-12-01

    Methanotrophs can form the basis of a methane-driven food web on which heterotrophic microorganisms can feed. In return, these heterotrophs can stimulate growth of methanotrophs in co-culture by providing growth additives. However, only a few specific interactions are currently known. We incubated nine methanotrophs with 25 heterotrophic strains in a pairwise miniaturized co-cultivation setup. Through principal component analysis and k-means clustering, methanotrophs and heterotrophs could be grouped according to their interaction behaviour, suggesting strain-dependent methanotroph-heterotroph complementarity. Co-cultivation significantly enhanced the growth parameters of three methanotrophs. This was most pronounced for Methylomonas sp. M5, with a threefold increase in maximum density and a fourfold increase in maximum increase in density in co-culture with Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG 19424. In contrast, co-cultivation with Methylobacterium radiotolerans LMG 2269 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa LMG 12228 inhibited growth of most methanotrophs. Functional genomic analysis suggested the importance of vitamin metabolism for co-cultivation success. The generated data set was then successfully exploited as a proof-of-principle for predictive modelling of co-culture responses based on other interactions of the same heterotrophs and methanotrophs, yielding values of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73 upon 50% missing values for the maximum increase in density parameter. As such, these modelling-based tools were shown to hold great promise in reducing the amount of data that needs to be generated when conducting large co-cultivation studies.

  3. Quantifying the structure of the mesopelagic microbial loop from observed depth profiles of bacteria and protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Thingstad

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available t is widely recognized that organic carbon exported to the ocean aphotic layer is significantly consumed by heterotrophic organisms such as bacteria and zooplankton in the mesopelagic layer. However, very little is known for the trophic link between bacteria and zooplankton or the structure of the microbial loop in this layer. In the northwestern Mediterranean, recent studies have shown that viruses, bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, and ciliates distribute down to 2000 m with group-specific depth-dependent decreases, and that bacterial production decreases with depth down to 1000 m. Here we show that such data can be analyzed using a simple steady-state food chain model to quantify the carbon flow from bacteria to zooplankton over the mesopelagic layer. The model indicates that a similar amount of bacterial production is allocated to viruses and heterotrophic nanoflagellates, and that heterotrophic nanoflagellates are the important remineralizers.

  4. Nitrate and sulfate reducers-retrievable number of bacteria and their activities in Indian waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    Culturable heterotrophic, nitrate reducing and sulfate reducing bacteria (HB, NRB and SRB) were enumerated from 25, 50, 100 and 200 m depths at 15 stations and their potential activities viz. Nitrate reducing (NRA) and Sulfate reducing (SRA) were...

  5. Complete genome sequence of the extremely acidophilic methanotroph isolate V4, Methylacidiphilum infernorum, a representative of the bacterial phylum Verrucomicrobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stott Matthew B

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Verrucomicrobia is a widespread but poorly characterized bacterial clade. Although cultivation-independent approaches detect representatives of this phylum in a wide range of environments, including soils, seawater, hot springs and human gastrointestinal tract, only few have been isolated in pure culture. We have recently reported cultivation and initial characterization of an extremely acidophilic methanotrophic member of the Verrucomicrobia, strain V4, isolated from the Hell's Gate geothermal area in New Zealand. Similar organisms were independently isolated from geothermal systems in Italy and Russia. Results We report the complete genome sequence of strain V4, the first one from a representative of the Verrucomicrobia. Isolate V4, initially named "Methylokorus infernorum" (and recently renamed Methylacidiphilum infernorum is an autotrophic bacterium with a streamlined genome of ~2.3 Mbp that encodes simple signal transduction pathways and has a limited potential for regulation of gene expression. Central metabolism of M. infernorum was reconstructed almost completely and revealed highly interconnected pathways of autotrophic central metabolism and modifications of C1-utilization pathways compared to other known methylotrophs. The M. infernorum genome does not encode tubulin, which was previously discovered in bacteria of the genus Prosthecobacter, or close homologs of any other signature eukaryotic proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal proteins and RNA polymerase subunits unequivocally supports grouping Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia and Chlamydiae into a single clade, the PVC superphylum, despite dramatically different gene content in members of these three groups. Comparative-genomic analysis suggests that evolution of the M. infernorum lineage involved extensive horizontal gene exchange with a variety of bacteria. The genome of M. infernorum shows apparent adaptations for existence under extremely

  6. Succession of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the microbial community on corroding concrete in sewer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Satoshi; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Ito, Tsukasa; Satoh, Hisashi

    2007-02-01

    Microbially induced concrete corrosion (MICC) in sewer systems has been a serious problem for a long time. A better understanding of the succession of microbial community members responsible for the production of sulfuric acid is essential for the efficient control of MICC. In this study, the succession of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the bacterial community on corroding concrete in a sewer system in situ was investigated over 1 year by culture-independent 16S rRNA gene-based molecular techniques. Results revealed that at least six phylotypes of SOB species were involved in the MICC process, and the predominant SOB species shifted in the following order: Thiothrix sp., Thiobacillus plumbophilus, Thiomonas intermedia, Halothiobacillus neapolitanus, Acidiphilium acidophilum, and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. A. thiooxidans, a hyperacidophilic SOB, was the most dominant (accounting for 70% of EUB338-mixed probe-hybridized cells) in the heavily corroded concrete after 1 year. This succession of SOB species could be dependent on the pH of the concrete surface as well as on trophic properties (e.g., autotrophic or mixotrophic) and on the ability of the SOB to utilize different sulfur compounds (e.g., H2S, S0, and S2O3(2-)). In addition, diverse heterotrophic bacterial species (e.g., halo-tolerant, neutrophilic, and acidophilic bacteria) were associated with these SOB. The microbial succession of these microorganisms was involved in the colonization of the concrete and the production of sulfuric acid. Furthermore, the vertical distribution of microbial community members revealed that A. thiooxidans was the most dominant throughout the heavily corroded concrete (gypsum) layer and that A. thiooxidans was most abundant at the highest surface (1.5-mm) layer and decreased logarithmically with depth because of oxygen and H2S transport limitations. This suggested that the production of sulfuric acid by A. thiooxidans occurred mainly on the concrete surface and the

  7. Electricity generation from an inorganic sulfur compound containing mining wastewater by acidophilic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Gaofeng; Christel, Stephan; Roman, Pawel; Wong, Zhen Lim; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Dopson, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Sulfide mineral processing often produces large quantities of wastewaters containing acid-generating inorganic sulfur compounds. If released untreated, these wastewaters can cause catastrophic environmental damage. In this study, microbial fuel cells were inoculated with acidophilic microorganisms to investigate whether inorganic sulfur compound oxidation can generate an electrical current. Cyclic voltammetry suggested that acidophilic microorganisms mediated electron transfer to the anode, and that electricity generation was catalyzed by microorganisms. A cation exchange membrane microbial fuel cell, fed with artificial wastewater containing tetrathionate as electron donor, reached a maximum whole cell voltage of 72 ± 9 mV. Stepwise replacement of the artificial anolyte with real mining process wastewater had no adverse effect on bioelectrochemical performance and generated a maximum voltage of 105 ± 42 mV. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the microbial consortia resulted in sequences that aligned within the genera Thermoplasma, Ferroplasma, Leptospirillum, Sulfobacillus and Acidithiobacillus. This study opens up possibilities to bioremediate mining wastewater using microbial fuel cell technology.

  8. Heterotrophic ammonium removal characteristics of an aerobic heterotrophic nitrifying-denitrifying bacterium, Providencia rettgeri YL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAYLOR Shauna M; HE Yiliang; ZHAO Bin; HUANG Jue

    2009-01-01

    Bacterium Providencia rettgeri YL was found to exhibit an unusual ability to heterotrophically nitrify and aerobically denitrify various concentrations of ammonium (NH4+-N). In order to further analyze its removal ability, several experiments were conducted to identify the growth and ammonium removal response in different carbon to nitrogen (C/N) mass ratios, shaking speeds, temperatures, ammonium concentrations and to qualitatively verify the production of nitrogen gas using gas chromatography techniques. Results showed that under optimum conditions (C/N 10, 30℃, 120 r/min), YL can significantly remove low and high concentrations of ammonium within 12 to 48 h of growth. The nitrification products hydroxylamine (NH2OH), nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) as well as the denitrification product, nitrogen gas (N2), were detected under completely aerobic conditions.

  9. Optimized Production of Xylitol from Xylose Using a Hyper-Acidophilic Candida tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tamburini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Candida tropicalis DSM 7524 produces xylitol, a natural, low-calorie sweetener, by fermentation of xylose. In order to increase xylitol production rate during the submerged fermentation process, some parameters-substrate (xylose concentration, pH, aeration rate, temperature and fermentation strategy-have been optimized. The maximum xylitol yield reached at 60–80 g/L initial xylose concentration, pH 5.5 at 37 °C was 83.66% (w/w on consumed xylose in microaerophilic conditions (kLa = 2·h−1. Scaling up on 3 L fermenter, with a fed-batch strategy, the best xylitol yield was 86.84% (w/w, against a 90% of theoretical yield. The hyper-acidophilic behaviour of C. tropicalis makes this strain particularly promising for industrial application, due to the possibility to work in non-sterile conditions.

  10. Monitoring Acidophilic Microbes with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank F. Roberto

    2008-08-01

    Many techniques that are used to characterize and monitor microbial populations associated with sulfide mineral bioleaching require the cultivation of the organisms on solid or liquid media. Chemolithotrophic species, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, or thermophilic chemolithotrophs, such as Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus can grow quite slowly, requiring weeks to complete efforts to identify and quantify these microbes associated with bioleach samples. Real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays in which DNA targets are amplified in the presence of fluorescent oligonucleotide primers, allowing the monitoring and quantification of the amplification reactions as they progress, provide a means of rapidly detecting the presence of microbial species of interest, and their relative abundance in a sample. This presentation will describe the design and use of such assays to monitor acidophilic microbes in the environment and in bioleaching operations. These assays provide results within 2-3 hours, and can detect less than 100 individual microbial cells.

  11. Gene loss and horizontal gene transfer contributed to the genome evolution of the extreme acidophile Ferrovum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Roxana Ullrich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD, associated with active and abandoned mining sites, is a habitat for acidophilic microorganisms that gain energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and ferrous iron and that thrive at pH below 4. Members of the recently proposed genus Ferrovum are the first acidophilic iron oxidizers to be described within the Betaproteobacteria. Although they have been detected as typical community members in AMD habitats worldwide, knowledge of their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is scarce. Genomics approaches appear to be most promising in addressing this lacuna since isolation and cultivation of Ferrovum has proven to be extremely difficult and has so far only been successful for the designated type strain Ferrovum myxofaciens P3G. In this study, the genomes of two novel strains of Ferrovum (PN-J185 and Z-31 derived from water samples of a mine water treatment plant were sequenced. These genomes were compared with those of Ferrovum sp. JA12 that also originated from the mine water treatment plant, and of the type strain (P3G. Phylogenomic scrutiny suggests that the four strains represent three Ferrovum species that cluster in two groups (1 and 2. Comprehensive analysis of their predicted metabolic pathways revealed that these groups harbor characteristic metabolic profiles, notably with respect to motility, chemotaxis, nitrogen metabolism, biofilm formation and their potential strategies to cope with the acidic environment. For example, while the F. myxofaciens strains (group 1 appear to be motile and diazotrophic, the non-motile group 2 strains have the predicted potential to use a greater variety of fixed nitrogen sources. Furthermore, analysis of their genome synteny provides first insights into their genome evolution, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer and genome reduction in the group 2 strains by loss of genes encoding complete metabolic pathways or physiological features contributed to the observed

  12. Calorimetry and thermodynamic aspects of heterotrophic, mixotrophic, and phototrophic growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockar, von U.; Marison, I.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Patino, R.

    2011-01-01

    A simple stoichiometric model is proposed linking the biomass yield to the enthalpy and Gibbs energy changes in chemo-heterotrophic, mixotrophic, and photo-autotrophic microbial growth. A comparison with calorimetric experiments on the algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed the

  13. Corrosion by bacteria of concrete in sewerage systems and inhibitory effects of formates on their growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Tateo; Aso, Iwao; Togashi, Shunsuke; Tanigawa, Minoru; Shoji, Kazuo; Watanabe, Tsugumichi; Watanabe, Naoki; Maki, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    Not only sulfur-oxidizing bacteria but also an acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium (or bacteria) were found in the corroded concrete from several sewerage systems in Japan. The surface pH of concrete test piece exposed to an atmosphere containing hydrogen sulfide of the concentrations more than 600 ppm in the systems was usually below 2 after a month. This was attributable to ability of the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to grow in the thin water layer which contained hydrogen sulfide and covered the piece even when the surface pH of concrete was 12-13. When the sulfuroxidizing bacteria grew in the surface of concrete and produced sulfuric acid, the pH of the inner parts of concrete was lowered where the bacteria were hardly found. Probably, sulfuric acid formed by the bacteria in the surface parts penetrated into the inner parts. The different species of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were found in different sewerage systems. The growth of the sulfur-oxidizing and acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria was completely inhibited by formates, especially by calcium formate of concentrations more than 50 mM. Calcium formate can protect concrete in sewerage systems from bacterial corrosion.

  14. Succession of Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria in the Microbial Community on Corroding Concrete in Sewer Systems† ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Satoshi; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Ito, Tsukasa; Satoh, Hisashi

    2007-01-01

    Microbially induced concrete corrosion (MICC) in sewer systems has been a serious problem for a long time. A better understanding of the succession of microbial community members responsible for the production of sulfuric acid is essential for the efficient control of MICC. In this study, the succession of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the bacterial community on corroding concrete in a sewer system in situ was investigated over 1 year by culture-independent 16S rRNA gene-based molecular techniques. Results revealed that at least six phylotypes of SOB species were involved in the MICC process, and the predominant SOB species shifted in the following order: Thiothrix sp., Thiobacillus plumbophilus, Thiomonas intermedia, Halothiobacillus neapolitanus, Acidiphilium acidophilum, and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. A. thiooxidans, a hyperacidophilic SOB, was the most dominant (accounting for 70% of EUB338-mixed probe-hybridized cells) in the heavily corroded concrete after 1 year. This succession of SOB species could be dependent on the pH of the concrete surface as well as on trophic properties (e.g., autotrophic or mixotrophic) and on the ability of the SOB to utilize different sulfur compounds (e.g., H2S, S0, and S2O32−). In addition, diverse heterotrophic bacterial species (e.g., halo-tolerant, neutrophilic, and acidophilic bacteria) were associated with these SOB. The microbial succession of these microorganisms was involved in the colonization of the concrete and the production of sulfuric acid. Furthermore, the vertical distribution of microbial community members revealed that A. thiooxidans was the most dominant throughout the heavily corroded concrete (gypsum) layer and that A. thiooxidans was most abundant at the highest surface (1.5-mm) layer and decreased logarithmically with depth because of oxygen and H2S transport limitations. This suggested that the production of sulfuric acid by A. thiooxidans occurred mainly on the concrete surface and the

  15. Dynamics of auto- and heterotrophic picoplankton and associated viruses in Lake Geneva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvathi, A.; Zhong, X.; Pradeep Ram, A. S.; Jacquet, S.

    2014-03-01

    Microbial dynamics have rarely been investigated in Lake Geneva, known as the largest lake in western Europe. From a 5-month survey, we report dynamic patterns of free-living virus, bacteria and small phytoplankton abundances in response to a variety of environmental parameters. For the first time, we fractionated the primary production to separate the contribution of different size-related biological compartments and measured both bacterial and viral production in addition to experiments conducted to quantify the virus-induced bacterial mortality. We observed marked seasonal and vertical variations in picocyanobacteria, bacteria and virus abundances and production. The contribution of picoplankton and nanoplankton production to the total primary production was high (reaching up to 76% of total primary production) in November and the spring-summer transition period, respectively. The impact of viral lysis on both bacteria and picocyanobacteria was significantly higher than grazing activities. Virus-induced picocyanobacterial mortality reached up to 66% of cell removal compared to virus induced (heterotrophic) bacterial mortality, which reached a maximum of 34% in July. Statistical analyzes revealed that temperature and top-down control by viruses are among important factors regulating the picocyanobacterial dynamics in this lake. More generally speaking, our results add to the growing evidence and accepted view nowadays that viruses are an important actor of freshwater microbial dynamics and more globally of the functioning of the microbial food webs.

  16. Flow cytometry based techniques to study testicular acidophilic granulocytes from the protandrous fish gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaves-Pozo Elena

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The gilthead seabream is a protandrous seasonal breeding teleost that is an excellent model for studying the testicular regression process which occurs in both seasonal testicular involution and sex reversion. Little is known about the cell types and the molecular mechanisms involved in such processes, mainly because of the lack of appropriate methods for testis dissociation, and testicular cell isolation, culture and functional characterization. We have previously reported that gilthead seabream acidophilic granulocytes infiltrate the testis at post-spawning stage, settle close to the spermatogonia and accumulate intracellular interleukin-1&bgr;. In this paper, we report several flow cytometry based assays which allow to establish the role played by gilthead seabream testicular acidophilic granulocytes and permits their quantification.

  17. Response of heterotrophic and autotrophic microbial plankton to inorganic and organic inputs along a latitudinal transect in the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Martínez-García

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric nutrient deposition into the open ocean increased over the past decades as a result of human activity and water-soluble organic nitrogen accounts for up to 30% of the total nitrogen inputs. The effects of inorganic and/or organic nutrient inputs on phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria have never been concurrently assessed in open ocean oligotrophic communities over a wide spatial gradient. We studied the effects of potentially limiting inorganic (nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, silica and organic nutrient (glucose, aminoacids inputs on microbial plankton biomass, community structure and metabolism in five microcosm experiments conducted along a latitudinal transect in the Atlantic Ocean (from 26° N to 29° S.

    Primary production rates increased up to 1.8-fold. Bacterial respiration and microbial community respiration increased up to 14.3 and 12.7-fold, respectively. Bacterial production and bacterial growth efficiency increased up to 58.8-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively. The largest increases were measured after mixed inorganic-organic nutrients additions. Changes in microbial plankton biomass were small as compared with those in metabolic rates. A north to south increase in the response of heterotrophic bacteria was observed, which could be related to a latitudinal gradient in phosphorus availability. Our results suggest that organic matter inputs associated with atmospheric deposition into the Atlantic Ocean will result in a predominantly heterotrophic versus autotrophic response and in increases in bacterial growth efficiency, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. Subtle differences in the initial environmental and biological conditions are likely to result in differential microbial responses to inorganic and organic matter inputs.

  18. Systems biology for understanding and engineering of heterotrophic oleaginous microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Beom Gi; Kim, Minsuk; Kim, Joonwon; Yoo, Heewang; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrophic oleaginous microorganisms continue to draw interest as they can accumulate a large amount of lipids which is a promising feedstock for the production of biofuels and oleochemicals. Nutrient limitation, especially nitrogen limitation, is known to effectively trigger the lipid production in these microorganisms. For the aim of developing improved strains, the mechanisms behind the lipid production have been studied for a long time. Nowadays, system-level understanding of their metabolism and associated metabolic switches is attainable with modern systems biology tools. This work reviews the systems biology studies, based on (i) top-down, large-scale 'omics' tools, and (ii) bottom-up, mathematical modeling methods, on the heterotrophic oleaginous microorganisms with an emphasis on further application to metabolic engineering.

  19. Comparison and evaluation of immobilization methods for preparing bacterial probes using acidophilic bioleaching bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans for AFM studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Mengxue; Taran, Elena; Mahler, Stephen M; Nguyen, Anh V

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated different strategies for constructing bacterial probes for atomic force microscopy studies of bioleaching Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans interacting with pyrite mineral surfaces. Of three available techniques, the bacterial colloidal probe technique is the most reliable and provides a versatile platform for quantifying true interactive forces between bioleaching microorganisms and mineral surfaces.

  20. Nutrient and media recycling in heterotrophic microalgae cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, Joshua; Armenta, Roberto E; Brooks, Marianne S

    2016-02-01

    In order for microalgae-based processes to reach commercial production for biofuels and high-value products such as omega-3 fatty acids, it is necessary that economic feasibility be demonstrated at the industrial scale. Therefore, process optimization is critical to ensure that the maximum yield can be achieved from the most efficient use of resources. This is particularly true for processes involving heterotrophic microalgae, which have not been studied as extensively as phototrophic microalgae. An area that has received significant conceptual praise, but little experimental validation, is that of nutrient recycling, where the waste materials from prior cultures and post-lipid extraction are reused for secondary fermentations. While the concept is very simple and could result in significant economic and environmental benefits, there are some underlying challenges that must be overcome before adoption of nutrient recycling is viable at commercial scale. Even more, adapting nutrient recycling for optimized heterotrophic cultures presents some added challenges that must be identified and addressed that have been largely unexplored to date. These challenges center on carbon and nitrogen recycling and the implications of using waste materials in conjunction with virgin nutrients for secondary cultures. The aim of this review is to provide a foundation for further understanding of nutrient recycling for microalgae cultivation. As such, we outline the current state of technology and practical challenges associated with nutrient recycling for heterotrophic microalgae on an industrial scale and give recommendations for future work.

  1. Purification and biochemical characterization of an acidophilic amylase from a newly isolated Bacillus sp. DR90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoodeh, Ahmad; Alemi, Ashraf; Heydari, Akbar; Akbari, Jafar

    2013-03-01

    An acidophilic and Ca(2+)-independent amylase was purified from a newly isolated Bacillus sp. DR90 by ion-exchange chromatography, and exhibited a molecular weight of 68.9 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme were found to be 4.0 and 45 °C, respectively. The enzyme activity was increased by Ba(2+), Fe(2+) and Mg(2+), and decreased by Hg(2+) and Zn(2+), while it was not affected by Na(+), K(+), phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and β-mercaptoethanol. Ca(2+) and EDTA did not have significant effect on the enzyme activity and thermal stability. The values of K m and V max for starch as substrate were 4.5 ± 0.13 mg/ml and 307 ± 12 μM/min/mg, respectively. N,N-dialkylimidazolium-based ionic liquids such as 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide [HMIM][Br] have inhibitory effect on the enzyme activity. Thin layer chromatography analyses displayed that maltose and glucose are the main products of the enzyme reaction on starch. Regarding the features of the enzyme, it may be utilized as a novel candidate for industrial applications.

  2. Biodiversity and interactions of acidophiles: Key to understanding and optimizing microbial processing of ores and concentrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.B.JOHNSON

    2008-01-01

    Mining companies have become increasingly aware of the potential of microbiological approaches for recovering base and precious metals from low-grade ores,and for remediating acidic,metal-rich wastewaters that drain from both operating and abandoned mine sites.Biological systems offer a number of environmental and (sometimes) economical advantages over conventional approaches,such as pyrometallurgy,though their application is not appropriate in every situation.Mineral processing using micro-organisms has been exploited for extracting gold,copper,uranium and cobalt,and current developments are targeting other base metals.Recently,there has been a great increase in our knowledge and understanding of both the diversity of the microbiology of biomining environments,and of how the microorganisms interact with each other.The results from laboratory experiments which have simulated both stirred tank and heap bioreactor systems have shown that microbial consortia are more robust than pure cultures of mineral-oxidizing acidophiles,and also tend to be more effective at bioleaching and bio-oxidizing ores and concentrates.The paper presented a concise review of the nature and interactions of microbial consortia that are involved in the oxidation of sulfide minerals,and how these might be adapted to meet future challenges in biomining operations.

  3. Ardrea characterisation of acidophilic micro-organisms isolated from gold mines in Marmato, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Judith Márquez F.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Mineral bio-oxidation improves the extraction of valuable metals and also decreases the impact caused by mining waste; however, the interactions between the micro-organisms so involved are little known. Double-layer solid culture media techniques and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction enzyme analysis (Ardrea, using Eco72I, Eco24I, XcmI and BsaAI enzymes, were used for characterising four micro-organisms isolated from gold mines located in Marmato, Colombia. This work was aimed at better understanding of native acidophilic micro-organisms’ microbial interactions in mixed cultures. Iron and sulphur oxidising isolates revealed similar restriction patterns to those previously reported for Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans; however, one of them exhibited different colony morphology compared to previously reported morphology. The iron non-oxidising isolate presented a restriction pattern agreeing with theoretical analysis of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans database sequences. ARDREA proved to be a viable technique for differentiating between At. ferrooxidans and At. thiooxidans; in turn, it enabled checking isolates’ identity with their physiological traits and colony morphology.

  4. Solar Radiation Stress in Natural Acidophilic Biofilms of Euglena mutabilis Revealed by Metatranscriptomics and PAM Fluorometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente-Sánchez, Fernando; Olsson, Sanna; Gómez-Rodriguez, Manuel; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Altamirano-Jeschke, Maria; Amils, Ricardo; Parro, Victor; Aguilera, Angeles

    2016-02-01

    The daily photosynthetic performance of a natural biofilm of the extreme acidophilic Euglena mutabilis from Río Tinto (SW, Spain) under full solar radiation was analyzed by means of pulse amplitude-modulated (PAM) fluorescence measurements and metatrascriptomic analysis. Natural E. mutabilis biofilms undergo large-scale transcriptomic reprogramming during midday due to a dynamic photoinhibition and solar radiation stress. Photoinhibition is due to UV radiation and not to light intensity, as revealed by PAM fluorometry analysis. In order to minimize the negative effects of solar radiation, our data supports the presence of a circadian rhythm in this euglenophyte that increases their opportunity to survive. Differential gene expression throughout the day (at 12:00, 20:00 and night) was monitored by massive Illumina parallel sequencing of metatranscriptomic libraries. The transcription pattern was altered in genes involved in Photosystem II stability and repair, UV damaged DNA repair, non-photochemical quenching and oxidative stress, supporting the photoinhibition detected by PAM fluorometry at midday.

  5. Heterotrophic plate count and consumer's health under special consideration of water softeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambsch, Beate; Sacré, Clara; Wagner, Ivo

    2004-05-01

    The phenomenon of bacterial growth in water softeners is well known since years. To upgrade the hygienic safety of water softeners, the German DIN Standard 19636 was developed, to assure that the distribution system could not be contaminated by these devices and that the drinking water to be used in the household still meets the microbiological standards according to the German drinking water guidelines, i.e. among others heterotrophic plate count (HPC) below 100 CFU/ml. Moreover, the standard for the water softeners includes a test for contamination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa which has to be disinfected during the regeneration phase. This is possible by sanitizing the resin bed during regeneration by producing chlorine. The results of the last 10 years of tests of water softeners according to DIN 19636 showed that it is possible to produce water softeners that comply with that standard. Approximately 60% of the tested models were accepted. P. aeruginosa is used as an indicator for potentially pathogenic bacteria being able to grow also in low nutrient conditions which normally prevail in drinking water. Like other heterotrophs, the numbers of P. aeruginosa increase rapidly as stagnation occurs. Normally P. aeruginosa is not present in the distributed drinking water. However, under certain conditions, P. aeruginosa can be introduced into the drinking water distribution system, for instance, during construction work. The occurrence of P. aeruginosa is shown in different cases in treatment plants, public drinking water systems and in-house installations. The compliance with DIN 19636 provides assurance that a water softener will not be a constant source of contamination, even if it is once inoculated with a potentially pathogenic bacterium like P. aeruginosa.

  6. Role of inorganic carbon in lactic acid bacteria metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Bringel, Françoise

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Capnophiles are bacteria stimulated by bicarbonate and CO$_2$, the two major forms of inorganic carbon (IC) in physiological neutral liquids. Capnophiles are often pathogenic heterotrophs found in IC-rich ecological niches such as human cavities. Like capnophiles, the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecalis is stimulated by IC. CO$_2$ or HCO$^{-}_3$ are substrates in carbamoyl phosphate (CP) synthesis and other car...

  7. Diversity and Detection of Nitrate Assimilation Genes in Marine Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Andrew E.; Booth, Melissa G.; Frischer, Marc E.; Verity, Peter G.; Jonathan P Zehr; Zani, Sabino

    2001-01-01

    A PCR approach was used to construct a database of nasA genes (called narB genes in cyanobacteria) and to detect the genetic potential for heterotrophic bacterial nitrate utilization in marine environments. A nasA-specific PCR primer set that could be used to selectively amplify the nasA gene from heterotrophic bacteria was designed. Using seawater DNA extracts obtained from microbial communities in the South Atlantic Bight, the Barents Sea, and the North Pacific Gyre, we PCR amplified and se...

  8. Diversity and Ecophysiology of New Isolates of Extremely Acidophilic CS2-Converting Acidithiobacillus Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeulders, Marjan J.; Pol, Arjan; Zandvoort, Marcel H.; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Biofiltration of industrial carbon disulfide (CS2)-contaminated waste air streams results in the acidification of biofilters and therefore reduced performance, high water use, and increased costs. To address these issues, we isolated 16 extremely acidophilic CS2-converting Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strains that tolerated up to 6% (vol/vol) sulfuric acid. The ecophysiological properties of five selected strains (2Bp, Sts 4-3, S1p, G8, and BBW1) were compared. These five strains had pH optima between 1 (2Bp) and 2 (S1p). Their affinities for CS2 ranged between 80 (G8) and 130 (2Bp) μM. Strains S1p, G8, and BBW1 had more hydrophobic cell surfaces and produced less extracellular polymeric substance than did strains 2Bp and Sts 4-3. All five strains converted about 80% of the S added as CS2 to S0 when CS2 was supplied in excess. The rate of S0 consumption varied between 7 (Sts 4-3) and 63 (S1p) nmol O2 min−1 ml culture−1. Low S0 consumption rates correlated partly with low levels of cell attachment to externally produced S0 globules. During chemostat growth, the relative amount of CS2 hydrolase in the cell increased with decreasing growth rates. This resulted in more S0 accumulation during CS2 overloads at low growth rates. Intermittent interruptions of the CS2 supply affected all five strains. Strains S1p, G8, and BBW1 recovered from 24 h of starvation within 4 h, and strains 2Bp and Sts 4-3 recovered within 24 h after CS2 was resupplied. We recommend the use of mixtures of Acidithiobacillus strains in industrial biofilters. PMID:23995926

  9. Arsenic oxidation and bioaccumulation by the acidophilic protozoan, Euglena mutabilis, in acid mine drainage (Carnoules, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casiot, C.; Bruneel, O.; Personne, J.-C.; Leblanc, M.; Elbaz-Poulichet, F. [University of Montpellier 2, Montpellier (France)

    2004-03-29

    In the acid stream (pH 2.5-4.7) originating from the Camoules mine tailings, the acidophilic protozoan Euglena mutabilis grows with extremely high sulfate (1.9-4.9 g/l), iron (0.7-1.7 g/l) and arsenic concentrations (0.08-0.26 g/l). Strong variations in flow rate and high sulfate concentrations (up to 4.9 g/l) have been registered in early winter and might be the reason for the reduction in cell number of the protozoan from October to December 2001. No relation was established between arsenic concentration and/or speciation and abundance of the protozoan in the stream. Arsenite, which is the most toxic form, predominates in water. The oxidation of arsenite to arsenate occurred within a few days in laboratory experiments when E. mutabilis was present in Reigous Creek water and synthetic As(III)-rich culture medium. Methylated compounds (MMA, DMA) were not identified in the culture media. The protozoan bioaccumulated As in the cell (336{+-} 112 {mu}g As/g dry wt.) as inorganic arsenite (105 {+-} 52 {mu}g As/g dry wt.) and arsenate (231 {+-} 112 {mu}g As/g dry wt.). Adsorption of As at the cell surface reached 57 mg/g dry wt. in the As(V) form for E. mutabilis grown in 250 mg/l As(III) synthetic medium. Both intracellular accumulation and adsorption at the cell surface increased for increasing As(III) concentration in the medium but the concentration factor in the cell relative to soluble As decreased.

  10. Microalgae as a safe food source for animals: nutritional characteristics of the acidophilic microalga Coccomyxa onubensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Navarro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Edible microalgae are marine or fresh water mesophilic species. Although the harvesting of microalgae offers an abundance of opportunities to the food and pharmaceutical industries, the possibility to use extremophilic microalgae as a food source for animals is not well-documented. Objective: We studied the effects of dietary supplementation of a powdered form of the acidophilic microalga Coccomyxa onubensis on growth and health parameters of laboratory rats. Method: Four randomly organized groups of rats (n=6 were fed a standard diet (Diet 1, control or with a diet in which 0.4% (Diet 2, 1.25% (Diet 3, or 6.25% (Diet 4 (w/w of the standard diet weight was substituted with dried microalgae powder, respectively. The four groups of animals were provided ad libitum access to feed for 45 days. Results: C. onubensis biomass is rich in protein (44.60% of dry weight and dietary fiber (15.73%, and has a moderate carbohydrate content (24.8% and a low lipid content (5.4% in which polyunsaturated fatty acids represent 65% of the total fatty acid. Nucleic acids are present at 4.8%. No significant difference was found in growth rates or feed efficiency ratios of the four groups of rats. Histological studies of liver and kidney tissue revealed healthy organs in control and C. onubensis-fed animals, while plasma hematological and biochemical parameters were within healthy ranges for all animals. Furthermore, animals fed a microalgae-enriched diet exhibited a statistically significant decrease in both blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The blood triglyceride content and very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels decreased by about 50% in rats fed Diet 4. Conclusions: These data suggest that C. onubensis may be useful as a food supplement for laboratory animals and may also serve as a nutraceutical in functional foods. In addition, microalgae powder-supplemented diets exerted a significant hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic

  11. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEENA GARG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LAB are used as starter culture, consortium members and bioprotective agents in food industry that improve food quality, safety and shelf life. A variety of probiotic LAB species are available including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. lactis, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. reuteri, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. esselnsis, B. lactis, B. infantis that are currently recommended for development of functional food products with health-promoting capacities.

  12. Depth Dependent Relationships between Temperature and Ocean Heterotrophic Prokaryotic Production

    KAUST Repository

    Lønborg, Christian

    2016-06-07

    Marine prokaryotes play a key role in cycling of organic matter and nutrients in the ocean. Using a unique dataset (>14,500 samples), we applied a space-for-time substitution analysis to assess the temperature dependence of prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) in epi- (0-200 m), meso- (201-1000 m) and bathypelagic waters (1001-4000 m) of the global ocean. Here, we show that the temperature dependence of PHP is fundamentally different between these major oceanic depth layers, with an estimated ecosystem-level activation energy (E) of 36 ± 7 kJ mol for the epipelagic, 72 ± 15 kJ mol for the mesopelagic and 274 ± 65 kJ mol for the bathypelagic realm. We suggest that the increasing temperature dependence with depth is related to the parallel vertical gradient in the proportion of recalcitrant organic compounds. These Ea predict an increased PHP of about 5, 12, and 55% in the epi-, meso-, and bathypelagic ocean, respectively, in response to a water temperature increase by 1°C. Hence, there is indication that a major thus far underestimated feedback mechanism exists between future bathypelagic ocean warming and heterotrophic prokaryotic activity.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Heterotrophic Nitrifying Strain W1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕永康; 王荀; 刘博凯; 刘玉香; 杨晓华

    2012-01-01

    In a high concentration substrate medium, a heterotrophic bacterium with high removal efficiency of ammonium, named W1, was isolated from activated sludge of coking wastewater treatment facility. The bacterium was Gram-negative, rod-shaped, and identified preliminarily as Alcaligenes sp. according to its morphological and physiological properties and its 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In the high concentration ammonium medium (400 mg·L 1 4 NH -N), the effects of C source, N source, C/N ratio and initial pH of medium on ammonium removal were investigated in order to determine the optimal condition for strain W1. The maximum ammonium removal was around 95% in 4 days in an improved medium. The production of N 2 gas was examined in a closed system that was full of pure oxygen at the beginning. N 2 gas was detected in the system after 4 days of cultivation, which further testified that strain W1 has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities simultaneously.

  14. Genomics and ecophysiology of heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from estuarine surface water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Severin, Ina; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg;

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen (N 2) to ammonia, known as N 2 fixation, is a widely distributed trait among prokaryotes that accounts for an essential input of new N to a multitude of environments. Nitrogenase reductase gene (nifH) composition suggests that putative N 2-fixing...

  15. Diversity and bioactive potentials of culturable heterotrophic bacteria from the surficial sediments of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Nilayangod, C.; Jasmin, C.; Vinothkumar, S.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Nair, S.

    to a variety of envi- ronmental conditions and are considered as a vast untapped reservoir of metabolic diversity and overwhelming source of novel bioactive compounds. Recent reports of repeated isolation of known metabolites from terrestrial micro... representative isolates were selected and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Genomic DNA was extracted from overnight grown cultures following standard phenol–chloroform method, and the quality of DNA was checked on 0.8% agarose gel (Sambrook and Russel 2001...

  16. Polyphasic characterization of heterotrophic bacteria from shrimp farm environments to tetracyclines

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael dos Santos Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents of tetracycline class has been extensively used in aquaculture for disease control and growth promotion. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the polyphase profile of the bacterial community in shrimp farming environment front antimicrobial classes of tetracyclines, focusing on Vibrio genus. Water and sediment samples were collected four (4) shrimp farms: two (2) in the state of Cearà and two (2) in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, of points: estuary, supply chann...

  17. Genomics and ecophysiology of heterotrophic nitrogen fixing bacteria isolated from estuarine surface water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Severin, Ina; Hansen, Lars H.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen (N2) to ammonia, known as N2 fixation, is a widely distributed trait among prokaryotes that accounts for an essential input of new N to a multitude of environments. Nitrogenase reductase gene (nifH) composition suggests that putative N2-fixing heterotrop......The ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen (N2) to ammonia, known as N2 fixation, is a widely distributed trait among prokaryotes that accounts for an essential input of new N to a multitude of environments. Nitrogenase reductase gene (nifH) composition suggests that putative N2-fixing...

  18. Final Report - Cycling of DOC and DON by novel heterotrophic and photoheterotrophic bacteria in the ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, David F

    2011-06-10

    This report describes a collaboration between Lincoln University and the College of Earth, Ocean and Environment at the University of Delaware and was funded under the Department of Energy Biological Investigations – Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). The principal outcomes of the grant are (1) the opportunity for Lincoln students to participate in marine research at the University of Delaware, (2) the opportunity for participating students to present their research at a variety of scientific meetings, (3) the establishment of an environmental science major and a microbial ecology course at Lincoln, (4) the upgrade of research capabilities at Lincoln, and (5) the success of participating students in graduate and professional school.

  19. Genomics and ecophysiology of heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from estuarine surface water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Severin, Ina; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen (N 2) to ammonia, known as N 2 fixation, is a widely distributed trait among prokaryotes that accounts for an essential input of new N to a multitude of environments. Nitrogenase reductase gene (nifH) composition suggests that putative N 2-fixin...

  20. Ubiquity and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes in diverse marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be

  1. Development of a Laboratory Model of a Phototroph-Heterotroph Mixed-Species Biofilm at the Stone/Air Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Federica; Pitts, Betsey; Lauchnor, Ellen; Cappitelli, Francesca; Stewart, Philip S

    2015-01-01

    Recent scientific investigations have shed light on the ecological importance and physiological complexity of subaerial biofilms (SABs) inhabiting lithic surfaces. In the field of sustainable cultural heritage (CH) preservation, mechanistic approaches aimed at investigation of the spatiotemporal patterns of interactions between the biofilm, the stone, and the atmosphere are of outstanding importance. However, these interactions have proven difficult to explore with field experiments due to the inaccessibility of samples, the complexity of the ecosystem under investigation and the temporal resolution of the experiments. To overcome these limitations, we aimed at developing a unifying methodology to reproduce a fast-growing, phototroph-heterotroph mixed species biofilm at the stone/air interface. Our experiments underscore the ability of the dual-species SAB model to capture functional traits characteristic of biofilms inhabiting lithic substrate such as: (i) microcolonies of aggregated bacteria; (ii) network like structure following surface topography; (iii) cooperation between phototrophs and heterotrophs and cross feeding processes; (iv) ability to change the chemical parameters that characterize the microhabitats; (v) survival under desiccation and (vi) biocide tolerance. With its advantages in control, replication, range of different experimental scenarios and matches with the real ecosystem, the developed model system is a powerful tool to advance our mechanistic understanding of the stone-biofilm-atmosphere interplay in different environments.

  2. Development of a laboratory model of a phototroph-heterotroph mixed-species biofilm at the stone/air interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eVilla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent scientific investigations have shed light on the ecological importance and physiological complexity of subaerial biofilms (SABs inhabiting lithic surfaces. In the field of sustainable cultural heritage (CH preservation, mechanistic approaches aimed at investigation of the spatiotemporal patterns of interactions between the biofilm, the stone, and the atmosphere are of outstanding importance. However, these interactions have proven difficult to explore with field experiments due to the inaccessibility of samples, the complexity of the ecosystem under investigation and the temporal resolution of the experiments.To overcome these limitations, we aimed at developing a unifying methodology to reproduce a fast-growing, phototroph-heterotroph mixed species biofilm at the stone/air interface. Our experiments underscore the ability of the dual-species SAB model to capture functional traits characteristic of biofilms inhabiting lithic substrate such as: i microcolonies of aggregated bacteria; ii network like structure following surface topography; iii cooperation between phototrophs and heterotrophs and cross feeding processes; iv ability to change the chemical parameters that characterize the microhabitats; v survival under desiccation and vi biocide tolerance. With its advantages in control, replication, range of different experimental scenarios and matches with the real ecosystem, the developed model system is a powerful tool to advance our mechanistic understanding of the stone-biofilm-atmosphere interplay in different environments.

  3. Flow cytometric bacterial cell counts challenge conventional heterotrophic plate counts for routine microbiological drinking water monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nevel, S; Koetzsch, S; Proctor, C R; Besmer, M D; Prest, E I; Vrouwenvelder, J S; Knezev, A; Boon, N; Hammes, F

    2017-04-15

    Drinking water utilities and researchers continue to rely on the century-old heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) method for routine assessment of general microbiological water quality. Bacterial cell counting with flow cytometry (FCM) is one of a number of alternative methods that challenge this status quo and provide an opportunity for improved water quality monitoring. After more than a decade of application in drinking water research, FCM methodology is optimised and established for routine application, supported by a considerable amount of data from multiple full-scale studies. Bacterial cell concentrations obtained by FCM enable quantification of the entire bacterial community instead of the minute fraction of cultivable bacteria detected with HPC (typically water samples per day, depending on the laboratory and selected staining procedure(s). Moreover, many studies have shown FCM total (TCC) and intact (ICC) cell concentrations to be reliable and robust process variables, responsive to changes in the bacterial abundance and relevant for characterising and monitoring drinking water treatment and distribution systems. The purpose of this critical review is to initiate a constructive discussion on whether FCM could replace HPC in routine water quality monitoring. We argue that FCM provides a faster, more descriptive and more representative quantification of bacterial abundance in drinking water.

  4. Bacteria in non-woven textile filters for domestic wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spychała, Marcin; Starzyk, Justyna

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was preliminary identification of heterotrophic and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) cell concentration in the cross-sectional profile of geotextile filters for wastewater treatment. Filters of thicknesses 3.6 and 7.2 mm, made of non-woven textile TS20, were supplied with septic tank effluent and intermittently dosed and filtered under hydrostatic pressure. The cumulative loads of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total solids were about 1.36 and 1.06 kg/cm2, respectively. The filters under analysis reached a relatively high removal efficiency for organic pollution 70-90% for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) and 60-85% for COD. The ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency level proved to be unstable (15-55%). Biomass samples for dry mass identification were taken from two regions: continuously flooded with wastewater and intermittently flooded with wastewater. The culturable heterotrophic bacteria were determined as colony-forming units (CFUs) on microbiological-selective media by means of the plate method. AOB and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were examined using the FISH technique. A relatively wide range of heterotrophic bacteria was observed from 7.4×10(5)/cm2 to 3.8×10(6)/cm2 in geotextile layers. The highest concentration of heterotrophic bacteria (3.8×10(6)/cm2) was observed in the first layer of the textile filter. AOB were identified occasionally--about 8-15% of all bacteria colonizing the last filter layer, but occasionally much higher concentrations and ammonia nitrogen efficiency were achieved. Bacteria oxidizing nitrite to nitrate were not observed. The relation of total and organic fraction of biomass to culturable heterotrophic bacteria was also found.

  5. Draft genome sequence of the extremely acidophilic biomining bacterium Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ATCC 19377 provides insights into the evolution of the Acidithiobacillus genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Jorge; Ossandon, Francisco; Quatrini, Raquel; Dopson, Mark; Holmes, David S

    2011-12-01

    Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans is a mesophilic, extremely acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic gammaproteobacterium that derives energy from the oxidation of sulfur and inorganic sulfur compounds. Here we present the draft genome sequence of A. thiooxidans ATCC 19377, which has allowed the identification of genes for survival and colonization of extremely acidic environments.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Extremely Acidophilic Biomining Bacterium Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ATCC 19377 Provides Insights into the Evolution of the Acidithiobacillus Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Valdes, Jorge; Ossandon, Francisco; Quatrini, Raquel; Dopson, Mark; Holmes, David S

    2011-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans is a mesophilic, extremely acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic gammaproteobacterium that derives energy from the oxidation of sulfur and inorganic sulfur compounds. Here we present the draft genome sequence of A. thiooxidans ATCC 19377, which has allowed the identification of genes for survival and colonization of extremely acidic environments.

  7. Flow cytometric bacterial cell counts challenge conventional heterotrophic plate counts for routine microbiological drinking water monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Van Nevel, S.

    2017-02-08

    Drinking water utilities and researchers continue to rely on the century-old heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) method for routine assessment of general microbiological water quality. Bacterial cell counting with flow cytometry (FCM) is one of a number of alternative methods that challenge this status quo and provide an opportunity for improved water quality monitoring. After more than a decade of application in drinking water research, FCM methodology is optimised and established for routine application, supported by a considerable amount of data from multiple full-scale studies. Bacterial cell concentrations obtained by FCM enable quantification of the entire bacterial community instead of the minute fraction of cultivable bacteria detected with HPC (typically < 1% of all bacteria). FCM measurements are reproducible with relative standard deviations below 3% and can be available within 15 min of samples arriving in the laboratory. High throughput sample processing and complete automation are feasible and FCM analysis is arguably less expensive than HPC when measuring more than 15 water samples per day, depending on the laboratory and selected staining procedure(s). Moreover, many studies have shown FCM total (TCC) and intact (ICC) cell concentrations to be reliable and robust process variables, responsive to changes in the bacterial abundance and relevant for characterising and monitoring drinking water treatment and distribution systems. The purpose of this critical review is to initiate a constructive discussion on whether FCM could replace HPC in routine water quality monitoring. We argue that FCM provides a faster, more descriptive and more representative quantification of bacterial abundance in drinking water.

  8. Production Response and Digestive Enzymatic Activity of the Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931 Intensively Pregrown in Microbial Heterotrophic and Autotrophic-Based Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel J. Becerra-Dórame

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp postlarvae were reared into different microcosm systems without water exchange; a traditional system based on simple fertilization to improve microalgae concentration (control, an autotrophic system (AS based on the promotion of biofloc and biofilm by the addition of fertilizer and artificial substrates and a heterotrophic system (HS based on the promotion of heterotrophic bacteria by the addition of nitrogenous and carbonaceous sources and artificial substrates. Better growth performance and survival were registered in shrimp from the AS and HS compared to the control. Feed conversion ratios were below 0.7 for all treatments, but AS and HS were significantly lower than the control. Regarding digestive performance, no significant differences were observed for trypsin, amylase and lipase activities among AS and control shrimp; however, shrimp from HS showed a higher trypsin and amylase activities, suggesting a higher digestive activity caused by the presence of microbial bioflocs. The presence of biofilm and bioflocs composed by either autotrophic or heterotrophic organisms in combination with formulated feed improved the growth performance and survival of shrimp. Apparently, such combination fits the nutritional requirements of shrimp.

  9. Production response and digestive enzymatic activity of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931) intensively pregrown in microbial heterotrophic and autotrophic-based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Dórame, Manuel J; Martínez-Porchas, Marcel; Martínez-Córdova, Luis R; Rivas-Vega, Martha E; Lopez-Elias, José A; Porchas-Cornejo, Marco A

    2012-01-01

    Shrimp postlarvae were reared into different microcosm systems without water exchange; a traditional system based on simple fertilization to improve microalgae concentration (control), an autotrophic system (AS) based on the promotion of biofloc and biofilm by the addition of fertilizer and artificial substrates and a heterotrophic system (HS) based on the promotion of heterotrophic bacteria by the addition of nitrogenous and carbonaceous sources and artificial substrates. Better growth performance and survival were registered in shrimp from the AS and HS compared to the control. Feed conversion ratios were below 0.7 for all treatments, but AS and HS were significantly lower than the control. Regarding digestive performance, no significant differences were observed for trypsin, amylase and lipase activities among AS and control shrimp; however, shrimp from HS showed a higher trypsin and amylase activities, suggesting a higher digestive activity caused by the presence of microbial bioflocs. The presence of biofilm and bioflocs composed by either autotrophic or heterotrophic organisms in combination with formulated feed improved the growth performance and survival of shrimp. Apparently, such combination fits the nutritional requirements of shrimp.

  10. Food waste as nutrient source in heterotrophic microalgae cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleissner, Daniel; Lam, Wan Chi; Sun, Zheng; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2013-06-01

    Glucose, free amino nitrogen (FAN), and phosphate were recovered from food waste by fungal hydrolysis using Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae. Using 100g food waste (dry weight), 31.9 g glucose, 0.28 g FAN, and 0.38 g phosphate were recovered after 24h of hydrolysis. The pure hydrolysate has then been used as culture medium and nutrient source for the two heterotrophic microalgae Schizochytrium mangrovei and Chlorella pyrenoidosa, S. mangrovei and C. pyrenoidosa grew well on the complex food waste hydrolysate by utilizing the nutrients recovered. At the end of fermentation 10-20 g biomass were produced rich in carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Results of this study revealed the potential of food waste hydrolysate as culture medium and nutrient source in microalgae cultivation.

  11. Comparative lipid composition of heterotrophically and autotrophically grown Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langworthy, T A

    1977-06-01

    Complex lipids from the thermoacidophilic facultative autotroph Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as well as a strictly autotrophic isolate, were compared between cells grown on yeast extract and elemental sulfur. Lipids from both organisms grown autotrophically were nearly identical. Each contained about 15% neutral lipids, 35% glycolipids, and 50% acidic lipids. Glycolipids and acidic lipids contained C40H82-76-derived glycerol ether residues. Major glycolipids included the glycerol ether analogues of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride (5%) and glucosyl polyol diglyceride (75%). Acidic lipids were comprised mainly of the glycerol ether analogues of phosphatidyl inositol (7%), inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol diglyceride (72%), and a partially characterized sulfate- and phosphate-containing derivative of glucosyl polyol diglyceride (13%). The lipids from cells grown heterotrophically were similar to those from autotrophically grown cells, except that the partially characterized acidic lipid was absent. In addition, the two glycolipids as well as the respective inositolphosphoryl derivatives were each present in nearly equal proportions.

  12. A culture-dependent survey of thermophilic bacteria from hot springs in Xiamen area in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Bo; OUYANG Jianping; AO Jingqun; CHEN Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    Microbes are believed to play important roles in ecosystem function in many environments. The hot springs of Xiamen Island are close to the Xiamen Sea, and may have some characteristics different from those of inland hot springs. Microbes living in the hot springs of Xiamen may have new characteristics. However, little is known about microbial communities of hot springs close to the Xiamen Sea. A cuhure-dependent survey of microbial population in the Xiamen hot springs was pcrformed by using an approach combining total cellular protein profile identification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A total of 328 isolates of bacteria were obtained from liquid and sediment samples from the Xiamen hot springs, including neutrophilie thermophilic bacteria and moderately thermophilic acidophiles. Neutrophilic thermophilic bacteria, which grow at a temperature range of 55-90℃ including Rhodothermus marinus (Strain 1) , Thermus thermophilus (Strain 2), Thermus thiopara (Strain 3) , Geobacillus stearothermophilus(Strain 4) , Geobacillus thermoleovorans (Strain 5) , and Pseudomonas pseudoal-caligenes (Strain 6), were recovered by 2216E plates. Moderately thermophilic acidophiles, which can grow at temperatures above 50℃ and a pH range of 1. 8-3.5 such as Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris (Strain 8) , Sul-fobacillus acidophilus (Strain 9), and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans (Strain 10), were isolated on selective solid medium containing sulfur and Fe2+. Among these strains, Rhodothermus marinus, Thermus thermophilus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus are not only thermophilcs, but also halophiles. One bacterium strain (Strain 6) shared 99% nucleotide sequence homology with Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes on the 16S rRNA gene se-quence, but was quite different from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes in biological characteristics, suggesting that it may represent a novel thermophilic species. Results indicated that various species of neutrophilic thermophiles and moderately thermophilic

  13. Heterotrophic microbial colonization of the interior of impact-shocked rocks from Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, David A.; Cockell, Charles; Pearce, David; Lee, Pascal

    2002-10-01

    The polar desert is one of the most extreme environments on Earth. Endolithic organisms can escape or mitigate the hazards of the polar desert by using the resources available in the interior of rocks. We examined endolithic communities within crystalline rocks that have undergone shock metamorphism as a result of an asteroid or comet impact. Specifically, we present a characterization of the heterotrophic endolithic community and its environment in the interior of impact-shocked gneisses and their host polymict breccia from the Haughton impact structure on Devon Island, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic. Microbiological colonization of impact-shocked rocks is facilitated by impact-induced fissures and cavities, which occur throughout the samples, the walls of which are lined with high abundances of biologically important elements owing to the partial volatilization of minerals within the rock during the impact. 27 heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from these shocked rocks and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. The isolates from the shocked gneiss and the host breccia are similar to each other, and to other heterotrophic communities isolated from polar environments, suggesting that the interiors of the rocks are colonized by microorganisms from the surrounding country rocks and soils. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis were used to identify the chemical composition of the shocked materials and to document the in situ growth of microbes in their interiors. The identification of these heterotrophic communities within impact-shocked crystalline rocks extends our knowledge of the habitable biosphere on Earth. The colonization of the interiors of these samples has astrobiological applications both for considering terrestrial, microbiological contamination of meteorites from the Antarctic ice sheet and for investigating possible habitats for microbial

  14. An enrichment and acclimation procedure to obtain photo heterotrophic cultures for H{sub 2} production from organic effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo-Benitez, J. A.; Ponce-Noyola, M. T.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-07-01

    Production of H{sub 2} via photo heterotrophic is an attractive alternative, due to the capacity of photo heterotrophic organisms to convert the organic matter of effluents into H{sub 2}. The objective of our work was to develop a protocol for selecting undefined mixed cultures of photo heterotrophic microorganism with the capability of producing of H{sub 2}. (Author)

  15. Interaction between Chlorella vulgaris and bacteria:interference and resource competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Liang; WANG Renjun; ZHAO Peng; CHEN Ruinan; ZHOU Wenli; TANG Liuqing; TANG Xuexi

    2014-01-01

    Research of interaction mechanism between Chlorella vulgaris and two bacterial strains (Z-QD08 and Z-QS01) were conducted under laboratory conditions. Growth rates of bacteria and C. vulgaris were tested under co-culture conditions to evaluate the effects of concentrations of C. vulgaris and bacteria on their interactions. To test whether the availability of inorganic nutrients, vitamins and trace metals affects the interactions between C. vulgaris and bacteria, experiments were performed with or without the culture medium filtrate of C. vulgaris or bacteria. The results showed that the growth of C. vulgaris was promot-ed at low concentrations of bacteria (5×106 cells/ml), and expressed a positive correlation with the bacteria density, whereas opposite trend was observed for treatments with high bacteria density (10×106 cells/ml and 20×106 cells/ml). The growth rate of bacteria decreased with the increasing concentrations of C. vul-garis. The growth of bacteria Z-QD08 was inhibited by C. vulgaris through interference competition, while the mechanism for interaction between bacteria Z-QS01 and C. vulgaris was resource competition. The influence of cell density on the interaction between microalgae and bacteria was also discussed. These ex-periments confirm some elements of published theory on interactions between heterotrophic bacteria and microalgae and suggest that heterotrophic bacteria play an important role in the development of blooms in natural waters.

  16. [Leaching of copper ore of the Udokanskoe deposit at low temperatures by an association of acidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat'eva, T F; Pivovarova, T A; Krylova, L N; Melamud, V S; Adamov, E V; Karavaĭko, G I

    2011-01-01

    Pure cultures of indigenous microorganisms Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain TFUd, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans strain LUd, and Sulfobacillus thermotolerans strain SUd have been isolated from the oxidation zone of sulfide copper ore of the Udokanskoe deposit. Regimes of bacterial-chemical leaching of ore have been studied over a temperature range from -10 to +20 degrees C. Effects of pH, temperature, and the presence of microorganisms on the extraction of copper have been shown. Bacterial leaching has been detected only at positive values of temperature, and has been much more active at +20 than at +4 degrees C. The process of leaching was more active when the ore contained more hydrophilic and oxidized minerals. The possibility of copper ore leaching of the Udokanskoe deposit using sulfuric acid with pH 0.4 at negative values of temperature and applying acidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganisms at positive values of temperature and low pH values was shown.

  17. The Effect of Specific Conditions on Cu, Ni, Zn and Al Recovery from PCBS Waste Using Acidophilic Bacterial Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrážiková A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of static, stirring and shaking conditions on copper, zinc, nickel and aluminium dissolution from printed circuit boards (PCBs using the mixed acidophilic bacterial culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. The results revealed that static conditions were the most effective in zinc and aluminium dissolution. Zinc was removed almost completely under static conditions, whereas maximum of nickel dissolution was reached under the stirring conditions. The highest copper recovery (36% was reached under stirring conditions. The shaking conditions appeared to be the least suitable. The relative importance of these systems for the bioleaching of copper and nickel decreased in the order: stirring, static conditions, shaking.

  18. Sulphide bioxidation using native Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and thiooxidans, related acidophile strains from "El Zancudo" gold mine (Titiribí, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M Ossa H

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was aimed at a laboratory evaluation of the action of native Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans-and thiooxidans-related acidophile micro-organism (isolated from El Zancudo gold mine in Titiribí, Colombia on the oxidation of sulphides, mainly consisting of pyrite and arsenopyrite; sulphide concentration varied from 8% to 16% and particle size from 75 um to 106 um. pH and redox potential measurement revealed efficient oxidation for each culture over a 25-day period, reaching 1,4 pH and 600 mV redox potential. 20 g/L As and 60 g/L Fe levels were reached in solution. XRD, FTIR and SEM/EDX analysis revealed the presence of bacterial oxidation products such as jarosite and iron arsenates, as well as low and high corrosion in pyrites and arsenopyrites, respectively. Key words: chemolithotrophics, bioleaching, pyrite, arsenopyrite, applied mineralogy.

  19. Gene Loss and Horizontal Gene Transfer Contributed to the Genome Evolution of the Extreme Acidophile “Ferrovum”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sophie R.; González, Carolina; Poehlein, Anja; Tischler, Judith S.; Daniel, Rolf; Schlömann, Michael; Holmes, David S.; Mühling, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), associated with active and abandoned mining sites, is a habitat for acidophilic microorganisms that gain energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and ferrous iron and that thrive at pH below 4. Members of the recently proposed genus “Ferrovum” are the first acidophilic iron oxidizers to be described within the Betaproteobacteria. Although they have been detected as typical community members in AMD habitats worldwide, knowledge of their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is scarce. Genomics approaches appear to be most promising in addressing this lacuna since isolation and cultivation of “Ferrovum” has proven to be extremely difficult and has so far only been successful for the designated type strain “Ferrovum myxofaciens” P3G. In this study, the genomes of two novel strains of “Ferrovum” (PN-J185 and Z-31) derived from water samples of a mine water treatment plant were sequenced. These genomes were compared with those of “Ferrovum” sp. JA12 that also originated from the mine water treatment plant, and of the type strain (P3G). Phylogenomic scrutiny suggests that the four strains represent three “Ferrovum” species that cluster in two groups (1 and 2). Comprehensive analysis of their predicted metabolic pathways revealed that these groups harbor characteristic metabolic profiles, notably with respect to motility, chemotaxis, nitrogen metabolism, biofilm formation and their potential strategies to cope with the acidic environment. For example, while the “F. myxofaciens” strains (group 1) appear to be motile and diazotrophic, the non-motile group 2 strains have the predicted potential to use a greater variety of fixed nitrogen sources. Furthermore, analysis of their genome synteny provides first insights into their genome evolution, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer and genome reduction in the group 2 strains by loss of genes encoding complete metabolic pathways or physiological features

  20. Cubital tunnel syndrome due to heterotrophic ossification caused by radial head fracture: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyitali Gumustas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Compression of the ulnar nerve in the cubital tunnel is the second most common nerve entrapment syndrome in the upper extremity after carpal tunnel syndrome. Although various etiologies have been described, heterotrophic ossification is rarely seen. Heterotrophic ossification should be kept in mind as a cause of ulnar nerve entrapment after elbow trauma. Early diagnosis and surgical intervention are important in such cases before completion of the maturation phase. We report a case of heterotrophic ossification due to elbow trauma that caused cubital tunnel syndrome. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(1.000: 24-28

  1. Comparative biochemistry and physiology of iron-respiring bacteria from acidic and neutral-pH environments: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, T S

    2009-04-07

    Acidophilic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) are now being detected in a variety of ‘extreme’ low-pH, radionuclide- and heavy-metal contaminated habitats where Fe(III) reduction is taking place, and may represent a significant proportion of metal-transforming organisms in these environments. Acidiphilium cryptum is our model organism, a facultative iron-respiring Alphaproteobacterium. Major findings of this project have been 1) Discovery of novel outer-membrane and periplasmic cytochromes c in acidophiles that are reactive with Fe and Cr, 2) Discovery of Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms in acidophiles, mediated by c-type cytochromes and other reductase activity, 3) Development of enzyme detection methods specific for Cr-reducing enzymes, 4) Characterization of biofilm formation in A. cryptum, and 5) Annotation of the Acidiphilium cryptum genome (Magnuson, Kusel, and Cummings, DOE-JGI 2005-2006). Two manuscripts and one book chapter have been published, and several more mauscripts are prepared for submission.

  2. Unusual rise in mercury-resistant bacteria in coastal environs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; De, J.

    . When compared with other biota, the responses of heterotrophic bacteria to environmental changes are rapid and consistent [40]. Monitoring of bacterial responses is useful for assessing marine microbial heterotrophy [30] and environmental quality [31... atmospheric Hg 0 could bring about highly undesirable environmental changes. Since Hg 0 is oxidized to Hg 2+ by molecular oxygen [33] in marine environment, it can lead to formation of a variety of mercuric complexes, all of which are deleterious to life...

  3. Methane oxidation by an extremely acidophilic bacterium of the phylum Verrucomicrobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunfield, P.F.; Yurgey, A.Q.; Senin, P.; Smirnova, A.V.; Stott, M.B.; Hou, S.; Ly, B.; Saw, J.H.; Zhou, Z.; Ren, Y.; Wang, J.; Mountain, B.W.; Crowe, M.A.; Weatherby, T.M.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Liesack, W.; Feng, L.; Wang, L.; Alam, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria consume methane as it diffuses away from methanogenic zones of soil and sediment1. They act as a biofilter to reduce methane emissions to the atmosphere, and they are therefore targets in strategies to combat global climate change. No cultured methanotroph grows optim

  4. Global abundance of planktonic heterotrophic protists in the deep ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernice, Massimo C; Forn, Irene; Gomes, Ana; Lara, Elena; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Arrieta, Jesus M; del Carmen Garcia, Francisca; Hernando-Morales, Victor; MacKenzie, Roy; Mestre, Mireia; Sintes, Eva; Teira, Eva; Valencia, Joaquin; Varela, Marta M; Vaqué, Dolors; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon

    2015-03-01

    The dark ocean is one of the largest biomes on Earth, with critical roles in organic matter remineralization and global carbon sequestration. Despite its recognized importance, little is known about some key microbial players, such as the community of heterotrophic protists (HP), which are likely the main consumers of prokaryotic biomass. To investigate this microbial component at a global scale, we determined their abundance and biomass in deepwater column samples from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation using a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. HP were ubiquitously found at all depths investigated down to 4000 m. HP abundances decreased with depth, from an average of 72±19 cells ml(-1) in mesopelagic waters down to 11±1 cells ml(-1) in bathypelagic waters, whereas their total biomass decreased from 280±46 to 50±14 pg C ml(-1). The parameters that better explained the variance of HP abundance were depth and prokaryote abundance, and to lesser extent oxygen concentration. The generally good correlation with prokaryotic abundance suggested active grazing of HP on prokaryotes. On a finer scale, the prokaryote:HP abundance ratio varied at a regional scale, and sites with the highest ratios exhibited a larger contribution of fungi molecular signal. Our study is a step forward towards determining the relationship between HP and their environment, unveiling their importance as players in the dark ocean's microbial food web.

  5. Bias and conflict in phylogenetic inference of myco-heterotrophic plants: a case study in Thismiaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckx, V.; Bakker, F.T.; Huysmans, K.; Smets, B.F.

    2009-01-01

    Due to morphological reduction and absence of amplifiable plastid genes, the identification of photosynthetic relatives of heterotrophic plants is problematic. Although nuclear and mitochondrial gene sequences may offer a welcome alternative source of phylogenetic markers, the presence of rate heter

  6. Bacterial abundance, communities and heterotrophic activities in the coastal waters off Tamil Nadu

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Raghukumar, C.; Sheelu, G.; Chandramohan, D.

    Culturable aerobic heterotrophic bacterial (CAHB) numbers, total direct counts (TDC), bacterial generic composition and uptake of labelled glucose by natural microbial assemblages were studied from a few selected coastal sites off Tamil Nadu. A high...

  7. Screening, growth medium optimisation and heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zongchao; Liu, Ying; Daroch, Maurycy; Geng, Shu; Cheng, Jay J

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a study on screening of microalgal strains from the Peking University Algae Collection and heterotrophic cultivation for biodiesel production of a selected microalgal strain. Among 89 strains, only five were capable of growing under heterotrophic conditions in liquid cultures and Chlorella sp. PKUAC 102 was found the best for the production of heterotrophic algal biodiesel. Composition of the growth medium was optimised using response surface methodology and optimised growth conditions were successfully used for cultivation of the strain in a fermentor. Conversion of algal lipids to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) showed that the lipid profile of the heterotrophically cultivated Chlorella sp. PKUAC 102 contains fatty acids suitable for biodiesel production.

  8. Heterotrophic bacterial responses to the winter–spring phytoplankton bloom in open waters of the NW Mediterranean

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Ana

    2014-12-03

    The response of planktonic heterotrophic prokaryotes to the NW Mediterranean winter–spring offshore phytoplankton bloom was assessed in 3 cruises conducted in March, April–May and September 2009. Bulk measurements of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton biomass and production were complemented with an insight into bacterial physiological structure by single-cell analysis of nucleic acid content [low (LNA) vs. high (HNA)] and membrane integrity (“Live” vs. “Dead” cells). Bacterial production empirical conversion factors (0.82±0.25 SE kg C mol leucine−1) were almost always well below the theoretical value. Major differences in most microbial variables were found among the 3 periods, which varied from extremely high phytoplankton biomass and production during the bloom in March (>1 g C m−2 d−1 primary production) to typically oligotrophic conditions during September stratification (<200 mg C m−2 d−1). In both these periods bacterial production was ~30 mg C m−2 d−1 while very large bacterial production (mean 228, with some stations exceeding 500 mg C m−2 d−1) but low biomass was observed during the April–May post-bloom phase. The contribution of HNA (30–67%) and “Live” cells (47–97%) were temporally opposite in the study periods, with maxima in March and September, respectively. Different relationships were found between physiological structure and bottom-up variables, with HNA bacteria apparently more responsive to phytoplankton only during the bloom, coinciding with larger average cell sizes of LNA bacteria. Moderate phytoplankton–bacterioplankton coupling of biomass and activity was only observed in the bloom and post-bloom phases, while relationships between both compartments were not significant under stratification. With all data pooled, bacteria were only weakly bottom-up controlled. Our analyses show that the biomass and production of planktonic algae and bacteria followed opposite paths in the transition from bloom to

  9. Heterotrophic-autotrophic sequential system for reductive nitrate and perchlorate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Deniz; Cokgor, Emine Ubay; Sahinkaya, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate and perchlorate were identified as significant water contaminants all over the world. This study aims at evaluating the performances of the heterotrophic-autotrophic sequential denitrification process for reductive nitrate and perchlorate removal from drinking water. The reduced nitrate concentration in the heterotrophic reactor increased with increasing methanol concentrations and the remaining nitrate/nitrite was further removed in the following autotrophic denitrifying process. The performances of the sequential process were studied under varying nitrate loads of [Formula: see text] at a fixed hydraulic retention time of 2 h. The C/N ratio in the heterotrophic reactor varied between 1.24 and 2.77 throughout the study. Nitrate and perchlorate reduced completely with maximum initial concentrations of [Formula: see text] and 1000 µg/L, respectively. The maximum denitrification rate for the heterotrophic reactor was [Formula: see text] when the bioreactor was fed with [Formula: see text] and 277 mg/L methanol. For the autotrophic reactor, the highest denitrification rate was [Formula: see text] in the first period when the heterotrophic reactor performance was low. Perchlorate reduction was initiated in the heterotrophic reactor, but completed in the following autotrophic process. Effluent sulphate concentration was below the drinking water standard level of 250 mg/L and pH was in the neutral level.

  10. Alicyclobacillus sp. strain CC2, a thermo-acidophilic bacterium isolated from Deception Island (Antarctica) containing a thermostable superoxide dismutase enzyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniela N. Correa-Llantén; Maximiliano J. Amenábar; Patricio A. Muñoz; María T. Monsalves; Miguel E. Castro; Jenny M.Blamey

    2014-01-01

    A gram-positive, rod-shaped, aerobic, thermo-acidophilic bacterium CC2 (optimal temperature 55℃and pH 4.0), belonging to the genus Alicyclobacillus was isolated from geothermal soil collected from“Cerro Caliente”, Deception Island, Antarctica. Owing to the harsh environmental conditions found in this territory, microorganisms are exposed to conditions that trigger the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). They must have an effective antioxidant defense system to deal with this oxidative stress. We focused on one of the most important enzymes: superoxide dismutase, which was partially purified and characterized. This study presents the ifrst report of a thermo-acidophilic bacterium isolated from Deception Island with a thermostable superoxide dismutase (SOD).

  11. Real-time ArcGIS and heterotrophic plate count based chloramine disinfectant control in water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaohui; Zhi, Xinghua; Zhu, Huifeng; Meng, Mingqun; Zhang, Mingde

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of chloramine residual on bacteria growth and regrowth and the relationship between heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs) and the concentration of chloramine residual in the Shanghai drinking water distribution system (DWDS). In this study, models to control HPCs in the water distribution system and consumer taps are also developed. Real-time ArcGIS was applied to show the distribution and changed results of the chloramine residual concentration in the pipe system by using these models. Residual regression analysis was used to get a reasonable range of the threshold values that allows the chloramine residual to efficiently inhibit bacteria growth in the Shanghai DWDS; the threshold values should be between 0.45 and 0.5 mg/L in pipe water and 0.2 and 0.25 mg/L in tap water. The low residual chloramine value (0.05 mg/L) of the Chinese drinking water quality standard may pose a potential health risk for microorganisms that should be improved. Disinfection by-products (DBPs) were detected, but no health risk was identified.

  12. Direct and Indirect Evidence of Size-Selective Grazing on Pelagic Bacteria by Freshwater Nanoflagellates

    OpenAIRE

    Šimek, Karel; Thomas H. Chrzanowski

    1992-01-01

    Size-selective grazing of three heterotrophic nanoflagellates (with cell sizes of 21, 44, and 66 μm3) isolated from Lake Arlington, Texas was examined by using a natural mixture of fluorescence labelled lake bacteria. Sizes of ingested bacteria in food vacuoles were directly measured. Larger bacterial cells were ingested at a frequency much higher than that at which they occurred in the assemblage, indicating preferential flagellate grazing on the larger size classes within the lake bacteriop...

  13. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by an acidophilic Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain AJH1 isolated from a mineral mining site in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulazhagan, P; Al-Shekri, K; Huda, Q; Godon, J J; Basahi, J M; Jeyakumar, D

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims at analyzing the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at acidic conditions (pH = 2) by acidophilic Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain AJH1 (KU664513). The strain AJH1 was obtained from an enrichment culture obtained from soil samples of mining area in the presence of PAH as sole sources of carbon and energy. Strain AJH1was able to degrade low (anthracene, phenanthrene, naphthalene, fluorene) and high (pyrene, benzo(e)pyrene and benzo(k)fluoranthene) molecular weight PAHs in acidophilic mineral salt medium at pH 2, with removal rates of up to 95% (LMW PAH) and 80% (HMW PAH), respectively. In addition, strain AJH1 treated petroleum wastewater with 89 ± 1.1% COD removal under acidic condition (pH 2) in a continuously stirred reactor. Acidophilic S. maltophilia strain AJH1, hence holds the promise as an effective degrader for biological treatment of PAHs contaminated wastewater at acidic pH.

  14. Activities of methionine-γ-lyase in the acidophilic archaeon “Ferroplasma acidarmanus” strain fer1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan MA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available M A Khan,1 Madeline M López-Muñoz,2 Charles W Kaspar,3 Kai F Hung1 1Department of Biological Sciences, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA; 2Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico; 3Bacteriology Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Biogeochemical processes on exposed pyrite ores result in extremely high levels of sulfuric acid at these locations. Acidophiles that thrive in these conditions must overcome significant challenges, including an environment with proton concentrations at pH 3 or below. The role of sulfur metabolism in the archaeon “Ferroplasma acidarmanus” strain fer1's ability to thrive in this environment was investigated due to its growth-dependent production of methanethiol, a volatile organic sulfur compound. Two putative sequences for methionine-γ-lyase (EC 4.4.1.11, an enzyme known to carry out α, γ-elimination on L-methionine to produce methanethiol, were identified in fer1. Bioinformatic analyses identified a conserved pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP binding domain and a partially conserved catalytic domain in both putative sequences. Detection of PLP-dependent and L-methionine-dependent production of α-keto compounds and thiol groups in fer1 confirmed the presence of methionine-γ-lyase activity. Further, fer1 lysate was capable of processing related substrates, including D-methionine, L-cysteine, L-cystathionine, and L/D-homocysteine. When the two putative fer1 methionine-γ-lyase gene-coded proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, one sequence demonstrated an ability to carry out α, γ-elimination activity, while the other exhibited γ-replacement activity. These fer1 methionine-γ-lyases also exhibited optimum pH, substrate specificity, and catalytic preferences that are different from methionine-γ-lyases from other organisms. These differences are discussed in the context of molecular phylogeny constructed using a maximum

  15. Heterotrophic plate count methodology in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasoner, Donald J

    2004-05-01

    In the United States (US), the history of bacterial plate counting (BPC) methods used for water can be traced largely through Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater (Standard Methods). The bacterial count method has evolved from the original Standard Methods (1st edition, 1905) plate count which used nutrient gelatin and incubation at 20 degrees C for 48 h, to the HPC method options in the latest edition of Standard Methods that provide greater flexibility of application, depending on the data needs of the water analyst. The use of agar-agar as a gelling agent, replacing gelatin, allowed the use of higher incubation temperatures and resulted in the "body temperature count" (37 degrees C) found in the 3rd through the 8th edition of Standard Methods. The change from 37 degrees C incubation to 35+/-0.5 degrees C accommodated laboratories that did both milk and water analyses. By using a single temperature, fewer incubators were needed. The term "standard plate count" (SPC) first appeared in 1960 (11th edition) along with plate count agar. Incubation at 20 degrees C for the plate count was dropped from the 13th to 15th editions and few changes were made in the SPC method from the 11th edition through the 13th editions. Plate count analysis of bottled waters was included in the 14th edition (1975), calling for incubation at 35+/-0.5 degrees C for 72+/-4 h. Perhaps the most significant changes in plate count methods occurred with the 16th edition (1985). The term heterotrophic plate count replaced the standard plate count, and the spread plate (SP) and membrane filter (MF) methods were added along with new media for pour and spread plates (R2A agar and NWRI agar, both low nutrient) and for the membrane filter method (mHPC medium). The use of low nutrient media, lower incubation temperature, and longer incubation times, results in higher plate count results for most water samples. The options currently available, including low and high nutrient media

  16. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  17. Characterization of a novel thiosulfate dehydrogenase from a marine acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strain SH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Sultana; Yoshino, Eriko; Kanao, Tadayoshi; Kamimura, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    A marine acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strain SH, was isolated to develop a bioleaching process for NaCl-containing sulfide minerals. Because the sulfur moiety of sulfide minerals is metabolized to sulfate via thiosulfate as an intermediate, we purified and characterized the thiosulfate dehydrogenase (TSD) from strain SH. The enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 44 kDa and was purified 71-fold from the solubilized membrane fraction. Tetrathionate was the product of the TSD-oxidized thiosulfate and ferricyanide or ubiquinone was the electron acceptor. Maximum enzyme activity was observed at pH 4.0, 40 °C, and 200 mM NaCl. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NaCl-stimulated TSD activity. TSD was structurally different from the previously reported thiosulfate-oxidizing enzymes. In addition, TSD activity was strongly inhibited by 2-heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline N-oxide, suggesting that the TSD is a novel thiosulfate:quinone reductase.

  18. Organization and regulation of the arsenite oxidase operon of the moderately acidophilic and facultative chemoautotrophic Thiomonas arsenitoxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyemi, Djamila; Moinier, Danielle; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2013-11-01

    Thiomonas arsenitoxydans is an acidophilic and facultatively autotrophic bacterium that can grow by oxidizing arsenite to arsenate. A comparative genomic analysis showed that the T. arsenitoxydans aioBA cluster encoding the two subunits of arsenite oxidase is distinct from the other clusters, with two specific genes encoding a cytochrome c and a metalloregulator belonging to the ArsR/SmtB family. These genes are cotranscribed with aioBA, suggesting that these cytochromes c are involved in arsenite oxidation and that this operon is controlled by the metalloregulator. The growth of T. arsenitoxydans in the presence of thiosulfate and arsenite, or arsenate, is biphasic. Real-time PCR experiments showed that the operon is transcribed during the second growth phase in the presence of arsenite or arsenate, whereas antimonite had no effect. These results suggest that the expression of the aioBA operon of T. arsenitoxydans is regulated by the electron donor present in the medium, i.e., is induced in the presence of arsenic but is repressed by more energetic substrates. Our data indicate that the genetic organization and regulation of the aioBA operon of T. arsenitoxydans differ from those of the other arsenite oxidizers.

  19. Investigation of mixotrophic, heterotrophic, and autotrophic growth of Chlorella vulgaris under agricultural waste medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Mirzaie, M A; Kalbasi, M; Mousavi, S M; Ghobadian, B

    2016-01-01

    Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and its lipid production were investigated under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic conditions. Cheap agricultural waste molasses and corn steep liquor from industries were used as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Chlorella vulgaris grew remarkably under this agricultural waste medium, which resulted in a reduction in the final cost of the biodiesel production. Maximum dry weight of 2.62 g L(-1) was obtained in mixotrophic growth with the highest lipid concentration of 0.86 g L(-1). These biomass and lipid concentrations were, respectively, 140% and 170% higher than autotrophic growth and 300% and 1200% higher than heterotrophic growth. In mixotrophic growth, independent or simultaneous occurrence of autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms was investigated. The growth of the microalgae was observed to take place first heterotrophically to a minimum substrate concentration with a little fraction in growth under autotrophic metabolism, and then the cells grew more autotrophically. It was found that mixotrophic growth was not a simple combination of heterotrophic and autotrophic growth.

  20. Bioleaching of spent hydrotreating catalyst by acidophilic thermophile Acidianus brierleyi: Leaching mechanism and effect of decoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Abhilasha; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2013-02-01

    Bioleaching of spent hydrotreating catalyst by thermophillic archae Acidianus brierleyi was investigated. The spent catalyst (containing Al, Fe, Ni and Mo as major elements) was characterized, and the effect of pretreatment (decoking) on two-step and spent medium leaching was examined at 1% w/v pulp density. Decoking resulted in removal of carbonaceous deposits and volatile impurities, and affected the solubility of metal compounds through oxidization of the metal sulfides. Nearly 100% extraction was achieved using spent medium leaching for Fe, Ni and Mo, and 67% for Al. Bioleaching reduced nickel concentration in the leachate below the regulated levels for safe waste disposal. Chemical (i.e. abiotic) leaching using equimolar concentration of sulfuric acid produced by the bacteria during two-step process achieved a lower leaching efficiency (by up to 30%). Results indicated that A. brierleyi successfully leached heavy metals from spent catalyst.

  1. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the North Pacific Gyre. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Matthew T.; Mannino, Antonio; Kirchman, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The abundance of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AM) bacteria, cyanobacteria and heterotrophs was examined in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the central North Pacific gyre using infrared fluorescence microscopy coupled with image analysis and flow cytometry. AAP bacteria comprised 5% to 16% of total prokaryotes in the Atlantic but only 5% or less in the Pacific. In the Atlantic, AAP bacterial abundance was as much as 2-fold higher than Prochlorococcus and 10-folder higher than Synechococcus. In contrast, Prochlorococcus outnumbered AAP bacteria 5- to 50-fold in the Pacific. In both oceans, subsurface abundance maxima occurred within the photic zone, and AAP bacteria were least abundant below the 1% light depth. Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) were low (approx.1%) compared to chlorophyll a. Although the BChl a content of AAP bacteria per cell was typically 20- to 250-fold lower than the divinyl-chlorophyll a content of Prochlorococcus, in shelf break water the pigment content of AAP bacteria approached that of Prochlorococcus. The abundance of AAP bacteria rivaled some groups of strictly heterotrophic bacteria and was often higher than the abundance of known AAP genera (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter spp.). The distribution of AAP bacteria in the water column, which was similar in the Atlantic and the Pacific, was consistent with phototrophy.

  2. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    in plastic bags with subsequent melting and measurements of changes in total O2 concentrations. The standard incubations showed that the annual succession followed a distinctive pattern, with a low, almost balancing heterotrophic and autotrophic activity during February and March. This period was followed...... by an algal bloom in late March and April, leading to a net autotrophic community. During February and March, the oxygen level in the bag incubations remained constant, validating the low balanced heterotrophic and autotrophic activity. As the autotrophic activity exceeded the heterotrophic activity in late...... March and April, it resulted in a significant net oxygen accumulation in the bag incubations. Integrated over the entire season, the sea ice of Malene Bight was net autotrophic with an annual net carbon fixation of 220 mg C m– 2, reflecting the net result of a sea ice-related gross primary production...

  3. Transmission of specific groups of bacteria through water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabińska-Łoniewska, Anna; Wardzyńska, Grazyna; Pajor, Elzbieta; Korsak, Dorota; Boryń, Krystyna

    2007-01-01

    Microbial contamination of a water distribution system was examined. The number and the taxonomy of non-pigmented and pigmented heterotrophic bacteria (HB), number of bacteria (Pseudomonas sp., Enterococcus sp., Campylobacter sp., Yersinia sp., representatives of the Enterobacteriaceae, coagulase-positive staphylococci, and C. pefringens) in the bulk water phase, biomass of zoogloeal aggregates of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa and rotifers (ZABFAPR) (separated from the above on 5 microm pore size filters) and in pipe sediments was determined. An increased number of HB occurred at the sampling sites situated as close as 4.2 km to the Water Treatment Plant (WTP), and was especially significant at 10.3 km. It was shown that the main reservoir of hygienically relevant bacteria did not occur in the water phase which is monitored in routine control analyses carried out by the WTP laboratories, but in the ZABFAPR biomass not monitored so far.

  4. Nitrogen removal characteristics of a heterotrophic nitrifier Acinetobacter junii YB and its potential application for the treatment of high-strength nitrogenous wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Ren, Yong-Xiang; Liang, Xian; Zhao, Si-Qi; Wang, Jun-Ping; Xia, Zhi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    Acinetobacter junii YB was found to exhibit efficient heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification ability, with the maximum ammonium, nitrite and nitrate removal rate of 8.82, 8.45 and 7.98 mg/L/h, respectively. Meanwhile, ammonium was found to be removed preferentially in the process of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in mixed N-sources. The successful PCR amplification of hao, napA and nirS genes further provided additional evidence of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by strain YB. In addition, orthogonal test showed that dissolved oxygen was the most important determinant of nitrite removal, and the optimal conditions were C/N 15, pH 7.0, 37 °C and 200 rpm. Furthermore, stable nitrogen and organics removal were achieved by one-time dosing of enriched bacteria in a sequencing batch reactor. The inoculation of strain YB significantly improved the denitrification efficiency with minimal accumulation of nitrified products, which demonstrated high potential of the isolate for future practical applications.

  5. The Role of Heterotrophic Microbial Communities in Estuarine C Budgets and the Biogeochemical C Cycle with Implications for Global Warming: Research Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O Roger

    2016-05-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive and economically important marine ecosystems at the land-ocean interface and contribute significantly to exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere. Estuarine microbial communities are major links in the biogeochemical C cycle and flow of C in food webs from primary producers to higher consumers. Considerable attention has been given to bacteria and autotrophic eukaryotes in estuarine ecosystems, but less research has been devoted to the role of heterotrophic eukaryotic microbes. Current research is reviewed here on the role of heterotrophic eukaryotic microbes in C biogeochemistry and ecology of estuaries, with particular attention to C budgets, trophodynamics, and the metabolic fate of C in microbial communities. Some attention is given to the importance of these processes in climate change and global warming, especially in relation to sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 , while also documenting the current paucity of research on the role of eukaryotic microbes that contribute to this larger question of C biogeochemistry and the environment. Some recommendations are made for future directions of research and opportunities of applying newer technologies and analytical approaches to a more refined analysis of the role of C in estuarine microbial community processes and the biogeochemical C cycle.

  6. Loss of cytochrome cM stimulates cyanobacterial heterotrophic growth in the dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraide, Yuto; Oshima, Kenshiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Uesaka, Kazuma; Hirose, Yuu; Tsujimoto, Ryoma; Yamamoto, Haruki; Okamoto, Shinobu; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Terauchi, Kazuki; Omata, Tatsuo; Ihara, Kunio; Hattori, Masahira; Fujita, Yuichi

    2015-02-01

    Although cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs, they have the capability for heterotrophic metabolism that enables them to survive in their natural habitat. However, cyanobacterial species that grow heterotrophically in the dark are rare. It remains largely unknown how cyanobacteria regulate heterotrophic activity. The cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya boryana grows heterotrophically with glucose in the dark. A dark-adapted variant dg5 isolated from the wild type (WT) exhibits enhanced heterotrophic growth in the dark. We sequenced the genomes of dg5 and the WT to identify the mutation(s) of dg5. The WT genome consists of a circular chromosome (6,176,364 bp), a circular plasmid pLBA (77,793 bp) and two linear plasmids pLBX (504,942 bp) and pLBY (44,369 bp). Genome comparison revealed three mutation sites. Phenotype analysis of mutants isolated from the WT by introducing these mutations individually revealed that the relevant mutation is a single adenine insertion causing a frameshift of cytM encoding Cyt c(M). The respiratory oxygen consumption of the cytM-lacking mutant grown in the dark was significantly higher than that of the WT. We isolated a cytM-lacking mutant, ΔcytM, from another cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and ΔcytM grew in the dark with a doubling time of 33 h in contrast to no growth of the WT. The respiratory oxygen consumption of ΔcytM grown in the dark was about 2-fold higher than that of the WT. These results suggest a suppressive role(s) for Cyt cM in regulation of heterotrophic activity.

  7. Community diversity of bacteria in digestive tract of mud snail (Bullacta exarata Philippi) and its rearing shoal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国良; 郑天伦; 陆彤霞; 王一农; 於宏; 金珊

    2002-01-01

    The bacterial flora in the digestive tract of B. exarata Philippi and its rearing shoal were investigated, respectively. A total of 107 strains of heterotrophic bacteria, isolated from crop, stomach and intestine, mainly belong to genera Photobacterium, Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Vibrio. Varieties of bacteria in crop were significantly more than that in stomach and in intestine. A total of 173 strains of bacteria were isolated from the rearing shoal, belonging to 13 genera. The 5 predominant genera are Photobacterium, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio and some genera of Enterobacteriaceae. The number of heterotrophic bacteria and Vibrio in rearing shoal changed in line with the alteration of the temperature, and were significantly affected by the use of pesticide.

  8. Toxicological benchmarks for screening potential contaminants of concern for effects on soil and litter invertebrates and heterotrophic process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Will, M.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    One of the initial stages in ecological risk assessments for hazardous waste sites is the screening of contaminants to determine which of them are worthy of further consideration as {open_quotes}contaminants of potential concern.{close_quotes} This process is termed {open_quotes}contaminant screening.{close_quotes} It is performed by comparing measured ambient concentrations of chemicals to benchmark concentrations. Currently, no standard benchmark concentrations exist for assessing contaminants in soil with respect to their toxicity to soil- and litter-dwelling invertebrates, including earthworms, other micro- and macroinvertebrates, or heterotrophic bacteria and fungi. This report presents a standard method for deriving benchmarks for this purpose, sets of data concerning effects of chemicals in soil on invertebrates and soil microbial processes, and benchmarks for chemicals potentially associated with United States Department of Energy sites. In addition, literature describing the experiments from which data were drawn for benchmark derivation. Chemicals that are found in soil at concentrations exceeding both the benchmarks and the background concentration for the soil type should be considered contaminants of potential concern.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Limnobacter sp. Strain CACIAM 66H1, a Heterotrophic Bacterium Associated with Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fábio Daniel Florêncio; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Oliveira, Karol Guimarães; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-05-19

    Ecological interactions between cyanobacteria and heterotrophic prokaryotes are poorly known. To improve the genomic studies of heterotrophic bacterium-cyanobacterium associations, the draft genome sequence (3.2 Mbp) of Limnobacter sp. strain CACIAM 66H1, found in a nonaxenic culture of Synechococcus sp. (cyanobacteria), is presented here.

  10. Disruption of narH, narJ, and moaE Inhibits Heterotrophic Nitrification in Pseudomonas Strain M19

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Interruptions in three nitrate reductase-related genes, narH, narJ, and moaE, inhibited heterotrophic nitrification in Pseudomonas strain M19. No nitrate was detected in the medium, and nitrification proceeded in the presence of a nitrate reductase inhibitor. Heterotrophic nitrification was greatly stimulated by the addition of nitrate.

  11. Energetics and Application of Heterotrophy in Acetogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2016-07-15

    Acetogenic bacteria are a diverse group of strictly anaerobic bacteria that utilize the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for CO2 fixation and energy conservation. These microorganisms play an important part in the global carbon cycle and are a key component of the anaerobic food web. Their most prominent metabolic feature is autotrophic growth with molecular hydrogen and carbon dioxide as the substrates. However, most members also show an outstanding metabolic flexibility for utilizing a vast variety of different substrates. In contrast to autotrophic growth, which is hardly competitive, metabolic flexibility is seen as a key ability of acetogens to compete in ecosystems and might explain the almost-ubiquitous distribution of acetogenic bacteria in anoxic environments. This review covers the latest findings with respect to the heterotrophic metabolism of acetogenic bacteria, including utilization of carbohydrates, lactate, and different alcohols, especially in the model acetogen Acetobacterium woodii Modularity of metabolism, a key concept of pathway design in synthetic biology, together with electron bifurcation, to overcome energetic barriers, appears to be the basis for the amazing substrate spectrum. At the same time, acetogens depend on only a relatively small number of enzymes to expand the substrate spectrum. We will discuss the energetic advantages of coupling CO2 reduction to fermentations that exploit otherwise-inaccessible substrates and the ecological advantages, as well as the biotechnological applications of the heterotrophic metabolism of acetogens.

  12. Unmodified prolactin (PRL) promotes PRL secretion and acidophil hypertrophy and is associated with pituitary hyperplasia in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Terence E; Vue, Mayza; Brekhus, Sharyn; Khong, Amy; Ho, Timothy W C; Walker, Ameae M

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we have tested the hypothesis that unmodified prolactin (U-PRL) and phosphorylated prolactin (P-PRL) have differential roles in the autoregulation of PRL secretion in vivo. Recombinant human U-PRL and a molecular mimic of P-PRL (S179D PRL) were administered to male rats and to female rats in different physiological states and the effect on rat PRL release was measured. Administration of U-PRL elevated rat PRL in all female animals, but was without effect in males. By contrast, S179D PRL was inactive in females, but inhibited PRL release in males. Morphometric and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated acidophil hypertrophy and evidence of increased PRL secretion in the pituitaries of U-PRL-treated females. Analysis of the two forms of PRL during prolactinoma induction in two differentially susceptible strains of rats found a strong temporal correlation among increased ratios of U-PRL: P-PRL, increased circulating PRL, and increased cell proliferation. We conclude (1). that the autoregulatory mechanism(s) can distinguish between the two major forms of PRL and that higher proportions of U-PRL not only allow for higher circulating levels of PRL, but are also autostimulatory, (2). that the autoregulatory mechanism( s) are set differently in males and females such that females are more sensitive to autostimulation by U-PRL and less sensitive to inhibition by P-PRL, and (3). that U-PRL and P-PRL may also have differential roles in the regulation of pituitary cell proliferation.

  13. Cytochrome 572 is a conspicuous membrane protein with iron oxidation activity purified directly from a natural acidophilic microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeans, Chris; Singer, Steven W; Chan, Clara S; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Shah, Manesh; Hettich, Robert L; Banfield, Jillian F; Thelen, Michael P

    2008-05-01

    Recently, there has been intense interest in the role of electron transfer by microbial communities in biogeochemical systems. We examined the process of iron oxidation by microbial biofilms in one of the most extreme environments on earth, where the inhabited water is pH 0.5-1.2 and laden with toxic metals. To approach the mechanism of Fe(II) oxidation as a means of cellular energy acquisition, we isolated proteins from natural samples and found a conspicuous and novel cytochrome, Cyt(572), which is unlike any known cytochrome. Both the character of its covalently bound prosthetic heme group and protein sequence are unusual. Extraction of proteins directly from environmental biofilm samples followed by membrane fractionation, detergent solubilization and gel filtration chromatography resulted in the purification of an abundant yellow-red protein. The purified protein has a cytochrome c-type heme binding motif, CxxCH, but a unique spectral signature at 572 nm, and thus is called Cyt(572). It readily oxidizes Fe(2+) in the physiologically relevant acidic regime, from pH 0.95-3.4. Other physical characteristics are indicative of a membrane-bound multimeric protein. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicates that the protein is largely beta-stranded, and 2D Blue-Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and chemical crosslinking independently point to a multi-subunit structure for Cyt(572). By analyzing environmental genomic information from biofilms in several distinctly different mine locations, we found multiple genetic variants of Cyt(572). MS proteomics of extracts from these biofilms substantiated the prevalence of these variants in the ecosystem. Due to its abundance, cellular location and Fe(2+) oxidation activity at very low pH, we propose that Cyt(572) provides a critical function for fitness within the ecological niche of these acidophilic microbial communities.

  14. Differential lipid and fatty acid profiles of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic Chlorella zofingiensis: assessment of algal oils for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Junchao; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and compare the lipid class and fatty acid composition of the green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis cultivated under photoautotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, a 900% increase in lipid yield was achieved in heterotrophic cells fed with 30 g L(-1) of glucose. Furthermore heterotrophic cells accumulated predominantly neutral lipids (NL) that accounted for 79.5% of total lipids with 88.7% being triacylglycerol (TAG); whereas photoautotrophic cells contained mainly the membrane lipids glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL). Together with the much higher content of oleic acid (C18:1) (35.2% of total fatty acids), oils from heterotrophic C. zofingiensis appear to be more feasible for biodiesel production. Our study highlights the possibility of using heterotrophic algae for producing high quality biodiesel.

  15. [The use of real-time PCR technology to assess the effectiveness of methods of DNA extraction from cultures of acidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogatykh, S V; Dokshukina, A A; Khaĭnasova, T S; Muradov, S V; Kofiadi, I A

    2011-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of efficiency of several methods of DNA extraction from storage cultures of acidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganism communities isolated from sulfide ores of Shanuch ore deposit (Kamchatka peninsula) was conducted. DNA extraction methods in various combinations of physical (heating to 65-98 degrees C, grinding with SiO2 particles), enzymatic (treatment with lysozyme and proteinase K), and chemical (GuSCN, CTAB and KOH) treatments were tested. The evaluation of efficiency was performed using Real-time PCR. The best result was obtained for the combined method based on GuSCN lysis activity (lysis at 65 degrees C) followed by purification with phenol and chloroform.

  16. Acidophilic methanogens and their applications in anaerobic digestion.%嗜酸产甲烷菌及其在厌氧处理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓慧; 吴伟祥; 韩志英; 石德智

    2011-01-01

    产甲烷菌在自然界碳素循环过程中发挥着重要作用.酸性泥炭沼泽环境中存在着多种未知的产甲烷古菌,其中嗜酸产甲烷菌因其特殊的生长代谢特征近年来引起学者的广泛关注.若将嗜酸产甲烷菌应用于高浓度有机废物或废水的厌氧消化过程中,可从本质上克服因酸积累造成的产甲烷抑制,减少运行成本,扩展厌氧消化处理技术的应用范围.本文综述了嗜酸产甲烷菌的富集分离培养方法、生理生化特性、代谢特征及相关分子生物学研究等内容,并对其在厌氧处理中的应用前景进行了分析和展望,提出了未来研究的方向.%Methanogens play an important role in global carbon cycle. There exists a range of unknown methanogenic archaea in acidic peat lands. among which. acidophilic methanogens have attracted increasing research interests because of their special metabolic characteristics. To introduce acidophilic methanogens in the anaerobic digestion process of high concentration organic wastes or waste water could essentially overcome the inhibition of acid accumulation on the methanogens and help reduce the operation cost. broadening the industrial application of anaerobic bio-treatment technology. In this paper, we reviewed the recent researches on acidophilic methanogens, with the focus on enrichment and isolation methods, physiological and biochemical characters. metabolic characteristics. and application of molecular biology. The potential applications of acidophilic methanogens in anaerobic digestion process were analyzed and proposed, and the directions for further researches were suggested.

  17. Abundance and single-cell activity of heterotrophic bacterial groups in the western Arctic Ocean in summer and winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikrad, Mrinalini P; Cottrell, M T; Kirchman, D L

    2012-04-01

    Environmental conditions in the western Arctic Ocean range from constant light and nutrient depletion in summer to complete darkness and sea ice cover in winter. This seasonal environmental variation is likely to have an effect on the use of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by heterotrophic bacteria in surface water. However, this effect is not well studied and we know little about the activity of specific bacterial clades in the surface oceans. The use of DOM by three bacterial subgroups in both winter and summer was examined by microautoradiography combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization. We found selective use of substrates by these groups, although the abundances of Ant4D3 (Antarctic Gammaproteobacteria), Polaribacter (Bacteroidetes), and SAR11 (Alphaproteobacteria) were not different between summer and winter in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. The number of cells taking up glucose within all three bacterial groups decreased significantly from summer to winter, while the percentage of cells using leucine did not show a clear pattern between seasons. The uptake of the amino acid mix increased substantially from summer to winter by the Ant4D3 group, although such a large increase in uptake was not seen for the other two groups. Use of glucose by bacteria, but not use of leucine or the amino acid mix, related strongly to inorganic nutrients, chlorophyll a, and other environmental factors. Our results suggest a switch in use of dissolved organic substrates from summer to winter and that the three phylogenetic subgroups examined fill different niches in DOM use in the two seasons.

  18. Dynamics of natural prokaryotes, viruses and heterotrophic nanoflagellates in alpine karstic groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.C. Wilhartilz; A.K.T Krischner; C.P.D. Brussaard; U.R. Fisher; C. Wieltschnig; H. Stadler; A.H. Farnleitner

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal dynamics of naturally occurring prokaryotes, viruses, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates in two hydro-geologically contrasting alpine karst springs were monitored over three annual cycles. To our knowledge, this study is the first to shed light on the occurrence and possible interrelationshi

  19. Warming and Acidification Effects on Planktonic Heterotrophic Pico- and Nanoflagellates in a Mesocosm Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustaka-Gouni, Maria; Kormas, Konstantinos A; Scotti, Marco; Vardaka, Elisabeth; Sommer, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    We studied the response of the heterotrophic flagellate (HF) community to the combined impact of warming and ocean acidification in a mesocosm experiment with a plankton community from the western Baltic Sea. We performed a quantitative analysis of the response at the level of total biomass and size classes and a semi-quantitative one at the level of individual taxa. Total biomass of HF was significantly lower under higher temperatures while there was no significant effect of CO2. The mean biomass of the picoflagellates did not respond to temperature while the three nanoflagellate size classes (class limits 3, 5, 8, 15μm) responded negatively to warming while not responding to CO2. The taxon-level results indicate that heterotrophic flagellates do not form a homogenous trophic guild, as often assumed in pelagic food web studies. Instead, the heterotrophic flagellates formed a "food web within the food web". There was a pronounced succession of flagellates leading from a dominance of bacterivores and colloidal matter feeders before the phytoplankton bloom to omnivorous feeders preying upon phytoplankton and heterotrophic flagellates during and after the bloom. This complex intraguild predation patterns probably dampened the response to experimental treatments.

  20. Macrofauna regulate heterotrophic bacterial carbon and nitrogen incorporation in low-oxygen sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunter, W.R.; Veuger, B.; Witte, U.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) currently impinge upon >1 million km(2) of sea floor and are predicted to expand with climate change. We investigated how changes in oxygen availability, macrofaunal biomass and retention of labile organic matter (OM) regulate heterotrophic bacterial C and N incorporation

  1. Impact of Sulfur Starvation in Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Cultures of the Extremophilic Microalga Galdieria phlegrea (Cyanidiophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfagna, Simona; Bottone, Claudia; Cataletto, Pia Rosa; Petriccione, Milena; Pinto, Gabriele; Salbitani, Giovanna; Vona, Vincenza; Pollio, Antonino; Ciniglia, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    In plants and algae, sulfate assimilation and cysteine synthesis are regulated by sulfur (S) accessibility from the environment. This study reports the effects of S deprivation in autotrophic and heterotrophic cultures of Galdieria phlegrea (Cyanidiophyceae), a unicellular red alga isolated in the Solfatara crater located in Campi Flegrei (Naples, Italy), where H2S is the prevalent form of gaseous S in the fumarolic fluids and S is widespread in the soils near the fumaroles. This is the first report on the effects of S deprivation on a sulfurous microalga that is also able to grow heterotrophically in the dark. The removal of S from the culture medium of illuminated cells caused a decrease in the soluble protein content and a significant decrease in the intracellular levels of glutathione. Cells from heterotrophic cultures of G. phlegrea exhibited high levels of internal proteins and high glutathione content, which did not diminish during S starvation, but rather glutathione significantly increased. The activity of O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), the enzyme synthesizing cysteine, was enhanced under S deprivation in a time-dependent manner in autotrophic but not in heterotrophic cells. Analysis of the transcript abundance of the OASTL gene supports the OASTL activity increase in autotrophic cultures under S deprivation.

  2. Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and Heterotrophic Dinoflagellates at San Clemente Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    2 Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and Heterotrophic Dinoflagellates at San Clemente Island David Lapota Space and Naval...Warfare Systems Center, Pacific USA 1. Introduction A significant portion of bioluminescence in all oceans is produced by dinoflagellates . Numerous...studies have documented the ubiquitous distribution of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in near surface waters (Seliger et al., 1961; Yentsch and Laird

  3. Feeding, growth and metabolism of the marine heterotrophic dinoflagellate Gyrodinium dominans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmoker, Claire; Thor, Peter; Hernández-león, Santiago;

    2011-01-01

    Rates of grazing, growth, and respiration were studied in the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Gyrodinium dominans experiencing a single pulse of prey. Additionally, rates of grazing and growth were compared to those of G. dominans growing with constant concentrations of prey. The maximal specific...

  4. Effects of ultraviolet light disinfection on tetracycline-resistant bacteria in wastewater effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, H; Sullivan, B; Kaur, J; Karthikeyan, R

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitous use of antibiotics has led to an increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, including strains that are multidrug-resistant, pathogenic, or both. There is also evidence to suggest that antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) spread to the environment, humans, and animals through wastewater effluents. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection on antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Wastewater effluent samples from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Texas were evaluated for differences in tetracycline-resistant bacteria before and after UV treatment. The effects of photoreactivation or dark repair on the reactivation of bacteria present in WWTP effluent after UV disinfection were also examined. Culture-based methods were used to characterize viable heterotrophic, tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic, Escherichia coli, and tetracycline-resistant E. coli bacteria present before and after UV treatment. UV disinfection was found to be as effective at reducing concentrations of resistant heterotrophs and E. coli, as it was at reducing total bacterial concentrations. The lowest survival ratio following UV disinfection was observed in tetracycline-resistant E. coli showing particular susceptibility to UV treatment. Photoreactivation and dark repair rates were found to be comparable to each other for all bacterial populations.

  5. Heterotrophic microflora of highly alkaline (pH > 13) brown mud disposal site drainage water near Ziar nad Hronom (Banska Bystrica region, Slovakia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramova, Zuzana; Remenar, Matej; Javorsky, Peter; Pristas, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Brown mud is a waste by-product of alumina production by Bayer process. Due to extensive sodium hydroxide use in the process, brown mud disposal site near Ziar nad Hronom (Banska Bystrica region, Slovakia) and drainage water are ones of the greatest environmental burdens in Slovakia. Drainage water from this landfills has pH value higher than 13, and it contains many heavy metals and elevated salt content. In our experiments, relatively numerous bacterial population was detected in the drainage water with frequency of about 80 cfu/ml using cultivation approach. The alkalitolerant heterotrophic isolates were identified by combination of MALDI-TOF and 16S rDNA analysis. Drainage water population was dominated by Actinobacteria (Microbacterium spp. and Micrococcus spp.) followed by low G + C-content gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus spp.). Two isolates belonged to gram-negative bacteria only, identified as Brevundimonas spp. Phylogenetic and biochemical analyses indicate that nearly half of the bacteria isolated are probably representatives of a new species. Brown mud disposal site is proposed as a source of new bacterial taxa possibly used in bioremediation processes.

  6. A new iron-oxidizing/O2-reducing supercomplex spanning both inner and outer membranes, isolated from the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelle, Cindy; Guiral, Marianne; Malarte, Guillaume; Ledgham, Fouzia; Leroy, Gisèle; Brugna, Myriam; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse

    2008-09-19

    The iron respiratory chain of the acidophilic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans involves various metalloenzymes. Here we demonstrate that the oxygen reduction pathway from ferrous iron (named downhill pathway) is organized as a supercomplex constituted of proteins located in the outer and inner membranes as well as in the periplasm. For the first time, the outer membrane-bound cytochrome c Cyc2 was purified, and we showed that it is responsible for iron oxidation and determined that its redox potential is the highest measured to date for a cytochrome c. The organization of metalloproteins inside the supramolecular structure was specified by protein-protein interaction experiments. The isolated complex spanning the two membranes had iron oxidase as well as oxygen reductase activities, indicating functional electron transfer between the first iron electron acceptor, Cyc2, and the Cu(A) center of cytochrome c oxidase aa(3). This is the first characterization of a respirasome from an acidophilic bacterium. In Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans,O(2) reduction from ferrous iron must be coupled to the energy-consuming reduction of NAD(+)(P) from ferrous iron (uphill pathway) required for CO(2) fixation and other anabolic processes. Besides the proteins involved in the O(2) reduction, there were additional proteins in the supercomplex, involved in uphill pathway (bc complex and cytochrome Cyc(42)), suggesting a possible physical link between these two pathways.

  7. Health risks associated with the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in greywater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Moretton

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The removal and disposal of waste from domestic activities is a major health problem in densely populated urban areas. In many areas of Greater Buenos Aires, greywater is disposed in open ditches and risk potential of this has not been adequately quantified. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and its resistance profile present in raw greywater obtained from a channel located in the area of Ingeniero Budge Buenos Aires Province. Thus, the prevalence of heterotrophic bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics and vancomycin-resistant enterococci in greywater, their typing, and resistance to other antibiotics were determined. The prevalence of resistant bacteria was determined by the agar dilution method. Of all the antibiotics tested, the highest prevalence of resistant heterotrophic bacteria was detected with cephalothin (19% and ampicillin (8%. With regard to Gram-negative bacteria, the highest prevalence of resistance was given by coliforms ampicillin (34% and cephalothin (17%. A total of 38% of enterococci with low level resistance to vancomycin was detected. The multiresistant isolates were identified as Escherichia coli, Alcaligenes faecalis y Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. These results indicate that greywater can be considered as a reservoir of bacteria resistant to antibiotics, thus increasing their health risk.

  8. Metagenomic analysis reveals symbiotic relationship among bacteria in Microcystis-dominated community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meili eXie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis bloom, a cyanobacterial mass occurrence often found in eutrophicated water bodies, is one of the most serious threats to freshwater ecosystems worldwide. In nature, Microcystis forms aggregates or colonies that contain heterotrophic bacteria. The Microcystis-bacteria colonies were persistent even when they were maintained in lab culture for a long period. The relationship between Microcystis and the associated bacteria was investigated by a metagenomic approach in this study. We developed a visualization-guided method of binning for genome assembly after total colony DNA sequencing. We found that the method was effective in grouping sequences and it did not require reference genome sequence. Individual genomes of the colony bacteria were obtained and they provided valuable insights into microbial community structures. Analysis of metabolic pathways based on these genomes revealed that while all heterotrophic bacteria were dependent upon Microcystis for carbon and energy, Vitamin B12 biosynthesis, which is required for growth by Microcystis, was accomplished in a cooperative fashion among the bacteria. Our analysis also suggests that individual bacteria in the colony community contributed a complete pathway for degradation of benzoate, which is inhibitory to the cyanobacterial growth, and its ecological implication for Microcystis bloom is discussed.

  9. Vanadium removal from LD converter slag using bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazimi, S M J; Abbasalipour, Z; Rashchi, F

    2015-04-15

    Removal of vanadium from Linz-Donawits (LD) converter slag was investigated by means of three different species of microbial systems: Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (autotrophic bacteria), Pseudomonas putida (heterotrophic bacteria) and Aspergillus niger (fungi). The bioleaching process was carried out in both one-step and two-step process and the leaching efficiencies in both cases were compared. Formation of inorganic and organic acids during the leaching process caused mobilization of vanadium. In order to reduce toxic effects of the metal species on the above mentioned microorganisms, a prolonged adaptation process was performed. Both bacteria, A. thiooxidans and P. putida were able to remove more than 90% of vanadium at slag concentrations of 1-5 g L(-1) after 15 days. Also, the maximum achievable vanadium removal in the fungal system was approximately 92% at a slag concentration of 1 g L(-1) after 22 days.

  10. Cultivation of Acidophilic Algae Galdieria sulphuraria and Pseudochlorella sp. YKT1 in Media Derived from Acidic Hot Springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Shunsuke; Miyagishima, Shin-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae possess a high potential for producing pigments, antioxidants, and lipophilic compounds for industrial applications. However, the cultivation of microalgae comes at a high cost. To reduce the cost, changes from a closed bioreactor to open pond system and from a synthetic medium to environmental or wastewater-based medium are being sought. However, the use of open pond systems is currently limited because of contamination by undesirable organisms. To overcome this issue, one strategy is to combine acidophilic algae and acidic drainage in which other organisms are unable to thrive. Here, we tested waters from sulfuric acidic hot springs (Tamagawa, pH 1.15 and Tsukahara, pH 1.14) in Japan for the cultivation of the red alga Galdieria sulphuraria 074G and the green alga Pseudochlorella sp. YKT1. Both of these spring waters are rich in phosphate (0.043 and 0.145 mM, respectively) compared to other environmental freshwater sources. Neither alga grew in the spring water but they grew very well when the waters were supplemented with an inorganic nitrogen source. The algal yields were ∼2.73 g dry weight/L for G. sulphuraria and ∼2.49 g dry weight/L for P. sp. YKT1, which were comparable to those in an autotrophic synthetic medium. P. sp. YKT1 grew in the spring waters supplemented either of NH4(+), NO3(-) or urea, while G. sulphuraria grew only when NH4(+) was supplemented. For P. sp. YKT1, the spring water was adjusted to pH 2.0, while for G. sulphuraria, no pH adjustment was required. In both cases, no additional pH-buffering compound was required. The phycocyanin of the thermophilic G. sulphuraria is known to be more thermostable than that from the Spirulina platensis currently used in phycocyanin production for commercial use. The phycocyanin content in G. sulphuraria in the Tsukahara water supplemented with NH4(+) was 107.42 ± 1.81 μg/mg dry weight, which is comparable to the level in S. platensis (148.3 μg/mg dry weight). P. sp. YKT1 cells in the

  11. Cultivation of acidophilic algae Galdieria sulphuraria and Pseudochlorella sp. YKT1 in media derived from acidic hot springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Hirooka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae possess a high potential for producing pigments, antioxidants, and lipophilic compounds for industrial applications. However, the cultivation of microalgae comes at a high cost. To reduce the cost, changes from a closed bioreactor to open pond system and from a synthetic medium to environmental or wastewater-based medium are being sought. However, the use of open pond systems is currently limited because of contamination by undesirable organisms. To overcome this issue, one strategy is to combine acidophilic algae and acidic drainage in which other organisms are unable to thrive. Here, we tested waters from sulfuric acidic hot springs (Tamagawa, pH 1.15 and Tsukahara, pH 1.14 in Japan for the cultivation of the red alga Galdieria sulphuraria 074G and the green alga Pseudochlorella sp. YKT1. Both of these spring waters are rich in phosphate (0.043 and 0.145 mM, respectively compared to other environmental freshwater sources. Neither alga grew in the spring water but they grew very well when the waters were supplemented with an inorganic nitrogen source. The algal yields were ~2.73 g dry weight/L for G. sulphuraria and ~2.49 g dry weight/L for P. sp. YKT1, which were comparable to those in an autotrophic synthetic medium. P. sp. YKT1 grew in the spring waters supplemented either of NH4+, NO3- or urea, while G. sulphuraria grew only when NH4+ was supplemented. For P. sp. YKT1, the spring water was adjusted to pH 2.0, while for G. sulphuraria, no pH adjustment was required. In both cases, no additional pH-buffering compound was required. The phycocyanin of the thermophilic G. sulphuraria is known to be more thermostable than that from the Spirulina platensis currently used in phycocyanin production for commercial use. The phycocyanin content in G. sulphuraria in the Tsukahara water supplemented with NH4+ was 107.42±1.81 μg/mg dry weight, which is comparable to the level in S. platensis (148.3 μg/mg dry weight. P. sp. YKT1 cells in the

  12. Nitrate reduction by organotrophic Anammox bacteria in a nitritation/anammox granular sludge and a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Mari K H; Yang, Jingjing; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Plaza, Elzbieta; Trela, Jozef; Hultman, Bengt; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2012-06-01

    The effects of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on nitrogen removal and microbial community structure in nitritation/anammox process were compared within a granular sludge reactor and a moving bed biofilm reactor. Nitrate productions in both systems were lower by 40-68% in comparison with expected nitrate production. Expected sludge production on VFAs was estimated to be 67-77% higher if heterotrophs were the main acetate degraders suggesting that Anammox bacteria used its organotrophic capability and successfully competed with general heterotrophs for organic carbon, which led to a reduced sludge production. FISH measurements showed a population consisting of mainly Anammox and AOB in both reactors and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) tests also confirmed that flocculent biomass consisted of a minor proportion of heterotrophs with a large proportion of AOBs. The dominant Anammox bacterium was Candidatus "Brocadia fulgida" with a minor fraction of Candidatus "Anammoxoglobus propionicus", both known to be capable of oxidizing VFAs.

  13. Incidence of prosthecate bacteria in a polluted stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, J T

    1971-10-01

    Water samples were collected aseptically several times throughout the year at nine stations on the Red Cedar River, a stream flowing through farmland and receiving effluent from several municipalities in central Michigan. Total prosthecate bacteria were enumerated by both direct and viable counting techniques. By direct techniques, these bacteria accounted for 0.62 to 1.1% of the total microflora during the study. The predominant type of appendaged bacteria was the caulobacters (Caulobacter, Asticcacaulis, and the fusiform caulobacter), which accounted for 64 to 93% of the total prosthecate forms. The others of importance were prosthecomicrobia (< 1 to 24%), including Prosthecomicrobium and Prosthecochloris; hyphomicrobia (< 1 to 15%), including Hyphomicrobium and Rhodomicrobium; and Ancalomicrobium (< 1 to 6%). The viable counts of heterotrophs also indicated that the caulobacters were the most numerous prosthecate bacteria in the stream. They ranged from fewer than 1 per ml to a maximum of almost 4,000 per ml. During the coldest period, when the total viable counts decreased to about 10(4) per ml compared to their summer high of over 10(7) per ml, the caulobacters actually increased in numbers. In December (temperature 0 to 1 C), they comprised from 0.09 to 1.0% of the viable microbial count, and in March (6.0 to 8.0 C) they accounted for 0.14 to 2.8%. The other heterotrophic prosthecate bacteria were generally found at numbers less than 1 per ml, with the exception of the December study when Hyphomicrobium was present in numbers as high as 2,400 per ml. There was no consistent correlation between the frequency of prosthecate bacteria and total coliforms in the stream during the investigation.

  14. Detection of luciferase gene sequences in nonluminescent bacteria from the Chesapeake Bay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Chun, J.; Ravel, J.; Straube, W.L.; Hill, R.T.; Colwell, R.R.

    - tuarine waters have been based on visual detection of lu- minescence and have, therefore, omitted non-visibly luminous strains (dark variants). Marine luminous bacte- rial numbers enumerated in this manner range from non- 0168-6496 / 00 / $20.00 2000..., heterotrophic bacteria from Chesapeake Bay water samples (results not shown). 2.5. Detection of light emission Emission of light by laboratory strains and bacterial colonies isolated from environmental samples was checked visually in a photographic dark room...

  15. Influence of river discharge on abundance and dissemination of heterotrophic, indicator and pathogenic bacteria along the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, V.R.; Srinivas, T.N.R.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.

    . 64, 928-930. Suzuki, R., Ishimaru, T., 1990. An improved method for the determination of phytoplankton chlorophyll using N,N-dimethylformamide. J. Oceanogr. 46, 190-194. Varkey, M.J., Murty, V.S.N., Suryanarayana, A., 1996. Physical oceanography...

  16. Biological removal of nitrate by an oil reservoir culture capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic activities: kinetic evaluation and modeling of heterotrophic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shijie; Stone, Heather; Nemati, Mehdi

    2011-06-15

    Kinetics of heterotrophic denitrification was investigated using an oil reservoir culture with the ability to function under both autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. In the batch system nitrate at concentrations up to 30 mM did not influence the kinetics but with 50mM slower growth and removal rates were observed. A kinetic model, representing the denitrification as reduction of nitrate to nitrite, and subsequent reduction of nitrite to nitrous oxides and nitrogen gas was developed. The value of various kinetic coefficients, including maximum specific growth rate, saturation constant, yield and activation energy for nitrate and nitrite reductions were determined by fitting the experimental data into the developed model. In continuous bioreactors operated with 10 or 30 mM nitrate, complete removal of nitrate (no residual nitrite) and linear dependency between nitrate loading and removal rates were observed for loading rates up to 0.21 and 0.58 mM h(-1), respectively. The highest removal rates of 0.31 and 0.94 mM h(-1) observed at loading rates of 0.42 mM h(-1) and 1.26 mM h(-1), with corresponding removal percentages of nitrate and total nitrogen being 75.4, 54.4%, and 74.4 and 17.9%, respectively. Developed kinetic model predicted the performance of the continuous bioreactors with accuracy.

  17. Occurrence of Bacteria and Viruses on Elementary Classroom Surfaces and the Potential Role of Classroom Hygiene in the Spread of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Kelly R.; Boone, Stephanie A.; Gerba, Charles P.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of microorganisms on common classroom contact surfaces (fomites) was determined to identify the areas most likely to become contaminated. Six elementary classrooms were divided into control and intervention groups (cleaned daily with a quaternary ammonium wipe) and tested for heterotrophic bacteria. Three classrooms were also tested…

  18. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of autotrophic and heterotrophic activities of Arctic sea ice (Malene Bight, SW Greenland) as measured by 2 different approaches: (1) standard incubation techniques (H14CO3– and [3H]thymidine incubation) on sea ice cores brought to the laboratory and (2) cores incubated in situ...... in plastic bags with subsequent melting and measurements of changes in total O2 concentrations. The standard incubations showed that the annual succession followed a distinctive pattern, with a low, almost balancing heterotrophic and autotrophic activity during February and March. This period was followed...... March and April, it resulted in a significant net oxygen accumulation in the bag incubations. Integrated over the entire season, the sea ice of Malene Bight was net autotrophic with an annual net carbon fixation of 220 mg C m– 2, reflecting the net result of a sea ice-related gross primary production...

  19. New Discoveries in Study on Hydrocarbons From Thermal Degradation of Heterotrophically Yellowing Algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴庆余; 殷实; 盛国英; 傅家谟

    1994-01-01

    Green autotrophic alga Chlorella protothecoides contains a very small quantity of hydrocarbons. Heterotrophic culture of this alga results in the cells yellowing, chlorophyll disappearing, protein decreasing and lipid increasing remarkably. The quantities of hydrocarbons from them directly and from the thermal degradation of the cells at or below 200℃ are very low. These hydrocarbons are characterized by predominance of high molecular weight normal alkanes with maximum at C23-C25. When these heterotrophi-cally yellowing cells are thermally degraded at 300℃ , the aliphatic hydrocarbons increase greatly, 32 times that of the green autotrophic ones at the same temperature. Meanwhile, the low molecular weight normal alkanes with C17 as the peak become predominant instead of the original ones of high molecular weight. The actual potential of microplanktonic algae in producing hydrocarbons should be much greater than what people have recognized before.

  20. Growth Characteristics of Tetraselmis sp.-1 in Phototrophic, Mixotrophic and Heterotrophic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Jihong(沈继红); Yu Junhong; Lin Xuezheng; Li Guangyou; Liu Fayi

    2004-01-01

    Tetraselmis sp.-1 is a new microalgae strain constructed by cell fusion technique. In this paper, the growth characteristics of Tetraselmis sp.-1 under different culture conditions are investigated. The growth kinetic models are obtained, the assimilation of C and NH4+ is investigated and the assimilation efficiency of Tetraselmis sp.-1 under different culture conditions is calculated. The results show that different culture conditions do not have obvious influence on carbon absorbance, but have significant influence on nitrogen absorbance, C∶N is maximum under heterotrophic condition, while minimum under phototrophic condition. The assimilation efficiency (η) of Tetraselmis sp.-1 has the highest value in heterotrophic condition and largely higher than those in phototrophic and mixotrophic conditions.

  1. Heterotrophic microalgae cultivation to synergize biodiesel production with waste remediation: progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Mohan, S; Rohit, M V; Chiranjeevi, P; Chandra, Rashmi; Navaneeth, B

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are inexhaustible feedstock for synthesis of biodiesel rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and valuable bioactive compounds. Their cultivation is critical in sustaining the global economy in terms of human consumption of food and fuel. When compared to autotrophic cultivation, heterotrophic systems are more suitable for producing high cell densities of microalgae for accumulation of large quantities of lipids (triacylglycerols) which can be converted into biodiesel. Consorted efforts are made in this communication to converge recent literature on heterotrophic cultivation systems with simultaneous wastewater treatment and algal oil production. Challenges faced during large scale production and limiting factors which hinder the microalgae growth are enumerated. A strategic deployment of integrated closed loop biorefinery concept with multi-product recovery is proposed to exploit the full potential of algal systems. Sustainable algae cultivation is essential to produce biofuels leading to green future.

  2. Formalising a mechanistic linkage between heterotrophic feeding and thermal bleaching resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Scott A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, I utilise the CO2 (sink) limitation model of coral bleaching to propose a new biochemical framework that explains how certain (well-adapted) coral species can utilise heterotrophic carbon acquisition to combat the damaging algal photoinhibition response sequence that underpins thermal bleaching, thereby increasing thermal bleaching resistance. This mechanistic linkage helps to clarify a number of previously challenging experimental responses arising from feeding (versus starved) temperature stress experiments, and isotope labelling (tracer) experiments with heterotrophic carbon sources (e.g., zooplankton). In an era of rapidly warming surface ocean temperatures, the conferred fitness benefits arising from such a mechanistic linkage are considerable. Yet, various ecological constraints are outlined which caution against the ultimate benefit of the mechanism for raising bleaching thresholds at the coral community (reef) scale. Future experiments are suggested that can strengthen these proposed arguments.

  3. Significance of microbial communities and interactions in safeguarding reactive mine tailings by ecological engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D Barrie

    2011-12-01

    Pyritic mine tailings (mineral waste generated by metal mining) pose significant risk to the environment as point sources of acidic, metal-rich effluents (acid mine drainage [AMD]). While the accelerated oxidative dissolution of pyrite and other sulfide minerals in tailings by acidophilic chemolithotrophic prokaryotes has been widely reported, other acidophiles (heterotrophic bacteria that catalyze the dissimilatory reduction of iron and sulfur) can reverse the reactions involved in AMD genesis, and these have been implicated in the "natural attenuation" of mine waters. We have investigated whether by manipulating microbial communities in tailings (inoculating with iron- and sulfur-reducing acidophilic bacteria and phototrophic acidophilic microalgae) it is possible to mitigate the impact of the acid-generating and metal-mobilizing chemolithotrophic prokaryotes that are indigenous to tailing deposits. Sixty tailings mesocosms were set up, using five different microbial inoculation variants, and analyzed at regular intervals for changes in physicochemical and microbiological parameters for up to 1 year. Differences between treatment protocols were most apparent between tailings that had been inoculated with acidophilic algae in addition to aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria and those that had been inoculated with only pyrite-oxidizing chemolithotrophs; these differences included higher pH values, lower redox potentials, and smaller concentrations of soluble copper and zinc. The results suggest that empirical ecological engineering of tailing lagoons to promote the growth and activities of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria could minimize their risk of AMD production and that the heterotrophic populations could be sustained by facilitating the growth of microalgae to provide continuous inputs of organic carbon.

  4. Membrane biofouling in a wastewater nitrification reactor: microbial succession from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Huijie

    2015-10-22

    Membrane biofouling is a complex process that involves bacterial adhesion, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excretion and utilization, and species interactions. To obtain a better understanding of the microbial ecology of biofouling process, this study conducted rigorous, time-course analyses on the structure, EPS and microbial composition of the fouling layer developed on ultrafiltration membranes in a nitrification bioreactor. During a 14-day fouling event, three phases were determined according to the flux decline and microbial succession patterns. In Phase I (0-2 days), small sludge flocs in the bulk liquid were selectively attached on membrane surfaces, leading to the formation of similar EPS and microbial community composition as the early biofilms. Dominant populations in small flocs, e.g., Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, and Acinetobacter spp., were also the major initial colonizers on membranes. In Phase II (2-4 d), fouling layer structure, EPS composition, and bacterial community went through significant changes. Initial colonizers were replaced by fast-growing and metabolically versatile heterotrophs (e.g., unclassified Sphingobacteria). The declining EPS polysaccharide to protein (PS:PN) ratios could be correlated well with the increase in microbial community diversity. In Phase III (5-14 d), heterotrophs comprised over 90% of the community, whereas biofilm structure and EPS composition remained relatively stable. In all phases, AOB and NOB were constantly found within the top 40% of the fouling layer, with the maximum concentrations around 15% from the top. The overall microbial succession pattern from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination implied that MBR biofouling could be alleviated by forming larger bacterial flocs in bioreactor suspension (reducing autotrophic colonization), and by designing more specific cleaning procedures targeting dominant heterotrophs during typical filtration cycles.

  5. Dynamics of natural prokaryotes, viruses, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates in alpine karstic groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Wilhartilz, I.C.; Krischner, A.K.T; C. P. D. Brussaard; Fisher, U.R.; Wieltschnig, C.; Stadler, H; Farnleitner, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Seasonal dynamics of naturally occurring prokaryotes, viruses, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates in two hydro-geologically contrasting alpine karst springs were monitored over three annual cycles. To our knowledge, this study is the first to shed light on the occurrence and possible interrelationships between these three groups in karstic groundwater. Hydrological and microbiological standard indicators were recovered simultaneously in order to estimate surface influence, especially ...

  6. Using an ecophysiological framework for characterizing germination and heterotrophic growth of several genotypes of Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    Brunel, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    Germination and growth of heterotrophic stages are crucial steps for crop establishment. They highly depend on environmental conditions. The analytical framework provided by the emergence model SIMPLE (SImulation of PLant Emergence) has been used for the characterization of Medicago truncatula (M.tr.) during the early stages of its cycle in response to seedbeds physical factors with major impacts on emergence: temperature, water potential, mechanical obstacles. M.tr. is a model species. It wa...

  7. Citric acid cycle in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum grown autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yajing; Holden, James F

    2006-06-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum uses the citric acid cycle in the oxidative and reductive directions for heterotrophic and autotrophic growth, respectively, but the control of carbon flow is poorly understood. P. islandicum was grown at 95 degrees C autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate, H2, and small amounts of yeast extract and with thiosulfate as the terminal electron acceptor. The autotrophic growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells were significantly lower than those in other media. The growth rates on H2 and 0.001% yeast extract with and without 0.05% acetate were the same, but the maximum concentration of cells was fourfold higher with acetate. There was no growth with acetate if 0.001% yeast extract was not present, and addition of H2 to acetate-containing medium greatly increased the growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells. P. islandicum cultures assimilated 14C-labeled acetate in the presence of H2 and yeast extract with an efficiency of 55%. The activities of 11 of 19 enzymes involved in the central metabolism of P. islandicum were regulated under the three different growth conditions. Pyruvate synthase and acetate:coenzyme A (CoA) ligase (ADP-forming) activities were detected only in heterotrophically grown cultures. Citrate synthase activity decreased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures compared to the activity in heterotrophic cultures. Acetylated citrate lyase, acetate:CoA ligase (AMP forming), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities increased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures. Citrate lyase activity was higher than ATP citrate synthase activity in autotrophic cultures. These data suggest that citrate lyase and AMP-forming acetate:CoA ligase, but not ATP citrate synthase, work opposite citrate synthase to control the direction of carbon flow in the citric acid cycle.

  8. Membrane biofouling in a wastewater nitrification reactor: Microbial succession from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huijie; Xue, Zheng; Saikaly, Pascal; Nunes, Suzana P; Bluver, Ted R; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-01-01

    Membrane biofouling is a complex process that involves bacterial adhesion, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excretion and utilization, and species interactions. To obtain a better understanding of the microbial ecology of biofouling process, this study conducted rigorous, time-course analyses on the structure, EPS and microbial composition of the fouling layer developed on ultrafiltration membranes in a nitrification bioreactor. During a 14-day fouling event, three phases were determined according to the flux decline and microbial succession patterns. In Phase I (0-2 days), small sludge flocs in the bulk liquid were selectively attached on membrane surfaces, leading to the formation of similar EPS and microbial community composition as the early biofilms. Dominant populations in small flocs, e.g., Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, and Acinetobacter spp., were also the major initial colonizers on membranes. In Phase II (2-4 d), fouling layer structure, EPS composition, and bacterial community went through significant changes. Initial colonizers were replaced by fast-growing and metabolically versatile heterotrophs (e.g., unclassified Sphingobacteria). The declining EPS polysaccharide to protein (PS:PN) ratios could be correlated well with the increase in microbial community diversity. In Phase III (5-14 d), heterotrophs comprised over 90% of the community, whereas biofilm structure and EPS composition remained relatively stable. In all phases, AOB and NOB were constantly found within the top 40% of the fouling layer, with the maximum concentrations around 15% from the top. The overall microbial succession pattern from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination implied that MBR biofouling could be alleviated by forming larger bacterial flocs in bioreactor suspension (reducing autotrophic colonization), and by designing more specific cleaning procedures targeting dominant heterotrophs during typical filtration cycles.

  9. Chromium induced stress conditions in heterotrophic and auxotrophic strains of Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetta, Iara; Mazzuca, Marcia; Conforti, Visitación; Balzaretti, Vilma; del Carmen Ríos de Molina, María

    2012-10-01

    Oxidative stress parameter and antioxidant defense compound as well as enzyme activity were studied in relation to different Cr(VI) concentrations (0, 10, 20, 40 μM) in two strains of Euglena gracilis, one isolated from a polluted river (MAT) and the other acquired from a culture collection (UTEX). Chromium toxicity was measured in the auxotrophic and obligated heterotrophic variants of the two strains. Chromium uptake was higher in auxotrophic cultures, reflected by their higher cell proliferation inhibition and lower IC50 levels compared to heterotrophic ones. In the Cr(VI) treatments a reduction of chlorophyll a and b ratio (Chl a/Chl b) was observed, the ratio of protein to paramylon content was augmented, and total lipid content increased, having the auxotrophic strains the highest values. TBARS content increased significantly only at 40 μM Cr(VI) treatment. Unsaturated fatty acids also increased in the Cr(VI) treatments, with the higher storage lipid (saturated acids) content in the heterotrophic cells. The antioxidant response, such as SOD activity and GSH content, increased with chromium concentration, showing the highest GSH values in the heterotrophic cultures and the SOD enzyme participation in chromium toxicity. The MAT strain had higher IC50 values, higher carbohydrate and saturated acid content, and better response of the antioxidant system than the UTEX one. This strain isolated from the polluted place also showed higher GSH content and SOD activity in control cells and in almost all treated cultures. SOD activity reached a 9-fold increase in both MAT strains. These results suggest that tolerance of MAT strain against Cr(VI) stress is not only related to GSH level and/or biosynthesis capacity but is also related to the participation of the SOD antioxidant enzyme.

  10. Rhizosphere Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Feoktistova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the analysis of modern literature data on rhizosphere bacteria and their role in plant life. The structure of rhizosphere has been characterized. The role of plants as the centers of formation of microbial communities has been shown. Data on the main groups of microorganisms inhabiting the rhizosphere have been provided. The associative relationship between rhizobacteria and partner plants has been investigated. The modern concept of holobiont defined as the whole host plant organism and microorganisms associated with it has been reviewed. The role of rhizobacteria in the processes of nitrogen fixation has been discussed in detail. The mechanisms of direct stimulation of plant growth by biosynthesis of phytohormones, improvement of phosphorus and nitrogen nutrition, increase in resistance to stress, and stimulation mediated by antagonism against pathogenic microorganisms have been analyzed. The criteria for selection of rhizobacteria for practical purposes have been discussed.

  11. The characteristics of a novel heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium, Bacillus methylotrophicus strain L7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Ling; Liu, Ying; Ai, Guo-Min; Miao, Li-Li; Zheng, Hai-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2012-03-01

    Bacillus methylotrophicus strain L7, exhibited efficient heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification ability, with maximum NH(4)(+)-N and NO(2)(-)-N removal rate of 51.58 mg/L/d and 5.81 mg/L/d, respectively. Strain L7 showed different gaseous emitting patterns from those strains ever described. When (15)NH(4)Cl, or Na(15)NO(2), or K(15)NO(3) was used, results of GC-MS indicated that N(2)O was emitted as the intermediate of heterotrophic nitrification or aerobic denitrification, while GC-IRMS results showed that N(2) was produced as end product when nitrite was used. Single factor experiments suggested that the optimal conditions for heterotrophic nitrification were sodium succinate as carbon source, C/N 6, pH 7-8, 0 g/L NaCl, 37 °C and a wide range of NH(4)(+)-N from 80 to 1000 mg/L. Orthogonal tests showed that the optimal conditions for aerobic denitrification were C/N 20, pH 7-8, 10 g/L NaCl and DO 4.82 mg/L (shaking speed 50 r/min) when nitrite was served as substrate.

  12. Factor driving heterotrophic dinoflagellate in relation to environment conditions in Kerkennah Islands (eastern coast of Tunisa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mounir Ben Brahim; Morsi Feki; Wafa Feki-Sahnoun; Mabrouka Mahfoudi; Asma Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the seasonal variability of heterotrophic dinoflagellate in the station of Cercina (southern coast of Tunisia). Methods: Sampling was done in 2007 in Cercina station located in the western coast of Kerkennah (34°41'27' N; 11°07'45' E) (Southern Tunisia). Three replicates of water samples were taken during 10 days of each month. Environmental variables and nutrients were measured in situ. Results: A significant seasonal difference was observed for temperature and water salinity. The highest values were observed in spring and summer. No significant seasonal difference was, however, detected for nitrite, nitrate, ammonia, silica and phosphate. Sixty-five species of dinoflagellate were identified in the station of Cercina. Abundance of dinoflagellates fluctuated between seasons with values showing a significant seasonal and monthly difference. The highest mean abundance was recorded in spring in April, while the lowest abundance was detected in December in winter. Protoperidinium granii was the main species contributing to the dissimilarity between spring and winter with 13.98% followed by Peridinium sp. with 12.5% of dissimilarity and by Polykrikos sp. with 10.58%. Conclusions: Heterotrophic dinoflagellates proliferate in spring and summer. This increase was justified by the nutrient availability. Protoperidinium granii and Polykrikos kofoidii were the main heterotrophic dinoflagellate making difference between seasons and their densities were positively correlated with both temperature and salinity.

  13. A pH-control model for heterotrophic and hydrogen-based autotrophic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youneng; Zhou, Chen; Ziv-El, Michal; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a model to predict the alkalinity, pH, and Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) in heterotrophic and H(2)-based autotrophic denitrification systems. The model can also be used to estimate the amount of acid, e.g. HCl, added to the influent (method 1) or the pH set point in the reactor (method 2: pH can be maintained stable by CO(2)-sparge using a pH-control loop) to prevent the pH from exceeding the optimal range for denitrification and to prevent precipitation from occurring. The model was tested with two pilot plants carrying out denitrification of groundwater with high hardness: a heterotrophic system using ethanol as the electron donor and an H(2)-based autotrophic system. The measured alkalinity, pH, and LSI were consistent with the model for both systems. This work also quantifies: (1) how the alkalinity and pH in Stage-1 significantly differ from those in Stage-2; (2) how the pH and LSI differ significantly in the two denitrification systems while the alkalinity increase is about the same; and (3) why CO(2) addition is the preferred method for autotrophic system, while HCl addition is the preferred method for the heterotrophic system.

  14. Contribution of mono and polysaccharides to heterotrophic N2 fixation at the eastern Mediterranean coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahav, E; Giannetto, M J; Bar-Zeev, E

    2016-06-16

    N2 fixation should be a critical process in the nitrogen-poor surface water of the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Despite favorable conditions, diazotroph abundance and N2 fixation rates remains low for reasons yet explained. The main goal of this study was to investigate the limiting nutrients for diazotrophy in this oligotrophic environment. Hence, we conducted dedicated bottle-microcosms with eastern Mediterranean Sea water that were supplemented with mono and polysaccharides as well as inorganic nitrogen and phosphorous. Our results indicate that the diazotrophic community expressing nifH was primarily represented by heterotrophic Proteobacteria. N2 fixation and heterotrophic bacterial activity increased up-to tenfold following two days of dark incubations, once seawater was supplemented with organic carbon substrate in the form of glucose (monosaccharides) or gum-xanthan (polysaccharide surrogate). Furthermore, our results point that carbon-rich polysaccharides, such as transparent exopolymer particles, enhance heterotrophic N2 fixation, by forming microenvironments of intense metabolic activity, high carbon: nitrogen ratio, and possibly low O2 levels. The conclusions of this study indicate that diazotrophs in the eastern Mediterranean coast are primarily limited by organic carbon substrates, as possibly in many other marine regions.

  15. Relative contributions of Vibrio polysaccharide and quorum sensing to the resistance of Vibrio cholerae to predation by heterotrophic protists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyang Sun

    Full Text Available Protozoan grazing is a major mortality factor faced by bacteria in the environment. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease cholera, is a natural inhabitant of aquatic ecosystems, and its survival depends on its ability to respond to stresses, such as predation by heterotrophic protists. Previous results show that grazing pressure induces biofilm formation and enhances a smooth to rugose morphotypic shift, due to increased expression of Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS. In addition to negatively controlling vps genes, the global quorum sensing (QS regulator, HapR, plays a role in grazing resistance as the ΔhapR strain is efficiently consumed while the wild type (WT is not. Here, the relative and combined contributions of VPS and QS to grazing resistance were investigated by exposing VPS and HapR mutants and double mutants in VPS and HapR encoding genes at different phases of biofilm development to amoeboid and flagellate grazers. Data show that the WT biofilms were grazing resistant, the VPS mutants were less resistant than the WT strain, but more resistant than the QS mutant strain, and that QS contributes to grazing resistance mainly in mature biofilms. In addition, grazing effects on biofilms of mixed WT and QS mutant strains were investigated. The competitive fitness of each strain in mixed biofilms was determined by CFU and microscopy. Data show that protozoa selectively grazed the QS mutant in mixed biofilms, resulting in changes in the composition of the mixed community. A small proportion of QS mutant cells which comprised 4% of the mixed biofilm biovolume were embedded in grazing resistant WT microcolonies and shielded from predation, indicating the existence of associational protection in mixed biofilms.

  16. [Variation of bacteria numbers in fish-shrimp mix-culturing ecosystem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiufen; Chen, Bijuan; Qu, Keming; Yuan, Youxian; Li, Jian; Sun, Xiutao; Zhao, Fazhen

    2002-06-01

    The study on variation of bacteria numbers in Penaeus chinensis-fish mix-culturing ecosystem in 1997. Indicated that at the beginning of culturing season, total number of heterotrophic bacteria and that of nitrate-reducing bacteria in mix-culturing ponds was low, but it was higher than that in mono-culturing shrimp pond. With time going on, the number of bacteria in mono-culturing pond increased rapidly and remained at a high level in August and September, an that in mix-culturing ponds also increased. But the latter increased slowly, and it was never over 10(4) cells.ml-1 and dropped in September. Number of bacteria in bottom of the ponds varied with the similar regulation, but the numbers was 10-100 times higher. The numbers of vibrio in mix-culturing ponds was always lower than that in contrastive pond at the same time. So, in fish-shrimp mix-culturing ponds, the contents of organic matter were lower and the total amount and variability of phytoplankton were higher than corresponding items in mono-culturing pond. It was concluded that mix-culture could stimulate and control the growth of heterotrophic bacteria, accelerate the degradation of organic pollutants, consequently fasten and stabilize the circulation of mater in ecosystem of ponds in culturing season.

  17. Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2014-04-07

    Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

  18. Seasonal seawater temperature as the major determinant for populations of culturable bacteria in the sediments of an intact mangrove in an arid region

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Mangroves are highly productive marine ecosystems where bacteria (culturable and nonculturable) actively participate in biomineralization of organic matter and biotransformation of minerals. This study explores spatial and seasonal fluctuations of culturable heterotrophic bacteria and Vibrio spp. in the sediments of an intact mangrove ecosystem and determines the dominant environmental factors that govern these fluctuations. Sediment samples were collected monthly from three stations in the m...

  19. Characterization of the microbial community composition and the distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria in a creek contaminated by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weimin; Xiao, Enzong; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Qingxiang

    2016-10-01

    A small watershed heavily contaminated by long-term acid mine drainage (AMD) from an upstream abandoned coal mine was selected to study the microbial community developed in such extreme system. The watershed consists of AMD-contaminated creek, adjacent contaminated soils, and a small cascade aeration unit constructed downstream, which provide an excellent contaminated site to study the microbial response in diverse extreme AMD-polluted environments. The results showed that the innate microbial communities were dominated by acidophilic bacteria, especially acidophilic Fe-metabolizing bacteria, suggesting that Fe and pH are the primary environmental factors in governing the indigenous microbial communities. The distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria showed distinct site-specific patterns. A pronounced shift from diverse communities in the upstream to Proteobacteria-dominated communities in the downstream was observed in the ecosystem. This location-specific trend was more apparent at genus level. In the upstream samples (sampling sites just below the coal mining adit), a number of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria such as Alicyclobacillus spp., Metallibacterium spp., and Acidithrix spp. were dominant, while Halomonas spp. were the major Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria observed in downstream samples. Additionally, Acidiphilium, an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, was enriched in the upstream samples, while Shewanella spp. were the dominant Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in downstream samples. Further investigation using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) clustering confirmed the difference of microbial communities between upstream and downstream samples. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and Spearman's rank correlation indicate that total organic carbon (TOC) content is the primary environmental parameter in structuring the indigenous microbial communities

  20. Effects of deposit-feeding macrofauna on benthic bacteria, viruses, and protozoa in a silty freshwater sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieltschnig, Claudia; Fischer, Ulrike R; Velimirov, Branko; Kirschner, Alexander K T

    2008-07-01

    In microcosm experiments, we simultaneously tested the effects of increased numbers of deposit-feeding macrofauna (chironomids, oligochaetes and cladocerans) on the standing stock, activities and interactions of heterotrophic bacteria, viruses, and bacterivorous protozoa (heterotrophic nanoflagellates and ciliates) in the aerobic layer of a silty littoral freshwater sediment. On average, bacterial secondary production was stimulated between 11 and 29% by all macrofaunal groups compared to control experiments without macrofauna addition. Bacterial standing stock increased significantly by 8 and 13% in case of chironomids and cladocerans, respectively. Oligochaetes and chironomids produced significant negative effects on viral abundance while the results with cladocerans were inconsistent. The addition of oligochaetes and chironomids resulted in a significant decrease by on average 68 and 32% of viral decay rates, respectively, used as a measure of viral production. The calculated contribution of virus-induced lysis to benthic bacterial mortality was low, with 2.8 to 11.8% of bacterial secondary production, and decreased by 39 to 81% after the addition of macrofauna compared to the control. The abundances of heterotrophic nanoflagellates were significantly reduced by 20% by all tested macrofauna groups, while ciliates showed inconsistent results. The importance of heterotrophic nanoflagellate grazing on benthic bacteria was very low (virus-induced cell lysis and protozoan grazing.

  1. UV light tolerance and reactivation potential of tetracycline-resistant bacteria from secondary effluents of a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Jing; Xi, Jinying; Hu, Hong-Ying; Li, Yi; Lu, Sun-Qin; Tang, Fang; Pang, Yu-Chen

    2016-03-01

    Tetracycline-resistant bacteria (TRB) are of concern as emerging microbial contaminants in reclaimed water. To understand the effects of UV disinfection on TRB, both inactivation and reactivation profiles of TRB, as well as 16 tetracycline-resistant isolates from secondary effluent, were characterized in this study. The inactivation ratio of TRB was significantly lower (3.0-log) than that of heterotrophic bacteria (>4.0-log) in the secondary effluent. Additionally, the proportion of TRB significantly increased from 1.65% to 15.51% under 20mJ/cm(2) ultraviolet (UV) exposure. The inactivation rates of tetracycline-resistant isolates ranged from 0.57/s to 1.04/s, of which tetracycline-resistant Enterobacter-1 was the most tolerant to UV light. The reactivation of TRB, tetracycline-resistant isolated strains, as well as heterotrophic bacteria commonly occurred in the secondary effluent even after 20mJ/cm(2) UV exposure. The colony forming ability of TRB and heterotrophic bacteria reached 3.2-log and 3.0-log under 20mJ/cm(2) UV exposure after 22hr incubation. The final inactivation ratio of tetracycline-resistant Enterobacter-1 was 1.18-log under 20mJ/cm(2) UV exposure after 22hr incubation, which is similar to those of TRB (1.18-log) and heterotrophic bacteria (1.19-log). The increased proportion of TRB and the reactivation of tetracycline-resistant enterobacteria in reclaimed water could induce a microbial health risk during wastewater reuse.

  2. Growth of Dunaliella tertiolecta and associated bacteria in photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Intihar, Veera M; Tuovinen, Olli H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test three flat-plate photobioreactor configurations for cultivation of marine green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta under non-axenic growth conditions and to characterize and quantify the associated bacteria. The photobioreactor cultivations were conducted using tap water-based media. Static mixers intended to enhance mixing and light utilization did not generally increase algal growth at the low light intensities used. The maximum biomass concentration (measured as volatile suspended solids) and maximum specific growth rate achieved in the flat plate with no mixer were 2.9 g l⁻¹ and 1.3 day⁻¹, respectively. Based on quantitative polymerase chain reaction, bacterial growth followed the growth of D. tertiolecta. Based on 16S rDNA amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling, heterotrophic bacteria in the D. tertiolecta cultures mainly originated from the non-axenic algal inocula, and tap water heterotrophs were not enriched in high chloride media (3 % salinity). Bacterial communities were relatively stable and reproducible in all flat-plate cultivations and were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria.

  3. Soil moisture sensitivity of autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration in boreal xeric pine and mesic spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ťupek, Boris; Launiainen, Samuli; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Heikkinen, Jukka; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-04-01

    Litter decomposition rates of the most process based soil carbon models affected by environmental conditions are linked with soil heterotrophic CO2 emissions and serve for estimating soil carbon sequestration; thus due to the mass balance equation the variation in measured litter inputs and measured heterotrophic soil CO2 effluxes should indicate soil carbon stock changes, needed by soil carbon management for mitigation of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, if sensitivity functions of the applied model suit to the environmental conditions e.g. soil temperature and moisture. We evaluated the response forms of autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration to soil temperature and moisture in four boreal forest sites of the International Cooperative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP Forests) by a soil trenching experiment during year 2015 in southern Finland. As expected both autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration components were primarily controlled by soil temperature and exponential regression models generally explained more than 90% of the variance. Soil moisture regression models on average explained less than 10% of the variance and the response forms varied between Gaussian for the autotrophic forest floor respiration component and linear for the heterotrophic forest floor respiration component. Although the percentage of explained variance of soil heterotrophic respiration by the soil moisture was small, the observed reduction of CO2 emissions with higher moisture levels suggested that soil moisture response of soil carbon models not accounting for the reduction due to excessive moisture should be re-evaluated in order to estimate right levels of soil carbon stock changes. Our further study will include evaluation of process based soil carbon models by the annual heterotrophic respiration and soil carbon stocks.

  4. Phototrophic biofilm assembly in microbial-mat-derived unicyanobacterial consortia: model systems for the study of autotroph-heterotroph interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K Cole

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, but the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ manipulation make it challenging to elucidate the principles governing these interactions. The study of assembling phototrophic biofilm communities provides a robust means to identify such interactions and evaluate their contributions to the recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity over time. To examine primary succession in phototrophic communities, we isolated two unicyanobacterial consortia from the microbial mat in Hot Lake, Washington, characterizing the membership and metabolic function of each consortium. We then analyzed the spatial structures and quantified the community compositions of their assembling biofilms. The consortia retained the same suite of heterotrophic species, identified as abundant members of the mat and assigned to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Autotroph growth rates dominated early in assembly, yielding to increasing heterotroph growth rates late in succession. The two consortia exhibited similar assembly patterns, with increasing relative abundances of members from Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria concurrent with decreasing relative abundances of those from Gammaproteobacteria. Despite these similarities at higher taxonomic levels, the relative abundances of individual heterotrophic species were substantially different in the developing consortial biofilms. This suggests that, although similar niches are created by the cyanobacterial metabolisms, the resulting webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions are specific to each primary producer. The relative simplicity and tractability of the Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia make them useful model systems for deciphering interspecies interactions and assembly principles relevant to natural

  5. Use of a fluorescent redox probe for direct visualization of actively respiring bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, G G; Phipps, D; Ishiguro, K; Ridgway, H F

    1992-06-01

    The redox dye 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) was employed for direct epifluorescent microscopic enumeration of respiring bacteria in environmental samples. Oxidized CTC is nearly colorless and is nonfluorescent; however, the compound is readily reduced via electron transport activity to fluorescent, insoluble CTC-formazan, which accumulates intracellularly. Bacteria containing CTC-formazan were visualized by epifluorescence microscopy in wet-mount preparations, on polycarbonate membrane filter surfaces, or in biofilms associated with optically opaque surfaces. Counterstaining of CTC-treated samples with the DNA-specific fluorochrome 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole allowed enumeration of active and total bacterial subpopulations within the same preparation. Municipal wastewater, groundwater, and seawater samples supplied with exogenous nutrients yielded CTC counts that were generally lower than total 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole counts but typically equal to or greater than standard heterotrophic (aerobic) plate counts. In unsupplemented water samples, CTC counts were typically lower than those obtained with the heterotrophic plate count method. Reduction of CTC by planktonic or biofilm-associated bacteria was suppressed by formaldehyde, presumably because of inhibition of electron transport activity and other metabolic processes. Because of their bright red fluorescence (emission maximum, 602 nm), actively respiring bacteria were readily distinguishable from abiotic particles and other background substances, which typically fluoresced at shorter wavelengths. The use of CTC greatly facilitated microscopic detection and enumeration of metabolically active (i.e., respiring) bacteria in environmental samples.

  6. Enhanced production of lutein in heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides by oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Dong; CHEN Feng; CHEN Gu; ZHANG XueWu; LIU LongJun; ZHANG Hao

    2008-01-01

    The fast growing unicellular green microalgae Chlorella protothecoides has attracted interest as a promising organism for commercial production of a high-value carotenoid, lutein, by heterotrophic fermentation. Effects of two oxidant-forming reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the biomass concentration, and yield and content of lutein in batch culture of heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides were investigated in this study. The addition of 0.1 mmol/L H2O2 and 0.01 mmol/L NaClO plus 0.5 mmol/L Fe2+ to the culture led to the generation of OH and enhanced the lutein content from 1.75 to 1.90 and 1.95 mg/g, respectively. The lutein content further increased to 1.98 mg/g when 0.01 mmol/L H2O2 and 0.5 mmol/L NaClO were added to generate 1O2. The maximum yield of lutein (28.5, 29.8 and 31.4 mg/L) and a high biomass concentration (15.0, 15.3 and 15.9 g/L) were also achieved through the above treatments. The results indicated that 1O2 could promote lutein formation and enhance lutein production in heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides. Moreover, 1O2 produced from the reaction of H2O2 and NaClO was more effective in enhancing lutein production and reducing biomass loss than OH from the reaction of H2O2 or NaClO plus Fe2+.

  7. Heterotrophic bacterial production and metabolic balance during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wambeke, F.; Pfreundt, U.; Barani, A.; Berthelot, H.; Moutin, T.; Rodier, M.; Hess, W. R.; Bonnet, S.

    2015-12-01

    N2 fixation fuels ~ 50 % of new primary production in the oligotrophic South Pacific Ocean. The VAHINE mesocosm experiment designed to track the fate of diazotroph derived nitrogen (DDN) in the New Caledonia lagoon. Here, we examined the temporal dynamics of heterotrophic bacterial production during this experiment. Three replicate large-volume (~ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed and were intentionally fertilized with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate N2 fixation. We specifically examined relationships between N2 fixation rates and primary production, determined bacterial growth efficiency and established carbon budgets of the system from the DIP fertilization to the end of the experiment (days 5-23). Heterotrophic bacterioplankton production (BP) and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) were statistically higher during the second phase of the experiment (P2: days 15-23), when chlorophyll biomass started to increase compared to the first phase (P1: days 5-14). Among autotrophs, Synechococcus abundances increased during P2, possibly related to its capacity to assimilate leucine and to produce alkaline phosphatase. Bacterial growth efficiency based on the carbon budget was notably higher than generally cited for oligotrophic environments (27-43 %), possibly due to a high representation of proteorhodopsin-containing organisms within the picoplanctonic community. The carbon budget showed that the main fate of gross primary production (particulate + dissolved) was respiration (67 %), and export through sedimentation (17 %). BP was highly correlated with particulate primary production and chlorophyll biomass during both phases of the experiment but slightly correlated, and only during P2 phase, with N2 fixation rates. Our results suggest that most of the DDN reached the heterotrophic bacterial community through indirect processes, like mortality, lysis and grazing.

  8. Enhanced production of lutein in heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides by oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The fast growing unicellular green microalgae Chlorella protothecoides has attracted interest as a promising organism for commercial production of a high-value carotenoid, lutein, by heterotrophic fermentation. Effects of two oxidant-forming reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the biomass concen-tration, and yield and content of lutein in batch culture of heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides were investigated in this study. The addition of 0.1 mmol/L H2O2 and 0.01 mmol/L NaClO plus 0.5 mmol/L Fe2+ to the culture led to the generation of ·OH and enhanced the lutein content from 1.75 to 1.90 and 1.95 mg/g, respectively. The lutein content further increased to 1.98 mg/g when 0.01 mmol/L H2O2 and 0.5 mmol/L NaClO were added to generate 1O2. The maximum yield of lutein (28.5, 29.8 and 31.4 mg/L) and a high biomass concentration (15.0, 15.3 and 15.9 g/L) were also achieved through the above treatments. The results indicated that 1O2 could promote lutein formation and enhance lutein production in hetero-trophic Chlorella protothecoides. Moreover, 1O2 produced from the reaction of H2O2 and NaClO was more effective in enhancing lutein production and reducing biomass loss than ·OH from the reaction of H2O2 or NaClO plus Fe2+.

  9. Heterotrophic bacterial production and metabolic balance during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Van Wambeke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available N2 fixation fuels ~ 50 % of new primary production in the oligotrophic South Pacific Ocean. The VAHINE mesocosm experiment designed to track the fate of diazotroph derived nitrogen (DDN in the New Caledonia lagoon. Here, we examined the temporal dynamics of heterotrophic bacterial production during this experiment. Three replicate large-volume (~ 50 m3 mesocosms were deployed and were intentionally fertilized with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP to stimulate N2 fixation. We specifically examined relationships between N2 fixation rates and primary production, determined bacterial growth efficiency and established carbon budgets of the system from the DIP fertilization to the end of the experiment (days 5–23. Heterotrophic bacterioplankton production (BP and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA were statistically higher during the second phase of the experiment (P2: days 15–23, when chlorophyll biomass started to increase compared to the first phase (P1: days 5–14. Among autotrophs, Synechococcus abundances increased during P2, possibly related to its capacity to assimilate leucine and to produce alkaline phosphatase. Bacterial growth efficiency based on the carbon budget was notably higher than generally cited for oligotrophic environments (27–43 %, possibly due to a high representation of proteorhodopsin-containing organisms within the picoplanctonic community. The carbon budget showed that the main fate of gross primary production (particulate + dissolved was respiration (67 %, and export through sedimentation (17 %. BP was highly correlated with particulate primary production and chlorophyll biomass during both phases of the experiment but slightly correlated, and only during P2 phase, with N2 fixation rates. Our results suggest that most of the DDN reached the heterotrophic bacterial community through indirect processes, like mortality, lysis and grazing.

  10. Still acting green: continued expression of photosynthetic genes in the heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida (Peridiniales, Alveolata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang Hoon Kim

    Full Text Available The loss of photosynthetic function should lead to the cessation of expression and finally loss of photosynthetic genes in the new heterotroph. Dinoflagellates are known to have lost their photosynthetic ability several times. Dinoflagellates have also acquired photosynthesis from other organisms, either on a long-term basis or as "kleptoplastids" multiple times. The fate of photosynthetic gene expression in heterotrophs can be informative into evolution of gene expression patterns after functional loss, and the dinoflagellates ability to acquire new photosynthetic function through additional endosymbiosis. To explore this we analyzed a large-scale EST database consisting of 151,091 unique sequences (29,170 contigs, 120,921 singletons obtained from 454 pyrosequencing of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida. About 597 contigs from P. piscicida showed significant homology (E-value

  11. Inference of Interactions in Cyanobacterial-Heterotrophic Co-Cultures via Transcriptome Sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliaev, Alex S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Serres, Margaret; Bernstein, Hans C.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Isern, Nancy G.; Chrisler, William B.; Kucek, Leo A.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Bryant, Donald A.; Wiley, H. S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-04-29

    We employed deep sequencing technology to identify transcriptional adaptation of the euryhaline unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and the marine facultative aerobe Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 to growth in a co-culture and infer the effect of carbon flux distributions on photoautotroph-heterotroph interactions. The overall transcriptome response of both organisms to co-cultivation was shaped by their respective physiologies and growth constraints. Carbon limitation resulted in the expansion of metabolic capacities which was manifested through the transcriptional upregulation of transport and catabolic pathways. While growth coupling occurred via lactate oxidation or secretion of photosynthetically fixed carbon, there was evidence of specific metabolic interactions between the two organisms. On one hand, the production and excretion of specific amino acids (methionine and alanine) by the cyanobacterium correlated with the putative downregulation of the corresponding biosynthetic machinery of Shewanella W3-18-1. On the other hand, the broad and consistent decrease of mRNA levels for many Fe-regulated Synechococcus 7002 genes during co-cultivation suggested increased Fe availability as well as more facile and energy-efficient mechanisms for Fe acquisition by the cyanobacterium. Furthermore, evidence pointed at potentially novel interactions between oxygenic photoautotrophs and heterotrophs related to the oxidative stress response as transcriptional patterns suggested that Synechococcus 7002 rather than Shewanella W3-18-1 provided scavenging functions for reactive oxygen species under co-culture conditions. This study provides an initial insight into the complexity of photoautotrophic-heterotrophic interactions and brings new perspectives of their role in the robustness and stability of the association.

  12. Nitrate concentration-shift cultivation to enhance protein content of heterotrophic microalga Chlorella vulgaris: Over-compensation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tonghui; Xia, Yun; Zeng, Yu; Li, Xingrui; Zhang, Yongkui

    2017-02-27

    Protein production from microalgae requires both high cell density during cultivation and high protein content in cells. Heterotrophic microalgae can achieve high cell density, and yet are confronted with the problem of low protein content. Based on over-compensation strategy, a new concentration-shift method was proposed to cultivate heterotrophic Chlorella vulgaris, aiming to increase protein content. With a prior starvation period, microalgae utilized more nitrate and accumulated more proteins compared to one-stage cultivation. Considering the convenience of operation, nitrate-added culture was adopted for producing heterotrophic microalgae, rather than sterile centrifugal culture. Operating parameters including nitrate concentration in N-deficient medium, N-starved time and nitrate concentration in N-rich medium were optimized, which were 0.18gl(-1), 38h and 2.45gl(-1), respectively. Under the optimized conditions, protein content in heterotrophic Chlorella reached 44.3%. Furthermore, the heterotrophic microalga was suggested to be a potential single-cell protein source according to the amino acid composition.

  13. Pyruvic Oxime Nitrification and Copper and Nickel Resistance by a Cupriavidus pauculus, an Active Heterotrophic Nitrifier-Denitrifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ramirez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic nitrifiers synthesize nitrogenous gasses when nitrifying ammonium ion. A Cupriavidus pauculus, previously thought an Alcaligenes sp. and noted as an active heterotrophic nitrifier-denitrifier, was examined for its ability to produce nitrogen gas (N2 and nitrous oxide (N2O while heterotrophically nitrifying the organic substrate pyruvic oxime [CH3–C(NOH–COOH]. Neither N2 nor N2O were produced. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the organism is a member of a genus (Cupriavidus known for its resistance to metals and its metabolism of xenobiotics. The microbe (a Cupriavidus pauculus designated as C. pauculus strain UM1 was examined for its ability to perform heterotrophic nitrification in the presence of Cu2+ and Ni2+ and to metabolize the xenobiotic phenol. The bacterium heterotrophically nitrified well when either 1 mM Cu2+ or 0.5 mM Ni2+ was present in either enriched or minimal medium. The organism also used phenol as a sole carbon source in either the presence or absence of 1 mM Cu2+ or 0.5 mM Ni2+. The ability of this isolate to perform a number of different metabolisms, its noteworthy resistance to copper and nickel, and its potential use as a bioremediation agent are discussed.

  14. Novel insight into the role of heterotrophic dinoflagellates in the fate of crude oil in the sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Connelly, Tara L.; Buskey, Edward J.

    2014-12-01

    Although planktonic protozoans are likely to interact with dispersed crude oil after a spill, protozoan-mediated processes affecting crude oil pollution in the sea are still not well known. Here, we present the first evidence of ingestion and defecation of physically or chemically dispersed crude oil droplets (1-86 μm in diameter) by heterotrophic dinoflagellates, major components of marine planktonic food webs. At a crude oil concentration commonly found after an oil spill (1 μL L-1), the heterotrophic dinoflagellates Noctiluca scintillans and Gyrodinium spirale grew and ingested ~0.37 μg-oil μg-Cdino-1 d-1, which could represent ~17% to 100% of dispersed oil in surface waters when heterotrophic dinoflagellates are abundant or bloom. Egestion of faecal pellets containing crude oil by heterotrophic dinoflagellates could contribute to the sinking and flux of toxic petroleum hydrocarbons in coastal waters. Our study indicates that crude oil ingestion by heterotrophic dinoflagellates is a noteworthy route by which petroleum enters marine food webs and a previously overlooked biological process influencing the fate of crude oil in the sea after spills.

  15. Isolation and Characterisation of Diazotrophic Bacteria from Rhizosphere of Different Rice Cultivars of South Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FOLGUNI LASKAR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Free living heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of 10 local and cultivated varieties of rice grown in Karimganj district of South Assam. Among the 25 isolates, 11 isolates withplant growth promoting activity were identified based on phenotypic and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The strains were identified as Shingomonasazotifigens, Pseudomonas putida, Stenotrophomonasmaltophila,Acinetobacterradioresistance, Alkaligenesfaecalis, Enterobactercloaceae subsp. dissolvens, Pantoeaagglomerans, Klebsiellapneumoneae, Achromobacterxyloxidans, Herbispirillumrubrisubalbicans and Herbispirillum sp . The efficient strains are isolated from the local varieties of rice plant. The isolate KR-23 ( Sphingomonasazotifigens was a novel bacteria reported for the first time as nitrogen fixing bacteria from India. The nitrogen fixing ability along with IAA production, ACC deaminase activity and P-solubilisation by the bacteria has shown their potential for plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria. KR-6( Stenotrophomonasmaltophila and KR-7( Herbispirillumrubrisubalbicans have been reported earlier as plant pathogensbut theyhave shown a high potential for nitrogen fixing and auxin producing activity in the present study

  16. Ammonium removal by Agrobacterium sp. LAD9 capable of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Ni, Jinren

    2012-05-01

    Characteristics of ammonium removal by a newly isolated heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium Agrobacterium sp. LAD9 were systematically investigated. Succinate and acetate were found to be the most favorable carbon sources for LAD9. Response surface methodology (RSM) analysis demonstrated that maximum removal of ammonium occurred under the conditions with an initial pH of 8.46, C/N ratio of 8.28, temperature of 27.9°C and shaking speed of 150rpm, where temperature and shaking speed produced the largest effect. Further nitrogen balance analysis revealed that 50.1% of nitrogen was removed as gas products and 40.8% was converted to the biomass. Moreover, the occurrence of aerobic denitrification was evidenced by the utilization of nitrite and nitrate as nitrogen sources, and the successful amplifications of membrane bound nitrate reductase and cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase genes from strain LAD9. Thus, the nitrogen removal in strain LAD9 was speculated to comply with the mechanism of heterotrophic nitrification coupled with aerobic denitrification (NH(4)(+)-NH(2)OH-NO(2)(-)-N(2)O-N(2)), in which also accompanied with the mutual transformation of nitrite and nitrate. The findings can help in applying appropriate controls over operational parameters in systems involving the use of this kind of strain.

  17. Are freshwater mixotrophic ciliates less sensitive to solar ultraviolet radiation than heterotrophic ones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Bettina; Summerer, Monika; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2011-01-01

    We tested whether mixotrophic ciliates are more resistant to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than heterotrophic ones because symbiotic algae can provide self-shading by cell matter absorption and eventually by direct UV screening from mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). Sensitivity of a natural assemblage to solar radiation was tested in experiments in the original lake and in a more UV transparent alpine lake after transplantation of the ciliates. In both lakes, the assemblage was exposed either to full sunlight, to photosynthetically active radiation only, or kept in the dark. In each lake, exposure was for 5 h at the surface and at the depth corresponding to the 10% attenuation depth at 320 nm. Overall, when the assemblage was exposed to surface UVR, only one out of four dominant mixotrophic ciliates, Vorticella chlorellata, was more resistant than heterotrophic species. The higher UV resistance in V. chlorellata was related to the presence of MAAs and the high percentage of ciliate volume occupied by algal symbionts. Our results indicate that effects of UVR were species-specific and depended on efficient screening of these wavelengths, but also on the depth preference of the ciliates and thus, on their previous exposure history to UVR.

  18. Are Freshwater Mixotrophic Ciliates Less Sensitive to Solar Ultraviolet Radiation than Heterotrophic Ones?1

    Science.gov (United States)

    SONNTAG, BETTINA; SUMMERER, MONIKA; SOMMARUGA, RUBEN

    2011-01-01

    We tested whether mixotrophic ciliates are more resistant to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than heterotrophic ones because symbiotic algae can provide self-shading by cell matter absorption and eventually by direct UV screening from mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). Sensitivity of a natural assemblage to solar radiation was tested in experiments in the original lake and in a more UV transparent alpine lake after transplantation of the ciliates. In both lakes, the assemblage was exposed either to full sunlight, to photosynthetically active radiation only, or kept in the dark. In each lake, exposure was for 5 h at the surface and at the depth corresponding to the 10% attenuation depth at 320 nm. Overall, when the assemblage was exposed to surface UVR, only one out of four dominant mixotrophic ciliates, Vorticella chlorellata, was more resistant than heterotrophic species. The higher UV resistance in V. chlorellata was related to the presence of MAAs and the high percentage of ciliate volume occupied by algal symbionts. Our results indicate that effects of UVR were species-specific and depended on efficient screening of these wavelengths, but also on the depth preference of the ciliates and thus, on their previous exposure history to UVR. PMID:21414057

  19. Optimization of complex medium composition for heterotrophic cultivation of Euglena gracilis and paramylon production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivušić, Franjo; Šantek, Božidar

    2015-06-01

    Heterotrophic cultivation of Euglena gracilis was carried out on synthetic (Hutner medium) and complex cultivation media in order to optimize production of β-1,3-glucan (paramylon). For preparation of complex media, various industrial by-products (e.g., molasses, corn steep solid, yeast extract, and beef extract) were used with or without addition of pure compounds [glucose, galactose, fructose, lactose, maltose, sucrose, and (NH4)2HPO4]. Heterotrophic cultivation of E. gracilis was performed in Erlenmeyer flasks and additionally confirmed during research in the stirred tank bioreactor. The results clearly show that E. gracilis can easily metabolize glucose and fructose as carbon sources and corn steep solid as complex nitrogen and growth factors source for biomass growth and paramylon synthesis. Furthermore, it was also proved that addition of (NH4)2HPO4, beef extract, or gibberellic acid did not have positive effect on the biomass growth and paramylon synthesis. After optimization of complex medium composition and verification in the stirred tank bioreactor, it was concluded that medium composed of glucose (20 g/L) and corn steep solid (30 g/L) is the most suitable complex medium for industrial cultivation of E. gracilis and paramylon production.

  20. Treatment of cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater and the reuse of sludge for biodiesel production by microalgal heterotrophic bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Manzoni Maroneze

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microalgal heterotrophic bioreactors are a potential technological development that can convert organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus of wastewaters into a biomass suitable for energy production. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of microalgal heterotrophic bioreactors in the secondary treatment of cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater and the reuse of microalgal sludge for biodiesel production. The experiments were performed in a bubble column bioreactor using the microalgae Phormidium sp. Heterotrophic microalgal bioreactors removed 90 % of the chemical oxygen demand, 57 % of total nitrogen and 52 % of total phosphorus. Substantial microalgal sludge is produced in the process (substrate yield coefficient of 0.43 mg sludge mg chemical oxygen demand−¹, resulting in a biomass with high potential for producing biodiesel (ester content of more than 99 %, cetane number of 55, iodine value of 73.5 g iodine 100 g−¹, unsaturation degree of ~75 % and a cold filter plugging point of 5 ºC.

  1. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea-ice: Seasonal study from Marlene Bight, SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    in situ in plastic bags with subsequent melting and measurements of changes in total O-2 concentrations. The standard incubations showed that the annual succession followed a distinctive pattern, with a low, almost balancing heterotrophic and autotrophic activity during February and March. This period...... was followed by an algal bloom in late March and April, leading to a net autotrophic community. During February and March, the oxygen level in the bag incubations remained constant, validating the low balanced heterotrophic and autotrophic activity. As the autotrophic activity exceeded the heterotrophic...... activity in late March and April, it resulted in a significant net oxygen accumulation in the bag incubations. Integrated over the entire season, the sea ice of Malene Bight was net autotrophic with an annual net carbon fixation of 220 mg C m(-2), reflecting the net result of a sea ice-related gross...

  2. Dynamic Responses of Root, Mycorrhizal and Soil Heterotrophic Respiration to Temperature Increases in an Arid System of Southeast Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, C.; Pugnaire, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    Mycorrhizal and heterotrophic respiration may represent up to 80% of total soil respiration in temperate environments; however little is known about arid environments where the dynamics of carbon cycling is less known. To improve models of CO2 efflux to the atmosphere in these environments it is necessary to quantify the contribution of soil components (roots, mycorrhizas and heterotrophic respiration) to soil respiration and their response to temperature increases. We settled up a soil partitioning experiment in December 2013 to address this topic. Using a mesh-collar design we quantified soil respiration of the tree main components (roots, mycorrhiza and heterotrophic respiration) in a Mediterranean arid location dominated by the shrub Rethama sphaerocarpa under two temperature regimes, an increased air temperature using open-top chambers (OTC) and a control. For the firths 6 months of measurements, we recorded a decrease in annual species cover with increased temperature; total soil respiration varied between treatments, being higher in the control treatment while, contrary to our expectations, mycorrhizal and soil heterotrophic respiration did not vary between treatments. When looking at the relative contribution of the different soil components, the treatment enclosing both mycorrhizal and soil heterotrophic respiration represented more than half the total soil respiration. These results show that temperature affects total soil respiration and that, in our case, mycorrhizal and soil heterotrophic community were not major drivers of soil respiration responses to temperature. However, these data correspond to an abnormal dry period and data to be collected during the wet season would help us to better understand the contribution of the different soil components to temperature increases in arid environments.

  3. Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate tolerance in bacteria isolated from sediment of tropical water bodies polluted with detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eniola, Kehinde I T; Olayemi, Albert B

    2008-12-01

    The discharge of untreated detergent-bearing waste introduces linear alklcylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) to the aquatic environment. The surfactant persists in some streams and rivers in Nigeria, some is adsorbed to suspended materials and end in the sediment of the receiving water bodies. In this study, bacteria isolated from sediments of some tropical detergent-effluent-polluted streams were tested for tolerance to LAS using the media dilution technique. LAS-tolerance was indicated by growth of the bacteria in the presence of the surfactant. The pH, concentrations of surfactant, population of heterotrophic bacteria and population of LAS-tolerant bacteria in the sediments were determined. A direct relationship (r = 0.9124) was found between the alkaline conditions (pH= 8.2-12.0) and high surfactant concentrations (45-132 mg/g) in the sediment. The sediments harboured a high population and a wide variety of bacteria; the populations of viable heterotrophic bacteria (VHB: 2.9 x 10(5) to 1.2 x 10(7) cfu/g) and LAS tolerant bacteria (LTB: 1.5 x 10(4) to 1.2 x 10(6) cfu/g) had a direct relationship (r = 0.9500). An inverse relationship resulted between each of them and the concentration of surfactant in the sediment, r(VHB/LAS) = -0.9303 and r(LTB/LAS) = -0.9143, respectively. Twelve bacteria species were isolated from the sediment: Alcaligenes odorans, Bacillus subtilis, Burkholderia cepacia, Citrobacter freundii, Citrobacter diversus, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Micrococcus albus, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcusfaecalis. Most of them were adapted to the surfactant with their maximum acceptable concentrations ranging between 0.03 and >1.0% (w/v). The sediments could serve as source of adapted organisms which can be used in bio-treatment of LAS-bearing waste.

  4. Removal of bacteria and viruses from waters using layered double hydroxide nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Jin et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have identified synthetic layered double hydroxides (LDH nanocomposites as an effective group of material for removing bacteria and viruses from water. In this study, LDH nanocomposites were synthesized and tested for removing biological contaminants. LDH was used to remove MS2 and X174 (indicator viruses, and Escherichia coli (an indicator bacterium from synthetic groundwater and to remove mixed communities of heterotrophic bacteria from raw river water. Our results indicate that LDH composed of magnesium–aluminium or zinc–aluminium has a viral and bacterial adsorption efficiency ≥99% at viral concentrations between 5.9×106 and 9.1×106 plaque forming units (pfu/L and bacterial concentrations between 1.6×1010 and 2.6×1010 colony forming units (cfu/L when exposed to LDH in a slurry suspension system. Adsorption densities of viruses and bacteria to LDH in suspension ranged from 1.4×1010 to 2.1×1010 pfu/kg LDH and 3.2×1013–5.2×1013 cfu/kg LDH, respectively. We also tested the efficiency of LDH in removing heterotrophic bacteria from raw river water. While removal efficiencies were still high (87–99%, the adsorption capacities of the two kinds of LDH were 4–5 orders of magnitude lower than when exposed to synthetic groundwater, depending on if the LDH was in suspension or a packed column, respectively.

  5. Deposition of calcium carbonate in karst caves: role of bacteria in Stiffe's cave.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercole Claudia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria make a significant contribution to the accumulation of carbonate in several natural habitats where large amounts of carbonates are deposited. However, the role played by microbial communities in speleothem formation (stalactites, stalagmites etc. in caves is still unclear. In bacteria carbonate is formed by autotrophic pathways, which deplete CO2 from the environment, and by heterotrophic pathways, leading to active or passive precipitation. We isolated cultivable heterotrophic microbial strains, able to induce CaCO3 precipitation in vitro, from samples taken from speleothems in the galleries of Stiffe’s cave, L’Aquila, Italy. We found a large number of bacteria in the calcite formations (1 x 104 to 5 x 109 cells g-1. Microscopic examination, in laboratory conditions at different temperatures, showed that most of the isolates were able to form calcium carbonate microcrystals. The most crystalline precipitates were observed at 32°C. No precipitation was detected in un-inoculated controls media or in media that had been inoculated with autoclaved bacterial cells. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis showed that most of the carbonate crystals produced were calcite. Bacillus strains were the most common calcifying isolates collected from Stiffe’s Cave. Analysis of carbonate-solubilization capability revealed that the non-calcifying bacteria were carbonate solubilizers.

  6. Heterotrophic Bioleaching of Sulfur, Iron, and Silicon Impurities from Coal by Fusarium oxysporum FE and Exophiala spinifera FM with Growing and Resting Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemadzadeh, Shekoofeh Sadat; Emtiazi, Giti; Etemadifar, Zahra

    2016-06-01

    Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel containing sulfur and other elements which promote environmental pollution after burning. Also the silicon impurities make the transportation of coal expensive. In this research, two isolated fungi from oil contaminated soil with accessory number KF554100 (Fusarium oxysporum FE) and KC925672 (Exophiala spinifera FM) were used for heterotrophic biological leaching of coal. The leaching were detected by FTIR, CHNS, XRF analyzer and compared with iron and sulfate released in the supernatant. The results showed that E. spinifera FM produced more acidic metabolites in growing cells, promoting the iron and sulfate ions removal while resting cells of F. oxysporum FE enhanced the removal of aromatic sulfur. XRF analysis showed that the resting cells of E. spinifera FM proceeded maximum leaching for iron and silicon (48.8, 43.2 %, respectively). CHNS analysis demonstrated that 34.21 % of sulfur leaching was due to the activities of resting cells of F. oxysporum FE. Also F. oxysporum FE removed organic sulfur more than E. spinifera FM in both growing and resting cells. FTIR data showed that both fungi had the ability to remove pyrite and quartz from coal. These data indicated that inoculations of these fungi to the coal are cheap and impurity removals were faster than autotrophic bacteria. Also due to the removal of dibenzothiophene, pyrite, and quartz, we speculated that they are excellent candidates for bioleaching of coal, oil, and gas.

  7. Influence of tryptophan and indole-3-acetic acid on starch accumulation in the synthetic mutualistic Chlorella sorokiniana-Azospirillum brasilense system under heterotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Oskar A; Choix, Francisco J; Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2016-06-01

    This study measured the relations between tryptophan production, the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the metabolism and accumulation of starch during synthetic mutualism between the microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana and the microalgae growth-promoting bacteria Azospirillum brasilense, created by co-immobilization in alginate beads. Experiments used two wild-type A. brasilense strains (Cd and Sp6) and an IAA-attenuated mutant (SpM7918) grown under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-starved conditions tested under dark, heterotrophic and aerobic growth conditions. Under all incubating conditions, C. sorokiniana, but not A. brasilense, produced tryptophan. A significant correlation between IAA-production by A. brasilense and starch accumulation in C. sorokiniana was found, since the IAA-attenuated mutant was not producing increased starch levels. The highest ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) activity, starch content and glucose uptake were found during the interaction of A. brasilense wild type strains with the microalgae. When the microalgae were grown alone, they produced only small amounts of starch. Supplementation with synthetic IAA to C. sorokiniana grown alone enhanced the above parameters, but only transiently. Activity of α-amylase decreased under nitrogen-replete conditions, but increased under nitrogen-starved conditions. In summary, this study demonstrated that, during synthetic mutualism, the exchange of tryptophan and IAA between the partners is a mechanism that governs several changes in starch metabolism of C. sorokiniana, yielding an increase in starch content.

  8. Assemblage of benthic diatoms and culturable heterotrophs in shallow-water hydrothermal vent of the D. Joao de Castro Seamount, Azores in the Atlantic Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Mohandass, C.; Cardigos, F.; DeCosta, P.M.; Santos, R.S.; Colaco, A.

    of heterotrophic organisms were isolated from the yellow zone than the white zone. Most of the culturable heterotrophic bacterial isolates showed better growth in the presence of Fe, Mn and Pb than in their absence. Here we report the presence of culturable...

  9. Cloning and expression of acidstable, high maltose-forming, Ca2+-independent α-amylase from an acidophile Bacillus acidicola and its applicability in starch hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Archana; Satyanarayana, T

    2012-05-01

    The α-amylase encoding gene from acidophilic bacterium Bacillus acidicola was cloned into pET28a(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant E. coli produced a 15-fold higher α-amylase than B. acidicola strain. The recombinant α-amylase was purified to homogeneity by one-step nickel affinity chromatography using Ni(2+)-NTA resin with molecular mass of 62 KDa. It is active in the pH range between 3.0 and 7.0 and 30 and 100 °C with optimum at pH 4.0 and 60 °C. The enzyme is Ca(2+)-independent with K (m) and k (cat) values (on soluble starch) of 1.6 mg ml(-1) and 108.7 s(-1), respectively. The α-amylase of B. acidicola is acidstable, high maltose forming and Ca(2+)-independent, and therefore, is a suitable candidate for starch hydrolysis and baking.

  10. Adaptation of a mixed culture of acidophiles for a tank biooxidation of refractory gold concentrates containing a high concentration of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jeongsik; Silva, Rene A; Park, Jeonghyun; Lee, Eunseong; Park, Jayhyun; Kim, Hyunjung

    2016-05-01

    We adapted a mixed culture of acidophiles to high arsenic concentrations to confirm the possibility of achieving more than 70% biooxidation of refractory gold concentrates containing high arsenic (As) concentration. The biooxidation process was applied to refractory gold concentrates containing approximately 139.67 g/kg of total As in a stirred tank reactor using an adapted mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. The percentage of the biooxidation process was analyzed based on the total As removal efficiency. The As removal was monitored by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, conducted every 24 h. The results obtained with the adapted culture were compared with the percentage of biooxidation obtained with a non-adapted mixed culture of A. ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans, and with their respective pure cultures. The percentages of biooxidation obtained during 358 h of reaction were 72.20%, 38.20%, 27.70%, and 11.45% for adapted culture, non-adapted culture, and pure cultures of A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans, respectively. The adapted culture showed a peak maximum percentage of biooxidation of 77% at 120 h of reaction, confirming that it is possible to obtain biooxidation percentages over 70% in gold concentrates containing high As concentrations.

  11. Influence of water chemistry on the distribution of an acidophilic protozoan in an acid mine drainage system at the abandoned Green Valley coal mine, Indiana, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A.; Hasiotis, S.T. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography Geology & Anthropology

    2001-07-01

    Euglena mutabilis, a benthic photosynthetic protozoan that intracellularly sequesters Fe, is variably abundant in the main effluent channel that contains acid mine drainage (AMD) discharging from the Green Valley coal mine site in western Indiana. Samples of effluent (pH 3.0-4.6) taken from the main channel and samples of contaminated stream water (pH 3.3 to 8.0) collected from an adjacent stream were analyzed to evaluate the influence of water chemistry on E. mutabilis distribution. E. mutabilis communities were restricted to areas containing unmixed effluent with the thickest (up to 3 mm) benthic communities residing in effluent containing high concentrations of total Fe (up to 12110 mg/l), SO{sub 4}(up to 2940 mg/l), Al (up to 1846 mg/l), and Cl (up to 629 mg/l). Communities were also present, but much less abundant, in areas with effluent containing lower concentrations of these same constituents. In effluent where SO{sub 4} was most highly concentrated, E. mutabilis was largely absent, suggesting that extremely high concentrations of SO{sub 4} may have an adverse effect on this potentially beneficial Fe-mediating, acidophilic protozoan.

  12. Influence of temperature in phosphate removal by microalgae in heterotrophic bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Queiroz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The removal of total dissolved phosphate by the cyanobacteria Aphanothece microscopica Nägeli cultivated heterotrophically in dairy processing wastewater was investigated in this work. The experiments were carried out in bioreactors operating in a batch mode, fed with 4.5 L of wastewater. The experimental conditions were as follows: initial cell concentration of 0.2 g/L, pH adjusted to 7.6, isothermal reactor operating at temperatures of 10, 20 and 30ºC with absence of light and continuous aeration of 1 VVM. The results showed that phosphate removal is strongly dependent on process temperature. A. microscopica Nägeli was effective in the removal phosphate achieving removal rates of 3.77 mg/L.h, which reflected in the conversion of 98.4% in hydraulic detention times of 24 h.

  13. ZOOINDICATION AND PHYTOINDICATION OF AUTOTROPHIC AND HETEROTROPHIC CONSORTIA OF BIOGEOCOENOSES ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunah O. N.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The main results of ecomorfology structure of soil mesofauna in the adjacent area of Dneprovsko-Orylskiy Natural Reserve (Ireland Pogorily ore Dyka Kosa have been presented by the methods of OMI- and RLQ – analysis. The components of variability of the soil animal world (in colony of Ardea cinerea L., which is conditioned by auto- and heterotrophic consortia and also by influence of edaphically properties of biogeocoenoses were determined. Also we registered the high level and dynamics of mineral feed and presence of nitrogen in the soil. The results of description of taxonomic and ecological diversity in association of mesopedobionts were presented. We proved that the coenomorphic type of the animals was bog-forest. On the basic of joint measuring of edaphically descriptions and features of fauna structure we estimated the properties of ecological niche of soil mesofauna.

  14. Solazyme Integrated Biorefinery (SzIBR): Diesel Fuels from Heterotrophic Algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, David [Solazyme, Inc., South San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Under Department of Energy Award Number DE-EE0002877 (the “DOE Award”), Solazyme, Inc. (“Solazyme”) has built a demonstration scale “Solazyme Integrated Biorefinery (SzlBR).” The SzIBR was built to provide integrated scale-up of Solazyme’s novel heterotrophic algal oil biomanufacturing process, validate the projected commercial-scale economics of producing multiple algal oils, and to enable Solazyme to collect the data necessary to complete the design of its first commercial-scale facility. Solazyme’s technology enables it to convert a range of low-cost plant-based sugars into high-value oils. Solazyme’s renewable products replace or enhance oils derived from the world’s three existing sources—petroleum, plants, and animal fats. Solazyme tailors the composition of its oils to address specific customer requirements, offering superior performance characteristics and value. This report summarizes history and the results of the project.

  15. 'Prepackaged symbioses': propagules on roots of the myco-heterotrophic plant Arachnitis uniflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Laura; Sérsic, Alicia; Melville, Lewis; Peterson, R Larry

    2006-01-01

    Arachnitis uniflora, a myco-heterotrophic plant species, has fleshy tuberous roots colonized by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal genus Glomus (Phylum Glomeromycota). These roots produce apical and lateral propagules, both reported here for the first time. The objective of the study was to characterize the ontogeny and structure of the propagules, and to determine their function. Scanning electron microscopy, laser scanning confocal microscopy and light microscopy were used to study the ontogeny and structure of the propagules. Propagules developed either from cortical parenchyma cells or from cells immediately beneath the root cap; they developed a shoot meristem and cells in the basal region which were colonized by various fungal structures including hyphae and vesicles. These propagules may detach from the roots, establishing new plants.

  16. Kinetic modeling of growth and lipid body induction in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under heterotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Neha; Kumar, G Dinesh; Gupta, Ravi Prakash; Mathur, Anshu Shankar; Manikandan, B; Basu, Biswajit; Tuli, Deepak Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a mathematical model to describe the biomass and (total) lipid productivity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa NCIM 2738 under heterotrophic conditions. Biomass growth rate was predicted by Droop's cell quota model, while changes observed in cell quota (utilization) under carbon excess conditions were used for the modeling and predicting the lipid accumulation rate. The model was simulated under non-limiting (excess) carbon and limiting nitrate concentration and validated with experimental data for the culture grown in batch (flask) mode under different nitrate concentrations. The present model incorporated two modes (growth and stressed) for the prediction of endogenous lipid synthesis/induction and aimed to predict the effect and response of the microalgae under nutrient starvation (stressed) conditions. MATLAB and Genetic Algorithm were employed for the prediction and validation of the model parameters.

  17. Circadian cycles in growth and feeding rates of heterotrophic protist plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Strom, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    comatum, no day-night difference in growth and feeding rates was found. Maintenance of day-night rate differences during 24-h exposures to continuous darkness demonstrated that most of these protists had circadian cycles. The heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina exhibited a clear irradiance...... threshold for maintenance of the circadian cycle: day-night differences in growth and feeding rates were observed at irradiances as low as 2.6 X 10(-3) mumol photons m(-2) s(-1) but not at 3.1 X 10(-4) mumol photons m(-2) s(-1). We also studied growth and feeding in transition from complete darkness...... to culturing in a day: night light cycle in O. marina and found that resetting the circadian cycle in this dinoflagellate temporarily arrested growth and feeding. We suggest that protists use a time-integrated light threshold rather than an instantaneous irradiance to maintain the circadian cell cycle...

  18. Draft genome sequence of Microbacterium oleivorans strain Wellendorf implicates heterotrophic versatility and bioremediation potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton P. Avramov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbacterium oleivorans is a predominant member of hydrocarbon-contaminated environments. We here report on the genomic analysis of M. oleivorans strain Wellendorf that was isolated from an indoor door handle. The partial genome of M. oleivorans strain Wellendorf consists of 2,916,870 bp of DNA with 2831 protein-coding genes and 49 RNA genes. The organism appears to be a versatile mesophilic heterotroph potentially capable of hydrolysis a suite of carbohydrates and amino acids. Genomic analysis revealed metabolic versatility with genes involved in the metabolism and transport of glucose, fructose, rhamnose, galactose, xylose, arabinose, alanine, aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, serine, glycine, threonine and cysteine. This is the first detailed analysis of a Microbacterium oleivorans genome.

  19. Bacteria, fungi and biokarst in Lechuguilla Cave, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, K. I.; Northup, D. E.; Pollastro, R. M.; Wright, W. G.; Larock, E. J.

    1995-02-01

    Lechuguilla Cave is a deep, extensive, gypsumand sulfur-bearing hypogenic cave in Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico, most of which (>90%) lies more than 300 m beneath the entrance. Located in the arid Guadalupe Mountains, Lechuguilla's remarkable state of preservation is partially due to the locally continuous Yates Formation siltstone that has effectively diverted most vadose water away from the cave. Allocthonous organic input to the cave is therefore very limited, but bacterial and fungal colonization is relatively extensive: (1) Aspergillus sp. fungi and unidentified bacteria are associated with iron-, manganese-, and sulfur-rich encrustations on calcitic folia near the suspected water table 466 m below the entrance; (2) 92 species of fungi in 19 genera have been identified throughout the cave in oligotrophic (nutrient-poor) “soils” and pools; (3) cave-air condensate contains unidentified microbes; (4) indigenous chemoheterotrophic Seliberius and Caulobacter bacteria are known from remote pool sites; and (5) at least four genera of heterotrophic bacteria with population densities near 5×105 colony-forming units (CFU) per gram are present in ceiling-bound deposits of supposedly abiogenic condensation-corrosion residues. Various lines of evidence suggest that autotrophic bacteria are present in the ceiling-bound residues and could act as primary producers in a unique subterranean microbial food chain. The suspected autotrophic bacteria are probably chemolithoautotrophic (CLA), utilizing trace iron, manganese, or sulfur in the limestone and dolomitic bedrock to mechanically (and possibly biochemically) erode the substrate to produce residual floor deposits. Because other major sources of organic matter have not been detected, we suggest that these CLA bacteria are providing requisite organic matter to the known heterotrophic bacteria and fungi in the residues. The cavewide bacterial and fungal distribution, the large volumes of corrosion residues

  20. Seasonal seawater temperature as the major determinant for populations of culturable bacteria in the sediments of an intact mangrove in an arid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Acosta, Barbara; Bashan, Yoav; Hernandez-Saavedra, Norma Y; Ascencio, Felipe; Cruz-Agüero, Gustavo

    2006-02-01

    Mangroves are highly productive marine ecosystems where bacteria (culturable and non-culturable) actively participate in biomineralization of organic matter and biotransformation of minerals. This study explores spatial and seasonal fluctuations of culturable heterotrophic bacteria and Vibrio spp. in the sediments of an intact mangrove ecosystem and determines the dominant environmental factors that govern these fluctuations. Sediment samples were collected monthly from three stations in the mangroves of Laguna de Balandra, Baja California Sur, Mexico, through an annual cycle. Physicochemical parameters included seawater temperature, salinity, and concentration of dissolved oxygen. Viable counts of culturable heterotrophic bacteria and Vibrio spp. were made. In one sample (March 2003), nutrient concentrations (ammonium, nitrites, nitrates, and phosphates), organic matter, pH and sediment texture were also determined. General cluster analyses, analysis of variance of specific variables, and several principal component analyses demonstrated that seawater temperature is the principal determinant of seasonal distribution of culturable heterotrophic bacteria and Vibrio spp. in mangrove sediments. Soil texture, concentration of nutrients, and organic matter concentration contribute to heterogenicity to a lesser extent. A large spatial variation in bacterial populations was observed over short distances ( approximately 1 m) in sampling areas within the same site. These analyses show that the culturable bacterial distribution in sediments of mangroves has high spatial and temporal heterogeneity.

  1. Comparison of the effect of salinity on the D/H ratio of fatty acids of heterotrophic and photoautotrophic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinzelmann, S.M.; Chivall, David; M'Boule, D.; Sinke-Schoen, Daniëlle; Villanueva, Laura; Sinninghe Damste, J.S.; Schouten, Stefan; Van der Meer, Marcel T J

    2015-01-01

    The core metabolism of microorganisms has a major influence on the hydrogen isotopic composition of their fatty acids. Heterotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids with a deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) ratio either slightly depleted or enriched in D compared to the growth water, while photo- and ch

  2. Identification of facultatively heterotrophic, N2-fixing cyanobacteria able to receive plasmid vectors from Escherichia coli by conjugation.

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, E; Wolk, C P

    1985-01-01

    Plasmid vectors transferable by conjugation from Escherichia coli to obligately photoautotrophic strains of Anabaena spp. are also transferred to and maintained in heterotrophic, filamentous cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. These organisms can be used for the genetic analysis of oxygenic photosynthesis, chromatic adaptation, nitrogen fixation, and heterocyst development.

  3. Heterotrophic bacterial production and extracellular enzymatic activity in sinking particulate matter in the western North Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namiha eYamada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic activities on sinking particulate matter (SPM play an important role in SPM fluxes in the ocean. To demonstrate regional differences in heterotrophic activities on SPM, we measured heterotrophic bacterial production (HBP in seawater and SPM as well as potential extracellular enzyme activity (EEA in SPM on a transect along 155°E in the western North Pacific Ocean in the subarctic (44°N, the Kuroshio Extension area (35°N, and the subtropical gyre (20°N. Depth-integrated HBP in seawater from the surface to 500 m was comparable between the locations, whereas HBP in SPM at 44°N was substantially lower than at the other sites. We found the highest particulate organic carbon (POC export flux and export efficiency to bathypelagic depths, and the lowest water temperatures, at 44°N. We found significant correlations between leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase activity, ß-glucosidase (BGase activity, POC flux and particulate organic nitrogen flux. LAPase activity was two orders of magnitude higher than BGase activity, with a BGase:LAPase activity ratio of 0.027. There were no significant correlations between HBP and EEA in SPM except for lipase, and lipase activity was significantly correlated with temperature. We propose that hydrographic conditions are an important factor controlling heterotrophic bacterial activity and export efficiency of organic carbon to the deep ocean, as are the sources and abundance of SPM produced in the euphotic zone via primary production.

  4. Gyrodiniellum shiwhaense n. gen., n. sp., A New Planktonic Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate from the Coastal Waters of Western Korea 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Nam Seon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Moestrup, O.

    2011-01-01

    The heterotrophic dinoflagellate Gyrodiniellum shiwhaense n. gen., n. sp. is described from live cells and from cells prepared for light, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. Also, sequences of the small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) of rDNA have been analyzed. The epi...

  5. Biology of the Marine Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina: Current Status and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2013-10-21

    Heterotrophic dinoflagellates are prevalent protists in marine environments, which play an important role in the carbon cycling and energy flow in the marine planktonic community. Oxyrrhismarina (Dinophyceae), a widespread heterotrophic dinoflagellate, is a model species used for a broad range of ecological, biogeographic, and evolutionary studies. Despite the increasing research effort on this species, there lacks a synthesis of the existing data and a coherent picture of this organism. Here we reviewed the literature to provide an overview of what is known regarding the biology of O. marina, and identify areas where further studies are needed. As an early branch of the dinoflagellate lineage, O. marina shares similarity with typical dinoflagellates in permanent condensed chromosomes, less abundant nucleosome proteins compared to other eukaryotes, multiple gene copies, the occurrence of trans-splicing in nucleus-encoded mRNAs, highly fragmented mitochondrial genome, and disuse of ATG as a start codon for mitochondrial genes. On the other hand, O. marina also exhibits some distinct cytological features (e.g., different flagellar structure, absence of girdle and sulcus or pustules, use of intranuclear spindle in mitosis, presence of nuclear plaque, and absence of birefringent periodic banded chromosomal structure) and genetic features (e.g., a single histone-like DNA-associated protein, cob-cox3 gene fusion, 5' oligo-U cap in the mitochondrial transcripts of protein-coding genes, the absence of mRNA editing, the presence of stop codon in the fused cob-cox3 mRNA produced by post-transcriptional oligoadenylation, and vestigial plastid genes). The best-studied biology of this dinoflagellate is probably the prey and predators types, which include a wide range of organisms. On the other hand, the abundance of this species in the natural waters and its controlling factors, genome organization and gene expression regulation that underlie the unusual cytological and

  6. Relationships between meiofaunal biodiversity and prokaryotic heterotrophic production in different tropical habitats and oceanic regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pusceddu

    Full Text Available Tropical marine ecosystems are among the most diverse of the world oceans, so that assessing the linkages between biodiversity and ecosystem functions (BEF is a crucial step to predict consequences of biodiversity loss. Most BEF studies in marine ecosystems have been carried out on macrobenthic diversity, whereas the influence of the meiofauna on ecosystem functioning has received much less attention. We compared meiofaunal and nematode biodiversity and prokaryotic heterotrophic production across seagrass, mangrove and reef sediments in the Caribbean, Celebes and Red Seas. For all variables we report the presence of differences among habitats within the same region, and among regions within the same habitat. In all regions, the richness of meiofaunal taxa in reef and seagrass sediments is higher than in mangrove sediments. The sediments of the Celebes Sea show the highest meiofaunal biodiversity. The composition of meiofaunal assemblages varies significantly among habitats in the same region. The nematode beta diversity among habitats within the same region is higher than the beta diversity among regions. Although one site per habitat was considered in each region, these results suggest that the composition of meiofaunal assemblages varies primarily among biogeographic regions, whereas the composition of nematode assemblages varies more considerably among habitats. Meiofauna and nematode biodiversity and prokaryotic heterotrophic production, even after the removal of covariate effects linked with longitude and the quantity and nutritional quality of organic matter, are positively and linearly linked both across regions and within each habitat type. Our results confirm that meiofauna and nematode biodiversity may influence benthic prokaryotic activity, which, in turn, implies that diversity loss could have negative impacts on ecosystem functioning in these systems.

  7. Coscinaraea marshae corals that have survived prolonged bleaching exhibit signs of increased heterotrophic feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell-Browne, Pia; Stat, Michael; Thomson, Damian; Clode, Peta L.

    2014-09-01

    Colonies of Coscinaraea marshae corals from Rottnest Island, Western Australia have survived for more than 11 months in various bleached states following a severe heating event in the austral summer of 2011. These colonies are situated in a high-latitude, mesophotic environment, which has made their long-term survival of particular interest as such environments typically suffer from minimal thermal pressures. We have investigated corals that remain unbleached, moderately bleached, or severely bleached to better understand potential survival mechanisms utilised in response to thermal stress. Specifically, Symbiodinium (algal symbiont) density and genotype, chlorophyll- a concentrations, and δ13C and δ15N levels were compared between colonies in the three bleaching categories. Severely bleached colonies housed significantly fewer Symbiodinium cells ( p coral in both severely and moderately bleached colonies, with clade C and a mixed clade population detected. In unbleached colonies, only clade B was observed. Levels of δ15N indicate that severely bleached colonies are utilising heterotrophic feeding mechanisms to aid survival whilst bleached. Collectively, these results suggest that these C. marshae colonies can survive with low symbiont and chlorophyll densities, in response to prolonged thermal stress and extended bleaching, and increase heterotrophic feeding levels sufficiently to meet energy demands, thus enabling some colonies to survive and recover over long time frames. This is significant as it suggests that corals in mesophotic and high-latitude environments may possess considerable plasticity and an ability to tolerate and adapt to large environmental fluctuations, thereby improving their chances of survival as climate change impacts coral ecosystems worldwide.

  8. De novo transcriptomes of a mixotrophic and a heterotrophic ciliate from marine plankton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana F Santoferrara

    Full Text Available Studying non-model organisms is crucial in the context of the current development of genomics and transcriptomics for both physiological experimentation and environmental characterization. We investigated the transcriptomes of two marine planktonic ciliates, the mixotrophic oligotrich Strombidium rassoulzadegani and the heterotrophic choreotrich Strombidinopsis sp., and their respective algal food using Illumina RNAseq. Our aim was to characterize the transcriptomes of these contrasting ciliates and to identify genes potentially involved in mixotrophy. We detected approximately 10,000 and 7,600 amino acid sequences for S. rassoulzadegani and Strombidinopsis sp., respectively. About half of these transcripts had significant BLASTP hits (E-value <10-6 against previously-characterized sequences, mostly from the model ciliate Oxytricha trifallax. Transcriptomes from both the mixotroph and the heterotroph species provided similar annotations for GO terms and KEGG pathways. Most of the identified genes were related to housekeeping activity and pathways such as the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleotides, and vitamins. Although S. rassoulzadegani can keep and use chloroplasts from its prey, we did not find genes clearly linked to chloroplast maintenance and functioning in the transcriptome of this ciliate. While chloroplasts are known sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS, we found the same complement of antioxidant pathways in both ciliates, except for one enzyme possibly linked to ascorbic acid recycling found exclusively in the mixotroph. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find qualitative differences in genes potentially related to mixotrophy. However, these transcriptomes will help to establish a basis for the evaluation of differential gene expression in oligotrichs and choreotrichs and experimental investigation of the costs and benefits of mixotrophy.

  9. Pore-scale investigation on the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in heterogeneous soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Todd-Brown, Katherine E.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between microbial respiration rate and soil moisture content is an important property for understanding and predicting soil organic carbon degradation, CO2 production and emission, and their subsequent effects on climate change. This paper reports a pore-scale modeling study to investigate the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in soils and to evaluate various factors that affect this response. X-ray computed tomography was used to derive soil pore structures, which were then used for pore-scale model investigation. The pore-scale results were then averaged to calculate the effective respiration rates as a function of water content in soils. The calculated effective respiration rate first increases and then decreases with increasing soil water content, showing a maximum respiration rate at water saturation degree of 0.75 that is consistent with field and laboratory observations. The relationship between the respiration rate and moisture content is affected by various factors, including pore-scale organic carbon bioavailability, the rate of oxygen delivery, soil pore structure and physical heterogeneity, soil clay content, and microbial drought resistivity. Simulations also illustrates that a larger fraction of CO2 produced from microbial respiration can be accumulated inside soil cores under higher saturation conditions, implying that CO2 flux measured on the top of soil cores may underestimate or overestimate true soil respiration rates under dynamic moisture conditions. Overall, this study provides mechanistic insights into the soil respiration response to the change in moisture conditions, and reveals a complex relationship between heterotrophic microbial respiration rate and moisture content in soils that is affected by various hydrological, geochemical, and biophysical factors.

  10. Partitioning Longleaf Pine Soil Respiration into Its Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Components through Root Exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Althea A. ArchMiller

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and accurate estimations of the heterotrophic and autotrophic components of total soil respiration (Rs are important for calculating forest carbon budgets and for understanding carbon dynamics associated with natural and management-related disturbances. The objective of this study was to use deep (60 cm root exclusion tubes and paired control (i.e., no root exclusion collars to estimate heterotrophic respiration (Rh and Rs, respectively, in three 26-year-old longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill. stands in western Georgia. Root biomass was measured in root exclusion tubes and control collars after 102–104 days of incubation and fine root biomass loss from root exclusion was used to quantify root decay. Mean Rs from control collars was 3.3 micromol•CO2•m−2•s−1. Root exclusion tubes decreased Rs, providing an estimate of Rh. Mean Rh was 2.7 micromol•CO2•m−2•s−1 when uncorrected by pretreatment variation, root decay, or soil moisture compared to 2.1 micromol•CO2•m−2•s−1 when Rh was corrected for root decay. The corresponding ratio of Rh to Rs ranged from 66% to 82%, depending on the estimation method. This study provides an estimate of Rh in longleaf pine forests, and demonstrates the potential for deep root exclusion tubes to provide relatively rapid assessments (i.e., ~40 days post-treatment of Rh in similar forests. The range in Rh to Rs is comparable to other reports for similar temperate coniferous ecosystems.

  11. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, iain J.; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Rodriguez, Jason; Hooper, Sean; Porat, Iris; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Sun, Hui; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Huber, Harald; Zhulin, Igor B.; Whitman, William B.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-09-05

    Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced - Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  12. Feeding by heterotrophic dinoflagellates and ciliates on the free-living dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. (Clade E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Lim, An Suk; Yoo, Yeong Du; Lee, Moo Joon; Lee, Kyung Ha; Jang, Tae Young; Lee, Kitack

    2014-01-01

    To investigate heterotrophic protists grazing on Symbiodinium sp., we tested whether the common heterotrophic dinoflagellates Gyrodinium dominans, Gyrodinium moestrupii, Gyrodinium spirale, Oblea rotundata, Oxyrrhis marina, and Polykrikos kofoidii and the ciliates Balanion sp. and Parastrombidinopsis sp. preyed on the free-living dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. (clade E). We measured the growth and ingestion rates of O. marina and G. dominans on Symbiodinium sp. as a function of prey concentration. Furthermore, we compared the results to those obtained for other algal prey species. In addition, we measured the growth and ingestion rates of other predators at single prey concentrations at which these rates of O. marina and G. dominans were saturated. All predators tested in the present study, except Balanion sp., preyed on Symbiodinium sp. The specific growth rates of O. marina and G. dominans on Symbiodinium sp. increased rapidly with increasing mean prey concentration < ca. 740-815 ng C/ml (7,400-8,150 cells/ml), but became saturated at higher concentrations. The maximum growth rates of O. marina and G. dominans on Symbiodinium sp. (0.87 and 0.61/d) were much higher than those of G. moestrupii and P. kofoidii (0.11 and 0.04/d). Symbiodinium sp. did not support positive growth of G. spirale, O. rotundata, and Parastrombidinopsis sp. However, the maximum ingestion rates of P. kofoidii and Parastrombidinopsis sp. (6.7-10.0 ng C/predator/d) were much higher than those of O. marina and G. dominans on Symbiodinium sp. (1.9-2.1 ng C/predator/d). The results of the present study suggest that Symbiodinium sp. may increase or maintain the populations of some predators.

  13. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  14. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  15. Can heterotrophic uptake of dissolved organic carbon and zooplankton mitigate carbon budget deficits in annually bleached corals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levas, Stephen; Grottoli, Andréa G.; Schoepf, Verena; Aschaffenburg, Matthew; Baumann, Justin; Bauer, James E.; Warner, Mark E.

    2016-06-01

    Annual coral bleaching events due to increasing sea surface temperatures are predicted to occur globally by the mid-century and as early as 2025 in the Caribbean, and severely impact coral reefs. We hypothesize that heterotrophic carbon (C) in the form of zooplankton and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a significant source of C to bleached corals. Thus, the ability to utilize multiple pools of fixed carbon and/or increase the amount of fixed carbon acquired from one or more pools of fixed carbon (defined here as heterotrophic plasticity) could underlie coral acclimatization and persistence under future ocean-warming scenarios. Here, three species of Caribbean coral— Porites divaricata, P. astreoides, and Orbicella faveolata—were experimentally bleached for 2.5 weeks in two successive years and allowed to recover in the field. Zooplankton feeding was assessed after single and repeat bleaching, while DOC fluxes and the contribution of DOC to the total C budget were determined after single bleaching, 11 months on the reef, and repeat bleaching. Zooplankton was a large C source for P. astreoides, but only following single bleaching. DOC was a source of C for single-bleached corals and accounted for 11-36 % of daily metabolic demand (CHARDOC), but represented a net loss of C in repeat-bleached corals. In repeat-bleached corals, DOC loss exacerbated the negative C budgets in all three species. Thus, the capacity for heterotrophic plasticity in corals is compromised under annual bleaching, and heterotrophic uptake of DOC and zooplankton does not mitigate C budget deficits in annually bleached corals. Overall, these findings suggest that some Caribbean corals may be more susceptible to repeat bleaching than to single bleaching due to a lack of heterotrophic plasticity, and coral persistence under increasing bleaching frequency may ultimately depend on other factors such as energy reserves and symbiont shuffling.

  16. Heterotrophic compensation: a possible mechanism for resilience of coral reefs to global warming or a sign of prolonged stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Hughes

    Full Text Available Thermally induced bleaching has caused a global decline in corals and the frequency of such bleaching events will increase. Thermal bleaching severely disrupts the trophic behaviour of the coral holobiont, reducing the photosynthetically derived energy available to the coral host. In the short term this reduction in energy transfer from endosymbiotic algae results in an energy deficit for the coral host. If the bleaching event is short-lived then the coral may survive this energy deficit by depleting its lipid reserves, or by increasing heterotrophic energy acquisition. We show for the first time that the coral animal is capable of increasing the amount of heterotrophic carbon incorporated into its tissues for almost a year following bleaching. This prolonged heterotrophic compensation could be a sign of resilience or prolonged stress. If the heterotrophic compensation is in fact an acclimatization response, then this physiological response could act as a buffer from future bleaching by providing sufficient heterotrophic energy to compensate for photoautotrophic energy losses during bleaching, and potentially minimizing the effect of subsequent elevated temperature stresses. However, if the elevated incorporation of zooplankton is a sign that the effects of bleaching continue to be stressful on the holobiont, even after 11 months of recovery, then this physiological response would indicate that complete coral recovery requires more than 11 months to achieve. If coral bleaching becomes an annual global phenomenon by mid-century, then present temporal refugia will not be sufficient to allow coral colonies to recover between bleaching events and coral reefs will become increasingly less resilient to future climate change. If, however, increasing their sequestration of zooplankton-derived nutrition into their tissues over prolonged periods of time is a compensating mechanism, the impacts of annual bleaching may be reduced. Thus, some coral species

  17. Heterotrophic Compensation: A Possible Mechanism for Resilience of Coral Reefs to Global Warming or a Sign of Prolonged Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adam D.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2013-01-01

    Thermally induced bleaching has caused a global decline in corals and the frequency of such bleaching events will increase. Thermal bleaching severely disrupts the trophic behaviour of the coral holobiont, reducing the photosynthetically derived energy available to the coral host. In the short term this reduction in energy transfer from endosymbiotic algae results in an energy deficit for the coral host. If the bleaching event is short-lived then the coral may survive this energy deficit by depleting its lipid reserves, or by increasing heterotrophic energy acquisition. We show for the first time that the coral animal is capable of increasing the amount of heterotrophic carbon incorporated into its tissues for almost a year following bleaching. This prolonged heterotrophic compensation could be a sign of resilience or prolonged stress. If the heterotrophic compensation is in fact an acclimatization response, then this physiological response could act as a buffer from future bleaching by providing sufficient heterotrophic energy to compensate for photoautotrophic energy losses during bleaching, and potentially minimizing the effect of subsequent elevated temperature stresses. However, if the elevated incorporation of zooplankton is a sign that the effects of bleaching continue to be stressful on the holobiont, even after 11 months of recovery, then this physiological response would indicate that complete coral recovery requires more than 11 months to achieve. If coral bleaching becomes an annual global phenomenon by mid-century, then present temporal refugia will not be sufficient to allow coral colonies to recover between bleaching events and coral reefs will become increasingly less resilient to future climate change. If, however, increasing their sequestration of zooplankton-derived nutrition into their tissues over prolonged periods of time is a compensating mechanism, the impacts of annual bleaching may be reduced. Thus, some coral species may be better

  18. Intracellular Bacteria in Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Brigge, Theo

    Intracellular bacteria in humans are typically detrimental, and such infections are regarded by the patients as accidental and abnormal. In protozoa it seems obvious that many bacteria have coevolved with their hosts and are well adapted to the intracellular way of life. Manifold interactions between hosts and intracellular bacteria are found, and examples of antibacterial resistance of unknown mechanisms are observed. The wide diversity of intracellular bacteria in protozoa has become particularly obvious since they have begun to be classified by molecular techniques. Some of the bacteria are closely related to pathogens; others are responsible for the production of toxins.

  19. Marine oil degrading bacteria related to oil inputs and surface currents in the western Caribbean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizarraga-Partida, M.L.; Vicuna, F.B.I.; Chang, I.W. (Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Ensenada (Mexico))

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of oil degrading bacteria (ODB) and its ratios to viable heterotrophic bacteria (CFU) and direct counts (AODC) were examined in relation to the surface currents of the western Caribbean Sea. High ODB/CFU and ODB/AODC ratios were found, suggesting that chronic sources of hydrocarbons in the region may have a larger impact than those in the southern Gulf of Mexico, where previous studies have been performed. It was concluded that, in western Caribbean waters, the distribution of oil degrading bacteria, or its ratios to CFU or AODC, could be useful indicators of chronic oil inputs originating at the east of the Caribbean Sea, as well as their motions afterwards. (author).

  20. Levoglucosan-assimilating bacteria was isolated from levoglucosan treated soil suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, H.J. [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China). Environment Research Inst.; Chinese Academy of Sciencess, Beijing (China). Dept. of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences; Zhuang, X.L.; Bai, Z.H.; Zhang, H.X. [Chinese Academy of Sciencess, Beijing (China). Dept. of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences

    2008-07-01

    Levoglucosan (LG) is emitted into the environment only during the combustion of wood and cigarettes. As such, it is a useful tracer for wood smoke in the atmosphere. It also has potential use as a fermentative carbon and energy resource in the fermentation industry. Depending on the initial cellulose content of woody feedstocks, the yield of LG may range from 38 to 58 per cent. This study examined whether the LG-assimilating bacterium could be isolated or not under LG treatment. The study also addressed the impact of the LG on the genetic diversity and the diversity of the cultivable fraction of the bacterial community in soil suspension. Genetic diversity was analyzed by Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprinting. The changes in diversity were monitored by two different methods following a 90 day incubation period for 20 mg of LG per mL of soil suspension. The cultivable heterotrophic diversity was investigated by colony morphology on solid 1/5 lactobacillus medium. The results of the cultivable heterotrophic diversity and genetic diversity showed that there was an obvious decrease in diversity, and the amount of levoglucosan-assimilating bacteria also decreased. The application of LG had an obvious impact on Bacillus spp and Marinibacillus spp. Through cultivable analysis, five levoglucosan-assimilating bacteria were isolated from an LG treated soil suspension. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that levoglucosan-assimilating bacteria belong to Bacillus and Marinibacillus. 2 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  1. Isolation and characterization of facultative mixotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from constructed wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soulwène Kouki; Neila Saidi; Fadhel M'hiri; Houda Nasr; Hanène Cherif; Hadda Ouzari; Abdermaceur Hassen

    2011-01-01

    Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been widely studied in constructed wetlands systems,while mixotrophic AOB have been less thoroughly examined.Heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from wastewater and rhizospheres of macrophytes of constructed wetlands,and then cultivated in a mixotrophic medium containing ammonium and acetic acid.A molecular characterization was accomplished using ITS-PCR amplification,and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.Results showed the presence of 35 bacteria,among 400 initially heterotrophic isolates,that were able to remove ammonia.These 35 isolates were classified into 10 genetically different groups based on ITS pattern.Then,a collection of 10 isolates were selected because of their relatively high ammonia removal efficiencies (ARE ≥ 80%) and their phylogenetic diversity.In conditions of mixotrophy,these strains were shown to be able to grow (increase of optical density OD660 during incubation with assimilation of nitrogen into cellular biomass) and to oxidize ammonia (important ammonia oxidation efficiencies,AOE between 79% and 87%).Among these facultative mixotrophic AOB,four isolates were genetically related to Firmicutes (Bacillus and Exiguobacterium),three isolates were affiliated to Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) and three other isolates were associated with Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas,Ochrobactrum and Bordetella).

  2. Ecological role of algobacterial cenosis links (chlorella - associated microflora or associated bacteria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechurkin, N. S.

    The problems of interrelation of microalgae and bacteria in the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle are discussed. The cause and mechanisms of algobacterial cenosis formation still have been explained contradictorily. This work views the results of experimental and theoretical study of algobacterial cenosis functioning by the example of microalga Chlorella vulgaris and associated microflora. The representatives of Pseudomonas mainly predominate in the Chlorella microbial complex. The experiment at non-sterile batch cultivation of Chlorella on Tamya medium showed that the biomass of microorganisms increases simultaneously with the increase of microalgal biomass. Microflora of Chlorella can use organic materials evolved by Chlorella after photosynthesis for reproduction. Moreover, microorganisms can use dying cells of Chlorella, i.e. form the "producer - reducer" biocycle. To understand the cenosis-forming role of microalgae the mathematical model of the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle was constructed taking into consideration the opportunities for microorganisms of using Chlorella photosynthates, dying cells and contribution of links to the nitrogen cycle. The theoretical investigation showed that the biomass of associated bacteria growing on glucose and detritus exceeds the biomass of bacteria using only microalgal photosynthates, which is comparable with experimental data.

  3. Antibacterial activity of marine and black band disease cyanobacteria against coral-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantar, Miroslav; Kaczmarsky, Longin T; Stanić, Dina; Miller, Aaron W; Richardson, Laurie L

    2011-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) of corals is a cyanobacteria-dominated polymicrobial disease that contains diverse populations of heterotrophic bacteria. It is one of the most destructive of coral diseases and is found globally on tropical and sub-tropical reefs. We assessed ten strains of BBD cyanobacteria, and ten strains of cyanobacteria isolated from other marine sources, for their antibacterial effect on growth of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from BBD, from the surface mucopolysaccharide layer (SML) of healthy corals, and three known bacterial coral pathogens. Assays were conducted using two methods: co-cultivation of cyanobacterial and bacterial isolates, and exposure of test bacteria to (hydrophilic and lipophilic) cyanobacterial cell extracts. During co-cultivation, 15 of the 20 cyanobacterial strains tested had antibacterial activity against at least one of the test bacterial strains. Inhibition was significantly higher for BBD cyanobacteria when compared to other marine cyanobacteria. Lipophilic extracts were more active than co-cultivation (extracts of 18 of the 20 strains were active) while hydrophilic extracts had very limited activity. In some cases co-cultivation resulted in stimulation of BBD and SML bacterial growth. Our results suggest that BBD cyanobacteria are involved in structuring the complex polymicrobial BBD microbial community by production of antimicrobial compounds.

  4. Gram-positive bacteria of marine origin: a numerical taxonomic study on Mediterranean isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigosa, M; Garay, E; Pujalte, M J

    1997-12-01

    A numerical taxonomic study was performed on 65 Gram-positive wild strains of heterotrophic, aerobic, marine bacteria, and 9 reference strains. The isolates were obtained from oysters and seawater sampled monthly over one year, by direct plating on Marine Agar. The strains were characterized by 96 morphological, biochemical, physiological and nutritional tests. Clustering yielded 13 phena at 0.62 similarity level (Sl coefficient). Only one of the seven phena containing wild isolates could be identified (Bacillus marinus). A pronounced salt requirement was found in most isolates.

  5. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T) and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidans (T), the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidans (T) cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270(T) genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis.

  6. New insights into the biogeochemistry of extremely acidic environments revealed by a combined cultivation-based and culture-independent study of two stratified pit lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagán, Carmen; Sánchez-España, Javier; Johnson, David Barrie

    2014-01-01

    The indigenous microbial communities of two extremely acidic, metal-rich stratified pit lakes, located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (Spain), were identified, and their roles in mediating transformations of carbon, iron, and sulfur were confirmed. A combined cultivation-based and culture-independent approach was used to elucidate microbial communities at different depths and to examine the physiologies of isolates, which included representatives of at least one novel genus and several species of acidophilic Bacteria. Phosphate availability correlated with redox transformations of iron, and this (rather than solar radiation) dictated where primary production was concentrated. Carbon fixed and released as organic compounds by acidophilic phototrophs acted as electron donors for acidophilic heterotrophic prokaryotes, many of which catalyzed the dissimilatory reduction in ferric iron; the ferrous iron generated was re-oxidized by chemolithotrophic acidophiles. Bacteria that catalyze redox transformations of sulfur were also identified, although these Bacteria appeared to be less abundant than the iron oxidizers/reducers. Primary production and microbial numbers were greatest, and biogeochemical transformation of carbon, iron, and sulfur, most intense, within a zone of c. 8-10 m depth, close to the chemocline, in both pit lakes. Archaea detected in sediments included two Thaumarchaeota clones, indicating that members of this recently described phylum can inhabit extremely acidic environments.

  7. Bacterias autótrofas y heterótrofas asociadas a nieve marina lodosa en arrecifes con escorrentía continental

    OpenAIRE

    Henao-Castro, Alejandro; Comba González, Natalia; M. Alvarado Ch, Elvira; Santamaría, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    The density of heterotrophic bacteria is greater than autotrophic in marine snow aggregates influenced by continental runoff. Four coral reef areas at different distances from the Canal del Dique served to evaluate this premise; this canal is the main source of inland resources for the coral reefs of the Nuestra Señora del Rosario archipelago in Cartagena in the Colombian Caribbean. The average density of microorganisms in marine snow aggregates was determined using epifluorescence. The resul...

  8. High current densities enable exoelectrogens to outcompete aerobic heterotrophs for substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2014-08-05

    © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates could be described by first-order kinetics with respect to COD concentration at different current densities, even under open circuit conditions with no current generation. The COD concentration was reduced more quickly with current generation due to the greater consumption of substrate by exoelectrogens, and less substrate was lost to aerobic heterotrophs. Higher current densities enabled exoelectrogens to outcompete aerobic heterotrophs for substrate, allowing for increased coulombic efficiencies with current densities. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. In mixed-culture microbial fuel cells (MFCs), exoelectrogens and other microorganisms compete for substrate. It has previously been assumed that substrate losses to other terminal electron acceptors over a fed-batch cycle, such as dissolved oxygen, are constant. However, a constant rate of substrate loss would only explain small increases in coulombic efficiencies (CEs, the fraction of substrate recovered as electrical current) with shorter cycle times, but not the large increases in CE that are usually observed with higher current densities and reduced cycle times. To better understand changes in CEs, COD concentrations were measured over time in fed-batch, single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs at different current densities (external resistances). COD degradation rates were all found to be first-order with respect to COD concentration, even under open circuit conditions with no current generation (first-order rate constant of 0.14±0.01h-1). The rate of COD removal increased when there was current generation, with the highest rate constant (0.33±0.02h-1) obtained at the lowest external resistance (100Ω). Therefore, as the substrate concentration was reduced more quickly due to current generation, the rate of loss of substrate to non-exoelectrogens decreased due to this first-order substrate-concentration dependence. As a result, coulombic

  9. Heterotrophic bacterial production in the South East Pacific: longitudinal trends and coupling with primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Van Wambeke

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variations of heterotrophic bacterial production and phytoplankton primary production were investigated across South East Pacific Ocean (–141° W, –8° S to –72° W, –35° S in November–December 2004. Bacterial production (³H leucine incorporation integrated over the euphotic zone encompassed a wide range of values, from 43 mg C m−2 d−1 in the hyper-oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre to 392 mg C m−2 d−1 in the upwelling off Chile. Within the gyre (120° W, 22° S records of low phytoplankton biomass (7 mg TChla m−2 were obtained and in situ 14C based particulate primary production rates were as low as 153 mg C m−2 d−1, thus equal to the value considered as a limit for primary production under strong oligotrophic conditions. In the South Pacific gyre average rates of ³H leucine incorporation rates, and leucine incorporation rates per cell (5–21 pmol L−1 h−1 and 15–56×10−21 mol cell−1 h−1, respectively, were in the same range as those reported for other oligotrophic sub tropical and temperate waters. Rates of dark community respiration, determined at selected stations across the transect varied in a narrow range (42–97 mmol O2 m−2 d−1, except for one station in the upwelling off Chile (245 mmol O2 m−2 d−1. Bacterial growth efficiencies varied between 5 and 38% and bacterial carbon demand largely exceeded 14C particulate primary production across the South Pacific Ocean. Net community production also revealed negative values in the South Pacific Gyre (–13±20 to –37±40 mmol O2 m−2 d−1. Such imbalances being impossible in this area far from any external input, we discuss the techniques involved for determining the coupling between

  10. Dynamics of auto- and heterotrophic picoplankton and associated viruses in Lake Geneva.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A.; Zhong, X.; Ram, A.S.P.; Jacquet, S.

    Microbial dynamics have rarely been investigated in Lake Geneva, known as the largest lake in western Europe. From a 5-month survey, we report dynamic patterns of free-living virus, bacteria and small phytoplankton abundances in response to a...

  11. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  12. DISTRIBUTION OF BACTERIA IN SHELLFISH CULTURE AREA AROUND QINGDAO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria numbers in water of coastal shellfish culture area around Qingdao were examined in April, August and October 1998 respectively. The results showed that the total numbers of heterotrophic and coliform bacteria in waters of the area and the specific geographical area varied with seasons. The highest populations were recorded during summer, I.e. 1.0×104~4.5×106cell/ml and 3.0×100~2.4×103cell/100ml, and with average values of 1.61×105cell/ml and 1.24×102cell/100ml respectively. The second highest populations occurred in autumn, and the lowest were in spring. The numbers of coliform bacteria were relatively low in waters near the mouths of bays and open part of the shellfish culture area, while those in waters near the estuaries of big rivers, wharves, navigation routes or the area in front of downtown areas were much higher than other areas. Single-index assessment of the environment quality of shellfish culture was made to indicate that the water sanitary quality in most of these areas are very good, however, some parts were serious polluted by the faeces of warm-blood animals. These results provided theoretical reference for the programming and organizing of shellfish culture.

  13. A novel heterotrophic nitrifying and aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Zobellella taiwanensis DN-7, can remove high-strength ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Wang, Yangqing; Liu, Hongjie; Xi, Chuanwu; Song, Liyan

    2016-05-01

    A novel heterotrophic bacterium capable of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification was isolated from ammonium contaminated landfill leachate and physiochemical and phylogenetically identified as Zobellella taiwanensis DN-7. DN-7 converted nitrate, nitrate, and ammonium to N2 as the primary end product. Single factor experiments suggested that the optimal conditions for ammonium removal were trisodium citrate as carbon source, C/N ratio 8, pH 8.0-10.0, salinity less than 3 %, temperature 30 °C, and rotation speed more than 150 rpm. Specifically, DN-7 could remove 1000.0 and 2000.0 mg/L NH4 (+)-N completely within 96 and 216 h, with maximum removal rates of 19.6 and 17.3 mg L(-1) h(-1), respectively. These results demonstrated that DN-7 is a promising candidate for application of high-strength ammonium wastewater treatments.

  14. [Identification and Nitrogen Removal Characteristics of a Heterotrophic Nitrification-Aerobic Denitrification Strain Isolated from Marine Environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing-hua; Yu, De-shuang; Zhang, Pei-yu; Lin, Xue-zheng; Li, Jin

    2016-02-15

    A heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification strain named y5 was isolated from marine environment by traditional microbial isolation method using seawater as medium. It was identified as Klebsiella sp. based on the morphological, physiological and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The experiment results showed that the optimal carbon resource was sodium citrate; the optimal pH was 7.0; and the optimal C/N was 17. The strain could use NH4Cl, NaNO2 and KNO3 as sole nitrogen source, and the removal efficiencies were77.07%, 64.14% and 100% after 36 hours, respectively. The removal efficiency reached 100% after 36 hours in the coexistence of NH4Cl, NaNO2 and KNO3. The results showed that the strain y5 had independent and efficient heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification activities in high salt wastewater.

  15. Heterotrophic respiration in disturbed forests: A review with examples from North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Mark E.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Tang, Jianwu; Vargas, Rodrigo

    2011-12-01

    Heterotrophic respiration (RH) is a major process releasing carbon to the atmosphere and is essential to understanding carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we review what is known about this flux as related to forest disturbance using examples from North America. The global RH flux from soils has been estimated at 53-57 Pg C yr-1, but this does not include contributions from other sources (i.e., dead wood, heart-rots). Disturbance-related inputs likely account for 20-50% of all RH losses in forests, and disturbances lead to a reorganization of ecosystem carbon pools that influences how RH changes over succession. Multiple controls on RH related to climate, the material being decomposed, and the decomposers involved have been identified, but how each potentially interacts with disturbance remains an open question. An emerging paradigm of carbon dynamics suggests the possibility of multiple periods of carbon sinks and sources following disturbance; a large contributing factor is the possibility that postdisturbance RH does not always follow the monotonic decline assumed in the classic theory. Without a better understanding and modeling of RH and its controlling factors, it will be difficult to estimate, forecast, understand, and manage carbon balances of regions in which disturbance frequency and severity are changing. Meeting this challenge will require (1) improved field data on processes and stores, (2) an improved understanding of the physiological and environmental controls of RH, and (3) a more formal analysis of how model structure influences the RH responses that can be predicted.

  16. Rapid Prediction of Bacterial Heterotrophic Fluxomics Using Machine Learning and Constraint Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen Gang; Wang, Yuxuan; Jiang, Wu; Oyetunde, Tolutola; Yao, Ruilian; Zhang, Xuehong; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Tang, Yinjie J; Bao, Forrest Sheng

    2016-04-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) has been widely used to measure in vivo enzyme reaction rates (i.e., metabolic flux) in microorganisms. Mining the relationship between environmental and genetic factors and metabolic fluxes hidden in existing fluxomic data will lead to predictive models that can significantly accelerate flux quantification. In this paper, we present a web-based platform MFlux (http://mflux.org) that predicts the bacterial central metabolism via machine learning, leveraging data from approximately 100 13C-MFA papers on heterotrophic bacterial metabolisms. Three machine learning methods, namely Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN), and Decision Tree, were employed to study the sophisticated relationship between influential factors and metabolic fluxes. We performed a grid search of the best parameter set for each algorithm and verified their performance through 10-fold cross validations. SVM yields the highest accuracy among all three algorithms. Further, we employed quadratic programming to adjust flux profiles to satisfy stoichiometric constraints. Multiple case studies have shown that MFlux can reasonably predict fluxomes as a function of bacterial species, substrate types, growth rate, oxygen conditions, and cultivation methods. Due to the interest of studying model organism under particular carbon sources, bias of fluxome in the dataset may limit the applicability of machine learning models. This problem can be resolved after more papers on 13C-MFA are published for non-model species.

  17. Rapid Prediction of Bacterial Heterotrophic Fluxomics Using Machine Learning and Constraint Programming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gang Wu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA has been widely used to measure in vivo enzyme reaction rates (i.e., metabolic flux in microorganisms. Mining the relationship between environmental and genetic factors and metabolic fluxes hidden in existing fluxomic data will lead to predictive models that can significantly accelerate flux quantification. In this paper, we present a web-based platform MFlux (http://mflux.org that predicts the bacterial central metabolism via machine learning, leveraging data from approximately 100 13C-MFA papers on heterotrophic bacterial metabolisms. Three machine learning methods, namely Support Vector Machine (SVM, k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN, and Decision Tree, were employed to study the sophisticated relationship between influential factors and metabolic fluxes. We performed a grid search of the best parameter set for each algorithm and verified their performance through 10-fold cross validations. SVM yields the highest accuracy among all three algorithms. Further, we employed quadratic programming to adjust flux profiles to satisfy stoichiometric constraints. Multiple case studies have shown that MFlux can reasonably predict fluxomes as a function of bacterial species, substrate types, growth rate, oxygen conditions, and cultivation methods. Due to the interest of studying model organism under particular carbon sources, bias of fluxome in the dataset may limit the applicability of machine learning models. This problem can be resolved after more papers on 13C-MFA are published for non-model species.

  18. Evaluation of growth yield of Spirulina (Arthrospira) sp. in photoautotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Zielińska, Agnieszka

    2012-02-01

    In microbial cultures, both cellular growth rate and yield (defined as the degree of substrate conversion into the biomass) are important. Although effect of culture conditions on growth kinetics has been well documented for various microbial strains, there is almost no literature concerning the effect of environmental conditions on growth equilibrium, expressed as biomass yield coefficients from substrate. The present paper discusses the effect of culture conditions: irradiance (physical substrate) and glucose concentration (chemical substrate) on biomass yield coefficients from two chemical substrates: glucose and nitrate-nitrogen in photoautotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic culture of blue-green alga Spirulina (Arthrospira) sp. The efficiency of substrates incorporation into the biomass can be precisely determined only if the elemental composition of the biomass is known. The experimental results showed that culture conditions had a substantial influence on biomass yield coefficients (biomass yield from glucose and nitrate-nitrogen). It was found that, the increase of irradiance favoured increase of biomass yield coefficient from both, glucose and nitrate-nitrogen. However, in the case of yield from nitrogen in mixotrophic culture, the effect was opposite. The effect of glucose concentration was different: the higher the initial glucose concentration, the lower the biomass yield coefficients from chemical substrates.

  19. Nitrate removal from groundwater driven by electricity generation and heterotrophic denitrification in a bioelectrochemical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yiran; He, Zhen

    2013-11-15

    This research aims to develop a new approach for in situ nitrate removal from groundwater by using a bioelectrochemical system (BES). The BES employs bioelectricity generated from organic compounds to drive nitrate moving from groundwater into the anode and reduces nitrate to nitrogen gas by heterotrophic denitrification. This laboratory study of a bench-scale BES demonstrated effective nitrate removal from both synthetic and actual groundwater. It was found that applying an electrical potential improved the nitrate removal and the highest nitrate removal rate of 208.2 ± 13.3g NO3(-)-Nm(-3) d(-1) was achieved at 0.8 V. Although the open circuit condition (no electricity generation) still resulted in a nitrate removal rate of 158.5 ± 4.2 gm(-3) d(-1) due to ion exchange, electricity production could inhibit ion exchange and prevent introducing other undesired ions into groundwater. The nitrate removal rate exhibited a linear relationship with the initial nitrate concentration in groundwater. The BES produced a higher current density of 33.4 Am(-3) and a higher total coulomb of 244.7 ± 9.1C from the actual groundwater than the synthetic groundwater, likely because other ions in the actual groundwater promoted ion movement to assist electricity generation. Further development of this BES will need to address several key challenges in anode feeding solution, ion competition, and long-term stability.

  20. Nitrogen removal by Providencia rettgeri strain YL with heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jun; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Huang, Yuan-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Providencia rettgeri strain YL shows the capability of nitrogen removal under sole aerobic conditions. By using isotope ratio mass spectrometry, (15)N-labelled N2O and N2 were detected in aerobic batch cultures containing [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text]. Strain YL converted [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] to produce more N2O than N2 in the presence of [Formula: see text]. An (15)N isotope tracing experiment confirmed that the nitrogen removal pathway of strain YL was heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification. The optimal treatment conditions for nitrogen removal were pH of 8, C/N ratio of 12, temperature of 25°C and shaking speed of 105 rpm. A continuous aerobic bioreactor inoculated with strain YL was developed. With an influent [Formula: see text] concentration of 90-200 mg/L, the [Formula: see text] removal efficiency ranged from 80% to 97% and the total nitrogen removal efficiency ranged from 72% to 95%. The nitrogen balance in the continuous bioreactor revealed that approximately 35-52% of influent [Formula: see text] was denitrified aerobically to form gaseous nitrogen. These findings show that the P. rettgeri strain YL has potential application in wastewater treatment for nitrogen removal under sole aerobic conditions.

  1. Photorespiration and Rate Synchronization in a Phototroph-Heterotroph Microbial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadoua El Moustaid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Theprocessofoxygenicphotosynthesisisrobustandubiquitous,relyingcentrallyoninput of light, carbon dioxide, and water, which in many environments are all abundantly available, and from which are produced, principally, oxygen and reduced organic carbon. However, photosynthetic machinery can be conflicted by the simultaneous presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen through a process sometimes called photorespiration. We present here a model of phototrophy, including competition for RuBisCO binding sites between oxygen and carbon dioxide, in a chemostat-based microbial population. The model connects to the idea of metabolic pathways to track carbon and degree of reduction through the system. We find decomposition of kinetics into elementary flux modes a mathematically natural way to study synchronization of mismatched rates of photon input and chemostat turnover. In the single species case, though total biomass is reduced by photorespiration, protection from excess light exposures and its consequences (oxidative and redox stress may result. We also find the possibility that a consortium of phototrophs with heterotrophs can recycle photorespiration byproduct into increased biomass at the cost of increase in oxidative product (here, oxygen.

  2. A New Heterotrophic Strain for Bioleaching of Low Grade Complex Copper Ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaijian Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A new heterotrophic strain, named Providencia sp. JAT-1, was isolated and used in bioleaching of low-grade complex copper ore. The strain uses sodium citrate as a carbon source and urea as a nitrogen source to produce ammonia. The optimal growth condition of the strain is 30 C, initial pH 8, sodium citrate 10 g/L and urea 20 g/L, under which the cell density and ammonia concentration in the medium reached a maximum of 4.83 × 108 cells/mL and 14 g/L, respectively. Ammonia produced by the strain is used as the main lixiviant in bioleaching. Bioleaching results revealed that higher strain growth led to a higher copper recovery, while higher pulp density will cause a greater inhibitory effect on strain growth and ammonia production. The copper extraction reached the highest value of 54.5% at the pulp density of 1%. Malachite, chrysocolla and chalcocite are easy to leach out in this bioleaching system while chalcopyrite is difficult. Results of comparative leaching experiments show that bioleaching using JAT-1 is superior to ammonia leaching at the same condition. The metabolites produced by the strain other than ammonia are also involved in bioleaching.

  3. Heterotrophic nitrogen removal by Acinetobacter sp. Y1 isolated from coke plant wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, YuXiang; Hu, Tingting; Song, Yujie; Chen, Hongping; Lv, YongKang

    2015-11-01

    A strain of Acinetobacter sp. Y1, which exhibited an amazing ability to remove ammonium, nitrite and nitrate, was isolated from the activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The aim of this work was to study the ability, influence factors and possible pathway of nitrogen removal by Acinetobacter sp. Y1. Results showed that maximum removal rate of NH4(+)-N by the strain was 10.28 mg-N/L/h. Carbon source had significant influence on the growth and ammonium removal efficiencies of strain Y1. Pyruvate, citrate and acetate were favourable carbon sources for the strain. Temperature, pH value and shaking speed could affect the growth and nitrogen removal ability. Nitrate or nitrite could be used as a sole nitrogen source for the growth and removed efficiently by the strain. N2 levels increased to 53.74%, 50.21% and 55.13% within 36 h when 100 mg/L NH4(+)-N, NO2(-)-N or NO3(-) -N was used as sole nitrogen source in the gas detection experiment. The activities of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO), nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), which are key enzymes in heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification, were all detectable in the strain. Consequently, a possible pathway for ammonium removal by the strain was also suggested.

  4. Simultaneous Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification by Chryseobacterium sp. R31 Isolated from Abattoir Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradyut Kundu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A heterotrophic carbon utilizing microbe (R31 capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND was isolated from wastewater of an Indian slaughterhouse. From an initial COD value of 583.0 mg/L, 95.54% was removed whilst, from a starting NH4+-N concentration of 55.7 mg/L, 95.87% was removed after 48 h contact. The concentrations of the intermediates hydroxylamine, nitrite, and nitrate were low, thus ensuring nitrogen removal. Aerobic denitrification occurring during ammonium removal by R31 was confirmed by utilization of both nitrate and nitrite as nitrogen substrates. Glucose and succinate were superior while acetate and citrate were poor substrates for nitrogen removal. Molecular phylogenetic identification, supported by chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, assigned R31 as a close relative of Chryseobacterium haifense. The NH4+-N utilization rate and growth of strain R31 were found to be higher at C/N = 10 in comparison to those achieved with C/N ratios of 5 and 20. Monod kinetic coefficients, half saturation concentration (Ks, maximum rate of substrate utilization (k, yield coefficient, (Y and endogenous decay coefficient (Kd indicated potential application of R31 in large-scale SND process. This is the first report on concomitant carbon oxidation, nitrification, and denitrification in the genus Chryseobacterium and the associated kinetic coefficients.

  5. The moisture response of soil heterotrophic respiration: interaction with soil properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyano, F E; Vasilyeva, N; Bouckaert, L

    2012-01-01

    Soil moisture is of primary importance for predicting the evolution of soil carbon stocks and fluxes, both because it strongly controls organic matter decomposition and because it is predicted to change at global scales in the following decades. However, the soil functions used to model the heter...... predictions of the response of soil carbon to future climate scenarios will require the integration of soil-dependent moisture-respiration functions coupled with realistic representations of soil water dynamics.......Soil moisture is of primary importance for predicting the evolution of soil carbon stocks and fluxes, both because it strongly controls organic matter decomposition and because it is predicted to change at global scales in the following decades. However, the soil functions used to model...... the heterotrophic respiration response to moisture have limited empirical support and introduce an uncertainty of at least 4% in global soil carbon stock predictions by 2100. The necessity of improving the representation of this relationship in models has been highlighted in recent studies. Here we present a data...

  6. Rapid Prediction of Bacterial Heterotrophic Fluxomics Using Machine Learning and Constraint Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen Gang; Wang, Yuxuan; Jiang, Wu; Oyetunde, Tolutola; Yao, Ruilian; Zhang, Xuehong; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Tang, Yinjie J.; Bao, Forrest Sheng

    2016-01-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) has been widely used to measure in vivo enzyme reaction rates (i.e., metabolic flux) in microorganisms. Mining the relationship between environmental and genetic factors and metabolic fluxes hidden in existing fluxomic data will lead to predictive models that can significantly accelerate flux quantification. In this paper, we present a web-based platform MFlux (http://mflux.org) that predicts the bacterial central metabolism via machine learning, leveraging data from approximately 100 13C-MFA papers on heterotrophic bacterial metabolisms. Three machine learning methods, namely Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN), and Decision Tree, were employed to study the sophisticated relationship between influential factors and metabolic fluxes. We performed a grid search of the best parameter set for each algorithm and verified their performance through 10-fold cross validations. SVM yields the highest accuracy among all three algorithms. Further, we employed quadratic programming to adjust flux profiles to satisfy stoichiometric constraints. Multiple case studies have shown that MFlux can reasonably predict fluxomes as a function of bacterial species, substrate types, growth rate, oxygen conditions, and cultivation methods. Due to the interest of studying model organism under particular carbon sources, bias of fluxome in the dataset may limit the applicability of machine learning models. This problem can be resolved after more papers on 13C-MFA are published for non-model species. PMID:27092947

  7. Optimization of culture media for large-scale lutein production by heterotrophic Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin Young; Kwon, Ji-Sue; Kang, Soon Tae; Kim, Bo-Ra; Jung, Yuchul; Han, Jae Gap; Park, Joon Hyun; Hwang, Jae Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid with a purported role in protecting eyes from oxidative stress, particularly the high-energy photons of blue light. Statistical optimization was performed to growth media that supports a higher production of lutein by heterotrophically cultivated Chlorella vulgaris. The effect of media composition of C. vulgaris on lutein was examined using fractional factorial design (FFD) and central composite design (CCD). The results indicated that the presence of magnesium sulfate, EDTA-2Na, and trace metal solution significantly affected lutein production. The optimum concentrations for lutein production were found to be 0.34 g/L, 0.06 g/L, and 0.4 mL/L for MgSO4 ·7H2 O, EDTA-2Na, and trace metal solution, respectively. These values were validated using a 5-L jar fermenter. Lutein concentration was increased by almost 80% (139.64 ± 12.88 mg/L to 252.75 ± 12.92 mg/L) after 4 days. Moreover, the lutein concentration was not reduced as the cultivation was scaled up to 25,000 L (260.55 ± 3.23 mg/L) and 240,000 L (263.13 ± 2.72 mg/L). These observations suggest C. vulgaris as a potential lutein source.

  8. Microwhip scorpions (Palpigradi feed on heterotrophic cyanobacteria in Slovak caves--a curiosity among Arachnida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Smrž

    Full Text Available To date, only morphological and anatomical descriptions of microwhip scorpions (Arachnida: Palpigradi have been published. This very rare group is enigmatic not only in its relationships to other arachnids, but especially due to the fact that these animals dwell only underground (in caves, soil, and interstitial spaces. We observed the curious feeding habit of the microwhip scorpion Eukoenenia spelaea over the course of one year in Ardovská Cave, located in Slovakia's Karst region. We chose histology as our methodology in studying 17 specimens and based it upon Masson's triple staining, fluorescent light and confocal microscopy. Single-celled cyanobacteria (blue-green algae were conspicuously predominant in the gut of all studied palpigrades. Digestibility of the consumed cyanobacteria was supported by the presence of guanine crystals, glycogen deposits and haemocytes inside the palpigrade body. Cyanobacteria, the oldest cellular organisms on Earth, are very resistant to severe conditions in caves, including even darkness. Therefore, the cyanobacteria are able to survive in dark caves as nearly heterotrophic organisms and are consumed by cave palpigrades. Such feeding habit is extraordinary within the almost wholly predacious orders of the class Arachnida, and particularly so due to the type of food observed.

  9. Microwhip scorpions (Palpigradi) feed on heterotrophic cyanobacteria in Slovak caves--a curiosity among Arachnida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrž, Jaroslav; Kováč, Ĺubomír; Mikeš, Jaromír; Lukešová, Alena

    2013-01-01

    To date, only morphological and anatomical descriptions of microwhip scorpions (Arachnida: Palpigradi) have been published. This very rare group is enigmatic not only in its relationships to other arachnids, but especially due to the fact that these animals dwell only underground (in caves, soil, and interstitial spaces). We observed the curious feeding habit of the microwhip scorpion Eukoenenia spelaea over the course of one year in Ardovská Cave, located in Slovakia's Karst region. We chose histology as our methodology in studying 17 specimens and based it upon Masson's triple staining, fluorescent light and confocal microscopy. Single-celled cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) were conspicuously predominant in the gut of all studied palpigrades. Digestibility of the consumed cyanobacteria was supported by the presence of guanine crystals, glycogen deposits and haemocytes inside the palpigrade body. Cyanobacteria, the oldest cellular organisms on Earth, are very resistant to severe conditions in caves, including even darkness. Therefore, the cyanobacteria are able to survive in dark caves as nearly heterotrophic organisms and are consumed by cave palpigrades. Such feeding habit is extraordinary within the almost wholly predacious orders of the class Arachnida, and particularly so due to the type of food observed.

  10. Cellular lipid production of a heterotrophic bacterium isolated from poultry processing wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattiya Ongmali

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell growth and lipid production of a heterotrophic bacterium, R4.4 which accumulated the highest lipid content among 12 bacterial colonies being isolated from wastewater of a poultry processing plant in Thailand, were evaluated in this study. The culture was identified as Aeromonas sp. by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing analysis.The highest lipid content was obtained when the cells were in the early stationary growth phase compared to the cells in the exponential and the late stationary phase. Over 50% of the fatty acid production by Aeromonas sp. KMITL-R4.4 were unsaturated fatty acids, including linoleic acid (C18:2, 43.2%, oleic acid (C18:1, 19.0%, and palmitoleic acid (C16:1, 8.2%. The culture had a preference for glucose and fructose as seen from the maximum biomass and lipid contents that were obtained. Among volatile fatty acid (VFA species tested, acetic acid was the preferred substrate for lipid production but not favorable for cell growth. In addition, ammonium sulfate was found to be the best among nitrogen sources tested. The C/N ratio exerts significant impact on lipid production as seen from an increase of the lipid content from 10.8% to 18.2% by exposing the bacterial cells to a medium with lower nitrogen concentration (0.1g/l and higher level of glucose (28 g/l.

  11. Nitrogen removal characteristics of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification by Alcaligenes faecalis C16

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxiang Liu; Yao Wang; Yi Li; Hua An; Yongkang Lv

    2015-01-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis C16 was found to have the ability to heterotrophically nitrify and aerobical y denitrify. In order to further understand its nitrogen removal ability and mechanism, the growth and ammonium removal response were investigated at different C/N ratios and ammonium concentrations in the medium with citrate and acetate as carbon source separately. Furthermore, experiments of nitrogen sources, production of nitrogen gas and enzyme assay were conducted. Results show that the bacterium converts NH4+-N and produces NH2OH during the growing phase and nitrite accumulation is its distinct metabolic feature. A. faecalis C16 is able to tolerate not only high ammonium concentration but also high C/N ratio, and the ammonium tolerance is associated with carbon source and C/N ratio. The nitrogen balance under different conditions shows that approximately 28%–45%of the initial ammonium is assimilated into the cells, 44%–60%is denitrified and several percent is converted to nitrification products. A. faecalis C16 cannot utilize hydroxylamine, nitrite or nitrate as the sole nitrogen source for growth. However, nitrate can be used when ammonium is simultaneously present in the medium. A possible pathway for nitrogen removal by C16 is suggested. The preliminary enzyme assay provides more evidence for this nitrogen removal pathway.

  12. Separating Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Contributions to Soil Respiration in Maize-Based Agroecosystems Using Stable Carbon Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, B.; Walters, D. T.; Madhavan, S.; Arkebauer, T. J.; Scoby, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    Any effort to establish a carbon budget for a growing crop by means of a thorough accounting of all C sources and sinks will require the ability to discriminate between autotrophic and heterotrophic contributions to soil surface CO2 flux. Autotrophic soil respiration (Ra) is defined as combined root respiration and the respiration of soil microorganisms residing in the rhizosphere and using root-derived carbohydrates as an energy source, while heterotrophic respiration (Rh) is defined as the respiration of soil microorganisms and macroorganisms not directly under the influence of the live root system and using SOM as an energy source. We partition soil surface CO2 flux into its autotrophic and heterotrophic components by combining root exclusion with stable carbon isotope techniques in production scale (~65 ha) maize-based agroecosystems. After flux measurements, small chambers are placed on collars in both root excluded shields and in non-root excluded soil, ambient headspace CO2 is removed using a soda lime trap, and soil-respired C is allowed to collect in the chambers. Soil respiration samples are then collected in 12mL evacuated exetainers and analyzed for δ13C by means of a Finnigan Delta-S isotope ratio mass spectrometer interfaced with a Thermo Finnigan GasBench II and a cryogenic trap to increase CO2 concentration. These δ13C measurements were made throughout the 2005 growing season in maize fields representing three agroecosystems: irrigated continuous maize, irrigated maize-soybean rotation, and rainfed maize soybean rotation. Estimates of autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration along with other results of this study will be presented.

  13. Can we distinguish autotrophic respiration from heterotrophic respiration in a field site using high temporal resolution CO2 flux measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Beatrice; Berger, Sina; Praetzel, Leandra; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The processes behind C-cycling in peatlands are important to understand for assessing the vulnerability of peatlands as carbon sinks under changing climate conditions. Especially boreal peatlands are likely to underlie strong alterations in the future. It is expected that C-pools that are directly influenced by vegetation and water table fluctuations can be easily destabilized. The CO2 efflux through respiration underlies autotrophic and heterotrophic processes that show different feedbacks on changing environmental conditions. In order to understand the respiration fluxes better for more accurate modelling and prognoses, the determination of the relative importance of different respiration sources is necessary. Earlier studies used e.g. exfoliation experiments, incubation experiments or modelling approaches to estimate the different respiration sources for the total ecosystem respiration (Reco). To further the understanding in this topic, I want to distinguish autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration using high temporal resolution measurements. The study site was selected along a hydrological gradient in a peatland in southern Ontario (Canada) and measurements were conducted from May to September 2015 once per month. Environmental controls (water table, soil temperature and soil moisture) that effect the respiration sources were recorded. In my study I used a Li-COR 6400XT and a Los Gatos greenhouse gas analyzer (GGA). Reco was determined by chamber flux measurements with the GGA, while simultaneously CO2 respiration measurements on different vegetation compartments like roots, leaves and mosses were conducted using the Li-COR 6400XT. The difference between Reco and autotrophic respiration equals heterotrophic respiration. After the measurements, the vegetation plots were harvested and separated for all compartments (leaves, roots, mosses, soil organic matter), dried and weighed. The weighted respiration rates from all vegetation compartments sum up to

  14. Influence of ciliated protozoa and heterotrophic nanoflagellates on the fate of primary production in the northeast Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayanni, Hera; Christaki, Urania; van Wambeke, France; Denis, Michel; Moutin, Thierry

    2005-07-01

    Heterotrophic nanoflagellates and ciliates and their herbivorous activity were studied within the framework of the Programme Océan Multidisciplinaire Méso Echelle (POMME) in the northeastern Atlantic between 16°-22°W and 38°-45°N during winter, spring, and late summer/autumn 2001. Ciliate ingestion rates of Synechococcus and eukaryotic algae were measured using fluorescently labeled prey. Heterotrophic nanoflagellate ingestion rates of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus were also estimated. Heterotrophic nanoflagellate and ciliate standing stock within the surface layer (0-100 m) showed seasonal variation, with maximal values in spring (866 mg C m-2 and 637 mg C m-2, respectively). Oligotrichs dominated the ciliate assemblages, except at one site visited during spring, where a tintinnid bloom was observed. Ingestion of photosynthetic cells less than 10 μm in size was positively correlated (r = 0.7, p consumption reflected differences in the evolution of the phytoplankton bloom and in the structure of the microbial food web, both associated with the strong mesoscale hydrodynamic variability of the study area. In that context it is worthy to note that when tintinnids reached high abundances locally (1260 cells L-1), their impact as phytoplankton grazers was important and reached 69% of primary production. Generally, heterotrophic nanoflagellates and ciliates were relatively more important in determining the fate of phytogenic carbon during spring. Another interesting feature of primary production consumption was that during the autumn, when Prochlorococcus dominated the phytoplankton community, the protozoan grazing activity was ineffective in regulating the fate of primary producers.

  15. Heterotrophic high cell-density fed-batch cultures of the phycocyanin-producing red alga Galdieria sulphuraria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rikke Ankerstjerne; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Eriksen, Niels Thomas

    2005-04-05

    Growth and phycocyanin production in batch and fed-batch cultures of the microalga Galdieria sulphuraria 074G, which was grown heterotrophically in darkness on glucose, fructose, sucrose, and sugar beet molasses, was investigated. In batch cultures, specific growth rates and yields of biomass dry weight on the pure sugars were 1.08-1.15 day-1 and 0.48-0.50 g g-1, respectively. They were slightly higher when molasses was the carbon source. Cellular phycocyanin contents during the exponential growth phase were 3-4 mg g-1 in dry weight. G. sulphuraria was able to tolerate concentrations of glucose and fructose of up to 166 g L-1 (0.9 M) and an ammonium sulfate concentration of 22 g L-1 (0.17 M) without negative effects on the specific growth rate. When the total concentration of dissolved substances in the growth medium exceeded 1-2 M, growth was completely inhibited. In carbon-limited fed-batch cultures, biomass dry weight concentrations of 80-120 g L-1 were obtained while phycocyanin accumulated to concentrations between 250 and 400 mg L-1. These results demonstrate that G. sulphuraria is well suited for growth in heterotrophic cultures at very high cell densities, and that such cultures produce significant amounts of phycocyanin. Furthermore, the productivity of phycocyanin in the heterotrophic fed-batch cultures of G. sulphuraria was higher than is attained in outdoor cultures of Spirulina platensis, where phycocyanin is presently obtained.

  16. Enhanced accumulation of starch and total carbohydrates in alginate-immobilized Chlorella spp. induced by Azospirillum brasilense: II. Heterotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choix, Francisco J; de-Bashan, Luz E; Bashan, Yoav

    2012-10-10

    The effect of the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense jointly immobilized with Chlorella vulgaris or C. sorokiniana in alginate beads on total carbohydrates and starch was studied under dark and heterotrophic conditions for 144 h in synthetic growth medium supplemented with either d-glucose or Na-acetate as carbon sources. In all treatments, enhanced total carbohydrates and starch content per culture and per cell was obtained after 24h; only jointly immobilized C. vulgaris growing on d-glucose significantly increased total carbohydrates and starch content after 96 h. Enhanced accumulation of carbohydrate and starch under jointly immobilized conditions was variable with time of sampling and substrate used. Similar results occurred when the microalgae was immobilized alone. In both microalgae growing on either carbon sources, the bacterium promoted accumulation of carbohydrates and starch; when the microalgae were immobilized alone, they used the carbon sources for cell multiplication. In jointly immobilized conditions with Chlorella spp., affinity to carbon source and volumetric productivity and yield were higher than when Chlorella spp. were immobilized alone; however, the growth rate was higher in microalgae immobilized alone. This study demonstrates that under heterotrophic conditions, A. brasilense promotes the accumulation of carbohydrates in two strains Chlorella spp. under certain time-substrate combinations, producing mainly starch. As such, this bacterium is a biological factor that can change the composition of compounds in microalgae in dark, heterotrophic conditions.

  17. Biofouling characteristics and identification of preponderant bacteria at different nutrient levels in batch tests of a recirculating cooling water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Zhao, Chao-Cheng; Xia, Lu; Yang, Fei; Chang, Xin; Wang, Yong-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the influence of nutrient levels on biofouling control is an important requirement for management strategies in a recirculating cooling water system. Nutrient limitation may be one way to control biofouling development without increasing biocide dosing. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the effects of nutrient levels on biofouling characteristics and to identify the preponderant bacteria in the batch tests with a simulated cooling water system. The biofouling characteristics were assessed by varying the biofoulant mass and the bacteria respiratory activity, which was estimated by measuring oxygen uptake rates. According to the results obtained in nutrient factor experiments, the biofouling could be better controlled at carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations of 30 mg N/L, 8 mg N/L and 1.0 mg P/L, respectively. Increasing carbon concentrations shortened the biofouling initial growth period and resulted in higher biofoulant mass. The preponderant bacteria strains involved in biofouling under two culture conditions were identified by applying both physiological and biochemical tests and further molecular biology techniques with phylogenetic affiliation analysis. Enterobacter (family Enterobacteriaceae), Staphylococcus (family Micrococcaceae), Bacillus (family Bacillaceae), Proteus (family Enterobacteriaceae), Neisseria (family Neisseriaceae) and Pseudomonas (family Pseudomonadaceae) were dominant in the conditions of lower carbon concentration (30 mg/L). Enterobacter are autotrophs, but the other five bacteria are all heterotrophs. In the conditions of higher carbon concentration (70 mg/L), Klebsiella (family Enterobacteriaceae), Enterobacter and Microbacterium (family Microbacteriaceae) were dominant; Enterobacter and Microbacterium are heterotrophs.

  18. Synergistic effects of UVR and simulated stratification on commensalistic phytoplankton-bacteria relationship in two optically contrasting oligotrophic Mediterranean lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, P.; Medina-Sánchez, J. M.; Durán, C.; Herrera, G.; Villafañe, V. E.; Helbling, E. W.

    2015-02-01

    An indirect effect of global warming is a reduction in the depth of the upper mixed layer (UML) causing organisms to be exposed to higher levels of ultraviolet (UVR, 280-400 nm) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm). This can affect primary and bacterial production as well as the commensalistic phytoplankton-bacteria relationship. The combined effects of UVR and reduction in the depth of the UML were assessed on variables related to the metabolism of phytoplankton and bacteria, during in situ experiments performed with natural pico- and nanoplankton communities from two oligotrophic lakes with contrasting UVR transparency (high-UVR versus low-UVR waters) of southern Spain. The negative UVR effects on epilimnetic primary production (PP) and on heterotrophic bacterial production (HBP), intensified under increased stratification, were higher in the low-UVR than in the high-UVR lake, and stronger on the phytoplanktonic than on the heterotrophic bacterial communities. Under UVR and increased stratification, the commensalistic phytoplankton-bacteria relationship was strengthened in the high-UVR lake where excretion of organic carbon (EOC) rates exceeded the bacterial carbon demand (BCD; i.e., BCD : EOC(%) ratio 100). The greater UVR damage to phytoplankton and bacteria and the weakening of their commensalistic interaction found in the low-UVR lake indicates that these ecosystems would be especially vulnerable to UVR and increased stratification as stressors related to global climate change. Thus, our findings may have important implications for the carbon cycle in oligotrophic lakes of the Mediterranean region.

  19. Microbial iron uptake in the naturally fertilized waters in the vicinity of Kerguelen Islands: phytoplankton–bacteria interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fourquez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe uptake by the microbial community and the contribution of three different size-fractions was determined during spring phytoplankton blooms in the naturally Fe fertilized area off Kerguelen Islands (KEOPS2. Total Fe uptake in surface waters was on average 34 ± 6 pmol Fe L−1 d−1, and microplankton (>25 μm size-fraction; 40–69% and pico-nanoplankton (0.8–25 μm size-fraction; 29–59% were the main contributors. The share of heterotrophic bacteria (0.2–0.8 μm size-fraction to total Fe uptake was low at all stations (1–2%. Iron uptake rates normalized to carbon biomass were highest for pico-nanoplankton above the Kerguelen plateau and for microplankton in the downstream plume. We also investigated the potential competition between heterotrophic bacteria and phytoplankton for the access to Fe. Bacterial Fe uptake rates normalized to carbon biomass were highest when bacteria were incubated in the absence of both micro- and pico-nanoplankton. The absence of microplankton resulted in a decrease in bacterial Fe uptake rates by up to 20-fold, while in incubations with the whole microbial community bacterial uptake rates were reduced by 2- to 8-fold. In Fe-fertilized waters, the bacterial Fe uptake rates normalized to carbon biomass were positively correlated with primary production. Taken together, these results demonstrate that heterotrophic bacteria are outcompeted by small sized phytoplankton cells for the access to Fe during the spring bloom development, most likely due to the limitation by organic matter. We conclude that the Fe and carbon cycles are tightly coupled and driven by a~complex interplay of competition and synergy between different members of the microbial community.

  20. How honey kills bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.H.S. Kwakman; A.A. te Velde; L. de Boer; D. Speijer; C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls; S.A.J. Zaat

    2010-01-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria t

  1. Metallization of bacteria cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎向锋; 李雅芹; 蔡军; 张德远

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria cells with different standard shapes are well suited for use as templates for the fabrication of magnetic and electrically conductive microstructures. In this paper, metallization of bacteria cells is demonstrated by an electroless deposition technique of nickel-phosphorus initiated by colloid palladium-tin catalyst on the surfaces of Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus. The activated and metallized bacteria cells have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results showed that both Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus had no deformation in shape after metallization; the metallized films deposited on the surfaces of bacteria cells are homogeneous in thickness and noncrystalline in phase structure. The kinetics of colloid palladium-tin solution and electroless plating on bacteria cells is discussed.

  2. Microbiology of acidic, geothermal springs of Montserrat: environmental rDNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, N P; Norris, P R

    2000-10-01

    DNA was extracted from water and sediment samples taken from acidic, geothermal pools on the Caribbean island of Montserrat. 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR, cloned, sequenced, and examined to indicate some of the organisms that might be significant components of the in situ microbiota. A clone bank representing the lowest temperature pool that was sampled (33 degrees C) was dominated by genes corresponding to two types of acidophiles: Acidiphilium-like mesophilic heterotrophs and thermotolerant Acidithiobacillus caldus. Three clone types with origins in low- and moderate- (48 degrees C) temperature pools corresponded to bacteria that could be involved in metabolism of sulfur compounds: the aerobic A. caldus and putative anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, sulfur-reducing bacteria (from an undescribed genus and from the Desulfurella group). A higher-temperature sample indicated the presence of a Ferroplasma-like organism, distinct from the other strains of these recently recognized acidophilic, iron-oxidizing members of the Euryarchaeota. Acidophilic Archaea from undescribed genera related to Sulfolobus and Acidianus were predicted to dominate the indigenous acidophilic archaeal population at the highest temperatures.

  3. Estimating heterotrophic respiration at large scales: challenges, approaches, and next steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Epron, Daniel; Harden, Jennifer W.; Harmon, Mark; Hoffman, F. M.; Kumar, Jitendra; McGuire, A. David; Vargas, Rodrigo

    2016-06-27

    Heterotrophic respiration (HR), the aerobic and anaerobic processes mineralizing organic matter, is a key carbon flux but one impossible to measure at scales significantly larger than small experimental plots. This impedes our ability to understand carbon and nutrient cycles, benchmark models, or reliably upscale point measurements. Given that a new generation of highly mechanistic, genomic-specific global models is not imminent, we suggest that a useful step to improve this situation would be the development of "Decomposition Functional Types" (DFTs). Analogous to plant functional types (PFTs), DFTs would abstract and capture important differences in HR metabolism and flux dynamics, allowing models to efficiently group and vary these characteristics across space and time. We argue that DFTs should be initially informed by top-down expert opinion, but ultimately developed using bottom-up, data-driven analyses, and provide specific examples of potential dependent and independent variables that could be used. We present and discuss an example clustering analysis to show how model-produced annual HR can be broken into distinct groups associated with global variability in biotic and abiotic factors, and demonstrate that these groups are distinct from already-existing PFTs. A similar analysis, incorporating observational data, could form a basis for future DFTs. Finally, we suggest next steps and critical priorities: collection and synthesis of existing data; more in-depth analyses combining open data with high-performance computing; rigorous testing of analytical results; and planning by the global modeling community for decoupling decomposition from fixed site data. These are all critical steps to build a foundation for DFTs in global models, thus providing the ecological and climate change communities with robust, scalable estimates of HR at large scales.

  4. Nutrient pulses driven by internal solitary waves enhance heterotrophic bacterial growth in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzong-Yueh; Tai, Jen-Hua; Ko, Chia-Ying; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Chen, Chung-Chi; Jiao, Nianzhi; Liu, Hong-Bin; Shiah, Fuh-Kwo

    2016-12-01

    This study demonstrated the potential effects of internal waves (IWs) on heterotrophic bacterial activities for the first time. Nine anchored studies were conducted from 2009-2012 in the South China Sea areas with different physical conditions, i.e. areas subjected to elevation IWs, to depression IWs, and to weak/no IWs. The latter two areas were treated as the Control sites. Field survey results indicated that within the euphotic zone, the minima of the depth-averaged bacterial production (IBP; ∼1.0 mgC m(-3) d(-1) ) and growth rate (IBμ; ∼0.1 d(-1) ) at all sites were similar. Except for one case, the maxima of IBP (6-12 mgC m(-3) d(-1) ) and IBμ (0.55-1.13 d(-1) ) of the elevation IWs areas were ∼fivefolds higher than those of the Control sites (IBP 1.7-2.1 mgC m(-3) d(-1) ; IBμ 0.13-0.24 d(-1) ). Replicate surveys conducted at the north-western area of the Dongsha atoll during spring-to-neap (NW1 survey) and neap-to-spring (NW2 survey) tide periods showed a great contrast to each other. Low variation and averages of IBμ in NW1 survey were similar to those of the Control sites, while those in NW2 were similar to the other elevation IWs sites with larger variation and higher averages of IBμ. This finding suggests that bacterial activities may be a function of the lunar fortnightly (14-day) cycle. Enrichment experiments suggested more directly that the limiting inorganic nutrients introduced by the elevation waves (EIWs) may contribute a higher IBμ within the euphotic zone.

  5. Feeding by the newly described, nematocyst-bearing heterotrophic dinoflagellate Gyrodiniellum shiwhaense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Lee, Kyung Ha; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kang, Nam Seon; Lee, Kitack

    2011-01-01

    We explored the feeding ecology of the newly described, nematocyst-bearing heterotrophic dinoflagellate Gyrodiniellum shiwhaense (GenBank accession number=FR720082). Using several different types of microscopes and high-resolution video-microscopy, we investigated feeding behavior and types of prey species that G. shiwhaense feeds upon. Additionally, we measured its growth and ingestion rates on its optimal algal prey, the cryptophyte Teleaulax sp. and the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae, as a function of prey concentration. These rates were measured for other edible prey at single prey concentrations at which the growth and ingestion rates of G. shiwhaense were saturated. After anchoring the prey with a tow filament, G. shiwhaense fed using a peduncle, ingesting small algal species with equivalent spherical diameters (ESDs) of <13 μm. However, it did not feed on larger algal species that had ESDs≥13 μm or the small diatom Skeletonema costatum. The specific growth rates for G. shiwhaense feeding upon Teleaulax sp. and A. carterae increased rapidly with increasing mean prey concentration before saturating at concentrations of ca. 180-430 ng C/ml. The maximum specific growth rate of G. shiwhaense on Teleaulax sp. and A. carterae were 1.05 and 0.82/d, respectively. However, Heterosigma akashiwo did not support positive growth of G. shiwhaense. The maximum ingestion rates of G. shiwhaense on Teleaulax sp. and A. carterae were 0.35 and 0.54 ng C/grazer/d, respectively. The calculated grazing coefficients attributable to G. shiwhaense on co-occurring cryptophytes and Amphidinium spp. were 0.01-1.87/d and 0.08-2.60/d, respectively. Our results suggest that G. shiwhaense can have a considerable grazing impact on algal populations.

  6. The newly described heterotrophic dinoflagellate Gyrodinium moestrupii, an effective protistan grazer of toxic dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yeong Du; Yoon, Eun Young; Jeong, Hae Jin; Lee, Kyung Ha; Hwang, Yeong Jong; Seong, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Jae Seong; Park, Jae Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Few protistan grazers feed on toxic dinoflagellates, and low grazing pressure on toxic dinoflagellates allows these dinoflagellates to form red-tide patches. We explored the feeding ecology of the newly described heterotrophic dinoflagellate Gyrodinium moestrupii when it fed on toxic strains of Alexandrium minutum, Alexandrium tamarense, and Karenia brevis and on nontoxic strains of A. tamarense, Prorocentrum minimum, and Scrippsiella trochoidea. Specific growth rates of G. moestrupii feeding on each of these dinoflagellates either increased continuously or became saturated with increasing mean prey concentration. The maximum specific growth rate of G. moestrupii feeding on toxic A. minutum (1.60/d) was higher than that when feeding on nontoxic S. trochoidea (1.50/d) or P. minimum (1.07/d). In addition, the maximum growth rate of G. moestrupii feeding on the toxic strain of A. tamarense (0.68/d) was similar to that when feeding on the nontoxic strain of A. tamarense (0.71/d). Furthermore, the maximum ingestion rate of G. moestrupii on A. minutum (2.6 ng C/grazer/d) was comparable to that of S. trochoidea (3.0 ng C/grazer/d). Additionally, the maximum ingestion rate of G. moestrupii on the toxic strain of A. tamarense (2.1 ng C/grazer/d) was higher than that when feeding on the nontoxic strain of A. tamarense (1.3 ng C/grazer/d). Thus, feeding by G. moestrupii is not suppressed by toxic dinoflagellate prey, suggesting that it is an effective protistan grazer of toxic dinoflagellates.

  7. Exploratory Research - Using Volatile Organic Compounds to Separate Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Forest Soil Respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Scott D [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2015-02-09

    The initial focus of this project was to develop a method to partition soil respiration into its components (autotrophic, heterotrophic etc.) using the fingerprint of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soils. We were able to identify 63 different VOCs in our study; however, due to technical difficulties we were unable to take reliable measurements in order to test our hypotheses and develop this method. In the end, we changed the objectives of the project. Our new objectives were to characterize the effects of species and soil moisture regime on the composition of soil organic matter. We utilized the soils from the greenhouse experiment we had established for the soil VOC study and determined the lignin biomarker profiles of each of the treatments. We found that moisture had a significant effect on the carbon content of the soils with the low moisture treatments having higher carbon content than the high moisture treatments. We found that the relative yield of syringyl phenols (SP), ligin (Lig), and substituted fatty acids (SFA) were elevated in deciduous planted pots and reduced in conifer planted pots relative to plant-free treatments. Our results suggest nuttall oak preserved lignin and SFA, while loblolly pine lost lignin and SFA similarly to the plant free treatments. Since we did not find that the carbon concentrations of the soils were different between the species, nuttall oak probably replaced more native soil carbon than loblolly pine. This suggests that relative to loblolly pine, nuttall oak is a priming species. Since priming may impact soil carbon pools more than temperature or moisture, determining which species are priming species may facilitate an understanding of the interaction that land use and climate change may have on soil carbon pools.

  8. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, A.; Terrado, R.; Thaler, M.; Comeau, A.; Medrinal, E.; Lovejoy, C.

    2013-06-01

    The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL) in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8-20 μm cell diameter), mostly phagotrophic protists in the upper pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer, where light and nutrients are both available. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL from different water masses within the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada), targeting the surface, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer (SCM) and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1) to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly suggested that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate-driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  9. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8–20 μm cell diameter, mostly phagotrophic protists in the pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM layer. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL across a wide region, and down the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada, targeting the surface, the SCM and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1 to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly implied that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  10. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8–20 μm cell diameter, mostly phagotrophic protists in the upper pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer, where light and nutrients are both available. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL from different water masses within the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada, targeting the surface, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer (SCM and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1 to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly suggested that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate-driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  11. Effects of bio stimulation on growth of indigenous bacteria in sub-antarctic soil contaminated with oil hydrocarbons; Effets de traitements de biostimulation sur la croissance des bacteries indigenes d'un sol subantarctique contamine par des hydrocarbures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, F.; Delille, D. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Observatoire Oceanologique, UMR-CNRS 7621, 66 - Banyuls sur Mer (France)

    2003-08-01

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of bio-stimulation of soil contaminated with oil hydrocarbons under sub-Antarctic conditions, a meso-cosm study was initiated in May 2001 in the Kerguelen Archipelago (49 deg. 21'S, 70 deg. 13'E). The effects of temperature and fertilizer addition (Inipol EAP-22, Elf Atochem) on soil bacterial assemblages contaminated with hydrocarbons were studied in 6-l batches of sub-antarctic soil incubated in the dark. Six different conditions were used at three temperatures (4, 10 and 20 deg. C): control, fertilizer (50 ml), diesel oil (100 ml), diesel oil (100 ml) + fertilizer (50 ml), 'Arabian light' crude oil (100 ml) and crude oil (100 ml) + fertilizer (50 ml). Meso-cosms were sampled on a regular basis over a seven-month period. All samples were analyzed for total bacteria, viable heterotrophic assemblages and hydrocarbon-utilising microflora. The results clearly showed a significant response of sub-Antarctic microbial soil communities to hydrocarbon contamination. Large increases in total, heterotrophic and hydrocarbon-utilising bacteria were observed (from less than 5 x 10{sup 5} MPN g{sup -1} to more than 10{sup 8} MPN g{sup -1} for hydrocarbon degrading bacteria). Temperature elevation had no significant impact on the total or heterotrophic assemblages but induced a one order of magnitude increase in hydrocarbon-utilising bacteria in contaminated meso-cosms. In contrast, fertilizer addition had no clear effect on hydrocarbon-degrading specific bacteria but stimulated heterotrophic growth in diesel oil-contaminated soils. (authors)

  12. The abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in activated sludge under autotrophic domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Ma, Chao; Sun, Shifang; Xie, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Jun; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-04-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play a key role in nitrogen-removal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as they can transform ammonia into nitrite. AOB can be enriched in activated sludge through autotrophic domestication although they are difficult to be isolated. In this study, autotrophic domestication was carried out in a lab-scale sequencing-batch-reactor (SBR) system with two activated sludge samples. The ammonia removal capacity of the sludge samples increased during the domestication, and pH exhibited a negative correlation with the ammonia removal amount, which indicated that it was one important factor of microbial ammonia oxidation. The count of AOB, measured by the most probable number (MPN) method, increased significantly during autotrophic domestication as ammonia oxidation efficiency was enhanced. We investigated the changes in the community structure of AOB before and after domestication by amoA clone library and T-RFLP profile. It showed that AOB had been successfully enriched and the community structure significantly shifted during the domestication. Two groups of AOB were found in sludge samples: Nitrosomonas-like group remained predominant all the time and Nitrosospira-like group changed obviously. Simultaneously, the total heterotrophic bacteria were investigated by MPN and Biolog assay. The metabolic diversity of heterotrophs had changed minutely, although the count of them decreased significantly and lost superiority of microbial communities in the sludge.

  13. Taxonomic status and ecologic function of methanogenic bacteria isolated from the oral cavity of humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    The detection of methane gas in samples of dental plaque and media inoculated with dental plaque was attributed to the presence of methane-producing bacteria in the plaque microbiota. The results of a taxonomic analysis of the 12 methanogenic isolates obtained from human dental plaque, (ABK1-ABK12), placed the organisms in the genus Methanobrevibacter. A DNA-DNA hybridization survey established three distinct genetic groups of oral methanogens based on percent homology values. The groups exhibited less than 32% homology between themselves and less than 17% homology with the three known members of the genus methanobrevibacter. The ecological role of the oral methanogens was established using mixed cultures of selected methanogenic isolates (ABK1, ABK4, ABK6, or ABK7) with oral heterotrophic bacteria. Binary cultures of either Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Veillonella rodentium, Lactobacillus casei, or Peptostreptococcus anaerobius together with either methanogenic isolates ABK6 or ABK7 were grown to determine the effect of the methanogens on the distribution of carbon end products produced by the heterotrophs. Binary cultures of S. mutans and ABK7 exhibited a 27% decrease in lactic acid formation when compared to pure culture of S. mutans. The decrease in lactic acid production was attributed to the removal of formate by the methanogen, (ABK7), which caused an alteration in the distribution of carbon end products by S. mutans.

  14. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  15. A THUMBNAIL HISTORY OF HETEROTROPHIC PLATE COUNT (HPC) METHODOLOGY IN THE UNITED STATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past 100 years, the method of determining the number of bacteria in water, foods or other materials has been termed variously as: bacterial plate count, total plate count, total viable plate count, aerobic plate count, standard plate cound and more recently, heterotrophi...

  16. Ocean acidification impacts bacteria-phytoplankton coupling at low-nutrient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornick, Thomas; Bach, Lennart T.; Crawfurd, Katharine J.; Spilling, Kristian; Achterberg, Eric P.; Woodhouse, Jason N.; Schulz, Kai G.; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Riebesell, Ulf; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    The oceans absorb about a quarter of the annually produced anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), resulting in a decrease in surface water pH, a process termed ocean acidification (OA). Surprisingly little is known about how OA affects the physiology of heterotrophic bacteria or the coupling of heterotrophic bacteria to phytoplankton when nutrients are limited. Previous experiments were, for the most part, undertaken during productive phases or following nutrient additions designed to stimulate algal blooms. Therefore, we performed an in situ large-volume mesocosm ( ˜ 55 m3) experiment in the Baltic Sea by simulating different fugacities of CO2 (fCO2) extending from present to future conditions. The study was conducted in July-August after the nominal spring bloom, in order to maintain low-nutrient conditions throughout the experiment. This resulted in phytoplankton communities dominated by small-sized functional groups (picophytoplankton). There was no consistent fCO2-induced effect on bacterial protein production (BPP), cell-specific BPP (csBPP) or biovolumes (BVs) of either free-living (FL) or particle-associated (PA) heterotrophic bacteria, when considered as individual components (univariate analyses). Permutational Multivariate Analysis of Variance (PERMANOVA) revealed a significant effect of the fCO2 treatment on entire assemblages of dissolved and particulate nutrients, metabolic parameters and the bacteria-phytoplankton community. However, distance-based linear modelling only identified fCO2 as a factor explaining the variability observed amongst the microbial community composition, but not for explaining variability within the metabolic parameters. This suggests that fCO2 impacts on microbial metabolic parameters occurred indirectly through varying physicochemical parameters and microbial species composition. Cluster analyses examining the co-occurrence of different functional groups of bacteria and phytoplankton further revealed a separation of

  17. Cold-active halophilic bacteria from the ice-sealed Lake Vida, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondino, Lindsay J; Asao, Marie; Madigan, Michael T

    2009-10-01

    Lake Vida is a large, permanently ice-covered lake in the Victoria Valley of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica and is unique among Dry Valley lakes because it is ice-sealed, with an ice-cover of nearly 19 m. Enrichment cultures of melt-water from Lake Vida 15.9 m ice yielded five pure cultures of aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria. Of these, one strain grew at -8 degrees C and the four others at -4 degrees C. All isolates were either halotolerant or halophilic, with two strains capable of growth at 15% NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the Lake Vida isolates to be Gammaproteobacteria, related to species of Psychrobacter and Marinobacter. This is the first report of pure cultures of bacteria from Lake Vida, and the isolates displayed a phenotype consistent with life in a cold hypersaline environment.

  18. [Darwin and bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2009-02-01

    As in 2009 the scientific world celebrates two hundreds years from the birthday of Charles Darwin and one hundred and fifty from the publication of The Origin of Species, an analysis of his complete work is performed, looking for any mention of bacteria. But it seems that the great naturahst never took knowledge about its existence, something rather improbable in a time when the discovery of bacteria shook the medical world, or he deliberately ignored them, not finding a place for such microscopic beings into his theory of evolution. But the bacteria badly affected his familiar life, killing scarlet fever one of his children and worsening to death the evolution of tuberculosis of his favourite Annie. Darwin himself could suffer the sickness of Chagas, whose etiological agent has a similar level to bacteria in the scale of evolution.

  19. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  20. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vassoler Serrato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2 is transformed into ammonia (NH3 by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS, anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  1. More, smaller bacteria in response to ocean's warming?

    KAUST Repository

    Moran, Xose Anxelu G.

    2015-06-10

    Heterotrophic bacteria play a major role in organic matter cycling in the ocean. Although the high abundances and relatively fast growth rates of coastal surface bacterioplankton make them suitable sentinels of global change, past analyses have largely overlooked this functional group. Here, time series analysis of a decade of monthly observations in temperate Atlantic coastal waters revealed strong seasonal patterns in the abundance, size and biomass of the ubiquitous flow-cytometric groups of low (LNA) and high nucleic acid (HNA) content bacteria. Over this relatively short period, we also found that bacterioplankton cells were significantly smaller, a trend that is consistent with the hypothesized temperature-driven decrease in body size. Although decadal cell shrinking was observed for both groups, it was only LNA cells that were strongly coherent, with ecological theories linking temperature, abundance and individual size on both the seasonal and interannual scale. We explain this finding because, relative to their HNA counterparts, marine LNA bacteria are less diverse, dominated by members of the SAR11 clade. Temperature manipulation experiments in 2012 confirmed a direct effect of warming on bacterial size. Concurrent with rising temperatures in spring, significant decadal trends of increasing standing stocks (3% per year) accompanied by decreasing mean cell size (-1% per year) suggest a major shift in community structure, with a larger contribution of LNA bacteria to total biomass. The increasing prevalence of these typically oligotrophic taxa may severely impact marine foodwebs and carbon fluxes by an overall decrease in the efficiency of the biological pump. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Methods to measure biomass and production of bacteria and photosynthetic microbiota and their application on illuminated lake sediments. A literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Eva [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Limnology

    2001-06-01

    In the work of finding a place for long time storage of radioactive waste it is of importance to understand the surrounding ecosystems. The storage is supposed to keep the radioactive waste away from humans and nature for some hundreds of thousands of years. It is important to be able to make risk assessments for a hypothetical release and understand by which ways the radionuclides could find their way into the biota. In lakes, released radionuclides would most probably find their way into the biota through heterotrophic bacteria or auto trophic microorganisms. Therefore, it is important to investigate how large the biomass and production of heterotrophic bacteria and photosynthetic organisms in lakes are. This report is an overview of methods that are commonly used today for measuring biomass and production of bacteria and photosynthetic microorganisms in lakes. It elucidates advantages and drawbacks of the different methods. Some results from studies on illuminated lake sediment habitats are given. Biomass of bacteria is commonly measured in microscope after colouring the bacteria with a dye. Dyes commonly used are acridine orange and 4',6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Biomass of photosynthetic microorganisms is also commonly measured in microscope but can also be determined by the amount of chlorophyll 'a' and other pigments. An advantage with measuring the biomass photosynthetic microorganisms in microscope is that a good resolution of the community is achieved. A disadvantage with determining the biomass by measuring the chlorophyll 'a' concentrations is that the concentrations may vary with light climate and nutrients even though the carbon biomass is constant. Methods for measuring bacterial production discussed in this report are the thymidine incorporation method, the leucine incorporation method and the frequency of dividing cell method (FDC). Methods for primary production discussed in this report are the {sup 14}CO{sub 2

  3. Autotrophic component of soil respiration is repressed by drought more than the heterotrophic one in dry grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, János; Papp, Marianna; Pintér, Krisztina; Fóti, Szilvia; Posta, Katalin; Eugster, Werner; Nagy, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Summer droughts projected to increase in central Europe due to climate changes strongly influence the carbon cycle of ecosystems. Persistent respiration activities during drought periods are responsible for a significant carbon loss, which may turn the ecosystem from a sink into a source of carbon. There are still gaps in our knowledge regarding the characteristic changes taking place in the respiration of the different components of the ecosystem in response to drought events.In the present study, we combined a physical separation of soil respiration components with continuous measurements of soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic (13C) signals at a dry grassland site in Hungary. The physical separation of soil respiration components was performed by means of inox meshes and tubes inserted into the soil. The root-excluded and root- and mycorrhiza-excluded treatments served to measure the isotopic signals of the rhizospheric, mycorrhizal fungi and heterotrophic components, respectively.In the dry grassland investigated in the study the three components of the soil CO2 efflux decreased at different rates under drought conditions. During drought the contribution made by the heterotrophic components was the highest (54 ± 8 %; mean ±SE). Rhizospheric component was the most sensitive to soil drying with its relative contribution to the total soil respiration dropping from 66 ± 7 (non-stressed) to 35 ± 17 % (mean ±SE) under drought conditions. According to our results the heterotrophic component of soil respiration is the major contributor to the respiration activities during drought events in the dry grassland ecosystem studied.

  4. The influence of soils on heterotrophic respiration exerts a strong control on net ecosystem productivity in seasonally dry Amazonian forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Melton

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Net ecosystem productivity of carbon (NEP in seasonally dry forests of the Amazon varies greatly between sites with similar precipitation patterns. Correctly modeling the NEP seasonality with terrestrial ecosystem models has proven difficult. Previous modelling studies have mostly advocated incorporating processes that act to reduce water stress on gross primary productivity (GPP during the dry season such as including deep soils and roots, plant-mediated hydraulic redistribution of soil moisture, and increased dry season leaf litter generation which reduces leaf age and thus increases photosynthetic capacity. Recent observations, however, indicate that seasonality in heterotrophic respiration also contributes to the observed seasonal cycle of NEP. Here, we use the dynamic vegetation model CLASS-CTEM – without deep soils or roots, hydraulic redistribution of soil moisture or increased dry season litter generation – at two Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment (LBA sites (Tapajós km 83 and Jarú Reserve. These LBA sites exhibit opposite seasonal NEP cycles despite similar meteorological conditions. Our simulations are able to reproduce the observed NEP seasonality at both sites. Simulated GPP, heterotrophic respiration, latent and sensible heat fluxes, litter fall rate, soil moisture and temperature, and basic vegetation state are also compared with available observation-based estimates which provide confidence that the model overall behaves realistically at the two sites. Our results indicate that appropriately representing the influence of soil texture and depth, through soil moisture, on seasonal patterns of GPP and, especially, heterotrophic respiration is important to correctly simulating NEP seasonality.

  5. Mineral and non-carbon nutrient utilization and recovery during sequential phototrophic-heterotrophic growth of lipid-rich algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohutskyi, Pavlo; Liu, Kexin; Kessler, Ben A; Kula, Thomas; Hong, Yongseok; Bouwer, Edward J; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Allnutt, F C Thomas

    2014-06-01

    A critical factor in implementing microalgal biofuels for mass production is the nutrient requirements. The current study investigated the fate of macro- and micronutrients and their availability in a sequential phototrophic-heterotrophic production process for the lipid rich microalga Auxenochlorella protothecoides. More than 99 % (by weight) of overall process nutrients were supplied during the initial photoautotrophic stage reflecting its significantly larger volume. Under photoautotrophic growth conditions only 9-35 % of supplied Mn, S, Fe, N, Mg, and Cu and less than 5 % of P, Mo, Co, B, Zn, and Ca were consumed by the algae. The rest of these nutrients remain in the spent growth media during the culture concentration-down from an 800 L phototrophic pond to a 5 L heterotrophic fermenter. In contrast, Zn, Mo, Mn, Mg, Ca, and N were exhausted (90-99 % removal) during the first 25 h of the heterotrophic growth stage. The depletion of these key nutrients may have ultimately limited the final biomass density and/or lipid productivity achieved. Approximately 10-20 % of the total supplied S, Mn, Fe, N, and Cu and 5 % of Ca and Zn were assimilated into algal biomass. Several elements including N, P, Mn, B, Cu, Ca, Mg, S, and Fe were released back into the liquid phase by anaerobic digestion (AD) of the residual biomass after lipid extraction. The nutrients recovered from the AD effluent and remaining in the spent medium should be recycled or their initial concentration to the phototrophic stage decreased to enhance process economics and sustainability for future commercialization of algal-derived biofuels.

  6. Energetics of potential heterotrophic metabolisms in the marine hydrothermal system of Vulcano Island, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Karyn L.; Amend, Jan P.

    2006-12-01

    Values of overall Gibbs free energy of 144 organic oxidation (respiration) and disproportionation (fermentation) reactions are calculated at the temperatures and chemical compositions that exist in nine submarine vents, sediment seeps and geothermal wells in the hydrothermal system of Vulcano Island, Italy. The organic compounds considered here include four carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propanoic and lactic), two C 5 aldoses (arabinose and xylose), three C 6 aldoses (galactose, glucose and mannose), and 15 protein-forming amino acids (Ala, Arg, Asp, Glu, Gly, His, Ile, Leu, Lys, Met, Phe, Ser, Thr, Tyr, and Val). Oxidation of these compounds is coupled to five redox pairs: O 2/H 2O, SO42-/HS, S 0/H 2S, NO3-/NH4+ and Fe 3O 4/Fe 2+. Energy yields from potential respiration reactions range from 6 to 118 kJ/mol of electrons transferred and show systematic behavior with respect to the terminal electron acceptor. Overall, respiration with O 2 yields the most energy (98-118 kJ/mol e -), followed by reactions with NO3- (53- 86 kJ/mol e -), magnetite (29-91 kJ/mol e -), S 0 (11-33 kJ/mol e -) and SO42- (6-34 kJ/mol e -). Energy yields show little correlation with organic compound family, but are correlated with fluid pH. Variability in energy yields across the nine sites is greatest for Fe(III) reduction and is primarily influenced by pH and the activity of Fe 2+. In addition to the potential respiration reactions, the energetics of 24 potential fermentation reactions are also calculated. As expected, fermentation reactions generally yield much less energy than respiration. Normalized to the number of moles of carbon transferred, fermentation yields-8 to 71 kJ/mol C, compared with 16 to 531 kJ/mol C for respiration reactions. All respiration and fermentation reactions, except for methionine (Met) fermentation, are exergonic under the in situ hydrothermal conditions and represent a plethora of potential metabolisms for Vulcano's diverse thermophilic heterotrophs.

  7. Short and long term biosorption of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in heterotrophic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrling, Maria P; Lackner, Susanne; Tatti, Oleg; Guthausen, Gisela; Delay, Markus; Franzreb, Matthias; Horn, Harald

    2016-02-15

    The increased application of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) in industrial processes and consumer products has raised concerns about their impact on health and environmental safety. When ENP enter the global water cycle by e.g. wastewater streams, wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) represent potential sinks for ENP. During biological WWT, the attachment of ENP to biofilms is responsible for the desired removal of ENP from the water phase avoiding their release into the aquatic environment. However, the fundamental mechanisms guiding the interactions between ENP and biofilms are not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study investigates the behavior and biosorption of inorganic ENP, here magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with silica (scFe3O4-NP), with heterotrophic biofilms at different time scales. Their magnetic properties enable to follow scFe3O4-NP in the biofilm system by a magnetic susceptibility balance and magnetic resonance imaging. Biofilms were exposed to scFe3O4-NP at short contact times (5 min) in flow cells and complementary, scFe3O4-NP were introduced into a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) to be observed for 27 d. Mass balances revealed that scFe3O4-NP sorbed to the biofilm within a few minutes, but that the total biosorption was rather low (3.2 μg Fe/mg TSS). scFe3O4-NP mainly sorbed to the biofilm surface inducing the detachment of outer biofilm parts starting after an exposure time of 3h in the MBBR. The biosorption depended on the exposure concentration of scFe3O4-NP, but less on the contact time. Most scFe3O4-NP exited the flow cell (up to 65%) and the MBBR (57%) via the effluent. This effect was favored by the stabilization of scFe3O4-NP in the bulk liquid by organic matter leading to a low retention capacity of the MBBR system. The results contribute to improve our understanding about the fate of ENP in environmental and in technical biofilm systems and give indications for future investigations needed.

  8. Heterotrophic nitrification by Achromobacter xylosoxidans S18 isolated from a small-scale slaughterhouse wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Pradyut; Pramanik, Arnab; Mitra, Sayani; Choudhury, Jayanta Debabrata; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2012-06-01

    Heterotrophic carbon utilizing microbes were acclimatized in the laboratory by inoculating sludge collected from the waste discharge pond of a small-scale rural abattoir in India in a nutrient solution intermittently fed with glucose and ammonium chloride. Cultures of 10 well-developed isolates were selected and grown in a basal medium containing glucose and ammonium chloride. Culture supernatants were periodically analyzed for ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)-N) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Polyphasic taxonomic study of the most active nitrifier (S18) was done. Half saturation concentration (K(s)), maximum rate of substrate utilization (k), yield coefficient (Y) and decay coefficient (K(d)) were determined from the Lineweaver-Burk plot using the modified Monod equation. S18 was able to remove 97 ± 2% of (NH(4)(+)-N) and 88 ± 3% of COD. Molecular phylogenetic study supported by physiological and biochemical characteristics assigned S18 as Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Nitrification activity of A. xylosoxidans was demonstrated for the first time, while interestingly, the distinctive anaerobic denitrification property was preserved in S18. K (s) values were determined as 232.13 ± 1.5 mg/l for COD reduction and 2.131 ± 1.9 mg/l for NH(4)(+)-N utilization. Yield coefficients obtained were 0.4423 ± 0.1134 mg of MLVSS/mg of COD and 0.2461 ± 0.0793 mg of MLVSS/mg of NH(4)(+)-N while the decay coefficients were 0.0627 ± 0.0013 per day and 0.0514 ± 0.0008 per day, respectively. After a contact period of 24 h, 650 ± 5 mg/l solids were produced when the initial concentration of COD and NH(4)(+)-N were 1820 ± 10 mg/l and 120 ± 5.5 mg/l, respectively. This is the first report on the kinetic coefficients for carbon oxidation and nitrification by a single bacterium isolated from slaughterhouse wastewater.

  9. Characteristics of the cultivable bacteria from sediments associated with two deep-sea hydrothermal vents in Okinawa Trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing-lei; Wang, Ming-qing; Sun, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this study, different culture-dependent methods were used to examine the cultivable heterotrophic bacteria in the sediments associated with two deep-sea hydrothermal vents (named HV1 and HV2) located at Iheya Ridge and Iheya North in Okinawa Trough. The two vents differed in morphology, with HV1 exhibiting diffuse flows while HV2 being a black smoker with a chimney-like structure. A total of 213 isolates were identified by near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Of these isolates, 128 were from HV1 and 85 were from HV2. The bacterial community structures were, in large parts, similar between HV1 and HV2. Nevertheless, differences between HV1 and HV2 were observed in one phylum, one class, 4 orders, 10 families, and 20 genera. Bioactivity analysis revealed that 25 isolates belonging to 9 different genera exhibited extracellular protease activities, 21 isolates from 11 genera exhibited extracellular lipase activities, and 13 isolates of 8 genera displayed antimicrobial activities. This is the first observation of a large population of bacteria with extracellular bioactivities existing in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Taken together, the results of this study provide new insights into the characteristics of the cultivable heterotrophic bacteria in deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems.

  10. Signatures of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Metabolic Activity in Enrichment Cultures from a Sulphur Oxidizing Acid Mine Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, G. F.; Bernier, L.; Cowie, B. R.; Warren, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    Delineating the role of microorganisms in geochemical processes of interest in natural environments requires the development of tools that provide the ability to distinguish amongst microbial activity associated with different metabolic guilds. The gap between phylogenetic characterization and phenotypic understanding remains, underscoring the need to consider alternative methods. Compound specific analysis of cellular components has the potential to differentiate between active metabolic processes supporting microbial communities and may be especially useful in extreme environments. The goal of this study was to determine whether the phospholipids fatty acid (PLFA) distribution and isotopic signatures associated with autotrophs and heterotrophs enriched from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system differed, and further whether natural consortial autotrophic isolates showed similar signatures to autotrophic pure strains of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans. Two distinct initial enrichments with tetrathionate and CO2 yielded primarily autotrophic (95%) Acidithiobaccillus spp. sulphur oxidizing communities. The remaining microbial members of theses enrichments (subculture of the consortial isolates in a medium amended with glucose but without tetrathionate selectively resulted in their visible growth. PLFA profiles and δ13C signatures from autotrophic (1) natural enrichments, pure cultures of (2) A. ferrooxidans and (3) A. thiooxidans were similar, but collectively differed from those of the natural heterotrophic enrichment cultures. The PLFA profiles for the heterotrophic communities were made up of primarily (88-99%) C16:0 and two isomers of C18:1. In contrast, the autotrophic communities had high proportions of C16:1 (up to 18%) as well as cyclo C17 and cyclo C19 PLFA that combined comprised 18 to 58% of the observed PLFA. The δ13C signatures of the PLFA also differed strongly between the two trophic levels. The δ13C of the autotrophic PLFA, - 24 to

  11. Heterotrophic and elemental-sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification processes for simultaneous nitrate and Cr(VI) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Kilic, Adem

    2014-03-01

    Nitrate and chromate can be present together in water resources as nitrate is a common co-contaminant in surface and ground waters. This study aims at comparatively evaluating simultaneous chromate and nitrate reduction in heterotrophic and sulfur-based autotrophic denitrifying column bioreactors. In sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification process, elemental sulfur and nitrate act as an electron donor and an acceptor, respectively, without requirement of organic supplementation. Autotrophic denitrification was complete and not adversely affected by chromate up to 0.5 mg/L. Effluent chromate concentration was water treatment due to the elimination of organic supplementation and the risk of treated effluent contamination.

  12. Damköhler number design method to avoid clogging of subsurface flow constructed wetlands by heterotrophic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, D; Maciolek, D; Davis, B; Wallace, S

    2007-01-01

    Clogging of subsurface flow (SSF) treatment wetlands from excess biofilm growth is a design problem for which only empirical guidelines exist. A method is proposed to systematically analyse this type of clogging as a design tool. In recognition of the physical reality that most SSF treatment wetland processes are a function of biofilm surface area, a Damköhler number (Da) definition based on aggregate specific surface area is used to investigate a method of predicting clogging induced by heterotrophic biofilms growing on treatment media.

  13. Enhanced biological nutrient removal by the alliance of a heterotrophic nitrifying strain with a nitrogen removing ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater was investigated in an airlift bioreactor (ALB), augmented with a novel heterotrophic nitrifier Pseudonocardia ammonioxydans H9T under organic carbon to nitrogen ratios (Corg/N) ranging from 0 to 12. Effect of the inoculated strain was also determined on the settling properties and the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD). Two laboratory scale reactors were set up to achieve a stable nitrifying state under the same physicochemical conditions of hydraulic retention time (HRT), temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen (DO), and operated under the sequencing batch mode. The level of DO was kept at 0.5-1.5 mg/L by periodic stirring and aeration. Each specific Corg/N ratio was continued for duration of 3 weeks. One of the reactors (BR2) was inoculated with P. ammonioxydans H9T periodically at the start of each Corg/N ratio. Sludge volumetric index (SVI) improved with the increasing Corg/N ratio, but no significant difference was detected between the two reactors. BR2 showed higher levels of nitrogen removal with the increasing heterotrophic conditions, and the ammonia removal reached to the level of 82%-88%, up to10% higher than that in the control reactor (BR1) at Corg/N ratios higher than 6; however, the ammonia removal level in experimental reactor was up to 8% lower than that in control reactor at Corg/N ratios lower than 2. The COD removal efficiency progressively increased with the increasing Corg/N ratios in both of the reactors. The COD removal percentage up to peak values of 88%-94% in BR2, up to 11% higher than that in BR1 at Corg/N ratio higher than 4. The peak values of ammonia and COD removal almost coincided with the highest number (18%-27% to total bacterial number) of the exogenous bacterium in the BR2, detected as colony forming units (CFU). Furthermore, the removal of ammonia and COD in BR2 was closely related to the number of the inoculated strain with a coefficient index (R2) up to 0.82 and 0.85 for ammonia

  14. Dynamics of auto- and heterotrophic picoplankton and associated viruses in Lake Geneva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parvathi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial dynamics has been rarely investigated in Lake Geneva, which is paradoxically the largest lake in Western Europe. From a 5 month survey, we report dynamic patterns of free living viruses, bacteria and small phytoplankton abundances in response to a variety of environmental parameters. For the first time, we fractionated the primary production to separate the contribution of different size-related biological compartments and measured both bacterial and viral production in addition to experiments conducted to appreciate virus-induced bacterial mortality. We observed marked seasonal and vertical variations in picocyanobacteria, bacteria and virus abundances and production. The contribution of picoplankton and nanoplankton production to the total primary production was high in November and spring-summer transition period respectively. The impact of viral lysis on both bacteria and picocyanobacteria was significantly higher than grazing activities. Virus-induced picocyanobacterial mortality reached up to 66% compared to virus induced bacterial mortality that reached a maximum of 34% in July. Statistical analyses revealed a complex interplay between biological abundances and/or activity with environmental factors in Lake Geneva. Our results provide new evidence on the critical role played by viruses in freshwater microbial dynamics and more globally on the functioning of the microbial food webs. This study highlights the importance of further considering this biological compartment for a better understanding of the plankton ecology of Lake Geneva, especially for modeling purposes and in a context of reoligotrophication and warming of this ecosystem.

  15. The fecal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  16. Phylogenetic diversity and specificity of bacteria associated with Microcystis aeruginosa and other cyanobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Limei; CAI Yuanfeng; YANG Hualin; XING Peng; LI Pengfu; KONG Lingdong; KONG Fanxiang

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between bacteria and cyanobacteria have been suggested to have a potential to influence harmful algal bloom dynamics,however,little information on these interactions is reported.In this study,the bacterial communities associated with five strains of Microcystis aeruginosa,three species of other Microcystis spp.,and four representative species of non-Microcystis cyanobacteria were compared.Bacterial 16S rDNA fragments were amplified and separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) followed DNA sequence analysis.The similarities among bacterial communities associated with these cyanobacteria were compared to the digitized DGGE profiles using the cluster analyses technique.The bacterial community structure of all cyanobacterial cultures differed.Cluster analysis showed that the similarity values among M.aeruginosa cultures were higher than those of other cyanobacterial cultures.Sequence analysis of DGGE fragments indicated the presence of bacteria including Alphaproteobacteria,Betaproteobacteria,Gammaproteobacteria,Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria in the cyanobacterial cultures.Members of the Sphingobacteriales were the prevalent group among the Microcystis-associated bacteria.The results provided further evidence for species-specific associations between cyanoabcteria and heterotrophic bacteria,which are useful for understanding interactions between Microcystis and their associated bacteria.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Pb Resistant Bacteria from Cilalay Lake, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesi Kurnia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pollution of water environment with heavy metals is becoming one of the most severe environmental and human health hazards. Lead (Pb is a major pollutant and highly toxic to human, animals, plants, and microbes. Toxic metals are difficult to remove from the environment, since they cannot be chemically or biologically degraded and are ultimately indestructible. Biological approaches based on metal-resistant microorganisms have received a great deal of attention as alternative remediation processes. This study aim to isolate and characterize Pb resistant of heterotrophic bacteria in Cilalay Lake, West Java, Indonesia. The water samples were collected along three points around Cilalay Lake. Water physical and chemical determination was performed using the Water Quality Checker. The bacterial isolates were screened on Triptone Glucose Yeast (TGY agar plates. Afterwards selected isolates were grown on Nutrient Agar media 50% with supplemented Pb 100 ppm by the standard disk. Population of resistant bacteria was counted. The result from metal resistant bacteria indicated that all isolates were resistant. The most abundant type of resistant bacteria to lead was Gram negative more than Gram positive. Identified have metal resistant bacteria could be useful for the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated sewage and waste water

  18. Heavy metal pollution exerts reduction/adaptation in the diversity and enzyme expression profile of heterotrophic bacteria in Cochin estuary, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jose, J.; Giridhar, R.; Anas, A; LokaBharathi, P.A; Nair, S.

    Over the past three decades heavy metal pollution has increased substantially in Cochin estuary, south west coast of India. The distribution, diversity and enzyme expression profile of culturable microbial population along a pollution gradient...

  19. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  20. Irrigation waters and pipe-based biofilms as sources for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaustein, Ryan A; Shelton, Daniel R; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S; Karns, Jeffrey S; Stocker, Matthew D; Pachepsky, Yakov A

    2016-01-01

    The presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in environmental surface waters has gained recent attention. Wastewater and drinking water distribution systems are known to disseminate antibiotic-resistant bacteria, with the biofilms that form on the inner-surfaces of the pipeline as a hot spot for proliferation and gene exchange. Pipe-based irrigation systems that utilize surface waters may contribute to the dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a similar manner. We conducted irrigation events at a perennial stream on a weekly basis for 1 month, and the concentrations of total heterotrophic bacteria, total coliforms, and fecal coliforms, as well as the concentrations of these bacterial groups that were resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline, were monitored at the intake water. Prior to each of the latter three events, residual pipe water was sampled and 6-in. sections of pipeline (coupons) were detached from the system, and biofilm from the inner-wall was removed and analyzed for total protein content and the above bacteria. Isolates of biofilm-associated bacteria were screened for resistance to a panel of seven antibiotics, representing five antibiotic classes. All of the monitored bacteria grew substantially in the residual water between irrigation events, and the biomass of the biofilm steadily increased from week to week. The percentages of biofilm-associated isolates that were resistant to antibiotics on the panel sometimes increased between events. Multiple-drug resistance was observed for all bacterial groups, most often for fecal coliforms, and the distributions of the numbers of antibiotics that the total coliforms and fecal coliforms were resistant to were subject to change from week to week. Results from this study highlight irrigation waters as a potential source for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which can subsequently become incorporated into and proliferate within irrigation pipe-based biofilms.

  1. Comparison of the effect of salinity on the D/H ratio of fatty acids of heterotrophic and photoautotrophic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, Sandra M; Chivall, David; M'Boule, Daniela; Sinke-Schoen, Danielle; Villanueva, Laura; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T J

    2015-05-01

    The core metabolism of microorganisms has a major influence on the hydrogen isotopic composition of their fatty acids. Heterotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids with a deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) ratio either slightly depleted or enriched in D compared to the growth water, while photo- and chemoautotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids which are heavily depleted in D. However, besides metabolism other biochemical and environmental factors (i.e. biosynthetic pathways, growth phase and temperature) have been shown to affect the D/H ratio of fatty acids, and it is necessary to evaluate the magnitude of these effects compared to that of metabolism. Here, we show that the effect of salinity on the D/H ratio of fatty acids depends on the core metabolism of the microorganism. While fatty acids of the photoautotroph Isochrysis galbana become more enriched in D with increasing salinity (enrichment of 30-40‰ over a range of 25 salinity units), no effect of salinity on the D/H ratio of fatty acids of the heterotrophic Pseudomonas str. LFY10 was observed ((ε)lipid/water of the C16:0 fatty acid of ~120‰ over a range of 10 salinity units). This can likely be explained by the relative contributions of different H and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sources during fatty acid biosynthesis.

  2. Simultaneous heterotrophic and sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification process for drinking water treatment: control of sulfate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dursun, Nesrin; Kilic, Adem; Demirel, Sevgi; Uyanik, Sinan; Cinar, Ozer

    2011-12-15

    A long-term performance of a packed-bed bioreactor containing sulfur and limestone was evaluated for the denitrification of drinking water. Autotrophic denitrification rate was limited by the slow dissolution rate of sulfur and limestone. Dissolution of limestone for alkalinity supplementation increased hardness due to release of Ca(2+). Sulfate production is the main disadvantage of the sulfur autotrophic denitrification process. The effluent sulfate concentration was reduced to values below drinking water guidelines by stimulating the simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification with methanol supplementation. Complete removal of 75 mg/L NO(3)-N with effluent sulfate concentration of around 225 mg/L was achieved when methanol was supplemented at methanol/NO(3)-N ratio of 1.67 (mg/mg), which was much lower than the theoretical value of 2.47 for heterotrophic denitrification. Batch studies showed that sulfur-based autotrophic NO(2)-N reduction rate was around three times lower than the reduction rate of NO(3)-N, which led to NO(2)-N accumulation at high loadings.

  3. Heterotrophic nature of the cell-free protein-synthesizing system from the strict chemolithotroph, Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, K; Umbreit, W W

    1974-02-01

    A cell-free protein-synthesizing system prepared from the strict chemolithotroph, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, was similar to that of heterotrophs. The poly-U directed system had a temperature optimum of 37 C, but in the presence of spermidine (3 mM) the optimum shifted to 45 C. Although growth of the chemolithotroph occurs only in acid conditions, the pH optimum for the cell-free system was pH 7.2. The endogenous-directed activity in the presence or absence of spermidine was maximal at pH 7.8. Spermidine had a stimulatory effect; however, this effect was dependent on the magnesium and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) concentrations. At low Tris concentrations (10 mM), spermidine (3 to 5 mM) could completely replace magnesium. When the Tris concentration was increased (50 mM), spermidine could not replace magnesium. Supernatant and ribosomal fractions from T. thiooxidans were exchanged with those of Bacillus thuringiensis and Escherichia coli, and the ribosomal fraction from the chemolithotroph gave good to moderate stimulation when exchanged with the supernatant from the heterotrophs. On the other hand, the supernatant from T. thiooxidans gave good stimulation when mixed with ribosomes from B. thuringiensis but poor activity with ribosomes from E. coli. Both supernatant and ribosomal fractions prepared from stationary phase extracts of T. thiooxidans were inactive in the cell-free system.

  4. Heterotrophic Production of Omega-3 Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids by Trophically Converted Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary L. Hamilton

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We have created via metabolic engineering a heterotrophic strain of Phaeodactylum tricornutum that accumulates enhanced levels of the high value omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. This was achieved by generation of transgenic strains in which the Δ5-elongase from Ostreococcus tauri was co-expressed with a glucose transporter from the moss Physcomitrella patens. This double transformant has the capacity to grow in the dark in liquid medium supplemented with glucose and accumulate substantial levels of omega-3 LC-PUFAs. The effects of glucose concentrations on growth and LC-PUFA production of wild type and transformed strains cultivated in the light and dark were studied. The highest omega-3 LC-PUFAs accumulation was observed in cultures grown under mixotrophic conditions in the presence of 1% glucose (up to 32.2% of total fatty acids, TFA. Both DHA and EPA are detected at high levels in the neutral lipids of transgenic cells grown under phototrophic conditions, averaging 36.5% and 23.6% of TFA, respectively. This study demonstrates the potential for P. tricornutum to be developed as a viable commercial strain for both EPA and DHA production under mixo- and heterotrophic conditions.

  5. Biosynthesis of high yield fatty acids from Chlorella vulgaris NIES-227 under nitrogen starvation stress during heterotrophic cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Fei; Chu, Fei-Fei; Lam, Paul K S; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-09-15

    In this study the heterotrophic cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris NIES-227 fed with glucose was investigated systematically using six media types; combinations of nitrogen repletion/depletion and phosphorus repletion/limitation/depletion. It was found that a high yield of fatty acids (0.88 of fed glucose-COD) and a high content of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) (89% of dry weight) were obtained under nitrogen starved conditions. To our knowledge it is the first report on such high COD conversion yield and FAME content in microalgae. The dominant fatty acid (>50%) was methyl oleate (C18:1), a desirable component for biodiesel synthesis. FAME content under nitrogen starved conditions was significantly higher than under nitrogen sufficient conditions, while phosphorus had no significant influence, indicating that nitrogen starvation was the real "fatty acids trigger" in heterotrophic cultivation. These findings could simplify the downstream extraction process, such as the extrusion of oil from soybeans, and could reduce operating costs by improving the fatty acid yield from waste COD.

  6. Autotrophic potential in mesophilic heterotrophic bacterial isolates from Sino-Pacific marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Cao, W.; Das, A.; Saren, G.; Jiang, M.; Zhang, H.; Yu, X.

    Viral Nucleic Acid Kit (Roche) following the manufac- turer’s instructions (Zhang et al., 2010). Bacteria-specific primers 8F (AGRGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAG) and 1492R (CGG CTACCT- TGTTACGACTT) were used for 16S rRNA gene amplification. PCR reaction mixture (25 μ...Finder dye (Biov) and the correct bands were excised and purified using Zymoclean Gel DNA Recovery KitTM accord- ing to manufacturer’s protocol. The gel-purified 16S rRNA gene was ligated into pMD19-T simple vectors (Takara) according to the manufacturer’s...

  7. Short and long term biosorption of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in heterotrophic biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrling, Maria P. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lackner, Susanne [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Urban Bioengineering for Resource Recovery, Bauhaus-Institute for Infrastructure Solutions, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Coudraystraße 7, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Tatti, Oleg [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Guthausen, Gisela [Pro" 2NMR, Institute for Biological Interfaces 4 and Institute for Mechanical Process Engineering and Mechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Adenauerring 20b, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Delay, Markus [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Franzreb, Matthias [Institute of Functional Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Horn, Harald, E-mail: harald.horn@kit.edu [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); DVGW Research Laboratories for Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The increased application of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) in industrial processes and consumer products has raised concerns about their impact on health and environmental safety. When ENP enter the global water cycle by e.g. wastewater streams, wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) represent potential sinks for ENP. During biological WWT, the attachment of ENP to biofilms is responsible for the desired removal of ENP from the water phase avoiding their release into the aquatic environment. However, the fundamental mechanisms guiding the interactions between ENP and biofilms are not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study investigates the behavior and biosorption of inorganic ENP, here magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with silica (scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP), with heterotrophic biofilms at different time scales. Their magnetic properties enable to follow scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP in the biofilm system by a magnetic susceptibility balance and magnetic resonance imaging. Biofilms were exposed to scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP at short contact times (5 min) in flow cells and complementary, scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP were introduced into a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) to be observed for 27 d. Mass balances revealed that scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP sorbed to the biofilm within a few minutes, but that the total biosorption was rather low (3.2 μg Fe/mg TSS). scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP mainly sorbed to the biofilm surface inducing the detachment of outer biofilm parts starting after an exposure time of 3 h in the MBBR. The biosorption depended on the exposure concentration of scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP, but less on the contact time. Most scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP exited the flow cell (up to 65%) and the MBBR (57%) via the effluent. This effect was favored by the stabilization of scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP in the bulk liquid by organic matter leading to a low retention capacity of the MBBR system. The results contribute to improve our understanding about the fate of ENP in environmental and in

  8. Heterotrophic prokaryote distribution along a 2300 km transect in the North Pacific subtropical gyre during strong La Niña conditions: relationship between distribution and hydrological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Girault

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of heterotrophic prokaryotes was investigated during the Tokyo–Palau cruise in the western part of the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG along a north–south transect between 33.60 and 13.25° N. The cruise was conducted in three different hydrological areas identified as the Kuroshio region, the Subtropical gyre area and the Transition zone. Two eddies were crossed along the transect: one cold core cyclonic eddy and one warm core anticyclonic eddy and distributions of the heterotrophic prokaryotes were recorded. By using analytical flow cytometry and a nucleic acid staining protocol, heterotrophic prokaryotes were discriminated into three subgroups depending on their nucleic acid content (low, high and very high nucleic acid contents labeled LNA, HNA and VHNA, respectively. Statistical analyses performed on the dataset showed that LNA, mainly associated with temperature and salinity, were dominant in all the hydrological regions. In contrast, HNA distribution seemed to be associated with temperature, salinity, Chl a and silicic acid. A latitudinal increase in the HNA / LNA ratio was observed along the north–south transect and was related to higher phosphate and nitrate concentrations. In the Kuroshio Current, it is suggested that the high concentration of heterotrophic prokaryotes observed at station 4 was linked to the path of the cold cyclonic eddy core. In contrast, it is thought that low concentrations of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the warm core of the anticyclonic gyre (Sta. 9 are related to the low nutrient concentrations measured in the seawater column. Our results showed that the high variability between the various heterotrophic prokaryote cluster abundances depend both on the mesoscale structures and the oligotrophic gradient.

  9. Heterotrophic prokaryote distribution along a 2300 km transect in the North Pacific subtropical gyre during strong La Niña conditions: relationship between distribution and hydrological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, M.; Arakawa, H.; Barani, A.; Ceccaldi, H. J.; Hashihama, F.; Gregori, G.

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution of heterotrophic prokaryotes was investigated during the Tokyo-Palau cruise in the western part of the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) along a north-south transect between 33.60 and 13.25° N. The cruise was conducted in three different hydrological areas identified as the Kuroshio region, the Subtropical gyre area and the Transition zone. Two eddies were crossed along the transect: one cold core cyclonic eddy and one warm core anticyclonic eddy and distributions of the heterotrophic prokaryotes were recorded. By using analytical flow cytometry and a nucleic acid staining protocol, heterotrophic prokaryotes were discriminated into three subgroups depending on their nucleic acid content (low, high and very high nucleic acid contents labeled LNA, HNA and VHNA, respectively). Statistical analyses performed on the dataset showed that LNA, mainly associated with temperature and salinity, were dominant in all the hydrological regions. In contrast, HNA distribution seemed to be associated with temperature, salinity, Chl a and silicic acid. A latitudinal increase in the HNA / LNA ratio was observed along the north-south transect and was related to higher phosphate and nitrate concentrations. In the Kuroshio Current, it is suggested that the high concentration of heterotrophic prokaryotes observed at station 4 was linked to the path of the cold cyclonic eddy core. In contrast, it is thought that low concentrations of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the warm core of the anticyclonic gyre (Sta. 9) are related to the low nutrient concentrations measured in the seawater column. Our results showed that the high variability between the various heterotrophic prokaryote cluster abundances depend both on the mesoscale structures and the oligotrophic gradient.

  10. MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

    2013-09-12

    Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is

  11. The antimicrobial peptide hepcidin exerts an important role in the innate immunity against bacteria in the bony fish gilthead seabream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Esteban, Maria Angeles

    2008-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important mediators of the immune response against bacteria and hepcidin is a 20-25 residues member with known functions in iron regulation and the innate immune response. Most studies have focused on mammalian organisms but very little is known about other vertebrate groups including teleost fish. Thus, based on the sequence of an EST database, we have characterized hepcidin gene organization, gene expression, distribution and in vitro and in vivo regulation, as well as the biological activity of a synthetic peptide in the teleost fish gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.). First, it was found that the seabream hep gene genomic organization is formed by 3 exons and 2 introns, while the mRNA transcript is constitutively detected in most of the fish tissues but mainly in peritoneal leucocytes, head-kidney, liver and skin. Moreover, we have identified for the first time that hep is much more highly expressed in acidophilic granulocytes than in monocyte-macrophages and lymphocytes. In vitro, hep expression is up-regulated by several mitogens, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and particulated antigens. Not surprisingly, intraperitoneal injection of bacteria or virus led to a significant gene up-regulation in the liver, head-kidney, peritoneal exudate or spleen. These observations suggest a major role for seabream hepcidin in the immune response to bacteria and viruses. Furthermore, the synthetic seabream Hep exerted an important antimicrobial activity against several bacterial strains in vitro reducing their viability. To conclude, seabream hep gene expression, up-regulation after in vitro or in vivo treatment with mitogens, PAMPs or particulated antigens and the direct in vitro biological activity against bacteria demonstrate that it is an important antimicrobial peptide and probably plays an important role in the innate immune response of fish.

  12. The influence of metal speciation in combustion waste on the efficiency of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Ni and Cr bioleaching in a mixed culture of sulfur-oxidizing and biosurfactant-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowska, Ewa; Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Andrzejewska, Dorota

    2015-12-15

    Metal leachability from ash and combustion slag is related to the physico-chemical properties, including their speciation in the waste. Metals speciation is an important factor that influences the efficiency of metal bioleaching from combustion wastes in a mixed culture of acidophilic and biosurfactant-producing bacteria. It was observed that individual metals tended to occur in different fractions, which reflects their susceptibility to bioleaching. Cr and Ni were readily removed from wastes when present with a high fraction bound to carbonates. Cd and Pb where not effectively bioleached when present in high amounts in a fraction bound to organic matter. The best bioleaching results were obtained for power plant slag, which had a high metal content in the exchangeable, bound to carbonates and bound to Fe and Mg oxides fractions- the metal recovery percentage for Zn, Cu and Ni from this waste exceeded 90%.

  13. Characterization of iron- and sulphide mineral-oxidizing moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria from an Indonesian auto-heating copper mine waste heap and a deep South African gold mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Päivi H-M; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2004-10-01

    Iron- and chalcopyrite-oxidizing enrichment cultures were obtained at 50 degrees C from acidic, high-temperature, copper/gold mine environments in Indonesia and South Africa. Over 90% copper yield was obtained from chalcopyrite concentrate with the Indonesian enrichment in 3 months with 2% solids concentration, when pH was maintained at around 2. Neither addition of silver cations nor an enhanced nutrient concentration influenced chalcopyrite leaching. Excision and sequencing of bands from denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of the amplified partial 16S rRNA gene showed that the enrichment cultures from different environments in South Africa and Indonesia were very simple, and similar. Chalcopyrite concentrate supported a simpler and different community than Fe2+. The members of the enrichment cultures were closely related to Sulfobacillus yellowstonensis and Sulfobacillus acidophilus.

  14. Mycophagous soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudnick, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    Soil microorganisms evolved several strategies to compete for limited nutrients in soil. Bacteria of the genus Collimonas developed a way to exploit fungi as a source of organic nutrients. This strategy has been termed “mycophagy&r

  15. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  16. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  17. Fractionation of hydrogen isotopes by sulfate- and nitrate-reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Rose Osburn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen atoms from water and food are incorporated into biomass during cellular metabolism and biosynthesis, fractionating the isotopes of hydrogen –protium and deuterium –that are recorded in biomolecules. While these fractionations are often relatively constant in plants, large variations in the magnitude of fractionation are observed for many heterotrophic microbes utilizing different central metabolic pathways. The correlation between metabolism and lipid δ2H provides a potential basis for reconstructing environmental and ecological parameters, but the calibration dataset has thus far been limited mainly to aerobes. Here we report on the hydrogen isotopic fractionations of lipids produced by nitrate-respiring and sulfate-reducing bacteria. We observe only small differences in fractionation between oxygen- and nitrate-respiring growth conditions, with a typical pattern of variation between substrates that is broadly consistent with previously described trends. In contrast, fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria does not vary significantly between different substrates, even when autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions are compared. This result is in marked contrast to previously published observations and has significant implications for the interpretation of environmental hydrogen isotope data. We evaluate these trends in light of metabolic gene content of each strain, growth rate, and potential flux and reservoir-size effects of cellular hydrogen, but find no single variable that can account for the differences between nitrate- and sulfate-respiring bacteria. The emerging picture of bacterial hydrogen isotope fractionation is therefore more complex than the simple correspondence between δ2H and metabolic pathway previously understood from aerobes. Despite the complexity, the large signals and rich variability of observed lipid δ2H suggest much potential as an environmental recorder of metabolism.

  18. Fractionation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Sulfate- and Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Magdalena R; Dawson, Katherine S; Fogel, Marilyn L; Sessions, Alex L

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen atoms from water and food are incorporated into biomass during cellular metabolism and biosynthesis, fractionating the isotopes of hydrogen-protium and deuterium-that are recorded in biomolecules. While these fractionations are often relatively constant in plants, large variations in the magnitude of fractionation are observed for many heterotrophic microbes utilizing different central metabolic pathways. The correlation between metabolism and lipid δ(2)H provides a potential basis for reconstructing environmental and ecological parameters, but the calibration dataset has thus far been limited mainly to aerobes. Here we report on the hydrogen isotopic fractionations of lipids produced by nitrate-respiring and sulfate-reducing bacteria. We observe only small differences in fractionation between oxygen- and nitrate-respiring growth conditions, with a typical pattern of variation between substrates that is broadly consistent with previously described trends. In contrast, fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria does not vary significantly between different substrates, even when autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions are compared. This result is in marked contrast to previously published observations and has significant implications for the interpretation of environmental hydrogen isotope data. We evaluate these trends in light of metabolic gene content of each strain, growth rate, and potential flux and reservoir-size effects of cellular hydrogen, but find no single variable that can account for the differences between nitrate- and sulfate-respiring bacteria. The emerging picture of bacterial hydrogen isotope fractionation is therefore more complex than the simple correspondence between δ(2)H and metabolic pathway previously understood from aerobes. Despite the complexity, the large signals and rich variability of observed lipid δ(2)H suggest much potential as an environmental recorder of metabolism.

  19. Effects of dissolved and complexed copper on heterotrophic bacterial production in San Diego bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Thomas J; Wolgast, David M; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Holm-Hansen, Osmund; Hewes, Christopher D; Zirino, Alberto; Chadwick, D Bart

    2005-04-01

    Bacterial abundance and production, free (uncomplexed) copper ion concentration, total dissolved copper concentration, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total suspended solids (TSS), and chlorophyll a were measured over the course of 1 year in a series of 27 sample "Boxes" established within San Diego Bay. Water was collected through a trace metal-clean system so that each Box's sample was a composite of all the surface water in that Box. Bacterial production, chlorophyll a, TSS, DOC, and dissolved copper all generally increased from Box 1 at the mouth of the Bay to Box 27 in the South or back Bay. Free copper ion concentration generally decreased from Box 1 to Box 27 presumably due to increasing complexation capacity within natural waters. Based on correlations between TSS, chlorophyll a, bacterial production or DOC and the ratio of dissolved to free Cu ion, both DOC and particulate (bacteria and algae) fractions were potentially responsible for copper complexation, each at different times of the year. CuCl2 was added to bacterial production assays from 0 to 10 microg L(-1) to assess acute copper toxicity to the natural microbial assemblage. Interestingly, copper toxicity appeared to increase with decreases in free copper from the mouth of the Bay to the back Bay. This contrasts the free-ion activity model in which higher complexation capacity should afford greater copper protection. When cell-specific growth rates were calculated, faster growing bacteria (i.e. toward the back Bay) appeared to be more susceptible to free copper toxicity. The protecting effect of natural dissolved organic material (DOM) concentrated by tangential flow ultrafiltration (>1 kDa), illite and kaolinite minerals, and glutathione (a metal chelator excreted by algae under copper stress) was assessed in bacterial production assays. Only DOM concentrate offered any significant protection to bacterial production under increased copper concentrations. Although the potential copper protecting

  20. Seasonal variations in carbon biomass of bacteria, thraustochytrids and microzooplankton in the Northern Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaiah, N.; Raghukumar, S.; Mangesh, G.; Madhupratap, M.

    2005-07-01

    As a part of the JGOFS-India Programme, abundance of heterotrophic bacteria (Hbac; 0-2000 m), thraustochytrids (0-2000 m), microzooplankton (0-200 m occasionally up to 300 m) as well as bacterial growth rates (0-500 m) were studied in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during Spring (SpIM) and Fall intermonsoon (FIM), Northeast Winter (Win) and Summer (SuM) monsoon seasons. Hbac abundance was mostly in the range of 10 8-10 9 cells l -1 in the surface (0-100 m) and intermediate (150-400 m) depths. Thraustochytrids (heterotrophic protists rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids) were roughly in the range of 10 3 l -1 (nil to ˜2.7×10 5). Below 200 m, they decreased drastically to values between nil and 10 l -1. Seasonal differences in carbon biomass of Hbac, thraustochytrids and microzooplankton were more pronounced than those seen in the mesozooplankton. The highest Hbac C biomass was observed during FIM. Bacterial carbon demand (BCD, mg C m -3 d -1; at an assumed 33% conversion efficiency) varied from 0.45 to 40.6 in FIM, 23.43 to 100 in SpIM, 2.31 to 17.5 in Win and from 6.6 to 25.4 in SuM in the top 100 m. In general, with increasing depth the BCD decreased quite rapidly ranging from 0.007 to 1.65 mg C m -3 d -1 below 100 m. In the NAS, heterotrophic bacteria appear to play a significant role in sustaining microzooplankton and the so-called 'Arabian Sea mesozooplankton stable-biomass paradox' through microbial loop. Sizable quantities of Hbac, thraustochytrids and microzooplankton C might be suggestive that Hbac support these microheterotrophs, in mesopelagic zone in particular. Their role in sustaining a variety of deep-water micro- and mesozooplanktonic communities as well as in some ways, the myctophids ingesting marine snow (enriched with bacteria, thraustocytrids and dead organic matter besides zooplankters) is brought to attention.

  1. Assessment of nitrogen and sulphur cycle bacteria and shrimp production in ponds treated with biological products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thangapalam Jawahar Abraham; Shubhadeep Ghosh; Debasis Sasmal

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the influence of biological products on the levels of nitrogen and sulphur cycle bacteria in shrimp culture systems of West Bengal, India. Methods: The pond water and sediment samples were analyzed for physico-chemical parameters as per standard methods. The bacteria involved in ammonification, nitrification, denitrification, sulphate reduction and sulphur oxidation were enumerated by most probable number technique. Results:The semi-intensive and modified extensive shrimp farms used a variety of biological products during various stages of production. No biological products were used in traditional farms. The water and sediment samples of modified extensive system recorded significantly higher mean heterotrophic bacterial counts. The counts of ammonia, nitrite and sulphur oxidizers, and nitrate and sulphate reducers varied among the systems. The cycling of nitrogen and sulphur appeared to be affected with the intensification of culture practices. Conclusions:The application of biological products in certain systems helped to maintain the bacteria involved in nitrogen and sulphur cycles and safe levels of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. An assessment of these metabolically active bacteria in shrimp culture ponds and the application of right kind microbial products would help ameliorate the organic pollution in shrimp aquaculture.

  2. Is Your ATM Dispensing Bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162067.html Is Your ATM Dispensing Bacteria? Study in New York City found most of ... keypads in New York City were covered in bacteria, researchers reported, with most of the microbes coming ...

  3. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan

    2015-09-11

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6oC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μat the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 106 cells mL-1 and generally covaried with μbut, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μand K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. © FEMS 2015.

  4. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  5. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  6. Exopolysaccharides from Marine Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Zhenming; FANG Yan

    2005-01-01

    Microbial polysaccharides represent a class of important products of growing interest for many sectors of industry. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in isolating new exopolysaccharides (EPSs)-producing bacteria from marine environments, particularly from various extreme marine environments. Many new marine microbial EPSs with novel chemical compositions, properties and structures have been found to have potential applications in fields such as adhesives,textiles, pharmaceuticals and medicine for anti-cancer, food additives, oil recovery and metal removal in mining and industrial waste treatments, etc This paper gives a brief summary of the information about the EPSs produced by marine bacteria,including their chemical compositions, properties and structures, together with their potential applications in industry.

  7. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the fre...

  8. Seasonal dynamics of autotrophic and heterotrophic plankton metabolism and PCO2 in a subarctic Greenland fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejr, Mikael K.; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Dalsgaard, Tage;

    2014-01-01

    We measured net planktonic community production (NCP), community respiration (CR), and gross primary production (GPP) in September, February, and May in a subarctic Greenland fjord influenced by glacial meltwater and terrestrial runoff. Potential controls of pelagic carbon cycling, including...... the role of terrestrial carbon, were investigated by relating surface-water partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2), NCP, GPP, and CR to physicochemical conditions, chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration, phytoplankton production, inventories of particulate (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and vertical flux...... of POC. The planktonic community was net heterotrophic in the photic zone in September (NCP = −21 ± 45 mmol O2 m−2 d−1) and February (NCP = −17 mmol O2 m−2 d−1) but net autotrophic during a developing spring bloom in May (NCP = 129 ± 102 mmol O2 m−2 d−1). In September, higher temperatures, shorter day...

  9. Toxicological benchmarks for potential contaminants of concern for effects on soil and litter invertebrates and heterotrophic process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Will, M.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1995-09-01

    An important step in ecological risk assessments is screening the chemicals occur-ring on a site for contaminants of potential concern. Screening may be accomplished by comparing reported ambient concentrations to a set of toxicological benchmarks. Multiple endpoints for assessing risks posed by soil-borne contam