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Sample records for acid-labile subunit deficiency

  1. Normal growth spurt and final height despite low levels of all forms of circulating insulin-like growth factor-I in a patient with acid-labile subunit deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domené, Horacio M; Martínez, Alicia S; Frystyk, Jan;

    2007-01-01

    of circulating versus locally produced IGF-I in skeletal growth in this patient, we now describe in detail growth changes and their relationship with several components of the circulating IGF system. DESIGN AND METHODS: We followed growth and development up to the final height in a patient with complete ALS...... deficiency and determined both spontaneous and growth hormone (GH)-stimulated changes in the IGF system, including measurements of total, free and bioactive IGF-I, total IGF-II and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3. RESULTS: The patient had a delayed growth......BACKGROUND: In a recently described patient with acid-labile subunit (ALS) deficiency, the inability to form ternary complexes resulted in a marked reduction in circulating total insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, whereas skeletal growth was only marginally affected. To further study the role...

  2. The acid-labile subunit of the ternary insulin-like growth factor complex in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Juul, A; Becker, U;

    2000-01-01

    In the circulation, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is bound in a trimeric complex of 150 kDa with IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and the acid-labile subunit (ALS). Whereas circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 are reported to be low in patients with chronic liver failure, the level of ALS has...... not been described in relation to hepatic dysfunction. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure circulating and hepatic venous concentrations of ALS in relation to hepatic function and the IGF axis....

  3. The acid-labile subunit of human ternary insulin-like growth factor binding protein complex in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Møller, S; Mosfeldt-Laursen, E;

    1998-01-01

    Circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is predominantly bound in the trimeric complex comprised of IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and acid-labile subunit (ALS). Circulating concentrations of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and ALS are believed to reflect the GH secretory status, but the clinical use...... of ALS determination is not known. We therefore, determined the: 1) hepatosplanchnic release of ALS by liver vein catheterization (n=30); 2) 24-h diurnal variation of ALS (n=8); 3) normal age-related ranges of circulating ALS (n=1158); 4) diagnostic value of ALS in 108 patients with childhood-onset GH...... deficiency (GHD). We found: 1) no significant arteriovenous gradient over the liver ofALS, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3; 2) the diurnal variation of ALS was 12% (mean coefficient of variation percent); 3) ALS levels increased throughout childhood with maximal levels in puberty, with a subsequent decrease with age...

  4. The acid-labile subunit of the ternary insulin-like growth factor complex in cirrhosis: relation to liver dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Juul, A; Becker, U;

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In the circulation, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is bound in a trimeric complex of 150 kDa with IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and the acid-labile subunit (ALS). Whereas circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 are reported to be low in patients with chronic liver failure, the level...... of ALS has not been described in relation to hepatic dysfunction. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure circulating and hepatic venous concentrations of ALS in relation to hepatic function and the IGF axis. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with cirrhosis (Child class A/B/C:5/10/10) and 30...... controls with normal liver function were studied. During a haemodynamic investigation, blood samples were collected from the hepatic vein and femoral artery, and the plasma concentrations of ALS, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were determined. RESULTS: Hepatic venous and arterial concentrations of ALS were...

  5. Long-term effects of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I on serum IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3 and acid labile subunit in Laron syndrome patients with normal growth hormone binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanety, H; Silbergeld, A; Klinger, B; Karasik, A; Baxter, R C; Laron, Z

    1997-12-01

    A minority of patients with Laron syndrome have normal serum GH binding protein (GHBP), indicating that the defect is elsewhere than in the extracellular domain of the GH receptor. We have evaluated the effect of long-term IGF-I treatment on serum IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and the acid-labile subunit (ALS) in three sibling with Laron syndrome caused by a GH post-receptor defect and with normal GHBP. The children (a boy aged 3 years, a girl aged 4 years and a boy aged 10 years) were treated by daily s.c. injection of IGF-I in a dose of 150 micrograms/kg. IGFBP-3 was measured by RIA and Western ligand blotting, ALS by RIA. Based values of IGFBP-3 and ALS were low. During IGF-I treatment, the IGFBP-3 concentrations in the girl gradually increased, whereas in the boys there was a 60% decrease during the first week, followed by gradual increase towards baseline. The ALS concentrations followed a similar pattern. We conclude that IGF-I treatment induces and initial suppression and then an increase in the IGFBP-3 and ALS concentrations, confirming data from animal experiments that IGFBP-3 synthesis is not solely under GH control. The differences in responsiveness between the female and male siblings may reflect genetic differences, or lower circulating concentrations of IGF-I in the boys compared with the girl.

  6. Iron deficiency causes a shift in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK subunit composition in rat skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merrill John F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a cellular energy sensor, the 5’AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is activated in response to energy stresses such as hypoxia and muscle contraction. To determine effects of iron deficiency on AMPK activation and signaling, as well as the AMPK subunit composition in skeletal muscle, rats were fed a control (C=50-58 mg/kg Fe or iron deficient (ID=2-6 mg/kg Fe diet for 6–8 wks. Results Their respective hematocrits were 47.5% ± 1.0 and 16.5% ± 0.6. Iron deficiency resulted in 28.3% greater muscle fatigue (p Conclusions This study indicates that chronic iron deficiency causes a shift in the expression of AMPKα, β, and γ subunit composition. Iron deficiency also causes chronic activation of AMPK as well as an increase in AMPKα1 activity in exercised skeletal muscle.

  7. Yeast Dun1 Kinase Regulates Ribonucleotide Reductase Small Subunit Localization in Response to Iron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanvisens, Nerea; Romero, Antonia M; Zhang, Caiguo; Wu, Xiaorong; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Puig, Sergi

    2016-04-29

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is an essential iron-dependent enzyme that catalyzes deoxyribonucleotide synthesis in eukaryotes. Living organisms have developed multiple strategies to tightly modulate RNR function to avoid inadequate or unbalanced deoxyribonucleotide pools that cause DNA damage and genome instability. Yeast cells activate RNR in response to genotoxic stress and iron deficiency by facilitating redistribution of its small heterodimeric subunit Rnr2-Rnr4 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it forms an active holoenzyme with large Rnr1 subunit. Dif1 protein inhibits RNR by promoting nuclear import of Rnr2-Rnr4. Upon DNA damage, Dif1 phosphorylation by the Dun1 checkpoint kinase and its subsequent degradation enhances RNR function. In this report, we demonstrate that Dun1 kinase triggers Rnr2-Rnr4 redistribution to the cytoplasm in response to iron deficiency. We show that Rnr2-Rnr4 relocalization by low iron requires Dun1 kinase activity and phosphorylation site Thr-380 in the Dun1 activation loop, but not the Dun1 forkhead-associated domain. By using different Dif1 mutant proteins, we uncover that Dun1 phosphorylates Dif1 Ser-104 and Thr-105 residues upon iron scarcity. We observe that the Dif1 phosphorylation pattern differs depending on the stimuli, which suggests different Dun1 activating pathways. Importantly, the Dif1-S104A/T105A mutant exhibits defects in nucleus-to-cytoplasm redistribution of Rnr2-Rnr4 by iron limitation. Taken together, these results reveal that, in response to iron starvation, Dun1 kinase phosphorylates Dif1 to stimulate Rnr2-Rnr4 relocalization to the cytoplasm and promote RNR function.

  8. Acid-Labile Amphiphilic PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO Copolymers: Degradable Poloxamer Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, Matthias; Kang, Biao; Dingels, Carsten; Wurm, Frederik R; Frey, Holger

    2016-05-01

    Poly ((ethylene oxide)-b-(propylene oxide)-b-(ethylene oxide)) triblock copolymers commonly known as poloxamers or Pluronics constitute an important class of nonionic, biocompatible surfactants. Here, a method is reported to incorporate two acid-labile acetal moieties in the backbone of poloxamers to generate acid-cleavable nonionic surfactants. Poly(propylene oxide) is functionalized by means of an acetate-protected vinyl ether to introduce acetal units. Three cleavable PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers (Mn,total = 6600, 8000, 9150 g·mol(-1) ; Mn,PEO = 2200, 3600, 4750 g·mol(-1) ) have been synthesized using anionic ring-opening polymerization. The amphiphilic copolymers exhibit narrow molecular weight distributions (Ð = 1.06-1.08). Surface tension measurements reveal surface-active behavior in aqueous solution comparable to established noncleavable poloxamers. Complete hydrolysis of the labile junctions after acidic treatment is verified by size exclusion chromatography. The block copolymers have been employed as surfactants in a miniemulsion polymerization to generate polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles with mean diameters of ≈200 nm and narrow size distribution, as determined by dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy. Acid-triggered precipitation facilitates removal of surfactant fragments from the nanoparticles, which simplifies purification and enables nanoparticle precipitation "on demand."

  9. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M W; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-02-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the patient's mitochondria. However, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of complex I polypeptides demonstrated that the majority of the 25 polypeptides comprising complex I were present in the affected mitochondria. A more detailed analysis using subunit selective antisera against the main polypeptides of the iron-protein fragments of complex I revealed a selective absence of the 75- and 13-kD polypeptides. These findings suggest that the underlying basis for this patient's disease was a congenital deficiency of at least two polypeptides comprising the iron-protein fragment of complex I, which resulted in the inability to correctly assemble a functional enzyme complex.

  10. The acid-labile subunit of human ternary insulin-like growth factor binding protein complex in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Møller, S; Mosfeldt-Laursen, E;

    1998-01-01

    of ALS determination is not known. We therefore, determined the: 1) hepatosplanchnic release of ALS by liver vein catheterization (n=30); 2) 24-h diurnal variation of ALS (n=8); 3) normal age-related ranges of circulating ALS (n=1158); 4) diagnostic value of ALS in 108 patients with childhood-onset GH...

  11. Uniparental disomy of chromosome 2 resulting in lethal trifunctional protein deficiency due to homozygous alpha-subunit mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Eeds, Angela; Yue, Zou; Haines, Jonathan; Strauss, Arnold W; Summar, Marshall

    2002-12-01

    The mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP) is an enzyme complex of the fatty acid beta-oxidation cycle composed of an alpha- and a beta-subunit. The two encoding genes are located in the same region on chromosome 2 (2p23). TFP deficiency due to either alpha- or beta-subunit mutations is characterized by mutational and phenotypic heterogeneity with severe, early-onset, cardiac forms and milder, later-onset, myopathic phenotypes. In two unrelated patients with lethal TFP deficiency, we delineated apparently homozygous alpha-subunit mutations that were present in heterozygous form in both mothers, but not in either biological father. We performed a microsatellite repeat analysis of both patients and their parents using seven chromosome 2-specific polymorphic DNA markers and four nonchromosome 2 markers. In both patients, two chromosome 2-specific markers demonstrated maternal isodisomy of chromosome 2. The other five chromosome 2-specific markers were noninformative in each patient. Inheritance of alleles from chromosomes 4, 5, and 7 was consistent with paternity. These results explain the apparently anomalous pattern of transmission. Six of our 12 known TFP-deficient patients with alpha-subunit mutations have disease due to homozygous changes and two of them via the mechanism of uniparental disomy (UPD) (16.7%). For very rare autosomal recessive diseases, UPD may represent a common mechanism. This study emphasizes the need to confirm mutations in parents whenever possible. TFP deficiency is another disorder that has become manifest due to isodisomy of chromosome 2. This information will impact genetic counseling for these families, reducing greatly the 25% risk normally used for recessive disorders.

  12. AChR deficiency due to epsilon-subunit mutations : two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Catharina G.; Molenaar, Peter C.; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Bonifati, Domenic M.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine patients (s

  13. The β-conglycinin deficiency in wild soybean is associated with the tail-to-tail inverted repeat of the α-subunit genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokura, Yasutaka; Hajika, Makita; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Xia, Zhengjun; Watanabe, Satoshi; Kaga, Akito; Katayose, Yuichi; Ishimoto, Masao; Harada, Kyuya

    2012-02-01

    β-conglycinin, a major seed protein in soybean, is composed of α, α', and β subunits sharing a high homology among them. Despite its many health benefits, β-conglycinin has a lower amino acid score and lower functional gelling properties compared to glycinin, another major soybean seed protein. In addition, the α, α', and β subunits also contain major allergens. A wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb et Zucc.) line, 'QT2', lacks all of the β-conglycinin subunits, and the deficiency is controlled by a single dominant gene, Scg-1 (Suppressor of β-conglycinin). This gene was characterized using a soybean cultivar 'Fukuyutaka', 'QY7-25', (its near-isogenic line carrying the Scg-1 gene), and the F₂ population derived from them. The physical map of the Scg-1 region covered by lambda phage genomic clones revealed that the two α-subunit genes, a β-subunit gene, and a pseudo α-subunit gene were closely organized. The two α-subunit genes were arranged in a tail-to-tail orientation, and the genes were separated by 197 bp in Scg-1 compared to 3.3 kb in the normal allele (scg-1). In addition, small RNA was detected in immature seeds of the mutants by northern blot analysis using an RNA probe of the α subunit. These results strongly suggest that β-conglycinin deficiency in QT2 is controlled by post-transcriptional gene silencing through the inverted repeat of the α subunits.

  14. Molecular glass positive i-line photoresist materials containing 2,1,4-DNQ and acid labile group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyuan; Yu, Jinxing; Xu, Na

    2010-04-01

    Recent years increasing attention has been given to molecular glass resist materials. In this paper, maleopimaric acid, cycloaddition reaction product of rosin with maleic anhydride, was reacted with hydroxylamine and then further esterified with 2-diazo-1-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonyl chloride to give N-hydroxy maleopimarimide sulfonate. The carboxylic acid group of the compound was then protected by the reaction of this compound with vinyl ethyl ether or dihydropyran. Thus obtained compounds were amorphous. When irradiated with i-line light, the 2,1,4-DNQ group undergo photolysis not only to give off nitrogen gas but also generate sulfonic acid which can result in the decomposition of the acid labile group. So, a novel chemically amplified positive i-line molecular glass photoresists can be formed by the compound and other acidolytic molecular glass compounds. The lithographic performance of the resist materials is evaluated.

  15. An acid-labile block copolymer of PDMAEMA and PEG as potential carrier for intelligent gene delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Song; Du, Fusheng; Wang, Yang; Ji, Shouping; Liang, Dehai; Yu, Lei; Li, Zichen

    2008-01-01

    Intelligent gene delivery systems based on physiologically triggered reversible shielding technology have evinced enormous interest due to their potential in vivo applications. In the present work, an acid-labile block copolymer consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) segments connected through a cyclic ortho ester linkage (PEG- a-PDMAEMA) was synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization of DMAEMA using a PEG macroinitiator with an acid-cleavable end group. PEG- a-PDMAEMA condensed with plasmid DNA formed polyplex nanoparticles with an acid-triggered reversible PEG shield. The pH-dependent shielding/deshielding effect of PEG chains on the polyplex particles were evaluated by zeta potential and size measurements. At pH 7.4, polyplexes generated from PEG- a-PDMAEMA exhibited smaller particle size, lower surface charge, reduced interaction with erythrocytes, and less cytotoxicity compared to PDMAEMA-derived polyplexes. At pH 5.0, zeta potential of polyplexes formed from PEG- a-PDMAEMA increased, leveled up after 2 h of incubation and gradual aggregation occurred in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). In contrast, the stably shielded polyplexes formed by DNA and an acid-stable block copolymer, PEG- b-PDMAEMA, did not change in size and zeta potential in 6 h. In vitro transfection efficiency of the acid-labile copolymer greatly increased after 6 h incubation at pH 5.0, approaching the same level of PDMAEMA, whereas there was only slight increase in efficiency for the stable copolymer, PEG- b-PDMAEMA.

  16. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M. W.; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-01-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the pati...

  17. Low Molecular Weight PEI-Based Vectors via Acid-Labile Ortho Ester Linkage for Improved Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Yu, Min; Wang, Jun; Tang, Rupei; Yan, Guoqing; Yao, Weijing; Wang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    A series of novel pH-sensitive gene delivery vectors (POEI 1, 2, and 3) are synthesized through Michael addition from low molecular weight PEI (LMW PEI) via acid-labile ortho ester linkage with terminal acrylates (OEAc) by various feed molar ratios. The obtained POEI 1 and POEI 2 can efficiently condense plasmid DNA into nanoparticles with size range of 200-300 nm and zeta-potentials of about +15 mV while protecting DNA from enzymatic digestion compared with POEI 3. Significantly, ortho ester groups of POEI main-chains can make an instantaneous degradation-response to acidic endosomal pH (≈5.0), resulting in accelerated disruption of polyplexes and intracellular DNA release. MTT assay reveals that all POEIs exhibit much lower cytotoxicity in different cells than branched PEI (25 KDa). As expected, POEI 1 and POEI 2 perform improved gene transfection in vitro, suggesting that such polycations might be promising gene vectors based on overcoming toxicity-efficiency contradiction.

  18. A simple and inexpensive enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Darren S; Parsons, Anne Michelle; Bresland, John; Herde, Paul; Pham, Duc Minh; Tan, Angel; Hsu, Hung-yao; Prestidge, Clive A; Kuchel, Tim; Begg, Rezaul; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Butler, Ross N

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the ecology of the gastrointestinal tract and the impact of the contents on the host mucosa is emerging as an important area for defining both wellness and susceptibility to disease. Targeted delivery of drugs to treat specific small intestinal disorders such as small bowel bacterial overgrowth and targeting molecules to interrogate or to deliver vaccines to the remote regions of the small intestine has proven difficult. There is an unmet need for methodologies to release probes/drugs to remote regions of the gastrointestinal tract in furthering our understanding of gut health and pathogenesis. In order to address this concern, we need to know how the regional delivery of a surrogate labeled test compound is handled and in turn, if delivered locally as a liquid or powder, the dynamics of its subsequent handling and metabolism. In the studies we report on in this paper, we chose (13)C sodium acetate ((13)C-acetate), which is a stable isotope probe that once absorbed in the small intestine can be readily measured non-invasively by collection and analysis of (13)CO2 in the breath. This would provide information of gastric emptying rates and an indication of the site of release and absorptive capacity. In a series of in vitro and in vivo pig experiments, we assessed the enteric-protective properties of a commercially available polymer EUDRAGIT(®) L100-55 on gelatin capsules and also on DRcaps(®). Test results demonstrated that DRcaps(®) coated with EUDRAGIT(®) L100-55 possessed enhanced enteric-protective properties, particularly in vivo. These studies add to the body of knowledge regarding gastric emptying in pigs and also begin the process of gathering specifications for the design of a simple and cost-effective enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine.

  19. Development of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianjing; Maniglio, Devid; Chen, Jie; Chen, Bin; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Oral administration is the most convenient way of all the drug delivery routes. Orally administered bioactive compounds must resist the harsh acidic fluids or enzyme digestion in stomach, to reach their absorbed destination in small intestine. This is the case for silibinin, a drug used to protect liver cells against toxins that has also been demonstrated in vitro to possess anti-cancer effects. However, as many other drugs, silibinin can degrade in the stomach due to the action of the gastric fluid. The use of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (pH-SNEDDS) could overcome the drawback due to degradation of the drug in the stomach while enhancing its solubility and dissolution rate. In this paper we have investigated pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying formulations containing silibinin as model drug. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams have been constructed in order to identify the self-emulsification regions under different pH. Solubility of silibinin in selected formulations has been assessed and stability of the pure drug and of the silibinin loaded pH-SNEDDS formulations in simulated gastric fluid had been compared. Droplet size of the optimized pH-SNEDDS has been correlated to pH, volume of dilution medium and silibinin loading amount. TEM (transmission electron microscopy) studies have shown that emulsion droplets had spherical shape and narrow size distribution. In vitro drug release studies of the optimal pH-SNEDDS indicated substantial increase of the drug release and release rate in comparison to pure silibinin and to the commercial silibinin tablet. The results indicated that pH-SNEDDS have potential to improve the biopharmaceutics properties of acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

  20. pH-responsive biodegradable micelles based on acid-labile polycarbonate hydrophobe: synthesis and triggered drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Meng, Fenghua; Li, Feng; Ji, Shun-Jun; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2009-07-13

    pH-responsive biodegradable micelles were prepared from block copolymers comprising of a novel acid-labile polycarbonate hydrophobe and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Two new cyclic aliphatic carbonate monomers, mono-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzylidene-pentaerythritol carbonate (TMBPEC, 2a) and mono-4-methoxybenzylidene-pentaerythritol carbonate (MBPEC, 2b) were designed and successfully synthesized via a two-step procedure. The ring-opening polymerization of 2a or 2b in the presence of methoxy PEG in dichloromethane at 50 °C using zinc bis[bis(trimethylsilyl)amide] as a catalyst yielded the corresponding block copolymers PEG-PTMBPEC (3a) or PEG-PMBPEC (3b) with low polydispersities (PDI 1.03-1.04). The copolymerization of D,L-lactide (DLLA) and 2a under otherwise the same conditions could also proceed smoothly to afford PEG-P(TMBPEC-co-DLLA) (3c) block copolymer. These block copolymers readily formed micelles in water with sizes of about 120 nm as determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The hydrolysis of the acetals of the polycarbonate was investigated using UV/vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the acetals of micelles 3a, while stable at pH 7.4 are prone to rapid hydrolysis at mildly acidic pH of 4.0 and 5.0, with a half-life of 1 and 6.5 h, respectively. The acetal hydrolysis resulted in significant swelling of micelles, as a result of change of hydrophobic polycarbonate to hydrophilic polycarbonate. In comparison, the acetals of PMBPEC of micelles 3b displayed obviously slower hydrolysis at the same pH. Both paclitaxel and doxorubicin could be efficiently encapsulated into micelles 3a achieving high drug loading content (13.0 and 11.7 wt %, respectively). The in vitro release studies showed clearly a pH dependent release behavior, that is, significantly faster drug release at mildly acidic pH of 4.0 and 5.0 compared to physiological pH. These pH-responsive biodegradable micelles are promising as smart nanovehicles for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  1. Wfs1-deficient animals have brain-region-specific changes of Na+, K+-ATPase activity and mRNA expression of α1 and β1 subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütt, S; Altpere, A; Reimets, R; Visnapuu, T; Loomets, M; Raud, S; Salum, T; Mahlapuu, R; Kairane, C; Zilmer, M; Vasar, E

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in the WFS1 gene, which encodes the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glycoprotein, cause Wolfram syndrome, a disease characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and different psychiatric abnormalities. Loss of neuronal cells and pancreatic β-cells in Wolfram syndrome patients is probably related to the dysfunction of ER stress regulation, which leads to cell apoptosis. The present study shows that Wfs1-deficient mice have brain-region-specific changes in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and in the expression of the α1 and β1 subunits. We found a significant (1.6-fold) increase of Na-pump activity and β1 subunit mRNA expression in mice lacking the Wfs1 gene in the temporal lobe compared with their wild-type littermates. By contrast, exposure of mice to the elevated plus maze (EPM) model of anxiety decreased Na-pump activity 1.3-fold in the midbrain and dorsal striatum and 2.0-fold in the ventral striatum of homozygous animals compared with the nonexposed group. Na-pump α1 -subunit mRNA was significantly decreased in the dorsal striatum and midbrain of Wfs1-deficient homozygous animals compared with wild-type littermates. In the temporal lobe, an increase in the activity of the Na-pump is probably related to increased anxiety established in Wfs1-deficient mice, whereas the blunted dopamine function in the forebrain of Wfs1-deficient mice may be associated with a decrease of Na-pump activity in the dorsal and ventral striatum and in the midbrain after exposure to the EPM.

  2. Detection of a variable intracellular acid-labile carbon pool in Thalassiosira weissflogii (Heterokontophyta) and Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) in response to changes in the seawater carbon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isensee, Kirsten; Erez, Jonathan; Stoll, Heather M

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of an intracellular pool of carbon (C(i) pool) is one strategy by which marine algae overcome the low abundance of dissolved CO2 (CO2 (aq) ) in modern seawater. To identify the environmental conditions under which algae accumulate an acid-labile C(i) pool, we applied a (14) C pulse-chase method, used originally in dinoflagellates, to two new classes of algae, coccolithophorids and diatoms. This method measures the carbon accumulation inside the cells without altering the medium carbon chemistry or culture cell density. We found that the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii [(Grunow) G. Fryxell & Hasle] and a calcifying strain of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi [(Lohmann) W. W. Hay & H. P. Mohler] develop significant acid-labile C(i) pools. C(i) pools are measureable in cells cultured in media with 2-30 µmol l(-1) CO2 (aq), corresponding to a medium pH of 8.6-7.9. The absolute C(i) pool was greater for the larger celled diatoms. For both algal classes, the C(i) pool became a negligible contributor to photosynthesis once CO2 (aq) exceeded 30 µmol l(-1) . Combining the (14) C pulse-chase method and (14) C disequilibrium method enabled us to assess whether E. huxleyi and T. weissflogii exhibited thresholds for foregoing accumulation of DIC or reduced the reliance on bicarbonate uptake with increasing CO2 (aq) . We showed that the C(i) pool decreases with higher CO2 :HCO3 (-) uptake rates.

  3. Total and free insulin-like growth factor I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 and acid-labile subunit reflect clinical activity in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Lange, Merete Wolder; Pedersen, L M;

    2001-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate, markers of disease activity in acromegaly in relation to perceived disease activity. Thirty-seven consecutively treated, acromegalic patients, classified by clinical symptoms as inactive (n=16), slightly active (n=10) and active (n=11), entered the study. When evaluating......-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) with PV(pos) of 0.69 and 0.71 and PV(neg) of 0.91 and 0.92 respectively. We conclude that free IGF-I is more closely related than total IGF-I to perceived disease activity and is as such useful when evaluating previously treated acromegaly for disease activity...

  4. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  5. Mass spectrometry method to identify aging pathways of Sp- and Rp-tabun adducts on human butyrylcholinesterase based on the acid labile P-N bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Cashman, John R; Nachon, Florian; Masson, Patrick; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-04-01

    The phosphoramidate nerve agent tabun inhibits butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and acetylcholinesterase by making a covalent bond on the active site serine. The adduct loses an alkyl group in a process called aging. The mechanism of aging of the tabun adduct is controversial. Some studies claim that aging proceeds through deamination, whereas crystal structure studies show aging by O-dealkylation. Our goal was to develop a method that clearly distinguishes between deamination and O-dealkylation. We began by studying the tetraisopropyl pyrophosphoramide adduct of BChE because this adduct has two P-N bonds. Mass spectra showed that the P-N bonds were stable during trypsin digestion at pH 8 but were cleaved during pepsin digestion at pH 2. The P-N bond in tabun was also acid labile, whereas the P-O bond was stable. A scheme to distinguish aging by deamination from aging by O-dealkylation was based on the acid labile P-N bond. BChE was inhibited with Sp- and Rp-tabun thiocholine nerve agent model compounds to make adducts identical to those of tabun with known stereochemistry. After aging and digestion with pepsin at pH 2, peptide FGES198AGAAS from Sp-tabun thiocholine had a mass of 902.2 m/z in negative mode, indicating that it had aged by deamination, whereas peptide FGES198AGAAS from Rp-tabun thiocholine had a mass of 874.2 m/z in negative mode, indicating that it had aged by O-dealkylation. BChE inhibited by authentic, racemic tabun yielded both 902.2 and 874.2 m/z peptides, indicating that both stereoisomers reacted with BChE and aged either by deamination or dealkylation.

  6. Fatal infantile cardiac glycogenosis with phosphorylase kinase deficiency and a mutation in the gamma2-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Hasan O; Sampayo, James N; Ross, Fiona A; Scott, John W; Wilson, Gregory; Benson, Lee; Bruno, Claudio; Shanske, Sara; Hardie, D Grahame; Dimauro, Salvatore

    2007-10-01

    A 10-wk-old infant girl with severe hypertrophy of the septal and atrial walls by cardiac ultrasound, developed progressive ventricular wall thickening and died of aspiration pneumonia at 5 mo of age. Postmortem examination revealed ventricular hypertrophy and massive atrial wall thickening due to glycogen accumulation. A skeletal muscle biopsy showed increased free glycogen and decreased activity of phosphorylase b kinase (PHK). The report of a pathogenic mutation (R531Q) in the gene (PRKAG2) encoding the gamma2 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in three infants with congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, glycogen storage, and "pseudo PHK deficiency" prompted us to screen this gene in our patient. We found a novel (R384T) heterozygous mutation in PRKAG2, affecting an arginine residue in the N-terminal AMP-binding domain. Like R531Q, this mutation reduces the binding of AMP and ATP to the isolated nucleotide-binding domains, and prevents activation of the heterotrimer by metabolic stress in intact cells. The mutation was not found in DNA from the patient's father, the only available parent, and is likely to have arisen de novo. Our studies confirm that mutations in PRKAG2 can cause fatal infantile cardiomyopathy, often associated with apparent PHK deficiency.

  7. Dopamine receptor D5 deficiency results in a selective reduction of hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit NR2B expression and impaired memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; González, Hugo; Ugalde, Valentina; Donoso-Ramos, Juan Pablo; Quintana-Donoso, Daisy; Lara, Marcelo; Morales, Bernardo; Rojas, Patricio; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacological evidence associates type I dopamine receptors, including subtypes D1 and D5, with learning and memory. Analyses using genetic approaches have determined the relative contribution of dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) in cognitive tasks. However, the lack of drugs that can discriminate between D1R and D5R has made the pharmacological distinction between the two receptors difficult. Here, we aimed to determine the role of D5R in learning and memory. In this study we tested D5R knockout mice and wild-type littermates in a battery of behavioral tests, including memory, attention, locomotion, anxiety and motivational evaluations. Our results show that genetic deficiency of D5R significantly impairs performance in the Morris water maze paradigm, object location and object recognition memory, indicating a relevant role for D5R in spatial memory and recognition memory. Moreover, the lack of D5R resulted in decreased exploration and locomotion. In contrast, D5R deficiency had no impact on working memory, anxiety and depressive-like behavior, measured using the spontaneous alternation, open-field, tail suspension test, and forced swimming test. Electrophysiological analyses performed on hippocampal slices showed impairment in long-term-potentiation in mice lacking D5R. Further analyses at the molecular level showed that genetic deficiency of D5R results in a strong and selective reduction in the expression of the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate the relevant contribution of D5R in memory and suggest a functional interaction of D5R with hippocampal glutamatergic pathways.

  8. Chronic treatment with mood-stabilizers attenuates abnormal hyperlocomotion of GluA1-subunit deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Maksimovic

    Full Text Available Abnormal excitatory glutamate neurotransmission and plasticity have been implicated in schizophrenia and affective disorders. Gria1-/- mice lacking GluA1 subunit (encoded by Gria1 gene of AMPA-type glutamate receptor show robust novelty-induced hyperactivity, social deficits and heightened approach features, suggesting that they could be used to test for anti-manic activity of drugs. Here, we tested the efficacy of chronic treatment with established anti-manic drugs on behavioural properties of the Gria1-/- mice. The mice received standard mood stabilizers (lithium and valproate and novel ones (topiramate and lamotrigine, used more as anticonvulsants as supplements in rodent chow for at least 4 weeks. All drugs attenuated novelty-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the Gria1-/- mice, especially by promoting the habituation, while none of them attenuated 2-mg/kg amphetamine-induced hyperactivity as compared to control diet. Treatment with lithium and valproate reversed the elevated exploratory activity of Gria1-/- mice. Valproate treatment also reduced struggling behaviour in tail suspension test and restored reciprocally-initiated social contacts of Gria1-/- mice to the level shown by the wild-type Gria1+/+ mice. Gria1-/- mice consumed slightly more sucrose during intermittent sucrose exposure than the wild-types, but ran similar distances on running wheels. These behaviours were not consistently affected by lithium and valproate in the Gria1-/- mice. The efficacy of various anti-manic drug treatments on novelty-induced hyperactivity suggests that the Gria1-/- mouse line can be utilized in screening for new therapeutics.

  9. Reversal of novelty-induced hippocampal c-Fos expression in GluA1 subunit-deficient mice by chronic treatment targeting glutamatergic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic, Milica; Aitta-aho, Teemu; Korpi, Esa R

    2014-12-15

    Malfunction of glutamate transmission is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders. Gria1-/- mouse line with knocked-out GluA1 subunits of ionotropic AMPA glutamate receptor displays several behavioural features of schizoaffective disorder. Typically, these mice show hyperactivity provoked by environmental novelty, which is attenuated after 4-week treatment with the standard mood-stabilisers lithium and valproate and the mood-stabilising anticonvulsants topiramate and lamotrigine (Maksimovic, M., Vekovischeva, O.Y., Aitta-Aho, T., Korpi, E.R., 2014. Chronic treatment with mood-stabilizers attenuates abnormal hyperlocomotion of GluA1-subunit deficient mice. PloS One. 9, e100188). Here, we complement our study by treating these mice chronically with perampanel, a novel non-competitive antagonist of AMPA receptors, for 4 weeks at the dose of 60 mg/kg diet, and found reduced locomotor hyperactivity in the Gria1-/- animals, while not affecting the wild-type littermates. To study the cellular mechanism by which chronic treatments with glutamate-modulating mood-stabilizing drugs alleviate this hyperactivity, we used the immediate early gene c-Fos protein expression as a marker of neuronal activity in the brain. Chronic lithium, valproate and topiramate blunted the c-Fos expression especially in the dorsal hippocampus of the Gria1-/- mice, with all of them reducing the number of c-Fos-positive cells in the CA3 region and valproate and topiramate also in the dentate gyrus (DG). Lamotrigine and perampanel treatments had the same effect in the all CA1, CA3 and DG subfields of the dorsal hippocampus of Gria1-/- mice. The results suggest that abnormal (hippocampal) glutamatergic transmission underlies the hyperactive phenotype of the Gria1-/- mice in a novel environment, and based on the efficacies of the present chronic drug treatments, this mouse model may serve as a predictive tool for studying novel mood-stabilisers.

  10. Application of nanoparticles for oral delivery of acid-labile lansoprazole in the treatment of gastric ulcer: in vitro and in vivo evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop nanoparticles for oral delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ), for gastric ulcer therapy. LPZ-loaded positively charged Eudragit(®) RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNPs-LPZ) and negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGANPs-LPZ) were prepared. The effect of charge on nanoparticle deposition in ulcerated and non-ulcerated regions of the stomach was investigated. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles in the intestine was evaluated in a Caco-2 cell model. The pharmacokinetic performance and ulcer healing response of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles following oral administration were evaluated in Wistar rats with induced ulcers. The prepared drug-loaded ERSNPs-LPZ and PLGANPs-LPZ possessed opposite surface charge (+38.5±0.3 mV versus -27.3±0.3 mV, respectively) and the particle size was around 200 nm with a narrow size distribution. The negatively charged PLGANPs adhered more readily to the ulcerated region (7.22%±1.21% per cm(2)), whereas the positively charged ERSNPs preferentially distributed in the non-ulcerated region (8.29%±0.35% per cm(2)). Both ERSNPs and PLGANPs were prominent uptake in Caco-2 cells, too. The nanoparticles sustained and prolonged LPZ concentrations up to 24 hours, and the half-life and mean residence time of LPZ were prolonged by 3.5-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, as compared with LPZ solution. Oral administration of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles healed 92.6%-95.7% of gastric ulcers in Wistar rats within 7 days.

  11. Application of nanoparticles for oral delivery of acid-labile lansoprazole in the treatment of gastric ulcer: in vitro and in vivo evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alai M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Milind Alai,1 Wen Jen Lin1,2 1Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, 2Drug Research Center, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: The aim of this study was to develop nanoparticles for oral delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ, for gastric ulcer therapy. LPZ-loaded positively charged Eudragit® RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNPs-LPZ and negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (PLGANPs-LPZ were prepared. The effect of charge on nanoparticle deposition in ulcerated and non-ulcerated regions of the stomach was investigated. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles in the intestine was evaluated in a Caco-2 cell model. The pharmacokinetic performance and ulcer healing response of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles following oral administration were evaluated in Wistar rats with induced ulcers. The prepared drug-loaded ERSNPs-LPZ and PLGANPs-LPZ possessed opposite surface charge (+38.5±0.3 mV versus -27.3±0.3 mV, respectively and the particle size was around 200 nm with a narrow size distribution. The negatively charged PLGANPs adhered more readily to the ulcerated region (7.22%±1.21% per cm2, whereas the positively charged ERSNPs preferentially distributed in the non-ulcerated region (8.29%±0.35% per cm2. Both ERSNPs and PLGANPs were prominent uptake in Caco-2 cells, too. The nanoparticles sustained and prolonged LPZ concentrations up to 24 hours, and the half-life and mean residence time of LPZ were prolonged by 3.5-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, as compared with LPZ solution. Oral administration of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles healed 92.6%–95.7% of gastric ulcers in Wistar rats within 7 days. Keywords: nanoparticles, lansoprazole, Eudragit® RS100, PLGA

  12. Stimulation of the 150-kilodalton insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 ternary complex by continuous and pulsatile patterns of growth hormone (GH) administration in GH-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde

    2000-01-01

    Abstract In the circulation insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and the acid-labile subunit (ALS) form a 150-kDa ternary complex that is of importance for the regulation of IGF-I bioactivity. GH administration is known to increase each of the single components...... of the ternary complex, and in GH-deficient rats formation of the 150-kDa complex is induced more by continuous than by pulsatile GH patterns. The aim of the present studies was to study the effects of the GH administration pattern on the formation of the 150-kDa ternary complex in humans. A fixed total GH dose...... (2 IU/m2-24 h) was administered iv randomly as 1) continuous infusion or 2) eight bolus injections to five GH-deficient patients over a period of 24 h. GH administration significantly increased serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels and the IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio. IGF-I levels increased most pronouncedly after...

  13. Posttranscriptional down-regulation of small ribosomal subunit proteins correlates with reduction of 18S rRNA in RPS19 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhai, Jitendra; Fröjmark, Anne-Sophie; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Davey, Edward; Schuster, Jens; Dahl, Niklas

    2009-06-18

    Ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) is mutated in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA). We hypothesized that decreased levels of RPS19 lead to a coordinated down-regulation of other ribosomal (r-)proteins at the subunit level. We show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knock-down of RPS19 results in a relative decrease of small subunit (SSU) r-proteins (S20, S21 and S24) when compared to large subunit (LSU) r-proteins (L3, L9, L30 and L38). This correlates with a relative decrease in 18S rRNA with respect to 28S rRNA. The r-protein mRNA levels remain relatively unchanged indicating a post transcriptional regulation of r-proteins at the level of subunit formation.

  14. Effects of short-term caloric restriction on circulating free IGF-I, acid-labile subunit, IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs)-1-4, and IGFBPs-1-3 protease activity in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby; Juul, Anders; Kjems, Lise Lund

    2006-01-01

    Decreased levels of GH and total IGF-I have been reported in obesity. It has been hypothesized that increased free (biologically active) IGF-I levels generated from IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) protease activity could be the mechanism for the low GH release in dieting obese subjects. However, no p...... a short-term very low-calorie diet (VLCD)....

  15. Prenatal copper deficiency in rat dams causes persistent reduction in nuclear-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunits in cardiac mitochrondria of the first generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that the offspring of rat dams having low copper (Cu) intake during pregnancy and lactation experience a deficiency in cardiac cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) after postnatal day 10. The present study was undertaken to determine the relative influences of pre-and postnatal Cu ...

  16. Genetic contribution to iron status: SNPs related to iron deficiency anaemia and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 calcium channel subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Richer, Carlos; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Toxqui, Laura; Remacha, Angel; Vaquero, M Pilar; López-Parra, Ana M

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies associate genetic markers with iron- and erythrocyte-related parameters, but few relate them to iron-clinical phenotypes. Novel SNP rs1375515, located in a subunit of the calcium channel gene CACNA2D3, is associated with a higher risk of anaemia. The aim of this study is to further investigate the association of this SNP with iron-related parameters and iron-clinical phenotypes, and to explore the potential role of calcium channel subunit region in iron regulation. Furthermore, we aim to replicate the association of other SNPs reported previously in our population. We tested 45 SNPs selected via systematic review and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 region, with haematological and biochemical traits in 358 women of reproductive age. Multivariate analyses include back-step logistic regression and decision trees. The results replicate the association of SNPs with iron-related traits, and also confirm the protective effect of both A allele of rs1800562 (HFE) and G allele of rs4895441 (HBS1L-MYB). The risk of developing anaemia is increased in reproductive age women carriers of A allele of rs1868505 (CACNA2D3) and/or T allele of rs13194491 (HIST1H2BJ). Association of SNPs from fine mapping with ferritin and serum iron suggests that calcium channels could be a potential pathway for iron uptake in physiological conditions.

  17. The Combined Deficiency of Immunoproteasome Subunits Affects Both the Magnitude and Quality of Pathogen- and Genetic Vaccination-Induced CD8+ T Cell Responses to the Human Protozoan Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Ersching

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The β1i, β2i and β5i immunoproteasome subunits have an important role in defining the repertoire of MHC class I-restricted epitopes. However, the impact of combined deficiency of the three immunoproteasome subunits in the development of protective immunity to intracellular pathogens has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrate that immunoproteasomes play a key role in host resistance and genetic vaccination-induced protection against the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas disease, immunity to which is dependent on CD8+ T cells and IFN-γ (the classical immunoproteasome inducer. We observed that infection with T. cruzi triggers the transcription of immunoproteasome genes, both in mice and humans. Importantly, genetically vaccinated or T. cruzi-infected β1i, β2i and β5i triple knockout (TKO mice presented significantly lower frequencies and numbers of splenic CD8+ effector T cells (CD8+CD44highCD62Llow specific for the previously characterized immunodominant (VNHRFTLV H-2Kb-restricted T. cruzi epitope. Not only the quantity, but also the quality of parasite-specific CD8+ T cell responses was altered in TKO mice. Hence, the frequency of double-positive (IFN-γ+/TNF+ or single-positive (IFN-γ+ cells specific for the H-2Kb-restricted immunodominant as well as subdominant T. cruzi epitopes were higher in WT mice, whereas TNF single-positive cells prevailed among CD8+ T cells from TKO mice. Contrasting with their WT counterparts, TKO animals were also lethally susceptible to T. cruzi challenge, even after an otherwise protective vaccination with DNA and adenoviral vectors. We conclude that the immunoproteasome subunits are key determinants in host resistance to T. cruzi infection by influencing both the magnitude and quality of CD8+ T cell responses.

  18. The Combined Deficiency of Immunoproteasome Subunits Affects Both the Magnitude and Quality of Pathogen- and Genetic Vaccination-Induced CD8+ T Cell Responses to the Human Protozoan Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersching, Jonatan; Vasconcelos, José R.; Ferreira, Camila P.; Caetano, Braulia C.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Bruna–Romero, Oscar; Baron, Monique A.; Ferreira, Ludmila R. P.; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    The β1i, β2i and β5i immunoproteasome subunits have an important role in defining the repertoire of MHC class I-restricted epitopes. However, the impact of combined deficiency of the three immunoproteasome subunits in the development of protective immunity to intracellular pathogens has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrate that immunoproteasomes play a key role in host resistance and genetic vaccination-induced protection against the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas disease), immunity to which is dependent on CD8+ T cells and IFN-γ (the classical immunoproteasome inducer). We observed that infection with T. cruzi triggers the transcription of immunoproteasome genes, both in mice and humans. Importantly, genetically vaccinated or T. cruzi-infected β1i, β2i and β5i triple knockout (TKO) mice presented significantly lower frequencies and numbers of splenic CD8+ effector T cells (CD8+CD44highCD62Llow) specific for the previously characterized immunodominant (VNHRFTLV) H-2Kb-restricted T. cruzi epitope. Not only the quantity, but also the quality of parasite-specific CD8+ T cell responses was altered in TKO mice. Hence, the frequency of double-positive (IFN-γ+/TNF+) or single-positive (IFN-γ+) cells specific for the H-2Kb-restricted immunodominant as well as subdominant T. cruzi epitopes were higher in WT mice, whereas TNF single-positive cells prevailed among CD8+ T cells from TKO mice. Contrasting with their WT counterparts, TKO animals were also lethally susceptible to T. cruzi challenge, even after an otherwise protective vaccination with DNA and adenoviral vectors. We conclude that the immunoproteasome subunits are key determinants in host resistance to T. cruzi infection by influencing both the magnitude and quality of CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:27128676

  19. 大豆7S球蛋白α'亚基缺失及(α'+α)亚基双缺失品系的回交转育%Development of Soybean Lines with a'-Subunit or (α'+α)-Subunits Deficiency in 7S Globulin by Backcrossing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋波; 蓝岚; 田福东; 拓云; 白月; 姜自芹; 申丽威; 李文滨; 刘珊珊

    2012-01-01

    7S球蛋白α’与α亚基是大豆种子贮藏蛋白的重要组分,是影响大豆营养价值与加工品质的重要因子,同时还是主要的大豆致敏原,降低它们的含量是大豆品质改良育种的最新研究热点之一.以日本育种材料7S球蛋白(α’+α)-亚基双缺失型日B为供体亲本,黑龙江省主栽大豆品种东农47为受体亲本,采用回交转育方法,将α’与(α’+α)-亚基缺失特性导入东农47.结果表明,α’-缺失型(Cc)和(α’+α)-双缺失型(Cd)品系均能正常生长、结实,并能稳定遗传;Cc、Cd产量组分性状的平均值均远高于轮回亲本,蛋白质含量平均值均高于双亲,部分Cd株系籽粒蛋白质总量高达46.7%,脂肪含量平均值介于双亲之间,略高于日B;导入α’-缺失和(α’+α)双缺失性状后,绝大多数氨基酸组分含量和氨基酸总量提高,其中精氨酸和天门冬氨酸平均含量变幅最大.Cd株系籽粒含硫氨基酸含量(蛋氨酸与胱氨酸之和)及氨基酸总量分别比东农47高出0.11和5.56个百分点.说明通过常规育种重组α’-缺失或(α’+α)-双缺失性状即可提高大豆含硫氨基酸含量,并提高其他氨基酸组分含量及氨基酸总量,在Cc、Cd的BC2F3后代群体中有望筛选到α’-缺失或α’与α同时缺失的高产、高含硫氨基酸、优质大豆新品种.%The α'- and a-subunits of 7S globulin, the components of soybean storage protein as well as the main allergens, are important factors affecting the nutritional and processing quality of soybean. It is currently focused to improve the quality of soybean variety by reducing the contents of α' and a-subunits in soybean breeding. In the experiment, we successfully recombined the character of allergenic proteins deficiency into Chinese soybean, using a Japanese variety "Ri B" with (α'+α)-subunits deficiency of 7S globulin (β-conglycinin) as the donor parent, and soybean variety Dongnong 47 with high oil

  20. Acid-labile sulfides in shallow marine bottom sediments: A review of the impact on ecosystems in the Azov Sea, the NE Black Sea shelf and NW Adriatic lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Yu. I.; Zakuskina, O. Yu

    2012-02-01

    Acid-labile sulfides (LS) increase in bottom sediments at sites in the Azov Sea, at the NE Black Sea shelf and in the coastal lagoons of NW Adriatic Sea experiencing direct impacts of anthropogenic pollution. Fresh anthropogenic organic matter stimulates the bacterial sulfate reduction and here the rate of the LS production overcomes their loss during the oxidation and pyritization. This results in the expansion of reduced sediment layer up to the bottom surface. The LS concentration in the reduced sediments varies between 300 and 2000 mg S l -1 of wet silt depending on the size of pollution loading and on the rate of sedimentation. In the oxidized sediments away from the direct pollution impact, the LS concentration did not exceed 100-150 mg S l -1. Being a strong cytochrome toxin, the LS adversely affect the coastal ecosystems. The concentrations over 600 mg S l -1 result in quasi total benthic mortality whereas >300-400 mg S l -1 depletes the benthic faunal abundance and taxonomic diversity. Accumulation of the LS in sediments also induces nocturnal hypoxia and stimulates domination of toxic cyanobacteria in the pelagic phytocenoses.

  1. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 By ATA | Featured , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Potassium Iodide (KI) | No Comments IDD NEWSLETTER – February 2017 VOLUME ... 2016 By ATA | Featured , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Potassium Iodide (KI) | No Comments IDD NEWSLETTER – November 2015 (PDF ...

  2. Disaccharidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, T M; Christopher, N L

    1969-02-01

    This review of the literature and current knowledge concerning a nutritional disorder of disaccharidase deficiency discusses the following topics: 1) a description of disorders of disaccharide digestion; 2) some historical perspective on the laboratory and bedside advances in the past 10 years that have helped define a group of these digestive disorders; 3) a classification of conditions causing disaccharide intolerance; and 4) a discussion of some of the specific clinical syndromes emphasizing nutritional consequences of these syndromes. The syndromes described include congenital lactase deficiency, acquired lactase deficiency in teenagers and adults, acquired generalized disaccharidase deficiency secondary to diffuse mucosal damage, acquired lactose intolerance secondary to alterations in the intestinal transit, sucrase-isomaltase deficiencies, and other disease associations connected with lactase deficiency such as colitis.

  3. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected. Howeve

  4. Protein Kinase A Subunit Balance Regulates Lipid Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammalian Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Han, Ji Seul; Kong, Jinuk; Ji, Yul; Lv, Xuchao; Lee, Junho; Li, Peng; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-23

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase composed of catalytic and regulatory subunits and involved in various physiological phenomena, including lipid metabolism. Here we demonstrated that the stoichiometric balance between catalytic and regulatory subunits is crucial for maintaining basal PKA activity and lipid homeostasis. To uncover the potential roles of each PKA subunit, Caenorhabditis elegans was used to investigate the effects of PKA subunit deficiency. In worms, suppression of PKA via RNAi resulted in severe phenotypes, including shortened life span, decreased egg laying, reduced locomotion, and altered lipid distribution. Similarly, in mammalian adipocytes, suppression of PKA regulatory subunits RIα and RIIβ via siRNAs potently stimulated PKA activity, leading to potentiated lipolysis without increasing cAMP levels. Nevertheless, insulin exerted anti-lipolytic effects and restored lipid droplet integrity by antagonizing PKA action. Together, these data implicate the importance of subunit stoichiometry as another regulatory mechanism of PKA activity and lipid metabolism.

  5. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  6. A simple and inexpensive enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine%题目:一种用于递送酸度敏感大分子到小肠的简易且廉价的肠溶胶囊

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Darren S MILLER; Rezaul BEGG; Syed Mahfuzul AZIZ; Ross N BUTLER; Anne Michelle PARSONS; John BRESLAND; Paul HERDE; Duc Minh PHAM; Angel TAN; Hung-yao HSU; Clive A PRESTIDGE; Tim KUCHEL

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the ecology of the gastrointestinal tract and the impact of the contents on the host mucosa is emerging as an important area for defining both welness and susceptibility to disease. Targeted delivery of drugs to treat specific smal intestinal disorders such as smal bowel bacterial overgrowth and targeting molecules to interrogate or to deliver vaccines to the remote regions of the smal intestine has proven difficult. There is an unmet need for methodologies to release probes/drugs to remote regions of the gastrointestinal tract in furthering our understanding of gut health and pathogenesis. In order to address this concern, we need to know how the regional delivery of a sur-rogate labeled test compound is handled and in turn, if delivered localy as a liquid or powder, the dynamics of its subsequent handling and metabolism. In the studies we report on in this paper, we chose13C sodium acetate (13C-acetate), which is a stable isotope probe that once absorbed in the smal intestine can be readily measured non-invasively by colection and analysis of13CO2 in the breath. This would provide information of gastric emptying rates and an indication of the site of release and absorptive capacity. In a series ofin vitro andin vivo pig experiments, we assessed the enteric-protective properties of a commercialy available polymer EUDRAGIT® L100-55 on gelatin capsules and also on DRcaps®. Test results demonstrated that DRcaps® coated with EUDRAGIT® L100-55 possessed enhanced enteric-protective properties, particularlyin vivo. These studies add to the body of knowledge regarding gastric emptying in pigs and also begin the process of gathering specifications for the design of a simple and cost-effective enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the smal intestine.%目的:通过开展胃肠道远端释放药物的研究,以增加对肠道健康和发病机制的理解。创新点:本研究选择了13C醋酸钠作为同位素探针,

  7. Pituitary glycoprotein hormone a-subunit secretion by cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of the a-subunit of pituitary glycoprotein hormones usually follows the secretion of intact gonadotropins and is increased in gonadal failure and decreased in isolated gonadotropin deficiency. The aim of the present study was to determine the levels of the a-subunit in the serum of patients with cirrhosis of the liver and to compare the results obtained for eugonadal cirrhotic patients with those obtained for cirrhotic patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Forty-seven of 63 patients with cirrhosis (74.6% presented hypogonadism (which was central in 45 cases and primary in 2, 7 were eugonadal, and 9 women were in normal menopause. The serum a-subunit was measured by the fluorimetric method using monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity with LH, TSH, FSH and hCG was 6.5, 1.2, 4.3 and 1.1%, respectively, with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV of less than 5% and an interassay CV of 5%, and sensitivity limit of 4 ng/l. The serum a-subunit concentration ranged from 36 to 6253 ng/l, with a median of 273 ng/l. The median was 251 ng/l for patients with central hypogonadism and 198 ng/l for eugonadal patients. The correlation between the a-subunit and basal LH levels was significant both in the total sample (r = 0.48, P<0.01 and in the cirrhotic patients with central hypogonadism (r = 0.33, P = 0.02. Among men with central hypogonadism there was a negative correlation between a-subunit levels and total testosterone levels (r = 0.54, P<0.01 as well as free testosterone levels (r = -0.53, P<0.01. In conclusion, although the a-subunit levels are correlated with LH levels, at present they cannot be used as markers for hypogonadism in patients with cirrhosis of the liver.

  8. Muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naini, Ali; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia;

    2009-01-01

    storage disease type X and novel mutations in the gene encoding the muscle subunit of PGAM (PGAM2). DESIGN: Clinical, pathological, biochemical, and molecular analyses. SETTING: Tertiary care university hospitals and academic institutions. Patients A 37-year-old Danish man of Pakistani origin who had...... PGAM deficiency, and molecular studies revealed 2 novel homozygous mutations, a nonsense mutation and a single nucleotide deletion. Pathological studies of muscle showed mild glycogen accumulation but prominent tubular aggregates in both patients. CONCLUSIONS: We found that glycogen storage disease...

  9. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  10. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    2006-01-01

    -negative diagnoses of VLCADD in asymptomatic newborn babies. In view of the emerging genotype-phenotype correlation in this disorder, the information derived from mutational analysis can be helpful in designing the appropriate follow-up and therapeutic regime for these patients.......We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood...... samples taken at age 48-72 h were diagnostic whereas repeat samples at an older age were normal in 4/6 babies. Urine analysis was normal in 5/5. We conclude that the timing of blood sampling for newborn screening is important and that it is important to perform mutation analysis to avoid false...

  11. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  12. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froissart, Roseline; Piraud, Monique; Boudjemline, Alix Mollet; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Petit, François; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Eberschweiler, Pascale Trioche; Gajdos, Vincent; Labrune, Philippe

    2011-05-20

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  13. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance of studying different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy.

  14. Mutation in mitochondrial complex IV subunit COX5A causes pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, and failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertling, Fabian; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; Al-Senaidi, Khalfan; Joshi, Niranjan P; Venselaar, Hanka; van den Brand, Mariël Am; Nijtmans, Leo Gj; Rodenburg, Richard Jt

    2017-03-01

    COX5A is a nuclear-encoded subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase). We present patients with a homozygous pathogenic variant in the COX5A gene. Clinical details of two affected siblings suffering from early-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, failure to thrive, and isolated complex IV deficiency are presented. We show that the variant lies within the evolutionarily conserved COX5A/COX4 interface domain, suggesting that it alters the interaction between these two subunits during complex IV biogenesis. In patient skin fibroblasts, the enzymatic activity and protein levels of complex IV and several of its subunits are reduced. Lentiviral complementation rescues complex IV deficiency. The monomeric COX1 assembly intermediate accumulates demonstrating a function of COX5A in complex IV biogenesis. A potential therapeutic lead is demonstrated by showing that copper supplementation leads to partial rescue of complex IV deficiency in patient fibroblasts.

  15. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin deficiency anemia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vitamin deficiency anemia is a lack of healthy red ... you have lower than normal amounts of certain vitamins. Vitamins linked to vitamin deficiency anemia include folate, ...

  16. Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. Partial genetic correction in two mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuang, W; Xu, H; Vachon, P H;

    1998-01-01

    Humans and mice with deficiency of the alpha2 subunit of the basement membrane protein laminin-2/merosin suffer from merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MCMD). We have expressed a human laminin alpha2 chain transgene under the regulation of a muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter ...

  17. The POLD3 subunit of DNA polymerase δ can promote translesion synthesis independently of DNA polymerase ζ

    OpenAIRE

    Hirota, Kouji; Yoshikiyo, Kazunori; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Murai, Junko; Tsuda, Masataka; Phillips, Lara G.; Narita, Takeo; Nishihara, Kana; Kobayashi, Kaori; Yamada, Kouich; Nakamura, Jun; Pommier, Yves; Lehmann, Alan; Sale, Julian E.

    2015-01-01

    The replicative DNA polymerase Polδ consists of a catalytic subunit POLD1/p125 and three regulatory subunits POLD2/p50, POLD3/p66 and POLD4/p12. The ortholog of POLD3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pol32, is required for a significant proportion of spontaneous and UV-induced mutagenesis through its additional role in translesion synthesis (TLS) as a subunit of DNA polymerase ζ. Remarkably, chicken DT40 B lymphocytes deficient in POLD3 are viable and able to replicate undamaged genomic DNA with ...

  18. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Anouk de Bruyn; Yves Jacquemyn; Kristof Kinget; François Eyskens

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, su...

  19. Role of the Rubisco Small Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreitzer, Robert Joseph [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation in photosynthesis. However, it is a slow enzyme, and O2 competes with CO2 at the active site. Oxygenation initiates the photorespiratory pathway, which also results in the loss of CO2. If carboxylation could be increased or oxygenation decreased, an increase in net CO2 fixation would be realized. Because Rubisco provides the primary means by which carbon enters all life on earth, there is much interest in engineering Rubisco to increase the production of food and renewable energy. Rubisco is located in the chloroplasts of plants, and it is comprised of two subunits. Much is known about the chloroplast-gene-encoded large subunit (rbcL gene), which contains the active site, but much less is known about the role of the nuclear-gene-encoded small subunit in Rubisco function (rbcS gene). Both subunits are coded by multiple genes in plants, which makes genetic engineering difficult. In the eukaryotic, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it has been possible to eliminate all the Rubisco genes. These Rubisco-less mutants can be maintained by providing acetate as an alternative carbon source. In this project, focus has been placed on determining whether the small subunit might be a better genetic-engineering target for improving Rubisco. Analysis of a variable-loop structure (βA-βB loop) of the small subunit by genetic selection, directed mutagenesis, and construction of chimeras has shown that the small subunit can influence CO2/O2 specificity. X-ray crystal structures of engineered chimeric-loop enzymes have indicated that additional residues and regions of the small subunit may also contribute to Rubisco function. Structural dynamics of the small-subunit carboxyl terminus was also investigated. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the most-conserved small-subunit residues has identified a

  20. Schedule of NMDA receptor subunit expression and functional channel formation in the course of in vitro-induced neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varju, P; Schlett, K; Eisel, U; Madarasz, E

    2001-01-01

    NE-7C2 neuroectodermal cells derived from forebrain vesicles of p53-deficient mouse embryos (E9) produce neurons and astrocytes in vitro if induced by all-trans retinoic acid. The reproducible morphological stages of neurogenesis were correlated with the expression of various NMDA receptor subunits.

  1. Risk capital allocation with autonomous subunits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Smilgins, Aleksandrs

    2016-01-01

    Risk capital allocation problems have been widely discussed in the academic literature. We consider a set of independent subunits collaborating in order to reduce risk: that is, when subunit portfolios are merged a diversification benefit arises and the risk of the group as a whole is smaller than...

  2. The beta subunit of casein kinase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Piontek, K; Schmidt-Spaniol, I;

    1991-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the beta subunit of pig and mouse CKII were isolated. The porcine cDNA was expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and used for the production of anti-CKII-beta subunit specific antibodies....

  3. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  4. Anemia - B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000574.htm Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on ... tissues. There are many types of anemia. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia is a low red blood cell ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by ...

  9. Threonine 788 in integrin subunit beta1 regulates integrin activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Stina; Kaniowska, Dorota; Brakebusch, Cord

    2006-01-01

    was identified as a site with major influence on integrin function. The mutation to A788 strongly reduced beta1-dependent cell attachment and exposure of the extracellular 9EG7 epitope, whereas replacement of T789 with alanine did not interfere with the ligand-binding ability. Talin has been shown to mediate......In the present study, the functional role of suggested phosphorylation of the conserved threonines in the cytoplasmic domain of integrin subunit beta1 was investigated. Mutants mimicking phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of beta1 were expressed in beta1 deficient GD25 cells. T788 in beta1...... integrin activation, but the talin head domain bound equally well to the wild-type beta1 and the mutants indicating that the T788A mutation caused defect integrin activation by another mechanism. The phosphorylation-mimicking mutation T788D was fully active in promoting cell adhesion. GD25 cells expressing...

  10. Chaperonin Structure - The Large Multi-Subunit Protein Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Roterman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multi sub-unit protein structure representing the chaperonins group is analyzed with respect to its hydrophobicity distribution. The proteins of this group assist protein folding supported by ATP. The specific axial symmetry GroEL structure (two rings of seven units stacked back to back - 524 aa each and the GroES (single ring of seven units - 97 aa each polypeptide chains are analyzed using the hydrophobicity distribution expressed as excess/deficiency all over the molecule to search for structure-to-function relationships. The empirically observed distribution of hydrophobic residues is confronted with the theoretical one representing the idealized hydrophobic core with hydrophilic residues exposure on the surface. The observed discrepancy between these two distributions seems to be aim-oriented, determining the structure-to-function relation. The hydrophobic force field structure generated by the chaperonin capsule is presented. Its possible influence on substrate folding is suggested.

  11. Cloning and sequence analysis of the gene encoding 19-kD subunit of Complex I from Dunaliella salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Qiao, Dai Rong; Zheng, Hong Bo; Dai, Xu Lan; Bai, Lin Han; Zeng, Jing; Cao, Yi

    2008-09-01

    NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I ) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain catalyzes the transfer of electrons from NADH to ubiquinone coupled to proton translocation across the membrane. The cDNA sequence of Dunaliella salina mitochondrial NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase 19-kD subunit contains a 682-bp ORF encoding a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 19 kD. The sequence has been submitted to the GenBank database under Accession No. EF566890 (cDNA sequences) and EF566891 (genomic sequence). The deduced amino-acid sequence is 74% identical to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase 18-kD subunit. The 19-kD subunit mRNA expression was observed in oxygen deficiency, salt treatment, and rotenone treatment with lower levels. It demonstrate that the 19-kD subunit of Complex I from Dunaliella salina is regulated by these stresses.

  12. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  13. Mutations in the BLOC-1 Subunits Dysbindin and Muted Generate Divergent and Dosage-dependent Phenotypes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimore, Jennifer; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Gokhale, Avanti; Tornieri, Karine; Singleton, Kaela S.; Mullin, Ariana P.; Tang, Junxia; Talbot, Konrad; Faundez, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Post-mortem analysis has revealed reduced levels of the protein dysbindin in the brains of those suffering from the neurodevelopmental disorder schizophrenia. Consequently, mechanisms controlling the cellular levels of dysbindin and its interacting partners may participate in neurodevelopmental processes impaired in that disorder. To address this question, we studied loss of function mutations in the genes encoding dysbindin and its interacting BLOC-1 subunits. We focused on BLOC-1 mutants affecting synapse composition and function in addition to their established systemic pigmentation, hematological, and lung phenotypes. We tested phenotypic homogeneity and gene dosage effects in the mouse null alleles muted (Bloc1s5mu/mu) and dysbindin (Bloc1s8sdy/sdy). Transcripts of NMDA receptor subunits and GABAergic interneuron markers, as well as expression of BLOC-1 subunit gene products, were affected differently in the brains of Bloc1s5mu/mu and Bloc1s8sdy/sdy mice. Unlike Bloc1s8sdy/sdy, elimination of one or two copies of Bloc1s5 generated indistinguishable pallidin transcript phenotypes. We conclude that monogenic mutations abrogating the expression of a protein complex subunit differentially affect the expression of other complex transcripts and polypeptides as well as their downstream effectors. We propose that the genetic disruption of different subunits of protein complexes and combinations thereof diversifies phenotypic presentation of pathway deficiencies, contributing to the wide phenotypic spectrum and complexity of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24713699

  14. Cleft Lip Repair: The Hybrid Subunit Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-04-01

    The unilateral cleft lip repair is one of the most rewarding and challenging of plastic surgery procedures. Surgeons have introduced a variety of straight line, geometric, and rotation-advancement designs, while in practice the majority of North American surgeons have been using hybrids of the rotation-advancement techniques. The anatomic subunit approach was introduced in 2005 by Fisher and has gained popularity, with early adopters of the design touting its simplicity and effectiveness. The objectives of this article are to summarize the basic tenets of respecting the philtral subunit, accurate measurement and planning, and tips for transitioning to this subunit approach.

  15. Inhibition of mitochondrial Na+-Ca2+ exchange restores agonist-induced ATP production and Ca2+ handling in human complex I deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visch, H.J.; Rutter, G.A.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Koenderink, J.B.; Verkaart, S.A.J.; Groot, T. de; Varadi, A.; Mitchell, K.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    Human mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) of the oxidative phosphorylation system is a multiprotein assembly comprising both nuclear and mitochondrially encoded subunits. Deficiency of this complex is associated with numerous clinical syndromes ranging from highly progressive, o

  16. Gene targeting of CK2 catalytic subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, David Y.; Toselli, Paul; Landesman-Bollag, Esther; Dominguez, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a highly conserved and ubiquitous serine–threonine kinase. It is a tetrameric enzyme that is made up of two regulatory CK2β subunits and two catalytic subunits, either CK2α/CK2α, CK2α/ CK2α′, or CK2α′/CK2α′. Although the two catalytic subunits diverge in their C termini, their enzymatic activities are similar. To identify the specific function of the two catalytic subunits in development, we have deleted them individually from the mouse genome by homologous recombination. We have previously reported that CK2α′is essential for male germ cell development, and we now demonstrate that CK2α has an essential role in embryogenesis, as mice lacking CK2α die in mid-embryogenesis, with cardiac and neural tube defects. PMID:18594950

  17. Gene targeting of CK2 catalytic subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, David C; Lou, David Y; Toselli, Paul; Landesman-Bollag, Esther; Dominguez, Isabel

    2008-09-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a highly conserved and ubiquitous serine-threonine kinase. It is a tetrameric enzyme that is made up of two regulatory CK2beta subunits and two catalytic subunits, either CK2alpha/CK2alpha, CK2alpha/CK2alpha', or CK2alpha'/CK2alpha'. Although the two catalytic subunits diverge in their C termini, their enzymatic activities are similar. To identify the specific function of the two catalytic subunits in development, we have deleted them individually from the mouse genome by homologous recombination. We have previously reported that CK2alpha' is essential for male germ cell development, and we now demonstrate that CK2alpha has an essential role in embryogenesis, as mice lacking CK2alpha die in mid-embryogenesis, with cardiac and neural tube defects.

  18. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  19. Deficiently Extremal Gorenstein Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavinder Singh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this article is to study the homological properties of deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras. We prove that if / is an odd deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebra with pure minimal free resolution, then the codimension of / must be odd. As an application, the structure of pure minimal free resolution of a nearly extremal Gorenstein algebra is obtained.

  20. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  1. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A;

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  2. Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Tarım

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone deficiency is the most promising entity in terms of response to therapy among the treatable causes of growth retardation. It may be due to genetic or acquired causes. It may be isolated or a part of multiple hormone deficiencies. Diagnostic criteria and therefore treatment indications are still disputed. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 36-8

  3. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  5. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  6. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  7. GABA B receptor subunit expression in glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, K J; Deuchars, J; Davies, C H; Pangalos, M N

    2003-09-01

    GABA(B) receptor subunits are widely expressed on neurons throughout the CNS, at both pre- and postsynaptic sites, where they mediate the late, slow component of the inhibitory response to the major inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. The existence of functional GABA(B) receptors on nonneuronal cells has been reported previously, although the molecular composition of these receptors has not yet been described. Here we demonstrate for the first time, using immunohistochemistry the expression of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b), and GABA(B2) on nonneuronal cells of the rat CNS. All three principle GABA(B) receptor subunits were expressed on these cells irrespective of whether they had been cultured or found within brain tissue sections. At the ultrastructural level GABA(B) receptor subunits were expressed on astrocytic processes surrounding both symmetrical and assymetrical synapses in the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus. In addition, GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b), and GABA(B2) receptor subunits were expressed on activated microglia in culture but were not found on myelin forming oligodendrocytes in the white matter of rat spinal cord. Together these data demonstrate that the obligate subunits of functional GABA(B) receptors are expressed in astrocytes and microglia in the rat CNS.

  8. Molecular characterization and mutational analysis of the human B17 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeitink, J; Loeffen, J; Smeets, R; Triepels, R; Ruitenbeek, W; Trijbels, F; van den Heuvel, L

    1998-08-01

    Bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex 1) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of about 36 nuclear-encoded subunits. We review the current knowledge of the 15 human complex I subunits cloned so far, and report the 598-bp cDNA sequence, the chromosomal localization and the tissue expression of an additional subunit, the B17 subunit. The cDNA open reading frame of B17 comprises 387 bp and encodes a protein of 128 amino acids (calculated Mr 15.5 kDa). There is 82.7% and 78.1% homology, respectively, at the cDNA and amino acid level with the bovine counterpart. The gene of the B17 subunit has been mapped to chromosome 2. Multiple-tissue dot-blots showed ubiquitous expression of the mRNA with relatively higher expression in tissues known for their high energy demand. Of these, kidney showed the highest expression. Mutational analysis of the subunit revealed no mutations or polymorphisms in 20 patients with isolated enzymatic complex I deficiency in cultured skin fibroblasts.

  9. Mutations in COA6 cause cytochrome c oxidase deficiency and neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertling, Fabian; A M van den Brand, Mariel; Hertecant, Jozef L; Al-Shamsi, Aisha; P van den Heuvel, Lambert; Distelmaier, Felix; Mayatepek, Ertan; Smeitink, Jan A; Nijtmans, Leo G J; Rodenburg, Richard J T

    2015-01-01

    COA6/C1ORF31 is involved in cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) biogenesis. We present a new pathogenic COA6 variant detected in a patient with neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and isolated complex IV deficiency. For the first time, clinical details about a COA6-deficient patient are given and patient fibroblasts are functionally characterized: COA6 protein is undetectable and steady-state levels of complex IV and several of its subunits are reduced. The monomeric COX1 assembly intermediate accumulates. Using pulse-chase experiments, we demonstrate an increased turnover of mitochondrial encoded complex IV subunits. Although monomeric complex IV is decreased in patient fibroblasts, the CI/CIII2 /CIVn -supercomplexes remain unaffected. Copper supplementation shows a partial rescue of complex IV deficiency in patient fibroblasts. We conclude that COA6 is required for complex IV subunit stability. Furthermore, the proposed role in the copper delivery pathway to complex IV subunits is substantiated and a therapeutic lead for COA6-deficient patients is provided.

  10. Compound inheritance of a low-frequency regulatory SNP and a rare null mutation in exon-junction complex subunit RBM8A causes TAR syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, C.A.; Paul, D.S.; Schulze, H.; Freson, K.; Stephens, J.C.; Smethurst, P.A.; Jolley, J.D.; Cvejic, A.; Kostadima, M.; Bertone, P.; Breuning, M.H.; Debili, N.; Deloukas, P.; Favier, R.; Fiedler, J.; Hobbs, C.M.; Huang, N.; Hurles, M.E.; Kiddle, G.; Krapels, I.; Nurden, P.; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; Sambrook, J.G.; Smith, K.; Stemple, D.L.; Strauss, G.; Thys, C.; Geet, C. van; Newbury-Ecob, R.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Ghevaert, C.

    2012-01-01

    The exon-junction complex (EJC) performs essential RNA processing tasks. Here, we describe the first human disorder, thrombocytopenia with absent radii (TAR), caused by deficiency in one of the four EJC subunits. Compound inheritance of a rare null allele and one of two low-frequency SNPs in the reg

  11. Multiple efficacy studies of an adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A24 subunit vaccine in cattle using direct homologous challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    The safety and efficacy of an experimental, replication-deficient, human adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A24 Cruzeiro capsid-based subunit vaccine (AdtA24) was examined in eight independent cattle studies. AdtA24 non-adjuvanted vaccine was administered intramuscularl...

  12. Mutations in congenital myasthenic syndromes reveal an epsilon subunit C-terminal cysteine, C470, crucial for maturation and surface expression of adult AChR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ealing, J; Webster, R; Brownlow, S; Abdelgany, A; Oosterhuis, H; Muntoni, F; Vaux, DJ; Vincent, A; Beeson, D

    2002-01-01

    Many congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are associated with mutations in the genes encoding the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), an oligomeric protein with the structure alpha(2)betadeltaepsilon. AChR deficiency is frequently due to homozygous or heteroallelic mutations in the AChR epsilon subunit,

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  14. Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fractures), muscle weakness, and the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis. Severe vitamin D deficiency can cause rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Both problems cause soft, weak bones, as well ...

  15. Factor II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  16. Factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  19. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  1. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contra...

  2. Iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be ...

  3. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Labrune Philippe; Gajdos Vincent; Eberschweiler Pascale; Hubert-Buron Aurélie; Petit François; Vianey-Saban Christine; Boudjemline Alix; Piraud Monique; Froissart Roseline

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, betw...

  4. Investigating the role of the physiological isoform switch of cytochrome c oxidase subunits in reversible mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczonadi, Veronika; Giunta, Michele; Lane, Maria; Tulinius, Mar; Schara, Ulrike; Horvath, Rita

    2015-06-01

    Reversible infantile respiratory chain deficiency is characterised by spontaneous recovery of mitochondrial myopathy in infants. We studied whether a physiological isoform switch of nuclear cytochrome c oxidase subunits contributes to the age-dependent manifestation and spontaneous recovery in reversible mitochondrial disease. Some nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase are present as tissue-specific isoforms. Isoforms of subunits COX6A and COX7A expressed in heart and skeletal muscle are different from isoforms expressed in the liver, kidney and brain. Furthermore, in skeletal muscle both the heart and liver isoforms of subunit COX7A have been demonstrated with variable levels, indicating that the tissue-specific expression of nuclear-encoded subunits could provide a basis for the fine-tuning of cytochrome c oxidase activity to the specific metabolic needs of the different tissues. We demonstrate a developmental isoform switch of COX6A and COX7A subunits in human and mouse skeletal muscle. While the liver type isoforms are more present soon after birth, the heart/muscle isoforms gradually increase around 3 months of age in infants, 4 weeks of age in mice, and these isoforms persist in muscle throughout life. Our data in follow-up biopsies of patients with reversible infantile respiratory chain deficiency indicate that the physiological isoform switch does not contribute to the clinical manifestation and to the spontaneous recovery of this disease. However, understanding developmental changes of the different cytochrome c oxidase isoforms may have implications for other mitochondrial diseases. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  5. Probing subunit-subunit interactions in the yeast vacuolar ATPase by peptide arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee S Parsons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vacuolar (H(+-ATPase (V-ATPase; V(1V(o-ATPase is a large multisubunit enzyme complex found in the endomembrane system of all eukaryotic cells where its proton pumping action serves to acidify subcellular organelles. In the plasma membrane of certain specialized tissues, V-ATPase functions to pump protons from the cytoplasm into the extracellular space. The activity of the V-ATPase is regulated by a reversible dissociation mechanism that involves breaking and re-forming of protein-protein interactions in the V(1-ATPase - V(o-proton channel interface. The mechanism responsible for regulated V-ATPase dissociation is poorly understood, largely due to a lack of detailed knowledge of the molecular interactions that are responsible for the structural and functional link between the soluble ATPase and membrane bound proton channel domains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain insight into where some of the stator subunits of the V-ATPase associate with each other, we have developed peptide arrays from the primary sequences of V-ATPase subunits. By probing the peptide arrays with individually expressed V-ATPase subunits, we have identified several key interactions involving stator subunits E, G, C, H and the N-terminal domain of the membrane bound a subunit. CONCLUSIONS: The subunit-peptide interactions identified from the peptide arrays complement low resolution structural models of the eukaryotic vacuolar ATPase obtained from transmission electron microscopy. The subunit-subunit interaction data are discussed in context of our current model of reversible enzyme dissociation.

  6. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart.

  7. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  8. Limitations of RNAi of α6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits for assessing the in vivo sensitivity to spinosad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank D.Rinkevich; Jeffrey G.Scott

    2013-01-01

    Spinosad is a widely used insecticide that exerts its toxic effect primarily through interactions with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.The α6 nicotinic acetyl-choline receptor subunit is involved in spinosad toxicity as demonstrated by the high levels of resistance observed in strains lacking α6.RNAi was performed against the Dα6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit in Drosophila melanogaster using the Ga14-UAS system to examine if RNAi would yield results similar to those of Dα6 null mutants.These Dα6-deficient flies were subject to spinosad contact bioassays to evaluate the role of the Dα6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit on spinosad sensitivity.The expression of Dα6 was reduced 60%-75% as verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.However,there was no change in spinosad sensitivity in D.melanogaster.We repeated RNAi experiments in Tribolium castaneum using injection of dsRNA for Tcasα6.RNAi of Tcasα6 did not result in changes in spinosad sensitivity,similar to results obtained with D.melanogaster.The lack of change in spinosad sensitivity in both D.melanogaster and T.castaneum using two routes of dsRNA administration shows that RNAi may not provide adequate conditions to study the role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits on insecticide sensitivity due to the inability to completely eliminate expression of the α6 subunit in both species.Potential causes for the lack of change in spinosad sensitivity are discussed.

  9. Familial Congenital Hypothyroidism Caused by Abnormal and Bioinactive TSH due to Mutations in the beta-Subunit Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros-Neto, G; de Lacerda, L; Wondisford, F E

    1997-01-01

    Hereditary TSH deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disease described in inbred Japanese families and in Greek and Brazilian kindreds. The TSH-beta-subunit gene has been shown to be the site of mutations that will give rise to truncated proteins that cannot dimerize with the alpha subunit or, alternatively, will produce a mutated TSH that is present in the circulation of the affected patients, but it is biologically inactive. Characteristically, the patients with TSH-beta-subunit-defects are born with congenital hypothyroidism, with very low levels of serum thyroid hormones and serum thyroglobulin and, paradoxically, with serum TSH levels that are consistently undetectable or at very low levels. Goiter is not present at birth, but the low radioactive thyroid uptake will increase after bovine TSH stimulation. Other pituitary hormones responses to provocative tests are normal. The subunit levels are at high concentration and are significantly increased following TRH stimulation. In two kindreds, molecular biological studies have indicated mutations in two different sites of exon 2, generating a peptide that would not dimerize with subunits to synthesize TSH molecules. In one kindred, a truncated TSH-beta protein was translated that generated a biologically inactive but detectable serum TSH molecule. (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:15-20).

  10. Subunit organization in cytoplasmic dynein subcomplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen J.; Bonilla, Myriam; Rodgers, Michael E.; Schroer, Trina A.

    2002-01-01

    Because cytoplasmic dynein plays numerous critical roles in eukaryotic cells, determining the subunit composition and the organization and functions of the subunits within dynein are important goals. This has been difficult partly because of accessory polypeptide heterogeneity of dynein populations. The motor domain containing heavy chains of cytoplasmic dynein are associated with multiple intermediate, light intermediate, and light chain accessory polypeptides. We examined the organization of these subunits within cytoplasmic dynein by separating the molecule into two distinct subcomplexes. These subcomplexes were competent to reassemble into a molecule with dynein-like properties. One subcomplex was composed of the dynein heavy and light intermediate chains whereas the other subcomplex was composed of the intermediate and light chains. The intermediate and light chain subcomplex could be further separated into two pools, only one of which contained dynein light chains. The two pools had distinct intermediate chain compositions, suggesting that intermediate chain isoforms have different light chain–binding properties. When the two intermediate chain pools were characterized by analytical velocity sedimentation, at least four molecular components were seen: intermediate chain monomers, intermediate chain dimers, intermediate chain monomers with bound light chains, and a mixture of intermediate chain dimers with assorted bound light chains. These data provide new insights into the compositional heterogeneity and assembly of the cytoplasmic dynein complex and suggest that individual dynein molecules have distinct molecular compositions in vivo. PMID:11967380

  11. [Vitamin deficiencies and hypervitaminosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, M

    1999-10-01

    There have recently been very few deficiencies with respect to fat soluble and water soluble vitamins in Japan All-trans-retinoic acid as induction or maintenance treatment improves disease free and overall survival against acute promyelocytic leukemia. In the isolated vitamin E deficiencies gene mutation has been cleared for alpha-tocopherol transferprotein. Recently, a relation of nutritional vitamin K intake and senile osteoporosis in women was epidemiologically demonstrated on a prospective study. Thiamin was yet noticed as development of deficiency in alcoholism, while the importance of supplemental folic acid during pregnancy has become especially clear in light of studies showing that folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects in the fetus. With respect to hypervitaminosis, the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), USA, has established safe intakes by identifying the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) and LOAEL (Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level). Summaries of NOAEL and LOAEL for individual vitamins were shown.

  12. Antepartum Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakajima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  13. Replication protein A subunit 3 and the iron efficiency response in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Sarah E; O'Rourke, Jamie A; Peiffer, Gregory A; Yin, Tengfei; Majumder, Mahbubul; Zhang, Chunquan; Cianzio, Silvia R; Hill, John H; Cook, Dianne; Whitham, Steven A; Shoemaker, Randy C; Graham, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], iron deficiency results in interveinal chlorosis and decreased photosynthetic capacity, leading to stunting and yield loss. In this study, gene expression analyses investigated the role of soybean replication protein A (RPA) subunits during iron stress. Nine RPA homologs were significantly differentially expressed in response to iron stress in the near isogenic lines (NILs) Clark (iron efficient) and Isoclark (iron inefficient). RPA homologs exhibited opposing expression patterns in the two NILs, with RPA expression significantly repressed during iron deficiency in Clark but induced in Isoclark. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) to repress GmRPA3 expression in the iron inefficient line Isoclark and mirror expression in Clark. GmRPA3-silenced plants had improved IDC symptoms and chlorophyll content under iron deficient conditions and also displayed stunted growth regardless of iron availability. RNA-Seq comparing gene expression between GmRPA3-silenced and empty vector plants revealed massive transcriptional reprogramming with differential expression of genes associated with defense, immunity, aging, death, protein modification, protein synthesis, photosynthesis and iron uptake and transport genes. Our findings suggest the iron efficient genotype Clark is able to induce energy controlling pathways, possibly regulated by SnRK1/TOR, to promote nutrient recycling and stress responses in iron deficient conditions.

  14. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into chil......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided...

  15. Na+ channel β subunits: Overachievers of the ion channel family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Brackenbury

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Voltage gated Na+ channels (VGSCs in mammals contain a pore-forming α subunit and one or more β subunits. There are five mammalian β subunits in total: β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4, encoded by four genes: SCN1B-SCN4B. With the exception of the SCN1B splice variant, β1B, the β subunits are type I topology transmembrane proteins. In contrast, β1B lacks a transmembrane domain and is a secreted protein. A growing body of work shows that VGSC β subunits are multifunctional. While they do not form the ion channel pore, β subunits alter gating, voltage-dependence, and kinetics of VGSC α subunits and thus regulate cellular excitability in vivo. In addition to their roles in channel modulation, β subunits are members of the immunoglobulin (Ig superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs and regulate cell adhesion and migration. β subunits are also substrates for sequential proteolytic cleavage by secretases. An example of the multifunctional nature of β subunits is β1, encoded by SCN1B, that plays a critical role in neuronal migration and pathfinding during brain development, and whose function is dependent on Na+ current and γ-secretase activity. Functional deletion of SCN1B results in Dravet Syndrome, a severe and intractable pediatric epileptic encephalopathy. β subunits are emerging as key players in a wide variety of pathophysiologies, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and cancer. β subunits mediate multiple signaling pathways on different timescales, regulating electrical excitability, adhesion, migration, pathfinding, and transcription. Importantly, some β subunit functions may operate independent of α subunits. Thus, β subunits perform critical roles during development and disease. As such, they may prove useful in disease diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Activation of initiation factor 2 by ligands and mutations for rapid docking of ribosomal subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Zorzet, Anna; Andersson, Dan I; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified mutations in the GTPase initiation factor 2 (IF2), located outside its tRNA-binding domain, compensating strongly (A-type) or weakly (B-type) for initiator tRNA formylation deficiency. We show here that rapid docking of 30S with 50S subunits in initiation of translation depends on switching 30S subunit-bound IF2 from its inactive to active form. Activation of wild-type IF2 requires GTP and formylated initiator tRNA (fMet-tRNAi). In contrast, extensive activation of A-type IF2 occurs with only GTP or with GDP and fMet-tRNAi, implying a passive role for initiator tRNA as activator of IF2 in subunit docking. The theory of conditional switching of GTPases quantitatively accounts for all our experimental data. We find that GTP, GDP, fMet-tRNAi and A-type mutations multiplicatively increase the equilibrium ratio, K, between active and inactive forms of IF2 from a value of 4 × 10−4 for wild-type apo-IF2 by factors of 300, 8, 80 and 20, respectively. Functional characterization of the A-type mutations provides keys to structural interpretation of conditional switching of IF2 and other multidomain GTPases. PMID:21151095

  17. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  18. Factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When certain blood clotting factors are low or missing, your blood does not clot properly. Factor V deficiency is rare. It may be caused by: A defective Factor V gene passed down through families (inherited) An antibody that interferes with normal Factor ...

  19. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficien

  20. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    biennially to exchange views and research findings. The fourth biennial meeting was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2-3 June 2005. This review covers the wide range of AAT deficiency-related topics that were addressed encompassing advances in genetic characterization, risk factor identification, clinical...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  1. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA-shun) is a condition that ... the following: You don't get enough sleep (sleep deprivation) You sleep at the wrong time of day ( ...

  2. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  3. Prefoldin Subunits Are Protected from Ubiquitin-Proteasome System-mediated Degradation by Forming Complex with Other Constituent Subunits*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation. PMID:21478150

  4. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith;

    2016-01-01

    for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce......The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens...... been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly...

  5. Recombinant factor XIII and congenital factor XIII deficiency: an update from human and animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inbal A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aida InbalThrombosis and Hemostasis Unit, Hematology Institute, Beilinson Hospital, Rabin Medical Center, Petach Tikva, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelAbstract: Factor XIII (FXIII is a protransglutaminase composed of two catalytic A subunits and two carrier B subunits. An intracellular form of FXIII is present in monocytes/macrophages and platelets as a homodimer of two A subunits. Following activation by thrombin, FXIII becomes plasma transglutaminase, which crosslinks γ-glutamyl-ε-lysine residues of fibrin chains and thereby stabilizes the fibrin clot. FXIII deficiency results in a moderate to severe hemorrhagic disorder, abnormal wound healing in about 30% of patients, and recurrent abortion in homozygous females. More than 800 cases of FXIII deficiency have been reported, most of them due to mutation in the FXIII-A gene, resulting in FXIII-A deficiency. Among mutations causing FXIII-A deficiency, 50% are missense mutations. Only 16 mutations in the FXIII-B gene have been published. Routine laboratory tests are normal in patients with FXIII deficiency, and the diagnosis is established by demonstration of decreased FXIII activity and antigen. Plasma-derived, virus-inactivated factor XIII concentrate is the treatment of choice. The low plasma levels of FXIII (about 5% required to control bleeding and its long half-life make monthly prophylactic therapy feasible. Recently, recombinant FXIII concentrate with a half-life similar to that of native FXIII has been developed and tested in a multinational clinical study. This new product appears to be safe and appropriate for lifelong prophylactic treatment of patients with FXIII-A deficiency.Keywords: recombinant FXIII concentrate, FXIII deficiency

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition in which ...

  7. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... c m y one in Children What is growth hormone deficiency? Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a rare condition in which the body does not make enough growth hormone (GH). GH is made by the pituitary gland, ...

  8. STEADY-STATE TRANSCRIPT LEVELS OF CYTOCHROME-C-OXIDASE GENES DURING HUMAN MYOGENESIS INDICATE SUBUNIT SWITCHING OF SUBUNIT VIA AND COEXPRESSION OF SUBUNIT VIIA ISOFORMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TAANMAN, JW; HERZBERG, NH; DEVRIES, H; BOLHUIS, PA; VANDENBOGERT, C

    1992-01-01

    Steady-state levels of the mitochondrial rRNAs, of mRNAs for mitochondrially and nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase and for the beta-subunit of ATP synthase were assessed by Northern blot hybridizations during the in vitro differentiation of human myoblasts. Transcript levels of the so

  9. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  10. Knockout mutants as a tool to identify the subunit composition of Arabidopsis glutamine synthetase isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragićević, Milan; Todorović, Slađana; Bogdanović, Milica; Filipović, Biljana; Mišić, Danijela; Simonović, Ana

    2014-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in nitrogen assimilation, which catalyzes the formation of glutamine from ammonia and glutamate. Plant GS isoforms are multimeric enzymes, recently shown to be decamers. The Arabidopsis genome encodes five cytosolic (GS1) proteins labeled as GLN1;1 through GLN1;5 and one chloroplastic (GS2) isoform, GLN2;0. However, as many as 11 GS activity bands were resolved from different Arabidopsis tissues by Native PAGE and activity staining. Western analysis showed that all 11 isoforms are composed exclusively of 40 kDa GS1 subunits. Of five GS1 genes, only GLN1;1, GLN1;2 and GLN1;3 transcripts accumulated to significant levels in vegetative tissues, indicating that only subunits encoded by these three genes produce the 11-band zymogram. Even though the GS2 gene also had significant expression, the corresponding activity was not detected, probably due to inactivation. To resolve the subunit composition of 11 active GS1 isoforms, homozygous knockout mutants deficient in the expression of different GS1 genes were selected from the progeny of T-DNA insertional SALK and SAIL lines. Comparison of GS isoenzyme patterns of the selected GS1 knockout mutants indicated that all of the detected isoforms consist of varying proportions of GLN1;1, GLN1;2 and GLN1;3 subunits, and that GLN1;1 and GLN1;3, as well as GLN1;2 and GLN1;3 and possibly GLN1;1 and GLN1;2 proteins combine in all proportions to form active homo- and heterodecamers.

  11. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contrast arthrography orMagnetic Resonance Imaging is indicated when radiological features are questionable and to disclose thepresence and location of the femoral head and any cartilagenous anlage. The disorder is more commonlyunilateral and is apparent at birth. However, bilateral involvement is rarely seen. Therapy of the disorder isdirected towards satisfactory ambulation and specific treatment depending on the severity of dysplasia.

  12. Micronutrient deficiency in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, M K; Sommerfelt, H; Strand, T

    2001-05-01

    Malnutrition increases morbidity and mortality and affects physical growth and development, some of these effects resulting from specific micronutrient deficiencies. While public health efforts must be targeted to improve dietary intakes in children through breast feeding and appropriate complementary feeding, there is a need for additional measures to increase the intake of certain micronutrients. Food-based approaches are regarded as the long-term strategy for improving nutrition, but for certain micronutrients, supplementation, be it to the general population or to high risk groups or as an adjunct to treatment must also be considered. Our understanding of the prevalence and consequences of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency in children and pregnant women has advanced considerably while there is still a need to generate more knowledge pertaining to many other micronutrients, including zinc, selenium and many of the B-vitamins. For iron and vitamin A, the challenge is to improve the delivery to target populations. For disease prevention and growth promotion, the need to deliver safe but effective amounts of micronutrients such as zinc to children and women of fertile age can be determined only after data on deficiency prevalence becomes available and the studies on mortality reduction following supplementation are completed. Individual or multiple micronutrients must be used as an adjunct to treatment of common infectious diseases and malnutrition only if the gains are substantial and the safety window sufficiently wide. The available data for zinc are promising with regard to the prevention of diarrhea and pneumonia. It should be emphasized that there must be no displacement of important treatment such as ORS in acute diarrhea by adjunct therapy such as zinc. Credible policy making requires description of not only the clinical effects but also the underlying biological mechanisms. As findings of experimental studies are not always feasible to extrapolate to

  13. Orexin deficiency and narcolepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Orexin deficiency results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy in many mammalian species, including mice, dogs, and humans, suggesting that the orexin system is particularly important for normal regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, and especially for maintenance of wakefulness. This review discusses animal models of narcolepsy; the contribution of each orexin receptor subtype to the narcoleptic phenotypes; and the etiology of orexin neuronal death. It also raises the possibility of novel thera...

  14. Loss of the smallest subunit of cytochrome c oxidase, COX8A, causes Leigh-like syndrome and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Kerstin; Kudin, Alexei P; Zsurka, Gábor; Kornblum, Cornelia; Reimann, Jens; Stüve, Burkhard; Waltz, Stephan; Hattingen, Elke; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Rüb, Cornelia; Voos, Wolfgang; Kopatz, Jens; Neumann, Harald; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2016-02-01

    Isolated cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) deficiency is one of the most frequent respiratory chain defects in humans and is usually caused by mutations in proteins required for assembly of the complex. Mutations in nuclear-encoded structural subunits are very rare. In a patient with Leigh-like syndrome presenting with leukodystrophy and severe epilepsy, we identified a homozygous splice site mutation in COX8A, which codes for the ubiquitously expressed isoform of subunit VIII, the smallest nuclear-encoded subunit of complex IV. The mutation, affecting the last nucleotide of intron 1, leads to aberrant splicing, a frame-shift in the highly conserved exon 2, and decreased amount of the COX8A transcript. The loss of the wild-type COX8A protein severely impairs the stability of the entire cytochrome c oxidase enzyme complex and manifests in isolated complex IV deficiency in skeletal muscle and fibroblasts, similar to the frequent c.845_846delCT mutation in the assembly factor SURF1 gene. Stability and activity of complex IV could be rescued in the patient's fibroblasts by lentiviral expression of wild-type COX8A. Our findings demonstrate that COX8A is indispensable for function of human complex IV and its mutation causes human disease.

  15. Human mitochondrial complex I assembles through the combination of evolutionary conserved modules: a framework to interpret complex I deficiencies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ugalde, C.; Vogel, R.O.; Huijbens, R.J.F.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    With 46 subunits, human mitochondrial complex I is the largest enzyme of the oxidative phosphorylation system. We have studied the assembly of complex I in cultured human cells. This will provide essential information about the nature of complex I deficiencies and will enhance our understanding of m

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia A A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  18. Comparative Analysis of Eubacterial DNA Polymerase Ⅲ Alpha Subunits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qian Zhao; Jian-Fei Hu; Jun Yu

    2006-01-01

    DNA polymerase Ⅲ is one of the five eubacterial DNA polymerases that is responsible for the replication of DNA duplex. Among the ten subunits of the DNA polymerase Ⅲ core enzyme, the alpha subunit catalyzes the reaction for polymerizing both DNA strands. In this study, we extracted genomic sequences of the alpha subunit from 159 sequenced eubacterial genomes, and carried out sequencebased phylogenetic and structural analyses. We found that all eubacterial genomes have one or more alpha subunits, which form either homodimers or heterodimers.Phylogenetic and domain structural analyses as well as copy number variations of the alpha subunit in each bacterium indicate the classification of alpha subunit into four basic groups: polC, dnaE1, dnaE2, and dnaE3. This classification is of essence in genome composition analysis. We also consolidated the naming convention to avoid further confusion in gene annotations.

  19. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John J; Trakadis, Yannis J; Scriver, Charles R

    2011-08-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in intolerance to the dietary intake of the essential amino acid phenylalanine. It occurs in approximately 1:15,000 individuals. Deficiency of this enzyme produces a spectrum of disorders including classic phenylketonuria, mild phenylketonuria, and mild hyperphenylalaninemia. Classic phenylketonuria is caused by a complete or near-complete deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase activity and without dietary restriction of phenylalanine most children will develop profound and irreversible intellectual disability. Mild phenylketonuria and mild hyperphenylalaninemia are associated with lower risk of impaired cognitive development in the absence of treatment. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency can be diagnosed by newborn screening based on detection of the presence of hyperphenylalaninemia using the Guthrie microbial inhibition assay or other assays on a blood spot obtained from a heel prick. Since the introduction of newborn screening, the major neurologic consequences of hyperphenylalaninemia have been largely eradicated. Affected individuals can lead normal lives. However, recent data suggest that homeostasis is not fully restored with current therapy. Treated individuals have a higher incidence of neuropsychological problems. The mainstay of treatment for hyperphenylalaninemia involves a low-protein diet and use of a phenylalanine-free medical formula. This treatment must commence as soon as possible after birth and should continue for life. Regular monitoring of plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine concentrations is necessary. Targets of plasma phenylalanine of 120-360 μmol/L (2-6 mg/dL) in the first decade of life are essential for optimal outcome. Phenylalanine targets in adolescence and adulthood are less clear. A significant proportion of patients with phenylketonuria may benefit from adjuvant therapy with 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin stereoisomer. Special consideration must be

  20. Subunit structure of the phycobiliproteins of blue-green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, A N; Cohen-Bazire, G

    1971-07-01

    The phycobiliproteins of the blue-green algae Synechococcus sp. and Aphanocapsu sp. were characterized with respect to homogeneity, isoelectric point, and subunit composition. Each of the biliproteins consisted of two different noncovalently associated subunits, with molecular weights of about 20,000 and 16,000 for phycocyanin, 17,500 and 15,500 for allophycocyanin, and 22,000 and 20,000 for phycoerythrin. Covalently bound chromophore was associated with each subunit.

  1. Newborn screening for dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency: Citrulline as a useful analyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane C. Quinonez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency, also known as maple syrup urine disease (MSUD type III, is caused by the deficiency of the E3 subunit of branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (αKGDH, and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH. DLD deficiency variably presents with either a severe neonatal encephalopathic phenotype or a primarily hepatic phenotype. As a variant form of MSUD, it is considered a core condition recommended for newborn screening. The detection of variant MSUD forms has proven difficult in the past with no asymptomatic DLD deficiency patients identified by current newborn screening strategies. Citrulline has recently been identified as an elevated dried blood spot (DBS metabolite in symptomatic patients affected with DLD deficiency. Here we report the retrospective DBS analysis and second-tier allo-isoleucine testing of 2 DLD deficiency patients. We show that an elevated citrulline and an elevated allo-isoleucine on second-tier testing can be used to successfully detect DLD deficiency. We additionally recommend that DLD deficiency be included in the “citrullinemia/elevated citrulline” ACMG Act Sheet and Algorithm.

  2. Work environments of different types of nursing subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatt, P; Schneck, R

    1982-11-01

    Based upon organizational theory, the purpose of this research was to identify and describe similarities and differences in the work environments of nine different types of nursing subunits (intensive care, medical, surgical, psychiatric, auxiliary, rehabilitation, rural, paediatric and obstetrical) in hospitals. Six measures of nursing subunit environment were developed: these included measures of nursing subunit autonomy, and the complexity and pervasiveness of other medical and hospital groups interacting with the nursing subunit. Data were collected by questionnaire from headnurses in 157 nursing subunits located in 24 hospitals in Alberta, Canada. The results indicated that the types of nursing subunits were similar in their degree of autonomy from both physicians and administration in the larger context in which they were located but were significantly different in terms of number and heterogeneity of groups outside nurses with which they interacted and the extent to which such groups pervaded the subunits. For example, intensive care units appeared as the type of nursing subunit with the greatest need for interaction with physicians, paramedics, hotel services and so on, whereas, psychiatric subunits appeared to be the least dependent on groups outside nursing in the hospital. These findings have implications for the management practices and educational programme for nursing.

  3. Hydrogen sulphide improves adaptation of Zea mays seedlings to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Shang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is emerging as a potential molecule involved in physiological regulation in plants. However, whether H2S regulates iron-shortage responses in plants is largely unknown. Here, the role of H2S in modulating iron availability in maize (Zea mays L. cv Canner) seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution is reported. The main results are as follows: Firstly, NaHS, a donor of H2S, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution. Secondly, electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize seedlings revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. On the contrary, mesophyll chloroplasts appeared completely developed in H2S-treated maize seedlings. Thirdly, H2S treatment increased iron accumulation in maize seedlings by changing the expression levels of iron homeostasis- and sulphur metabolism-related genes. Fourthly, phytosiderophore (PS) accumulation and secretion were enhanced by H2S treatment in seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. Indeed, the gene expression of ferric-phytosiderophore transporter (ZmYS1) was specifically induced by iron deficiency in maize leaves and roots, whereas their abundance was decreased by NaHS treatment. Lastly, H2S significantly enhanced photosynthesis through promoting the protein expression of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (RuBISCO LSU) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the expression of genes encoding RuBISCO large subunit (RBCL), small subunit (RBCS), D1 protein (psbA), and PEPC in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. These results indicate that H2S is closely related to iron uptake, transport, and accumulation, and consequently increases chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast development, and photosynthesis in plants.

  4. Thermostable Subunit Vaccines for Pulmonary Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    -administrable, can be distributed independently of functioning freezers and refrigerators, and can be designed to induce mucosal and/or cell-mediated immunity, which is attractive for a number of diseases requiring stimulation of local mucosal immunity for protection. However, the design and delivery of thermostable...... dry powder-based vaccines represents a technological challenge: It calls for careful formulation and dosage form design, combined with cheap and efficient delivery devices, which must be engineered via a thorough understanding of the physiological barrier and the requirements for induction of mucosal...... immunity. Here, I review state of the art and perspectives in formulation design and processing methods for powder-based subunit vaccines intended for pulmonary administration, and present dry powder inhaler technologies suitable for translating these vaccines into clinical trials....

  5. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  6. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  7. Preclinical studies for the gene therapy of leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon Rico, D.

    2015-07-01

    Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I (LAD-I) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in ITGB2 gene, encoding for CD18 protein (also known as 2 subunit). This protein binds to different CD11 subunits to form 2 integrins, which are expressed in the leukocyte membrane and allow leukocytes to firmly adhere to the endothelium as a previous step to the extravasation. In LAD-I patients, ITGB2 mutations lead to absent, low or aberrant CD18 expression, which results in absent or low 2 integrin expression on the leukocyte membrane. CD18 deficient leukocytes, especially neutrophils, fail to extravasate from the bloodstream to infected tissues. LAD-I patients suffer from recurrent and severe infections leading normally to death. (Author)

  8. Dynamic regulation of β1 subunit trafficking controls vascular contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, M Dennis; Bannister, John P; Narayanan, Damodaran; Nair, Anitha; Grubbs, Jordan E; Gabrick, Kyle S; Boop, Frederick A; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2014-02-11

    Ion channels composed of pore-forming and auxiliary subunits control physiological functions in virtually all cell types. A conventional view is that channels assemble with their auxiliary subunits before anterograde plasma membrane trafficking of the protein complex. Whether the multisubunit composition of surface channels is fixed following protein synthesis or flexible and open to acute and, potentially, rapid modulation to control activity and cellular excitability is unclear. Arterial smooth muscle cells (myocytes) express large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channel α and auxiliary β1 subunits that are functionally significant modulators of arterial contractility. Here, we show that native BKα subunits are primarily (∼95%) plasma membrane-localized in human and rat arterial myocytes. In contrast, only a small fraction (∼10%) of total β1 subunits are located at the cell surface. Immunofluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy demonstrated that intracellular β1 subunits are stored within Rab11A-postive recycling endosomes. Nitric oxide (NO), acting via cGMP-dependent protein kinase, and cAMP-dependent pathways stimulated rapid (≤1 min) anterograde trafficking of β1 subunit-containing recycling endosomes, which increased surface β1 almost threefold. These β1 subunits associated with surface-resident BKα proteins, elevating channel Ca(2+) sensitivity and activity. Our data also show that rapid β1 subunit anterograde trafficking is the primary mechanism by which NO activates myocyte BK channels and induces vasodilation. In summary, we show that rapid β1 subunit surface trafficking controls functional BK channel activity in arterial myocytes and vascular contractility. Conceivably, regulated auxiliary subunit trafficking may control ion channel activity in a wide variety of cell types.

  9. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith

    2016-01-01

    be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode......The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens...... of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR expression profile of the target APCs. Here, we review state-of-the-art formulation approaches employed for the inclusion of immunostimulators and subunit...

  10. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  11. Structure of the archaeal Cascade subunit Csa5: relating the small subunits of CRISPR effector complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeks, Judith; Graham, Shirley; Anderson, Linzi; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F; Naismith, James H

    2013-05-01

    The Cascade complex for CRISPR-mediated antiviral immunity uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target invading DNA species from mobile elements such as viruses, leading to their destruction. The core of the Cascade effector complex consists of the Cas5 and Cas7 subunits, which are widely conserved in prokaryotes. Cas7 binds crRNA and forms the helical backbone of Cascade. Many archaea encode a version of the Cascade complex (denoted Type I-A) that includes a Csa5 (or small) subunit, which interacts weakly with the core proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Csa5 protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Csa5 comprises a conserved α-helical domain with a small insertion consisting of a weakly conserved β-strand domain. In the crystal, the Csa5 monomers have multimerized into infinite helical threads. At each interface is a strictly conserved intersubunit salt bridge, deletion of which disrupts multimerization. Structural analysis indicates a shared evolutionary history among the small subunits of the CRISPR effector complexes. The same α-helical domain is found in the C-terminal domain of Cse2 (from Type I-E Cascade), while the N-terminal domain of Cse2 is found in Cmr5 of the CMR (Type III-B) effector complex. As Cmr5 shares no match with Csa5, two possibilities present themselves: selective domain loss from an ancestral Cse2 to create two new subfamilies or domain fusion of two separate families to create a new Cse2 family. A definitive answer awaits structural studies of further small subunits from other CRISPR effector complexes.

  12. Optic nerve compression and retinal degeneration in Tcirg1 mutant mice lacking the vacuolar-type H-ATPase a3 subunit.

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    Nobuyuki Kawamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vacuolar-type proton transporting ATPase (V-ATPase is involved in the proper development of visual function. Mutations in the Tcirg1 (also known as Atp6V0a3 locus, which encodes the a3 subunit of V-ATPase, cause severe autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO in humans. ARO is often associated with impaired vision most likely because of nerve compression at the optic canal. We examined the ocular phenotype of mice deficient in Tcirg1 function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: X-ray microtomography showed narrowed foramina in the skull, suggesting that optic nerve compression occurred in the a3-deficient (Tcirg1-/- mice. The retina of the mutant mice had normal architecture, but the number of apoptotic cells was increased at 2-3 wks after birth. In the ocular system, the a3 subunit accumulated in the choriocapillary meshwork in uveal tissues. Two other subunit isoforms a1 and a2 accumulated in the retinal photoreceptor layer. We found that the a4 subunit, whose expression has previously been shown to be restricted to several transporting epithelia, was enriched in pigmented epithelial cells of the retina and ciliary bodies. The expression of a4 in the uveal tissue was below the level of detection in wild-type mice, but it was increased in the mutant choriocapillary meshwork, suggesting that compensation may have occurred among the a subunit isoforms in the mutant tissues. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a similar etiology of visual impairment is involved in both humans and mice; thus, a3-deficient mice may provide a suitable model for clinical and diagnostic purposes in cases of ARO.

  13. Phosphorus Deficiency in Ducklins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CuiHengmin; LuoLingping

    1995-01-01

    20 one-day-old Tianfu ducklings were fed on a natural diet deficient in phosphorus(Ca 0.80%,P 0.366%)for three weeks and examined for signs and lesions.Signs began to appear at the age of one week,and became serous at two weeks.13 ducklings died during the experiment.Morbidity was 100% and mortality was 65%.The affected ducklings mainly showed leg weakness,severe lamencess,deprssion,lack of appetite and stunted growth,The serum alkaline phosphatase activities increased markedly.The serum phosphorus concentration,tibial ash,ash calcium and phosphorus content decreased obviously.At necropsy,maxillae and ribe were soft,and the latter was crooked.Long ones were soft and broke easily.The hypertrophic zone of the growth-plate in the epiphysis of long ones was lengthened and osteoid tissue increased in the metaphyseal spongiosa histopathologically.The above mentioned symptoms and lesions could be prevented by adding phosphorus to the natural deficient diet(up to 0.65%),The relationship between lesions and signs,pathomorphological characterisation and pathogensis were also discussed in this paper.

  14. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  15. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blo...

  16. Molecular Basis of Inherited Factor XIII- A Deficiency among Patients from Sistan - Baluchestan

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    Hejazi Shabnam

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Factor ХШ, the last zymogene in the clotting cascade, converts the loose fibrin polymer into a firm polymer. In the absence of factor ХШ the abnormal fibrin is soluble in acetic acid, as well as 5M urea. Factor ХШ is composed of 2 catalytic A subunit bounds and 2 B subunits as carriers (A2B2. The gene of A chain is located on chromosome 6. Factor ХШ deficiency is rare; with a prevalence of only 1 in 2 million in the general population. The overwhelming majority of cases are due to mutations in subunit A. The aim of this study was to detect the mutations of subunit A.Materials & Methods: In this study we investigated the molecular basis of inherited factor ХШ deficiency among 10 unrelated patients from Sistan and Balouchestan province in 2006. Mutations were detected by amplifying each exon. Those exons exhibiting the presence of heteroduplex by conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE were selected for direct sequencing. Sequencing of mutations was carried out by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP.Results: All patients had homologous subsitiation of TGG to CGG in exon 4 which led to change of arginine to tryptophan.Conclusion: The mutation found in this study was in the core domain of enzyme. It seems that the changs in electric charge and affinity of enzyme to substrate‚as a result decreases the level of factor XIII-A activity.

  17. Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Bikram S; Finelli, Frederick C; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2012-09-01

    Lifestyle intervention programmes often produce insufficient weight loss and poor weight loss maintenance. As a result, an increasing number of patients with obesity and related comorbidities undergo bariatric surgery, which includes approaches such as the adjustable gastric band or the 'divided' Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This Review summarizes the current knowledge on nutrient deficiencies that can develop after bariatric surgery and highlights follow-up and treatment options for bariatric surgery patients who develop a micronutrient deficiency. The major macronutrient deficiency after bariatric surgery is protein malnutrition. Deficiencies in micronutrients, which include trace elements, essential minerals, and water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins, are common before bariatric surgery and often persist postoperatively, despite universal recommendations on multivitamin and mineral supplements. Other disorders, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, can promote micronutrient deficiencies, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus. Recognition of the clinical presentations of micronutrient deficiencies is important, both to enable early intervention and to minimize long-term adverse effects. A major clinical concern is the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the development of metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis or osteomalacia; metabolic bone diseases may explain the increased risk of hip fracture in patients after RYGB. Further studies are required to determine the optimal levels of nutrient supplementation and whether postoperative laboratory monitoring effectively detects nutrient deficiencies. In the absence of such data, clinicians should inquire about and treat symptoms that suggest nutrient deficiencies.

  18. Gene for the catalytic subunit of mouse DNA-dependent protein kinase maps to the scid locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R D; Hogg, J; Ozaki, J H; Gell, D; Jackson, S P; Riblet, R

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) has been proposed recently as a candidate gene for the mouse severe combined immune deficiency (scid) locus. We have used a partial cDNA clone for human DNA-PKcs to map the mouse homologue using a large interspecific backcross panel. We found that the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs does not recombine with scid, consistent with the hypothesis that scid is a mutation in the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7479885

  19. A revised model for AMP-activated protein kinase structure: The alpha-subunit binds to both the beta- and gamma-subunits although there is no direct binding between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-11-24

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor for cellular metabolic energy state. It is activated by a high AMP/ATP ratio and leads to metabolic changes that conserve energy and utilize alternative cellular fuel sources. The kinase is composed of a heterotrimeric protein complex containing a catalytic alpha-subunit, an AMP-binding gamma-subunit, and a scaffolding beta-subunit thought to bind directly both the alpha- and gamma-subunits. Here, we use coimmunoprecipitation of proteins in transiently transfected cells to show that the alpha2-subunit binds directly not only to the beta-subunit, confirming previous work, but also to the gamma1-subunit. Deletion analysis of the alpha2-subunit reveals that the C-terminal 386-552 residues are sufficient to bind to the beta-subunit. The gamma1-subunit binds directly to the alpha2-subunit at two interaction sites, one within the catalytic domain consisting of alpha2 amino acids 1-312 and a second within residues 386-552. Binding of the alpha2 and the gamma1-subunits was not affected by 400 mum AMP or ATP. Furthermore, we show that the beta-subunit C terminus is essential for binding to the alpha2-subunit but, in contrast to previous work, the beta-subunit does not bind directly to the gamma1-subunit. Taken together, this study presents a new model for AMPK heterotrimer structure where through its C terminus the beta-subunit binds to the alpha-subunit that, in turn, binds to the gamma-subunit. There is no direct interaction between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

  20. The subunit composition and function of mammalian cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadenbach, Bernhard; Hüttemann, Maik

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) from mammals and birds is composed of 13 subunits. The three catalytic subunits I-III are encoded by mitochondrial DNA, the ten nuclear-coded subunits (IV, Va, Vb, VIa, VIb, VIc, VIIa, VIIb, VIIc, VIII) by nuclear DNA. The nuclear-coded subunits are essentially involved in the regulation of oxygen consumption and proton translocation by COX, since their removal or modification changes the activity and their mutation causes mitochondrial diseases. Respiration, the basis for ATP synthesis in mitochondria, is differently regulated in organs and species by expression of tissue-, developmental-, and species-specific isoforms for COX subunits IV, VIa, VIb, VIIa, VIIb, and VIII, but the holoenzyme in mammals is always composed of 13 subunits. Various proteins and enzymes were shown, e.g., by co-immunoprecipitation, to bind to specific COX subunits and modify its activity, but these interactions are reversible, in contrast to the tightly bound 13 subunits. In addition, the formation of supercomplexes with other oxidative phosphorylation complexes has been shown to be largely variable. The regulatory complexity of COX is increased by protein phosphorylation. Up to now 18 phosphorylation sites have been identified under in vivo conditions in mammals. However, only for a few phosphorylation sites and four nuclear-coded subunits could a specific function be identified. Research on the signaling pathways leading to specific COX phosphorylations remains a great challenge for understanding the regulation of respiration and ATP synthesis in mammalian organisms. This article reviews the function of the individual COX subunits and their isoforms, as well as proteins and small molecules interacting and regulating the enzyme.

  1. Regulation of BK channels by auxiliary γ subunits

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    Jiyuan eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The large-conductance, calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK channel has the largest single-channel conductance among potassium channels and can be activated by both membrane depolarization and increases in intracellular calcium concentration. BK channels consist of pore-forming, voltage- and calcium-sensing α subunits, either alone or in association with regulatory subunits. BK channels are widely expressed in various tissues and cells including both excitable and non-excitable cells and display diverse biophysical and pharmacological characteristics. This diversity can be explained in part by posttranslational modifications and alternative splicing of the α subunit, which is encoded by a single gene, KCNMA1, as well as by tissue-specific β subunit modulation. Recently, a leucine-rich repeat-containing membrane protein, LRRC26, was found to interact with BK channels and cause an unprecedented large negative shift (~-140 mV in the voltage dependence of the BK channel activation. LRRC26 allows BK channels to open even at near-physiological calcium concentration and membrane voltage in non-excitable cells. Three LRRC26-related proteins, LRRC52, LRRC55, and LRRC38, were subsequently identified as BK channel modulators. These LRRC proteins are structurally and functionally distinct from the BK channel β subunits and were designated as γ subunits. The discovery of the γ subunits adds a new dimension to BK channel regulation and improves our understanding of the physiological functions of BK channels in various tissues and cell types. Unlike BK channel β subunits, which have been intensively investigated both mechanistically and physiologically, our understanding of the γ subunits is very limited at this stage. This article reviews the structure, modulatory mechanisms, physiological relevance, and potential therapeutic implications of γ subunits as they are currently understood.

  2. Identification of a novel HMW glutenin subunit and comparison of its amino acid sequence with those of homologous subunits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Aegilops tauschii is the donor of the D genome of common wheat (Triticum aestivum). Genetic variation of HMW glutenin subunits encoded by the Glu-1Dt locus of Ae. tauschii has been found to be higher than that specified by the Glu-1D locus in common wheat. In the present note, we report the identification of a novel HMW glutenin subunit, Dy13t, from Ae. tauschii. The newly identified subunit possessed an electrophoretic mobility that was faster than that of the Dy12 subunit of common wheat. The complete ORF of encoding the Dy13t subunit contained 624 codons (excluding the stop codons). The amino acid sequence deduced from the Dy13t gene ORF was the shortest among those of the previously reported subunits derived by the D genome. A further comparison of Dy13t amino acid sequence with those of the subunits characterized from the A, B, D, R genomes of Triticeae showed that the smaller size of the Dy13t subunit was associated with a reduction in the size of its repetitive domain.

  3. A Deficit of ATP-ase Subunit 8: with Contribution for Two New Cases

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    Naumova E.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In two consanguineous children brother and sister were reported rare mitochondrial disorder caused by mutation of the gene of MT-ATP8: base change T8412C, with aminoacid change: methionin - threonine which wasthe cause for decreased activity of the synthesized protein (enzyme and to dysfunction of central nervous system and muscle of the affected children. These cases give us the base to recommend children with muscle hypotonia, mental retardation with unknown cause to be hospitalized in Clinical genetics for confirmation of the diagnosis and careful genetic consultation. The foundation of new rare mitochondrial disease of ATP synthase subunit 8 deficiency is useful in Pediatrics and permit treatment and prenatal diagnosis of the family.

  4. Nuclear life of the voltage-gated Cacnb4 subunit and its role in gene transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronjat, Michel; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Barbado, Maud; De Waard, Michel; Mori, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    The pore-forming subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels is associated to auxiliary subunits among which the cytoplasmic β subunit. The different isoforms of this subunit control both the plasma membrane targeting and the biophysical properties of the channel moiety. In a recent study, we demonstrated that the Cacnb4 (β 4) isoform is at the center of a new signaling pathway that connects neuronal excitability and gene transcription. This mechanism relies on nuclear targeting of β 4 triggered by neuronal electrical stimulation. This re-localization of β 4 is promoted by its interaction with Ppp2r5d a regulatory subunit of PP2A in complex with PP2A itself. The formation, as well as the nuclear translocation, of the β 4/ Ppp2r5d/ PP2A complex is totally impaired by the premature R482X stops mutation of β 4 that has been previously associated with juvenile epilepsy. Taking as a case study the tyrosine hydroxylase gene that is strongly upregulated in brain of lethargic mice, deficient for β 4 expression, we deciphered the molecular steps presiding to this signaling pathway. Here we show that expression of wild-type β 4 in HEK293 cells results in the regulation of several genes, while expression of the mutated β 4 (β 1-481) produces a different set of gene regulation. Several genes regulated by β 4 in HEK293 cells were also regulated upon neuronal differentiation of NG108-15 cells that induces nuclear translocation of β 4 suggesting a link between β 4 nuclear targeting and gene regulation.

  5. Iodine deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delange, F

    1995-01-18

    Iodine is a trace element present in the human body in minute amounts (15-20 mg in adults, i.e. 0.0285 x 10(-3)% of body weight). The only confirmed function of iodine is to constitute an essential substrate for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, tetraiodothyronine, thyroxine or T4 and triiodothyronine, T3 (1). In thyroxine, iodine is 60% by weight. Thyroid hormones, in turn, play a decisive role in the metabolism of all cells of the organism (2) and in the process of early growth and development of most organs, especially of the brain (3). Brain development in humans occurs from fetal life up to the third postnatal year (4). Consequently, a deficit in iodine and/or in thyroid hormones occurring during this critical period of life will result not only in the slowing down of the metabolic activities of all the cells of the organism but also in irreversible alterations in the development of the brain. The clinical consequence will be mental retardation (5). When the physiological requirements of iodine are not met in a given population, a series of functional and developmental abnormalities occur (Table 1), including thyroid function abnormalities and, when iodine deficiency is severe, endemic goiter and cretinism, endemic mental retardation, decreased fertility rate, increased perinatal death, and infant mortality. These complications, which constitute an hindrance to the development of the affected population, are grouped under the general heading of Iodine Deficiency Disorders, IDD (6). Broad geographic areas exist in which the population is affected by IDD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  7. Inactivated and subunit vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome: Current status and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Calvert, Jay G; Roof, Michael; Lager, Kelly M

    2015-06-17

    Within a few years of its emergence in the late 1980s, the PRRS virus had spread globally to become the foremost infectious disease concern for the pork industry. Since 1994, modified live-attenuated vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV-MLV) have been widely used, but have failed to provide complete protection against emerging and heterologous field strains of the virus. Moreover, like many other MLVs, PRRSV-MLVs have safety concerns including vertical and horizontal transmission of the vaccine virus and several documented incidences of reversion to virulence. Thus, the development of efficacious inactivated vaccines is warranted for the control and eradication of PRRS. Since the early 1990s, researchers have been attempting to develop inactivated PRRSV vaccines, but most of the candidates have failed to elicit protective immunity even against homologous virus challenge. Recent research findings relating to both inactivated and subunit candidate PRRSV vaccines have shown promise, but they need to be pursued further to improve their heterologous efficacy and cost-effectiveness before considering commercialization. In this comprehensive review, we provide information on attempts to develop PRRSV inactivated and subunit vaccines. These includes various virus inactivation strategies, adjuvants, nanoparticle-based vaccine delivery systems, DNA vaccines, and recombinant subunit vaccines produced using baculovirus, plant, and replication-deficient viruses as vector vaccines. Finally, future directions for the development of innovative non-infectious PRRSV vaccines are suggested. Undoubtedly there remains a need for novel PRRSV vaccine strategies targeted to deliver cross-protective, non-infectious vaccines for the control and eradication of PRRS.

  8. TFIIH subunit alterations causing xeroderma pigmentosum and trichothiodystrophy specifically disturb several steps during transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amita; Compe, Emanuel; Le May, Nicolas; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the ERCC3 (XPB), ERCC2 (XPD), and GTF2H5 (p8 or TTD-A) subunits of the transcription and DNA-repair factor TFIIH lead to three autosomal-recessive disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), XP associated with Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). Although these diseases were originally associated with defects in DNA repair, transcription deficiencies might be also implicated. By using retinoic acid receptor beta isoform 2 (RARB2) as a model in several cells bearing mutations in genes encoding TFIIH subunits, we observed that (1) the recruitment of the TFIIH complex was altered at the activated RARB2 promoter, (2) TFIIH participated in the recruitment of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors during transcription in a manner different from that observed during NER, and (3) the different TFIIH variants disturbed transcription by having distinct consequences on post-translational modifications of histones, DNA-break induction, DNA demethylation, and gene-loop formation. The transition from heterochromatin to euchromatin was disrupted depending on the variant, illustrating the fact that TFIIH, by contributing to NER factor recruitment, orchestrates chromatin remodeling. The subtle transcriptional differences found between various TFIIH variants thus participate in the phenotypic variability observed among XP, XP/CS, and TTD individuals.

  9. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of card

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pochinok, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the article the role of iron in the human body is highlighted. The mechanism of development of iron deficiency states, their consequences and the basic principles of diagnosis and correction of children of different ages are shown.Key words: children, iron deficiency anemia, treatment.

  11. Conservation of helical bundle structure between the exocyst subunits.

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    Nicole J Croteau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exocyst is a large hetero-octomeric protein complex required for regulating the targeting and fusion of secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane in eukaryotic cells. Although the sequence identity between the eight different exocyst subunits is less than 10%, structures of domains of four of the subunits revealed a similar helical bundle topology. Characterization of several of these subunits has been hindered by lack of soluble protein for biochemical and structural studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using advanced hidden Markov models combined with secondary structure predictions, we detect significant sequence similarity between each of the exocyst subunits, indicating that they all contain helical bundle structures. We corroborate these remote homology predictions by identifying and purifying a predicted domain of yeast Sec10p, a previously insoluble exocyst subunit. This domain is soluble and folded with approximately 60% alpha-helicity, in agreement with our predictions, and capable of interacting with several known Sec10p binding partners. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although all eight of the exocyst subunits had been suggested to be composed of similar helical bundles, this has now been validated by our hidden Markov model structure predictions. In addition, these predictions identified protein domains within the exocyst subunits, resulting in creation and characterization of a soluble, folded domain of Sec10p.

  12. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  13. Fe deficiency induced changes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwen; Xu, Chao; Li, Kang; Cai, Xiaojie; Wu, Min; Chen, Guoxiang

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency is an important abiotic stress that limits productivity of crops all over the world. We selected a hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.), LYPJ, which is super high-yield and widely cultured in China, to investigate changes in the components and structure of thylakoid membranes and photosynthetic performance in response to iron deficiency. Our results demonstrated that photosystem I (PSI) is the primary target for iron deficiency, while the changes in photosystem II (PSII) are important for rebuilding a balance in disrupted energy utilization and dissipation caused by differential degradation of photosynthetic components. The result of immunoblot analysis suggested that the core subunit PsaA declined drastically, while PsbA remained relatively stable. Furthermore, several organizational changes of the photosynthetic apparatus were found by BN-PAGE, including a marked decrease in the PSI core complexes, the Cytb 6 /f complex, and the trimeric form of the LHCII antenna, consistent with the observed unstacking grana. The fluorescence induction analysis indicated a descending PSII activity with energy dissipation enhanced markedly. In addition, we proposed that the crippled CO2 assimilation could be compensated by the enhanced of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which is suggested by the decreased ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and photosynthetic efficiency.

  14. Complementation of diverse HIV-1 Env defects through cooperative subunit interactions: a general property of the functional trimer

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    Salzwedel Karl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 Env glycoprotein mediates virus entry by catalyzing direct fusion between the virion membrane and the target cell plasma membrane. Env is composed of two subunits: gp120, which binds to CD4 and the coreceptor, and gp41, which is triggered upon coreceptor binding to promote the membrane fusion reaction. Env on the surface of infected cells is a trimer consisting of three gp120/gp41 homo-dimeric protomers. An emerging question concerns cooperative interactions between the protomers in the trimer, and possible implications for Env function. Results We extended studies on cooperative subunit interactions within the HIV-1 Env trimer, using analysis of functional complementation between coexpressed inactive variants harboring different functional deficiencies. In assays of Env-mediated cell fusion, complementation was observed between variants with a wide range of defects in both the gp120 and gp41 subunits. The former included gp120 subunits mutated in the CD4 binding site or incapable of coreceptor interaction due either to mismatched specificity or V3 loop mutation. Defective gp41 variants included point mutations at different residues within the fusion peptide or heptad repeat regions, as well as constructs with modifications or deletions of the membrane proximal tryptophan-rich region or the transmembrane domain. Complementation required the defective variants to be coexpressed in the same cell. The observed complementation activities were highly dependent on the assay system. The most robust activities were obtained with a vaccinia virus-based expression and reporter gene activation assay for cell fusion. In an alternative system involving Env expression from integrated provirus, complementation was detected in cell fusion assays, but not in virus particle entry assays. Conclusion Our results indicate that Env function does not require every subunit in the trimer to be competent for all essential activities. Through

  15. NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I sequences compared for members of the genus Taenia (Cestoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, R B; Zhu, X; McManus, D P

    1999-12-01

    Nine members of the genus Taenia (Taenia taeniaeformis, Taenia hydatigena, Taenia pisiformis, Taenia ovis, Taenia multiceps, Taenia serialis, Taenia saginata, Taenia solium and the Asian Taenia) were characterised by their mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 gene sequences and their genetic relationships were compared with those derived from the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 sequence data. The extent of inter-taxon sequence difference in NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (approximately 5.9-30.8%) was usually greater than in cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (approximately 2.5-18%). Although topology of the phenograms derived from NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 sequence data differed, there was concordance in that T. multiceps, T. serialis (of canids), T. saginata and the Asian Taenia (of humans) were genetically most similar, and those four members were genetically more similar to T. ovis and T. solium than they were to T. hydatigena and T. pisiformis (of canids) or T. taeniaeformis (of cats). The NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 sequence data may prove useful in studies of the systematics and population genetic structure of the Taeniidae.

  16. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase signal transduction in mecobalamin-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, S; Watanabe, M; Ikeda, H; Kamada, H; Saito, T; Ohshika, H

    1995-11-30

    This study examined alterations in the beta-adrenoceptor-G5-adenylyl cyclase system in cerebral cortex membranes from vitamin B12-deficient rats fed a diet lacking vitamin B12 (mecobalamin) for 15 weeks. Basal, 5(7)-guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp)-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities were significantly reduced in mecobalamin-deficient rats compared with those in control rats. However, no significant differences were observed in the amount and function of G5- estimated by immunoblotting and guanine nucleotide photoaffinity labeling, respectively, or in the densities and the dissociation constants of beta-adrenoceptors, estimated by [125I] pindolol binding, between control and the deficient rats. These results indicate that vitamin B12 deficiency results in the impairment of the coupling among the beta-adrenoceptor, G5- and the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase, and in dysfunction of the catalytic subunit of the enzyme, suggesting that vitamin B12 participates in the regulation of neuronal adenylyl cyclase signal transduction.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: familial HDL deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions familial HDL deficiency familial HDL deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Familial HDL deficiency is a condition characterized by low levels ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: eosinophil peroxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions eosinophil peroxidase deficiency eosinophil peroxidase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is a condition that affects certain white ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: protein C deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Thrombophilia, hereditary, due to protein C deficiency, autosomal dominant ... my area? Other Names for This Condition hereditary thrombophilia due to protein C deficiency PROC deficiency Related ...

  1. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  2. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kevin Pfister

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia National Blood Clot Alliance: Antithrombin Deficiency Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital antithrombin deficiency Patient Support and ...

  4. The AMPKγ1 subunit plays an essential role in erythrocyte membrane elasticity, and its genetic inactivation induces splenomegaly and anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foretz, Marc; Hébrard, Sophie; Guihard, Soizic; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Do Cruzeiro, Marcio; Hamard, Ghislaine; Niedergang, Florence; Gaudry, Muriel; Viollet, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an αβγ heterotrimer conserved throughout evolution and important for energy sensing in all eukaryote cells. AMPK controls metabolism and various cellular events in response to both hormones and changes in cellular energy status. The γ subunit senses intracellular energy status through the competitive binding of AMP and ATP. We show here that targeted disruption of the mouse AMPKγ1 gene (Prkag1) causes regenerative hemolytic anemia by increasing the sequestration of abnormal erythrocytes. Prkag1(-/-) mice displayed splenomegaly and iron accumulation due to compensatory splenic erythropoiesis and erythrophagocytosis. Moreover, AMPKγ1-deficient erythrocytes were highly resistant to osmotic hemolysis and poorly deformable in response to increasing shear stress, consistent with greater membrane rigidity. No change in cytoskeletal protein composition was observed; however, the phosphorylation level of adducin, a protein promoting the binding of spectrin to actin, was higher in AMPKγ1-deficient erythrocytes. Together, these results demonstrate that AMPKγ1 subunit is required for the maintenance of erythrocyte membrane elasticity.

  5. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqin eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits have been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease.

  6. Reduced prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) activity eliminates HAI-1 and HAI-2 deficiency-associated developmental defects by preventing matriptase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Roman; Uzzun Sales, Katiuchia; Kosa, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    to placental labyrinth failure, and neural tube defects in HAI-2-deficient embryos. Inactivation of genes encoding c-Met, protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), or the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) alpha subunit all failed to rescue embryonic lethality, suggesting that deregulated matriptase...

  7. Protein kinase A subunit expression is altered in Bloom syndrome fibroblasts and the BLM protein is increased in adrenocortical hyperplasias: inverse findings for BLM and PRKAR1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyerdahl, S L; Boikos, S; Horvath, A; Giatzakis, C; Bossis, I; Stratakis, C A

    2008-06-01

    Bloom syndrome is a genetic disorder associated with chromosomal instability and a predisposition to tumors that is caused by germline mutations of the BLM gene, a RecQ helicase. Benign adrenocortical tumors display a degree of chromosomal instability that is more significant than benign tumors of other tissues. Cortisol-producing hyperplasias, such as primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), which has been associated with protein kinase A (PKA) abnormalities and/or PRKAR1A mutations, also show genomic instability. Another RecQ helicase, WRN, directly interacts with the PRKAR1B subunit of PKA. In this study, we have investigated the PRKAR1A expression in primary human Bloom syndrome cell lines with known BLM mutations and examined the BLM gene expression in PPNAD and other adrenal tumor tissues. PRKAR1A and other protein kinase A (PKA) subunits were expressed in Bloom syndrome cells and their level of expression differed by subunit and cell type. Overall, fibroblasts exhibited a significant decrease in protein expression of all PKA subunits except for PRKAR1A, a pattern that has been associated with neoplastic transformation in several cell types. The BLM protein was upregulated in PPNAD and other hyperplasias, compared to samples from normal adrenals and normal cortex, as well as samples from cortisol- and aldosterone-producing adenomas (in which BLM was largely absent). These data reveal an inverse relationship between BLM and PRKAR1A: BLM deficiency is associated with a relative excess of PRKAR1A in fibroblasts compared to other PKA subunits; and PRKAR1A deficiency is associated with increased BLM protein in adrenal hyperplasias.

  8. Hydroponics on a chip: analysis of the Fe deficient Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Gómez, Stephen M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Nishio, John N

    2009-04-13

    The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was used to evaluate the thylakoid membrane proteome under Fe-deficient conditions. Plants were cultivated using a novel hydroponic system, called "hydroponics on a chip", which yields highly reproducible plant tissue samples for physiological analyses, and can be easily used for in vivo stable isotope labeling. The thylakoid membrane proteome, from intact chloroplasts isolated from Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient plants grown with hydroponics on a chip, was analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Intact masses of thylakoid membrane proteins were measured, many for the first time, and several proteins were identified with post-translational modifications that were altered by Fe deficiency; for example, the doubly phosphorylated form of the photosystem II oxygen evolving complex, PSBH, increased under Fe-deficiency. Increased levels of photosystem II protein subunit PSBS were detected in the Fe-deficient samples. Antioxidant enzymes, including ascorbate peroxidase and peroxiredoxin Q, were only detected in the Fe-deficient samples. We present the first biochemical evidence that the two major LHC IIb proteins (LHCB1 and LHCB2) may have significantly different functions in the thylakoid membrane. The study illustrates the utility of intact mass proteomics as an indispensable tool for functional genomics. "Hydroponics on a chip" provides the ability to grow A. thaliana under defined conditions that will be useful for systems biology.

  9. Helicobacterpy loriinfection and micronutrient deficiencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javed Yakoob; Wasim Jafri; Shahab Abid

    2003-01-01

    It is known that deficiencies of micronutrients due to infections increase morbidity and mortality. This phenomenon depicts itself conspicuously in developing countries.Deficiencies of iron, vitamins A, E, C, B12, etc are widely prevalent among populations living in the third world countries. Helicobacterpylori (Hpylori) infection has a high prevalence throughout the world. Deficiencies of several micronutrients due to Hpylori infection may be concomitantly present and vary from subtle sub-clinical states to severe clinical disorders. These essential trace elementsl micronutrients are involved in host defense mechanisms,maintaining epithelial cell integrity, glycoprotein synthesis,transport mechanisms, myocardial contractility, brain development, cholesterol and glucose metabolism. In this paper Hpyloriinfection in associaed with various micronutrients deficiencies is briefly reviewed.

  10. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf T Soliman; Vincenzo De Sanctis; Rania Elalaily; Said Bedair; Islam Kassem

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical ...

  11. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-01-01

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with...

  12. Mechanism of testosterone deficiency in the transgenic sickle cell mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R; Zirkin, Barry R; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease.

  13. Mechanism of testosterone deficiency in the transgenic sickle cell mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Musicki

    Full Text Available Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD, but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH levels compared with wild type (WT mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR, but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc, in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease.

  14. Corneal wound healing is compromised by immunoproteasome deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Ferrington

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed roles for immunoproteasome in regulating cell processes essential for maintaining homeostasis and in responding to stress and injury. The current study investigates how the absence of immunoproteasome affects the corneal epithelium under normal and stressed conditions by comparing corneas from wildtype (WT mice and those deficient in two immunoproteasome catalytic subunits (lmp7(-/-/mecl-1(-/-, L7M1. Immunoproteasome expression was confirmed in WT epithelial cells and in cells of the immune system that were present in the cornea. More apoptotic cells were found in both corneal explant cultures and uninjured corneas of L7M1 compared to WT mice. Following mechanical debridement, L7M1 corneas displayed delayed wound healing, including delayed re-epithelialization and re-establishment of the epithelial barrier, as well as altered inflammatory cytokine production compared to WT mice. These results suggest that immunoproteasome plays an important role in corneal homeostasis and wound healing.

  15. Phosphorylation of ATPase subunits of the 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, G G; Murray, R Z; Pappin, D; Rivett, A J

    1998-07-01

    The 26S proteasome complex plays a major role in the non-lysosomal degradation of intracellular proteins. Purified 26S proteasomes give a pattern of more than 40 spots on 2D-PAGE gels. The positions of subunits have been identified by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides and by immunoblotting with subunit-specific antipeptide antibodies. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from [32P]phosphate-labelled human embryo lung L-132 cells revealed the presence of at least three major phosphorylated polypeptides among the regulatory subunits as well as the C8 and C9 components of the core 20S proteasome. Comparison with the positions of the regulatory polypeptides revealed a minor phosphorylated form to be S7 (MSS1). Antibodies against S4, S6 (TBP7) and S12 (MOV34) all cross-reacted at the position of major phosphorylated polypeptides suggesting that several of the ATPase subunits may be phosphorylated. The phosphorylation of S4 was confirmed by double immunoprecipitation experiments in which 26S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated as above and dissociated and then S4 was immunoprecipitated with subunit-specific antibodies. Antibodies against the non-ATPase subunit S10, which has been suggested by others to be phosphorylated, did not coincide with the position of a phosphorylated polypeptide. Some differences were observed in the 2D-PAGE pattern of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from cultured cells compared to purified rat liver 26S proteasomes suggesting possible differences in subunit compositions of 26S proteasomes.

  16. NOX Activation by Subunit Interaction and Underlying Mechanisms in Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Radhika; Geng, Xiaokun; Li, Fengwu; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAPDH) oxidase (NOX) is an enzyme complex with the sole function of producing superoxide anion and reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the expense of NADPH. Vital to the immune system as well as cellular signaling, NOX is also involved in the pathologies of a wide variety of disease states. Particularly, it is an integral player in many neurological diseases, including stroke, TBI, and neurodegenerative diseases. Pathologically, NOX produces an excessive amount of ROS that exceed the body’s antioxidant ability to neutralize them, leading to oxidative stress and aberrant signaling. This prevalence makes it an attractive therapeutic target and as such, NOX inhibitors have been studied and developed to counter NOX’s deleterious effects. However, recent studies of NOX have created a better understanding of the NOX complex. Comprised of independent cytosolic subunits, p47-phox, p67-phox, p40-phox and Rac, and membrane subunits, gp91-phox and p22-phox, the NOX complex requires a unique activation process through subunit interaction. Of these subunits, p47-phox plays the most important role in activation, binding and translocating the cytosolic subunits to the membrane and anchoring to p22-phox to organize the complex for NOX activation and function. Moreover, these interactions, particularly that between p47-phox and p22-phox, are dependent on phosphorylation initiated by upstream processes involving protein kinase C (PKC). This review will look at these interactions between subunits and with PKC. It will focus on the interaction involving p47-phox with p22-phox, key in bringing the cytosolic subunits to the membrane. Furthermore, the implication of these interactions as a target for NOX inhibitors such as apocynin will be discussed as a potential avenue for further investigation, in order to develop more specific NOX inhibitors based on the inhibition of NOX assembly and activation. PMID:28119569

  17. Dlic1 deficiency impairs ciliogenesis of photoreceptors by destabilizing dynein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanshan Kong; Xinrong Du; Chao Peng; Yiming Wu; Huirong Li; Xi Jin; Ling Hou

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein 1 is fundamentally important for transporting a variety of essential cargoes along microtubules within eukaryotic cells.However,in mammals,few mutants are available for studying the effects of defects in dynein-controlled processes in the context of the whole organism.Here,we deleted mouse Dlic1 gene encoding DLIC1,a subunit of the dynein complex.Dlic1-/-mice are viable,but display severe photoreceptor degeneration.Ablation of Dlic1 results in ectopic accumulation of outer segment (OS) proteins,and impairs OS growth and ciliogenesis of photoreceptors by interfering with Rabll-vesicle trafficking and blocking efficient OS protein transport from Golgi to the basal body.Our studies show that Dlic1 deficiency partially blocks vesicle export from endoplasmic reticulum (ER),but seems not to affect vesicle transport from the ER to Golgi.Further mechanistic study reveals that lack of Dlic1 destabilizes dynein subunits and alters the normal subcellular distribution of dynein in photoreceptors,probably due to the impaired transport function of dynein.Our results demonstrate that Dlic1 plays important roles in ciliogenesis and protein transport to the OS,and is required for photoreceptor development and survival.The Dlic1-/-mice also provide a new mouse model to study human retinal degeneration.

  18. Clinical manifestation of myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F

    1998-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an iron-containing heme protein localized in the azurophilic granules of neutrophil granulocytes and in the lysosomes of monocytes, is involved in the killing of several micro-organisms and foreign cells, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, red cells, and malignant and nonmalignant nucleated cells. Despite the primary role of the oxygen-dependent MPO system in the destruction of certain phagocytosed microbes, subjects with total or partial MPO deficiency generally do not have an increased frequency of infections, probably because other MPO-independent mechanism(s) for microbicidal activity compensate for the lack of MPO. Infectious diseases, especially with species of Candida, have been observed predominantly in MPO-deficient patients who also have diabetes mellitus, but the frequency of such cases is very low, less than 5% of reported MPO-deficient subjects. Evidence from a number of investigators indicates that individuals with total MPO deficiency show a high incidence of malignant tumors. Since MPO-deficient PMNs exhibit in vitro a depressed lytic action against malignant human cells, it can be speculated that the neutrophil MPO system plays a central role in the tumor surveillance of the host. However, any definitive conclusion on the association between MPO deficiency and the occurrence of cancers needs to be confirmed in further clinical studies. Clinical manifestations of this disorder depend on the nature of the defect; an acquired abnormality associated with other hematological or nonhematological diseases has been occasionally described, but the primary deficiency is the form more commonly reported. Another area of interest pertinent to MPO expression is related to the use of anti-MPO monoclonal antibodies for the lineage assignment of acute leukemic cells, the definition of FAB MO acute myeloid leukemia, the identification of biphenotypic acute leukemias, and their distinction from acute leukemia with minimal phenotypic deviation

  19. Mutations in COA3 cause isolated complex IV deficiency associated with neuropathy, exercise intolerance, obesity, and short stature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Elsebet; Weraarpachai, Woranontee; Ravn, Kirstine Johanne Theresia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated a subject with an isolated cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency presenting with an unusual phenotype characterised by neuropathy, exercise intolerance, obesity, and short stature. METHODS AND RESULTS: Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) analysis...... showed an almost complete lack of COX assembly in subject fibroblasts, consistent with the very low enzymatic activity, and pulse-labelling mitochondrial translation experiments showed a specific decrease in synthesis of the COX1 subunit, the core catalytic subunit that nucleates assembly...... assembly and mitochondrial translation defects, confirming the pathogenicity of the mutations, and resulted in increased steady-state levels of COX1 in control cells, demonstrating a role for COA3 in the stabilisation of this subunit. COA3 exists in an early COX assembly complex that contains COX1...

  20. Increased Motor-Impairing Effects of the Neuroactive Steroid Pregnanolone in Mice with Targeted Inactivation of the GABAA Receptor γ2 Subunit in the Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppä, Elli; Linden, Anni-Maija; Aller, Maria I.; Wulff, Peer; Vekovischeva, Olga; Luscher, Bernhard; Lüddens, Hartmut; Wisden, William; Korpi, Esa R.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous neurosteroids and neuroactive steroids have potent and widespread actions on the brain via inhibitory GABAA receptors. In recombinant receptors and genetic mouse models their actions depend on the α, β, and δ subunits of the receptor, especially on those that form extrasynaptic GABAA receptors responsible for non-synaptic (tonic) inhibition, but they also act on synaptically enriched γ2 subunit-containing receptors and even on αβ binary receptors. Here we tested whether behavioral sensitivity to the neuroactive steroid agonist 5β-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one is altered in genetically engineered mouse models that have deficient GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition in selected neuronal populations. Mouse lines with the GABAA receptor γ2 subunit gene selectively deleted either in parvalbumin-containing cells (including cerebellar Purkinje cells), cerebellar granule cells, or just in cerebellar Purkinje cells were trained on the accelerated rotating rod and then tested for motor impairment after cumulative intraperitoneal dosing of 5β-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one. Motor-impairing effects of 5β-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one were strongly increased in all three mouse models in which γ2 subunit-dependent synaptic GABAA responses in cerebellar neurons were genetically abolished. Furthermore, rescue of postsynaptic GABAA receptors in Purkinje cells normalized the effect of the steroid. Anxiolytic/explorative effects of the steroid in elevated plus maze and light:dark exploration tests in mice with Purkinje cell γ2 subunit inactivation were similar to those in control mice. The results suggest that, when the deletion of γ2 subunit has removed synaptic GABAA receptors from the specific cerebellar neuronal populations, the effects of neuroactive steroids solely on extrasynaptic αβ or αβδ receptors lead to enhanced changes in the cerebellum-generated behavior. PMID:27833556

  1. Role of PCSK5 expression in mouse ovarian follicle development: identification of the inhibin α- and β-subunits as candidate substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Antenos

    Full Text Available Inhibin and activin are essential dimeric glycoproteins belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ superfamily. Inhibin is a heterodimer of α- and β-subunits, whereas activin is a homodimer of β-subunits. Production of inhibin is regulated during the reproductive cycle and requires the processing of pro-ligands to produce mature hormone. Furin is a subtilisin-like proprotein convertase (proconvertase that activates precursor proteins by cleavage at basic sites during their transit through the secretory pathway and/or at the cell surface. We hypothesized that furin-like proconvertases are central regulators of inhibin α- and β-subunit processing within the ovary. We analyzed the expression of the proconvertases furin, PCSK5, PCSK6, and PCSK7 in the developing mouse ovary by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. The data showed that proconvertase enzymes are temporally expressed in ovarian cells. With the transition from two-layer secondary to pre-antral follicle, only PCSK5 mRNA was significantly elevated. Activin A selectively enhanced expression of PCSK5 mRNA and decreased expression of furin and PCSK6 in cultured two-layer secondary follicles. Inhibition of proconvertase enzyme activity by dec-RVKR-chloromethylketone (CMK, a highly specific and potent competitive inhibitor of subtilisin-like proconvertases, significantly impeded both inhibin α- and β-subunit maturation in murine granulosa cells. Overexpression of PC5/6 in furin-deficient cells led to increased inhibin α- and β(B-subunit maturation. Our data support the role of proconvertase PCSK5 in the processing of ovarian inhibin subunits during folliculogenesis and suggest that this enzyme may be an important regulator of inhibin and activin bioavailability.

  2. Effects of truncated mutants of the ε subunit of chloroplast ATP synthase on the fast phase of millisecond delayed light emission of chloroplast and its ATP synthesis ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xiaomei; SHI Xiaobing; SHEN Yungang

    2004-01-01

    The ε subunit of the chloroplast ATP synthase and the truncated ε mutants which lack some amino acid residues from the N-terminus or C-terminus were overexpressed in E. coli. When the ε subunit or the truncated ε proteins was added to the spinach chloroplast suspension, both the intensity of the fast phase of millisecond delayed light emission (ms-DLE) and the cyclic and noncyclic photophosphorylation activity of chloroplast were enhanced. With an increase in the number of residues deleted from the N-terminus, the enhancement effect of the N-terminal truncated proteins decreased gradually. For the C-terminal truncated proteins, the enhancement effect increased gradually with an increase in the number of residues deleted from the C-terminus. Besides, the ATP synthesis activity of ε-deficient membrane reconstituted with the ε subunit or the truncated ε proteins was compared. The ATP synthesis activity of reconstituted membrane with the N-terminal truncated proteins decreased gradually as the number of residues deleted from the N-terminus increased. For the C-terminal truncated proteins, the ATP synthesis activity of reconstituted membrane increased gradually with an increase in the number of residues deleted from the C-terminus, but was still lower than that of the wild type ε protein. These results suggested that: (a) the N-terminal domain of the ε subunit of the chloroplast ATP synthase could affect the ATP synthesis activity of ATP synthase by regulating the efficiency of blocking proton leakage of ε subunit; and (b) the C-terminal domain of the ε subunit of the chloroplast ATP synthase had a subtle function in modulating the ATP synthesis ability of ATP synthase.

  3. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  4. GABA receptor subunit composition relative to insecticide potency and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratra, G S; Casida, J E

    2001-07-01

    Three observations on the 4-[(3)H]propyl-4'-ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]EBOB) binding site in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor indicate the specific target for insecticide action in human brain and a possible mechanism for selectivity. First, from published data, alpha-endosulfan, lindane and fipronil compete for the [(3)H]EBOB binding site with affinities of 0.3--7 nM in both human recombinant homooligomeric beta 3 receptors and housefly head membranes. Second, from structure-activity studies, including new data, GABAergic insecticide binding potency on the pentameric receptor formed from the beta 3 subunit correlates well with that on the housefly receptor (r=0.88, n=20). This conserved inhibitor specificity is consistent with known sequence homologies in the housefly GABA receptor and the human GABA(A) receptor beta 3 subunit. Third, as mostly new findings, various combinations of alpha 1, alpha 6, and gamma 2 subunits coexpressed with a beta 1 or beta 3 subunit confer differential insecticide binding sensitivity, particularly to fipronil, indicating that subunit composition is a major factor in insecticide selectivity.

  5. Iron deficiency in blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Cortés

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: Blood donation results in a substantial loss of iron (200 to 250 mg at each bleeding procedure (425 to 475 ml and subsequent mobilization of iron from body stores. Recent reports have shown that body iron reserves generally are small and iron depletion is more frequent in blood donors than in non-donors. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors and to establish the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors according to sex, whether they were first-time or multi-time donors. Design: From march 20 to April 5, 2004, three hundred potential blood donors from Hemocentro del Café y Tolima Grande were studied. Diagnostic tests: Using a combination of biochemical measurements of iron status: serum ferritin (RIA, ANNAR and the hemoglobin pre and post-donation (HEMOCUE Vital technology medical . Results: The frequency of iron deficiency in potential blood donors was 5%, and blood donors accepted was 5.1%; in blood donors rejected for low hemoglobin the frequency of iron deficiency was 3.7% and accepted blood donors was 1.7% in male and 12.6% in female. The frequency of iron deficiency was higher in multi-time blood donors than in first-time blood donors, but not stadistic significative. Increase nivel accepted hemoglobina in 1 g/dl no incidence in male; in female increase of 0.5 g/dl low in 25% blood donors accepted with iron deficiency, but increased rejected innecesary in 16.6% and increased is 1 g/dl low blood donors female accepted in 58% (7/12, but increased the rejected innecesary in 35.6%. Conclusions: We conclude that blood donation not is a important factor for iron deficiency in blood donors. The high frequency of blood donors with iron deficiency found in this study suggests a need for a more accurate laboratory trial, as hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement alone is not sufficient for detecting and excluding blood donors with iron deficiency without anemia, and ajustes hacia

  6. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D

    2015-11-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of cardiovascular medicine. Data indicate that iron deficiency has detrimental effects in patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF), and pulmonary hypertension, and possibly in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Around one-third of all patients with HF, and more than one-half of patients with pulmonary hypertension, are affected by iron deficiency. Patients with HF and iron deficiency have shown symptomatic improvements from intravenous iron administration, and some evidence suggests that these improvements occur irrespective of the presence of anaemia. Improved exercise capacity has been demonstrated after iron administration in patients with pulmonary hypertension. However, to avoid iron overload and T-cell activation, it seems that recipients of cardiac transplantations should not be treated with intravenous iron preparations.

  7. SUBNANOMOLAR DETECTION OF ACID-LABILE SULFIDES BY THE CLASSICAL METHYLENE BLUE METHOD COUPLED TO HPLC. (R825395)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. xCT deficiency induces autophagy via endoplasmic reticulum stress activated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase and mTOR in sut melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, XueTing; Li, Yang; Zhao, Rui; Yan, Fei; Ma, YiXuan; Zhao, LiPing; Qiao, Haixuan

    2016-01-01

    xCT, the functional subunit of the system xc(-) encoded by the Slc7a11 gene, plays an important role in maintaining intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels. In previous study, we have indicated that xCT deficiency induces OS and that OS triggers apoptosis through JNK pathway, however, this induction of apoptotic features did not fully explain the cell death induced by xCT deficiency. In the current study, we demonstrated that sut melanocytes of xCT deficiency showed activation of both ER stress and autophagy. And that the activation of autophagy by xCT deficiency was mediated by ER stress induced activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB pathways and subsequently inhibited functions of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K survival pathways, ultimately led to autophagic cell death of sut melanocytes. Our novel results provided important insights into understanding the mechanism associated with xCT deficiency.

  9. Hypersecretion of the alpha-subunit in clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas: Diagnostic accuracy is improved by adding alpha-subunit/gonadotropin ratio to levels of alpha-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne; Ganc-Petersen, Joanna; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vitro, the majority of clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) produce gonadotropins or their alpha-subunit; however, in vivo, measurements of alpha-subunit levels may not accurately detect the hypersecretion of the alpha-subunit. AIM: We wanted to estimate the refere......BACKGROUND: In vitro, the majority of clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) produce gonadotropins or their alpha-subunit; however, in vivo, measurements of alpha-subunit levels may not accurately detect the hypersecretion of the alpha-subunit. AIM: We wanted to estimate...... the reference intervals and decision limits for gonadotropin alpha-subunit, LH and FSH levels, and aratio (alpha-subunit/LH+FSH), especially taking into consideration patient gender and menstrual status. Furthermore, we wanted to examine if the diagnostic utility of alpha-subunit hypersecretion was improved...... patients with NFPAs. Gonadotropin alpha-subunit, LH and FSH levels were measured and alpha-ratios were calculated. RESULTS: In healthy adults, the cut-offs for alpha-subunit levels were significantly different between men and pre- and postmenopausal women: the cut-offs were 1.10, 0.48 and 3.76 IU...

  10. Separation and characterization of alpha-chain subunits from tilapia (Tilapia zillii) skin gelatin using ultrafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shulin; Tang, Lanlan; Su, Wenjin; Weng, Wuyin; Osako, Kazufumi; Tanaka, Munehiko

    2015-12-01

    Alpha-chain subunits were separated from tilapia skin gelatin using ultrafiltration, and the physicochemical properties of obtained subunits were investigated. As a result, α1-subunit and α2-subunit could be successfully separated by 100 kDa MWCO regenerated cellulose membranes and 150 kDa MWCO polyethersulfone membranes, respectively. Glycine was the most dominant amino acid in both α1-subunit and α2-subunit. However, the tyrosine content was higher in α2-subunit than in α1-subunit, resulting in strong absorption near 280 nm observed in the UV absorption spectrum. Based on the DSC analysis, it was found that the glass transition temperatures of gelatin, α1-subunit and α2-subunit were 136.48 °C, 126.77 °C and 119.43 °C, respectively. Moreover, the reduced viscosity and denaturation temperature of α1-subunit were higher than those of α2-subunit, and the reduced viscosity reached the highest when α-subunits were mixed with α1/α2 ratio of approximately 2, suggesting that α1-subunit plays a more important role in the thermostability of gelatin than α2-subunit.

  11. Cholera Toxin B: One Subunit with Many Pharmaceutical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keegan J. Baldauf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholera, a waterborne acute diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae, remains prevalent in underdeveloped countries and is a serious health threat to those living in unsanitary conditions. The major virulence factor is cholera toxin (CT, which consists of two subunits: the A subunit (CTA and the B subunit (CTB. CTB is a 55 kD homopentameric, non-toxic protein binding to the GM1 ganglioside on mammalian cells with high affinity. Currently, recombinantly produced CTB is used as a component of an internationally licensed oral cholera vaccine, as the protein induces potent humoral immunity that can neutralize CT in the gut. Additionally, recent studies have revealed that CTB administration leads to the induction of anti-inflammatory mechanisms in vivo. This review will cover the potential of CTB as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent. We will also summarize various recombinant expression systems available for recombinant CTB bioproduction.

  12. Dengue vaccine: an update on recombinant subunit strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Hermida, L

    2016-03-01

    Dengue is an increasing public health problem worldwide, with the four serotypes of the virus infecting over 390 million people annually. There is no specific treatment or antiviral drug for dengue, and prevention is largely limited to controlling the mosquito vectors or disrupting the human-vector contact. Despite the considerable progress made in recent years, an effective vaccine against the virus is not yet available. The development of a dengue vaccine has been hampered by many unique challenges, including the need to ensure the absence of vaccine-induced enhanced severity of disease. Recombinant protein subunit vaccines offer a safer alternative to other vaccine approaches. Several subunit vaccine candidates are presently under development, based on different structural and non-structural proteins of the virus. Novel adjuvants or immunopotentiating strategies are also being tested to improve their immunogenicity. This review summarizes the current status and development trends of subunit dengue vaccines.

  13. Proteasome activity and subunit composition in endometrial hyperplasia and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Spirina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In endometrial hyperplasia the total proteasome activity was not changed however the 26S proteasome activity was increased in comparison with the normal tissues. In endometrial cancer the high total proteasome activity and activities of 26S and 20S proteasomes wer e revealed. The changes in proteasome activities were correlated with the decreased content of α1α2α3α5α6α7 proteasome subunits and increased con- tents of LMP2, LMP7 and PA28β proteasome subunits compared to that in nonaltered tissues. Low content of α1α2α3α5α6α7 proteasome subunits was revealed at the second stage of cancer patients in comparison with that at the first stage.

  14. Cholera toxin B: one subunit with many pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Keegan J; Royal, Joshua M; Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-03-20

    Cholera, a waterborne acute diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae, remains prevalent in underdeveloped countries and is a serious health threat to those living in unsanitary conditions. The major virulence factor is cholera toxin (CT), which consists of two subunits: the A subunit (CTA) and the B subunit (CTB). CTB is a 55 kD homopentameric, non-toxic protein binding to the GM1 ganglioside on mammalian cells with high affinity. Currently, recombinantly produced CTB is used as a component of an internationally licensed oral cholera vaccine, as the protein induces potent humoral immunity that can neutralize CT in the gut. Additionally, recent studies have revealed that CTB administration leads to the induction of anti-inflammatory mechanisms in vivo. This review will cover the potential of CTB as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent. We will also summarize various recombinant expression systems available for recombinant CTB bioproduction.

  15. Antigenic breadth: a missing ingredient in HSV-2 subunit vaccines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, William P

    2014-06-01

    The successful human papillomavirus and hepatitis B virus subunit vaccines contain single viral proteins that represent 22 and 12%, respectively, of the antigens encoded by these tiny viruses. The herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) genome is >20 times larger. Thus, a single protein subunit represents 1% of HSV-2's total antigenic breadth. Antigenic breadth may explain why HSV-2 glycoprotein subunit vaccines have failed in clinical trials, and why live HSV-2 vaccines that express 99% of HSV-2's proteome may be more effective. I review the mounting evidence that live HSV-2 vaccines offer a greater opportunity to stop the spread of genital herpes, and I consider the unfounded 'safety concerns' that have kept live HSV-2 vaccines out of U.S. clinical trials for 25 years.

  16. The subunit delta-subunit b domain of the Escherichia coli F1F0 ATPase. The B subunits interact with F1 as a dimer and through the delta subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, A J; Wilkens, S; Aggeler, R; Morris, M B; Howitt, S M; Capaldi, R A

    1997-12-05

    The delta and b subunits are both involved in binding the F1 to the F0 part in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase (ECF1F0). The interaction of the purified delta subunit and the isolated hydrophilic domain of the b subunit (bsol) has been studied here. Purified delta binds to bsol weakly in solution, as indicated by NMR studies and protease protection experiments. On F1, i.e. in the presence of ECF1-delta, delta, and bsol interact strongly, and a complex of ECF1.bsol can be isolated by native gel electrophoresis. Both delta subunit and bsol are protected from trypsin cleavage in this complex. In contrast, the delta subunit is rapidly degraded by the protease when bound to ECF1 when bsol is absent. The interaction of bsol with ECF1 involves the C-terminal domain of delta as delta(1-134) cannot replace intact delta in the binding experiments. As purified, bsol is a stable dimer with 80% alpha helix. A monomeric form of bsol can be obtained by introducing the mutation A128D (Howitt, S. M., Rodgers, A. J.,W., Jeffrey, P. D., and Cox, G. B. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 7038-7042). Monomeric bsol has less alpha helix, i.e. only 58%, is much more sensitive to trypsin cleavage than dimer, and unfolds at much lower temperatures than the dimer in circular dichroism melting studies, indicating a less stable structure. The bsol dimer, but not monomer, binds to delta in ECF1. To examine whether subunit b is a monomor or dimer in intact ECF1F0, CuCl2 was used to induce cross-link formation in the mutants bS60C, bQ104C, bA128C, bG131C, and bS146C. With the exception of bS60C, CuCl2 treatment resulted in formation of b subunit dimers in all mutants. Cross-linking yield was independent of nucleotide conditions and did not affect ATPase activity. These results show the b subunit to be dimeric for a large portion of the C terminus, with residues 124-131 likely forming a pair of parallel alpha helices.

  17. Carrier subunit of plasma membrane transporter is required for oxidative folding of its helper subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Mònica; Chillarón, Josep

    2012-05-25

    We study the amino acid transport system b(0,+) as a model for folding, assembly, and early traffic of membrane protein complexes. System b(0,+) is made of two disulfide-linked membrane subunits: the carrier, b(0,+) amino acid transporter (b(0,+)AT), a polytopic protein, and the helper, related to b(0,+) amino acid transporter (rBAT), a type II glycoprotein. rBAT ectodomain mutants display folding/trafficking defects that lead to type I cystinuria. Here we show that, in the presence of b(0,+)AT, three disulfides were formed in the rBAT ectodomain. Disulfides Cys-242-Cys-273 and Cys-571-Cys-666 were essential for biogenesis. Cys-673-Cys-685 was dispensable, but the single mutants C673S, and C685S showed compromised stability and trafficking. Cys-242-Cys-273 likely was the first disulfide to form, and unpaired Cys-242 or Cys-273 disrupted oxidative folding. Strikingly, unassembled rBAT was found as an ensemble of different redox species, mainly monomeric. The ensemble did not change upon inhibition of rBAT degradation. Overall, these results indicated a b(0,+)AT-dependent oxidative folding of the rBAT ectodomain, with the initial and probably cotranslational formation of Cys-242-Cys-273, followed by the oxidation of Cys-571-Cys-666 and Cys-673-Cys-685, that was completed posttranslationally.

  18. Differential diagnosis of iron deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A deficiência de ferro é considerada a patologia hematológica mais prevalente no homem. Assim, é fundamental a adequada identificação de suas causas, bem como a diferenciação com outras patologias distintas para adequada abordagem da deficiência de ferro. Neste artigo são brevemente descritas outras condições que podem cursar com anemia microcítica, tais como: talassemias, anemia de doença crônica, anemia sideroblástica e envenenamento por chumbo, patologias estas que devem ser afastadas dura...

  19. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  20. Primary Carnitine (OCTN2) Deficiency Without Neonatal Carnitine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L. de; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Morava, E.

    2013-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a primary carnitine deficiency is usually based on a very low level of free and total carnitine (free carnitine: 1-5 muM, normal 20-55 muM) (Longo et al. 2006), we detected a patient via newborn screening with a total carnitine level 67 % of the normal value. At the age of

  1. Kcne2 deletion causes early-onset nonalcoholic fatty liver disease via iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Min; Nguyen, Dara; Anand, Marie; Kant, Ritu; Köhncke, Clemens; Lisewski, Ulrike; Roepke, Torsten K.; Hu, Zhaoyang; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasing health problem worldwide, with genetic, epigenetic, and environmental components. Here, we describe the first example of NAFLD caused by genetic disruption of a mammalian potassium channel subunit. Mice with germline deletion of the KCNE2 potassium channel β subunit exhibited NAFLD as early as postnatal day 7. Using mouse genetics, histology, liver damage assays and transcriptomics we discovered that iron deficiency arising from KCNE2-dependent achlorhydria is a major factor in early-onset NAFLD in Kcne2─/─ mice, while two other KCNE2-dependent defects did not initiate NAFLD. The findings uncover a novel genetic basis for NAFLD and an unexpected potential factor in human KCNE2-associated cardiovascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26984260

  2. Efficient reconstitution of functional Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits from a complete set of recombinant small subunit ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, G M; Noller, H F

    1999-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the 30S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli can be reconstituted in vitro from individually purified ribosomal proteins and 16S ribosomal RNA, which were isolated from natural 30S subunits. We have developed a 30S subunit reconstitution system that uses only recombinant ribosomal protein components. The genes encoding E. coli ribosomal proteins S2-S21 were cloned, and all twenty of the individual proteins were overexpressed and purified. Reconstitution, following standard procedures, using the complete set of recombinant proteins and purified 16S ribosomal RNA is highly inefficient. Efficient reconstitution of 30S subunits using these components requires sequential addition of proteins, following either the 30S subunit assembly map (Mizushima & Nomura, 1970, Nature 226:1214-1218; Held et al., 1974, J Biol Chem 249:3103-3111) or following the order of protein assembly predicted from in vitro assembly kinetics (Powers et al., 1993, J MoI Biol 232:362-374). In the first procedure, the proteins were divided into three groups, Group I (S4, S7, S8, S15, S17, and S20), Group II (S5, S6, S9, Sll, S12, S13, S16, S18, and S19), and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21), which were sequentially added to 16S rRNA with a 20 min incubation at 42 degrees C following the addition of each group. In the second procedure, the proteins were divided into Group I (S4, S6, S11, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S20), Group II (S7, S8, S9, S13, and S19), Group II' (S5 and S12) and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21). Similarly efficient reconstitution is observed whether the proteins are grouped according to the assembly map or according to the results of in vitro 30S subunit assembly kinetics. Although reconstitution of 30S subunits using the recombinant proteins is slightly less efficient than reconstitution using a mixture of total proteins isolated from 30S subunits, it is much more efficient than reconstitution using proteins that were individually isolated

  3. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Rustin, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.rustin@inserm.fr [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  4. Protein-disulfide Isomerase Displaces the Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit from the Holotoxin without Unfolding the A1 Subunit*

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Michael; Banerjee, Tuhina; Ray, Supriyo; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been proposed to exhibit an “unfoldase” activity against the catalytic A1 subunit of cholera toxin (CT). Unfolding of the CTA1 subunit is thought to displace it from the CT holotoxin and to prepare it for translocation to the cytosol. To date, the unfoldase activity of PDI has not been demonstrated for any substrate other than CTA1. An alternative explanation for the putative unfoldase activity of PDI has been suggested by recent structural studies demons...

  5. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  6. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA a

  7. Epigenetic Deficiencies and Replicative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell-specific synthetic lethal interactions entail promising therapeutic possibilities. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Pfister et al. describe a synthetic lethal interaction where cancer cells deficient in H3K36me3 owing to SETD2 loss-of-function mutation are strongly sensitized to inhibiti...

  8. Deferasirox in pyruvate kinase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Deeren, Dries

    2008-01-01

    Deferasirox in pyruvate kinase deficiency phone: +32-51-237437 (Deeren, Dries) (Deeren, Dries) Department of Haematology, Heilig-Hartziekenhuis Roeselare-Menen vzw - Wilgenstraat 2 - B-8800 - Roeselare - BELGIUM (Deeren, Dries) BELGIUM Registration: 2008-09-10 Received: 2008-09-05 Accepted: 2008-09-10 ePublished: 2008-09-23

  9. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  10. Congenital β-lipoprotein deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchem, F.S.P. van; Pol, G.; Gier, J. de; Böttcher, C.J.F.; Pries, C.

    1966-01-01

    There are several degrees of β-lipoprotein deficiency. If there is no β-lipoprotein present, or if there are only traces of it, the Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome develops. A constant feature of this syndrome is disturbed fat absorption with accumulation of fat in the epithelium of intestinal mucosa and

  11. Production of active glycosylation-deficient γ-secretase complex for crystallization studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Andrés Ricardo; Dimitrov, Mitko; Gerber, Hermeto; Braman, Virginie; Hacker, David L; Wurm, Florian M; Fraering, Patrick C

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD)-associated γ-secretase is a ubiquitously expressed multi-subunit protease complex embedded in the lipid bilayer of cellular compartments including endosomes and the plasma membrane. Although γ-secretase is of crucial interest for AD drug discovery, its atomic structure remains unresolved. γ-Secretase assembly and maturation is a multistep process, which includes extensive glycosylation on nicastrin (NCT), the only γ-secretase subunit having a large extracellular domain. These posttranslational modifications lead to protein heterogeneity that likely prevents the three-dimensional (3D) crystallization of the protease complex. To overcome this issue, we have engineered a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line deficient in complex sugar modifications (CHO lec1) to overexpress the four subunits of γ-secretase as a functional complex. We purified glycosylation-deficient γ-secretase from this recombinant cell line (CL1-9) and fully glycosylated γ-secretase from a recombinant CHO DG44-derived cell line (SS20). We characterized both complexes biochemically and pharmacologically in vitro. Interestingly, we found that the complex oligosaccharides, which largely decorate the extracellular domain of fully glycosylated NCT, are not involved in the proper assembly and maturation of the complex, and are dispensable for the specific generation, in physiological ratios, of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavage products. In conclusion, we propose a novel bioengineering approach for the production of functional glycosylation-deficient γ-secretase, which may be suitable for crystallization studies. We expect that these findings will contribute both to solving the high-resolution 3D structure of γ-secretase and to structure-based drug discovery for AD.

  12. Analysis of the subunit stoichiometries in viral entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Magnus

    Full Text Available Virions of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infect cells by first attaching with their surface spikes to the CD4 receptor on target cells. This leads to conformational changes in the viral spikes, enabling the virus to engage a coreceptor, commonly CCR5 or CXCR4, and consecutively to insert the fusion peptide into the cellular membrane. Finally, the viral and the cellular membranes fuse. The HIV spike is a trimer consisting of three identical heterodimers composed of the gp120 and gp41 envelope proteins. Each of the gp120 proteins in the trimer is capable of attaching to the CD4 receptor and the coreceptor, and each of the three gp41 units harbors a fusion domain. It is still under debate how many of the envelope subunits within a given trimer have to bind to the CD4 receptors and to the coreceptors, and how many gp41 protein fusion domains are required for fusion. These numbers are referred to as subunit stoichiometries. We present a mathematical framework for estimating these parameters individually by analyzing infectivity assays with pseudotyped viruses. We find that the number of spikes that are engaged in mediating cell entry and the distribution of the spike number play important roles for the estimation of the subunit stoichiometries. Our model framework also shows why it is important to subdivide the question of the number of functional subunits within one trimer into the three different subunit stoichiometries. In a second step, we extend our models to study whether the subunits within one trimer cooperate during receptor binding and fusion. As an example for how our models can be applied, we reanalyze a data set on subunit stoichiometries. We find that two envelope proteins have to engage with CD4-receptors and coreceptors and that two fusion proteins must be revealed within one trimer for viral entry. Our study is motivated by the mechanism of HIV entry but the experimental technique and the model framework can be extended to

  13. A P-loop Mutation in G[alpha] Subunits Prevents Transition to the Active State: Implications for G-protein Signaling in Fungal Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Willard, Francis S.; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Kimple, Adam J.; Willard, Melinda D.; Naqvi, Naweed I.; Siderovski, David P. (UNC); (Singapore)

    2012-10-23

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches integral to a panoply of different physiological responses that many organisms make to environmental cues. The switch from inactive to active G{alpha}{beta}{gamma} heterotrimer relies on nucleotide cycling by the G{alpha} subunit: exchange of GTP for GDP activates G{alpha}, whereas its intrinsic enzymatic activity catalyzes GTP hydrolysis to GDP and inorganic phosphate, thereby reverting G{alpha} to its inactive state. In several genetic studies of filamentous fungi, such as the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, a G42R mutation in the phosphate-binding loop of G{alpha} subunits is assumed to be GTPase-deficient and thus constitutively active. Here, we demonstrate that G{alpha}(G42R) mutants are not GTPase deficient, but rather incapable of achieving the activated conformation. Two crystal structure models suggest that Arg-42 prevents a typical switch region conformational change upon G{alpha}{sub i1}(G42R) binding to GDP {center_dot} AlF{sub 4}{sup -} or GTP, but rotameric flexibility at this locus allows for unperturbed GTP hydrolysis. G{alpha}(G42R) mutants do not engage the active state-selective peptide KB-1753 nor RGS domains with high affinity, but instead favor interaction with G{beta}{gamma} and GoLoco motifs in any nucleotide state. The corresponding G{alpha}{sub q}(G48R) mutant is not constitutively active in cells and responds poorly to aluminum tetrafluoride activation. Comparative analyses of M. oryzae strains harboring either G42R or GTPase-deficient Q/L mutations in the G{alpha} subunits MagA or MagB illustrate functional differences in environmental cue processing and intracellular signaling outcomes between these two G{alpha} mutants, thus demonstrating the in vivo functional divergence of G42R and activating G-protein mutants.

  14. Downregulation of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor subunits modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothandapani, Anbarasi [Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, University of Toledo-Health Science Campus, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel [Physiological Genomics Laboratory, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Kahali, Bhaskar; Reisman, David [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Patrick, Steve M., E-mail: Stephan.Patrick@utoledo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, University of Toledo-Health Science Campus, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF plays important roles in many cellular processes including transcription, proliferation, differentiation and DNA repair. In this report, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF catalytic subunits Brg1 and Brm in the cellular response to cisplatin in lung cancer and head/neck cancer cells. Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhanced cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Repair kinetics of cisplatin DNA adducts revealed that downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impeded the repair of both intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Cisplatin ICL-induced DNA double strand break repair was also decreased in Brg1 and Brm depleted cells. Altered checkpoint activation with enhanced apoptosis as well as impaired chromatin relaxation was observed in Brg1 and Brm deficient cells. Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm did not affect the recruitment of DNA damage recognition factor XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions, but affected ERCC1 recruitment, which is involved in the later stages of DNA repair. Based on these results, we propose that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity by facilitating efficient repair of the cisplatin DNA lesions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhances cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impedes the repair of cisplatin intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brg1 and Brm deficiency results in impaired chromatin relaxation, altered checkpoint activation as well as enhanced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm affects recruitment of ERCC1, but not XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions.

  15. Condensin II subunit dCAP-D3 restricts retrotransposon mobilization in Drosophila somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Schuster

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposon sequences are positioned throughout the genome of almost every eukaryote that has been sequenced. As mobilization of these elements can have detrimental effects on the transcriptional regulation and stability of an organism's genome, most organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress their movement. Here, we identify a novel role for the Drosophila melanogaster Condensin II subunit, dCAP-D3 in preventing the mobilization of retrotransposons located in somatic cell euchromatin. dCAP-D3 regulates transcription of euchromatic gene clusters which contain or are proximal to retrotransposon sequence. ChIP experiments demonstrate that dCAP-D3 binds to these loci and is important for maintaining a repressed chromatin structure within the boundaries of the retrotransposon and for repressing retrotransposon transcription. We show that dCAP-D3 prevents accumulation of double stranded DNA breaks within retrotransposon sequence, and decreased dCAP-D3 levels leads to a precise loss of retrotransposon sequence at some dCAP-D3 regulated gene clusters and a gain of sequence elsewhere in the genome. Homologous chromosomes exhibit high levels of pairing in Drosophila somatic cells, and our FISH analyses demonstrate that retrotransposon-containing euchromatic loci are regions which are actually less paired than euchromatic regions devoid of retrotransposon sequences. Decreased dCAP-D3 expression increases pairing of homologous retrotransposon-containing loci in tissue culture cells. We propose that the combined effects of dCAP-D3 deficiency on double strand break levels, chromatin structure, transcription and pairing at retrotransposon-containing loci may lead to 1 higher levels of homologous recombination between repeats flanking retrotransposons in dCAP-D3 deficient cells and 2 increased retrotransposition. These findings identify a novel role for the anti-pairing activities of dCAP-D3/Condensin II and uncover a new way in which dCAP-D3/Condensin

  16. Mutations of SURF-1 in Leigh disease associated with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Leigh disease associated with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency (LD[COX-]) is one of the most common disorders of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, in infancy and childhood. No mutations in any of the genes encoding the COX-protein subunits have been identified in LD(COX-) patients. Using complementation assays based on the fusion of LD(COX-) cell lines with several rodent/human rho0 hybrids, we demonstrated that the COX phenotype was rescued by the presence of a normal human chromosome 9. L...

  17. Identifying Causes of Job Performance Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herem, Maynard A.

    1979-01-01

    A model to guide the search for types of performance deficiencies is set forth within the general framework of systems theory. Five types of problems, singly or in combination, are discussed as causes of deficiencies. (Author)

  18. Genetics Home Reference: congenital leptin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obesity? National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Active at Any Size! Educational Resources (6 links) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Obesity and Genetics MalaCards: congenital leptin deficiency Orphanet: Obesity due to congenital leptin deficiency ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: protein S deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my area? Other Names for This Condition hereditary thrombophilia due to protein S deficiency Related Information How are ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital protein S deficiency ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels of potassium in the blood (hyponatremia and hyperkalemia, respectively). Individuals with corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency can also ... acid in the blood (metabolic acidosis). The hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis associated with corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency ...

  1. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven F Werder

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven F Werder1,21Kansas University School of Medicine – Wichita, Wichita, KS, USA; 2Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, Pittsburg, KS, USAIntroduction: Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1 Which patients should be tested? (2 What test should be ordered? (3 How are inferences made from such testing? (4 In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5 Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6 What is to be expected from treatment? (7 How is B12 deficiency treated?Methods: On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment and then reviewed in answering the above questions.Results: The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed.Discussion: Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test

  2. Age-related decline of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit expression in the auditory cortex of the mimetic aging rat model associated with the common deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yi; Hu, Yujuan; Peng, Wei; Sun, Yu; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Xueyan; Huang, Xiang; Zhang, Honglian; Kong, Weijia

    2012-12-01

    The age-related deterioration in the central auditory system is well known to impair the abilities of sound localization and speech perception. However, the mechanisms involved in the age-related central auditory deficiency remain unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions accumulated with age in the auditory system. Also, a cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) deficiency has been proposed to be a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity. This study was designed to explore the changes of CcO activity and to investigate the possible relationship between the mtDNA common deletion (CD) and CcO activity as well as the mRNA expression of CcO subunits in the auditory cortex of D-galactose (D-gal)-induced mimetic aging rats at different ages. Moreover, we explored whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were involved in the changes of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded CcO subunits in the auditory cortex during aging. Our data demonstrated that d-gal-induced mimetic aging rats exhibited an accelerated accumulation of the CD and a gradual decline in the CcO activity in the auditory cortex during the aging process. The reduction in the CcO activity was correlated with the level of CD load in the auditory cortex. The mRNA expression of CcO subunit III was reduced significantly with age in the d-gal-induced mimetic aging rats. In contrast, the decline in the mRNA expression of subunits I and IV was relatively minor. Additionally, significant increases in the mRNA and protein levels of PGC-1α, NRF-1 and TFAM were observed in the auditory cortex of D-gal-induced mimetic aging rats with aging. These findings suggested that the accelerated accumulation of the CD in the auditory cortex may induce a substantial decline in CcO subunit III and lead to a significant decline in the Cc

  3. Effect of high and low molecular weight glutenin subunits, and subunits of gliadin on physicochemical parameters of different wheat genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Souza Costa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Identification of functional properties of wheat flour by specific tests allows genotypes with appropriate characteristics to be selected for specific industrial uses. The objective of wheat breeding programs is to improve the quality of germplasm bank in order to be able to develop wheat with suitable gluten strength and extensibility for bread making. The aim of this study was to evaluate 16 wheat genotypes by correlating both glutenin subunits of high and low molecular weight and gliadin subunits with the physicochemical characteristics of the grain. Protein content, sedimentation volume, sedimentation index, and falling number values were analyzed after the grains were milled. Hectoliter weight and mass of 1000 seeds were also determined. The glutenin and gliadin subunits were separated using polyacrylamide gel in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The data were evaluated using variance analysis, Pearson's correlation, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis. The IPR 85, IPR Catuara TM, T 091015, and T 091069 genotypes stood out from the others, which indicate their possibly superior grain quality with higher sedimentation volume, higher sedimentation index, and higher mass of 1000 seeds; these genotypes possessed the subunits 1 (Glu-A1, 5 + 10 (Glu-D1, c (Glu-A3, and b (Glu-B3, with exception of T 091069 genotype that possessed the g allele instead of b in the Glu-B3.

  4. Cobalamin deficiency in children: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Synne Helland

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to present cobalamin deficiency in children with a specific focus on infants. Background: Cobalamin deficiency is caused by inadequate intake, malabsorption or inborn errors of vitamin B12 metabolism. Cobalamin deficiency in infants is usually caused by deficiency in the mother. There is often a diagnostic delay among infants because the most frequent symptoms are unspecific, e.g., developmental delay, apathy, hypotonia, anorexia and failure to thrive. Chi...

  5. Complementation of Escherichia coli unc mutant strains by chloroplast and cyanobacterial F1-ATPase subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, H; Burkovski, A; Altendorf, K; Junge, W; Engelbrecht, S

    1993-10-04

    The genes encoding the five subunits of the F1 portion of the ATPases from both spinach chloroplasts and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were cloned into expression vectors and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant subunits formed inclusion bodies within the cells. Each particular subunit was expressed in the respective unc mutant, each unable to grow on non-fermentable carbon sources. The following subunits restored growth under conditions of oxidative phosphorylation: alpha (both sources, cyanobacterial subunit more than spinach subunit), beta (cyanobacterial subunit only), delta (both spinach and Synechocystis), and epsilon (both sources), whereas no growth was achieved with the gamma subunits from both sources. Despite a high degree of sequence homology the large subunits alpha and beta of spinach and cyanobacterial F1 were not as effective in the substitution of their E. coli counterparts. On the other hand, the two smallest subunits of the E. coli ATPase could be more effectively replaced by their cyanobacterial or chloroplast counterparts, although the sequence identity or even similarity is very low. We attribute these findings to the different roles of these subunits in F1: The large alpha and beta subunits contribute to the catalytic centers of the enzyme, a function rendering them very sensitive to even minor changes. For the smaller delta and epsilon subunits it was sufficient to maintain a certain tertiary structure during evolution, with little emphasis on the conservation of particular amino acids.

  6. Iron-induced nickel deficiency in pecan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency can occur in horticultural and agronomic crops. This study assesses impact of excessive iron (Fe) on expression of Ni deficiency in pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Field and greenhouse experiments found Ni deficiency to be inducible by ei...

  7. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity.

  9. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existing...... 25(OH)D values from national health/nutrition surveys. OBJECTIVE: This study applied VDSP protocols to serum 25(OH)D data from representative childhood/teenage and adult/older adult European populations, representing a sizable geographical footprint, to better quantify the prevalence of vitamin D...... sera. These data were combined with standardized serum 25(OH)D data from 4 previously standardized studies (for a total n = 55,844). Prevalence estimates of vitamin D deficiency [using various serum 25(OH)D thresholds] were generated on the basis of standardized 25(OH)D data. RESULTS: An overall pooled...

  10. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    : homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage......Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...

  11. Removal of GABA(A receptor γ2 subunits from parvalbumin neurons causes wide-ranging behavioral alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elli Leppä

    Full Text Available We investigated the behavioral significance of fast synaptic inhibition by αβγ2-type GABA(A receptors on parvalbumin (Pv cells. The GABA(A receptor γ2 subunit gene was selectively inactivated in Pv-positive neurons by Cre/loxP recombination. The resulting Pv-Δγ2 mice were relatively healthy in the first postnatal weeks; but then as Cre started to be expressed, the mice progressively developed wide-ranging phenotypic alterations including low body weight, motor deficits and tremor, decreased anxiety levels, decreased pain sensitivity and deficient prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex and impaired spatial learning. Nevertheless, the deletion was not lethal, and mice did not show increased mortality even after one year. Autoradiography with t-butylbicyclophosphoro[(35S]thionate suggested an increased amount of GABA(A receptors with only α and β subunits in central nervous system regions that contained high levels of parvalbumin neurons. Using BAC-transgenesis, we reduced some of the Pv-Δγ2 phenotype by selectively re-expressing the wild-type γ2 subunit back into some Pv cells (reticular thalamic neurons and cerebellar Pv-positive neurons. This produced less severe impairments of motor skills and spatial learning compared with Pv-Δγ2 mice, but all other deficits remained. Our results reveal the widespread significance of fast GABAergic inhibition onto Pv-positive neurons for diverse behavioral modalities, such as motor coordination, sensorimotor integration, emotional behavior and nociception.

  12. DNAJC21 Mutations Link a Cancer-Prone Bone Marrow Failure Syndrome to Corruption in 60S Ribosome Subunit Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Hemanth; Walne, Amanda J; Williams, Mike; Bockett, Nicholas; Collopy, Laura; Cardoso, Shirleny; Ellison, Alicia; Wynn, Rob; Leblanc, Thierry; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Kelsell, David P; van Heel, David A; Payne, Elspeth; Plagnol, Vincent; Dokal, Inderjeet; Vulliamy, Tom

    2016-07-07

    A substantial number of individuals with bone marrow failure (BMF) present with one or more extra-hematopoietic abnormality. This suggests a constitutional or inherited basis, and yet many of them do not fit the diagnostic criteria of the known BMF syndromes. Through exome sequencing, we have now identified a subgroup of these individuals, defined by germline biallelic mutations in DNAJC21 (DNAJ homolog subfamily C member 21). They present with global BMF, and one individual developed a hematological cancer (acute myeloid leukemia) in childhood. We show that the encoded protein associates with rRNA and plays a highly conserved role in the maturation of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Lymphoblastoid cells obtained from an affected individual exhibit increased sensitivity to the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D and reduced amounts of rRNA. Characterization of mutations revealed impairment in interactions with cofactors (PA2G4, HSPA8, and ZNF622) involved in 60S maturation. DNAJC21 deficiency resulted in cytoplasmic accumulation of the 60S nuclear export factor PA2G4, aberrant ribosome profiles, and increased cell death. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that mutations in DNAJC21 cause a cancer-prone BMF syndrome due to corruption of early nuclear rRNA biogenesis and late cytoplasmic maturation of the 60S subunit.

  13. Molecular Genetics of Lactase Deficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Kuokkanen, Mikko

    2006-01-01

    Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) (MIM 223000) is a rare autosomal recessive gastrointestinal disorder characterized by watery diarrhea in infants fed with breast milk or other lactose-containing formulas. The CLD locus was previously assigned by linkage and linkage disequilibrium analyses on 2q21 in 19 Finnish families. In this study, the molecular background of this disorder is reported. The CLD locus was refined in 32 CLD patients in 24 families by using microsatellite and single nucleot...

  14. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  15. Congenital deficiency of factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, M; Gomber, S; Madan, N; Rusia, U; Sharma, S

    1996-01-01

    A case of congenital factor VII deficiency in a five-year-old child is reported. The patient, born of a non-consanguineous marriage, presented with repeated bouts of epistaxis since childhood. The prothrombin time (PT) was markedly prolonged with a normal bleeding time (BT), partial thromboplastin time with Kaolin (PTTK) and platelet count. The patient has been on follow up for the last four years and is doing apparently well.

  16. Contribution of IL-12/IL-35 common subunit p35 to maintaining the testicular immune privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terayama, Hayato; Yoshimoto, Takayuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Naito, Munekazu; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Shogo; Mitobe, Kana; Furusawa, Jun-Ichi; Mizoguchi, Izuru; Kezuka, Takeshi; Goto, Hiroshi; Suyama, Kaori; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Sakabe, Kou; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The testis is an organ with immune privilege. The comprehensive blood-testis barrier formed by Sertoli cells protects autoimmunogenic spermatozoa and spermatids from attack by the body's immune system. The interleukin (IL)-6/IL-12 family cytokines IL-12 (p35/p40), IL-23 (p19/p40), IL-27 (p28/Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 [EBI3]), and IL-35 (p35/EBI3) play critical roles in the regulation of various immune responses, but their roles in testicular immune privilege are not well understood. In the present study, we investigated whether these cytokines are expressed in the testes and whether they function in the testicular immune privilege by using mice deficient in their subunits. Expression of EBI3 was markedly increased at both mRNA and protein levels in the testes of 10- or 12-week-old wild-type mice as compared with levels in 2-week-old mice, whereas the mRNA expression of p40 was markedly decreased and that of p35 was conserved between these two groups. Lack of EBI3, p35, and IL-12 receptor β2 caused enhanced infiltration of lymphocytes into the testicular interstitium, with increased interferon-γ expression in the testes and autoantibody production against mainly acrosomal regions of spermatids. Spermatogenic disturbance was more frequently observed in the seminiferous tubules, especially when surrounded by infiltrating lymphocytes, of these deficient mice than in those of wild-type mice. In particular, p35-deficient mice showed the most severe spermatogenic disturbance. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that endothelial cells and peritubular cells in the interstitium were highly positive for p35 at both ages, and CD163+ resident macrophages positive for p35 and EBI3, possibly producing IL-35, were also detected in the interstitium of 12-week-old mice but not those of 2-week-old mice. These results suggest that p35 helps in maintaining the testicular immune privilege, in part in an IL-35-dependent manner.

  17. [Iodine deficiency in cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, I; Magyari, M; Stief, L

    1998-08-30

    The thyroid hormone deficiency on cardiovascular function can be characterized with decreased myocardial contractility and increased peripheral vascular resistance as well as with the changes in lipid metabolism. 42 patients with cardiovascular disease (mean age 65 +/- 13 yr, 16 males) were investigated if iodine insufficiency can play a role as a risk factor for the cardiovascular diseases. The patients were divided in 5 subgroups on the ground of the presence of hypertension, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, coronary disfunction and arrhythmia. Urine iodine concentration (5.29 +/- 4.52 micrograms/dl) was detected with Sandell-Kolthoff colorimetric reaction. The most decreased urine iodine concentration was detected in the subgroups with arrhythmia and congestive heart failure (4.7 +/- 4.94 micrograms/dl and 4.9 +/- 4.81 micrograms/dl, respectively). An elevated TSH level was found by 3 patients (5.3 +/- 1.4 mlU/l). An elevation in lipid metabolism (cholesterol, triglyceride) associated with all subgroups without arrhythmia. In conclusion, the occurrence of iodine deficiency in cardiovascular disease is frequent. Iodine supplementation might prevent the worsing effect of iodine deficiency on cardiovascular disease.

  18. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    OpenAIRE

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in ...

  19. Testing experimental subunit furunculosis vaccines for rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika H.; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Skov, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida (AS) is the etiological agent of typical furunculosis in salmonid fish. The disease causes bacterial septicemia and is a major fish health problem in salmonid aquaculture worldwide, inducing high morbidity and mortality. In this study we vaccinated rainbow...... trout with subunit vaccines containing protein antigens that were selected based on an in silico antigen discovery approach. Thus, the proteome of AS strain A449 was analyzed by an antigen discovery platform and its proteins consequently ranked by their predicted ability to evoke protective immune...... response against AS. Fourteen proteins were prepared in 3 different experimental subunit vaccine combinations and used to vaccinate rainbow trout by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. We tested the proteins for their ability to elicit antibody production and protection. Thus, fish were exposed to virulent...

  20. Developments of Subunit and VLP Vaccines Against Influenza A Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma-ping Deng; Zhi-hong Hu; Hua-lin Wang; Fei Deng

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus is a continuous and severe global threat to mankind.The continuously re-emerging disease gives rise to thousands of deaths and enormous economic losses each year,which emphasizes the urgency and necessity to develop high-quality influenza vaccines in a safer,more efficient and economic way.The influenza subunit and VLP vaccines,taking the advantage of recombinant DNA technologies and expression system platforms,can be produced in such an ideal way.This review summarized the recent advancements in the research and development of influenza subunit and VLP vaccines based on the recombinant expression of hemagglutinin antigen (HA),neuraminidase antigen (NA),Matrix 2 protein (M2) and nucleocapsid protein (NP).It would help to get insight into the current stage of influenza vaccines,and suggest the future design and development of novel influenza vaccines.

  1. Thermostable Subunit Vaccines for Pulmonary Delivery: How Close Are We?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    , such as influenza, tuberculosis, and Ebola, for which no good universal vaccines exist. At least two pharmaceutical improvements are expected to help filling this gap: i) The development of thermostable vaccine dosage forms, and ii) the full exploitation of the adjuvant technology for subunit vaccines to potentiate......In the past century, vaccines have contributed to a significant improvement in global public health by preventing a number of infectious diseases. Despite this, the vaccine field is still facing challenges related to incomplete vaccine coverage and persistent difficult vaccine targets...... strong immune responses. This review highlights the status and recent advances in formulation and pulmonary delivery of thermostable human subunit vaccines. Such vaccines are very appealing from compliance, distribution and immunological point of view: Being non-invasive, inhalable vaccines are self...

  2. Mapping of the Mouse Actin Capping Protein Beta Subunit Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper John A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capping protein (CP, a heterodimer of α and β subunits, is found in all eukaryotes. CP binds to the barbed ends of actin filaments in vitro and controls actin assembly and cell motility in vivo. Vertebrates have three isoforms of CPβ produced by alternatively splicing from one gene; lower organisms have one gene and one isoform. Results We isolated genomic clones corresponding to the β subunit of mouse CP and identified its chromosomal location by interspecies backcross mapping. Conclusions The CPβ gene (Cappb1 mapped to Chromosome 4 between Cdc42 and D4Mit312. Three mouse mutations, snubnose, curly tail, and cribriform degeneration, map in the vicinity of the β gene.

  3. Differential expression of G protein alpha and ß subunit genes during development of Phytophthora infestans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laxalt, A.M.; Latijnhouwers, M.; Hulten, van M.; Govers, F.

    2002-01-01

    A G protein subunit gene (pigpa1) and a G protein subunit gene (pigpb1) were isolated from the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of potato late blight. Heterotrimeric G proteins are evolutionary conserved GTP-binding proteins that are composed of ,, and subunits and participate in di

  4. The European database on small subunit ribosomal RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wuyts, Jan; Van de Peer, Yves; Winkelmans, Tina; De Wachter, Rupert

    2002-01-01

    The European database on SSU rRNA can be consulted via the World WideWeb at http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ssu/ and compiles all complete or nearly complete small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences. Sequences are provided in aligned format. The alignment takes into account the secondary structure information derived by comparative sequence analysis of thousands of sequences. Additional information such as literature references, taxonomy, secondary structure models and nucleotide variability maps, is also...

  5. Structure of the archaeal Cascade subunit Csa5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeks, Judith; Graham, Shirley; Anderson, Linzi; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.; Naismith, James H.

    2013-01-01

    The Cascade complex for CRISPR-mediated antiviral immunity uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target invading DNA species from mobile elements such as viruses, leading to their destruction. The core of the Cascade effector complex consists of the Cas5 and Cas7 subunits, which are widely conserved in prokaryotes. Cas7 binds crRNA and forms the helical backbone of Cascade. Many archaea encode a version of the Cascade complex (denoted Type I-A) that includes a Csa5 (or small) subunit, which interacts weakly with the core proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Csa5 protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Csa5 comprises a conserved α-helical domain with a small insertion consisting of a weakly conserved β-strand domain. In the crystal, the Csa5 monomers have multimerized into infinite helical threads. At each interface is a strictly conserved intersubunit salt bridge, deletion of which disrupts multimerization. Structural analysis indicates a shared evolutionary history among the small subunits of the CRISPR effector complexes. The same α-helical domain is found in the C-terminal domain of Cse2 (from Type I-E Cascade), while the N-terminal domain of Cse2 is found in Cmr5 of the CMR (Type III-B) effector complex. As Cmr5 shares no match with Csa5, two possibilities present themselves: selective domain loss from an ancestral Cse2 to create two new subfamilies or domain fusion of two separate families to create a new Cse2 family. A definitive answer awaits structural studies of further small subunits from other CRISPR effector complexes. PMID:23846216

  6. Immunological Effect of Subunit Influenza Vaccine Entrapped by Liposomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHUI-HUA ZHANG; JIA-XU LIANG; SHU-YAN DAI; XIAO-LIN QIU; YAN-RONG YI; YUN PAN

    2009-01-01

    Objective To elevate the immunological effect of subunit influenza vaccine in infants and aged people (over 60) using liposomal adjuvant in the context of its relatively low immunity and to investigate the relation between vaccine antigens and liposomal characteristics. Methods Several formulations of liposomal subunit influenza vaccine were prepared. Their relevant characteristics were investigated to optimize the preparation method. Antisera obtained from immunizinged mice were used to evaluate the antibody titers of various samples by HI and ELISA. Results Liposomal trivalent influenza vaccine prepared by film evaporation in combinedation with freeze-drying significantly increased its immunological effect in SPF Balb/c mice. Liposomal vaccine stimulated the antibody titer of H3N2, H1N1, and B much stronger than conventional influenza vaccine. As a result, liposomal vaccine (mean size: 4.5-5.5 μm, entrapment efficiency: 30%-40%) significantly increased the immunological effect of subunit influenza vaccine. Conclusion The immune effect of liposomal vaccine depends on different antigens, and enhanced immunity is not positively correlated with the mean size of liposome or its entrapped efficiency.

  7. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2‧OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  8. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  9. CLK2 inhibition ameliorates autistic features associated with SHANK3 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidinosti, Michael; Botta, Paolo; Krüttner, Sebastian; Proenca, Catia C; Stoehr, Natacha; Bernhard, Mario; Fruh, Isabelle; Mueller, Matthias; Bonenfant, Debora; Voshol, Hans; Carbone, Walter; Neal, Sarah J; McTighe, Stephanie M; Roma, Guglielmo; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E; Porter, Jeffrey A; Caroni, Pico; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Lüthi, Andreas; Galimberti, Ivan

    2016-03-11

    SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (SHANK3) haploinsufficiency is causative for the neurological features of Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMDS), including a high risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We used unbiased, quantitative proteomics to identify changes in the phosphoproteome of Shank3-deficient neurons. Down-regulation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt)-mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling resulted from enhanced phosphorylation and activation of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulatory subunit, B56β, due to increased steady-state levels of its kinase, Cdc2-like kinase 2 (CLK2). Pharmacological and genetic activation of Akt or inhibition of CLK2 relieved synaptic deficits in Shank3-deficient and PMDS patient-derived neurons. CLK2 inhibition also restored normal sociability in a Shank3-deficient mouse model. Our study thereby provides a novel mechanistic and potentially therapeutic understanding of deregulated signaling downstream of Shank3 deficiency.

  10. Complex II deficiency--a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain-Ghai, Shailly; Cameron, Jessie M; Al Maawali, Almundher; Blaser, Susan; MacKay, Nevena; Robinson, Brian; Raiman, Julian

    2013-02-01

    Complex II deficiency is a rare cause of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects with a prevalence of 2-23%. It is exclusively nuclear encoded and functions in the citric acid cycle by oxidizing succinate to fumarate and in the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) by transferring electrons to ubiquinone. Of the four subunits, SDHA and SDHB are catalytic and SDHC and SDHD are anchoring. Mutations in SDHA and SDHAF1 (assembly factor) have been found in patients with CII deficiency and a mitochondrial phenotype. We present a patient with CII deficiency with a previously undescribed phenotype of dilated cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and developmental delay. Also, a comprehensive review of 36 cases published in the literature was undertaken. The results show that CII deficiency has a variable phenotype with no correlation with residual complex activity in muscle although the phenotype and enzyme activities are comparable within a family. For some, the condition was fatal in infancy, others had multisystem involvement and some had onset in adulthood with mild symptoms and normal cognition. Neurological involvement is most commonly observed and brain imaging commonly shows leukoencephalopathy, Leigh syndrome, or cerebellar atrophy. Mutations in SDHAF1 are associated with leukoencephalopathy. Other organ systems like heart, muscle, and eyes are only involved in about 50% of the cases but cardiomyopathy is associated with high mortality and morbidity. In some patients, riboflavin has provided clinical improvement.

  11. Selenium Deficiency Attenuates Chicken Duodenal Mucosal Immunity via Activation of the NF-κb Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Qu, Yanpeng; Wang, Jianfa; Wu, Rui

    2016-08-01

    Selenium (Se) deficiency can cause intestinal mucosal inflammation, which is related to activation of nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of inflammatory response in chicken duodenal mucosa caused by Se deficiency and its relationship with the NF-κB signaling pathway remain elusive. In this study, we firstly obtained Se-deficient chickens bred with 0.01 mg/kg Se and the normal chickens bred with 0.4 mg/kg Se for 35 days. Then, NF-κB signaling pathway, secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), inflammatory cytokines, oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione activities were determined. The results showed that Se deficiency obviously enhanced p50, p65, and p65 DNA-binding activities. The phosphorylation of IκB-α and phosphorylation of kappa-B kinase subunit alpha (IKKα) and IKKα were elevated, but IκB-α was decreased (P mucosal immunity via activation of NF-κB signaling pathway regulated by redox activity, which suggested that Se is a crucial host factor involved in regulating inflammation.

  12. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA.

  13. Primary Carnitine (OCTN2) Deficiency Without Neonatal Carnitine Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, L.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Morava, E.

    2012-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a primary carnitine deficiency is usually based on a very low level of free and total carnitine (free carnitine: 1–5 μM, normal 20–55 μM) (Longo et al. 2006), we detected a patient via newborn screening with a total carnitine level 67 % of the normal value. At the age of 1 year, after interruption of carnitine supplementation for a 4-week period the carnitine profile was assessed and the free carnitine level had dropped to 10.4 μmol/l (normal: 20–55 μM) and total car...

  14. Function and Subunit Interactions of the N-terminal Domain of Subunit a (Vph1p) of the Yeast V-ATPase*

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Jie; Forgac, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The vacuolar (H+)-ATPases (V-ATPases) are ATP-dependent proton pumps that operate by a rotary mechanism in which ATP hydrolysis drives rotation of a ring of proteolipid subunits relative to subunit a within the integral V0 domain. In vivo dissociation of the V-ATPase (an important regulatory mechanism) generates a V0 domain that does not passively conduct protons. EM analysis indicates that the N-terminal domain of subunit a approaches the rotary subunits in free V0, ...

  15. Alteration of proteins and pigments influence the function of photosystem I under iron deficiency from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Yadavalli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron is an essential micronutrient for all organisms because it is a component of enzyme cofactors that catalyze redox reactions in fundamental metabolic processes. Even though iron is abundant on earth, it is often present in the insoluble ferric [Fe (III] state, leaving many surface environments Fe-limited. The haploid green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is used as a model organism for studying eukaryotic photosynthesis. This study explores structural and functional changes in PSI-LHCI supercomplexes under Fe deficiency as the eukaryotic photosynthetic apparatus adapts to Fe deficiency. RESULTS: 77K emission spectra and sucrose density gradient data show that PSI and LHCI subunits are affected under iron deficiency conditions. The visible circular dichroism (CD spectra associated with strongly-coupled chlorophyll dimers increases in intensity. The change in CD signals of pigments originates from the modification of interactions between pigment molecules. Evidence from sucrose gradients and non-denaturing (green gels indicates that PSI-LHCI levels were reduced after cells were grown for 72 h in Fe-deficient medium. Ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy suggests that red-shifted pigments in the PSI-LHCI antenna were lost during Fe stress. Further, denaturing gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis reveals that levels of the PSI subunits PsaC and PsaD decreased, while PsaE was completely absent after Fe stress. The light harvesting complexes were also susceptible to iron deficiency, with Lhca1 and Lhca9 showing the most dramatic decreases. These changes in the number and composition of PSI-LHCI supercomplexes may be caused by reactive oxygen species, which increase under Fe deficiency conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Fe deficiency induces rapid reduction of the levels of photosynthetic pigments due to a decrease in chlorophyll synthesis. Chlorophyll is important not only as a light-harvesting pigment, but also has a structural role

  16. Skin wound healing in MMP2-deficient and MMP2 / plasminogen double-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøssing, Signe; Rønø, Birgitte; Hald, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    -sensitive MMPs during wound healing. To address whether MMP2 is accountable for the galardin-induced healing deficiency in wildtype and Plg-deficient mice, incisional skin wounds were generated in MMP2 single-deficient mice and in MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice and followed until healed. Alternatively, tissue...... was isolated 7 days post wounding for histological and biochemical analyses. No difference was found in the time from wounding to overt gross restoration of the epidermal surface between MMP2-deficient and wildtype control littermate mice. MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice were viable and fertile, and displayed...... an unchallenged general phenotype resembling that of Plg-deficient mice, including development of rectal prolapses. MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice displayed a slight increase in the wound length throughout the healing period compared with Plg-deficient mice. However, the overall time to complete healing...

  17. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Jong; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Lin, Yu-Fen; Sun, Jingxin; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Saha, Debabrata; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2015-04-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs-deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality.

  18. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Jong Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1, the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1, which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs–deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality.

  19. NUCLEAR GENE MUTATIONS AS THE CAUSE OF MITOCHONDRIAL COMPLEX III DEFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eFernandez-Vizarra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex III (CIII deficiency is one of the least common oxidative phosphorylation defects associated to mitochondrial disease. CIII constitutes the center of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, as well as a crossroad for several other metabolic pathways. For more than ten years, of all the potential candidate genes encoding structural subunits and assembly factors, only three were known to be associated to CIII defects in human pathology. Thus, leaving many of these cases unresolved. These first identified genes were MT-CYB, the only CIII subunit encoded in the mitochondrial DNA; BCS1L, encoding an assembly factor, and UQCRB, a nuclear-encoded structural subunit. Nowadays, thanks to the fast progress that has taken place in the last three-four years, pathological changes in seven more genes are known to be associated to these conditions. This review will focus on the strategies that have permitted the latest discovery of mutations in factors that are necessary for a correct CIII assembly and activity, in relation with their function. In addition, new data further establishing the molecular role of LYRM7/MZM1L as a chaperone involved in CIII biogenesis are provided.

  20. Reduced prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) activity eliminates HAI-1 and HAI-2 deficiency-associated developmental defects by preventing matriptase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Roman; Uzzun Sales, Katiuchia; Kosa, Peter

    2012-01-01

    to placental labyrinth failure, and neural tube defects in HAI-2-deficient embryos. Inactivation of genes encoding c-Met, protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), or the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) alpha subunit all failed to rescue embryonic lethality, suggesting that deregulated matriptase...... neural tube closure. Paradoxically, although matriptase auto-activates and is a well-established upstream epidermal activator of prostasin, biochemical analysis of matriptase- and prostasin-deficient placental tissues revealed a requirement of prostasin for conversion of the matriptase zymogen to active...

  1. Alcoholic Myelopathy and Nutritional Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Haruki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Ikeda, Shohei; Takahashi, Mie; Kawagashira, Yuichi; Iijima, Masahiro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2017-01-01

    A patient with chronic alcoholism presented with myelopathy and low serum folate and cobalamin levels. A 42-year-old alcoholic man had gait disturbance for 4 months. A neurological examination revealed marked spasticity with increased deep tendon reflexes and extensor plantar responses of the lower limbs. His cobalamin level was decreased and his serum folate level was particularly low. His plasma ammonia level was not increased. Abstinence and folic acid and cobalamin supplementation stopped the progression of his neurological deficits. This case indicates that nutritional deficiency should be monitored closely in patients with chronic alcoholism who present with myelopathy. PMID:28049986

  2. Early expression of GABA(A) receptor delta subunit in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelon, F; Mladinic', M; Cherubini, E; Bradbury, A

    2000-12-01

    The cDNA library screening strategy was used to identify the genes encoding for GABA(A) receptor subunits in the rat hippocampus during development. With this technique, genes encoding eleven GABA(A) receptor subunits were identified. The alpha5 subunit was by far the most highly expressed, followed by the gamma2, alpha2 and alpha4 subunits respectively. The expression of the beta2, alpha1, gamma1, beta1 and beta3 subunits was moderate, although that of the alpha3 and delta subunits was weak. In situ hybridization experiments, using digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes, confirmed that the delta subunit was expressed in the neonatal as well as in the adult hippocampus, and is likely to form functional receptors in association with other subunits of the GABA(A) receptor. When the more sensitive RT-PCR approach was used, the gamma3 subunit was also detected, suggesting that this subunit is present in the hippocampus during development but at low levels of expression. The insertion of the delta subunit into functional GABA(A) receptors may enhance the efficacy of GABA in the immediate postnatal period when this amino acid is still exerting a depolarizing and excitatory action.

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Targeted Subunit Toxins Provide a New Approach to Rescue Misfolded Mutant Proteins and Revert Cell Models of Genetic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Tailor, Chetankumar; Che, Clare; Kamani, Mustafa; Spitalny, George; Binnington, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Many germ line diseases stem from a relatively minor disturbance in mutant protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) 3D assembly. Chaperones are recruited which, on failure to correct folding, sort the mutant for retrotranslocation and cytosolic proteasomal degradation (ER-associated degradation-ERAD), to initiate/exacerbate deficiency-disease symptoms. Several bacterial (and plant) subunit toxins, retrograde transport to the ER after initial cell surface receptor binding/internalization. The A subunit has evolved to mimic a misfolded protein and hijack the ERAD membrane translocon (dislocon), to effect cytosolic access and cytopathology. We show such toxins compete for ERAD to rescue endogenous misfolded proteins. Cholera toxin or verotoxin (Shiga toxin) containing genetically inactivated (± an N-terminal polyleucine tail) A subunit can, within 2–4 hrs, temporarily increase F508delCFTR protein, the major cystic fibrosis (CF) mutant (5-10x), F508delCFTR Golgi maturation (chloride transport (2x) in F508del CFTR transfected cells and patient-derived F508delCFTR bronchiolar epithelia, without apparent cytopathology. These toxoids also increase glucocerobrosidase (GCC) in N370SGCC Gaucher Disease fibroblasts (3x), another ERAD–exacerbated misfiling disease. We identify a new, potentially benign approach to the treatment of certain genetic protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27935997

  4. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; Mcginnis, Karen A.; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic ana- lyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two sub- types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  5. Isolation and characterization of recombinant human casein kinase II subunits alpha and beta from bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1991-01-01

    cDNA encoding the casein kinase II (CKII) subunits alpha and beta of human origin were expressed in Escherichia coli using expression vector pT7-7. Significant expression was obtained with E. coli BL21(DE3). The CKII subunits accounted for approximately 30% of the bacterial protein; however, most...... of the expressed proteins were produced in an insoluble form. The recombinant CKII alpha subunit was purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, followed by phosphocellulose and heparin-agarose chromatography. The recombinant CKII beta subunit was extracted from the insoluble pellet and purified in a single step...... on phosphocellulose. From 10 g bacterial cells, the yield of soluble protein was 12 mg alpha subunit and 5 mg beta subunit. SDS/PAGE analysis of the purified recombinant proteins indicated molecular masses of 42 kDa and 26 kDa for the alpha and beta subunits, respectively, in agreement with the molecular masses...

  6. Vitamin D deficiency and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D comprises a group of fat-soluble pro-hormones, obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements, and it must undergo two hydroxylation reactions to be activated in the body. Several studies have shown the role of vitamin D in mineral metabolism regulation, especially calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Some factors such as inadequate vitamin intake and liver or kidney disorders can lead to vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, vitamin D malnutrition may also be linked to susceptibility to chronic diseases such as heart failure, peripheral artery disease, high blood pressure, cognitive impairment including foggy brain and memory loss, and autoimmune diseases including diabetes type I. Recent research has revealed that low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of cardiovascular-related morbidity (Sato et al., 2004 and mortality (Pilz et al., 2008. Also, hypertension contributes to a reduction in bone mineral density and increase in the incidence of stroke and death. This article reviews the function and physiology of vitamin D and examines the effects of vitamin D deficiency on susceptibility to stroke, as a cardiovascular event, and its morbidity and subsequent mortality.

  7. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-02-13

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated.

  8. Cryptosporidiosis in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D A; Wodak, A; Marriot, D J; Harkness, J L; Ralston, M; Hill, A; Penny, R

    1984-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis was found in a patient with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The microbiological and morphological features of this newly recognized opportunistic infection are distinctive and diagnostic.

  9. Vitamin C deficiency in weanling guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Trueba, Gilberto Perez; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    2007-01-01

    Neonates are particularly susceptible to malnutrition due to their limited reserves of micronutrients and their rapid growth. In the present study, we examined the effect of vitamin C deficiency on markers of oxidative stress in plasma, liver and brain of weanling guinea pigs. Vitamin C deficiency...... increased, while protein oxidation decreased (P¼0003). The results show that the selective preservation of brain ascorbate and induction of DNA repair in vitamin C-deficient weanling guinea pigs is not sufficient to prevent oxidative damage. Vitamin C deficiency may therefore be particularly adverse during...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: factor X deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency occurs in approximately 1 per million individuals worldwide. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  11. Iron deficiency anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2013-07-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are quite prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF) and may overlap. Both anemia and iron deficiency are associated with worse symptoms and adverse clinical outcomes. In the past few years, there has been an enormous interest in the subject of iron deficiency and its management in patients with HF. In this review, the etiology and relevance of iron deficiency, iron metabolism in the setting of HF, studies on iron supplementation in patients with HF and potential cardiovascular effects of subclinical iron overload are discussed.

  12. Human mediator subunit MED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsubo, Takuya; Nishitani, Saori; Kikuchi, Yuko; Iida, Satoshi; Yamada, Kana; Tanaka, Aki; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotes, the Mediator complex is an essential transcriptional cofactor of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, it contains up to 30 subunits and consists of four modules: head, middle, tail, and CDK/Cyclin. One of the subunits, MED15, is located in the tail module, and was initially identified as Gal11 in budding yeast, where it plays an essential role in the transcriptional regulation of galactose metabolism with the potent transcriptional activator Gal4. For this reason, we investigated the function of the human MED15 subunit (hMED15) in transcriptional activation. First, we measured the effect of hMED15 knockdown on cell growth in HeLa cells. The growth rate was greatly reduced. By immunostaining, we observed the colocalization of hMED15 with the general transcription factors TFIIE and TFIIH in the nucleus. We measured the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown of hMED15 on transcriptional activation using two different transcriptional activators, VP16 and SREBP1a. Treatment with siRNAs reduced transcriptional activation, and this reduction could be rescued by overexpression of HA/Flag-tagged, wild-type hMED15. To investigate hMED15 localization, we treated human MCF-7 cells with the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3, thus inducing p21 transcription. We found that hMED15 localized to both the p53 binding site and the p21 promoter region, along with TFIIE and TFIIH. These results indicate that hMED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

  13. Properties and subunit structure of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, M; Hiraoka, T; Koike, K; Ogasahara, K; Kanzaki, T

    1976-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase [EC 1.2.4.1] was separated from the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and its molecular weight was estimated to be about 150,000 by sedimentation equilibrium methods. The enzyme was dissociated into two subunits (alpha and beta), with estimated molecular weights of 41,000 (alpha) and 36,000 (beta), respectively, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The subunits were separated by phosphocellulose column chromatography and their chemical properties were examined. The subunit structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase was assigned as alpha2beta2. The content of right-handed alpha-helix in the enzyme molecule was estimated to be about 29 and 28% by optical rotatory dispersion and by circular dichroism, respectively. The enzyme contained no thiamine-PP, and its dehydrogenase activity was completely dependent on added thiamine-PP and partially dependent on added Mg2+ and Ca2+. The Km value of pyruvate dehydrogenase for thiamine diphosphate was estimated to be 6.5 X 10(-5) M in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+. The enzyme showed highly specific activity for thiamine-PP dependent oxidation of both pyruvate and alpha-ketobutyrate, but it also showed some activity with alpha-ketovalerate, alpha-ketoisocaproate, and alpha-ketoisovalerate. The pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was strongly inhibited by bivalent heavy metal ions and by sulfhydryl inhibitors; and the enzyme molecule contained 27 moles of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-reactive sulfhydryl groups and a total of 36 moles of sulfhydryl groups. The inhibitory effect of p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by preincubating the enzyme with thiamine-PP plus pyruvate. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase necessary for formation of the complex is also reported.

  14. Characterisation of the tryptophan synthase alpha subunit in maize

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    Gierl Alfons

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, such as Salmonella typhimurium, tryptophan is synthesized from indole-3-glycerole phosphate (IGP by a tryptophan synthase αββα heterotetramer. Plants have evolved multiple α (TSA and β (TSB homologs, which have probably diverged in biological function and their ability of subunit interaction. There is some evidence for a tryptophan synthase (TS complex in Arabidopsis. On the other hand maize (Zea mays expresses the TSA-homologs BX1 and IGL that efficiently cleave IGP, independent of interaction with TSB. Results In order to clarify, how tryptophan is synthesized in maize, two TSA homologs, hitherto uncharacterized ZmTSA and ZmTSAlike, were functionally analyzed. ZmTSA is localized in plastids, the major site of tryptophan biosynthesis in plants. It catalyzes the tryptophan synthase α-reaction (cleavage of IGP, and forms a tryptophan synthase complex with ZmTSB1 in vitro. The catalytic efficiency of the α-reaction is strongly enhanced upon complex formation. A 160 kD tryptophan synthase complex was partially purified from maize leaves and ZmTSA was identified as native α-subunit of this complex by mass spectrometry. ZmTSAlike, for which no in vitro activity was detected, is localized in the cytosol. ZmTSAlike, BX1, and IGL were not detectable in the native tryptophan synthase complex in leaves. Conclusion It was demonstrated in vivo and in vitro that maize forms a tryptophan synthase complex and ZmTSA functions as α-subunit in this complex.

  15. Effects of metal ions on recombinant calcineurin A subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Effects of metal ions on activities and solution conformations of calcineurin A subunit have been examined.The ability of several metal ions to activate calcineurin A has been tested with Ni2+>Mn2+>Mg2+/Ca2+.The corresponding CD spectra and intrinsic fluorescent emission spectra show that calcineurin A exists in different metal ion-dependent conformation states.Effects of the different concentritions of Ni2+ on activities and solution conformations of calcineurin A have been tested too.Results indicate that effects of these metal ions to activate calcineurin are due to their conformational changes.

  16. The phosphorylation pattern of bovine heart complex I subunits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Signorile, Anna;

    2007-01-01

    The phosphoproteome of bovine heart complex I of the respiratory chain has been analysed with a procedure based on nondenaturing gel electrophoretic separation of complex I from small quantities of mitochondria samples, in-gel digestion, in combination with phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium...... dioxide and MS. The results, complemented by analyses of purified samples of complex I, showed phosphorylation of five subunits of the complex, 42 kDa (human gene NDUFA10), ESSS, B14.5a (human gene NDUFA7), B14.5b (human gene NDUFC2) and B16.6 (GRIM-19). MS also revealed the presence of phosphorylated...

  17. The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron def...

  18. Luteinizing hormone promotes gonadal tumorigenesis in inhibin-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Ankur K.; Agno, Julio E.; Kumar, T. Rajendra; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The inhibins are secreted α:β heterodimers of the TGF-β superfamily that are mainly synthesized in Sertoli cells and granulosa cells, and are critical regulators of testicular and ovarian development and function. Mice homozygous for a targeted deletion of the inhibin α subunit gene (Inha-/-) develop sex cord-stromal tumors in a gonadotropin-dependent manner. Here, we determine the contribution of LH to gonadal tumorigenesis by generating mice deficient in both inhibins and LH. Inha-/-Lhb-/- mice have increased survival and delayed tumor progression, and these observations correlate with lower serum FSH and estradiol levels compared to Inha-/- controls. Double mutant testicular tumors demonstrate decreased expression of cyclin D2, while double mutant ovarian tumors have elevated expression of p15INK4b and trend toward higher levels of p27Kip1. We conclude that LH is not required for tumor formation in the absence of inhibins but promotes tumor progression, likely through alterations in serum hormone levels and cell cycle regulators. PMID:18657590

  19. Cernunnos/XLF Deficiency: A Syndromic Primary Immunodeficiency

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    Funda Erol Çipe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Artemis, DNA ligase IV, DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit, and Cernunnos/XLF genes in nonhomologous end joining pathways of DNA repair mechanisms have been identified as responsible for radiosensitive SCID. Here, we present a 3-year-old girl patient with severe growth retardation, bird-like face, recurrent perianal abscess, pancytopenia, and polydactyly. Firstly, she was thought as Fanconi anemia and spontaneous DNA breaks were seen on chromosomal analysis. After that DEB test was found to be normal and Fanconi anemia was excluded. Because of that she had low IgG and IgA levels, normal IgM level, and absence of B cells in peripheral blood; she was considered as primary immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome. A mutation in NBS1 gene was not found; then Cernunnos/XLF deficiency was investigated due to clinical similarities with previously reported cases. Homozygous mutation in Cernunnos/XLF gene (NHEJ1 was identified. She is now on regular IVIG prophylaxis and has no new infection. Fully matched donor screening is in progress for bone marrow transplantation which is curative treatment of the disease. In conclusion, the patients with microcephaly, bird-like face, and severe growth retardation should be evaluated for hypogammaglobulinemia and primary immunodeficiency diseases.

  20. Genetic causes for iron deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Saad,Sara Teresinha O.

    2010-01-01

    As causas genéticas de deficiência de ferro, real ou funcional, ocorrem por defeitos em muitas proteínas envolvidas na absorção e metabolismo de ferro. Neste capítulo descreveremos sucintamente causas genéticas de carência de ferro para a síntese de hemoglobina, que cursa então com anemia microcítica e hipocrômica. Ressalto que estas são alterações raras, com poucas descrições na literatura. Em alguns casos, o ferro funcional não está disponível para os eritroblastos sintetizarem hemoglobina,...

  1. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease. Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient.

  2. Photodissociation of neutron deficient nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnabend, K.; Babilon, M.; Hasper, J.; Mueller, S.; Zarza, M.; Zilges, A. [TU Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    The knowledge of the cross sections for photodissociation reactions like e.g. ({gamma}, n) of neutron deficient nuclei is of crucial interest for network calculations predicting the abundances of the so-called p nuclei. However, only single cross sections have been measured up to now, i.e., one has to rely nearly fully on theoretical predictions. While the cross sections of stable isotopes are accessible by experiments using real photons, the bulk of the involved reactions starts from unstable nuclei. Coulomb dissociation (CD) experiments in inverse kinematics might be a key to expand the experimental database for p-process network calculations. The approach to test the accuracy of the CD method is explained. (orig.)

  3. [delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, H; Ishida, N; Akagi, R

    1995-06-01

    delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD: E. C. 4.2.1.24), the second enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, condenses two moles of delta-aminolevulinic acid to form porphobilinogen. ALAD deficiency is well known to develop signs and symptoms of typical hepatic porphyria, and classified into three categories as follows: (i) ALAD porphyria, a genetic defect of the enzyme, (ii) tyrosinemia type I, a genetic defect of fumarylacetoacetase in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, producing succinylacetone (a potent inhibitor of ALAD), and (iii) ALAD inhibition by environmental hazards, such as lead, trichloroethylene, and styrene. In the present article, we will describe molecular and biochemical mechanisms to cause the enzyme defect to discuss the significance of ALAD defect on human health.

  4. B12 Deficiency with Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Katar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: to rewieved the clinical and laboratory properties of seven cases with megaloblastic anemia. Clinical and laboratory findings of seven cases with megaloblastic anemia are described. İt is determined that all of the patients received little or no animal products by nutritional history. Clinically apatite, malasia, headeche, otism, and parestheia in the lower extremities and foods were present in patients. On physical examination; four patients had glossit, four had hyporeflexia, one had ataxia. Folat level was normal and B12 vitamin level was low in all patients. The MCV (mean corpuscular volume was normal in three patients. Hypersegmentation of neutrophil was observed in all patients, leukopenia in two, and trombocytopenia was observed in one patient.Conclusion: it is suggested B12 vitamin deficiency in the patients that received little or no animal products by nutritional history. However, hypersegmentation of neutrophil in peripheral blood sample is an important finding for diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia.

  5. Determination of the 1-ethyl-3-[(3-dimethylamino)propyl]-carbodiimide- induced cross-link between the beta and epsilon subunits of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, H G; Flynn, T G; Dunn, S D

    1992-09-15

    The zero-length cross-link between the inhibitory epsilon subunit and one of three catalytic beta subunits of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase (alpha 3 beta 3 gamma delta epsilon), induced by a water-soluble carbodiimide, 1-ethyl-3-[(3-dimethylamino) propyl]-carbodiimide (EDC), has been determined at the amino acid level. Lability of cross-linked beta-epsilon to base suggested an ester cross-link rather than the expected amide. A 10-kDa cross-linked CNBr fragment derived from beta-epsilon was identified by electrophoresis on high percentage polyacrylamide gels. Sequence analysis of this peptide revealed the constituent peptides to be Asp-380 to Met-431 of beta and Glu-96 to Met-138 of epsilon. Glu-381 of beta was absent from cycle 2 indicating that it was one of the cross-linked residues, but no potential cross-linked residue in epsilon was identified in this analysis. A form of epsilon containing a methionine residue in place of Val-112 (epsilon V112M) was produced by site-directed mutagenesis. epsilon V112M was incorporated into F1-ATPase which was then cross-linked with EDC. An 8-kDa cross-linked CNBr fragment of beta-epsilon V112M was shown to contain the peptide of epsilon between residues Glu-96 and Met-112 and the peptide of beta between residues Asp-380 and Met-431. Again residue Glu-381 of beta was notably reduced and no missing residue from the epsilon peptide could be identified, but the peptide sequence limited the possible choices to Ser-106, Ser-107, or Ser-108. Furthermore, an epsilon mutant in which Ser-108 was replaced by cysteine could no longer be cross-linked to a beta subunit in F1-ATPase by EDC. Both mutant forms of epsilon supported growth of an uncC-deficient E. coli strain and inhibited F1-ATPase. These results indicate that the EDC-induced cross-link between the beta and epsilon subunits of F1-ATPase is an ester linkage between beta-Glu-381 and, likely, epsilon-Ser-108. As these residues must be located immediately adjacent to one another in F1

  6. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania; Bedair, Said; Kassem, Islam

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH) and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH) 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products), encouraging adequate exposure

  7. Vitamin A deficiency in quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, R.B.; Bailey, W.W.

    1943-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the symptoms of avitaminosis A in growing and adolescent bobwhites. Chicks from parents that have received a diet rich in vitamin A may have enough stored to carry them a week or ten days on a growing diet deficient in vitamin A before symptoms of deficiency occur. The first sign is ruffled feathering, with the wing primaries standing out from the body and drooping. Ophthalmia in one or both eyes occurs and may close the eyes completely, but this condition is not severe in all cases and may not even be noticeable. Birds show poor growth, loss of appetite, and weakness before death. Under the conditions of the experiments discussed herein, death may occur in the fourth or fifth week, and mortality is high......Postmortem examination may reveal visceral gout with thick deposits of urates on the kidneys, in the ureters, on the heart, in the proventriculus, and occasionally covering all the viscera. There may also be hemorrhage of the heart and other organs....Adolescent quail reared on a diet rich in vitamin A may be able to live through the winter on a maintenance diet low in this vitamin without showing symptoms of avitaminosis, but some individuals whose storage of vitamin A in the liver is not as great as that of others may succumb to visceral gout.....A growing mash for quail which contains sufficient vitamin A when fresh may, after a period of storage, lose enough of the vitamin to cause the characteristic symptoms of avitaminosis A to appear.

  8. Auxiliary Subunits: Shepherding AMPA Receptors to the Plasma Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C. Haering

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs are tetrameric ligand-gated cation channels that mediate excitatory signal transmission in the central nervous system (CNS of vertebrates. The members of the iGluR subfamily of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptors (AMPARs mediate most of the fast excitatory signal transmission, and their abundance in the postsynaptic membrane is a major determinant of the strength of excitatory synapses. Therefore, regulation of AMPAR trafficking to the postsynaptic membrane is an important constituent of mechanisms involved in learning and memory formation, such as long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD. Auxiliary subunits play a critical role in the facilitation and regulation of AMPAR trafficking and function. The currently identified auxiliary subunits of AMPARs are transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs, suppressor of lurcher (SOL, cornichon homologues (CNIHs, synapse differentiation-induced gene I (SynDIG I, cysteine-knot AMPAR modulating proteins 44 (CKAMP44, and germ cell-specific gene 1-like (GSG1L protein. In this review we summarize our current knowledge of the modulatory influence exerted by these important but still underappreciated proteins.

  9. Fungal mediator tail subunits contain classical transcriptional activation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongle; Myers, Lawrence C

    2015-04-01

    Classical activation domains within DNA-bound eukaryotic transcription factors make weak interactions with coactivator complexes, such as Mediator, to stimulate transcription. How these interactions stimulate transcription, however, is unknown. The activation of reporter genes by artificial fusion of Mediator subunits to DNA binding domains that bind to their promoters has been cited as evidence that the primary role of activators is simply to recruit Mediator. We have identified potent classical transcriptional activation domains in the C termini of several tail module subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, and Candida dubliniensis Mediator, while their N-terminal domains are necessary and sufficient for their incorporation into Mediator but do not possess the ability to activate transcription when fused to a DNA binding domain. This suggests that Mediator fusion proteins actually are functioning in a manner similar to that of a classical DNA-bound activator rather than just recruiting Mediator. Our finding that deletion of the activation domains of S. cerevisiae Med2 and Med3, as well as C. dubliniensis Tlo1 (a Med2 ortholog), impairs the induction of certain genes shows these domains function at native promoters. Activation domains within coactivators are likely an important feature of these complexes and one that may have been uniquely leveraged by a common fungal pathogen.

  10. Heterotrimeric G protein subunits are located on rat liver endosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dyke Rebecca W

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rat liver endosomes contain activated insulin receptors and downstream signal transduction molecules. We undertook these studies to determine whether endosomes also contain heterotrimeric G proteins that may be involved in signal transduction from G protein-coupled receptors. Results By Western blotting Gsα, Giα1,2, Giα3 and Gβ were enriched in both canalicular (CM and basolateral (BLM membranes but also readily detectable on three types of purified rat liver endosomes in the order recycling receptor compartment (RRC > compartment for uncoupling of receptor and ligand (CURL > multivesicular bodies (MVB >> purified secondary lysosomes. Western blotting with antibodies to Na, K-ATPase and to other proteins associated with plasma membranes and intracellular organelles indicated this was not due to contamination of endosome preparations by CM or BLM. Adenylate cyclase (AC was also identified on purified CM, BLM, RRC, CURL and MVB. Percoll gradient fractionation of liver postnuclear supernatants demonstrated co-occurrence of endosomes and heterotrimeric G protein subunits in fractions with little plasma membrane markers. By confocal microscopy, punctate staining for Gsα, Giα3 and Gβ corresponded to punctate areas of endocytosed Texas red-dextran in hepatocytes from control and cholera toxin-treated livers. Conclusion We conclude that heterotrimeric G protein subunits as well as AC likely traffic into hepatocytes on endosome membranes, possibly generating downstream signals spatially separate from signalling generated at the plasma membrane, analogous to the role(s of internalized insulin receptors.

  11. Thermostable cross-protective subunit vaccine against Brucella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherwonogrodzky, John W; Barabé, Nicole D; Grigat, Michelle L; Lee, William E; Poirier, Robert T; Jager, Scott J; Berger, Bradley J

    2014-12-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 10(5) CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation.

  12. IMMUNOLOGICAL RESPONSE IN BOVINE LYMPH NODES STIMULATED WITH SUBUNITS VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Andres Tafur Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The vaccination process belongs to the public health intervention methodologies that help prevent infections. Vaccinations performed successfully in the history of medicine reported the significance of this procedure to increase the quality of life, prevent zoonoses and improve animal production. Vaccine emergence remained without exact rules for a long time, maintaining a close relationship with pathogens. However, subunit vaccines, with a difference from the classical idea of protective immunity with microorganisms showed it is possible to trigger T-dependent responses with peptide, revealing new rules for vaccine development. This vaccination process starts by the modulation chance of adaptive immune response through peptide sequences process by APCs for immune synapse formation interceded for pMHC-TCR as a scaffold to T cells priming. In this way the immunological signal triggered by immune synapses is amplified in lymph nodes. As a consequence, T and B cells modulated by peptide activity interact between the B cell follicles region and T cell aggregates, which constitute the paracortical region of secondary lymphoid tissue to form connate unions as a prerequisite for clonal amplification and subsequent immunological memory. Indicating the knowledge of the mechanisms of immune response generated by peptides immunization is essential for understanding modulation, amplification and immune protection as demands for good subunits vaccine.

  13. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 regulatory subunit gene and spinal muscular atrophy disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica STAVARACHI

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a frequent neuromuscular disorder caused by motoneuronal apoptosis, as a result of SMN (Survival Motor Neuron protein deficiency. Although the SMA determining gene was identified, the molecular mechanism of the disease is not clearly understood, due to the heterogeneity of clinical manifestations. Trying to complete the molecular describing SMA picture, by identifying potential modulators factors, we investigated the relationship between phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 regulatory subunit gene (PIK3R1 and SMA pathology. As IGF signaling pathway has been reported to play an important role in motoneurons survival and PIK3 is a key element of this cascade signaling, we focused on the relationship between PIK3R1 gene Met326Ile polymorphism and SMA type I, the most severe form of the disease. A total of 80 subjects (40 SMA type I patients and 40 unrelated healthy controls were included in the study. The statistical analyzes performed consequently to the genotyping by mismatch PCR-RFLP method, revealed that Met326Ile polymorphism is not associated with SMA type I disease: ORMet/Met = 0.398 with a p = 0.072 meanwhile ORMet = 0.495, p = 0.063. However, the Cochrane – Armitage test indicated that there is a statistically association trend between the analyzed polymorphism and SMA type I pathology: ORMet = 0.438, p = 0.032. We concluded that additional researches with an increased subjects number and replicates studies in other populations will clarify the investigated relationship and it may contribute to the SMA molecular mechanism understanding.

  14. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif

    1995-01-01

    -deficiency may be at risk for developing hyperthermia. To pursue this, we performed a controlled study on sweating and body temperature regulation during exercise in the heat in 16 GH-treated GH-deficient patients with normalized insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor/binding protein-3 serum...

  15. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  16. How common is vitamin B12 deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In considering the vitamin B-12 fortification of flour, it is important to know who is at risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency and whether those individuals would benefit from flour fortification.This article reviews current knowledge of the prevalence and causes of vitamin B-12 deficiency and considers ...

  17. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  18. Molecular diagnosis of coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yubero, Delia; Montero, Raquel; Armstrong, Judith; Espinós, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Salviati, Leonardo; Navas, Placido; Artuch, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) deficiency syndromes comprise a growing number of neurological and extraneurological disorders. Primary-genetic but also secondary CoQ deficiencies have been reported. The biochemical determination of CoQ is a good tool for the rapid identification of CoQ deficiencies but does not allow the selection of candidate genes for molecular diagnosis. Moreover, the metabolic pathway for CoQ synthesis is an intricate and not well-understood process, where a large number of genes are implicated. Thus, only next-generation sequencing techniques (either genetic panels of whole-exome and -genome sequencing) are at present appropriate for a rapid and realistic molecular diagnosis of these syndromes. The potential treatability of CoQ deficiency strongly supports the necessity of a rapid molecular characterization of patients, since primary CoQ deficiencies may respond well to CoQ treatment.

  19. Prevalence of Color Vision Deficiency in Qazvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad khalaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Color vision deficiency (CVD is an X chromosome-linked recessive autosomal dominant. Determine the prevalence of color blindness in Qazvin population. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study color vision deficiency examined in 1853 individuals with age 10-25 years old who participated in private clinics and eye clinic of Bu-Ali hospital in Qazvin in 2010. The screening of color vision deficiency was performed using Ishihara test. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 with χP2P test with p<0.05. Results: Mean age of participant was 17.86±4.48 years. 59.5% of them were female. 3.49% of the total population had color vision deficiency that 0.93% and 2.56% were female and male respectively. Conclusion: color vision deficiency must be noticed by decision makers in health field for screen planning.

  20. [Trial of indirect screening of tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, S; Guardamagna, O; Bracco, G; Ponzone, A

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of an early diagnosis of tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency among hyperphenylalaninemic infants, when specific screening tests cannot be performed, was evaluated. Three tetrahydrobiopterin deficient patients, two with dihydropteridine reductase deficiency and one with dihydrobiopterin synthetase deficiency were examined together with their parents and compared with twelve phenylketonuric patients, their parents and sixteen normal subjects. The parameters considered in the hyperphenylalaninemic patients (degree of neonatal hyperphenylalaninemia, phenylalanine lowering speed in response to a restricted diet, dietary tolerance to phenylalanine, oral phenylalanine load) were found to be insufficiently or lately indicative. By contrast, heterozygosity tests (molar ratio (Phe)2/Tyr and sigma discriminant function) performed on the parents allowed a suspicion of tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency, the definite diagnosis being of course based upon specific investigations.

  1. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice.

  2. Expression of accessory colonization factor subunit A (ACFA) of Vibrio cholerae and ACFA fused to cholera toxin B subunit in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Jani, Dewal; Thungapathra, M; Gautam, J K; Meena, L S; Singh, Yogendra; Ghosh, Amit; Tyagi, Akhilesh Kumar; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2008-05-20

    In earlier study from our group, cholera toxin B subunit had been expressed in tomato for developing a plant-based vaccine against cholera. In the present investigation, gene for accessory colonization factor (acf) subunit A, earlier reported to be essential for efficient colonization in the intestine, has been expressed in Escherichia coli as well as tomato plants. Gene encoding for a chimeric protein having a fusion of cholera toxin B subunit and accessory colonization factor A was also expressed in tomato to generate more potent combinatorial antigen. CaMV35S promoter with a duplicated enhancer sequence was used for expression of these genes in tomato. Integration of transgenes into tomato genome was confirmed by PCR and Southern hybridization. Expression of the genes was confirmed at transcript and protein levels. Accessory colonization factor A and cholera toxin B subunit fused to this protein accumulated up to 0.25% and 0.08% of total soluble protein, respectively, in the fruits of transgenic plants. Whereas protein purified from E. coli, in combination with cholera toxin B subunit can be used for development of conventional subunit vaccine, tomato fruits expressing these proteins can be used together with tomato plants expressing cholera toxin B subunit for development of oral vaccine against cholera.

  3. Rotation of subunits during catalysis by Escherichia coli F1-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, T M; Bulygin, V V; Zhou, Y; Hutcheon, M L; Cross, R L

    1995-11-21

    During oxidative and photo-phosphorylation, F0F1-ATP synthases couple the movement of protons down an electrochemical gradient to the synthesis of ATP. One proposed mechanistic feature that has remained speculative is that this coupling process requires the rotation of subunits within F0F1. Guided by a recent, high-resolution structure for bovine F1 [Abrahams, J. P., Leslie, A. G., Lutter, R. & Walker, J. E. (1994) Nature (London) 370, 621-628], we have developed a critical test for rotation of the central gamma subunit relative to the three catalytic beta subunits in soluble F1 from Escherichia coli. In the bovine F1 structure, a specific point of contact between the gamma subunit and one of the three catalytic beta subunits includes positioning of the homolog of E. coli gamma-subunit C87 (gamma C87) close to the beta-subunit 380DELSEED386 sequence. A beta D380C mutation allowed us to induce formation of a specific disulfide bond between beta and gamma C87 in soluble E. coli F1. Formation of the crosslink inactivated beta D380C-F1, and reduction restored full activity. Using a dissociation/reassembly approach with crosslinked beta D380C-F1, we incorporated radiolabeled beta subunits into the two noncrosslinked beta-subunit positions of F1. After reduction of the initial nonradioactive beta-gamma crosslink, only exposure to conditions for catalytic turnover results in similar reactivities of unlabeled and radiolabeled beta subunits with gamma C87 upon reoxidation. The results demonstrate that gamma subunit rotates relative to the beta subunits during catalysis.

  4. The NH2-terminal php domain of the alpha subunit of the Escherichia coli replicase binds the epsilon proofreading subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Anna; McHenry, Charles S

    2006-05-05

    The alpha subunit of the replicase of all bacteria contains a php domain, initially identified by its similarity to histidinol phosphatase but of otherwise unknown function (Aravind, L., and Koonin, E. V. (1998) Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 3746-3752). Deletion of 60 residues from the NH2 terminus of the alpha php domain destroys epsilon binding. The minimal 255-residue php domain, estimated by sequence alignment with homolog YcdX, is insufficient for epsilon binding. However, a 320-residue segment including sequences that immediately precede the polymerase domain binds epsilon with the same affinity as the 1160-residue full-length alpha subunit. A subset of mutations of a conserved acidic residue (Asp43 in Escherichia coli alpha) present in the php domain of all bacterial replicases resulted in defects in epsilon binding. Using sequence alignments, we show that the prototypical gram+ Pol C, which contains the polymerase and proofreading activities within the same polypeptide chain, has an epsilon-like sequence inserted in a surface loop near the center of the homologous YcdX protein. These findings suggest that the php domain serves as a platform to enable coordination of proofreading and polymerase activities during chromosomal replication.

  5. Erythromycin resistance by L4/L22 mutations and resistance masking by drug efflux pump deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovmar, Martin; Nilsson, Karin; Lukk, Eliisa; Vimberg, Vladimir; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    We characterized the effects of classical erythromycin resistance mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 of the large ribosomal subunit on the kinetics of erythromycin binding. Our data are consistent with a mechanism in which the macrolide erythromycin enters and exits the ribosome through the nascent peptide exit tunnel, and suggest that these mutations both impair passive transport through the tunnel and distort the erythromycin-binding site. The growth-inhibitory action of erythromycin was characterized for bacterial populations with wild-type and L22-mutated ribosomes in drug efflux pump deficient and proficient backgrounds. The L22 mutation conferred reduced erythromycin susceptibility in the drug efflux pump proficient, but not deficient, background. This ‘masking' of drug resistance by pump deficiency was reproduced by modelling with input data from our biochemical experiments. We discuss the general principles behind the phenomenon of drug resistance ‘masking', and highlight its potential importance for slowing down the evolution of drug resistance among pathogens. PMID:19197244

  6. Natural disease course and genotype-phenotype correlations in Complex I deficiency caused by nuclear gene defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koene, S; Rodenburg, R J; van der Knaap, M S;

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the largest multi-protein enzyme complex of the oxidative phosphorylation system. Seven subunits of this complex are encoded by the mitochondrial and the remainder by the nuclear genome. We review the natural disease course and signs and symptoms of 130 patients (four new...... cases and 126 from literature) with mutations in nuclear genes encoding structural complex I proteins or those involved in its assembly. Complex I deficiency caused by a nuclear gene defect is usually a non-dysmorphic syndrome, characterized by severe multi-system organ involvement and a poor prognosis...

  7. Structure of the human protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit CK2α' and interaction thermodynamics with the regulatory subunit CK2β

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Nils; Olsen, Birgitte; Raaf, Jennifer;

    2011-01-01

    the limited biochemical knowledge about the second paralog (CK2α'), we developed a well-soluble catalytically active full-length mutant of human CK2α', characterized it by Michaelis-Menten kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry, and determined its crystal structure to a resolution of 2 Å. The affinity......Protein kinase CK2 (formerly "casein kinase 2") is composed of a central dimer of noncatalytic subunits (CK2β) binding two catalytic subunits. In humans, there are two isoforms of the catalytic subunit (and an additional splicing variant), one of which (CK2α) is well characterized. To supplement...

  8. Effect of HMM Glutenin Subunits on Wheat Quality Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Horvat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutenin is a group of polymeric gluten proteins. Glutenin molecules consist of glutenin subunits linked together with disulphide bonds and having higher (HMM-GS and lower (LMM-GS molecular mass. The main objective of this study is the evaluation of the influence of HMM-GS on flour processing properties. Seven bread wheat genotypes with contrasting quality attributes and different HMM-GS composition were analyzed during three years. The composition and quantity of HMM-GS were determined by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, respectively. The quality diversity among genotypes was estimated by the analysis of wheat grain, and flour and bread quality parameters. The presence of HMM glutenin subunits 1 and 2* at Glu-A1 and the subunits 5+10 at Glu-D1 loci, as well as a higher proportion of total HMM-GS, had a positive effect on wheat quality. Cluster analysis of the three groups of data (genotype and HMM-GS, flour and bread quality, and dough rheology yielded the same hierarchical structure for the first top three levels, and similarity of the corresponding dendrograms was proved by the principal eigenvalues of the corresponding Euclidian distance matrices. The obtained similarity in classification based on essentially different types of measurements reflects strong natural association between genetic data, product quality and physical properties. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to effectively reduce large data set into lower dimensions of latent variables amenable for the analysis. PCA analysis of the total set of data (15 variables revealed a very strong interrelationship between the variables. The first three PCA components accounted for 96 % of the total variance, which was significant to the level of 0.05 and was considered as the level of experimental error. These data imply that the quality of wheat cultivars can be contributed to HMM-GS data and should be taken into account in breeding programs assisted by computer models with the aim to

  9. Structure–Function Relationships in Fungal Large-Subunit Catalases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, A.; Valdez, V; Rudino-Pinera, E; Horjales, E; Hansberg, W

    2009-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has two large-subunit catalases, CAT-1 and CAT-3. CAT-1 is associated with non-growing cells and accumulates particularly in asexual spores; CAT-3 is associated with growing cells and is induced under different stress conditions. It is our interest to elucidate the structure-function relationships in large-subunit catalases. Here we have determined the CAT-3 crystal structure and compared it with the previously determined CAT-1 structure. Similar to CAT-1, CAT-3 hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) saturation kinetics exhibited two components, consistent with the existence of two active sites: one saturated in the millimolar range and the other in the molar range. In the CAT-1 structure, we found three interesting features related to its unusual kinetics: (a) a constriction in the channel that conveys H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to the active site; (b) a covalent bond between the tyrosine, which forms the fifth coordination bound to the iron of the heme, and a vicinal cysteine; (c) oxidation of the pyrrole ring III to form a cis-hydroxyl group in C5 and a cis-{gamma}-spirolactone in C6. The site of heme oxidation marks the starts of the central channel that communicates to the central cavity and the shortest way products can exit the active site. CAT-3 has a similar constriction in its major channel, which could function as a gating system regulated by the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration before the gate. CAT-3 functional tyrosine is not covalently bonded, but has instead the electron relay mechanism described for the human catalase to divert electrons from it. Pyrrole ring III in CAT-3 is not oxidized as it is in other large-subunit catalases whose structure has been determined. Different in CAT-3 from these enzymes is an occupied central cavity. Results presented here indicate that CAT-3 and CAT-1 enzymes represent a functional group of catalases with distinctive structural characteristics that determine similar kinetics.

  10. Selective Pyramidal Cell Reduction of GABAA Receptor α1 Subunit Messenger RNA Expression in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Glausier, Jill R; Lewis, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) for the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor, which is present in 60% of cortical GABAA receptors, have been reported to be lower in layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in subjects with schizophrenia. This subunit is expressed in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, and thus lower α1 subunit levels in each cell population would have opposite effects on net cortical excitation. We used dual-label in situ hybridization to quantify GABAA α1 subunit mRNA expression...

  11. Evidence for an unusual transmembrane configuration of AGG3, a Class C Gγ Subunit, of Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfenstetter, Susanne; Chakravorty, David; Kula, Ryan; Urano, Daisuke; Trusov, Yuri; Sheahan, Michael B.; McCurdy, David W.; Assmann, Sarah M.; Alan M Jones; Jose R. Botella

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are crucial for the perception of external signals and subsequent signal transduction in animal and plant cells. In both model systems, the complex is comprised of one Gα, one Gβ and one Gγ subunit. However, in addition to the canonical Gγ subunits (Class A), plants also possess two unusual, plant-specific classes of Gγ subunits (Classes B and C) not yet found in animals. These include Gγ subunits lacking the C-terminal CaaX motif (Class B) which is important for mem...

  12. Subunit Characteristics of Pig Pancreas Ferritin Revealed by MALDI-TOF MS and RP-HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lin; LIN Zhi-cao; LIN Qing; LUO Lian-zhong; HUANG He-qing

    2008-01-01

    Pig pancreas ferritin(PPF) was purified by ultra-centrifugation,ion-exchange chromatography,and native gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(PAGENG).Sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS)-PAGE indicates that PPF consists of two subunit types,namely,H(21000) and L(19000) subunits,and its core shows an average element composition of 1698 Fe3+ and 179 phosphate molecules within the hollow shell,giving a 9.5:1 ratio of Fe3+ to phosphate.An off line approach combining reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography(RP-HPLC) with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass speetrometry(MALDI-TOF MS) made the decomposition of PPF shell into H and L subunits for the analysis of mass spectrometry(MS),giving molecular weights of both H(21014.4) and L(18319.9)subunits.Both subunit types were further identified by an approach combining peptide mass fingerprint(PMF) with database search.A ratio of IH to 2L subunits in PPF was determined by SDS-PAGE,RP-HPLC,and MALDI-TOF MS,respectively.It is well known that the non-covalent interaction of L-L or H-L subunits is stronger than that of H-H subunits in PPF,which may be further used to explain the unclear physiological function between H and L subunits in PPF.

  13. Composition and Content of High-Molecular-Weight Glutenin Subunits and Their Effects on Wheat Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jian-min; LIU Ai-feng; WU Xiang-yun; LIU Jian-jun; ZHAO Zhen-dong; LIU Guang-tian

    2002-01-01

    Sedimentation values, flour glutenin macropolymer (GMP) contents, composition and contents of high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenin subunits (GS) of 233 flour samples were determined. Our data indicated that subunit 1 occurred more frequently at Glu-A1, subunit pair 7 + 8 at Glu- B1 and 2 + 12 at Glu-D1. The significant relationships between Glu-1 quality score and total HMW glutenin content, sedimentation value and GMP content suggested that the composition of HMW-GS affects wheat quality strongly. Moreover,the total content of HMW-GS was correlated with certain quality parameters more significantly. Relationship between subunit 5 + 10 content and breadmaking quality was better than others, but 2 + 12, 7 + 8, 7 + 9 and 4 + 12 also correlated with certain quality parameters significantly. The contents of total HMW-glutenin, x-type subunits and y-type subunits related with sedimentation value, flour GMP content, and Glu-1 quality score more strongly than that of individual subunit or subunit pair. The flour GMP content, with excellent correlation to sedimentation value, total contents of HMW glutenin, x- and y-type subunits and many other quality parameters, could be an ideal indicator of breadmaking quality at earlier generations for breeding purpose for its simple procedure and small scale.

  14. Genetic Diversity of High and Low Molecular Weight Glutenin Subunits in Algerian Aegilops geniculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma MEDOURI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aegilops geniculata Roth is an annual grass relative to cultivated wheat and is widely distributed in North Algeria. Endosperm storage proteins of wheat and its relatives, namely glutenins and gliadins, play an important role in dough properties and bread making quality. In the present study, the different alleles encoded at the four glutenin loci (Glu-M1, Glu-U1, Glu-M3 and Glu-U3 were identified from thirty five accessions of the tetraploid wild wheat A. geniculata collected in Algeria using Sodium dodecyl Sulfate - Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. At Glu-M1 and Glu-U1 loci, encoding high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS or A-subunits, 15 and 12 alleles were observed respectively, including one new subunit. B-Low molecular weight glutenin subunits zone (B-LMW-GS displayed a far greater variation, as 28 and 25 alleles were identified at loci Glu-M3 and Glu-U3 respectively. Thirty two subunits patterns were revealed at the C subunits- zone and a total of thirty four patterns resulted from the genetic combination of the two zones (B- and C-zone. The wide range of glutenin subunits variation (high molecular weight glutenin subunits and low molecular weight glutenin subunits in this species has the potential to enhance the genetic variability for improving the quality of wheat./span>

  15. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf T Soliman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products, encouraging

  16. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  17. Kalirin Binds the NR2B Subunit of the NMDA Receptor, Altering Its Synaptic Localization and Function

    KAUST Repository

    Kiraly, D. D.

    2011-08-31

    The ability of dendritic spines to change size and shape rapidly is critical in modulating synaptic strength; these morphological changes are dependent upon rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Kalirin-7 (Kal7), a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor localized to the postsynaptic density (PSD), modulates dendritic spine morphology in vitro and in vivo. Kal7 activates Rac and interacts with several PSD proteins, including PSD-95, DISC-1, AF-6, and Arf6. Mice genetically lacking Kal7 (Kal7KO) exhibit deficient hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as behavioral abnormalities in models of addiction and learning. Purified PSDs from Kal7KO mice contain diminished levels of NR2B, an NMDA receptor subunit that plays a critical role in LTP induction. Here we demonstrate that Kal7KO animals have decreased levels of NR2B-dependent NMDA receptor currents in cortical pyramidal neurons as well as a specific deficit in cell surface expression of NR2B. Additionally, we demonstrate that the genotypic differences in conditioned place preference and passive avoidance learning seen in Kal7KO mice are abrogated when animals are treated with an NR2B-specific antagonist during conditioning. Finally, we identify a stable interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain of Kal7 and the juxtamembrane region of NR2B preceding its cytosolic C-terminal domain. Binding of NR2B to a protein that modulates the actin cytoskeleton is important, as NMDA receptors require actin integrity for synaptic localization and function. These studies demonstrate a novel and functionally important interaction between the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor and Kalirin, proteins known to be essential for normal synaptic plasticity.

  18. Complement anaphylatoxin C5a neuroprotects through regulation of glutamate receptor subunit 2 in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of numerous neurological diseases. We previously reported that pre-treatment of murine cortico-hippocampal neuronal cultures with the complement derived anaphylatoxin C5a, protects against glutamate mediated apoptosis. Our present study with C5a receptor knock out (C5aRKO mice corroborates that the deficiency of C5a renders C5aRKO mouse more susceptible to apoptotic injury in vivo. In this study we explored potential upstream mechanisms involved in C5a mediated neuroprotection in vivo and in vitro. Methods Based on evidence suggesting that reduced expression of glutamate receptor subunit 2 (GluR2 may influence apoptosis in neurons, we studied the effect of human recombinant C5a on GluR2 expression in response to glutamate neurotoxicity. Glutamate analogs were injected into C5aRKO mice or used to treat in vitro neuronal culture and GluR2 expression were assessed in respect with cell death. Results In C5aRKO mice we found that the neurons are more susceptible to excitotoxicity resulting in apoptotic injury in the absence of the C5a receptor compared to WT control mice. Our results suggest that C5a protects against apoptotic pathways in neurons in vitro and in vivo through regulation of GluR2 receptor expression. Conclusion Complement C5a neuroprotects through regulation of GluR2 receptor subunit.

  19. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  20. Isolated respiratory chain enzyme deficiency in patients with a mitochondrial (encephalo-) myopathy: Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial complex and IV genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, D. de; Coo, I. de; Buddiger, P. [University Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of four enzyme complexes. Deficiencies of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) are frequently found in muscle biopsies from patients with a mitochondrial (encephalo-)myopathy. Mutations in the mitochondrial-encoded subunits have been observed in a number of different mitochondrial (encephalo-)myophathies. We screened eight mitochondrial (encephalo-)myopathy patients with an isolated complex I deficiency for mutations in the ND genes by direct sequencing. No abnormality was detected. We also studied 9 mitochondrial (encephalo-)myopathy patients and an isolated complex IV deficiency. In the muscle biopsy of one patient a novel heteroplasmic mutation (T {r_arrow} C) at nucleotide position 6681 was found in the mitochondrial COX I gene. This mutation led to the substitution of a conserved Tyr for His. As this mutation changed the secondary structure of the protein and was not found in the healthy mother, we consider it likely that this mutation is pathological. In the other patients no abnormality was detected. Therefore, mutations in the mitochondrially-encoded subunits are not a frequent cause of isolated respiratory chain enzyme deficiency.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that ...

  2. Genetic, molecular and functional analyses of complement factor I deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, S.C.; Trouw, L.A.; Renault, N.;

    2009-01-01

    Complete deficiency of complement inhibitor factor I (FI) results in secondary complement deficiency due to uncontrolled spontaneous alternative pathway activation leading to susceptibility to infections. Current genetic examination of two patients with near complete FI deficiency and three...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  4. Tropomyosin diffusion over actin subunits facilitates thin filament assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Fischer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coiled-coil tropomyosin binds to consecutive actin-subunits along actin-containing thin filaments. Tropomyosin molecules then polymerize head-to-tail to form cables that wrap helically around the filaments. Little is known about the assembly process that leads to continuous, gap-free tropomyosin cable formation. We propose that tropomyosin molecules diffuse over the actin-filament surface to connect head-to-tail to partners. This possibility is likely because (1 tropomyosin hovers loosely over the actin-filament, thus binding weakly to F-actin and (2 low energy-barriers provide tropomyosin freedom for 1D axial translation on F-actin. We consider that these unique features of the actin-tropomyosin interaction are the basis of tropomyosin cable formation.

  5. Expression and secretion of cholera toxin B subunit in lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Takahiro; Kashige, Nobuhiro; Satho, Tomomitsu; Irie, Keiichi; Hiramatsu, Yukihiro; Sharmin, Tanjina; Fukumitsu, Yuki; Uyeda, Saori; Yamada, Seitaro; Harakuni, Tetsuya; Miyata, Takeshi; Arakawa, Takeshi; Imoto, Masumi; Toda, Akihisa; Nakashima, Yukihiko; Miake, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are used in various fields, including in food and medical supplies. There has been a great deal of research into vaccine development using LAB as carriers due to their "generally recognized as safe" status. Cholera is an infectious disease that causes diarrhea due to cholera toxin (CT) produced by Vibrio cholerae. The pentameric cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit has no toxicity, and is used as an antigen in cholera vaccines and as a delivery molecule in vaccines to various diseases. In this study, we generated recombinant LAB expressing and secreting CTB. Here, we first report that CTB expressed and secreted from LAB bound to GM1 ganglioside. The secreted CTB was purified, and its immunogenicity was determined by intranasal administration into mice. The results of the present study suggested that it may be useful as the basis of a new oral cholera vaccine combining LAB and CTB.

  6. Thermostable Subunit Vaccines for Pulmonary Delivery: How Close Are We?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    -administrable, can be distributed independently of functioning freezers and refrigerators, and can be designed to induce mucosal and/or cell-mediated immunity, which is attractive for a number of diseases requiring stimulation of local mucosal immunity for protection. However, the design and delivery of thermostable...... dry powder-based vaccines represents a technological challenge: It calls for careful formulation and dosage form design, combined with cheap and efficient delivery devices, which must be engineered via a thorough understanding of the physiological barrier and the requirements for induction of mucosal...... immunity. Here, I review state of the art and perspectives in formulation design and processing methods for powder-based subunit vaccines intended for pulmonary administration, and present dry powder inhaler technologies suitable for translating these vaccines into clinical trials....

  7. Glycine Receptor α2 Subunit Activation Promotes Cortical Interneuron Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Avila

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glycine receptors (GlyRs are detected in the developing CNS before synaptogenesis, but their function remains elusive. This study demonstrates that functional GlyRs are expressed by embryonic cortical interneurons in vivo. Furthermore, genetic disruption of these receptors leads to interneuron migration defects. We discovered that extrasynaptic activation of GlyRs containing the α2 subunit in cortical interneurons by endogenous glycine activates voltage-gated calcium channels and promotes calcium influx, which further modulates actomyosin contractility to fine-tune nuclear translocation during migration. Taken together, our data highlight the molecular events triggered by GlyR α2 activation that control cortical tangential migration during embryogenesis.

  8. Tropomyosin diffusion over actin subunits facilitates thin filament assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Stefan; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Lehman, William

    2016-01-01

    Coiled-coil tropomyosin binds to consecutive actin-subunits along actin-containing thin filaments. Tropomyosin molecules then polymerize head-to-tail to form cables that wrap helically around the filaments. Little is known about the assembly process that leads to continuous, gap-free tropomyosin cable formation. We propose that tropomyosin molecules diffuse over the actin-filament surface to connect head-to-tail to partners. This possibility is likely because (1) tropomyosin hovers loosely over the actin-filament, thus binding weakly to F-actin and (2) low energy-barriers provide tropomyosin freedom for 1D axial translation on F-actin. We consider that these unique features of the actin-tropomyosin interaction are the basis of tropomyosin cable formation. PMID:26798831

  9. Deficient Approaches to Human Neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eStelzer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is the workhorse of imaging-based human cognitive neuroscience. The use of fMRI is ever-increasing; within the last 4 years more fMRI studies have been published than in the previous 17 years. This large body of research has mainly focused on the functional localization of condition- or stimulus-dependent changes in the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD signal.In recent years, however, many aspects of the commonly practiced analysis frameworks and methodologies have been critically reassessed. Here we summarize these critiques, providing an overview of the major conceptual and practical deficiencies in widely used brain-mapping approaches, and exemplify some of these issues by the use of imaging data and simulations. In particular, we discuss the inherent pitfalls and shortcomings of methodologies for statistical parametric mapping. Our critique emphasizes recent reports of excessively high numbers of both false positive and false negative findings in fMRI brain mapping. We outline our view regarding the broader scientific implications of these methodological considerations and briefly discuss possible solutions.

  10. Testosterone deficiency and cardiovascular mortality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abraham Morgentaler

    2015-01-01

    New concerns have been raised regarding cardiovascular (CV) risks with testosterone (T) therapy (TTh). These concerns are based primarily on two widely reported retrospective studies. However, methodological flaws and data errors invalidate both studies as credible evidence of risk. One showed reduced adverse events by half in T‑treated men but reversed this result using an unproven statistical approach. The authors subsequently acknowledged serious data errors including nearly 10% contamination of the dataset by women. The second study mistakenly used the rate of T prescriptions written by healthcare providers to men with recent myocardial infarction (MI) as a proxy for the naturally occurring rate of MI. Numerous studies suggest T is beneficial, including decreased mortality in association with TTh, reduced MI rate with TTh in men with the greatest MI risk prognosis, and reduced CV and overall mortality with higher serum levels of endogenous T. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of TTh in men with coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. Improvement in CV risk factors such as fat mass and glycemic control have been repeatedly demonstrated in T‑deficient men treated with T. The current evidence does not support the belief that TTh is associated with increased CV risk or CV mortality. On the contrary, a wealth of evidence accumulated over several decades suggests that low serum T levels are associated with increased risk and that higher endogenous T, as well as TTh itself, appear to be beneficial for CV mortality and risk.

  11. Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Clare Radlowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is the most common form of nutrient deficiency worldwide. It is highly prevalent due to the limited availability of high quality food in developing countries, and poor dietary habits in industrialized countries. According to the World Health Organization, it affects nearly 2 billion people and up to 50% of women who are pregnant. Maternal anemia during pregnancy is especially burdensome to healthy neurodevelopment in the fetus because iron is needed for proper neurogenesis, development, and myelination. Maternal anemia also increases the risk of low birth weight, either due to premature birth or fetal growth restriction, which is associated with delayed neurocognitive development and even psychiatric illness. As rapid neurodevelopment continues after birth infants that received sufficient iron in utero, but that receive a low iron diet after 6 months of age, also show deficits in neurocognitive development, including impairments in learning and memory. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive complications of iron deficiency during critical pre- and postnatal periods of brain development are difficult to remedy, persisting into adulthood. Thus, preventing iron deficiency in the pre- and postnatal periods is critical as is devising new means to recapture cognitive function in individuals who experienced early iron deficiency. This review will discuss the prevalence of pre- and postnatal iron deficiency, the mechanism, and effects of iron deficiency on brain and cognitive development.

  12. Treatment of zinc deficiency without zinc fortification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald OBERLEAS; Barbara F. HARLAND

    2008-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in animals became of interest until the 1950s. In this paper, progresses in researches on physi-ology of Zn deficiency in animals, phytate effect on bioavailability of Zn, and role of phytase in healing Zn deficiency of animals were reviewed. Several studies demonstrated that Zn is recycled via the pancreas; the problem of Zn deficiency was controlled by Zn homeostasis. The endogenous secretion of Zn is considered as an important factor influencing Zn deficiency, and the critical molar ratio is 10. Phytate (inositol hexaphosphate) constituted up to 90% of the organically bound phosphorus in seeds. Great improvement has been made in recent years on isolating and measuring phytate, and its structure is clear. Phytate is considered to reduce Zn bioavailability in animal. Phytase is the enzyme that hydrolyzes phytate and is present in yeast, rye bran, wheat bran, barley, triticale, and many bacteria and fungi. Zinc nutrition and bioavailability can be enhanced by addition of phytase to animal feeds. Therefore, using phytase as supplements, the most prevalent Zn deficiency in animals may be effectively corrected without the mining and smelting of several tons of zinc daily needed to correct this deficiency by fortification worldwide.

  13. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  14. Antibiotic prophylaxis in primary immune deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Merin; de la Morena, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Long-term prophylactic antibiotics are being widely implemented as primary or adjunctive therapy in primary immune deficiencies. This practice has transformed clinical outcomes in the setting of chronic granulomatous disease, complement deficiencies, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, hyper-IgE syndrome, Toll signaling defects, and prevented Pneumocystis in patients with T-cell deficiencies. Yet, controlled trials are few in the context of primary antibody deficiency syndromes, and most of this practice has been extrapolated from data in patients who are immune competent and with recurrent acute otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. The paucity of guidelines on the subject is reflected in recent surveys among practicing immunologists that highlight differences of habit regarding this treatment. Such discrepancies reinforce the lack of standard protocols on the subject. This review will provide evidence for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in various primary immune deficiency populations, especially highlighting the role antibiotic prophylaxis in primary antibody deficiency syndromes. We also discussed the relationship of long-term antibiotic use and the prevalence of resistant pathogens. Overall, examination of available data on the use of prophylactic antibiotics in antibody deficiency syndromes merit future investigation in well-designed multicenter prospective trials because this population has few other management options.

  15. Exchangeability of the b subunit of the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase of Acetabularia acetabulum with the beta subunit of E. coli F1-ATPase: construction of the chimeric beta subunits and complementation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Kadowaki, H; Ikeda, H; Moritani, C; Kanazawa, H

    1997-11-10

    The gene encoding the b subunit of the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase (aclB) was isolated from total RNA and poly(A)+ RNA of Acetabularia acetabulum and sequenced (total nucleotides of 3038 bp and an open reading frame with 478 amino acids). The deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to the beta subunit of the F type ATPases, but was different in the N-terminal 120 amino acids. The role of the N-terminal region was investigated using an F -ATPase beta-less mutant of E. coli, JP17. The JP17 strain expressing the aclB could not grow under conditions permitting oxidative phosphorylation, although ACLB was detected in the membrane fraction. The beta subunit was divided into three portions: amino acid position from 1 to 95 (portion A), 96 to 161 (portion B) and 162 to the C-terminus (portion C). The corresponding regions of ACLB were designated as portions A' (from 1 to 106), B' (from 107 to 172) and C' (from 173 to 478). Chimeric proteins with combinations of A-B'-C', A-B-C' and A'-B-C restored the function as the beta subunit in E. coli F0F1-complex, but those with combinations of A'-B'-C and A-B'-C had no function as the beta subunit. These findings suggested that portion B plays an important role in the assembly and function of the beta subunit in the F0F1-complex, while portion B' of ACLB exhibited inhibitory effects on assembly and function. In addition, portion A was also important for interaction of the beta subunit with the alpha subunit in E. coli F0F1-complex. These findings also suggested that the b subunit of the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase of A. acetabulum has a different function in the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase complex, although the primary structure resembled to the beta subunit of the F1-ATPase.

  16. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by a novel mutation in the MTCO1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debray, François-Guillaume; Seneca, Sara; Gonce, Michel; Vancampenhaut, Kim; Bianchi, Elettra; Boemer, François; Weekers, Laurent; Smet, Joél; Van Coster, Rudy

    2014-07-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is one of the most common respiratory chain deficiencies. A woman was presented at the age of 18y with acute loss of consciousness, non-convulsive status epilepticus, slow neurological deterioration, transient cortical blindness, exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, hearing loss, cataract and cognitive decline. Muscle biopsy revealed ragged-red fibers, COX negative fibers and a significant decreased activity of complex IV in a homogenate. Using next generation massive parallel sequencing of the mtDNA, a novel heteroplasmic mutation was identified in MTCO1, m.7402delC, causing frameshift and a premature termination codon. Single fiber PCR showed co-segregation of high mutant load in COX negative fibers. Mutation in mitochondrially encoded complex IV subunits should be considered in mitochondrial encephalomyopathies and COX negative fibers after the common mtDNA mutations have been excluded.

  17. Cross-links between ribosomal proteins of 30S subunits in 70S tight couples and in 30S subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, J M; Boileau, G; Cover, J A; Traut, R R

    1983-08-01

    Ribosome 70S tight couples and 30S subunits derived from them were modified with 2-iminothiolane under conditions where about two sulfhydryl groups per protein were added to the ribosomal particles. The 70S and 30S particles were not treated with elevated concentrations of NH4Cl, in contrast to those used in earlier studies. The modified particles were oxidized to promote disulfide bond formation. Proteins were extracted from the cross-linked particles by using conditions to preclude disulfide interchange. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were fractionated on the basis of charge by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide/urea gels at pH 5.5. The proteins from sequential slices of the urea gels were analyzed by two-dimensional diagonal polyacrylamide/sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Final identification of proteins in cross-linked complexes was made by radioiodination of the proteins, followed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide/urea gel electrophoresis. Attention was focused on cross-links between 30S proteins. We report the identification of 27 cross-linked dimers and 2 trimers of 30S proteins, all but one of which were found in both 70S ribosomes and free 30S subunits in similar yield. Seven of the cross-links, S3-S13, S13-S21, S14-S19, S7-S12, S9-S13, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21, have not been reported previously when 2-iminothiolane was used. Cross-links S3-S13, S13-S21, S7-S12, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21 are reported for the first time. The identification of the seven new cross-links is illustrated and discussed in detail. Ten of the dimers reported in the earlier studies of Sommer & Traut (1976) [Sommer, A., & Traut, R. R. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 106, 995-1015], using 30S subunits treated with high salt concentrations, were not found in the experiments reported here.

  18. Responses of Legumes to Phosphorus Deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorus deficiency is a universal problem in most world soils. Furthermore, of all nutrients, shortage of phosphorus has the biggest impact on legumes, therefore, lots of studies were carried out for identifying responses of legumes to shortage of phosphorus. They concluded that to maintain improved growth under phosphorus deficiency conditions plants develop two major mechanisms: (i) Phosphorus acquisition (root morphology, root exudation and phosphorus uptake mechanisms), (ii) Phosphorus utilization (internal mechanisms associated with better use of absorbed phosphorus at cellular level). The aim of this brief review is to elucidate root morphological changes and rhizophere acidification to phosphorus deficiency.

  19. Molecular genetics of human lactase deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvelä, Irma; Torniainen, Suvi; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2009-01-01

    Lactase non-persistence (adult-type hypolactasia) is present in more than half of the human population and is caused by the down-regulation of lactase enzyme activity during childhood. Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a rare severe gastrointestinal disorder of new-borns enriched in the Finnish population. Both lactase deficiencies are autosomal recessive traits and characterized by diminished expression of lactase activity in the intestine. Genetic variants underlying both forms have been identified. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular defects of human lactase deficiencies and their phenotype-genotype correlation, the implications on clinical practice, and the understanding of their function and role in human evolution.

  20. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been misdiagnosed as musculoskeletal disorders, including fibromyalgia, polymyalgia rheumatica and ankylosing spondylitis. Here, we report two cases presented with kyphoscoliosis, diagnosed to have severe vitamin D deficiency.

  1. Nutrition and hair: deficiencies and supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finner, Andreas M

    2013-01-01

    Hair follicle cells have a high turnover. A caloric deprivation or deficiency of several components, such as proteins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and vitamins, caused by inborn errors or reduced uptake, can lead to structural abnormalities, pigmentation changes, or hair loss, although exact data are often lacking. The diagnosis is established through a careful history, clinical examination of hair loss activity, and hair quality and confirmed through targeted laboratory tests. Examples of genetic hair disorders caused by reduced nutritional components are zinc deficiency in acrodermatitis enteropathica and copper deficiency in Menkes kinky hair syndrome.

  2. An uncommon presentation of hexosaminidase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iype Mary

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Focal muscular atrophy (FMA can occur due to several causes. We report three cases of FMA associated with deficiency of hexosaminidase A. The serum level of hexosaminidase A was assayed in seven patients with FMA without any definite aetiology identified over a period of two years. Three cases of FMA showed deficiency of hexosaminidase A. All these patients had clinical features of isolated lower motor neurone involvement in one limb without any evidence of involvement of the rest of the neuraxis. Detailed laboratory tests were negative. Electromyography confirmed neurogenic involvement without any evidence of radiculopathy or neuropathy. Hexosaminidase deficiency as a possible association for FMA is highlighted.

  3. Hypopituitarism: growth hormone and corticotropin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Wass, John A H

    2015-03-01

    This article presents an overview of adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) and corticotropin deficiency (central adrenal failure, CAI). Both conditions can result from various ailments affecting the hypothalamus or pituitary gland (most frequently a tumor in the area or its treatment). Clinical manifestations are subtle in AGHD but potentially life-threatening in CAI. The diagnosis needs dynamic testing in most cases. Treatment of AGHD is recommended in patients with documented severe deficiency, and treatment of CAI is mandatory in all cases. Despite significant progress in replacement hormonal therapy, more physiologic treatments and more reliable indicators of treatment adequacy are still needed.

  4. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ......Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH...

  5. Identification of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X L; Danto, S I; Borok, Z; Eber, J T; Martín-Vasallo, P; Lubman, R L

    1997-01-01

    The Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase is a heterodimeric plasma membrane protein that consists of a catalytic alpha-subunit and a smaller glycosylated beta-subunit that has not been fully characterized in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) to date. In this study, we identified the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit protein in rat AEC and lung membranes using immunochemical techniques. Rat AEC grown in primary culture and rat lung, brain, and kidney membranes were solubilized in either 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) sample buffer for SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or in 1% Nonidet P-40 lysis buffer for immunoprecipitation studies. Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit was not detected in either AEC or lung membranes on Western blots when probed with a panel of antibodies (Ab) against beta-subunit isoforms, whereas brain and kidney beta-subunit were recognized as broad approximately 50-kDa bands. AEC, lung, and kidney membranes were immunoprecipitated with anti-beta Ab IEC 1/48, a monoclonal Ab that recognizes beta-subunit protein only in its undenatured state. The beta-subunit was detected in the immunoprecipitate (IP) from kidney membranes by several different anti-beta-subunit Ab. The beta-subunit was faintly detectable from AEC and lung IP as a broad approximately 50-kDa band when blotted with the polyclonal anti-beta 1-subunit Ab SpET but could not be detected by blotting with other anti-beta Ab. Treatment of the IP from kidney, lung, and AEC with N-glycosidase F for 2 h at 37 degrees C resulted in immunodetection of identical approximately 35 kDa bands when probed with all anti-beta 1 Ab on Western blots. From these results, we conclude that rat lung and AEC possess immunoreactive beta-subunit protein that is only readily detectable after deglycosylation. Because anti-beta Ab fail to detect the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit in rat lung or AEC by standard Western blotting techniques under the conditions of these experiments, our results suggest that lung beta-subunit may be

  6. Molecular base of biochemical complex I deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefs, S.J.G.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system, consisting of five enzyme complexes (I-V) together with 2 electron carriers, has an important role in the energy metabolism of the cell. With 45 subunits, complex I is the first and largest complex of the respiratory chain. It is under bigenomic control

  7. 21-Hydroxylase deficiency in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A.S.S. Bachega

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available We determined the frequency of large rearrangements and point mutations in 130 Brazilian patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency and correlated genotype with phenotype. The frequency of CYP21 deletions was lower (4.4% than in most of the previous series described, whereas the frequency of large gene conversions was similar to the frequency reported in the literature (6.6%. The most frequent point mutations were I2 splice (41.8% in salt wasting - SW, I172N (32.6% in simple virilizing - SV and V281L (40.2% in the late onset form - LO. The frequency of the nine most common point mutations was similar to that reported for other countries. The 93 fully genotyped patients were classified into 3 mutation groups based on the degree of enzymatic activity (A@ 2%, C>20%. In group A, 62% of cases presented the SW form; in group B, 96% the SV form, and in group C, 88% the LO form. We diagnosed 80% of the affected alleles after screening for large rearrangements and 15 point mutations. To diagnose these remaining alleles we sequenced the CYP21 gene of one patient with the SV form and identified a heterozygous G->A transition in codon 424. This mutation leads to a substitution of glycine by serine in a conserved region and was also found in a compound heterozygous state in 4 other patients. The mutation G424S presented a linkage disequilibrium with CYP21P and C4A gene deletions and HLA DR17, suggesting a probable founder effect. Search for the G424S mutation in other populations will reveal if it is restricted to the Brazilian patients or if it has a wider ethnic distribution.

  8. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the skin on the palms and soles (hand-foot syndrome); shortness of breath; and hair loss may also ... dehydrogenase deficiency , with its early-onset neurological symptoms, is a rare disorder. Its prevalence is ...

  10. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 146,000 ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: primary carnitine deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Majdalani M. Primary carnitine deficiency: novel mutations and insights into the cardiac phenotype. Clin Genet. 2014 Feb; ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia and Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in young children at the time of stroke and in age-matched healthy controls was compared in a case-control study conducted at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

  13. Oxygen deficiency in the North Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A

    in contact with oxygen-depleted waters. Impacts of the oxygen deficiency on regional biogeochemistry, especially anaerobic nitrogen transformaions, are described. A comparison of the perrenial, mesopelagic OMZ in the open Northwestern Indian Ocean is made...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency guanidinoacetate methyltransferase ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GM3 synthase deficiency GM3 synthase ...

  16. Isoprenoid biosynthesis and mevalonate kinase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, L.

    2011-01-01

    Mevalonaat Kinase Deficiëntie (MKD) is een aangeboren ziekte geassocieerd met heftige koortsaanvallen die drie tot vier dagen aanhouden en gepaard gaan met koude rillingen, gewrichtsklachten, huiduitslag, hoofdpijn, duizeligheid, buikpijn, braken en diarree. De koortsaanvallen treden gemiddeld eens

  17. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... production in these cells. This defect underlies the muscle cramping and myoglobinuria that occur after strenuous exercise in ... phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency , including episodes of exercise-induced muscle cramping and myoglobinuria. Related Information What does it mean ...

  18. Integrin alpha(3)-subunit expression modulates alveolar epithelial cell monolayer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubman, R L; Zhang, X L; Zheng, J; Ocampo, L; Lopez, M Z; Veeraraghavan, S; Zabski, S M; Danto, S I; Borok, Z

    2000-07-01

    We investigated expression of the alpha(3)-integrin subunit by rat alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) grown in primary culture as well as the effects of monoclonal antibodies with blocking activity against the alpha(3)-integrin subunit on AEC monolayer formation. alpha(3)-Integrin subunit mRNA and protein were detectable in AECs on day 1 and increased with time in culture. alpha(3)- and beta(1)-integrin subunits coprecipitated in immunoprecipitation experiments with alpha(3)- and beta(1)-subunit-specific antibodies, consistent with their association as the alpha(3)beta(1)-integrin receptor at the cell membrane. Treatment with blocking anti-alpha(3) monoclonal antibody from day 0 delayed development of transepithelial resistance, reduced transepithelial resistance through day 5 compared with that in untreated AECs, and resulted in large subconfluent patches in monolayers viewed by scanning electron microscopy on day 3. These data indicate that alpha(3)- and beta(1)-integrin subunits are expressed in AEC monolayers where they form the heterodimeric alpha(3)beta(1)-integrin receptor at the cell membrane. Blockade of the alpha(3)-integrin subunit inhibits formation of confluent AEC monolayers. We conclude that the alpha(3)-integrin subunit modulates formation of AEC monolayers by virtue of the key role of the alpha(3)beta(1)-integrin receptor in AEC adhesion.

  19. Specific Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase by Helical Peptides Corresponding to the Subunit Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digard, Paul; Williams, Kevin P.; Hensley, Preston; Brooks, Ian S.; Dahl, Charles E.; Coen, Donald M.

    1995-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase consists of two subunits-a catalytic subunit and an accessory subunit, UL42, that increases processivity. Mutations affecting the extreme C terminus of the catalytic subunit specifically disrupt subunit interactions and ablate virus replication, suggesting that new antiviral drugs could be rationally designed to interfere with polymerase heterodimerization. To aid design, we performed circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation studies, which revealed that a 36-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of the catalytic subunit folds into a monomeric structure with partial α-helical character. CD studies of shorter peptides were consistent with a model where two separate regions of α-helix interact to form a hairpin-like structure. The 36-residue peptide and a shorter peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 18 residues blocked UL42-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis at concentrations that had no effect on synthesis by the catalytic subunit alone or by calf thymus DNA polymerase δ and its processivity factor. These peptides, therefore, represent a class of specific inhibitors of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase that act by blocking accessory-subunit-dependent synthesis. These peptides or their structures may form the basis for the synthesis of clinically effective drugs.

  20. Positive modulation of delta-subunit containing GABAA receptors in mouse neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardya, Irina; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis;

    2012-01-01

    δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors are potential targets for modifying neuronal activity in a range of brain disorders. With the aim of gaining more insight in synaptic and extrasynaptic inhibition, we used a new positive modulator, AA29504, of δ-subunit containing GABA(A) recep...

  1. Incorporation of high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits into doughs using 2 gram mixograph and extensigraphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    To study the contributions of high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) to the gluten macropolymer and dough properties, wheat HMW-GS (x- and y-types) are synthesized in a bacterial expression system. These subunits are then purified and used to supplement dough mixing and extensigraph exper...

  2. A-Raf kinase is a new interacting partner of protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1997-01-01

    In a search for protein kinase CK2 beta subunit binding proteins using the two-hybrid system, more than 1000 positive clones were isolated. Beside clones for the alpha' and beta subunit of CK2, there were clones coding for a so far unknown protein, whose partial cDNA sequence was already deposite...

  3. Regulation of Voltage-Activated K(+) Channel Gating by Transmembrane β Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-activated K(+) (K(V)) channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. K(V) channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD) surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many K(V) channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the K(V) β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM) segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of K(V) α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening, and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into K(V) channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  4. Regulation of KV channel voltage-dependent activation by transmembrane β subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eSun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-activated K+ (KV channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. KV channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSD. The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many KV channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the KV β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of KV α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into KV channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  5. Iron Deficiency, Zinc, Magnesium, Vitamin Deficiencies in Crohn's Disease: Substitute or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Wolfgang; Phuong Nguyen, G

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by inflammatory reactions, complications, extraintestinal manifestations and a loss of intestinal functions, for example, failures of absorption and secretion. According to intestinal dysfunction, a wide array of pathogenetic pathways is existing leading to iron deficiency and numerous vitamins as well as trace element deficiencies. Complications, symptoms and signs of those deficiencies are common in IBD with varying degrees of clinical significance. This review focuses on selected micronutrients including iron, zinc, magnesium and some vitamins. Epidemiology with respect to IBD, pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical aspects are addressed. Finally, some suggestions for treatment of deficient situations are discussed. In conclusion, some micronutrients have significant impact on complications and quality of life in IBD. Deficiencies may even influence the course of the disease. Those deficiencies should be thoroughly supplemented.

  6. Cushing, acromegaly, GH deficiency and tendons

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cushing’s syndrome, induced by an endogenous or exogenous cortisol excess, and acromegaly, the clinical syndrome caused by growth hormone (GH) excess in adulthood, as well as the disease induced by GH deficiency (GHD), represent perfect models for the evaluation of the effects induced by chronic exposure in vivo, respectively, to cortisol and GH/IGF-1 excess or deficiency on the complex structure of the tendons as well as on the related post-traumatic repair mechanism. Although the literature...

  7. Deficiently Extremal Cohen-Macaulay Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chanchal Kumar; Pavinder Singh

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study homological properties of deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay algebras. Eagon–Reiner showed that the Stanley–Reisner ring of a simplicial complex has a linear resolution if and only if the Alexander dual of the simplicial complex is Cohen–Macaulay. An extension of a special case of Eagon–Reiner theorem is obtained for deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay Stanley–Reisner rings.

  8. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure.

  9. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF.

  10. Dietary restriction causing iodine-deficient goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, Tim; Plumb, Emma; Callaghan, James; Jackson, Michael; Michaelis, Louise

    2015-08-01

    Iodine-deficient goitre was common in some parts of the UK prior to the introduction of salt iodisation. Many contemporary salt preparations do not contain much iodine, and there are renewed concerns about the iodine status of the population. We present a boy with severe allergy who developed goitre and significant thyroid dysfunction in association with an iodine-deficient 'food-restricted' diet. The case highlights the importance of a comprehensive nutritional assessment in all children on multiple food restrictions.

  11. Androgen deficiency and metabolic syndrome in men

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Ashley G; Zhao, Fujun; Lee, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a growing health concern worldwide. Initially a point of interest in cardiovascular events, the cluster of HTN, obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance known as MetS has become associated with a variety of other disease processes, including androgen deficiency and late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Men with MetS are at a higher risk of developing androgen deficiency, and routine screening of testosterone (T) is advised in this population. The pathophysiology of ...

  12. Colour vision deficiency and physics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of ‘colourblindness’ most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision deficiency and looks at ways in which we can help the many students who have this problem.

  13. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been ...

  14. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation?

    OpenAIRE

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Summary Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body’s iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear ph...

  15. Structural characterization of recombinant crustacyanin subunits from the lobster Homarus americanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michele; Folli, Claudia; Pincolini, Elisa; McClintock, Timothy S; Rössle, Manfred; Berni, Rodolfo; Cianci, Michele

    2012-08-01

    Crustacean crustacyanin proteins are linked to the production and modification of carapace colour, with direct implications for fitness and survival. Here, the structural and functional properties of the two recombinant crustacyanin subunits H(1) and H(2) from the American lobster Homarus americanus are reported. The two subunits are structurally highly similar to the corresponding natural apo crustacyanin CRTC and CRTA subunits from the European lobster H. gammarus. Reconstitution studies of the recombinant crustacyanin proteins H(1) and H(2) with astaxanthin reproduced the bathochromic shift of 85-95 nm typical of the natural crustacyanin subunits from H. gammarus in complex with astaxanthin. Moreover, correlations between the presence of crustacyanin genes in crustacean species and the resulting carapace colours with the spectral properties of the subunits in complex with astaxanthin confirmed this genotype-phenotype linkage.

  16. Association of condensin with chromosomes depends on DNA binding by its HEAT-repeat subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ilaria; Rutkowska, Anna; Ori, Alessandro; Walczak, Marta; Metz, Jutta; Pelechano, Vicent; Beck, Martin; Haering, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Condensin complexes have central roles in the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes during cell divisions, but how they interact with chromatin to promote chromosome segregation is largely unknown. Previous work has suggested that condensin, in addition to encircling chromatin fibers topologically within the ring-shaped structure formed by its SMC and kleisin subunits, contacts DNA directly. Here we describe the discovery of a binding domain for double-stranded DNA formed by the two HEAT-repeat subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin complex. From detailed mapping data of the interfaces between the HEAT-repeat and kleisin subunits, we generated condensin complexes that lack one of the HEAT-repeat subunits and consequently fail to associate with chromosomes in yeast and human cells. The finding that DNA binding by condensin's HEAT-repeat subunits stimulates the SMC ATPase activity suggests a multistep mechanism for the loading of condensin onto chromosomes.

  17. HMW glutenin subunits in multiploid Aegilops species: composition analysis and molecular cloning of coding sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Aegilops genus contains species closely related to wheat. Incommon with wheat, Aegilops species accumulate high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin subunits in their endospermic tissue. In this study, we investigated the composition of HMW glutenin subunits in four multiploid Aegilops species using SDS-PAGE analysis. Furthermore, by working with Ae. ventricosa, we established an efficient genomic PCR condition for simultaneous amplification of DNA sequences coding for either x-ory-type HMW glutenin subunits from polyploid Aegilops species. Using the genomic PCR condition, we amplified and subsequently cloned two DNA fragments that may code for HMW glutenin subunits in Ae. ventricosa. Based on an analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences, we concluded that the two cloned sequences encode one x- and one y-type of HMW glutenin subunit, respectively.

  18. An Approach to Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Rasul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron-deficiency anemia is a common reason for referral to a gastroenterologist. In adult men and postmenopausal women, gastrointestinal tract pathology is often the cause of iron-deficiency anemia, so patients are frequently referred for endoscopic evaluation. Endoscopy may be costly and at times difficult for the patient. Therefore, physicians need to know what lesions can be identified reliably and, more importantly, the importance of ruling out life-threatening conditions such as occult malignancy. Over the past decade, a number of prospective studies have been completed that examined the yield of endoscopy in the investigation of iron-deficiency anemia. The present article provides a broad overview of iron-deficiency anemia, with particular emphasis on hematological diagnosis, etiology, the use of endoscopy in identifying lesions and iron-repletion therapy. Other clinical scenarios, including assessment of patients on anti-inflammatory or anticoagulation therapy and patients with bleeding of obscure origin, are also addressed. The present article provides a diagnostic algorithm to iron-deficiency anemia, which describes a more systematic manner in which to approach iron-deficiency anemia.

  19. Recognition and management of vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Paula; Ghetu, Maria V; Langan, Robert C

    2009-10-15

    Vitamin D deficiency affects persons of all ages. Common manifestations of vitamin D deficiency are symmetric low back pain, proximal muscle weakness, muscle aches, and throbbing bone pain elicited with pressure over the sternum or tibia. A 25-hydroxyvitamin D level should be obtained in patients with suspected vitamin D deficiency. Deficiency is defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of less than 20 ng per mL (50 nmol per L), and insufficiency is defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 20 to 30 ng per mL (50 to 75 nmol per L). The goal of treatment is to normalize vitamin D levels to relieve symptoms and decrease the risk of fractures, falls, and other adverse health outcomes. To prevent vitamin D deficiency, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants and children receive at least 400 IU per day from diet and supplements. Evidence shows that vitamin D supplementation of at least 700 to 800 IU per day reduces fracture and fall rates in adults. In persons with vitamin D deficiency, treatment may include oral ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) at 50,000 IU per week for eight weeks. After vitamin D levels normalize, experts recommend maintenance dosages of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) at 800 to 1,000 IU per day from dietary and supplemental sources.

  20. [Approaches to vitamin B12 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russcher, Henk; Heil, Sandra G; Slobbe, Lennert; Lindemans, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female vegetarian was referred to a specialist in internal medicine with persistent iron deficiency. Laboratory analysis revealed microcytic anaemia with low ferritin levels but normal total vitamin B12 levels. The red blood cell distribution width, however, showed a very wide variation in red blood cell sizes, indicating a coexisting vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed by the low concentration of active vitamin B12. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with a history of previous gastric surgery and renal insufficiency as a complication of diabetes mellitus, was suspected to be deficient in vitamin B12, as she had low total vitamin B12 levels and an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in her blood. Testing the total concentration of vitamin B12 alone has insufficient diagnostic accuracy and no accepted gold standard is available for diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. With the development of newer tests, such as measuring holotranscobalamin II (concentration of active vitamin B12), atypical and subclinical deficiency states can be recognized. A new approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency is presented, based upon these 2 case descriptions.

  1. A novel early onset phenotype in a zebrafish model of merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah J.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Gupta, Vandana A.; Dowling, James J.

    2017-01-01

    Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) is a severe neuromuscular disorder with onset in infancy that is associated with severe morbidities (particularly wheelchair dependence) and early mortality. It is caused by recessive mutations in the LAMA2 gene that encodes a subunit of the extracellular matrix protein laminin 211. At present, there are no treatments for this disabling disease. The zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system for the identification of novel therapies. However, drug discovery in the zebrafish is largely dependent on the identification of phenotypes suitable for chemical screening. Our goal in this study was to elucidate novel, early onset abnormalities in the candyfloss (caf) zebrafish, a model of MDC1A. We uncovered and characterize abnormalities in spontaneous coiling, the earliest motor movement in the zebrafish, as a fully penetrant change specific to caf mutants that is ideal for future drug testing. PMID:28241031

  2. NADPH oxidase deficient mice develop colitis and bacteremia upon infection with normally avirulent, TTSS-1- and TTSS-2-deficient Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, Boas; Songhet, Pascal; Slack, Emma Marie Caroline; Müller, Andreas J; Kremer, Marcus; Van Maele, Laurye; Cayet, Delphine; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Infections, microbe sampling and occasional leakage of commensal microbiota and their products across the intestinal epithelial cell layer represent a permanent challenge to the intestinal immune system. The production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase is thought to be a key element of defense. Patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease are deficient in one of the subunits of NADPH oxidase. They display a high incidence of Crohn's disease-like intestinal inflammation and are hyper-susceptible to infection with fungi and bacteria, including a 10-fold increased risk of Salmonellosis. It is not completely understood which steps of the infection process are affected by the NADPH oxidase deficiency. We employed a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea to study how NADPH oxidase deficiency (Cybb (-/-)) affects microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa. In this animal model, wild type S. Typhimurium causes pronounced enteropathy in wild type mice. In contrast, an avirulent S. Typhimurium mutant (S.Tm(avir); invGsseD), which lacks virulence factors boosting trans-epithelial penetration and growth in the lamina propria, cannot cause enteropathy in wild type mice. We found that Cybb (-/-) mice are efficiently infected by S.Tm(avir) and develop enteropathy by day 4 post infection. Cell depletion experiments and infections in Cybb (-/-) Myd88 (-/-) mice indicated that the S.Tm(avir)-inflicted disease in Cybb (-/-) mice hinges on CD11c(+)CX3CR1(+) monocytic phagocytes mediating colonization of the cecal lamina propria and on Myd88-dependent proinflammatory immune responses. Interestingly, in mixed bone marrow chimeras a partial reconstitution of Cybb-proficiency in the bone marrow derived compartment was sufficient to ameliorate disease severity. Our data indicate that NADPH oxidase expression is of key importance for restricting the growth of S.Tm(avir) in the mucosal lamina propria. This provides important insights into microbe handling by the large

  3. Mechanisms underlying probucol-induced hERG-channel deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi YQ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuan-Qi Shi,1,* Cai-Chuan Yan,1,* Xiao Zhang,1 Meng Yan,1 Li-Rong Liu,1 Huai-Ze Geng,1 Lin Lv,1 Bao-Xin Li1,21Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, 2State-Province Key Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Engineering, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The hERG gene encodes the pore-forming α-subunit of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium channel (IKr, which is important for cardiac repolarization. Reduction of IhERG due to genetic mutations or drug interferences causes long QT syndrome, leading to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias (torsades de pointes or sudden death. Probucol is a cholesterol-lowering drug that could reduce hERG current by decreasing plasma membrane hERG protein expression and eventually cause long QT syndrome. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of probucol effects on IhERG and hERG-channel expression. Our data demonstrated that probucol reduces SGK1 expression, known as SGK isoform, in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in downregulation of phosphorylated E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 expression, but not the total level of Nedd4-2. As a result, the hERG protein reduces, due to the enhanced ubiquitination level. On the contrary, carbachol could enhance the phosphorylation level of Nedd4-2 as an alternative to SGK1, and thus rescue the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of hERG channels caused by probucol. These discoveries provide a novel mechanism of probucol-induced hERG-channel deficiency, and imply that carbachol or its analog may serve as potential therapeutic compounds for the handling of probucol cardiotoxicity.Keywords: long QT, hERG potassium channels, probucol, SGK1, Nedd4-2

  4. Lower limb deficient children in the Netherlands : epidemiological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, LJM; Boonstra, AM; Groothoff, JW; Cornel, MC; Eisma, WH

    2000-01-01

    information on the characteristics of children with limb deficiencies and amputations in the Netherlands is largely lacking. The present study aimed to collect data about the prevalence of congenital deficiencies, the ratio of congenital to acquired limb deficiencies, types of lower leg deficiency o

  5. SB-205384 Is a Positive Allosteric Modulator of Recombinant GABAA Receptors Containing Rat α3, α5, or α6 Subunit Subtypes Coexpressed with β3 and γ2 Subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Heidelberg, Laura S.; Warren, James W.; Fisher, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    Many drugs used to treat anxiety are positive modulators of GABAA receptors, which mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission. The GABAA receptors can be assembled from a combination of at least 16 different subunits. The receptor’s subunit composition determines its pharmacologic and functional properties, and subunit expression varies throughout the brain. A primary goal for new treatments targeting GABAA receptors is the production of subunit-selective modulators acting upon a discrete popu...

  6. Soluble guanylate cyclase α1-deficient mice: a novel murine model for primary open angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel S Buys

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The molecular signaling involved in the pathogenesis of POAG remains unknown. Here, we report that mice lacking the α1 subunit of the nitric oxide receptor soluble guanylate cyclase represent a novel and translatable animal model of POAG, characterized by thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer and loss of optic nerve axons in the context of an open iridocorneal angle. The optic neuropathy associated with soluble guanylate cyclase α1-deficiency was accompanied by modestly increased intraocular pressure and retinal vascular dysfunction. Moreover, data from a candidate gene association study suggests that a variant in the locus containing the genes encoding for the α1 and β1 subunits of soluble guanylate cyclase is associated with POAG in patients presenting with initial paracentral vision loss, a disease subtype thought to be associated with vascular dysregulation. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis and genetics of POAG and suggest new therapeutic strategies for POAG.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Using drug from mathematical perceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Amar Nath; Saha, Shubhankar; Roy, Priti Kumar

    2015-11-12

    Entry of acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus into the host immune cell involves the participation of various components of host and viral cell unit. These components may be categorized as attachment of the viral surface envelope protein subunit, gp120, to the CD4(+) receptor and chemokine coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, present on T cell surface. The viral fusion protein, gp41, the second cleaved subunit of Env undergoes reconfiguration and the membrane fusion reaction itself. Since the CD4(+) T cell population is actively involved; the ultimate outcome of human immunodeficiency virus infection is total collapse of the host immune system. Mathematical modeling of the stages in viral membrane protein-host cell receptor-coreceptor interaction and the effect of antibody vaccine on the viral entry into the susceptible host cell has been carried out using as impulsive differential equations. We have studied the effect of antibody vaccination and determined analytically the threshold value of drug dosage and dosing interval for optimum levels of infection. We have also investigated the effect of perfect adherence of drug dose on the immune cell count in extreme cases and observed that systematic drug dosage of the immune cells leads to longer and improved lives.

  8. β-Secretase BACE1 regulates hippocampal and reconstituted M-currents in a β-subunit-like fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessler, Sabine; Zheng, Fang; Hartmann, Stephanie; Rittger, Andrea; Lehnert, Sandra; Völkel, Meike; Nissen, Matthias; Edelmann, Elke; Saftig, Paul; Schwake, Michael; Huth, Tobias; Alzheimer, Christian

    2015-02-25

    The β-secretase BACE1 is widely known for its pivotal role in the amyloidogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease, but how its action on transmembrane proteins other than the amyloid precursor protein affects the nervous system is only beginning to be understood. We report here that BACE1 regulates neuronal excitability through an unorthodox, nonenzymatic interaction with members of the KCNQ (Kv7) family that give rise to the M-current, a noninactivating potassium current with slow kinetics. In hippocampal neurons from BACE1(-/-) mice, loss of M-current enhanced neuronal excitability. We relate the diminished M-current to the previously reported epileptic phenotype of BACE1-deficient mice. In HEK293T cells, BACE1 amplified reconstituted M-currents, altered their voltage dependence, accelerated activation, and slowed deactivation. Biochemical evidence strongly suggested that BACE1 physically associates with channel proteins in a β-subunit-like fashion. Our results establish BACE1 as a physiologically essential constituent of regular M-current function and elucidate a striking new feature of how BACE1 impacts on neuronal activity in the intact and diseased brain.

  9. MELAS-like encephalomyopathy caused by a new pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial DNA encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamperti, Costanza; Diodato, Daria; Lamantea, Eleonora; Carrara, Franco; Ghezzi, Daniele; Mereghetti, Paolo; Rizzi, Romana; Zeviani, Massimo

    2012-11-01

    We report a 35-year-old woman presenting a stroke-like episode with transitory aphasia followed by generalized tonic-clonic seizures. She had severe hearing loss and suffered from frequent episodes of migraine. Although a brain MRI disclosed a T2-hyperintense lesion in the left parietal lobe, she had hardly any long-term sequela. Exercise intolerance, myalgias and limb-girdle muscle weakness indicated a slowly progressive myopathy. Extra-neurological features included short stature, and secondary amenorrhea with low gonadotropin levels, indicating secondary hypogonadism. However, she had three mutation-free, healthy children by ovarian stimulation. A muscle biopsy showed ragged-red, cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers, and an isolated defect of cytochrome c oxidase activity in muscle mitochondria. Sequence analysis of muscle mtDNA revealed a previously unreported heteroplasmic m.6597C>A transversion in the MTCOI gene, encoding subunit I of cytochrome c oxidase, corresponding to p.Q232K aminoacid change. Analysis on transmitochondrial cybrids demonstrated that the mutation is indeed associated with COX deficiency, i.e. pathogenic.

  10. GABAB receptor subunit GB1 at the cell surface independently activates ERK1/2 through IGF-1R transactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume A Baloucoune

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional GABA(B receptor is believed to require hetero-dimerization between GABA(B1 (GB1 and GABA(B2 (GB2 subunits. The GB1 extracellular domain is required for ligand binding, and the GB2 trans-membrane domain is responsible for coupling to G proteins. Atypical GABA(B receptor responses observed in GB2-deficient mice suggested that GB1 may have activity in the absence of GB2. However the underlying mechanisms remain poorly characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, by using cells overexpressing a GB1 mutant (GB1asa with the ability to translocate to the cell surface in the absence of GB2, we show that GABA(B receptor agonists, such as GABA and Baclofen, can induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the absence of GB2. Furthermore, we demonstrate that GB1asa induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation through Gi/o proteins and PLC dependent IGF-1R transactivation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that GB1 may form a functional receptor at the cell surface in the absence of GB2.

  11. Disruption of the CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE DEFICIENT1 gene leads to cytochrome c oxidase depletion and reorchestrated respiratory metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Jennifer; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Macherel, David; Benamar, Abdelilah; Belcram, Katia; Quadrado, Martine; Arnal, Nadège; Mireau, Hakim

    2014-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the last respiratory complex of the electron transfer chain in mitochondria and is responsible for transferring electrons to oxygen, the final acceptor, in the classical respiratory pathway. The essentiality of this step makes it that depletion in complex IV leads to lethality, thereby impeding studies on complex IV assembly and respiration plasticity in plants. Here, we characterized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) embryo-lethal mutant lines impaired in the expression of the CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE DEFICIENT1 (COD1) gene, which encodes a mitochondria-localized PentatricoPeptide Repeat protein. Although unable to germinate under usual conditions, cod1 homozygous embryos could be rescued from immature seeds and developed in vitro into slow-growing bush-like plantlets devoid of a root system. cod1 mutants were defective in C-to-U editing events in cytochrome oxidase subunit2 and NADH dehydrogenase subunit4 transcripts, encoding subunits of respiratory complex IV and I, respectively, and consequently lacked cytochrome c oxidase activity. We further show that respiratory oxygen consumption by cod1 plantlets is exclusively associated with alternative oxidase activity and that alternative NADH dehydrogenases are also up-regulated in these plants. The metabolomics pattern of cod1 mutants was also deeply altered, suggesting that alternative metabolic pathways compensated for the probable resulting restriction in NADH oxidation. Being the first complex IV-deficient mutants described in higher plants, cod1 lines should be instrumental to future studies on respiration homeostasis.

  12. Subunit structure of 6-phosphofructokinase from brewers' yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, N; Hess, B

    1975-11-01

    An analysis of 6-phosphofructokinase from brewers' yeast in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate reveals the occurrence of four components with the following molecular weights: alpha = 140000, beta = 130000, and alpha' = 92000, beta' = 87000. It was found that the alpha- and beta-components can be converted to the alpha' and beta' components by treatment of the native preparation with hyaluronidase. A comparison of the molecular weight obtained by ultracentrifugation and gel filtration with the results obtained by dodecylsulfate electrophoresis after treatment with hyaluronidase reveals that the alpha' and beta' components are the smallest molecular structures obtained upon dissociation of the native enzyme. The mechanism of action of hyaluronidase suggests a desensitization of the alpha and beta components of the enzyme towards dodecylsulfate. Thus, in the absence of hyaluronidase treatment; only an apparent molecular weight for the alpha and beta component is obtained. The analysis indicates that the native enzyme might be composed of four different subunits with an alpha, beta, alpha' and beta' configuration. It is not excluded that the native enzyme consists only of alpha- and beta-chains.

  13. Expansion of transducin subunit gene families in early vertebrate tetraploidizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, David; Sundström, Görel; Ocampo Daza, Daniel; Abalo, Xesús M; Larhammar, Dan

    2012-10-01

    Hundreds of gene families expanded in the early vertebrate tetraploidizations including many gene families in the phototransduction cascade. We have investigated the evolution of the heterotrimeric G-proteins of photoreceptors, the transducins, in relation to these events using both phylogenetic analyses and synteny comparisons. Three alpha subunit genes were identified in amniotes and the coelacanth, GNAT1-3; two of these were identified in amphibians and teleost fish, GNAT1 and GNAT2. Most tetrapods have four beta genes, GNB1-4, and teleosts have additional duplicates. Finally, three gamma genes were identified in mammals, GNGT1, GNG11 and GNGT2. Of these, GNGT1 and GNGT2 were found in the other vertebrates. In frog and zebrafish additional duplicates of GNGT2 were identified. Our analyses show all three transducin families expanded during the early vertebrate tetraploidizations and the beta and gamma families gained additional copies in the teleost-specific genome duplication. This suggests that the tetraploidizations contributed to visual specialisations.

  14. DNA binding properties of the small cascade subunit Csa5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Daume

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems provide immunity against viral attacks in archaeal and bacterial cells. Type I systems employ a Cas protein complex termed Cascade, which utilizes small CRISPR RNAs to detect and degrade the exogenic DNA. A small sequence motif, the PAM, marks the foreign substrates. Previously, a recombinant type I-A Cascade complex from the archaeon Thermoproteus tenax was shown to target and degrade DNA in vitro, dependent on a native PAM sequence. Here, we present the biochemical analysis of the small subunit, Csa5, of this Cascade complex. T. tenax Csa5 preferentially bound ssDNA and mutants that showed decreased ssDNA-binding and reduced Cascade-mediated DNA cleavage were identified. Csa5 oligomerization prevented DNA binding. Specific recognition of the PAM sequence was not observed. Phylogenetic analyses identified Csa5 as a universal member of type I-A systems and revealed three distinct groups. A potential role of Csa5 in R-loop stabilization is discussed.

  15. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B.; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K.; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N.; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P.; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology.

  16. Editing modifies the GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlson, Johan; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Haussler, David

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) pre-mRNA editing by the ADAR enzyme family has the potential to increase the variety of the proteome. This editing by adenosine deamination is essential in mammals for a functional brain. To detect novel substrates for A-to-I editing we have used an experimental method...... to find selectively edited sites and combined it with bioinformatic techniques that find stem-loop structures suitable for editing. We present here the first verified editing candidate detected by this screening procedure. We show that Gabra-3, which codes for the alpha3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor......, is a substrate for editing by both ADAR1 and ADAR2. Editing of the Gabra-3 mRNA recodes an isoleucine to a methionine. The extent of editing is low at birth but increases with age, reaching close to 100% in the adult brain. We therefore propose that editing of the Gabra-3 mRNA is important for normal brain...

  17. trt-1 is the Caenorhabditis elegans catalytic subunit of telomerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Meier

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutants of trt-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans telomerase reverse transcriptase, reproduce normally for several generations but eventually become sterile as a consequence of telomere erosion and end-to-end chromosome fusions. Telomere erosion and uncapping do not cause an increase in apoptosis in the germlines of trt-1 mutants. Instead, late-generation trt-1 mutants display chromosome segregation defects that are likely to be the direct cause of sterility. trt-1 functions in the same telomere replication pathway as mrt-2, a component of the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1 proliferating cell nuclear antigen-like sliding clamp. Thus, the 9-1-1 complex may be required for telomerase to act at chromosome ends in C. elegans. Although telomere erosion limits replicative life span in human somatic cells, neither trt-1 nor telomere shortening affects postmitotic aging in C. elegans. These findings illustrate effects of telomere dysfunction in C. elegans mutants lacking the catalytic subunit of telomerase, trt-1.

  18. Structure of the Tribolium castaneum Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillis,A.; Schuller, A.; Skordalakes, E.

    2008-01-01

    A common hallmark of human cancers is the overexpression of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex that is responsible for maintaining the length and integrity of chromosome ends. Telomere length deregulation and telomerase activation is an early, and perhaps necessary, step in cancer cell evolution. Here we present the high-resolution structure of the Tribolium castaneum catalytic subunit of telomerase, TERT. The protein consists of three highly conserved domains, organized into a ring-like structure that shares common features with retroviral reverse transcriptases, viral RNA polymerases and B-family DNA polymerases. Domain organization places motifs implicated in substrate binding and catalysis in the interior of the ring, which can accommodate seven to eight bases of double-stranded nucleic acid. Modelling of an RNA-DNA heteroduplex in the interior of this ring demonstrates a perfect fit between the protein and the nucleic acid substrate, and positions the 3'-end of the DNA primer at the active site of the enzyme, providing evidence for the formation of an active telomerase elongation complex.

  19. On the evolution of the single-subunit RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermakian, N; Ikeda, T M; Miramontes, P; Lang, B F; Gray, M W; Cedergren, R

    1997-12-01

    Many eukaryotic nuclear genomes as well as mitochondrial plasmids contain genes displaying evident sequence similarity to those encoding the single-subunit RNA polymerase (ssRNAP) of bacteriophage T7 and its relatives. We have collected and aligned these ssRNAP sequences and have constructed unrooted phylogenetic trees that demonstrate the separation of ssRNAPs into three well-defined and nonoverlapping clusters (phage-encoded, nucleus-encoded, and plasmid-encoded). Our analyses indicate that these three subfamiles of T7-like RNAPs shared a common ancestor; however, the order in which the groups diverged cannot be inferred from available data. On the basis of structural similarities and mutational data, we suggest that the ancestral ssRNAP gene may have arisen via duplication and divergence of a DNA polymerase or reverse transcriptase gene. Considering the current phylogenetic distribution of ssRNAP sequences, we further suggest that the origin of the ancestral ssRNAP gene closely paralleled in time the introduction of mitochondria into eukaryotic cells through a eubacterial endosymbiosis.

  20. The Roles of RNA Polymerase I and III Subunits Polr1c and Polr1d in Craniofacial Development and in Zebrafish Models of Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack Watt, Kristin E; Achilleos, Annita; Neben, Cynthia L; Merrill, Amy E; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a global process required for growth and proliferation of all cells, yet perturbation of ribosome biogenesis during human development often leads to tissue-specific defects termed ribosomopathies. Transcription of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) by RNA polymerases (Pol) I and III, is considered a rate limiting step of ribosome biogenesis and mutations in the genes coding for RNA Pol I and III subunits, POLR1C and POLR1D cause Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare congenital craniofacial disorder. Our understanding of the functions of individual RNA polymerase subunits, however, remains poor. We discovered that polr1c and polr1d are dynamically expressed during zebrafish embryonic development, particularly in craniofacial tissues. Consistent with this pattern of activity, polr1c and polr1d homozygous mutant zebrafish exhibit cartilage hypoplasia and cranioskeletal anomalies characteristic of humans with Treacher Collins syndrome. Mechanistically, we discovered that polr1c and polr1d loss-of-function results in deficient ribosome biogenesis, Tp53-dependent neuroepithelial cell death and a deficiency of migrating neural crest cells, which are the primary progenitors of the craniofacial skeleton. More importantly, we show that genetic inhibition of tp53 can suppress neuroepithelial cell death and ameliorate the skeletal anomalies in polr1c and polr1d mutants, providing a potential avenue to prevent the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. Our work therefore has uncovered tissue-specific roles for polr1c and polr1d in rRNA transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and neural crest and craniofacial development during embryogenesis. Furthermore, we have established polr1c and polr1d mutant zebrafish as models of Treacher Collins syndrome together with a unifying mechanism underlying its pathogenesis and possible prevention.

  1. The Roles of RNA Polymerase I and III Subunits Polr1c and Polr1d in Craniofacial Development and in Zebrafish Models of Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin E Noack Watt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome biogenesis is a global process required for growth and proliferation of all cells, yet perturbation of ribosome biogenesis during human development often leads to tissue-specific defects termed ribosomopathies. Transcription of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs by RNA polymerases (Pol I and III, is considered a rate limiting step of ribosome biogenesis and mutations in the genes coding for RNA Pol I and III subunits, POLR1C and POLR1D cause Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare congenital craniofacial disorder. Our understanding of the functions of individual RNA polymerase subunits, however, remains poor. We discovered that polr1c and polr1d are dynamically expressed during zebrafish embryonic development, particularly in craniofacial tissues. Consistent with this pattern of activity, polr1c and polr1d homozygous mutant zebrafish exhibit cartilage hypoplasia and cranioskeletal anomalies characteristic of humans with Treacher Collins syndrome. Mechanistically, we discovered that polr1c and polr1d loss-of-function results in deficient ribosome biogenesis, Tp53-dependent neuroepithelial cell death and a deficiency of migrating neural crest cells, which are the primary progenitors of the craniofacial skeleton. More importantly, we show that genetic inhibition of tp53 can suppress neuroepithelial cell death and ameliorate the skeletal anomalies in polr1c and polr1d mutants, providing a potential avenue to prevent the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. Our work therefore has uncovered tissue-specific roles for polr1c and polr1d in rRNA transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and neural crest and craniofacial development during embryogenesis. Furthermore, we have established polr1c and polr1d mutant zebrafish as models of Treacher Collins syndrome together with a unifying mechanism underlying its pathogenesis and possible prevention.

  2. 17β-Estradiol Regulation of the mRNA Expression of T-type Calcium Channel subunits: Role of Estrogen Receptor α and Estrogen Receptor β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Martha A.; Hou, Jingwen; Fang, Yuan; Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv., Oline K.

    2009-01-01

    Low voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels are responsible for burst firing and transmitter release in neurons and are important for exocytosis and hormone secretion in pituitary cells. T-type channels contain an α1 subunit, of which there are three subtypes, Cav3.1, 3.2 and 3.3, and each subtype has distinct kinetic characteristics. Although 17β-estradiol modulates T-type calcium channel expression and function, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. Presently, we used real-time PCR quantification of RNA extracted from hypothalamic nuclei and pituitary in vehicle and E2-treated C57BL/6 mice to elucidate E2-mediated regulation of Cav3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 subunits. The three subunits were expressed in both the hypothalamus and the pituitary. E2 treatment increased the mRNA expression of Cav3.1 and 3.2, but not Cav3.3, in the medial preoptic area and the arcuate nucleus. In the pituitary, Cav3.1 was increased with E2-treatment and Cav3.2 and 3.3 were decreased. In order to examine whether the classical estrogen receptors (ERs) were involved in the regulation, we used ERα- and ERβ-deficient C57BL/6 mice and explored the effects of E2 on T-type channel subtypes. Indeed, we found that the E2-induced increase in Cav3.1 in the hypothalamus was dependent on ERα, whereas the E2 effect on Cav3.2 was dependent on both ERα and ERβ. However, the E2-induced effects in the pituitary were dependent on only the expression of ERα. The robust E2-regulation of the T-type calcium channels could be an important mechanism by which E2 increases the excitability of hypothalamic neurons and modulates pituitary secretion. PMID:19003958

  3. Reduction of mouse egg surface integrin alpha9 subunit (ITGA9) reduces the egg's ability to support sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vjugina, Ulyana; Zhu, Xiaoling; Oh, Eugene; Bracero, Nabal J; Evans, Janice P

    2009-04-01

    The involvement of egg integrins in mammalian sperm-egg interactions has been controversial, with data from integrin inhibitor studies contrasting with evidence from knockouts showing that specific integrin subunits are not essential for fertility. An alpha(4)/alpha(9) (ITGA4/ITGA9) integrin subfamily member has been implicated in fertilization but not extensively examined, so we tested the following three hypotheses: 1) an ITGA4/ITGA9 integrin participates in sperm-egg interactions, 2) short-term acute knockdown by RNA interference of integrin subunits would result in a fertilization phenotype differing from that of chronic depletion via knockout, and 3) detection of a fertilization phenotype is sensitive to in vitro fertilization (IVF) assay conditions. We show that mouse and human eggs express the alpha(9) integrin subunit (ITGA9). RNA interference-mediated knockdown resulted in reduced levels of Itga9 mRNA and surface protein in mouse eggs. RNA interference attempts to knockdown ITGA9's likely beta partner, beta(1) (ITGB1), resulted in reduced Itgb1 mRNA but no reduction in ITGB1 surface protein. Therefore, studies using a function-blocking anti-ITGB1 antibody tested the hypothesis that ITGB1 participates in gamete interactions. Analyses of sperm-egg interactions with Itga9-knockdown eggs and anti-ITGB1 antibody-treated eggs in IVF assays using specific sperm:egg ratios revealed the following: 1) a reduction, but not complete loss, of sperm-egg binding and fusion was observed and 2) the reduction of sperm-egg binding and fusion was not detected in inseminations with high sperm:egg ratios. These data demonstrate that ITGA9 and ITGB1 participate in sperm-egg interactions but clearly are not the only molecules involved. This also shows that careful design of IVF parameters allows detection of deficiencies in gamete interactions.

  4. Impaired folding and subunit assembly as disease mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, P; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    1998-01-01

    mutations. Characterization of the effect of these mutations is particularly important in order to establish that they are disease causing and to estimate their severity. We use the experiences with investigation of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency as an example to illustrate that (i) impaired......Rapid progress in DNA technology has entailed the possibility of readily detecting mutations in disease genes. In contrast to this, techniques to characterize the effects of mutations are still very time consuming. It has turned out that many of the mutations detected in disease genes are missense...... folding is a common effect of missense mutations occurring in genetic diseases, (ii) increasing the level of available chaperones may augment the level of functional mutant protein in vivo, and (iii) one mutation may have multiple effects. The interplay between the chaperones assisting folding...

  5. Molecular cloning of pituitary glycoprotein alpha-subunit and follicle stimulating hormone and chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunits from New World squirrel monkey and owl monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammell, Jonathan G; Funkhouser, Jane D; Moyer, Felricia S; Gibson, Susan V; Willis, Donna L

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the gonadotropins expressed in pituitary glands of the New World squirrel monkey (Saimiri sp.) and owl monkey (Aotus sp.). The various subunits were amplified from total RNA from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the deduced amino acid sequences compared to those of other species. Mature squirrel monkey and owl monkey glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides (96 amino acids in length) were determined to be 80% homologous to the human sequence. The sequences of mature beta subunits of follicle stimulating hormone (FSHbeta) from squirrel monkey and owl monkey (111 amino acids in length) are 92% homologous to human FSHbeta. New World primate glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides and FSHbeta subunits showed conservation of all cysteine residues and consensus N-linked glycosylation sites. Attempts to amplify the beta-subunit of luteinizing hormone from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands were unsuccessful. Rather, the beta-subunit of chorionic gonadotropin (CG) was amplified from pituitaries of both New World primates. Squirrel monkey and owl monkey CGbeta are 143 and 144 amino acids in length and 77% homologous with human CGbeta. The greatest divergence is in the C terminus, where all four sites for O-linked glycosylation in human CGbeta, responsible for delayed metabolic clearance, are predicted to be absent in New World primate CGbetas. It is likely that CG secreted from pituitary of New World primates exhibits a relatively short half-life compared to human CG.

  6. Mapping of a conformational epitope on the cashew allergen Ana o 2: a discontinuous large subunit epitope dependent upon homologous or heterologous small subunit association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lixin; Willison, LeAnna N; Porter, Lauren; Robotham, Jason M; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2010-05-01

    The 11S globulins are members of the cupin protein superfamily and represent an important class of tree nut allergens for which a number of linear epitopes have been mapped. However, specific conformational epitopes for these allergens have yet to be described. We have recently reported a cashew Ana o 2 conformational epitope defined by murine mAb 2B5 and competitively inhibited by a subset of patient IgE antibodies. The 2B5 epitope appears to reside on the large (acidic) subunit, is dependent upon small (basic) subunit association for expression, and is highly susceptible to denaturation. Here we fine map the epitope using a combination of recombinant chimeric cashew Ana o 2-soybean Gly m 6 chimeras, deletion and point mutations, molecular modeling, and electron microscopy of 2B5-Ana o 2 immune complexes. Key residues appear confined to a 24 amino acid segment near the N-terminus of the large subunit peptide, a portion of which makes direct contact with the small subunit. These data provide an explanation for both the small subunit dependence and the structurally labile nature of the epitope.

  7. Subunits of the Drosophila actin-capping protein heterodimer regulate each other at multiple levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Amândio

    Full Text Available The actin-Capping Protein heterodimer, composed of the α and β subunits, is a master F-actin regulator. In addition to its role in many cellular processes, Capping Protein acts as a main tumor suppressor module in Drosophila and in humans, in part, by restricting the activity of Yorkie/YAP/TAZ oncogenes. We aimed in this report to understand how both subunits regulate each other in vivo. We show that the levels and capping activities of both subunits must be tightly regulated to control F-actin levels and consequently growth of the Drosophila wing. Overexpressing capping protein α and β decreases both F-actin levels and tissue growth, while expressing forms of Capping Protein that have dominant negative effects on F-actin promote tissue growth. Both subunits regulate each other's protein levels. In addition, overexpressing one of the subunit in tissues knocked-down for the other increases the mRNA and protein levels of the subunit knocked-down and compensates for its loss. We propose that the ability of the α and β subunits to control each other's levels assures that a pool of functional heterodimer is produced in sufficient quantities to restrict the development of tumor but not in excess to sustain normal tissue growth.

  8. Subunits of the Drosophila actin-capping protein heterodimer regulate each other at multiple levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amândio, Ana Rita; Gaspar, Pedro; Whited, Jessica L; Janody, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The actin-Capping Protein heterodimer, composed of the α and β subunits, is a master F-actin regulator. In addition to its role in many cellular processes, Capping Protein acts as a main tumor suppressor module in Drosophila and in humans, in part, by restricting the activity of Yorkie/YAP/TAZ oncogenes. We aimed in this report to understand how both subunits regulate each other in vivo. We show that the levels and capping activities of both subunits must be tightly regulated to control F-actin levels and consequently growth of the Drosophila wing. Overexpressing capping protein α and β decreases both F-actin levels and tissue growth, while expressing forms of Capping Protein that have dominant negative effects on F-actin promote tissue growth. Both subunits regulate each other's protein levels. In addition, overexpressing one of the subunit in tissues knocked-down for the other increases the mRNA and protein levels of the subunit knocked-down and compensates for its loss. We propose that the ability of the α and β subunits to control each other's levels assures that a pool of functional heterodimer is produced in sufficient quantities to restrict the development of tumor but not in excess to sustain normal tissue growth.

  9. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V Subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Haag

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic analyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two subtypes of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  10. Insights into the subunit in-teractions of the chloroplast ATP synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Subunit interactions of the chloroplast F0F1- ATP synthase were studied using the yeast two-hybrid system. The coding sequences of all the nine subunits of spinach chloroplast ATP synthase were cloned in two-hybrid vectors. The vectors were transformed into the yeast strains HF7c and SFY526 by various pairwise combinations, and the protein interactions were analyzed by measuring the yeast growth on minimal SD medium without serine, lucine and histidine. Interactions of γ Subunit with wild type or two truncated mutants of γ sununit, △εN21 and △εC45, which lose their abilities to inhibit the ATP hydrolysis, were also detected by in vitro and in vivo binding assay. The present results are largely accordant to the common structure model of F0F1-ATP synthase. Different from that in the E. Coli F0F1-ATP synthase, the δ subunit of chloroplast ATP syn- thase could interact with β,γ,ε and all the CF0 subunits in the two-hybrid system. These results suggested that though the chloroplast ATP synthase shares the similar structure and composition of subunits with the enzyme from E. Coli, it may be different in the subunit interactions and con- formational change during catalysis between these two sources of ATP synthase. Based on the present results and our knowledge of structure model of E. Coli ATP synthase, a deduced structure model of chloroplast ATP synthase was proposed.

  11. Role of subunit III and its lipids in the molecular mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vivek; Ala-Vannesluoma, Pauliina; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Wikström, Mårten; Róg, Tomasz

    2015-08-01

    The terminal respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reduces molecular oxygen to water, and pumps protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane, or the plasma membrane of bacteria. A two-subunit CcO harbors all the elements necessary for oxygen reduction and proton pumping. However, it rapidly undergoes turnover-induced irreversible damage, which is effectively prevented by the presence of subunit III and its tightly bound lipids. We have performed classical atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a three-subunit CcO, which show the formation of water wires between the polar head groups of lipid molecules bound to subunit III and the proton uptake site Asp91 (Bos taurus enzyme numbering). Continuum electrostatic calculations suggest that these lipids directly influence the proton affinity of Asp91 by 1-2pK units. We surmise that lipids bound to subunit III influence the rate of proton uptake through the D-pathway, and therefore play a key role in preventing turnover-induced inactivation. Atomistic MD simulations show that subunit III is rapidly hydrated in the absence of internally bound lipids, which is likely to affect the rate of O2 diffusion into the active-site. The role of subunit III with its indigenous lipids in the molecular mechanism of CcO is discussed.

  12. Structural and spectroscopic studies of the native hemocyanin from Maia squinado and its structural subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolashka-Angelova, Pavlina; Hristova, Rumijana; Schuetz, Juergen; Stoeva, Stanka; Schwarz, Heinz; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2000-09-01

    The dodecameric hemocyanin of the crab Maia squinado contains five major electrophoretically separable polypeptide chains (structural subunits) which have been purified by FPLC ion exchange chromatography. The various proteins have been characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence quenching studies, using acrylamide, caesium chloride and potassium iodide as tryptophan quenchers. The results show that the tryptophyl side chains of dodecameric Hc are deeply buried in hydrophobic regions of the hemocyanin aggregates and the quenching efficiency values for the native Hc in comparison with those from the constituent subunits are two to four times less. The conformational stabilities of the native dodecameric aggregate and its isolated structural subunits towards various denaturants (pH, temperature, guanidinium hydrochloride) indicate that the quaternary structure is stabilized by hydrophilic and polar forces, whereby, both, the oxy- and apo-forms of the protein have been considered. The critical temperatures for the structural subunits, Tc, determined by fluorescence spectroscopy, are in the region of 50-60°C, coinciding with the melting temperatures, Tm, determined by CD spectroscopy. The free energy of stabilization in water, Δ GDH 2O , toward guanidinium hydrochloride is about two times higher for the dodecamer as compared to the isolated subunits. These studies reveal that oligomerization between functional subunits has a stabilizing effect on the whole molecule and differences in the primary structures result in different stabilities of the subunits.

  13. [Diagnostic criteria for vitamin D-deficient rickets and hypocalcemia-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency causes rickets or osteomalacia, which is associated with hypomineralization of bone and chondrocytes, and/or hypocalcemia. Accumulating evidence indicates increase in frequency of vitamin D deficiency due to insufficient intake of vitamin D and calcium and decrease in sunshine. It is necessary for clinician to diagnose vitamin D deficiency accurately and treat patients with vitamin D deficiency adequately. For the purpose, clinical guideline or expert opinion on vitamin D deficiency has been reported.

  14. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding in cholestatic infants with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasselt, P.M. van; Kok, K.F.; Vorselaars, A.D.; Vlerken, L. van; Nieuwenhuys, E.; Koning, T.J. de; Vries, R.A. de; Houwen, R.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Exclusively breastfed infants with unrecognised cholestatic jaundice are at high risk of a vitamin K deficiency (VKD) bleeding. It is presently unknown whether (the size of) this risk depends on the degree of cholestasis. Since alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1AD) induces a variable degr

  15. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding in cholestatic infants with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, P. M.; Kok, K.; Vorselaars, A. D. M.; van Vlerken, L.; Nieuwenhuys, E.; de Koning, T. J.; de Vries, Rindert; Houwen, R. H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Exclusively breastfed infants with unrecognised cholestatic jaundice are at high risk of a vitamin K deficiency (VKD) bleeding. It is presently unknown whether (the size of) this risk depends on the degree of cholestasis. Since alpha-l-antitrypsin deficiency (A1AD) induces a variable degr

  16. Experimental Copper Deficiency, Chromium Deficiency and Additional Molybdenum Supplementation in Goats – Pathological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary copper (Cu deficiency, chromium (Cr deficiency and molybdenosis (Mo has been suggested to cause the "mysterious" moose disease in the southwest of Sweden. The present experiment was performed on goats to investigate the clinical, chemical, and pathological alterations after 20 months feeding of a semi-synthetic diet deficient in Cu and Cr. Four groups were included in the study: control group (n = 4, Cu-deficient group (group 1, n = 4, Cr-deficient group (group 2, n = 2 and Cu+Cr-deficient group (group 3, n = 3. Group 3 was additionally supplemented with tetrathiomolybdate during the last 2 months of the experiment. Main histopathological findings in groups 1 and 3 were the lesions in the liver, characterised by a severe active fibrosis, bile duct proliferation, haemosiderosis and mild necroses. Additionally, degenerative alterations of the exocrine pancreas were prominent in groups 1 and 3. Lesions in group 3 were more pronounced than in group 1. In group 3, the skin showed an atrophic dermatosis, while in group 2 a crusty dermatitis caused by Candida spp. was observed. This study shows that liver, pancreas and skin are mainly affected by a long term deficiency of copper and the findings are complicated by molybdenum application while chromium deficiency produced no histomorphological effects in our study.

  17. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in blood does not decrease in proportion of the Zn deficiency. Adverse effects of Zn deficiency vary with age: low weight gain, diarrhoea, aneroxia and neurobehavioral disturbances are observed in infants, while skin changes and dwarfism are frequent in toddlers and adolescents. Common manifestations of Zn deficiency among elderly include hypogeusia, chronic non-healing ulcers and recurrent infections.Ameliorative measures of Zn deficiency in humans can be classified in two groups, namely, nutraceutical and biofortification of food grains. Nutraceutical interventions include pharmaceutical supplements, dietary supplements and dietary diversification, while biofortification of food grains can be achieved by genetic modification (GM of crops or by agronomic techniques that include soil or/and foliar fertilization of crops.The major disadvantage of nutraceutical approaches is that the major beneficiaries are urban people and the poor rural masses that need adequate Zn nutrition most are left out. Genetic biofortification of food grains requires large amounts of funds and a fairly long-period of time. Further, a large number of countries have not yet accepted genetically modified (GM foods. On the other hand agronomic biofortification of food grains yields immediate effects and rural and urban people are equally benefitted. Our studies have shown that Zn concentration in cereals (rice, wheat etc and pulses can be considerably increased by soil or/and foliar

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency in Medical Inpatients: A Retrospective Study of Implications of Untreated Versus Treated Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Asher Hussain; Singh, Gurjit; Owojori, Olukolade; Kela, Ram; Spoors, Shirley; Abbas, Mohamed; Barton, Florence; Rogers, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency may further increase fracture risk in patients with decreased bone mineral density. A cross-sectional study on serum vitamin D concentrations in medical inpatients was conducted at Bassetlaw District General Hospital between April 2014 and January 2015 (10 months), and the relationship of serum vitamin D concentrations with calcium and alkaline phosphatase was evaluated. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D immunoassays were used and analyzed in the local laboratory. The total number of patients analyzed was 200, age range 18–99 years, with mean age of 76 years. The most common presentation was found to be fall/collapse. The following cutoff points for serum vitamin D were used: levels ≤30 nmol/L for severe deficiency, >30–50 nmol/L for moderate deficiency, >50–75 nmol/L for mild deficiency, and anything above 75 nmol/L as normal. Of the 209 participants examined, 78 (37.3%) participants had mild vitamin D deficiency, 54 (25.8%) participants had moderate vitamin D deficiency, 68 (32.5%) participants had severe vitamin D deficiency, and 9 (4.3%) participants with low vitamin D levels died during their admission. Of the 122 moderate/severe patients, 70 (57.4%) patients had their vitamin D deficiency treated, according to local Trust guidelines. The study found no relationship between serum calcium levels and vitamin D deficiency, whereas patients’ alkaline phosphatase levels were found to be higher with increased severity of vitamin D deficiency. The study examined the implications of untreated severe/moderate vitamin D deficiency compared to treated deficiency, in terms of the frequency of readmission with similar complaints. It was found that the rate of readmission within one year in patients who were not treated was 57%, compared to 48% in patients whose vitamin D deficiency was treated. Presenting after falls was a recurring theme. It was concluded that even if moderate vitamin D deficiency can be asymptomatic, it is important to

  19. The epidemiology of global micronutrient deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Regan L; West, Keith P; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are essential to sustain life and for optimal physiological function. Widespread global micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) exist, with pregnant women and their children under 5 years at the highest risk. Iron, iodine, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiencies are the most widespread MNDs, and all these MNDs are common contributors to poor growth, intellectual impairments, perinatal complications, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is the most common MND worldwide and leads to microcytic anemia, decreased capacity for work, as well as impaired immune and endocrine function. Iodine deficiency disorder is also widespread and results in goiter, mental retardation, or reduced cognitive function. Adequate zinc is necessary for optimal immune function, and deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections, major causes of death in those diversification. It is widely accepted that intervention in the first 1,000 days is critical to break the cycle of malnutrition; however, a coordinated, sustainable commitment to scaling up nutrition at the global level is still needed. Understanding the epidemiology of MNDs is critical to understand what intervention strategies will work best under different conditions.

  20. Clinical implications of vitamin D deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Matyjaszek-Matuszek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common medical problem worldwide and its prevalence rises along with latitude, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, limited sunlight exposure and aging. A great body of evidence has shown that patients with vitamin D deficiency have increased cardiovascular risks and total mortality. Conversely, the presence of comorbidities progressive with age such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and hypertension places the patients at an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. The multidirectional effect of vitamin D deficiency is present in different phases of the aging process. Based on the literature review, the risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency most often found in post-menopausal women include limited sun exposure and time spent outdoors, inadequate dietary vitamin D intake, winter season and increased age. Vitamin D supplementation in this group might offer prevention of falls and fractures and may be beneficial for cardiovascular health, what may be especially important in osteoporotic and elderly populations. Prevention and treatment processes involve education regarding sunlight exposure and pharmacological cholecalciferol supplementation according to the recommendations for Central Europe. This manuscript reviews the role of vitamin D and its deficiency and considers their clinical implications, with particular regard to peri- and postmenopausal women.

  1. Biochemical Assessment of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

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    Juan Carlos Rodríguez-Aguilera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 deficiency syndrome includes clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial diseases that show a variety of severe and debilitating symptoms. A multiprotein complex encoded by nuclear genes carries out CoQ10 biosynthesis. Mutations in any of these genes are responsible for the primary CoQ10 deficiency, but there are also different conditions that induce secondary CoQ10 deficiency including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion and mutations in genes involved in the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The diagnosis of CoQ10 deficiencies is determined by the decrease of its content in skeletal muscle and/or dermal skin fibroblasts. Dietary CoQ10 supplementation is the only available treatment for these deficiencies that require a rapid and distinct diagnosis. Here we review methods for determining CoQ10 content by HPLC separation and identification using alternative approaches including electrochemical detection and mass spectrometry. Also, we review procedures to determine the CoQ10 biosynthesis rate using labeled precursors.

  2. Caspase 12 in calnexin-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendyk, Jody; Zuppini, Anna; Shore, Gordon; Opas, Michal; Bleackley, R Chris; Michalak, Marek

    2006-11-07

    We investigated a role for calnexin, caspase 12, and Bap31 in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in calnexin-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a calnexin-deficient human T cell line (NKR). We showed that calnexin-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts are relatively resistant to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Western blot analysis demonstrated that both wild-type and calnexin-deficient cells contained a caspase 12 protein. Caspase 12 expression was slightly inhibited in calnexin-deficient cells, and the protein carried out specific cleavage in the presence of thapsigargin. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that in the endoplasmic reticulum, caspase 12 forms complexes with Bap31 and calnexin. Treatment of wild-type cells with thapsigargin induced apoptosis and cleavage of Bap31. However, in the absence of calnexin, there was no significant cleavage of Bap31. There was also a negligible processing of caspase 8 in these cells. This work indicates that calnexin may play a role in modulating the sensitivity of a cell to apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress, in conjunction with caspase 12 and Bap31.

  3. Exact Length Distribution of Filamentous Structures Assembled from a Finite Pool of Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbage, David; Kondev, Jané

    2016-07-01

    Self-assembling filamentous structures made of protein subunits are ubiquitous in cell biology. These structures are often highly dynamic, with subunits in a continuous state of flux, binding to and falling off of filaments. In spite of this constant turnover of their molecular parts, many cellular structures seem to maintain a well-defined size over time, which is often required for their proper functioning. One widely discussed mechanism of size regulation involves the cell maintaining a finite pool of protein subunits available for assembly. This finite pool mechanism can control the length of a single filament by having assembly proceed until the pool of free subunits is depleted to the point when assembly and disassembly are balanced. Still, this leaves open the question of whether the same mechanism can provide size control for multiple filamentous structures that are assembled from a common pool of protein subunits, as is often the case in cells. We address this question by solving the steady-state master equation governing the stochastic assembly and disassembly of multifilament structures made from a shared finite pool of subunits. We find that, while the total number of subunits within a multifilament structure is well-defined, individual filaments within the structure have a wide, power-law distribution of lengths. We also compute the phase diagram for two multifilament structures competing for the same pool of subunits and identify conditions for coexistence when both have a well-defined size. These predictions can be tested in cell experiments in which the size of the subunit pool or the number of filament nucleators is tuned.

  4. An alternating GluN1-2-1-2 subunit arrangement in mature NMDA receptors.

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    Morgane Riou

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors (NMDARs form glutamate-gated ion channels that play a critical role in CNS physiology and pathology. Together with AMPA and kainate receptors, NMDARs are known to operate as tetrameric complexes with four membrane-embedded subunits associating to form a single central ion-conducting pore. While AMPA and some kainate receptors can function as homomers, NMDARs are obligatory heteromers composed of homologous but distinct subunits, most usually of the GluN1 and GluN2 types. A fundamental structural feature of NMDARs, that of the subunit arrangement around the ion pore, is still controversial. Thus, in a typical NMDAR associating two GluN1 and two GluN2 subunits, there is evidence for both alternating 1/2/1/2 and non-alternating 1/1/2/2 arrangements. Here, using a combination of electrophysiological and cross-linking experiments, we provide evidence that functional GluN1/GluN2A receptors adopt the 1/2/1/2 arrangement in which like subunits are diagonal to one another. Moreover, based on the recent crystal structure of an AMPA receptor, we show that in the agonist-binding and pore regions, the GluN1 subunits occupy a "proximal" position, closer to the central axis of the channel pore than that of GluN2 subunits. Finally, results obtained with reducing agents that differ in their membrane permeability indicate that immature (intracellular and functional (plasma-membrane inserted pools of NMDARs can adopt different subunit arrangements, thus stressing the importance of discriminating between the two receptor pools in assembly studies. Elucidating the quaternary arrangement of NMDARs helps to define the interface between the subunits and to understand the mechanism and pharmacology of these key signaling receptors.

  5. Role of the beta subunit of casein kinase-2 on the stability and specificity of the recombinant reconstituted holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Marin, O;

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human alpha subunit from casein kinase-2 (CK-2) was subjected, either alone or in combination with recombinant human beta subunit, to high temperature, tryptic digestion and urea treatment. In all three cases, it was shown that the presence of the beta subunit could drastically reduce...

  6. Recent advances in the production of recombinant subunit vaccines in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Yefu

    2016-04-01

    Recombinant protein subunit vaccines are formulated using defined protein antigens that can be produced in heterologous expression systems. The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has become an important host system for the production of recombinant subunit vaccines. Although many basic elements of P. pastoris expression system are now well developed, there is still room for further optimization of protein production. Codon bias, gene dosage, endoplasmic reticulum protein folding and culture condition are important considerations for improved production of recombinant vaccine antigens. Here we comment on current advances in the application of P. pastoris for the synthesis of recombinant subunit vaccines.

  7. Stoichiometry of the Human Glycine Receptor Revealed by Direct Subunit counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durisic, Nela; Godin, Antoine G.; Wever, Claudia M.; Heyes, Colin D.; Lakadamyali, Melike; Dent, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The subunit stoichiometry of heteromeric glycine-gated channels (GlyRs) determines fundamental properties of these key inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors; however the ratio of α1 to β-subunits per receptor remains controversial. We used single molecule imaging and stepwise photobleaching in Xenopus oocytes to directly determine the subunit stoichiometry of a glycine receptor to be 3α1:2β. This approach allowed us to determine the receptor stoichiometry in mixed populations consisting of both heteromeric and homomeric channels, additionally revealing the quantitative proportions for the two populations. PMID:22973015

  8. A genetic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase II subunits in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazoume, Adonis; Naderi, Kambiz; Candolfi, Ermanno; Kedinger, Claude; Chatton, Bruno; Vigneron, Marc

    2011-04-01

    RNA polymerase II is an essential nuclear multi subunit enzyme that transcribes nearly the whole genome. Its inhibition by the alpha-amanitin toxin leads to cell death. The enzyme of Plasmodium falciparum remains poorly characterized. Using a complementation assay in yeast as a genetic test, we demonstrate that five Plasmodium putative RNA polymerase subunits are indeed functional in vivo. The active site of this enzyme is built from the two largest subunits. Using site directed mutagenesis we were able to modify the active site of the yeast RNA polymerase II so as to introduce Plasmodium or human structural motifs. The resulting strains allow the screening of chemical libraries for potential specific inhibitors.

  9. Cereblon inhibits proteasome activity by binding to the 20S core proteasome subunit beta type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Min; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2012-10-26

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding cereblon (CRBN) are associated with mental retardation. Although CRBN has been investigated in several cellular contexts, its function remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CRBN plays a role in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Heterologous expression of CRBN inhibited proteasome activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome subunit beta type 4 (PSMB4), the β7 subunit of the 20S core complex, was identified as a direct binding partner of CRBN. These findings suggest that CRBN may modulate proteasome activity by directly interacting with the β7 subunit.

  10. Elongated polyproline motifs facilitate enamel evolution through matrix subunit compaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianquan Jin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate body designs rely on hydroxyapatite as the principal mineral component of relatively light-weight, articulated endoskeletons and sophisticated tooth-bearing jaws, facilitating rapid movement and efficient predation. Biological mineralization and skeletal growth are frequently accomplished through proteins containing polyproline repeat elements. Through their well-defined yet mobile and flexible structure polyproline-rich proteins control mineral shape and contribute many other biological functions including Alzheimer's amyloid aggregation and prolamine plant storage. In the present study we have hypothesized that polyproline repeat proteins exert their control over biological events such as mineral growth, plaque aggregation, or viscous adhesion by altering the length of their central repeat domain, resulting in dramatic changes in supramolecular assembly dimensions. In order to test our hypothesis, we have used the vertebrate mineralization protein amelogenin as an exemplar and determined the biological effect of the four-fold increased polyproline tandem repeat length in the amphibian/mammalian transition. To study the effect of polyproline repeat length on matrix assembly, protein structure, and apatite crystal growth, we have measured supramolecular assembly dimensions in various vertebrates using atomic force microscopy, tested the effect of protein assemblies on crystal growth by electron microscopy, generated a transgenic mouse model to examine the effect of an abbreviated polyproline sequence on crystal growth, and determined the structure of polyproline repeat elements using 3D NMR. Our study shows that an increase in PXX/PXQ tandem repeat motif length results (i in a compaction of protein matrix subunit dimensions, (ii reduced conformational variability, (iii an increase in polyproline II helices, and (iv promotion of apatite crystal length. Together, these findings establish a direct relationship between polyproline tandem

  11. P. berghei telomerase subunit TERT is essential for parasite survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Religa, Agnieszka A; Ramesar, Jai; Janse, Chris J; Scherf, Artur; Waters, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres define the ends of chromosomes protecting eukaryotic cells from chromosome instability and eventual cell death. The complex regulation of telomeres involves various proteins including telomerase, which is a specialized ribonucleoprotein responsible for telomere maintenance. Telomeres of chromosomes of malaria parasites are kept at a constant length during blood stage proliferation. The 7-bp telomere repeat sequence is universal across different Plasmodium species (GGGTTT/CA), though the average telomere length varies. The catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), is present in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is approximately three times larger than other eukaryotic TERTs. The Plasmodium RNA component of TERT has recently been identified in silico. A strategy to delete the gene encoding TERT via double cross-over (DXO) homologous recombination was undertaken to study the telomerase function in P. berghei. Expression of both TERT and the RNA component (TR) in P. berghei blood stages was analysed by Western blotting and Northern analysis. Average telomere length was measured in several Plasmodium species using Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis. TERT and TR were detected in blood stages and an average telomere length of ∼ 950 bp established. Deletion of the tert gene was performed using standard transfection methodologies and we show the presence of tert- mutants in the transfected parasite populations. Cloning of tert- mutants has been attempted multiple times without success. Thorough analysis of the transfected parasite populations and the parasite obtained from extensive parasite cloning from these populations provide evidence for a so called delayed death phenotype as observed in different organisms lacking TERT. The findings indicate that TERT is essential for P. berghei cell survival. The study extends our current knowledge on telomere biology in malaria parasites and validates further investigations to

  12. P. berghei telomerase subunit TERT is essential for parasite survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka A Religa

    Full Text Available Telomeres define the ends of chromosomes protecting eukaryotic cells from chromosome instability and eventual cell death. The complex regulation of telomeres involves various proteins including telomerase, which is a specialized ribonucleoprotein responsible for telomere maintenance. Telomeres of chromosomes of malaria parasites are kept at a constant length during blood stage proliferation. The 7-bp telomere repeat sequence is universal across different Plasmodium species (GGGTTT/CA, though the average telomere length varies. The catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, is present in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is approximately three times larger than other eukaryotic TERTs. The Plasmodium RNA component of TERT has recently been identified in silico. A strategy to delete the gene encoding TERT via double cross-over (DXO homologous recombination was undertaken to study the telomerase function in P. berghei. Expression of both TERT and the RNA component (TR in P. berghei blood stages was analysed by Western blotting and Northern analysis. Average telomere length was measured in several Plasmodium species using Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF analysis. TERT and TR were detected in blood stages and an average telomere length of ∼ 950 bp established. Deletion of the tert gene was performed using standard transfection methodologies and we show the presence of tert- mutants in the transfected parasite populations. Cloning of tert- mutants has been attempted multiple times without success. Thorough analysis of the transfected parasite populations and the parasite obtained from extensive parasite cloning from these populations provide evidence for a so called delayed death phenotype as observed in different organisms lacking TERT. The findings indicate that TERT is essential for P. berghei cell survival. The study extends our current knowledge on telomere biology in malaria parasites and validates further

  13. Preclinical and clinical development of a dengue recombinant subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoff, Susan B; George, Sarah L; Bett, Andrew J; Yelmene, Michele L; Dhanasekaran, Govindarajan; Eggemeyer, Linda; Sausser, Michele L; Dubey, Sheri A; Casimiro, Danilo R; Clements, David E; Martyak, Timothy; Pai, Vidya; Parks, D Elliot; Coller, Beth-Ann G

    2015-12-10

    This review focuses on a dengue virus (DENV) vaccine candidate based on a recombinant subunit approach which targets the DENV envelope glycoprotein (E). Truncated versions of E consisting of the N-terminal portion of E (DEN-80E) have been expressed recombinantly in the Drosophila S2 expression system and shown to have native-like conformation. Preclinical studies demonstrate that formulations containing tetravalent DEN-80E adjuvanted with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant induce high titer virus neutralizing antibodies and IFN-γ producing T cells in flavivirus-naïve non-human primates. The preclinical data further suggest that administration of such formulations on a 0, 1, 6 month schedule may result in higher maximum virus neutralizing antibody titers and better durability of those titers compared to administration on a 0, 1, 2 month schedule. In addition, the virus neutralizing antibody titers induced by adjuvanted tetravalent DEN-80E compare favorably to the titers induced by a tetravalent live virus comparator. Furthermore, DEN-80E was demonstrated to be able to boost virus neutralizing antibody titers in macaques that have had a prior DENV exposure. A monovalent version of the vaccine candidate, DEN1-80E, was formulated with Alhydrogel™ and studied in a proof-of-principle Phase I clinical trial by Hawaii Biotech, Inc. (NCT00936429). The clinical trial results demonstrate that both the 10 μg and 50 μg formulations of DEN1-80E with 1.25 mg of elemental aluminum were immunogenic when administered in a 3-injection series (0, 1, 2 months) to healthy, flavivirus-naïve adults. The vaccine formulations induced DENV-1 neutralizing antibodies in the majority of subjects, although the titers in most subjects were modest and waned over time. Both the 10 μg DEN1-80E and the 50 μg DEN1-80E formulations with Alhydrogel™ were generally well tolerated.

  14. Early diagnosis of sepsis using serum hemoglobin subunit Beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hayoung; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Shin-Woo; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-02-01

    The development of new sepsis-specific biomarkers is mandatory to improve the detection and monitoring of the disease. Hemoglobin is the main oxygen and carbon dioxide carrier in cells of the erythroid lineage and is responsible for oxygen delivery to the respiring tissues of the body. Hemoglobin subunit beta (HBβ) is a component of a larger protein called hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to evaluate blood levels of HBβ in septic patients. A prospective study of 82 patients with sepsis was conducted. Furthermore, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Alternatively, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or C57BL/6 mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml to HUVECs or 10 mg/kg to mice). The data showed that LPS induced upregulation of the synthesis and secretion of HBβ in LPS-treated HUVECs and in LPS-injected and CLP mice. In patients admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis, circulating levels of HBβ were significantly high (sepsis, 64.93-114.76 ng/ml, n = 30; severe sepsis, 157.37-268.69 ng/ml, n = 22; septic shock, 309.98-427.03 ng/ml, n = 30) when compared to the levels of control donors (9.76-12.28 ng/ml, n = 21). Patients with septic shock had higher HBβ levels when compared to patients with severe sepsis. Furthermore, the HBβ levels in septic patients were higher than those in healthy volunteers. These results suggest that in septic patients, HBβ blood level is related to the severity of sepsis and may represent a novel endothelial cell dysfunction marker. Moreover, HBβ can be used as a biomarker to determine the severity of sepsis.

  15. Multispectral Analysis of Color Vision Deficiency Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergejs FOMINS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Color deficiency tests are usually produced by means of polygraphy technologies and help to diagnose the type and severity of the color deficiencies. Due to different factors, as lighting conditions or age of the test, standard characteristics of these tests fail, thus not allowing diagnosing unambiguously the degree of different color deficiency. Multispectral camera was used to acquire the spectral images of the Ishihara and Rabkin pseudoisochromatic plates in the visible spectrum. Spectral data was converted to cone signals, and successive mathematics applied to provide a simple simulation of the test performance. Colorimetric data of the each pixel of the test image can be calculated and distribution of color coordinates is presented.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.259

  16. Experimental models of melatonin-deficient hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simko, Fedor; Reiter, Russel J; Pechanova, Olga; Paulis, Ludovit

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin secreted by the pineal gland plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure (BP) and its administration reduces hypertension both in animals and humans. There are two experimental models of melatonin-deficient hypertension: one induced by pinealectomy and another by continuous 24 hour exposure to light. Both models cause melatonin deficiency and prevent darkness-mediated nocturnal melatonin secretion and are associated with increased BP and myocardial, vascular and renal dysfunction. These models also lead to neurohumoral activation of the renin-angiotensin system, sympathetic nervous system, adrenocorticotrophin-glucocorticoid axis and cause insulin resistance. Together, these alterations contribute to rise in blood pressure by vasoconstrictive or circulatory fluid volume overload. The light induced hypertension model mimics the melatonin deficiency in patients with insufficient nocturnal BP decline, in those who have night shift or who are exposed to environmental light pollution. For this reason, this model is useful in development of anti-hypertensive drugs.

  17. Sneddon syndrome associated with Protein S deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refah Sayin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sneddon syndrome (SS is rare, arterio-occlusive disorder characterized by generalized livedo racemosa of the skin and various central nervous symptoms due to occlusion of medium-sized arteries of unknown. Seizure, cognitive impairment, hypertension, and history of repetitive miscarriages are the other symptoms seen in this disease. Livedo racemosa involves persisting irreversible skin lesions red or blue in color with irregular margins. Usually, SS occurs in women of childbearing age. Protein S deficiency is an inherited or acquired disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We present a 33-year-old woman with SS with diffuse livedo racemosa, recurrent cerebrovascular diseases, migraine-type headache, sinus vein thrombosis, and protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and with Sneddon syndrome rarely encountered in the literature.

  18. Sneddon syndrome associated with Protein S deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Refah; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Tombul, Temel

    2012-01-01

    Sneddon syndrome (SS) is rare, arterio-occlusive disorder characterized by generalized livedo racemosa of the skin and various central nervous symptoms due to occlusion of medium-sized arteries of unknown. Seizure, cognitive impairment, hypertension, and history of repetitive miscarriages are the other symptoms seen in this disease. Livedo racemosa involves persisting irreversible skin lesions red or blue in color with irregular margins. Usually, SS occurs in women of childbearing age. Protein S deficiency is an inherited or acquired disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We present a 33-year-old woman with SS with diffuse livedo racemosa, recurrent cerebrovascular diseases, migraine-type headache, sinus vein thrombosis, and protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and with Sneddon syndrome rarely encountered in the literature.

  19. Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assuncao, Ana G.L.; Persson, Daniel Olof; Husted, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    to develop plant-based solutions addressing nutrient-use-efficiency and adaptation to nutrient-limited or -toxic soils. Recently two transcription factors of the bZIP family (basic-region leucine zipper) have been identified in Arabidopsis and shown to be pivotal in the adaptation response to zinc deficiency....... They represent not only the first regulators of zinc homeostasis identified in plants, but also a very promising starting-point that can provide new insights into the molecular basis of how plants sense and adapt to the stress of zinc deficiency. Considering the available information thus far we propose...... in this review a putative model of how plants sense zinc deficiency....

  20. Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency in Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HR Joshaghani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a toxic material for mammalians. It is detoxificated and converted to urea in the urea cycle in liver. Each defect in the urea cycle cause increase in blood ammonia level. Ornithine transcarbamylase enzyme (OTC is the second enzyme in the urea cycle that exists in mitochondria. OTC deficiency is the most common hereditary disorder in the urea cycle. In this study, 45 hyper ammonia patients were selected (2-13 years old and assayed for serum OTC, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT. Four patients (n=45, 8.9% suffered from OTC deficiency. One patient was male (n=29, 3.4% and the others were female (n=16, 18.8%. About half of children (53.3 with hyper ammonia have liver disease. Further studies on OTC deficiency and OTC gene mutations in Iran are recommended.

  1. MRI findings of complete growth hormone deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiba, Yozo [National Hospital of Okayama (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed on the pituitary gland of 20 children (age range, 2-11 years) with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency. Sixteen patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency showed disappearance of the pituitary stalk, disappearance of high signal area of the posterior pituitary, presence of ectopic pituitary, and decreased volume of the anterior pituitary. Many of them had a history of perinatal abnormalities such as asphyxia at delivery, breech delivery, and bradytocia. On the contrary, patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency presented no abnormal findings on MR images, and had no history of perinatal abnormalities. The findings of pituitary stalk separation syndrome suggested the presence of multiple hypopituitarism. (S.Y.).

  2. An AP4B1 frameshift mutation in siblings with intellectual disability and spastic tetraplegia further delineates the AP-4 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahpour, Hengameh; Alawi, Malik; Kortüm, Fanny; Beckstette, Michael; Seemanova, Eva; Komárek, Vladimír; Rosenberger, Georg; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-02-01

    The recently proposed adaptor protein 4 (AP-4) deficiency syndrome comprises a group of congenital neurological disorders characterized by severe intellectual disability (ID), delayed or absent speech, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and growth retardation. AP-4 is a heterotetrameric protein complex with important functions in vesicle trafficking. Mutations in genes affecting different subunits of AP-4, including AP4B1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4M1, have been reported in patients with the AP-4 deficiency phenotype. We describe two siblings from a non-consanguineous couple who presented with severe ID, absent speech, microcephaly, growth retardation, and progressive spastic tetraplegia. Whole-exome sequencing in the two patients identified the novel homozygous 2-bp deletion c.1160_1161delCA (p.(Thr387Argfs*30)) in AP4B1. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the siblings and revealed it in the heterozygous state in both parents. The AP4B1-associated phenotype has previously been assigned to spastic paraplegia-47. Identification of a novel AP4B1 alteration in two patients with clinical manifestations highly similar to other individuals with mutations affecting one of the four AP-4 subunits further supports the observation that loss of AP-4 assembly or functionality underlies the common clinical features in these patients and underscores the existence of the clinically recognizable AP-4 deficiency syndrome.

  3. Proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves in response to acute boron deficiency and toxicity reveals effects on photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, and protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Mishra, Sasmita; Heckathorn, Scott A; Frantz, Jonathan M; Krause, Charles

    2014-02-15

    Boron (B) stress (deficiency and toxicity) is common in plants, but as the functions of this essential micronutrient are incompletely understood, so too are the effects of B stress. To investigate mechanisms underlying B stress, we examined protein profiles in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under normal B (30 μM), compared to plants transferred for 60 and 84 h (i.e., before and after initial visible symptoms) in deficient (0 μM) or toxic (3 mM) levels of B. B-responsive polypeptides were sequenced by mass spectrometry, following 2D gel electrophoresis, and 1D gels and immunoblotting were used to confirm the B-responsiveness of some of these proteins. Fourteen B-responsive proteins were identified, including: 9 chloroplast proteins, 6 proteins of photosynthetic/carbohydrate metabolism (rubisco activase, OEC23, photosystem I reaction center subunit II-1, ATPase δ-subunit, glycolate oxidase, fructose bisphosphate aldolase), 6 stress proteins, and 3 proteins involved in protein synthesis (note that the 14 proteins may fall into multiple categories). Most (8) of the B-responsive proteins decreased under both B deficiency and toxicity; only 3 increased with B stress. Boron stress decreased, or had no effect on, 3 of 4 oxidative stress proteins examined, and did not affect total protein. Hence, our results indicate relatively early specific effects of B stress on chloroplasts and protein synthesis.

  4. Vitamin D deficiency in early pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon K Flood-Nichols

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem in reproductive-aged women in the United States. The effect of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is unknown, but has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between vitamin D deficiency in the first trimester and subsequent clinical outcomes.This is a retrospective cohort study. Plasma was collected in the first trimester from 310 nulliparous women with singleton gestations without significant medical problems. Competitive enzymatic vitamin D assays were performed on banked plasma specimens and pregnancy outcomes were collected after delivery. Logistic regression was performed on patients stratified by plasma vitamin D concentration and the following combined clinical outcomes: preeclampsia, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, gestational diabetes, and spontaneous abortion.Vitamin D concentrations were obtained from 235 patients (mean age 24.3 years, range 18-40 years. Seventy percent of our study population was vitamin D insufficient with a serum concentration less than 30 ng/mL (mean serum concentration 27.6 ng/mL, range 13-71.6 ng/mL. Logistic regression was performed adjusting for age, race, body mass index, tobacco use, and time of year. Adverse pregnancy outcomes included preeclampsia, growth restriction, preterm delivery, gestational diabetes, and spontaneous abortion. There was no association between vitamin D deficiency and composite adverse pregnancy outcomes with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.01 (p value 0.738, 95% confidence intervals 0.961-1.057.Vitamin D deficiency did not associate with adverse pregnancy outcomes in this study population. However, the high percentage of affected individuals highlights the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in young, reproductive-aged women.

  5. Cited1 deficiency suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Méniel

    Full Text Available Conditional deletion of Apc in the murine intestine alters crypt-villus architecture and function. This process is accompanied by multiple changes in gene expression, including upregulation of Cited1, whose role in colorectal carcinogenesis is unknown. Here we explore the relevance of Cited1 to intestinal tumorigenesis. We crossed Cited1 null mice with Apc(Min/+ and AhCre(+Apc(fl/fl mice and determined the impact of Cited1 deficiency on tumour growth/initiation including tumour multiplicity, cell proliferation, apoptosis and the transcriptome. We show that Cited1 is up-regulated in both human and murine tumours, and that constitutive deficiency of Cited1 increases survival in Apc(Min/+ mice from 230.5 to 515 days. However, paradoxically, Cited1 deficiency accentuated nearly all aspects of the immediate phenotype 4 days after conditional deletion of Apc, including an increase in cell death and enhanced perturbation of differentiation, including of the stem cell compartment. Transcriptome analysis revealed multiple pathway changes, including p53, PI3K and Wnt. The activation of Wnt through Cited1 deficiency correlated with increased transcription of β-catenin and increased levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin. Hence, immediately following deletion of Apc, Cited1 normally restrains the Wnt pathway at the level of β-catenin. Thus deficiency of Cited1 leads to hyper-activation of Wnt signaling and an exaggerated Wnt phenotype including elevated cell death. Cited1 deficiency decreases intestinal tumourigenesis in Apc(Min/+ mice and impacts upon a number of oncogenic signaling pathways, including Wnt. This restraint imposed by Cited1 is consistent with a requirement for Cited1 to constrain Wnt activity to a level commensurate with optimal adenoma formation and maintenance, and provides one mechanism for tumour repression in the absence of Cited1.

  6. Rickets-vitamin D deficiency and dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Sahay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rickets is an important problem even in countries with adequate sun exposure. The causes of rickets/osteomalacia are varied and include nutritional deficiency, especially poor dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. Non-nutritional causes include hypophosphatemic rickets primarily due to renal phosphate losses and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis. In addition, some varieties are due to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism and are called vitamin D dependent rickets. This chapter highlights rickets/osteomalacia related to vitamin D deficiency or to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism. Hypophosphatemic rickets and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis are discussed in other sections of the journal.

  7. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency: diagnosis and management guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockley, Jerry; Andersson, Hans C; Antshel, Kevin M; Braverman, Nancy E; Burton, Barbara K; Frazier, Dianne M; Mitchell, John; Smith, Wendy E; Thompson, Barry H; Berry, Susan A

    2014-02-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, traditionally known as phenylketonuria, results in the accumulation of phenylalanine in the blood of affected individuals and was the first inborn error of metabolism to be identified through population screening. Early identification and treatment prevent the most dramatic clinical sequelae of the disorder, but new neurodevelopmental and psychological problems have emerged in individuals treated from birth. The additional unanticipated recognition of a toxic effect of elevated maternal phenylalanine on fetal development has added to a general call in the field for treatment for life. Two major conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health held >10 years apart reviewed the state of knowledge in the field of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, but there are no generally accepted recommendations for therapy. The purpose of this guideline is to review the strength of the medical literature relative to the treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency and to develop recommendations for diagnosis and therapy of this disorder. Evidence review from the original National Institutes of Health consensus conference and a recent update by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was used to address key questions in the diagnosis and treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency by a working group established by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. The group met by phone and in person over the course of a year to review these reports, develop recommendations, and identify key gaps in our knowledge of this disorder. Above all, treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency must be life long, with a goal of maintaining blood phenylalanine in the range of 120-360 µmol/l. Treatment has predominantly been dietary manipulation, and use of low protein and phenylalanine medical foods is likely to remain a major component of therapy for the immediate future. Pharmacotherapy for phenylalanine

  8. Zinc and biotin deficiencies after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazbeck, N; Muwakkit, S; Abboud, M; Saab, R

    2010-01-01

    We report zinc and biotin deficiencies after pancreaticoduodenectomy in a 16 year old female presenting clinically with marked alopecia, total body hair loss, dry skin with scales, and maculopathy with significant vision loss. These micronutrient deficiencies likely occurred due to resection of the duodenum and proximal jejunum, sites of primary absorption of several micronutrients and their protein carriers, including zinc and biotin. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent irreversible sequelae. Adequate supplementation of zinc and biotin as well as dietary advice is needed for clinical improvement.

  9. Vitamin C deficiency in an anticoagulated patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, George M; Goebel, Lynne J

    2013-06-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with a hemorrhagic perifollicular rash on her legs while taking warfarin. After biopsy, vitamin C deficiency was suggested as the diagnosis, which ascorbic acid assays later confirmed. Clinical resolution of the rash followed supplementation with vitamin C. Patients on a vitamin K limited diet may also be limiting their intake of vitamin C. Physicians should be aware of this possible correlation, and consider checking vitamin C levels in patients with a perifollicular hemorrhagic rash or other signs of vitamin C deficiency while on warfarin.

  10. Vitamin A deficiency in Crohn's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Main, A N; Mills, P. R.; Russell, R I; Bronte-Stewart, J; Nelson, L. M.; McLelland, A; Shenkin, A

    1983-01-01

    Fifty two patients with Crohn's disease (31 outpatients and 21 inpatients) were investigated for evidence of vitamin A deficiency. Eleven (21%) had low plasma retinol concentrations (less than 1.2 mumol/l (34.3 micrograms %)). Five of these were outpatients and plasma retinol was only slightly reduced (greater than 1.0 mumol/l (28.6%)). All outpatients weighed 80% or more of ideal, and were considered at low risk of developing vitamin A deficiency. In contrast, of the six inpatients with low ...

  11. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian A; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency......-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb...

  12. Sleep Transitions in Hypocretin-Deficient Narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Knudsen, Stine; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by instability of sleep-wake, tonus, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. It is associated with severe hypothalamic hypocretin deficiency, especially in patients with cataplexy (loss of tonus). As the hypocretin neurons coordinate and stabilize the brain......'s sleep-wake pattern, tonus, and REM flip-flop neuronal centers in animal models, we set out to determine whether hypocretin deficiency and/or cataplexy predicts the unstable sleep-wake and REM sleep pattern of the human phenotype....

  13. Genetic Analysis of the Mode of Interplay between an ATPase Subunit and Membrane Subunits of the Lipoprotein-Releasing ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter LolCDE†

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuko; Matsuzawa, Hitomi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The LolCDE complex, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane, thereby initiating lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. The LolCDE complex is composed of two copies of an ATPase subunit, LolD, and one copy each of integral membrane subunits LolC and LolE. LolD hydrolyzes ATP on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane, while LolC and/or LolE recognize and release lipoproteins anchored to the periplasmic leaflet of the i...

  14. Cyclophilin D deficiency rescues Aβ-impaired PKA/CREB signaling and alleviates synaptic degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Heng; Guo, Lan; Wu, Xiaoping; Sosunov, Alexander A; McKhann, Guy M; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2014-12-01

    The coexistence of neuronal mitochondrial pathology and synaptic dysfunction is an early pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cyclophilin D (CypD), an integral part of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), is involved in amyloid beta (Aβ)-instigated mitochondrial dysfunction. Blockade of CypD prevents Aβ-induced mitochondrial malfunction and the consequent cognitive impairments. Here, we showed the elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by antioxidants probucol or superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase blocks Aβ-mediated inactivation of protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP regulatory-element-binding (CREB) signal transduction pathway and loss of synapse, suggesting the detrimental effects of oxidative stress on neuronal PKA/CREB activity. Notably, neurons lacking CypD significantly attenuate Aβ-induced ROS. Consequently, CypD-deficient neurons are resistant to Aβ-disrupted PKA/CREB signaling by increased PKA activity, phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (PKA C), and CREB. In parallel, lack of CypD protects neurons from Aβ-induced loss of synapses and synaptic dysfunction. Furthermore, compared to the mAPP mice, CypD-deficient mAPP mice reveal less inactivation of PKA-CREB activity and increased synaptic density, attenuate abnormalities in dendritic spine maturation, and improve spontaneous synaptic activity. These findings provide new insights into a mechanism in the crosstalk between the CypD-dependent mitochondrial oxidative stress and signaling cascade, leading to synaptic injury, functioning through the PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway.

  15. Habituation of reflexive and motivated behaviour in mice with deficient BK channel function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marei eTyplt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Habituation is considered the most basic form of learning. It describes the decrease of a behavioural response to a repeated non-threatening sensory stimulus and therefore provides an important sensory filtering mechanism. While some neuronal pathways mediating habituation are well described, underlying cellular/molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In general, there is an agreement that short-term and long-term habituation are based on different mechanisms. Historically, a distinction has also been made between habituation of motivated versus reflexive behaviour. In recent studies in invertebrates the large conductance voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK channel has been implicated to be a key player in habituation by regulating synaptic transmission. Here, we tested mice deficient for the pore forming α-subunit of the BK channel for short-term and long-term habituation of the acoustic startle reflex (reflexive behaviour and of the exploratory locomotor behaviour in the open field box (motivated behaviour. Short-term habituation of startle was completely abolished in the BK knock-out mice, whereas neither long-term habituation of startle nor habituation of motivated behaviour was affected by the BK deficiency. Our results support a highly preserved mechanism for short-term habituation of startle across species that is distinct from long-term habituation mechanisms. It also supports the notion that there are different mechanisms underlying habituation of motivated behaviour versus reflexive behaviour.

  16. Dysbindin Deficiency Modifies the Expression of GABA Neuron and Ion Permeation Transcripts in the Developing Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimore, Jennifer; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Arnold, Miranda; Singleton, Kaela S.; Cross, Rebecca; Rudolph, Hannah; Bruegge, Martha V.; Sweetman, Andrea; Garza, Cecilia; Whisnant, Eli; Faundez, Victor

    2017-01-01

    The neurodevelopmental factor dysbindin is required for synapse function and GABA interneuron development. Dysbindin protein levels are reduced in the hippocampus of schizophrenia patients. Mouse dysbindin genetic defects and other mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders share defective GABAergic neurotransmission and, in several instances, a loss of parvalbumin-positive interneuron phenotypes. This suggests that mechanisms downstream of dysbindin deficiency, such as those affecting GABA interneurons, could inform pathways contributing to or ameliorating diverse neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we define the transcriptome of developing wild type and dysbindin null Bloc1s8sdy/sdy mouse hippocampus in order to identify mechanisms downstream dysbindin defects. The dysbindin mutant transcriptome revealed previously reported GABA parvalbumin interneuron defects. However, the Bloc1s8sdy/sdy transcriptome additionally uncovered changes in the expression of molecules controlling cellular excitability such as the cation-chloride cotransporters NKCC1, KCC2, and NCKX2 as well as the potassium channel subunits Kcne2 and Kcnj13. Our results suggest that dysbindin deficiency phenotypes, such as GABAergic defects, are modulated by the expression of molecules controlling the magnitude and cadence of neuronal excitability.

  17. Mutations in the SURF1 gene associated with Leigh syndrome and cytochrome C oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péquignot, M O; Dey, R; Zeviani, M; Tiranti, V; Godinot, C; Poyau, A; Sue, C; Di Mauro, S; Abitbol, M; Marsac, C

    2001-05-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is one of the major causes of Leigh Syndrome (LS), a fatal encephalopathy of infancy or childhood, characterized by symmetrical lesions in the basal ganglia and brainstem. Mutations in the nuclear genes encoding COX subunits have not been found in patients with LS and COX deficiency, but mutations have been identified in SURF1. SURF1 encodes a factor involved in COX biogenesis. To date, 30 different mutations have been reported in 40 unrelated patients. We aim to provide an overview of all known mutations in SURF1, and to propose a common nomenclature. Twelve of the mutations were insertion/deletion mutations in exons 1, 4, 6, 8, and 9; 10 were missense/nonsense mutations in exons 2, 4, 5, 7, and 8; and eight were detected at splicing sites in introns 3 to 7. The most frequent mutation was 312_321del 311_312insAT which was found in 12 patients out of 40. Twenty mutations have been described only once. We also list all polymorphisms discovered to date.

  18. Hematopoietic Fas deficiency does not affect experimental atherosclerotic lesion formation despite inducing a proatherogenic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Claro, R Angelo; Zhu, Xiaodong; Tang, Jingjing; Morgan-Stevenson, Vicki; Schwartz, Barbara R; Iwata, Akiko; Liles, W Conrad; Raines, Elaine W; Harlan, John M

    2011-06-01

    The Fas death receptor (CD95) is expressed on macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and T cells within atherosclerotic lesions. Given the dual roles of Fas in both apoptotic and nonapoptotic signaling, the aim of the present study was to test the effect of hematopoietic Fas deficiency on experimental atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice (Ldlr(-/-)). Bone marrow from Fas(-/-) mice was used to reconstitute irradiated Ldlr(-/-) mice as a model for atherosclerosis. After 16 weeks on an 0.5% cholesterol diet, no differences were noted in brachiocephalic artery lesion size, cellularity, or vessel wall apoptosis. However, Ldlr(-/-) mice reconstituted with Fas(-/-) hematopoietic cells had elevated hyperlipidemia [80% increase, relative to wild-type (WT) controls; P < 0.001] and showed marked elevation of plasma levels of CXCL1/KC, CCL2/MCP-1, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 subunit p70, and soluble Fas ligand (P < 0.01), as well as systemic microvascular inflammation. It was not possible to assess later stages of atherosclerosis because of increased mortality in Fas(-/-) bone marrow recipients. Our data indicate that hematopoietic Fas deficiency does not affect early atherosclerotic lesion development in Ldlr(-/-) mice.

  19. MEC-17 deficiency leads to reduced α-tubulin acetylation and impaired migration of cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wei, Dan; Wang, Qiong; Pan, Jing; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Xu; Bao, Lan

    2012-09-12

    Neuronal migration is a fundamental process during the development of the cerebral cortex and is regulated by cytoskeletal components. Microtubule dynamics can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to tubulin subunits. Acetylation of α-tubulin at lysine 40 is important in regulating microtubule properties, and this process is controlled by acetyltransferase and deacetylase. MEC-17 is a newly discovered α-tubulin acetyltransferase that has been found to play a major role in the acetylation of α-tubulin in different species in vivo. However, the physiological function of MEC-17 during neural development is largely unknown. Here, we report that MEC-17 is critical for the migration of cortical neurons in the rat. MEC-17 was strongly expressed in the cerebral cortex during development. MEC-17 deficiency caused migratory defects in the cortical projection neurons and interneurons, and perturbed the transition of projection neurons from the multipolar stage to the unipolar/bipolar stage in the intermediate zone of the cortex. Furthermore, knockdown of α-tubulin deacetylase HDAC6 or overexpression of tubulin(K40Q) to mimic acetylated α-tubulin could reduce the migratory and morphological defects caused by MEC-17 deficiency in cortical projection neurons. Thus, MEC-17, which regulates the acetylation of α-tubulin, appears to control the migration and morphological transition of cortical neurons. This finding reveals the importance of MEC-17 and α-tubulin acetylation in cortical development.

  20. High Prevalence of Vitamin B12 Deficiency and No Folate Deficiency in Young Children in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng'eno, Bernadette N; Perrine, Cria G; Whitehead, Ralph D; Subedi, Giri Raj; Mebrahtu, Saba; Dahal, Pradiumna; Jefferds, Maria Elena D

    2017-01-17

    Many children in low- and middle-income countries may have inadequate intake of vitamin B12 and folate; data confirming these inadequacies are limited. We used biochemical, demographic, behavioral and anthropometric data to describe the folate and vitamin B12 concentrations among six- to 23-month-old Nepalese children. Vitamin B12 (serum B12 B12 deficiency. The vitamin B12 geometric mean was 186 pmol/L; 30.2% of children were deficient. The mean RBC folate concentration was 13,612 nmol/L; there was no deficiency. Factors associated with vitamin B12 deficiency included: (a) age six to 11 months (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18, 1.92) or 12-17 months (aOR 1.38; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.72) compared to 18-23 months; (b) being stunted (aOR 1.24; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.50) compared to not being stunted; (c) and not eating animal-source foods (aOR 1.85; 95% CI: 1.42, 2.41) compared to eating animal-source foods the previous day. There was a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, but no folate deficiency. Improving early feeding practices, including the consumption of rich sources of vitamin B12, such as animal-source foods and fortified foods, may help decrease deficiency.

  1. Risk factors associated with anemia, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in rural Nepali pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Zeina; Taren, Douglas; Duncan, Burris; Pandey, Pooja; Thomson, Cynthia; Winzerling, Joy; Muramoto, Myra; Shrestha, Ram

    2012-05-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study to investigate risk factors associated with severe anemia [hemoglobin (Hb) iron status among Nepali pregnant women. Socio-demographic, anthropometric, health and dietary data were collected from 3,531 women living in the southeastern plains of Nepal. Stool samples were analyzed for intestinal helminthes. Dark adaptation was assessed using the Night Vision Threshold Test (NVTT). Hb levels were measured in all subjects to detect anemia and the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) was measured among a subsample of 479 women. The iron status categories were: 1) normal (Hb> or = 11.0 g/dl and sTfR anemia without iron deficiency (Hbiron deficiency without anemia (Hb > or = 11.0 g/dl and sTfR>8.5 mg/l); and 4) iron deficiency anemia (IDA): (Hb8.5 mg/l). Factors associated with severe anemia and poor iron status were determined using logistic regression. Hookworm infection increased the risk for developing severe anemia [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 4.26; 95% CI 1.67-10.89; piron deficiency with and without anemia. Intake of iron supplements as tablets and/or tonic was protective against severe anemia, anemia without iron deficiency and IDA. Dietary heme iron was significantly associated with iron deficiency without anemia (RRR: 0.1; 95% CI 0.02-0.47; panemia and associated nutrient deficiencies.

  2. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase I: Cyclic nucleotide binding, structural changes, and release of the catalytic subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Stephen B.; White, Hillary D.; Siegel, Jeffrey B.; Krebs, Edwin G.

    1981-01-01

    Type I cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase is composed of a dimeric regulatory subunit (R2) and two catalytic subunits (C subunits). The R2 dimer binds four cAMP molecules to release the two C subunits. To characterize the cAMP binding sites and elucidate their role in the release of the C subunits, the R2 dimer has been studied by equilibrium methods. The cAMP titration of R2 was monitored by endogenous tryptophan fluorescence, and the results suggest one class of binding sites. The t...

  3. Characterization of the alpha and beta subunits of casein kinase 2 by far-UV CD spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Brockel, C; Boldyreff, B;

    1992-01-01

    Although Chou-Fasman calculations of the secondary structure of recombinant casein kinase 2 subunits alpha and beta suggest they have a similar overall conformation, circular dichroism (CD) studies show that substantial differences in the conformation of the two subunits exist. In addition......, no changes in the far-UV CD spectrum of the alpha subunit are observed in the presence of casein or the synthetic decapeptide substrate RRRDDDSDDD. Furthermore, the alpha-helical structure of the alpha subunit (but not the beta subunit) can be increased in the presence of stoichiometric amounts of heparin...

  4. Rigidity of the subunit interfaces of the trimeric glutamate transporter GItT during translocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Maarten; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are trimeric membrane proteins in which each protomer contains a separate translocation path. To determine whether structural rearrangements take place at the subunit interfaces during transport, intersubunit disulfide bridges were introduced in the bacterial transporter GltT.

  5. Mapping of a liver phosphorylase kinase [alpha]-subunit gene on the mouse x chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Yan; Derry, J.M.J.; Barnard, P.J. (MRC Molecular Neurobiology Unit, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Hendrickx, J.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.R. (Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium))

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PHK) is a regulatory enzyme of the glycogenolytic pathway composed of a complex of four subunits. We recently mapped the muscle [alpha]-subunit gene (Phka) to the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with the proximal long arm of the human X chromosome and containing the human homologue of this gene, PHKA. We now report the mapping of the liver [alpha]-subunit gene to the telomeric end of the mouse X chromosome. This mapping position would suggest a location for the human liver [alpha]-subunit gene on the proximal short arm of the X chromosome, a region recently implicated in X-linked liver glycogenosis (XLG). 20 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Distinct Subunit Domains Govern Synaptic Stability and Specificity of the Kainate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straub

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic communication between neurons requires the precise localization of neurotransmitter receptors to the correct synapse type. Kainate-type glutamate receptors restrict synaptic localization that is determined by the afferent presynaptic connection. The mechanisms that govern this input-specific synaptic localization remain unclear. Here, we examine how subunit composition and specific subunit domains contribute to synaptic localization of kainate receptors. The cytoplasmic domain of the GluK2 low-affinity subunit stabilizes kainate receptors at synapses. In contrast, the extracellular domain of the GluK4/5 high-affinity subunit synergistically controls the synaptic specificity of kainate receptors through interaction with C1q-like proteins. Thus, the input-specific synaptic localization of the native kainate receptor complex involves two mechanisms that underlie specificity and stabilization of the receptor at synapses.

  7. Cooperative Subunit Refolding of a Light-Harvesting Protein through a Self-Chaperone Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laos, Alistair J; Dean, Jacob C; Toa, Zi S D; Wilk, Krystyna E; Scholes, Gregory D; Curmi, Paul M G; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-01-27

    The fold of a protein is encoded by its amino acid sequence, but how complex multimeric proteins fold and assemble into functional quaternary structures remains unclear. Here we show that two structurally different phycobiliproteins refold and reassemble in a cooperative manner from their unfolded polypeptide subunits, without biological chaperones. Refolding was confirmed by ultrafast broadband transient absorption and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to probe internal chromophores as a marker of quaternary structure. Our results demonstrate a cooperative, self-chaperone refolding mechanism, whereby the β-subunits independently refold, thereby templating the folding of the α-subunits, which then chaperone the assembly of the native complex, quantitatively returning all coherences. Our results indicate that subunit self-chaperoning is a robust mechanism for heteromeric protein folding and assembly that could also be applied in self-assembled synthetic hierarchical systems.

  8. Localization of a new type of X-linked liver glycogenosis to the chromosomal region Xp22 containing the liver {alpha}-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (PHKA2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickx, J.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.J. [Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe here a new type of X-linked liver glycogen storage disease. The main symptoms include liver enlargement and growth retardation. The clinical and biochemical abnormalities of this glycogenosis are similar to those of classical X-linked liver glycogenosis due to phosphorylase kinase deficiency (XLG). However, in constrast to patients with XLG, the patients described here have no reduced phosphorylase kinase activity in erythrocytes and leukocytes, and no enzyme deficiency could be found. Linkage analysis of four families with this X-linked type of liver glycogenosis assigned the disease gene to Xp22. Lod scores obtained with the markers DXS987, DXS207, and DXS999 were 3.97, 2.71, and 2.40, respectively, all at 0% recombination. Multipoint linkage analysis localized the disease gene between DXS143 and DXS989 with a maximum lod score of 4.70 at {theta}=0, relative to DXS987. As both the classical XLG gene and the liver {alpha}-subunit of PHK (PHKA2) are also located in Xp22, this variant type of XLG may be allelic to classical XLG, and both diseases may be caused by mutations in PHKA2. Therefore, they propose to classify XLG as XLG type I (the classical type of XLG) and XLG type II (the variant type of XLG). 28 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation rescues renal disease in Pdss2kd/kd mice with mutations in prenyl diphosphate synthase subunit 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Ryoichi; Lunceford, Adam L; Shi, Yuchen; Marbois, Beth; King, Rhonda; Pachuski, Justin; Kawamukai, Makoto; Gasser, David L; Clarke, Catherine F

    2008-11-01

    Homozygous mice carrying kd (kidney disease) mutations in the gene encoding prenyl diphosphate synthase subunit 2 (Pdss2kd/kd) develop interstitial nephritis and eventually die from end-stage renal disease. The PDSS2 polypeptide in concert with PDSS1 synthesizes the polyisoprenyl tail of coenzyme Q (Q or ubiquinone), a lipid quinone required for mitochondrial respiratory electron transport. We have shown that a deficiency in Q content is evident in Pdss2kd/kd mouse kidney lipid extracts by 40 days of age and thus precedes the onset of proteinuria and kidney disease by several weeks. The presence of the kd (V117M) mutation in PDSS2 does not prevent its association with PDSS1. However, heterologous expression of the kd mutant form of PDSS2 together with PDSS1 in Escherichia coli recapitulates the Q deficiency observed in the Pdss2kd/kd mouse. Dietary supplementation with Q10 provides a dramatic rescue of both proteinuria and interstitial nephritis in the Pdss2kd/kd mutant mice. The results presented suggest that Q may be acting as a potent lipid-soluble antioxidant, rather than by boosting kidney mitochondrial respiration. Such Q10 supplementation may have profound and beneficial effects in treatment of certain forms of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis that mirror the renal disease of the Pdss2kd/kd mouse.

  10. Functional protein expression of multiple sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunit isoforms in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Susann G; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Zechner, Christoph; Maass, Alexander H; Bischoff, Sebastian; Muck, Jenny; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Scheuer, Todd; Maier, Sebastian K G

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are composed of pore-forming alpha- and auxiliary beta-subunits and are responsible for the rapid depolarization of cardiac action potentials. Recent evidence indicates that neuronal tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunits are expressed in the heart in addition to the predominant cardiac TTX-resistant Na(v)1.5 sodium channel alpha-subunit. These TTX-sensitive isoforms are preferentially localized in the transverse tubules of rodents. Since neonatal cardiomyocytes have yet to develop transverse tubules, we determined the complement of sodium channel subunits expressed in these cells. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were stained with antibodies specific for individual isoforms of sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunits. alpha-actinin, a component of the z-line, was used as an intracellular marker of sarcomere boundaries. TTX-sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunit isoforms Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.4 and Na(v)1.6 were detected in neonatal rat heart but at levels reduced compared to the predominant cardiac alpha-subunit isoform, Na(v)1.5. Each of the beta-subunit isoforms (beta1-beta4) was also expressed in neonatal cardiac cells. In contrast to adult cardiomyocytes, the alpha-subunits are distributed in punctate clusters across the membrane surface of neonatal cardiomyocytes; no isoform-specific subcellular localization is observed. Voltage clamp recordings in the absence and presence of 20 nM TTX provided functional evidence for the presence of TTX-sensitive sodium current in neonatal ventricular myocardium which represents between 20 and 30% of the current, depending on membrane potential and experimental conditions. Thus, as in the adult heart, a range of sodium channel alpha-subunits are expressed in neonatal myocytes in addition to the predominant TTX-resistant Na(v)1.5 alpha-subunit and they contribute to the total sodium current.

  11. LEGO-NMR spectroscopy: a method to visualize individual subunits in large heteromeric complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mund, Markus; Overbeck, Jan H; Ullmann, Janina; Sprangers, Remco

    2013-10-18

    Seeing the big picture: Asymmetric macromolecular complexes that are NMR active in only a subset of their subunits can be prepared, thus decreasing NMR spectral complexity. For the hetero heptameric LSm1-7 and LSm2-8 rings NMR spectra of the individual subunits of the complete complex are obtained, showing a conserved RNA binding site. This LEGO-NMR technique makes large asymmetric complexes accessible to detailed NMR spectroscopic studies.

  12. Performance of information system implementation based on coupling-cohesion among subunits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Tienan; Li Yijun; Wang Mingzhu

    2007-01-01

    The intermediate information system benefit and the coupling-cohesion of subunits are presented to study the performance of information system implementation. Based on the organizational information processing theory and the organizational behaviour theory, a theoretical model is established from the perspective of coupling-cohesion of subunits. The reliability and validity of the model are checked up with the structural equation models and the data collected with questionnaires. The results of the study give some theoretical and practical guidance.

  13. Phorbol-induced surface expression of NR2A subunit homologues in HEK293 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chan-ying ZHENG; Xiu-juan YANG; Zhan-yan FU; Jian-hong LUO

    2006-01-01

    Aim: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are heteromeric complexes primarily assembled from NR1 and NR2 subunits. In normal conditions, NR2 sub-units assemble into homodimers in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These homodimers remain in the ER until they coassemble with NR1 dimers and are trafficked to the cell surface. However, it still remains unclear whether functional homomeric NMDAR exist in physiological or pathological conditions. Methods: We transfected GFP-NR2A alone into HEK293 cells, treated the cells with PKC activator 12-myristate-13 acetate (PMA), and then detected surface NR2A sub-units with a live cell immunostaining method. We also used a series of NR2A mutants with a partial deletion of its C-terminus to identify the regions that are involved in the PMA-mediated surface expression of NR2A subunits. Results: NR2A subunits were expressed on the cell membrane after incubation with PMA (200 nmol/L,30 min), although no functional NMDA channels were detected after PMA-induced membrane trafficking. Immunostaining with an ER marker also revealed that NR2A subunits were exported from the ER after PMA treatment. Furthermore, the deletion of amino acids between 1149-1347 or 1354-1464 of NR2A inhibited PMA-induced surface expression of NR2A subunits. Conclusion: First, our data suggests that PMA treatment can induce the surface expression of homomeric NR2A subunits. Furthermore, this process is probably mediated by the NR2A C-terminal region between positions 1149 and 1464.

  14. Differential Distribution of Exosome Subunits at the Nuclear Lamina and in Cytoplasmic FociD⃞V⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Amy C Graham; Kiss, Daniel L.; Andrulis, Erik D.

    2006-01-01

    The exosome complex plays important roles in RNA processing and turnover. Despite significant mechanistic insight into exosome function, we still lack a basic understanding of the subcellular locales where exosome complex biogenesis and function occurs. Here, we employ a panel of Drosophila S2 stable cell lines expressing epitope-tagged exosome subunits to examine the subcellular distribution of exosome complex components. We show that tagged Drosophila exosome subunits incorporate into compl...

  15. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  16. [A neonate with anaemia of prematurity: zinc protoporphyrin identifies iron deficiency anaemia without iron deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Feen, Diederik E; van Hillegersberg, Jacqueline L A M; Schippers, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Anaemia is a common problem in premature infants and is generally easy to treat with iron supplementation. If the anaemia persists despite appropriate correction of deficiencies, more extensive evaluation is required. We describe a case of a premature male infant with a production-deficient anaemia without metabolic deficiencies, eventually identified as anaemia of prematurity. This type of anaemia is commonly diagnosed but its highly variable and complex aetiology and phenotype are often poorly understood. A probable explanation for the anaemia of prematurity in this case was a transient iron incorporation defect, identifiable by high levels of zinc protoporphyrin.

  17. Significant prognostic values of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial complex I subunits in tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L D; Sun, H F; Bai, Y; Gao, S P; Jiang, H L; Jin, W

    2016-01-01

    In cancer biology, it remains still open question concerning the oncogenic versus oncosuppressor behavior of metabolic genes, which includes those encoding mitochondrial complex I (CI) subunits. The prognostic value of nuclear genome mRNAs expression of CI subunits is to be evaluated in the tumor patients. We used the Kaplan Meier plotter database, the cBio Cancer Genomics Portal, and the Oncomine in which gene expression data and survival information were from thousands of tumor patients to assess the relevance of nuclear genome mRNAs level of CI subunits to patients' survival, as well as their alterations in gene and expression level in tumors. We presented that the relative expression level of overwhelming majority of the nuclear genes of CI subunits with survival significance (overall survival, relapse free survival, progression free survival, distant metastasis free survival, post progression survival, and first progression), had consistent effects for patients in each type of four tumors separately, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, and gastric cancer. However, in gene level, frequent cumulative or individual alteration of these genes could not significantly affect patients' survival and the overexpression of the individual gene was not ubiquitous in tumors versus normal tissues. Given that reprogrammed energy metabolism was viewed as an emerging hallmark of tumor, thus tumor patients' survival might potentially to be evaluated by certain threshold for overall expression of CI subunits. Comprehensive understanding of the nuclear genome encoded CI subunits may have guiding significance for the diagnosis and prognosis in tumor patients.

  18. Proteasome (Prosome Subunit Variations during the Differentiation of Myeloid U937 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Henry

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available 20S proteasomes (prosomes/multicatalytic proteinase are protein particles built of 28 subunits in variable composition. We studied the changes in proteasome subunit composition during the differentiation of U937 cells induced by phorbol‐myristate‐acetate or retinoic acid plus 1,25‐dihydroxy‐cholecalciferol by western blot, flow cytometry and immuno‐fluorescence. p25K (C3, p27K (IOTA and p30/33K (C2 subunits were detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of undifferentiated cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated a biphasic decrease in proteasome subunits detection during differentiation induced by RA+VD. PMA caused an early transient decrease in these subunits followed by a return to their control level, except for p30/33K, which remained low. Immuno‐fluorescence also showed differences in the cytolocalization of the subunits, with a particular decrease in antigen labeling in the nucleus of RA+VD‐induced cells, and a scattering in the cytoplasm and a reorganization in the nucleus of PMA‐induced cells. Small amounts of proteasomal proteins were seen on the outer membrane of non‐induced cells; these membrane proteins disappeared when treated with RA+VD, whereas some increased on PMA‐induced cells. The differential changes in the distribution and type of proteasomes in RA+VD and PMA‐induced cells indicate that, possibly, 20S proteasomes may play a role in relation to the mechanisms of differentiation and the inducer used.

  19. Using yeast two-hybrid system to detect interactions of ATP synthase subunits from Spinacia oleracea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Subunit interactions among the chloroplast ATP synthase subunits were studied using the yeast two-hybrid system. Various pairwise combinations of genes encoding a , b , g , d and e subunits of Spinach ATP synthase fused to the binding domain or activation domain of GAL4 DNA were introduced into yeast and then expression of a reporter gene encoding b -galactosidase was detected. Of all the combinations, that of g and e subunit genes showed the highest level of reporter gene expression, while those of a and b , a and e , b and e and b and d induced stable and significant reporter gene expression. The combination of d and e as well as that of d and g induced weak and unstable reporter gene expression. However, combinations of a and g , b and g and a and d did not induce reporter gene expression. These results suggested that specific and strong interactions between g and e , a and b , a and e , b and e and b and d subunits, and weak and transient interactions between d and e and d and g subunits occurred in the yeast cell in the two-hybrid system. These results give a new look into the structural change of ATP synthase during catalysis.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a new subunit of phycocyanin from Chroomonas placoidea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Yun Zhang; Min Chen; Hong Cui

    2011-01-01

    A new phycocyanin (PC) fluorescent subunit named β2 (18 kDa) was isolated and characterized by both SDS-PAGE and isoelectric focusing (IEF) from a species of cryptophytic alga Chroomonas placoidea. PC was separated and purified by ammonium sulfate sedimentation followed by two steps of Sephadex G-100 chromatography. After denatured in 4 mol/L urea for 48 h, PC was divided into two fractions by passing through a Sephacryl S-100 chromatography column twice. The blue fraction (S-1) contained β subunits with a maximal absorbance at 595 nm in visible light region. While the green fraction (S-2) enriched in α subunits showed a characteristic long wavelength absorbance at 680-700 nm region and exhibited a relatively low molecular weight of 9.4 (α1) and 8.5 kDa (α2). Fraction S-1 also consisted of two different fluorescent subunits with molecular weight of 20.1 kDa (β1) and 18 kDa (β2) and differed from each other on isoelectric points of pH 5.7 (β1) and 6.0 (β2), respectively. Further investigation of peptide sequence will help a lot in elucidating the new subunit β2 that was smaller in size and more neutral than the known β1 subunit, and may provide an alternative explanation in structure of cryptophytic phycobiliproteins.