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Sample records for acid-associated autoantigens pathogenic

  1. Pathogen and autoantigen homologous regions within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein suggest an autoimmune treatable component of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris J

    2011-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel provides the glutathione and hypochlorous acid necessary for bactericidal/viricidal actions. CFTR mutations block these effects, diminishing pathogen defence and allowing extracellular pathogen accumulation, where antibody encounter is likely. KEGG pathway analysis of the CFTR interactome shows that CFTR is involved in pathogen entry pathways and immune defence as well as in pathways relevant to comorbid conditions (diabetes, cardiomyopathies and sexual organ development). Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus infections decrease the lifespan of cystic fibrosis patients and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia colonization is increased. Autoantibodies, targeting myeloperoxidase, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and calgranulin may further compromise pathogen defence. Short consensus sequences, within immunogenic extracellular regions of the CFTR protein, are homologous to proteins expressed by P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and S. maltophilia, and to several autoantigens, with a universal overlap between autoantigen/pathogen/CFTR consensi. Antibodies to pathogens are thus likely responsible for the creation of these autoantibodies, which, with pathogen antibodies, may target the CFTR protein acting as antagonists, further compromising its function. This creates a feedforward cycle, diminishing the function of the CFTR protein and increasing the probability of pathogen accumulation and antibody production at every turn. Interruption of this cycle by antibody adsorption or immunosuppressant therapy may be beneficial in cystic fibrosis.

  2. Tolerance checkpoint bypass permits emergence of pathogenic T cells to neuromyelitis optica autoantigen aquaporin-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Nelson, Patricia A.; Hagberg, Sarah; Miller, Corey N.; Spencer, Collin M.; Ho, Peggy P.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Levy, Michael; Levin, Marc H.; Verkman, Alan S.; Steinman, Lawrence; Green, Ari J.; Anderson, Mark S.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Zamvil, Scott S.

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-specific T cells are expanded in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients and exhibit Th17 polarization. However, their pathogenic role in CNS autoimmune inflammatory disease is unclear. Although multiple AQP4 T-cell epitopes have been identified in WT C57BL/6 mice, we observed that neither immunization with those determinants nor transfer of donor T cells targeting them caused CNS autoimmune disease in recipient mice. In contrast, robust proliferation was observed following immunization of AQP4-deficient (AQP4−/−) mice with AQP4 peptide (p) 135–153 or p201–220, peptides predicted to contain I-Ab–restricted T-cell epitopes but not identified in WT mice. In comparison with WT mice, AQP4−/− mice used unique T-cell receptor repertoires for recognition of these two AQP4 epitopes. Donor T cells specific for either determinant from AQP4−/−, but not WT, mice induced paralysis in recipient WT and B-cell–deficient mice. AQP4-specific Th17-polarized cells induced more severe disease than Th1-polarized cells. Clinical signs were associated with opticospinal infiltrates of T cells and monocytes. Fluorescent-labeled donor T cells were detected in CNS lesions. Visual system involvement was evident by changes in optical coherence tomography. Fine mapping of AQP4 p201–220 and p135–153 epitopes identified peptides within p201–220 but not p135–153, which induced clinical disease in 40% of WT mice by direct immunization. Our results provide a foundation to evaluate how AQP4-specific T cells contribute to AQP4-targeted CNS autoimmunity (ATCA) and suggest that pathogenic AQP4-specific T-cell responses are normally restrained by central tolerance, which may be relevant to understanding development of AQP4-reactive T cells in NMO. PMID:27940915

  3. Immunogenicity of autoantigens

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    Keller Andreas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoantibodies against self-antigens have been associated not only with autoimmune diseases, but also with cancer and are even found in healthy individuals. The mechanism causing the autoantibody response remains elusive for the majority of the immunogenic antigens. To deepen the understanding of autoantibody responses, we ask whether natural-occurring, autoimmunity-associated and tumor-associated antigens have structural or biological features related to the immune response. To this end, we have carried out the most comprehensive in-silicio study of different groups of autoantigens including large antigen sets identified by our groups combined with publicly available antigen sets. Results We found evidence for an enrichment of genes with a larger exon length increasing the probability of the occurrence of potential immunogenic features such as mutations, SNPs, immunogenic sequence patterns and structural epitopes, or alternative splicing events. While SNPs seem to play a more central role in autoimmunity, somatic mutations seem to be stronger enriched in tumor-associated antigens. In addition, antigens of autoimmune diseases are different from other antigen sets in that they appear preferentially secreted, have frequently an extracellular location, and they are enriched in pathways associated with the immune system. Furthermore, for autoantibodies in general, we found enrichment of sequence-based properties including coiled-coils motifs, ELR motifs, and Zinc finger DNA-binding motifs. Moreover, we found enrichment of proteins binding to proteins or nucleic acids including RNA and enrichment of proteins that are part of ribosome or spliceosome. Both, homologies to proteins of other species and an enrichment of ancient protein domains indicate that immunogenic proteins are evolutionary conserved and that mimicry might play a central role. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that proteins which i are evolutionary conserved

  4. An Innovative Method to Identify Autoantigens Expressed on the Endothelial Cell Surface: Serological Identification System for Autoantigens Using a Retroviral Vector and Flow Cytometry (SARF

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    Tsuyoshi Shirai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies against integral membrane proteins are usually pathogenic. Although anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECAs are considered to be critical, especially for vascular lesions in collagen diseases, most molecules identified as autoantigens for AECAs are localized within the cell and not expressed on the cell surface. For identification of autoantigens, proteomics and expression library analyses have been performed for many years with some success. To specifically target cell-surface molecules in identification of autoantigens, we constructed a serological identification system for autoantigens using a retroviral vector and flow cytometry (SARF. Here, we present an overview of recent research in AECAs and their target molecules and discuss the principle and the application of SARF. Using SARF, we successfully identified three different membrane proteins: fibronectin leucine-rich transmembrane protein 2 (FLRT2 from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 from a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, and Pk (Gb3/CD77 from an SLE patient with hemolytic anemia, as targets for AECAs. SARF is useful for specific identification of autoantigens expressed on the cell surface, and identification of such interactions of the cell-surface autoantigens and pathogenic autoantibodies may enable the development of more specific intervention strategies in autoimmune diseases.

  5. Increased polyamines alter chromatin and stabilize autoantigens in autoimmune diseases

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    Wesley H. Brooks

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines are small cations with unique combinations of charge and length that give them many putative interactions in cells. Polyamines are essential since they are involved in replication, transcription, translation, and stabilization of macro-molecular complexes. However, polyamine synthesis competes with cellular methylation for S-adenosylmethionine, the methyl donor. Also, polyamine degradation can generate reactive molecules like acrolein. Therefore, polyamine levels are tightly controlled. This control may be compromised in autoimmune diseases since elevated polyamine levels are seen in autoimmune diseases. Here a hypothesis is presented explaining how polyamines can stabilize autoantigens. In addition, the hypothesis explains how polyamines can inappropriately activate enzymes involved in NETosis, a process in which chromatin is modified and extruded from cells as extracellular traps that bind pathogens during an immune response. This polyamine-induced enzymatic activity can lead to an increase in NETosis resulting in release of autoantigenic material and tissue damage.

  6. Expression of pemphigus-autoantigen desmoglein 1 in human thymus.

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    Mouquet, H; Berrih-Aknin, S; Bismuth, J; Joly, P; Gilbert, D; Tron, F

    2008-05-01

    Desmoglein (Dsg) 1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the desmosome allowing cell-cell adhesion between keratinocytes, whose expression is restricted to stratified squamous epithelia-like epidermis. Dsg1 is the target autoantigen of pathogenic autoantibodies produced by pemphigus foliaceus and 50% of pemphigus vulgaris patients in a Dsg1-specific T-cell-dependent pathway. Herewith, we show that mRNA of the DSG1 gene is present in normal human thymus and show by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis that the expression of DSG1 transcript increases with age. Although immunoblot analysis on human thymus extracts using different anti-Dsg1 antibodies did not allow to detect the protein, we show by double-immunofluorescence assay that Dsg1 is expressed at protein level by CD19+ CD63+ cells located in the medulla. These data provide another illustration of the thymic expression of a tissue-specific autoantigen involved in an organ-specific autoimmune disease, which may participate in the tolerance acquisition and/or regulation of Dsg1-specific T cells.

  7. Identification of novel autoantigens by a triangulation approach.

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    Cottrell, Tricia R; Hall, John C; Rosen, Antony; Casciola-Rosen, Livia

    2012-11-30

    High titer autoantibodies, which are often associated with specific clinical phenotypes, are useful diagnostically and prognostically in systemic autoimmune diseases. In several autoimmune rheumatic diseases (e.g. myositis and Sjogren's syndrome), 20-40% of patients are autoantibody negative as assessed by conventional assays. The recent discovery of new specificities (e.g., anti-MDA5) in a subset of these autoantibody-negative subjects demonstrates that additional specificities await identification. In this manuscript, we describe a rapid multidimensional method to identify new autoantigens. A central foundation of this rapid approach is the use of an antigen source in which a pathogenic pathway active in the disease is recapitulated. Additionally, the method involves a modified serological proteome analysis strategy which allows confirmation that the correct gel plug has been removed prior to sending for sequencing. Lastly, the approach uses multiple sources of information to enable rapid triangulation and identification of protein candidates. Possible permutations and underlying principles of this triangulation strategy are elaborated to demonstrate the broad utility of this approach for antigen discovery.

  8. Purification of pituitary autoantigen by column liquid chromatography and chromatofocusing

    OpenAIRE

    Gut, Paweł; Fischbach, Jakub; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Bączyk, Maciej; Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pituitary autoantibodies can be determined both in patients with pituitary disease as well as patients with autoimmune endocrine diseases. The purpose of the study was to isolate and purify pituitary autoantigen using sera of patients and the microsomal fraction of the pituitary. Material and methods To isolate a pituitary autoantigen, patient sera were used, which showed a strong immune response to pituitary antigens. Pituitary microsomal fractions were prepared from pituitary t...

  9. CRALBP is a Highly Prevalent Autoantigen for Human Autoimmune Uveitis

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    Cornelia A. Deeg

    2007-01-01

    uveitis patient's sera was first evaluated in two-dimensional (2D Western blot analysis. Subsequent identification of the immunoreactive proteins by mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of CRALBP as a putative autoantigen. Additionally, sera from human uveitis and control patients were by Western blot using purified human recombinant CRALBP. Anti-CRALBP autoantibodies occur more frequently (P<.01 in human uveitis patients than in normal controls. Thirty out of 56 tested uveitis patient's sera contained autoantibodies reactive against CRALBP, compared to only four out of 23 normal control subjects. The presence of CRALBP autoantibodies in 54% of tested uveitis patients supports CRALBP as a possible autoantigen in human autoimmune uveitis.

  10. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

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    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role.

  11. Peroxiredoxin 2 is a novel autoantigen for anti-endothelial cell antibodies in systemic vasculitis

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    Karasawa, R; Kurokawa, M S; Yudoh, K; Masuko, K; Ozaki, S; Kato, T

    2010-01-01

    Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) have been frequently detected in systemic vasculitis, which affects blood vessels of various sizes. To understand the pathogenic roles of AECA in systemic vasculitis, we attempted to identify target antigens for AECA comprehensively by a proteomic approach. Proteins extracted from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and Western blotting was subsequently conducted using sera from patients with systemic vasculitis. As a result, 53 autoantigenic protein spots for AECA were detected, nine of which were identified by mass spectrometry. One of the identified proteins was peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2), an anti-oxidant enzyme. Frequency of anti-Prx2 autoantibodies, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was significantly higher in systemic vasculitis (60%) compared to those in collagen diseases without clinical vasculitis (7%, P vasculitis and would be involved in the inflammatory processes of systemic vasculitis. PMID:20646000

  12. Atomic features of an autoantigen in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT).

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    Cai, Zheng; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Greene, Mark I; Cines, Douglas B

    2016-07-01

    Autoantigen development is poorly understood at the atomic level. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an autoimmune thrombotic disorder caused by antibodies to an antigen composed of platelet factor 4 (PF4) and heparin or cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In solution, PF4 exists as an equilibrium among monomers, dimers and tetramers. Structural studies of these interacting components helped delineate a multi-step process involved in the pathogenesis of HIT. First, heparin binds to the 'closed' end of the PF4 tetramer and stabilizes its conformation; exposing the 'open' end. Second, PF4 arrays along heparin/GAG chains, which approximate tetramers, form large antigenic complexes that enhance antibody avidity. Third, pathogenic HIT antibodies bind to the 'open' end of stabilized PF4 tetramers to form an IgG/PF4/heparin ternary immune complex and also to propagate the formation of 'ultralarge immune complexes' (ULCs) that contain multiple IgG antibodies. Fourth, ULCs signal through FcγRIIA receptors, activating platelets and monocytes directly and generating thrombin, which transactivates hematopoietic and endothelial cells. A non-pathogenic anti-PF4 antibody prevents tetramer formation, binding of pathogenic antibody, platelet activation and thrombosis, providing a new approach to manage HIT. An improved understanding of the pathogenesis of HIT may lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutics for this autoimmune disease.

  13. Purification of pituitary autoantigen by column liquid chromatography and chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Paweł; Fischbach, Jakub; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Bączyk, Maciej; Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary autoantibodies can be determined both in patients with pituitary disease as well as patients with autoimmune endocrine diseases. The purpose of the study was to isolate and purify pituitary autoantigen using sera of patients and the microsomal fraction of the pituitary. To isolate a pituitary autoantigen, patient sera were used, which showed a strong immune response to pituitary antigens. Pituitary microsomal fractions were prepared from pituitary tissue homogenates. In the study, sera of patients with pituitary disease, Addison and Graves' disease were used. The initial stages were carried out by affinity chromatography on CN -Br sepharose column whereas purification was continued by column liquid chromatography on AcA54 Ultrogel. Chromatofocusing was performed by Polybuffer exchanger PBE 94. (125)I-labeled pituitary antigens after isolation appeared in column chromatography in three peaks. The first peak contained 50-70 kDa proteins, the second peak - 17 to 22 kDa proteins and the third peak contains (125)-iodides. Three fractions obtained from filtration on Ultrogel were separated in a polyacrylamide gel. In the first peak two bands 67 and 55 kDa appeared. The second peak contained low molecular weight substances, and the third peak contained (125)I. The first peak from Ultrogel was isolated by chromatofocusing - the first peak with pH 5.9 and the second one with pH 4.9. Isolation and purification of pituitary autoantigen with the use of column liquid chromatography and chromatofocusing resulted in obtainment of two antigenic proteins of specific gravity of 67 and 55 kDa.

  14. MHC Class II Auto-antigen Processing and Presentation is Unconventional

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    Scheherazade eSadegh-Nasseri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Antigen presentation is highly critical in adoptive immunity. Only by interacting with antigens presented by MHC Class II molecules, can helper T cells be stimulated to fight infections or diseases. The degradation of a full protein into small peptide fragments bound to class II molecules is a dynamic, lengthy process consisting of many steps and chaperons. Deregulation in any step of antigen processing could lead to the development of self-reactive T cells or defective immune response to pathogens. Indeed Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA Class II genes are the predominant contributors to susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Conventional antigen processing calls for internalization of extracellular antigens followed by processing and epitope selection within antigen processing subcellular compartments, enriched with all necessary accessory molecules, processing enzymes, and proper pH and denaturing conditions. However, recent data examining the temporal relationship between antigen uptakes, processing and epitope selection revealed unexpected characteristics for autoantigenic epitopes, which was not shared with antigenic epitopes from pathogens. This review provides a discussion of the relevance of these findings to the mechanisms of autoimmunity.

  15. A Highly Expressed Human Protein, Apolipoprotein B-100, Serves as an Autoantigen in a Subgroup of Patients With Lyme Disease.

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    Crowley, Jameson T; Drouin, Elise E; Pianta, Annalisa; Strle, Klemen; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Steere, Allen C

    2015-12-01

    To discover novel autoantigens associated with Lyme arthritis (LA), we identified T-cell epitopes presented in vivo by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR molecules in patients' inflamed synovial tissue or joint fluid and tested each epitope for autoreactivity. Using this approach, we identified the highly expressed human protein, apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), as a target of T- and B-cell responses in a subgroup of LA patients. Additionally, the joint fluid of these patients had markedly elevated levels of apoB-100 protein, which may contribute to its autoantigenicity. In patients with antibiotic-refractory LA, the magnitude of apoB-100 antibody responses correlated with increased numbers of plasma cells in synovial tissue, greater numbers and activation of endothelial cells, and more synovial fibroblast proliferation. Thus, a subset of LA patients have high levels of apoB-100 in their joints and autoreactive T- and B-cell responses to the protein, which likely contributes to pathogenic autoimmunity in patients with antibiotic-refractory LA.

  16. Autoantigenic targets of B-cell receptors derived from chronic lymphocytic leukemias bind to and induce proliferation of leukemic cells.

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    Zwick, Carsten; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Kemele, Maria; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Bühler, Andreas; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-06-06

    Antigenic targets of the B-cell receptor (BCR) derived from malignant cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) might play a role in the pathogenesis of this neoplasm. We screened human tissue-derived protein macroarrays with antigen-binding fragments derived from 47 consecutive cases of CLL. An autoantigenic target was identified for 12/47 (25.5%) of the cases, with 3 autoantigens being the target of the BCRs from 2 patients each. Recombinantly expressed autoantigens bound specifically to the CLL cells from which the BCR used for the identification of the respective autoantigen was derived. Moreover, binding of the autoantigen to the respective leukemic cells induced a specific activation and proliferation of these cells. In conclusion, autoantigens are frequent targets of CLL-BCRs. Their specific binding to and induction of proliferation in the respective leukemic cells provide the most convincing evidence to date for the long-time hypothesized role of autoantigens in the pathogenesis of CLL.

  17. Immunohistochemical analysis of medullary breast carcinoma autoantigens in different histological types of breast carcinomas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kostianets, Olga; Antoniuk, Stepan; Filonenko, Valeriy; Kiyamova, Ramziya

    2012-01-01

    ... and treatment of this disease. In current study we analyzed six previously identified medullary breast carcinoma autoantigens including LGALS3BP, RAD50, FAM50A, RBPJ, PABPC4, LRRFIP1 with cancer restricted serological profile...

  18. Changes in the expression of human cell division autoantigen-1 influence Toxoplasma gondii growth and development.

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    Jay R Radke

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma is a significant opportunistic pathogen in AIDS, and bradyzoite differentiation is the critical step in the pathogenesis of chronic infection. Bradyzoite development has an apparent tropism for cells and tissues of the central nervous system, suggesting the need for a specific molecular environment in the host cell, but it is unknown whether this environment is parasite directed or the result of molecular features specific to the host cell itself. We have determined that a trisubstituted pyrrole acts directly on human and murine host cells to slow tachyzoite replication and induce bradyzoite-specific gene expression in type II and III strain parasites but not type I strains. New mRNA synthesis in the host cell was required and indicates that novel host transcripts encode signals that were able to induce parasite development. We have applied multivariate microarray analyses to identify and correlate host gene expression with specific parasite phenotypes. Human cell division autoantigen-1 (CDA1 was identified in this analysis, and small interfering RNA knockdown of this gene demonstrated that CDA1 expression causes the inhibition of parasite replication that leads subsequently to the induction of bradyzoite differentiation. Overexpression of CDA1 alone was able to slow parasite growth and induce the expression of bradyzoite-specific proteins, and thus these results demonstrate that changes in host cell transcription can directly influence the molecular environment to enable bradyzoite development. Investigation of host biochemical pathways with respect to variation in strain type response will help provide an understanding of the link(s between the molecular environment in the host cell and parasite development.

  19. Autoantigens produced in plants for oral tolerance therapy of autoimmune diseases.

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    Ma, S; Jevnikar, A M

    1999-01-01

    Oral administration of protein antigens can induce antigen-specific immune hyporesponsiveness and may be useful in treating autoimmune diseases or preventing transplant rejection. However, the therapeutic value of oral tolerance may be limited when candidate autoantigens cannot be produced by conventional system in quantities sufficient for clinical studies. Plants may be ideally suited for this purpose, as they can produce hugh quantities of functional mammalian proteins at extremely competitive cost. Furthermore, transgenic food plants could provide a simple and direct method of autoantigen delivery for oral tolerance. Here we show that the diabetes-associated autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is efficiently expressed in both tobacco and potato plants, and that mice, when fed with fresh transgenic potato tubers, are fully protected from diabetes.

  20. Major retinal autoantigens remain stably expressed during all stages of spontaneous uveitis.

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    Deeg, Cornelia A; Hauck, Stefanie M; Amann, Barbara; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Stangassinger, Manfred; Ueffing, Marius

    2007-07-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is a valuable model for autoimmune diseases, since it develops frequently and occurs spontaneously. We investigated the overall expression level of three major retinal autoantigens in normal retinas and various ERU stages. Analysis of retinal proteomes of both, healthy and diseased retinas revealed an almost unaffected expression of IRBP, S-antigen and cRALBP in ERU cases. Validation of these findings with western blots and immunohistochemistry confirmed constant to increased expression of these autoantigens, although loss of their physiological expression sites within retina is evident. In contrast to stable expression of autoantigens, rhodopsin, the major component of phototransduction in photoreceptors, disappeared from destructed retinas. These results explain persistent uveitic attacks even in severely damaged eyes and draw the attention to further investigations of biological pathways and regulations in autoimmune target tissues.

  1. Identification of immunodominant autoantigens in rat autoimmune orchitis.

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    Fijak, Monika; Iosub, Radu; Schneider, Eva; Linder, Monika; Respondek, Kathrin; Klug, Jörg; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2005-10-01

    Infection and inflammation of the genital tract are amongst the leading causes of male infertility. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in the rat serves as a model for the investigation of inflammatory testicular impairment. In this study, experiments were conducted to identify the molecules that are responsible for eliciting the autoimmune attack on the testis. EAO was induced in in-bred Wistar rats by active immunization with testis homogenates (EAO group I). Development of disease was observed using histological techniques and a new non-invasive three-dimensional (3D) imaging technology for in vivo monitoring, termed flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpvCT). Examination of control and EAO testes demonstrated the superior image quality of high-resolution fpvCT. A proteomics approach using 2D SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis with EAO sera identified 12 spots. Seven were subsequently identified by mass spectrometry as heat shock proteins 60 (Hsp60) and 70 (Hsp70), disulphide isomerase ER-60, alpha-1-anti-trypsin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (hnRNP H1), sperm outer dense fibre major protein 2 (ODF-2), and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. Hsp70, ODF-2, hnRNP H1, and ER-60 were identified by all EAO sera studied. To test the capacity of the identified proteins to elicit testicular autoimmune disease, recombinant proteins were used either individually or in combination to immunize rats (EAO group II). In all groups, the incidence of EAO was 25%. Inflammatory-type (ED1+) and resident (ED2+) macrophages, lymphocytes (CD45RA+), and dendritic cells (Ox-62+) were strongly increased in EAO group II animals, comparable to the testes of EAO I rats. Pre-immunization with a low dose of recombinant Hsp 70, hnRNP H1 or ODF-2 before induction of EAO with testis homogenate significantly delayed the onset of EAO but could not prevent disease. The identification of testicular autoantigens will allow a better understanding of disease pathogenesis and could

  2. Epiplakin Is a Paraneoplastic Pemphigus Autoantigen and Related to Bronchiolitis Obliterans in Japanese Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Numata, Sanae; Teye, Kwesi; Natsuaki, Yohei; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Takeda, Yoshito; Wang, Wenqing; Ishikawa, Kazushi; Goto, Mizuki; Koga, Hiroshi; Sogame, Ryosuke; Ishii, Norito; Takamori, Shinzo; Hoshino, Tomoaki; Brandt, Oliver; Pas, Hendri H.; Fujiwara, Sakuhei; Hashimoto, Takashi

    All plakin family proteins are known to be autoantigens in paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP). In this study, we first examined whether PNP sera also react with epiplakin, another plakin protein, by various immunological methods using 48 Japanese PNP sera. Immunofluorescence confirmed that cultured

  3. Human islets and dendritic cells generate post-translationally modified islet auto-antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLaughlin, Rene J; de Haan, Anne; Zaldumbide, Arnaud; de Koning, Eelco J; de Ru, Arnoud H; van Veelen, Peter A; van Lummel, Menno; Roep, Bart O

    2016-01-01

    Initiation of type 1 diabetes (T1D) requires a break in peripheral tolerance. New insights into neo-epitope formation indicate that post-translational modification of islet auto-antigens, for example via deamidation, may be an important component of disease initiation or exacerbation. Indeed, deamid

  4. Retinal glycoprotein enrichment by concanavalin a enabled identification of novel membrane autoantigen synaptotagmin-1 in equine recurrent uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadzba, Margarete E; Hauck, Stefanie M; Naim, Hassan Y; Amann, Barbara; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2012-01-01

    Complete knowledge of autoantigen spectra is crucial for understanding pathomechanisms of autoimmune diseases like equine recurrent uveitis (ERU), a spontaneous model for human autoimmune uveitis. While several ERU autoantigens were identified previously, no membrane protein was found so far. As there is a great overlap between glycoproteins and membrane proteins, the aim of this study was to test whether pre-enrichment of retinal glycoproteins by ConA affinity is an effective tool to detect autoantigen candidates among membrane proteins. In 1D Western blots, the glycoprotein preparation allowed detection of IgG reactions to low abundant proteins in sera of ERU patients. Synaptotagmin-1, a Ca2+-sensing protein in synaptic vesicles, was identified as autoantigen candidate from the pre-enriched glycoprotein fraction by mass spectrometry and was validated as a highly prevalent autoantigen by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Analysis of Syt1 expression in retinas of ERU cases showed a downregulation in the majority of ERU affected retinas to 24%. Results pointed to a dysregulation of retinal neurotransmitter release in ERU. Identification of synaptotagmin-1, the first cell membrane associated autoantigen in this spontaneous autoimmune disease, demonstrated that examination of tissue fractions can lead to the discovery of previously undetected novel autoantigens. Further experiments will address its role in ERU pathology.

  5. Molecular architecture of the Goodpasture autoantigen in anti-GBM nephritis.

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    Pedchenko, Vadim; Bondar, Olga; Fogo, Agnes B; Vanacore, Roberto; Voziyan, Paul; Kitching, A Richard; Wieslander, Jörgen; Kashtan, Clifford; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Neilson, Eric G; Wilson, Curtis B; Hudson, Billy G

    2010-07-22

    In Goodpasture's disease, circulating autoantibodies bind to the noncollagenous-1 (NC1) domain of type IV collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The specificity and molecular architecture of epitopes of tissue-bound autoantibodies are unknown. Alport's post-transplantation nephritis, which is mediated by alloantibodies against the GBM, occurs after kidney transplantation in some patients with Alport's syndrome. We compared the conformations of the antibody epitopes in Goodpasture's disease and Alport's post-transplantation nephritis with the intention of finding clues to the pathogenesis of anti-GBM glomerulonephritis. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine the specificity of circulating autoantibodies and kidney-bound antibodies to NC1 domains. Circulating antibodies were analyzed in 57 patients with Goodpasture's disease, and kidney-bound antibodies were analyzed in 14 patients with Goodpasture's disease and 2 patients with Alport's post-transplantation nephritis. The molecular architecture of key epitope regions was deduced with the use of chimeric molecules and a three-dimensional model of the alpha345NC1 hexamer. In patients with Goodpasture's disease, both autoantibodies to the alpha3NC1 monomer and antibodies to the alpha5NC1 monomer (and fewer to the alpha4NC1 monomer) were bound in the kidneys and lungs, indicating roles for the alpha3NC1 and alpha5NC1 monomers as autoantigens. High antibody titers at diagnosis of anti-GBM disease were associated with ultimate loss of renal function. The antibodies bound to distinct epitopes encompassing region E(A) in the alpha5NC1 monomer and regions E(A) and E(B) in the alpha3NC1 monomer, but they did not bind to the native cross-linked alpha345NC1 hexamer. In contrast, in patients with Alport's post-transplantation nephritis, alloantibodies bound to the E(A) region of the alpha5NC1 subunit in the intact hexamer, and binding decreased on dissociation. The development of Goodpasture

  6. Autoantigenic proteins that bind recombinogenic sequences in Epstein-Barr virus and cellular DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    We have identified conserved autoantigenic cellular proteins that bind to G-rich sequence motifs in recombinogenic regions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA. This binding activity, called TRBP, recognizes the EBV terminal repeats, a locus responsible for interconversion of linear and circular EBV DNA. We found that TRBP also binds to EBV DNA sequences involved in deletion of EBNA2, a gene product required for immortalization. We show that TRBP binds sequences present in repetitive cellular DNA,...

  7. Identification of the novel autoantigen candidate Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha in isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyota, Atsushi; Iwama, Shintaro; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Takeuchi, Seiji; Takagi, Hiroshi; Iwata, Naoko; Nakashima, Kohtaro; Suzuki, Haruyuki; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kato, Takuya; Enomoto, Atsushi; Arima, Hiroshi; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency (IAD) is characterized by low or absent adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production. IAD is presumed to be caused in part by an autoimmune mechanism, and several lines of evidence have suggested the presence of anti-pituitary antibodies in IAD. However, the exact autoantigens remain unknown. The present study was designed to identify the autoantigen(s) in IAD using chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Rat anterior pituitary lysate was subjected to SDS-PAGE, and immunoblotting was performed using the sera from two patients with IAD and from a healthy subject. The bands detected by the patient serum samples, but not by the healthy subject sample, were excised, in-gel digested using trypsin, and subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis. On immunoblots, a 51-kDa band in the insoluble pellet was detected by the sera from the IAD patients but not from the healthy subject. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the 51-kDa band contained Rab guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) alpha. Consistent with the mass spectrometric analysis, a recombinant full-length human Rab GDI alpha was recognized by the two IAD patient samples but not by the healthy subject sample using immunoblotting. In total, anti-Rab GDI alpha antibodies were detected in serum samples from three of five patients with IAD (60%) but were absent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, Rab GDI alpha was expressed in the anterior pituitary. In conclusion, it appears that Rab GDI alpha is a candidate autoantigen involved in IAD, and that anti-Rab GDI alpha antibodies are present predominantly in patients with IAD.

  8. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 identified as autoantigens by biochemical and mass spectrometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N H; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Muncrief, T

    2000-01-01

    The antigenic specificity of an unusual antinuclear antibody pattern in three patient sera was identified after separating HeLa-cell nuclear extracts by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and localizing the antigens by immunoblotting with patient serum. Protein spots were excised from the 2......-separation methods and mass-spectrometric peptide mapping in combination with database searches are powerful tools in the identification of novel autoantigen specificities....

  9. The Role of Pathogenic Autoantibodies in Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merrill J. Rowley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The serological presence of autoantibodies is diagnostic of autoimmunity, and these autoantibodies may be present for many years before the presentation of autoimmune disease (AID. Although a pathogenic role has been demonstrated for various autoantibodies reactive with cell surface and extracellular autoantigens, studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAb show not all antibodies in the polyclonal response are pathogenic. Differences depend on Fab-mediated diversity in epitope specificity, Fc-mediated effects based on immunoglobulin (Ig class and subclass, activation of complement, and the milieu in which the reaction occurs. These autoantibodies often occur in organ-specific AID and this review illustrates their pathogenic and highly specific effects. The role of autoantibodies associated with intracellular antigens is less clear. In vitro they may inhibit or adversely affect well-defined intracellular biochemical pathways, yet, in vivo they are separated from their autoantigens by multiple cellular barriers. Recent evidence that Ig can traverse cell membranes, interact with intracellular proteins, and induce apoptosis has provided new evidence for a pathogenic role for such autoantibodies. An understanding of how autoantibodies behave in the polyclonal response and their role in pathogenesis of AID may help identify populations of culprit B-cells and selection of treatments that suppress or eliminate them.

  10. Paradoxical effect of pertussis toxin on the delayed hypersensitivity response to autoantigens in mice.

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    Rajwahrdhan Yadav

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pertussis toxin (PTX, an exotoxin of Bordetella pertussis, enhances the development of experimental autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in rodent models. The mechanisms of the promotion of experimental autoimmune diseases by PTX may be based upon PTX-induced disruption of the blood eye/brain barriers facilitating the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the modulation of inflammatory cell migration and the enhancement of the activation of inflammatory cells. We hypothesized that the facilitation of experimental autoimmunity by PTX suggests that its influence on the in vivo immune response to auto-antigen may differ from its influence on non-self antigens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have evaluated the effect of PTX on the simultaneous generation of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH responses and autoimmune responses to uveitogenic interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein peptide (IRBP161-180, encephalitogenic myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55 or ovalbumin (OVA. PTX injection of mice immunized to IRBP peptide161-180 led to (i the development of EAU as shown by histopathology of the retina, (ii pro-inflammatory cytokine production by splenocytes in response to IRBP peptide161-180, and (iii symptomatic EAE in mice immunized with encephalitogenic MOG peptide35-55. However, mice that received PTX had a reduced DTH response to IRBP161-180 peptide or MOG peptide35-55 when challenged distal to the site affected by autoreactive T cells. Moreover, footpad challenge with MOG35-55 peptide reduced EAE in mice immunized with MOG peptide. In contrast, the use of PTX when immunizing with OVA protein or an OVA immunogenic peptide did not affect the DTH response to OVA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that that the reduced DTH response in mice receiving PTX may be specific for autoantigens and autoantigen-reactive T cells are

  11. A La autoantigen homologue is required for the internal ribosome entry site mediated translation of giardiavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Garlapati

    Full Text Available Translation of Giardiavirus (GLV mRNA is initiated at an internal ribosome entry site (IRES in the viral transcript. The IRES localizes to a downstream portion of 5' untranslated region (UTR and a part of the early downstream coding region of the transcript. Recent studies indicated that the IRES does not require a pre-initiation complex to initiate translation but may directly recruit the small ribosome subunit with the help of a number of trans-activating protein factors. A La autoantigen homologue in the viral host Giardia lamblia, GlLa, was proposed as one of the potential trans-activating factors based on its specific binding to GLV-IRES in vitro. In this study, we further elucidated the functional role of GlLa in GLV-IRES mediated translation in Giardia by knocking down GlLa with antisense morpholino oligo, which resulted in a reduction of GLV-IRES activity by 40%. An over-expression of GlLa in Giardia moderately stimulated GLV-IRES activity by 20%. A yeast inhibitory RNA (IRNA, known to bind mammalian and yeast La autoantigen and inhibit Poliovirus and Hepatitis C virus IRES activities in vitro and in vivo, was also found to bind to GlLa protein in vitro and inhibited GLV-IRES function in vivo. The C-terminal domain of La autoantigen interferes with the dimerization of La and inhibits its function. An over-expression of the C-terminal domain (200-348aa of GlLa in Giardia showed a dominant-negative effect on GLV-IRES activity, suggesting a potential inhibition of GlLa dimerization. HA tagged GlLa protein was detected mainly in the cytoplasm of Giardia, thus supporting a primary role of GlLa in translation initiation in Giardiavirus.

  12. Identification of novel autoantigen in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients using an immunoproteomics approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagarika Biswas

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune and inflammatory joint disease with a poorly understood etiology. Despite widespread diagnostic use of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies and rheumatoid factor proteins there is a strong demand for novel serological biomarkers to improve the diagnosis this disease. The present study was aimed to identify novel autoantigens involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis through immune-proteomic strategy. Synovial fluid samples from clinically diagnosed RA patients were separated on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE. Samples from patients with non-RA rheumatisms (osteoarthritis and trauma were used as controls. Immunoreactive proteins were spotted by Western blotting followed by identification through Q-TOF mass spectrometer analysis. Forty Western blots were generated using plasma from ten individual RA patients and 33 reactive spots were identified, 20 from the high molecular weight (HMW gel and 13 from the low molecular weight (LMW gel. Among the 33 common immunogenic spots, 18 distinct autoantigens were identified, out of which 14 are novel proteins in this context. Expression analysis of five important proteins, vimentin, gelsolin, alpha 2 HS glycoprotein (AHSG, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and α1B-glycoprotein (A1BG by Western blot analysis using their specific antibodies revealed their higher expression in RA synovial fluid as compared to non-RA samples. Recombinantly expressed GFAP and A1BG protein were used to develop an in-house ELISA to quantify the amount of autoantibodies in the RA patients. RA patients revealed an increase in the expression of GFAP and A1BG in the plasma as compared to osteoarthritis patients. Therefore, GFAP and A1BG can be proposed as potential new autoantigens of diagnostic importance for RA subjects. Further characterization of these proteins in rheumatoid arthritis will be helpful in understanding the role of these proteins in the disease

  13. Posttranslational modification of HLA-DQ binding islet autoantigens in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lummel, Menno; Duinkerken, Gaby; van Veelen, Peter A; de Ru, Arnoud; Cordfunke, Robert; Zaldumbide, Arnaud; Gomez-Touriño, Iria; Arif, Sefina; Peakman, Mark; Drijfhout, Jan W; Roep, Bart O

    2014-01-01

    Posttranslational modification (PTM) of islet autoantigens can cause lack of central tolerance in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Tissue transglutaminase (tTG), involved in PTM of gluten antigens in celiac disease, creates negatively charged peptides favored by T1D-predisposing HLA-DQ molecules, offering an attractive candidate modifying islet autoantigens in T1D. The highly predisposing HLA-DQ8cis/trans molecules share preferences for negatively charged peptides, as well as distinct peptide-binding characteristics that distinguish their peptide-binding repertoire. We screened islet autoantigens with the tTG substrate motif for candidate-modified epitopes binding to HLA-DQ8cis/trans and identified 31 candidate islet epitopes. Deamidation was confirmed for 28 peptides (90%). Two of these epitopes preferentially bound to HLA-DQ8cis and six to HLA-DQ8trans upon deamidation, whereas all other peptides bound equally to HLA-DQ8cis/trans. HLA-DQ8cis-restricted T cells from a new-onset T1D patient could only be generated against a deamidated proinsulin peptide, but cross-reacted with native proinsulin peptide upon restimulation. The rate of T-cell autoreactivity in recent-onset T1D patients extended from 42% to native insulin to 68% adding responses to modified proinsulin, versus 20% and 37% respectively, in healthy donors. Most patients responded by interferon-γ, whereas most healthy donors produced interleukin-10 only. Thus, T-cell autoreactivity exists to modified islet epitopes that differs in quality and quantity between patients and healthy donors.

  14. Autoantigen microarrays reveal autoantibodies associated with proliferative nephritis and active disease in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddon, D James; Diep, Vivian K; Price, Jordan V; Limb, Cindy; Utz, Paul J; Balboni, Imelda

    2015-06-17

    Pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (pSLE) patients often initially present with more active and severe disease than adults, including a higher frequency of lupus nephritis. Specific autoantibodies, including anti-C1q, anti-DNA and anti-alpha-actinin, have been associated with kidney involvement in SLE, and DNA antibodies are capable of initiating early-stage lupus nephritis in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Over 100 different autoantibodies have been described in SLE patients, highlighting the need for comprehensive autoantibody profiling. Knowledge of the antibodies associated with pSLE and proliferative nephritis will increase the understanding of SLE pathogenesis, and may aid in monitoring patients for renal flare. We used autoantigen microarrays composed of 140 recombinant or purified antigens to compare the serum autoantibody profiles of new-onset pSLE patients (n = 45) to healthy controls (n = 17). We also compared pSLE patients with biopsy-confirmed class III or IV proliferative nephritis (n = 23) and without significant renal involvement (n = 18). We performed ELISA with selected autoantigens to validate the microarray findings. We created a multiple logistic regression model, based on the ELISA and clinical information, to predict whether a patient had proliferative nephritis, and used a validation cohort (n = 23) and longitudinal samples (88 patient visits) to test its accuracy. Fifty autoantibodies were at significantly higher levels in the sera of pSLE patients compared to healthy controls, including anti-B cell-activating factor (BAFF). High levels of anti-BAFF were associated with active disease. Thirteen serum autoantibodies were present at significantly higher levels in pSLE patients with proliferative nephritis than those without, and we confirmed five autoantigens (dsDNA, C1q, collagens IV and X and aggrecan) by ELISA. Our model, based on ELISA measurements and clinical variables, correctly identified patients with proliferative

  15. Shuttling of the autoantigen La between nucleus and cell surface after uv irradiation of human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, M.; Chang, S.; Slor, H.; Kukulies, J.; Mueller, W.E. (Universitaet, Mainz (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-12-01

    During the past years we have established that the nuclear autoantigen La shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in tumor cells after inhibition of transcription or virus infection. We reinvestigated this shuttling using primary human keratinocytes from both healthy donors and patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. Ultraviolet irradiation resulted in both an inhibition of transcription and a translocation of La protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. After a prolonged inhibition of transcription La protein relocated into the nucleus and assembled with nuclear storage regions. The uv-induced shuttling included a translocation to the cell surface, where La protein colocalized with epidermal growth factor receptors.

  16. A sensitive method for detecting proliferation of rare autoantigen-specific human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannering, Stuart I; Morris, Jessica S; Jensen, Kent P; Purcell, Anthony W; Honeyman, Margo C; van Endert, Peter M; Harrison, Leonard C

    2003-12-01

    The ability to measure proliferation of rare antigen-specific T cells among many bystanders is critical for the evaluation of cellular immune function in health and disease. T-cell proliferation in response to antigen has been measured almost exclusively by 3H-thymidine incorporation. This method does not directly identify the phenotype of the proliferating cells and is frequently not sufficiently sensitive to detect rare autoantigen-specific T cells. To overcome these problems, we developed a novel assay for antigen-specific human T-cell proliferation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were labelled with the fluorescent dye 5,6-carboxylfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) and cells that proliferated in response to antigen, with resultant reduction in CFSE intensity, were measured directly by flow cytometry. This assay was more sensitive than 3H-thymidine incorporation and detected the proliferation of rare antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells at 10-fold lower antigen concentrations. It also allowed the phenotype of the proliferating cells to be directly determined. Using the CFSE assay we were able to measure directly the proliferation of human CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors in response to the type 1 diabetes autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and proinsulin (PI).

  17. Transient systemic inflammation does not alter the induction of tolerance to gastric autoantigens by migratory dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Dorothée; Ross, Ellen M; Allen, Stacey; Read, Simon; Houghton, Fiona J; Bedoui, Sammy; Boon, Louis; Gleeson, Paul A; van Driel, Ian R

    2014-06-01

    It has been proposed that activation of dendritic cells (DCs) presenting self-antigens during inflammation may lead to activation of autoreactive T cells and the development of autoimmunity. To test this hypothesis, we examined the presentation of the autoantigen recognized in autoimmune gastritis, gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase, which is naturally expressed in the stomach and is constitutively presented in the stomach-draining lymph nodes. Systemic administration to mice of the TLR9 agonist CpG DNA, agonist anti-CD40 Ab, or TLR4 agonist LPS all failed to abrogate the process of peripheral clonal deletion of H(+)/K(+) ATPase-specific CD4 T cells or promote the development of autoimmune gastritis. We demonstrated that migratory DCs from the stomach-draining lymph nodes are the only DC subset capable of constitutively presenting the endogenous gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase autoantigen in its normal physiological context. Analysis of costimulatory molecules indicated that, relative to resident DCs, migratory DCs displayed a partially activated phenotype in the steady state. Furthermore, migratory DCs were refractory to stimulation by transient exposure to TLR agonists, as they failed to upregulate costimulatory molecules, secrete significant amounts of inflammatory cytokines, or induce differentiation of effector T cells. Together, these data show that transient systemic inflammation failed to break tolerance to the gastric autoantigen, as migratory DCs presenting the gastric autoantigen remain tolerogenic under such conditions, demonstrating the robust nature of peripheral tolerance.

  18. [The effect of long-term exposure to low doses of endocrine disruptor ddt on serum levels of thyroid protein autoantigenes and antithyroid autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaglova, N V; Yaglov, V V

    2016-01-01

    Changes in secretion of thyroid autoantigenes and production of antithyroid autoantibodies after long-term exposure to low doses of DDT were studied. Changes in serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies and thyroid peroxidase, attributed to disruption of thyroxine production by DDT were found. Long-term exposure of rats to low doses of DDT revealed no specific impact on serum autoantibodies to all thyroid autoantigenes studied. The increase of the ratio of autoantibody/autoantigen for thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin was rather small and thus could not be considered as a significant symptom of thyroid autoimmunity.

  19. Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) as target autoantigen in liver autoimmunity: lost and found.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Smyk, Daniel S; Liaskos, Christos; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Feist, Eugen; Conrad, Karsten; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2012-12-01

    Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) has attracted the attention of liver immunologists for many years. This liver-specific lectin was found to be a major B and T cell autoantigenic target in patients with autoimmune liver diseases, and in particular in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). This review discusses the biological significance of ASGPR and its relevance to the pathogenesis of autoimmune and virus-triggered liver diseases. We also discuss emerging data on the diagnostic and clinical relevance of anti-ASGPR antibodies in light of recent reports based on commercially available anti-ASGPR enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Finally, we critically revisit the data reporting on disease-specific cellular immune responses against ASGPR and their relevance in relation to the pathogenesis of AIH.

  20. Structural and Biochemical Basis for Misfolded RNA Recognition by the Ro Autoantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs,G.; Stein, A.; Fu, C.; Reinisch, K.; Wolin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Ro autoantigen is ring-shaped, binds misfolded noncoding RNAs and is proposed to function in quality control. Here we determine how Ro interacts with misfolded RNAs. Binding of Ro to misfolded precursor (pre)-5S ribosomal RNA requires a single-stranded 3 end and helical elements. As mutating most sequences of the helices and tail results in modest decreases in binding, Ro may be able to associate with a range of RNAs. Ro binds several other RNAs that contain single-stranded tails. A crystal structure of Ro bound to a misfolded pre-5S rRNA fragment reveals that the tail inserts into the cavity, while a helix binds on the surface. Most contacts of Ro with the helix are to the backbone. Mutagenesis reveals that Ro has an extensive RNA-binding surface. We propose that Ro uses this surface to scavenge RNAs that fail to bind their specific RNA-binding proteins.

  1. Multiple sclerosis autoantigen myelin basic protein escapes control by ubiquitination during proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurov, Alexey; Kudriaeva, Anna; Kuzina, Ekaterina; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatyana; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Kravtsova-Ivantsiv, Yelena; Ciechanover, Aaron; Gabibov, Alexander

    2014-06-20

    The vast majority of cellular proteins are degraded by the 26S proteasome after their ubiquitination. Here, we report that the major component of the myelin multilayered membrane sheath, myelin basic protein (MBP), is hydrolyzed by the 26S proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner both in vitro and in mammalian cells. As a proteasomal substrate, MBP reveals a distinct and physiologically relevant concentration range for ubiquitin-independent proteolysis. Enzymatic deimination prevents hydrolysis of MBP by the proteasome, suggesting that an abnormally basic charge contributes to its susceptibility toward proteasome-mediated degradation. To our knowledge, our data reveal the first case of a pathophysiologically important autoantigen as a ubiquitin-independent substrate of the 26S proteasome.

  2. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglin Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.

  3. Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens in pancreatic allograft recipients with preexisting beta cell autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Muhammad Ahmad; Fridell, Jonathan; Book, Benita; Faiz, Sara; Sharfuddin, Asif; Wiebke, Eric; Rigby, Mark; Taber, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens and its relevance in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in pancreatic allograft recipients is not well known. Thirty-three patients requiring a pancreas transplant were enrolled in an IRB approved study. They underwent prospective monitoring for DSA and beta cell autoantibody (BCAA) levels to GAD65, insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA-2), insulin (micro-IAA [mIAA]), and islet-specific zinc transporter isoform-8 (ZnT8). Twenty-five (75.7%) had pre-transplant BCAA. Twenty had a single antibody (mIAA n = 15, GAD65 n = 5); five had two or more BCAA (GAD65 + mIAA n = 2, GAD65 + mIAA+IA-2 n = 2, GA65 + mIAA+IA-2 + ZnT8 = 1). No changes in GAD65 (p > 0.29), IA-2 (>0.16), and ZnT8 (p > 0.07) were observed between pre-transplant and post-transplant at 6 or 12 months. A decrease in mIAA from pre- to post-6 months (p BCAA was observed at one yr. Seven (21.0%) developed de novo DSA. The incidence of DSA was 24% in patients with BCAA vs. 25% in patients without BCAA (p = 0.69). Pancreatic allograft function of patients with vs. without BCAA, and with and without BCAA + DSA was comparable until last follow-up (three yr). Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens by pancreas transplant may not lead to increased levels or development of new BCAA or pancreatic allograft dysfunction.

  4. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Honglin; Luo, Hui; Yan, Mei; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.

  5. 1型糖尿病自身抗原研究进展%Autoantigens in type 1 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟双

    2015-01-01

    自身免疫是1型糖尿病发病的重要机制.1型糖尿病自身抗原的发现为疾病的发病机制及临床诊治开拓了视野.胰岛素、谷氨酸脱羧酶65、胰岛细胞瘤相关抗原2等是已发现的1型糖尿病主要的自身抗原.近年来,1型糖尿病自身抗原如嗜铬粒蛋白A、胰岛淀粉样多肽、锌转运体8、胰-十二指肠同源盒因子1备受重视.该文就1型糖尿病自身抗原的研究进展进行综述.%Autoimmunity is the main mechanism of type 1 diabetes.The discovery of autoantigens has broadened our understanding of pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of type 1 diabetes.Insulin,glutamic acid decarboxylase 65,and insulinoma-associated protein 2 have been found to be major autoantigens of type 1 diabetes.In recent years,some autoantigens in type 1 diabetes,such as chromogranin A,islet amyloid polypeptide,zinc transporter 8,and pancreatic duodenal homeobox factor-1,have received some attention in the literature.The purpose of this article is to review the progress of novel autoantigens in type 1 diabetes.

  6. Apoptosis and Redistribution of the Ro Autoantigen in Balb/c Mouse Like in Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Herrera-Esparza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In subacute cutaneous lupus eryhematosus (SCLE the cutaneous antigens constitute the main source of Ro and La autoantigens. The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate if UV light increases the availability of Ro autoantigen in the skin, also the blocking effect of Ac-DEVD-CMK a caspase inhibitor was assessed. For this purpose newborn Balb/c mice were UVB irradiated (5–30 mJ/cm2 equivalent to a moderate to severe sunburn. Animals were injected with monoclonal anti-Ro antibodies from SCLE patients. Apoptosis was also induced by anti-Fas antibody injection. Skin samples were examined by direct immunofluoresence, by TUNEL, and the expression of caspase 3 by RT-PCR. Major findings of present studies were: 1. UVB irradiation and anti-Fas induced apoptosis of keratinocytes. 2. Apoptosis redistribute the Ro antigen on cell surface and is better triggered by Ro antibody. 3. The caspase 3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CMK decreases the availability of Ro autoantigen in epidermis and prevents deposition of anti-Ro. In conclusion, the caspase pathway would be blocked to avoid anti-Ro deposition along skin; this finding would be a prospect in the treatment of SCLE patients.

  7. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Honglin Zhu; Hui Luo; Mei Yan; Xiaoxia Zuo; Quan-Zhen Li

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplas-mic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epi-topes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection.

  8. β2-Glycoprotein I/HLA class II complexes are novel autoantigens in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Kenji; Jin, Hui; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Morikami, Satoko; Arase, Noriko; Kishida, Kazuki; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Kohyama, Masako; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Horita, Tetsuya; Takasugi, Kiyoshi; Ohmura, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Ken; Katayama, Ichiro; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Lanier, Lewis L; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Yamada, Hideto; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-04-30

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy complications. β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) complexed with phospholipid is recognized as a major target for autoantibodies in APS; however, less than half the patients with clinical manifestations of APS possess autoantibodies against the complexes. Therefore, the range of autoantigens involved in APS remains unclear. Recently, we found that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules transport misfolded cellular proteins to the cell surface via association with their peptide-binding grooves. Furthermore, immunoglobulin G heavy chain/HLA class II complexes were specific targets for autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we demonstrate that intact β2GPI, not peptide, forms a complex with HLA class II molecules. Strikingly, 100 (83.3%) of the 120 APS patients analyzed, including those whose antiphospholipid antibody titers were within normal range, possessed autoantibodies that recognize β2GPI/HLA class II complexes in the absence of phospholipids. In situ association between β2GPI and HLA class II was observed in placental tissues of APS patients but not in healthy controls. Furthermore, autoantibodies against β2GPI/HLA class II complexes mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity against cells expressing the complexes. These data suggest that β2GPI/HLA class II complexes are a target in APS that might be involved in the pathogenesis.

  9. Autoantigen TRIM21/Ro52 as a Possible Target for Treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusuke Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic, systemic, and autoimmune disease, whose etiology is still unknown. Although there has been progress in the treatment of SLE through the use of glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive drugs, these drugs have limited efficacy and pose significant risks of toxicity. Moreover, prognosis of patients with SLE has remained difficult to assess. TRIM21/Ro52/SS-A1, a 52-kDa protein, is an autoantigen recognized by antibodies in sera of patients with SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS, another systemic autoimmune disease, and anti-TRIM21 antibodies have been used as a diagnostic marker for decades. TRIM21 belongs to the tripartite motif-containing (TRIM super family, which has been found to play important roles in innate and acquired immunity. Recently, TRIM21 has been shown to be involved in both physiological immune responses and pathological autoimmune processes. For example, TRIM21 ubiquitylates proteins of the interferon-regulatory factor (IRF family and regulates type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines. In this paper, we summarize molecular features of TRIM21 revealed so far and discuss its potential as an attractive therapeutic target for SLE.

  10. Schizophrenia: A Pathogenetic Autoimmune Disease Caused by Viruses and Pathogens and Dependent on Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Carter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many genes have been implicated in schizophrenia as have viral prenatal or adult infections and toxoplasmosis or Lyme disease. Several autoantigens also target key pathology-related proteins. These factors are interrelated. Susceptibility genes encode for proteins homologous to those of the pathogens while the autoantigens are homologous to pathogens' proteins, suggesting that the risk-promoting effects of genes and risk factors are conditional upon each other, and dependent upon protein matching between pathogen and susceptibility gene products. Pathogens' proteins may act as dummy ligands, decoy receptors, or via interactome interference. Many such proteins are immunogenic suggesting that antibody mediated knockdown of multiple schizophrenia gene products could contribute to the disease, explaining the immune activation in the brain and lymphocytes in schizophrenia, and the preponderance of immune-related gene variants in the schizophrenia genome. Schizophrenia may thus be a “pathogenetic” autoimmune disorder, caused by pathogens, genes, and the immune system acting together, and perhaps preventable by pathogen elimination, or curable by the removal of culpable antibodies and antigens.

  11. Genetics and pathophysiology of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and its main autoantigen proteinase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relle, Manfred; Föhr, Bernd; Fasola, Federica; Schwarting, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a severe autoimmune disease and one of the small vessel anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides. Although its etiology and pathophysiology are still widely unknown, it is accepted that infections, environmental factors, epigenetic modifications, and a genetic predisposition provide the basis for this systemic disorder. GPA typically evolves into two phases: an initial phase characterized by ear, nose and throat (ENT) manifestations, such as chronic sinusitis and otitis, ulceration of the oral cavity and pharynx, as well as pulmonary nodules and a severe generalized phase, defined by the occurrence of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, pulmonary hemorrhage, and arthritis. ANCAs, directed against the neutrophilic enzymes proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase, are present in up to 90% of the affected patients in the systemic phase. As the humoral immunity is predominantly directed against neutrophilic antigens, it is apparent that neutrophils play a critical role in GPA both as target and effector cells. Although GPA pathogenesis is not well known, some susceptibility genes and loci have been identified by candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, and meta-analyses, as well as familial association studies. Such genes are CTLA4, PTPN22, COL11A2, SERPINA1, and the MHC class II gene cluster. This review highlights the clinical, pathophysiological, and genetic background of GPA and aims to give an overview of recent efforts to identify GPA susceptibility genes. We point out the genetic basis of the main autoantigen PR3 and why it is so difficult to establish a murine GPA model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of critical residues of linear B cell epitope on Goodpasture autoantigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yu Jia

    Full Text Available The autoantigen of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM disease has been identified as the non-collagenous domain 1 of α3 chain of type IV collagen, α3(IVNC1. Our previous study revealed a peptide on α3(IVNC1 as a major linear epitope for B cells and potentially nephrogenic, designated as P14 (α3129-150. This peptide has also been proven to be the epitope of auto-reactive T cells in anti-GBM patients. This study was aimed to further characterize the critical motif of P14.16 patients with anti-GBM disease and positive anti-P14 antibodies were enrolled. A set of truncated and alanine substituted peptides derived from P14 were synthesized. Circulating antibodies against the peptides were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.We found that all sera with anti-P14 antibodies reacted with the 13-mer sequence in the C-terminus of P14 (P14c exclusively. The level of antibodies against P14 was highly correlated with the level of antibodies against P14c (r=0.970, P<0.001. P14c was the core immunogenic region and the amino acid sequence (ISLWKGFSFIMFT was highly hydrophobic. Each amino acid residue in P14c was sequentially replaced by alanine. Three residues of glycine142, phenylalanine143, and phenylalanine145 were identified crucial for antibody binding based on the remarkable decline (P<0.001 of antibody reaction after each residue replacement.We defined GFxF (α3142, 143,145 as the critical motif of P14. It may provide some clues for understanding the etiology of anti-GBM disease.

  13. Modelling of Thyroid Peroxidase Reveals Insights into Its Enzyme Function and Autoantigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Sarah N; Porebski, Benjamin T; McCoey, Julia; Fodor, James; Riley, Blake; Godlewska, Marlena; Góra, Monika; Czarnocka, Barbara; Banga, J Paul; Hoke, David E; Kass, Itamar; Buckle, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) catalyses the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones and is a major autoantigen in Hashimoto's disease--the most common organ-specific autoimmune disease. Epitope mapping studies have shown that the autoimmune response to TPO is directed mainly at two surface regions on the molecule: immunodominant regions A and B (IDR-A, and IDR-B). TPO has been a major target for structural studies for over 20 years; however, to date, the structure of TPO remains to be determined. We have used a molecular modelling approach to investigate plausible modes of TPO structure and dimer organisation. Sequence features of the C-terminus are consistent with a coiled-coil dimerization motif that most likely anchors the TPO dimer in the apical membrane of thyroid follicular cells. Two contrasting models of TPO were produced, differing in the orientation and exposure of their active sites relative to the membrane. Both models are equally plausible based upon the known enzymatic function of TPO. The "trans" model places IDR-B on the membrane-facing side of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-like domain, potentially hindering access of autoantibodies, necessitating considerable conformational change, and perhaps even dissociation of the dimer into monomers. IDR-A spans MPO- and CCP-like domains and is relatively fragmented compared to IDR-B, therefore most likely requiring domain rearrangements in order to coalesce into one compact epitope. Less epitope fragmentation and higher solvent accessibility of the "cis" model favours it slightly over the "trans" model. Here, IDR-B clusters towards the surface of the MPO-like domain facing the thyroid follicular lumen preventing steric hindrance of autoantibodies. However, conformational rearrangements may still be necessary to allow full engagement with autoantibodies, with IDR-B on both models being close to the dimer interface. Taken together, the modelling highlights the need to consider the oligomeric state of TPO, its conformational

  14. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  15. Modelling of Thyroid Peroxidase Reveals Insights into Its Enzyme Function and Autoantigenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N Le

    Full Text Available Thyroid peroxidase (TPO catalyses the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones and is a major autoantigen in Hashimoto's disease--the most common organ-specific autoimmune disease. Epitope mapping studies have shown that the autoimmune response to TPO is directed mainly at two surface regions on the molecule: immunodominant regions A and B (IDR-A, and IDR-B. TPO has been a major target for structural studies for over 20 years; however, to date, the structure of TPO remains to be determined. We have used a molecular modelling approach to investigate plausible modes of TPO structure and dimer organisation. Sequence features of the C-terminus are consistent with a coiled-coil dimerization motif that most likely anchors the TPO dimer in the apical membrane of thyroid follicular cells. Two contrasting models of TPO were produced, differing in the orientation and exposure of their active sites relative to the membrane. Both models are equally plausible based upon the known enzymatic function of TPO. The "trans" model places IDR-B on the membrane-facing side of the myeloperoxidase (MPO-like domain, potentially hindering access of autoantibodies, necessitating considerable conformational change, and perhaps even dissociation of the dimer into monomers. IDR-A spans MPO- and CCP-like domains and is relatively fragmented compared to IDR-B, therefore most likely requiring domain rearrangements in order to coalesce into one compact epitope. Less epitope fragmentation and higher solvent accessibility of the "cis" model favours it slightly over the "trans" model. Here, IDR-B clusters towards the surface of the MPO-like domain facing the thyroid follicular lumen preventing steric hindrance of autoantibodies. However, conformational rearrangements may still be necessary to allow full engagement with autoantibodies, with IDR-B on both models being close to the dimer interface. Taken together, the modelling highlights the need to consider the oligomeric state of TPO, its

  16. Production of the main celiac disease autoantigen by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Soledad Marin Viegas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is a gluten sensitive enteropathy that remains widely undiagnosed and implementation of massive screening tests is needed to reduce the long term complications associated to untreated CD. The main CD autoantigen, human tissue transglutaminase (TG2, is a challenge for the different expression systems available since its cross-linking activity affects cellular processes. Plant-based transient expression systems can be an alternative for the production of this protein. In this work, a transient expression system for the production of human TG2 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves was optimized and reactivity of plant-produced TG2 in CD screening test was evaluated. First, a subcellular targeting strategy was tested. Cytosolic, secretory, endoplasmic reticulum (C-terminal SEKDEL fusion and vacuolar (C-terminal KISIA fusion TG2 versions were transiently expressed in leaves and recombinant protein yields were measured. ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 levels were 9 to 16 fold higher than their cytosolic and secretory counterparts. As second strategy, TG2 variants were co-expressed with a hydrophobic elastin-like polymer (ELP construct encoding for 36 repeats of the pentapeptide VPGXG in which the guest residue X were V and F in ratio 8:1. Protein bodies (PB were induced by the ELP, with a consequent 2 fold-increase in accumulation of both ER-TG2 and vac-TG2. Subsequently, ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were produced and purified using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Plant purified ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were recognized by three anti-TG2 monoclonal antibodies that bind different epitopes proving that plant-produced antigen has immunochemical characteristics similar to those of human TG2. Lastly, an ELISA was performed with sera of CD patients and healthy controls. Both vac-TG2 and ER-TG2 were positively recognized by IgA of CD patients while they were not recognized by serum from non-celiac controls. These results confirmed the usefulness of plant

  17. A lupus-like syndrome develops in mice lacking the Ro 60-kDa protein, a major lupus autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dahai; Shi, Hong; Smith, James D; Chen, Xinguo; Noe, Dennis A; Cedervall, Tommy; Yang, Derek D; Eynon, Elizabeth; Brash, Douglas E; Kashgarian, Michael; Flavell, Richard A; Wolin, Sandra L

    2003-06-24

    Antibodies against a conserved RNA-binding protein, the Ro 60-kDa autoantigen, occur in 24-60% of all patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Anti-Ro antibodies are correlated with photosensitivity and cutaneous lesions in these patients and with neonatal lupus, a syndrome in which mothers with anti-Ro antibodies give birth to children with complete congenital heart block and photosensitive skin lesions. In higher eukaryotes, the Ro protein binds small RNAs of unknown function known as Y RNAs. Because the Ro protein also binds misfolded 5S rRNA precursors, it is proposed to function in a quality-control pathway for ribosome biogenesis. Consistent with a role in the recognition or repair of intracellular damage, an orthologue of Ro in the radiation-resistant eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contributes to survival of this bacterium after UV irradiation. Here, we show that mice lacking the Ro protein develop an autoimmune syndrome characterized by anti-ribosome antibodies, anti-chromatin antibodies, and glomerulonephritis. Moreover, in one strain background, Ro-/- mice display increased sensitivity to irradiation with UV light. Thus, one function of this major human autoantigen may be to protect against autoantibody development, possibly by sequestering defective ribonucleoproteins from immune surveillance. Furthermore, the finding that mice lacking the Ro protein are photosensitive suggests that loss of Ro function could contribute to the photosensitivity associated with anti-Ro antibodies in humans.

  18. Aberrant accumulation of the diabetes autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi membranes in conditions of ER stress and autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet beta cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in beta cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes GABA......, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary beta cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes....... The palmitoylated form has heightened immunogenicity, exhibiting increased uptake by antigen presenting cells and T cell stimulation compared to the non-palmitoylated form. Similar accumulation of GAD65 in Golgi membranes is observed in human beta cells in pancreatic sections from GAD65 autoantibody positive...

  19. Construction and expression of a humanized M2 autoantigen trimer and its application in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hua Jiang; Ren-Qian Zhong; Sheng-Qian Yu; Yin Hu; Weng-Weng Li; Xian-Tao Kong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct and express a humanized M2 autoantigen trimer designated as BPO and to apply it in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). METHODS: cDNA fragments encoding M2-reactive epitopes of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex Ez (PDCE2), branched chain 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complex E2 (BCOADC-E2) and 2-oxo-glutarate dehydrogenase complex E2 (OGDC-E2) were amplified with PCR using total RNA extracted from human peripheral mononuclear blood cells. The fragments were cloned into the plasmid vector pQE-30 and then transferred into E. coliM15 (pREP4) for expression, which was induced by isopropylthio-β-Dgalactoside. The expressed recombinant BPO protein was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE, Western-blotting and Immunoabsorption test, its antigenic reactivity and specificity were identified with seven M2-positive sera confirmed at Euroimmun Research Center (Germany).Using the purified BPO, M2 antibodies in sera from patients with PBC and other liver related diseases were detected with ELISA. RESULTS: The expressed BPO was observed with both antigenic reactivity and specificity of M2 autoantigens. The determination of M2 antibodies by BPO with ELISA was more sensitive than using the Euroimmun's kit with the coefficients of variation less than 10 % in both interassay and intraassay.With the newly established method, M2 antibodies were found in 100 % (20/20) of patients with PBC. Six cases of liver disease with unknown etiology and 1 patient with drug induced liver injury had detectable levels of serum M2antibodies. There were also 2 patients with autoimmune cholangitis and 1 with autoimmune hepatitis showing M2-antibody positive. CONCLUSION: Compared with the routine immunofluorescenoe assay and commercially available assay kit using porcine heart mitochondrial protein as the antigen, the detection system established in the present study shows higher sensitivity and specificity and may be used as a powerful tool for the diagnosis of PBC.

  20. Pathogen intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behavior, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behavior, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies. PMID:24551600

  1. Peripheral nerve proteins as potential autoantigens in acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jia Pei; Devaux, Jérôme; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acute motor axonal neuropathy. Whereas autoantibodies to GM1 or GD1a induce the development of acute motor axonal neuropathy, pathogenic autoantibodies have yet to be identified in acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. This review highlights the importance of autoantibodies to peripheral nerve proteins in the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies. Moreover, we listed up other potential antigens, which may become helpful biomarkers for acquired, dysimmune demyelinating neuropathies based on their critical functions during myelination and their implications in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

  2. T-cell epitopes in type 1 diabetes autoantigen tyrosine phosphatase IA-2: potential for mimicry with rotavirus and other environmental agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Honeyman, M C; Stone, N. L.; Harrison, L. C.

    1998-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase IA-2 is a molecular target of pancreatic islet autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. T-cell epitope peptides in autoantigens have potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and they may hold clues to environmental agents with similar sequences that could trigger or exacerbate autoimmune disease. We identified 13 epitope peptides in IA-2 by measuring peripheral blood T-cell proliferation to 68 overlapping, synthetic peptides encompassing the intracytoplasmic domain ...

  3. Combinations of siRNAs against La Autoantigen with NS5B or hVAP-A Have Additive Effect on Inhibition of HCV Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Anirban; Ganta, Krishna Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus is major cause of chronic liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Presently available direct-acting antiviral drugs have improved success rate; however, high cost limits their utilization, especially in developing countries like India. In the present study, we evaluated anti-HCV potential of several siRNAs targeted against the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B and cellular factors, La autoantigen, PSMA7, and human VAMP-associated protein to intercept different steps of viral life cycle. The target genes were downregulated individually as well as in combinations and their impact on viral replication was evaluated. Individual downregulation of La autoantigen, PSMA7, hVAP-A, and NS5B resulted in inhibition of HCV replication by about 67.2%, 50.7%, 39%, and 52%, respectively. However, antiviral effect was more pronounced when multiple genes were downregulated simultaneously. Combinations of siRNAs against La autoantigen with NS5B or hVAP-A resulted in greater inhibition in HCV replication. Our findings indicate that siRNA is a potential therapeutic tool for inhibiting HCV replication and simultaneously targeting multiple viral steps with the combination of siRNAs is more effective than silencing a single target. PMID:27446609

  4. Aberrant Accumulation of the Diabetes Autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi Membranes in Conditions of ER Stress and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P; Pasquier, Miriella; Kanaani, Jamil; Nano, Rita; Lavallard, Vanessa; Billestrup, Nils; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Baekkeskov, Steinunn

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic islet β-cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in β-cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes γ-aminobutyric acid, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary β-cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes. The palmitoylated form has heightened immunogenicity, exhibiting increased uptake by antigen-presenting cells and T-cell stimulation compared with the nonpalmitoylated form. Similar accumulation of GAD65 in Golgi membranes is observed in human β-cells in pancreatic sections from GAD65 autoantibody-positive individuals who have not yet progressed to clinical onset of T1D and from patients with T1D with residual β-cell mass and ongoing T-cell infiltration of islets. We propose that aberrant accumulation of immunogenic GAD65 in Golgi membranes facilitates inappropriate presentation to the immune system after release from stressed and/or damaged β-cells, triggering autoimmunity.

  5. Characterization of human gene encoding SLA/LP autoantigen and its conserved homologs in mouse,fish,fly,and worm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Xia Wang; Andreas Teufel; Uta Cheruti; Joachim Gr(o)tzinger; Peter R Galle; Ansgar W Lohse; Johannes Herkel

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To approach the elusive function of the SLA/LP molecule, we have characterized genomic organization and conservation of the major antigenic and functional properties of the SLA/LP molecule in various species.METHODS: By means of computational biology, we have characterized the complete SLA/LP gene, mRNA and deduced protein sequences in man, mouse,zebrafish, fly, and worm.RESULTS: The human SLA/LP gene sequence of approximately 39 kb, which maps to chromosome 4p15.2, is organized in 11 exons, of which 10 or 11 are translated, depending on the splice variant. Homologous molecules were identified in several biological model organisms. The various homologous protein sequences showed a high degree of similarity or homology, notably at those residues that are of functional importance. The only domain of the human protein sequence that lacks significant homology with homologous sequences is the major antigenic epitope recognized by autoantibodies from autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) patients.CONCLUSION: The SLA/LP molecule and its functionally relevant residues have been highly conserved throughout the evoluti n, suggesting an indispensable function of the molecule. The finding that the only non-conserved domain is the dominant antigenic epitope of the human SLA/LP sequence, suggests that SLA/LP autoimmunity is autoantigen-driven rather than being driven by molecular mimicry.

  6. CD8+ T cells specific for the islet autoantigen IGRP are restricted in their T cell receptor chain usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Yannick F.; Eugster, Anne; Dietz, Sevina; Sebelefsky, Christian; Kühn, Denise; Wilhelm, Carmen; Lindner, Annett; Gavrisan, Anita; Knoop, Jan; Dahl, Andreas; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T cells directed against beta cell autoantigens are considered relevant for the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Using single cell T cell receptor sequencing of CD8+ T cells specific for the IGRP265-273 epitope, we examined whether there was expansion of clonotypes and sharing of T cell receptor chains in autoreactive CD8+ T cell repertoires. HLA-A*0201 positive type 1 diabetes patients (n = 19) and controls (n = 18) were analysed. TCR α- and β-chain sequences of 418 patient-derived IGRP265-273-multimer+ CD8+ T cells representing 48 clonotypes were obtained. Expanded populations of IGRP265-273-specific CD8+ T cells with dominant clonotypes that had TCR α-chains shared across patients were observed. The SGGSNYKLTF motif corresponding to TRAJ53 was contained in 384 (91.9%) cells, and in 20 (41.7%) patient-derived clonotypes. TRAJ53 together with TRAV29/DV5 was found in 15 (31.3%) clonotypes. Using next generation TCR α-chain sequencing, we found enrichment of one of these TCR α-chains in the memory CD8+ T cells of patients as compared to healthy controls. CD8+ T cell clones bearing the enriched motifs mediated antigen-specific target cell lysis. We provide the first evidence for restriction of T cell receptor motifs in the alpha chain of human CD8+ T cells with specificity to a beta cell antigen. PMID:28300170

  7. Pathogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Irudayaraj

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of sensors for detecting foodborne pathogens has been motivated by the need to produce safe foods and to provide better healthcare. However, in the more recent times, these needs have been expanded to encompass issues relating to biosecurity, detection of plant and soil pathogens, microbial communities, and the environment. The range of technologies that currently flood the sensor market encompass PCR and microarray-based methods, an assortment of optical sensors (including bioluminescence and fluorescence, in addition to biosensor-based approaches that include piezoelectric, potentiometric, amperometric, and conductometric sensors to name a few. More recently, nanosensors have come into limelight, as a more sensitive and portable alternative, with some commercial success. However, key issues affecting the sensor community is the lack of standardization of the testing protocols and portability, among other desirable elements, which include timeliness, cost-effectiveness, user-friendliness, sensitivity and specificity. [...

  8. The orthologue of Sjogren's syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 in Trypanosoma brucei is an immunogenic self-assembling molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P Price

    Full Text Available Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (PSS is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease, typically manifesting as lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands leading to chronically impaired lacrimal and salivary secretion. Sjögren's Syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 or NA14 is a major specific target for autoantibodies in PSS but the precise function and clinical relevance of this protein are largely unknown. Orthologues of the gene are absent from many of the commonly used model organisms but are present in Chlamyodomonas reinhardtii (in which it has been termed DIP13 and most protozoa. We report the functional characterisation of the orthologue of SSNA1 in the kinetoplastid parasite, Trypanosoma brucei. Both TbDIP13 and human SSNA1 are small coiled-coil proteins which are predicted to be remote homologues of the actin-binding protein tropomyosin. We use comparative proteomic methods to identify potential interacting partners of TbDIP13. We also show evidence that TbDIP13 is able to self-assemble into fibril-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, a property which may contribute to its immunogenicity. Endogenous TbDIP13 partially co-localises with acetylated α-tubulin in the insect procyclic stage of the parasite. However, deletion of the DIP13 gene in cultured bloodstream and procyclic stages of T. brucei has little effect on parasite growth or morphology, indicating either a degree of functional redundancy or a function in an alternative stage of the parasite life cycle.

  9. Transfection, overexpression and clinical application of human 60 kDa Ro/SSA autoantigens in HEp-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕良敬; 陈顺乐; 顾越英; 沈南; 鲍春德; 王元; 薛峰; 叶萍; 俞翀曌

    2003-01-01

    Objective To develop an improved substrate for indirect immunofluorescence test (IIF) for detecting anti-Ro60/Sjogren's syndrome A (Ro/SSA) autoantibodies.Methods 60-kDa Ro/SSA autoantigens (Ro60) cDNAs were obtained from human placental cDNA library using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and were cloned into the mammalian expression vector-pEGFP-C1. Then, the recombinant plasmids were transfected into HEp-2 cells. We confirmed the overexpression, localization and antigenicity of fusion proteins in transfected cells by means of immunoblotting, confocal fluorescence microscopy and IIF. HEp-2 and HEp-Ro60 were analyzed by IIF using a panel of 10 precipitin-positive anti-Ro human sera simultaneously.Results Stable expression of Ro60-green fluorescent protein (Ro60-GFP) fusion proteins were maintained ten more generations. Ro60-GFP kept the antigenicity of Ro while demonstrating its own characteristic immunofluorescent pattern in HEp-Ro60 cells. The transfectants dramatically increased the sensitivity of IIF testing (a mean increase of 6.7-fold in endpoint titer). Eight overten (8/10) positive anti-Ro sera showed characteristic immunofluorescent patterns for HEp-Ro60, including two sera that were anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) negative for untransfected HEp-2. IIF-ANA in all healthy sera was negative for HEp-Ro60. Conclusions As a new substrate for IIF, the Ro60 transfectants can be used to detect anti-Ro antibodies. In addition, transfected HEp-2 cells keep the immunofluorescent properties of HEp-2 cells in IIF-ANA tests and can be employed as a substrate for routine IIF-ANA detection.

  10. The IL-8 release from cultured human keratinocytes, mediated by antibodies to bullous pemphigoid autoantigen 180, is inhibited by dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, E; Reimer, S; Kruse, N; Bröcker, E-B; Zillikens, D

    2001-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a subepidermal blistering disease associated with autoantibodies to the hemidesmosomal 180 kD BP autoantigen (BP180). However, the binding of autoantibodies to BP180 alone is not sufficient for blister formation in this disease and the infiltration of neutrophils into the skin is required. Dapsone and nicotinamide inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis and are used effectively in treating BP. IL-8 is a known chemoattractant for neutrophils and has been implicated in the inflammatory process of both human and experimental murine BP. We have recently shown that antibodies to BP180 mediate a dose and time-dependent release of IL-6 and IL-8 from cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). In the present study, we addressed the question whether dapsone or nicotinamide influence this cytokine release. We demonstrate that dapsone, but not nicotinamide, in its pharmacological range, inhibits the IL-8, but not the IL-6 release from NHEK, induced by anti-BP180 IgG, in a dose-dependent fashion as detected by ELISA. IL-8 mRNA levels, as determined by RT-PCR, were the same in cells treated with BP IgG alone compared to cells treated with BP IgG plus dapsone. This observation suggests that dapsone inhibits the BP IgG-induced IL-8 release from cultured NHEK by mechanisms at the post-transcriptional level. Our findings contribute to the understanding how dapsone leads to a reduced influx of neutrophils into BP lesions and, finally, to the cessation of blister formation in this disease. PMID:11359455

  11. Design of Chemical Conjugate for Targeted Therapy of Multiple Sclerosis Based of Constant Fragment of Human Antibody Heavy Chain and Peptoid Analog of Autoantigen MOG35-55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakin, Y A; Stepanov, A V; Balabashin, D S; Ponomarenko, N A; Smirnov, I V; Belogurov, A A

    2017-04-01

    Elimination of B cells producing autoantibodies to neuroantigens is considered as beneficial in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a significant autoantigen in multiple sclerosis. It was shown that MOG-like peptoid AMogP3 can bind autoantibodies produced by pathological lymphocytes. We propose a structure of an innovative drug for targeted elimination of the pool of autoreactive B cells responsible for multiple sclerosis pathogenesis; this compound is a complex of peptoid AMogP3 with Fc fragment of human immunoglobulin. The obtained Fc-PEG-AMogP3 conjugate effectively interact with autoreactive antibodies, which attests to their high therapeutic potential.

  12. Melanoma inhibitor of apoptosis protein (ML-IAP) specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes cross-react with an epitope from the auto-antigen SS56

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek Sørensen, Rikke; Faurschou, Mikkel; Troelsen, Lone;

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of melanoma patients host a spontaneous T-cell response specifically against ML-IAP-derived peptides. In this study, we describe that some ML-IAP-specific cytotoxic T cells isolated from melanoma patients cross react with an epitope from the auto-antigen SS56. SS56 is a recently...... described target of autoantibody responses in Sjögren's syndrome (SS) as well as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we describe that SS56 is also an auto-antigen for T cells in SS and SLE. Hence, SS56-specific T cells could readily be detected in circulation and among the infiltrating cells of SLE...... skin lesions. SS56-specific T cells were able to lyse target cells presenting the peptide epitope on the surface. Notably, SS56-specific CD8 T cells isolated from an SS patient cross reacted with the ML-IAP epitope. This early evidence of a target for auto-reactive CTL in SS and SLE patients...

  13. Structural Basis for Recognition and Sequestration of UUUOH 3 ' Temini of Nascent RNA Polymerase III Transcripts by La, a Rheumatic Disease Autoantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova,M.; Yuan, Y.; Phan, A.; Malinina, L.; Ilin, S.; Teplov, A.; Patel, D.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear phosphoprotein La was identified as an autoantigen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjogren's syndrome. La binds to and protects the UUUOH 3' terminii of nascent RNA polymerase III transcripts from exonuclease digestion. We report the 1.85 Angstroms crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human La, consisting of La and RRM1 motifs, bound to r(U1-G2-C3-U4-G5-U6-U7-U8-U9OH). The U7-U8-U9OH 3' end, in a splayed-apart orientation, is sequestered within a basic and aromatic amino acid-lined cleft between the La and RRM1 motifs. The specificity-determining U8 residue bridges both motifs, in part through unprecedented targeting of the {beta} sheet edge, rather than the anticipated face, of the RRM1 motif. Our structural observations, supported by mutation studies of both La and RNA components, illustrate the principles behind RNA sequestration by a rheumatic disease autoantigen, whereby the UUUOH 3' ends of nascent RNA transcripts are protected during downstream processing and maturation events.

  14. In type 1 diabetes a subset of anti-coxsackievirus B4 antibodies recognize autoantigens and induce apoptosis of pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Bason

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes is characterized by autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells. The role played by autoantibodies directed against beta cells antigens in the pathogenesis of the disease is still unclear. Coxsackievirus B infection has been linked to the onset of type 1 diabetes; however its precise role has not been elucidated yet. To clarify these issues, we screened a random peptide library with sera obtained from 58 patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes, before insulin therapy. We identified an immunodominant peptide recognized by the majority of individual patients'sera, that shares homology with Coxsackievirus B4 VP1 protein and with beta-cell specific autoantigens such as phogrin, phosphofructokinase and voltage-gated L-type calcium channels known to regulate beta cell apoptosis. Antibodies against the peptide affinity-purified from patients' sera, recognized the viral protein and autoantigens; moreover, such antibodies induced apoptosis of the beta cells upon binding the L-type calcium channels expressed on the beta cell surface, suggesting a calcium dependent mechanism. Our results provide evidence that in autoimmune diabetes a subset of anti-Coxsackievirus antibodies are able to induce apoptosis of pancreatic beta cells which is considered the most critical and final step in the development of autoimmune diabetes without which clinical manifestations do not occur.

  15. Emerging Pathogens Initiative (EPI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Emerging Pathogens Initiative (EPI) database contains emerging pathogens information from the local Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). The EPI software...

  16. Pathogenicity of autoantibodies in anti-p200 pemphigoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Vafia

    Full Text Available Recently, the C-terminus of laminin γ1 has been identified as target antigen in anti-p200 pemphigoid and the disease was renamed as anti-laminin γ1 pemphigoid. However, the pathogenic relevance of these autoantibodies has not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, we employed an ex vivo model of autoantibody-mediated leukocyte-dependent neutrophil activation and dermal-epidermal separation (DES using cryosections of human skin. We showed that anti-p200 pemphigoid sera (n = 7 induced DES in a time-dependent manner, in contrast to sera from healthy controls. Furthermore, laminin γ1-specific IgG and serum depleted from anti-laminin γ1 reactivity were generated using the recombinant C-terminus of laminin γ1 (LAMC1-term; amino acids 1364 to 1609. Interestingly, both fractions labeled the dermal-epidermal-junction (DEJ by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy on human foreskin and recognized a 200 kDa protein by immunoblotting with dermal extract. Human and rabbit IgG against LAMC1-cterm failed to attract neutrophils at the DEJ and to induce DES. In contrast, patient serum depleted from LAMC1-cterm reactivity led to the same extent of DES as non-depleted IgG. Repeated injection of rabbit anti-murine LAMC1-cterm IgG into both neonatal and adult C57BL/6mice as well as repetitive immunization of various mouse strains with murine LAMC1-cterm failed to induce macro- and microscopic lesions. In all mice, circulating anti-LAMC1-cterm antibodies were present, but only in some mice, IgG deposits were seen at the DEJ. We conclude that autoantibodies in anti-p200 pemphigoid sera are pathogenic while pathogenicity is not mediated by autoantibodies against laminin γ1. Further studies are needed to identify the pathogenically relevant autoantigen in anti-p200 pemphigoid.

  17. 葡萄膜炎自身抗原表位的研究%Studies on autoantigenic epitopes involving in the development of uveitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵长霖; 杨培增

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that a few kinds of autoantigens imitate the development of autoimmune uveitis while the immunodominant epitopes of these antigens have not been identified.Researches on retinal S-antigen and interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein as well as tyrosinase-related protein epitopes mapping have shown that each autoantigen contains several immunopathogenic epitopes and immunogenic epitopes and that the immunopathogenic sites ale not coincident with the immunogenic epitopes.The reactivity of peripheral blood mononucleal cells from uveitis patients against each autoantigenic epitopes displays high heterogeneity.Epitopes spreading phenomenon has been disclosed in human uveifis study and reinforced in animal experiments.Study on this epitope spreading may contribute to our understanding of immune tolerance induced by different epitopes in the treatment of autoimmune disease including uveifis.%多种抗原参与自身免疫性葡萄膜炎的发生发展,但是这些抗原的免疫优势表位尚不明确.针对视网膜S抗原等葡萄膜炎自身抗原免疫表位的研究显示,每种抗原蛋白均存在多个可诱导易感动物葡萄膜炎发作的致病位点,每种抗原均存在多个可诱导葡萄膜炎患者产生体外细胞免疫反应的免疫原性表位,同种抗原的致病表位和免疫原性表位不完全一致.葡萄膜炎患者对于各抗原表位肽的反应性显示出高度异质性,表现为不同患者对不同肽发生反应和同一例患者在不同时期对不同肽发生反应.由此,提出了葡萄膜炎表位扩展现象,并利用动物实验得以证实.表位扩展可能是自身免疫反应的防御现象,但是自身免疫反应的多样化同时又对抗原特异性耐受疗法提出了挑战.

  18. Virus and autoantigen-specific CD4+ T cells are key effectors in a SCID mouse model of EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W; Mautner, Josef

    2014-05-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies.

  19. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  20. Pathogen Phytosensing: Plants to Report Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal Stewart

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Real-time systems that provide evidence of pathogen contamination in crops can be an important new line of early defense in agricultural centers. Plants possess defense mechanisms to protect against pathogen attack. Inducible plant defense is controlled by signal transduction pathways, inducible promoters and cis-regulatory elements corresponding to key genes involved in defense, and pathogen-specific responses. Identified inducible promoters and cis-acting elements could be utilized in plant sentinels, or ‘phytosensors’, by fusing these to reporter genes to produce plants with altered phenotypes in response to the presence of pathogens. Here, we have employed cis-acting elements from promoter regions of pathogen inducible genes as well as those responsive to the plant defense signal molecules salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene. Synthetic promoters were constructed by combining various regulatory elements supplemented with the enhancer elements from the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV 35S promoter to increase basal level of the GUS expression. The inducibility of each synthetic promoter was first assessed in transient expression assays using Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts and then examined for efficacy in stably transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. Histochemical and fluorometric GUS expression analyses showed that both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants responded to elicitor and phytohormone treatments with increased GUS expression when compared to untreated plants. Pathogen-inducible phytosensor studies were initiated by analyzing the sensitivity of the synthetic promoters against virus infection. Transgenic tobacco plants infected with Alfalfa mosaic virus showed an increase in GUS expression when compared to mock-inoculated control plants, whereas Tobacco mosaic virus infection caused no changes in GUS expression. Further research, using these transgenic plants against a range of different

  1. Relationships between values of antibodies to several connective tissue disease autoantigens and pulmonary function in a Japanese general population: the Takahata study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Nakano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism in the pathogenesis of respiratory dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between pulmonary function and serum antibodies to several connective tissue disease autoantigens (ACTDA levels, which has not been investigated in a general population. METHODS: Blood sampling and spirometry were performed for subjects (n = 3,257 aged ≥40 years who participated in a community-based annual health check in Takahata, Japan, from 2004 to 2006. ACTDA was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and subjects with ACTDA values ≥20 were defined as positive. RESULTS: In males, there were significant inverse relationships between logarithmically transformed ACTDA values and spirometric parameters, including % predicted values for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 and maximal midexpiratory flow (MMF as well as FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that except for the relationship between ACTDA and FEV1/FVC, these relationships were still significant after adjustment for Brinkman index (a measure of inhaled cigarette consumption. The prevalence of positive ACTDA was greater in male never-smokers with mixed ventilation disorders and relatively severe airflow obstruction (% predicted FEV1 below the median value. CONCLUSIONS: Autoimmunity may be involved in the mechanism of impaired pulmonary function in the general population.

  2. Cloning and molecular characterization of cDNA encoding a mouse male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2): a putative family of the Golgi autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, M; Sutou, S

    1997-01-01

    The male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2) gene was originally identified with a monoclonal histocompatibility Y (H-Y) antibody (mAb4VII). There is no report of the full length cDNA encode for Mea-2 product until this report. In this study, we isolated the full length mouse Mea-2 cDNA by screening a testis cDNA library with a PCR-amplified Mea-2 product, and direct PCR amplification of its upstream sequences from the cDNA library. The primary structure of the Mea-2 peptide, deduced from this nucleotide sequence, shows that it encode a 150 kDa protein, of 1325 amino acid residues, which contained five putative N-glycosylation sites and four leucine zipper motifs. A data bank search indicated that it has high homology with a human Golgi autoantigen (golgin-160) both in its nucleotides (78%) and amino acids sequence (83%). This suggests that Mea-2 gene product may encode a golgi structural protein. In situ hybridization analysis suggested that the Mea-2 gene is expressed in spermatids during spermatogenesis as already shown by Mea-1, suggesting that Mea-2 gene product as well as Mea-1 have also some role for spermatogenesis.

  3. La Autoantigen Induces Ribosome Binding Protein 1 (RRBP1) Expression through Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES)-Mediated Translation during Cellular Stress Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Zhu, Ruiyu; Jin, Jian

    2016-07-20

    The function of ribosome binding protein 1 (RRBP1) is regulating the transportation and secretion of some intracellular proteins in mammalian cells. Transcription of RRBP1 is induced by various cytokines. However, few studies focused on the process of RRPB1 mRNA translation. The RRBP1 mRNA has a long 5' untranslated region that potentially formed a stable secondary structure. In this study, we show that the 5' UTR of RRBP1 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Moreover, the RRBP1 expression is induced by chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or adriamycin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and accompanied with the increased expression of La autoantigen (La), which binds to RRBP1 IRES element and facilitates translation initiation. Interestingly, we found IRES-mediated RRBP1 translation is also activated during serum-starvation condition which can induce cytoplasmic localization of La. After mapping the entire RRBP1 5' UTR, we determine the core IRES activity is located between nt-237 and -58. Furthermore, two apical GARR loops within the functional RRBP1 IRES elements may be important for La binding. These results strongly suggest an important role for IRES-dependent translation of RRBP1 mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cells during cellular stress conditions.

  4. Aire-dependent thymic expression of desmoglein 3, the autoantigen in pemphigus vulgaris, and its role in T-cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Naoko; Nishifuji, Koji; Yamada, Taketo; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Peltonen, Leena; Nagafuchi, Seiho; Amagai, Masayuki

    2011-02-01

    In the mechanism of thymus-induced central tolerance, the transcription factor Aire has been demonstrated to promote the expression of a wide range of peripheral organ-specific antigens (Ags) in the medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), which serve as self-Ags in negative selection. We examined the expression of desmoglein 3 (Dsg3), the autoantigen in pemphigus vulgaris (PV), in mouse thymus and the involvement of Aire in tolerance to Dsg3. Immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization revealed Dsg3 in single cells or in clusters in ∼3% of mTECs near the cortico-medullary junction of the thymus in C57BL/6 mice. Dsg3-expressing mTECs also expressed some Ags of skin-unrelated peripheral organs simultaneously. In contrast, Dsg3-positive mTECs were not detected in the Aire(-/-) thymus. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from Aire(-/-) mice immunized with Dsg3 did not induce anti-Dsg3 IgG production or PV phenotype in Rag2(-/-) recipient mice. However, Aire(-/-) CD4(+) T cells, but not Aire(+/+) CD4(+) T cells, induced low levels of anti-Dsg3 IgG production when transferred with Dsg3(-/-) B cells. These findings indicate that Aire has an important role in Dsg3 expression as well as in selection of T cells that help B cells to produce anti-Dsg3 IgG in thymus.

  5. Potatoes, pathogens and pests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazebnik, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Currently, fungicides are necessary to protect potato crops against late blight, Phytophthora infestans, one of the world’s most damaging crop pathogens. The introgression of plant resistance genes from wild potato species targeted specifically to the late blight pathogen into susceptible

  6. Plant pathogen resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  7. Plant pathogen resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, Jean T.; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2015-10-20

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  8. The Goodpasture autoantigen. Structural delineation of two immunologically privileged epitopes on alpha3(IV) chain of type IV collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, R; Sun, M J; Hudson, B G; Neilson, E G

    1996-04-12

    antibody binding. In summary, our findings characterize two Goodpasture epitopes confined to each end of the alpha3 NC1 domain; one is lysine-dependent, and the other is not. We propose, as a hypothetical model, that these two immunologically privileged regions fold to form an optimal pathogenic structure within the NC1 domain of the alpha3 chain. These sites are subsequently concealed by NC1 hexamer assembly of type IV collagen.

  9. Increased expression of Siglec-1 on peripheral blood monocytes and its role in mononuclear cell reactivity to autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi-Song; Cheng, Yue; Lin, Qiu-Shui; Wu, Ai-Lin; Yu, Juan; Li, Chang; Sun, Yi; Zhong, Ren-Qian; Wu, Li-Juan

    2014-02-01

    Elevated expression of Siglec-1 on circulating monocytes has been reported in some inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, but its expression and role in RA has not been elucidated. The aims of this study were to determine the expression of Siglec-1 in peripheral blood and to explore its role in mononuclear cell reactivity to autoantigen in RA. Siglec-1 protein and mRNA levels in 42 RA patients, 39 OA patients, 28 SLE patients and 42 normal controls were determined by flow cytometry and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. In addition, 10 patients with active RA received DMARDs for 12 weeks and the frequencies of Siglec-1-positive cells and the 28-joint DAS (DAS28) were assessed before and after therapy. Furthermore, TNF-α, IFN-γ and type II collagen were used to up-regulate Siglec-1. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from different groups were stimulated with mitogens or antigens and cell proliferation and cytokine production were determined. The protein and mRNA levels of Siglec-1 on PBMCs and monocytes in RA patients were significantly higher than those in OA patients and healthy controls. Moreover, the expression of Siglec-1 protein on PBMCs was positively correlated with DAS28, ESR, high-sensitivity CRP and IgM-RF, but not with anti-CCP antibody. Interestingly, Siglec-1 expression was decreased in parallel with the decrease in the DAS28 after 12 weeks of anti-rheumatic treatment. Furthermore, TNF-α, IFN-γ and type II collagen can up-regulate Siglec-1 in PBMCs. Elevated PBMC proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine production to collagen stimulation in RA patients decreased when Siglec-1 was inhibited by anti-Siglec-1 antibodies. Elevated Siglec-1 expression in PBMCs and monocytes can potentially serve as a biomarker for monitoring disease activity in RA. Siglec-1 may also play a proinflammatory role in stimulating lymphocyte proliferation and activation in RA.

  10. Localization of two human autoantigen genes by PCR screening and in situ hybridization-glycyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 7p15 and Alanyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 16q22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.C.; Pai, S.I.; Liu, P. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Ge, Q.; Targoff, I.N. [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aminoacyl-RS) catalyze the attachment of an amino acid to its cognate tRNA. Five of 20 human aminoacyl-RS (histidyl-RS, threonyl-RS, isoleucyl-RS, glycyl-RS, and alanyl-RS) have been identified as targets of autoantibodies in the autoimmune disease polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM; 9). A sixth autoantigenic amino-acyl-RS, lysyl-RS, was recently reported. The genes for histidyl-RS and threonyl-RS have been assigned to chromosome 5, as have the genes for leucyl-RS and arginyl-RS. Six other aminoacyl-RS (glutamyl-prolyl-RS, valyl-RS, cysteinyl-RS, methionyl-RS, tryptophanyl-RS, and asparaginyl-RS) were assigned to chromosomes 1, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 18, respectively. The reason for a preponderance of aminoacyl-RS genes on chromosome 5 is unknown, but it has been suggested that regulatory relatedness might be a factor. Recently the entire or partial cDNA sequences for two autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS genes, glycyl-RS (gene symbol GARS; 4) and alanyl-RS (gene symbol AARS; 1), were reported. To understand further the genesis of autoimmune responses to aminoacyl-RS and to determine whether genes for autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS colocalize to chromosome 5, we have determined the chromosomal site of the GARS and AARS genes by PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid panels and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Least Wanted Foodborne Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Least Wanted Foodborne Pathogens The U.S. Public Health Service has identified the following microorganisms as being the biggest culprits of foodborne illness, either because of the severity of the ...

  12. T0 PATHOGENS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Crop Science Journal, Vol. ... Selection for durable resistance against such pathogens should consist ot' removing the ... major gene resistance has been overcome. .... a simple way. .... which causes either a change in the avirulence.

  13. Identification of the alpha 3 chain of type IV collagen as the common autoantigen in antibasement membrane disease and Goodpasture syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, R; Wilson, C B; Weber, M; Gunwar, S; Chonko, A M; Neilson, E G; Hudson, B G

    1995-10-01

    Antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies can cause glomerulonephritis or pulmonary hemorrhage by themselves or Goodpasture syndrome when they occur together. It is unknown if variations in antibody reactivity contribute to the different patterns of organ involvement seen in this disease. This study examines the reactivity of the alpha 1-alpha 6 NC1 domains of Type IV collagen, the putative autoantigen, in sera from patients with anti-GBM antibodies after various clinical presentations of lung hemorrhage and renal injury. Serum or plasma containing anti-GBM antibodies from 35 patients with combined glomerulonephritis and pulmonary hemorrhage, 19 with glomerulonephritis alone, and 4 with pulmonary hemorrhage alone were compared with samples from 19 normal controls and 32 patients with other kidney diseases. Four different immunologic assays were performed with bovine alpha 1-alpha 6(IV) and recombinant human type alpha 1-alpha 5(IV) collagen NC1 domains. The study found that the anti-GBM antibodies from all patients reacted with the alpha 3(IV) NC1 (85% exclusively). Additional limited reactivity with the alpha 1(IV) NC1 and alpha 4(IV) NC1 was found in 15 and 3%, respectively. This non-alpha 3(IV) NC1 reactivity was most frequent in the patients with anti-GBM antibodies and glomerulonephritis alone. None of the patients had reactivity to other basement membrane components like laminin, fibronectin, heparan sulfate proteoglycan, entactin, or the 7S and triple helical fragments of Type IV collagen. The observed alpha-chain NC1 reactivity was confined to patients with anti-GBM antibodies with no additional reactivities detected among a large number of other kidney diseases controls. The correlation of alpha 1-alpha 6(IV) NC1 reactivity in a large number of patients with anti-GBM antibodies defined by classic assays definitively establishes that reactivity to alpha 3(IV) NC1 domains is both sufficient and necessary for the expression of autoimmune disease

  14. Pancreatic beta cells express two autoantigenic forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase, a 65-kDa hydrophilic form and a 64-kDa amphiphilic form which can be both membrane-bound and soluble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, S; Schierbeck, H; Aanstoot, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 64-kDa pancreatic beta-cell autoantigen, which is a target of autoantibodies associated with early as well as progressive stages of beta-cell destruction, resulting in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) in humans, has been identified as the gamma-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme glutamic...... acid decarboxylase. We have identified two autoantigenic forms of this protein in rat pancreatic beta-cells, a Mr 65,000 (GAD65) hydrophilic and soluble form of pI 6.9-7.1 and a Mr 64,000 (GAD64) component of pI 6.7. GAD64 is more abundant than GAD65 and has three distinct forms with regard to cellular...... compartment and hydrophobicity. A major portion of GAD64 is hydrophobic and firmly membrane-anchored and can only be released from membrane fractions by detergent. A second portion is hydrophobic but soluble or of a low membrane avidity, and a third minor portion is soluble and hydrophilic. All the GAD64...

  15. Bioterrorism: pathogens as weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter D; Bokor, Gyula

    2012-10-01

    Biowarfare has been used for centuries. The use of biological weapons in terrorism remains a threat. Biological weapons include infectious agents (pathogens) and toxins. The most devastating bioterrorism scenario would be the airborne dispersal of pathogens over a concentrated population area. Characteristics that make a specific pathogen a high-risk for bioterrorism include a low infective dose, ability to be aerosolized, high contagiousness, and survival in a variety of environmental conditions. The most dangerous potential bioterrorism agents include the microorganisms that produce anthrax, plague, tularemia, and smallpox. Other diseases of interest to bioterrorism include brucellosis, glanders, melioidosis, Q fever, and viral encephalitis. Food safety and water safety threats are another area of concern.

  16. [Salmonella pathogenicity islands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sırıken, Belgin

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella species are facultative intracellular pathogenic bacteria. They can invade macrophages, dendritic and epithelial cells. The responsible virulence genes for invasion, survival, and extraintestinal spread are located in Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs). SPIs are thought to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Some of the SPIs are conserved throughout the Salmonella genus, and some of them are specific for certain serovars. There are differences between Salmonella serotypes in terms of adaptation to host cell, virulence factors and the resulting infection according to SPA presence and characteristics. The most important Salmonella virulence gene clusters are located in 12 pathogenicity islands. Virulence genes that are involved in the intestinal phase of infection are located in SPI-1 and SPI-2 and the remaining SPIs are required for intracellular survival, fimbrial expression, magnesium and iron uptake, multiple antibiotic resistance and the development of systemic infections. In addition SPIs, Sigma ss (RpoS) factors and adaptive acid tolerance response (ATR) are the other two important virulence factors. RpoS and ATR found in virulent Salmonella strains help the bacteria to survive under inappropriate conditions such as gastric acidity, bile salts, inadequate oxygen concentration, lack of nutrients, antimicrobial peptides, mucus and natural microbiota and also to live in phagosomes or phagolysosomes. This review article summarizes the data related to pathogenicity islands in Salmonella serotypes and some factors which play role in the regulation of virulence genes.

  17. Fungal pathogens of Proteaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crous, P.W.; Summerell, B.A.; Swart, L.; Denman, S.; Taylor, J.E.; Bezuidenhout, C.M.; Palm, M.E.; Marincowitz, S.; Groenewald, J.Z.

    2011-01-01

    Species of Leucadendron, Leucospermum and Protea (Proteaceae) are in high demand for the international floriculture market due to their brightly coloured and textured flowers or bracts. Fungal pathogens, however, create a serious problem in cultivating flawless blooms. The aim of the present study

  18. Fungal pathogens of Proteaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crous, P.W.; Summerell, B.A.; Swart, L.; Denman, S.; Taylor, J.E.; Bezuidenhout, C.M.; Palm, M.E.; Marincowitz, S.; Groenewald, J.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Species of Leucadendron, Leucospermum and Protea (Proteaceae) are in high demand for the international floriculture market due to their brightly coloured and textured flowers or bracts. Fungal pathogens, however, create a serious problem in cultivating flawless blooms. The aim of the present study

  19. Interaction between extracellular matrix molecules and microbial pathogens: the missing link in autoimmunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi eSofat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disease characterised by inflammation, tissue rebuilding and fibrosis. Inability by the body to regulate inflammation effectively is one of the hallmarks of RA. Interactions between the external environment and the human host play an important role in the development of autoimmunity. In RA, the observation of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA to autoantigens is well recognised. Citrullination is a post-translational modification mediated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PADs, which exist in both mammalian and bacterial forms. Previous studies have shown how proteins expressed in the human extracellular matrix (ECM acquire properties of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs in RA and include collagens, tenascin-C and fibronectin. ECM DAMPs can further potentiate tissue damage in RA. Recent work has shown that citrullination in RA occurs at mucosal sites, including the oral cavity and lung. Mucosal sites have been linked with bacterial infection e.g. periodontal disease, where exogenous pathogens are implicated in the development of autoimmunity via an infectious trigger. Here we explore how mucosal surfaces exposed to bacteria could trigger autoimmunity in RA.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes autophagy and apoptosis leading to cellular redistribution of the autoantigens Ro/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA) and La/SSB in salivary gland epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiougiannis, S; Tenta, R; Skopouli, F N

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in minor salivary glands, to investigate the interplay between ER stress-induced autophagy and apoptosis in human salivary gland (HSG) cells and to test the effect of ER stress-induced apoptosis on the cellular redistribution of the two major Sjögren's syndrome (SS) autoantigens Ro/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA) and La/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen B (SSB). Minor salivary gland biopsies from SS patients and sicca controls were examined by immunohistochemistry for the expression of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein/binding immunoglobulin protein (GRP78/BiP) as an indicator of unfolded protein response (UPR). HSG cells were treated with thapsigargin (TG) and cell viability, autophagy and apoptosis were assessed. Immunoblot was applied to detect the conversion of LC3I to LC3II and the protein levels of GRP78/BiP and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1). Apoptosis was evaluated by a single-stranded DNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ro/SSA and La/SSB localization was visualized using immunofluorescence. GRP78/BiP was expressed by acinar and ductal epithelial cells in salivary glands of patients and sicca controls. TG treatment induced autophagy, as indicated by enhanced protein expression of LC3II. The protein levels of UPR marker XBP-1 were increased after TG treatment, while GRP78/BiP levels were decreased. TG treatment resulted in induction of HSG apoptosis. Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantigens were localized predominantly to the cytoplasm in resting cells, while they were redistributed to cell membrane and blebs in the apoptotic cells. In conclusion, ER stress is activated in minor salivary gland epithelial cells from SS patients and controls. ER stress-induced apoptosis in HSG cells leads to cell surface and apoptotic blebs relocalization of Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantigens.

  1. 系统性红斑狼疮中内皮细胞相关自身抗原的鉴定%Identification of autoantigens associated with systemic lupus erythematosus from endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹毅; 吴乔; 牟芝蓉

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to identify new potential autoantigens associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Serum samples were collected from 27 SLE patients and 24 health donors. And IgG from serum was captured by Protein G Beads. Then the beads were washed and incubated with HUVEC lysate. The proteins which reacted with IgG-Beads were separated by immobilized pH gradient two -dimensional (2 -D) gel electrophoresis, and the unique protein spots in SLE patients group were identified by LC -MS -MS. We identified several proteins including known SLE autoantigen GAPDH, in which calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) was the first find to be involved in SLE. Furthermore, we also found that CASK antibody expression in SLE was significantly higher than that in health donor. From all the results, we presumed that CASK in HUVEC may be a new potential autoantigen in SLE. Systemic lupus erythematosus; Human umbilical vein endothelial cells; Calcium/calmodulin-%目的 在内皮细胞中筛选与系统性红斑狼疮(systemic lupus erythematosus,SLE)疾病相关的自身抗原.方法 用免疫沉淀法以SLE病人血清中自身抗体捕获人脐带内皮细胞(human umbilical vein endothelial cell,HUVEC)相关抗原,并用双向电泳法分离免疫沉淀产物,然后用LC-MS-MS串联质谱鉴定与SLE病人血清反应的蛋白点.最后用Western blot法验证部分鉴定蛋白.结果 相对于正常人血清对照,SLE病人血清捕获了多个内皮细胞相关蛋白,质谱鉴定结果 显示:通过免疫沉淀与双向电泳结合的方法 成功鉴定了包括GAPDH等已知SLE自身抗原在内的一系列蛋白,其中钙/钙调蛋白依赖性丝氨酸蛋白激酶(calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase,CASK)为新发现SLE候选自身抗原.并以重组人CASK蛋白证实SLE病人血清中CASK抗体水平显著高于正常人对照.结论 内皮细胞蛋白CASK可能作为一个新的SLE相关自身抗原.

  2. Plant Pathogenic Fungi and Oomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and Oomycetes are notorious plant pathogens and use similar strategies to infect plants. The majority of plants, however, is not infected by pathogens as they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors that mediate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) ,

  3. Plant Pathogenic Fungi and Oomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and Oomycetes are notorious plant pathogens and use similar strategies to infect plants. The majority of plants, however, is not infected by pathogens as they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors that mediate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) ,

  4. Assignment of two human autoantigen genes-isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 9q21 and lysyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 16q23-q24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.C.; Blinder, J.; Pai, S.I. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-15

    Protein synthesis is initiated by the attachment of amino acids to cognate tRNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). Five of twenty human aaRS (histidyl-RS, threonyl-RS, alanyl-RS, glycyl-RS, and isoleucyl-RS) have been identified as targets of autoantibodies in the autoimmune disease polymyositis/dermatomyositis. Autoantibodies to human lysyl-RS, a sixth autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS, were recently identified. The genes for histidyl-RS and threonyl-RS have been localized to chromosome 5, and we recently reported that the genes for alanyl-RS and glycyl-RS localize to chromosomes 16 and 7, respectively. To understand the genesis of autoimmune responses to aaRS better, we have used PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid panels and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to assign the genes for isoleucyl-RS and lysyl-RS. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  5. 风湿性心脏病自身抗原RHDAG1的获得与鉴定%Screening and identification of auto-antigen RHDAG1 of rheumatic heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟锦绣; 李运雄; 朱平; 李玲; 卢聪; 郑少忆; 李广华; 余细勇

    2011-01-01

    目的 探索用风湿性心脏病患者噬菌体表达文库构建和免疫筛选方法来研究风湿性心脏病的自身抗原候选分子.方法 提取风湿性瓣膜性心脏病患者心肌组织总RNA,分离纯化mRNA并逆转录合成长链cDNA,用噬菌体载体构建表达文库,用风湿热患者血清免疫筛选该库,对筛选获得的自身抗原基因进行鉴定、生物信息学分析、体外表达、Western blotting鉴定和免疫反应结合性分析.结果 成功构建了风湿性心脏病患者心脏组织噬菌体表达文库,原始文库滴度为3.3×106pfu/ml,重组率为99%,81%外源片段大于1 kb.通过免疫筛选方法获得了自身抗原RHDAG1,该自身抗原与人类角蛋白18同源,能与活动性风湿热患者血清和风湿性心脏病患者血清结合,而与体检健康人血清无结合.结论 构建噬菌体展示文库方法可以有效地用于筛选和获得风湿性心脏病患者自身抗原;本研究提示自身抗原RHDAG1可成为风湿热和威风心病的候选分子标志物.%Objective To identify the candidate auto-antigen of rheumatic heart disease as a molecular marker for this disease. Methods The total RNA of the heart tissue of patients with rheumatic heart disease was extracted and reverse-transcribed into long cDNA to construct the phage expression library. The library was screened using the serum from patients with active rheumatic fever, and the positive clone was identified and analyzed by bioinformatics and expressed in vitro. The expressed products were evaluated with Western blotting and its cross-reactivity was assessed. Results The phage expression library of the heart tissue of patients with rheumatic heart disease was constructed, with the titer of the primary library of 3.3x106 pfu/ml, recombinant rate of 99%, and 81% of the inserted segments were larger than 1 kb. An auto-antigen RHDAG1 was identified by screening, which was homologous to keratin 18. RHDAG1 was detected in the serum of

  6. Introduction to Pathogenic Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    1 1 Introduction Mary K. Klassen-Fischer and Ronald C. Neafie Introduction Protozoa Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic animals first dis...phylogeny of protozoa , see Table 1.1. A recent trend is to replace the term “ protozoa ” with “protista.” For these topics we retain “pro- tozoa” and...JUN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Introduction to Pathogenic Protozoa 5a. CONTRACT

  7. Characterization and expression of multiple alternatively spliced transcripts of the Goodpasture antigen gene region. Goodpasture antibodies recognize recombinant proteins representing the autoantigen and one of its alternative forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penadés, J R; Bernal, D; Revert, F; Johansson, C; Fresquet, V J; Cervera, J; Wieslander, J; Quinones, S; Saus, J

    1995-05-01

    Collagen IV, the major component of basement membranes, is composed of six distinct alpha chains (alpha 1-alpha 6). Atypically among the collagen IV genes, the exons encoding the carboxyl-terminal region of the human alpha 3(IV) chain undergo alternative splicing. This region has been designated as the Goodpasture antigen because of its reactivity in the kidney and lung with the pathogenic autoantibodies causing Goodpasture syndrome. The data presented in this report demonstrate that, in human kidney, the gene region encompassing the Goodpasture antigen generates at least six alternatively spliced transcripts predicting five distinct proteins that differ in their carboxyl-terminus and retain, except in one case, the exon that harbors the characteristic amino-terminus of the antigen. Goodpasture antibodies specifically recognize recombinant proteins representing the antigen and the alternative form that retains the amino-half of the antigen, suggesting that this moiety could be involved in the in vivo binding of the pathogenic antibodies. Furthermore, the sera of control individuals contain autoantibodies against the antigen that can be differentiated from those causing the syndrome based on their specific reactivities, suggesting that the binding of the pathogenic autoantibodies to a specific determinant likely trigger a distinct and unique cascade of events causing the disease.

  8. Pathogenic mycoflora on carrot seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Altogether 300 seed samples were collected during 9 years in 8 regions of Poland and the fungi Were isolated and their pathogenicity to carrot seedlings was examined. Alternaria rudicina provcd to be the most important pathogen although. A. alternata was more common. The other important pathogens were Fusarium spp., Phoma spp. and Botrytis cinerea. The infection of carrot seeds by A. radicina should be used as an important criterium in seed quality evaluation.

  9. Pathogenic mycoflora on carrot seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan Nowicki

    2013-01-01

    Altogether 300 seed samples were collected during 9 years in 8 regions of Poland and the fungi Were isolated and their pathogenicity to carrot seedlings was examined. Alternaria rudicina provcd to be the most important pathogen although. A. alternata was more common. The other important pathogens were Fusarium spp., Phoma spp. and Botrytis cinerea. The infection of carrot seeds by A. radicina should be used as an important criterium in seed quality evaluation.

  10. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection.

  11. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  12. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  13. USEPA PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE RETREAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pathogen Equivalency Committee held its retreat from September 20-21, 2005 at Hueston Woods State Park in College Corner, Ohio. This presentation will update the PEC’s membership on emerging pathogens, analytical methods, disinfection techniques, risk analysis, preparat...

  14. Proteomics of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerquist, Clifton K.

    This chapter is intended to be a relatively brief overview of proteomic techniques currently in use for the identification and analysis of microorganisms with a special emphasis on foodborne pathogens. The chapter is organized as follows. First, proteomic techniques are introduced and discussed. Second, proteomic applications are presented specifically as they relate to the identification and qualitative/quantitative analysis of foodborne pathogens.

  15. Molecular pathogenicity of Streptococcus anginosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asam, D; Spellerberg, B

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus anginosus and the closely related species Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius, are primarily commensals of the mucosa. The true pathogenic potential of this group has been under-recognized for a long time because of difficulties in correct species identification as well as the commensal nature of these species. In recent years, streptococci of the S. anginosus group have been increasingly found as relevant microbial pathogens in abscesses and blood cultures and they play a pathogenic role in cystic fibrosis. Several international studies have shown a surprisingly high frequency of infections caused by the S. anginosus group. Recent studies and a genome-wide comparative analysis suggested the presence of multiple putative virulence factors that are well-known from other streptococcal species. However, very little is known about the molecular basis of pathogenicity in these bacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge of pathogenicity factors and their regulation in S. anginosus.

  16. Genomics of clostridial pathogens: implication of extrachromosomal elements in pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Holger

    2005-10-01

    The recently decoded genomes of the major clostridial toxin-producing pathogens Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium tetani, Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium difficile have provided a huge amount of new sequence data. Recent studies have focused on the identification and investigation of pathogenic determinants and the regulatory events governing their expression. The sequence data revealed also the genomic background of virulence genes, as well as the contribution of extrachromosomal elements to a pathogenic phenotype. This has generated new insights in clostridial pathogenesis - and will continue to do so in the future - and has deepened our understanding of the anaerobic lifestyle of clostridial species.

  17. Transient virulence of emerging pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolker, Benjamin M; Nanda, Arjun; Shah, Dharmini

    2010-05-06

    Should emerging pathogens be unusually virulent? If so, why? Existing theories of virulence evolution based on a tradeoff between high transmission rates and long infectious periods imply that epidemic growth conditions will select for higher virulence, possibly leading to a transient peak in virulence near the beginning of an epidemic. This transient selection could lead to high virulence in emerging pathogens. Using a simple model of the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of emerging pathogens, along with rough estimates of parameters for pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, West Nile virus and myxomatosis, we estimated the potential magnitude and timing of such transient virulence peaks. Pathogens that are moderately evolvable, highly transmissible, and highly virulent at equilibrium could briefly double their virulence during an epidemic; thus, epidemic-phase selection could contribute significantly to the virulence of emerging pathogens. In order to further assess the potential significance of this mechanism, we bring together data from the literature for the shapes of tradeoff curves for several pathogens (myxomatosis, HIV, and a parasite of Daphnia) and the level of genetic variation for virulence for one (myxomatosis). We discuss the need for better data on tradeoff curves and genetic variance in order to evaluate the plausibility of various scenarios of virulence evolution.

  18. Ecological niche of plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Fodor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Disease ecology is a new approach to the understanding of the spread and dynamics of pathogens in natural and man-made environments. Defining and describing the ecological niche of the pathogens is one of the major tasks for ecological theory, as well as for practitioners preoccupied with the control and forecasting of established and emerging diseases. Niche theory has been periodically revised, not including in an explicit way the pathogens. However, many progresses have been achieved in niche modeling of disease spread, but few attempts were made to construct a theoretical frame for the ecological niche of pathogens. The paper is a review of the knowledge accumulated during last decades in the niche theory of pathogens and proposes an ecological approach in research. It quest for new control methods in what concerns forest plant pathogens, with a special emphasis on fungi like organisms of the genus Phytophthora. Species of Phytophthora are the most successful plant pathogens of the moment, affecting forest and agricultural systems worldwide, many of them being invasive alien organisms in many ecosystems. The hyperspace of their ecological niche is defined by hosts, environment and human interference, as main axes. To select most important variables within the hyperspace, is important for the understanding of the complex role of pathogens in the ecosystems as well as for control programs. Biotic relationships within ecosystem of host-pathogen couple are depicted by ecological network and specific metrics attached to this. The star shaped network is characterized by few high degree nodes, by short path lengths and relatively low connectivity, premises for a rapid disturbance spread.

  19. Ecological niche of plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Fodor

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Disease ecology is a new approach to the understanding of the spread and dynamics of pathogens in natural and man-made environments. Defining and describing the ecological niche of the pathogens is one of the major tasks for ecological theory, as well as for practitioners preoccupied with the control and forecasting of established and emerging diseases. Niche theory has been periodically revised, not including in an explicit way the pathogens. However, many progresses have been achieved in niche modeling of disease spread, but few attempts were made to construct a theoretical frame for the ecological niche of pathogens. The paper is a review of the knowledge accumulated during last decades in the niche theory of pathogens and proposes an ecological approach in research. It quest for new control methods in what concerns forest plant pathogens, with a special emphasis on fungi like organisms of the genus Phytophthora. Species of Phytophthora are the most successful plant pathogens of the moment, affecting forest and agricultural systems worldwide, many of them being invasive alien organisms in many ecosystems. The hyperspace of their ecological niche is defined by hosts, environment and human interference, as main axes. To select most important variables within the hyperspace, is important the understanding of the complex role of pathogens in the ecosystems as well as for control programs. Biotic relationships within ecosystem of host-pathogen couple are depicted by ecological network and specific metrics attached to this. The star shaped network is characterized by few high degree nodes, by short path lengths and relatively low connectivity, premises for a rapid disturbance spread. 

  20. Host Pathogen Relations: Exploring Animal Models for Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine G. Harwood

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic fungi cause superficial infections but pose a significant public health risk when infections spread to deeper tissues, such as the lung. Within the last three decades, fungi have been identified as the leading cause of nosocomial infections making them the focus of research. This review outlines the model systems such as the mouse, zebrafish larvae, flies, and nematodes, as well as ex vivo and in vitro systems available to study common fungal pathogens.

  1. Host pathogen relations: exploring animal models for fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Catherine G; Rao, Reeta P

    2014-06-30

    Pathogenic fungi cause superficial infections but pose a significant public health risk when infections spread to deeper tissues, such as the lung. Within the last three decades, fungi have been identified as the leading cause of nosocomial infections making them the focus of research. This review outlines the model systems such as the mouse, zebrafish larvae, flies, and nematodes, as well as ex vivo and in vitro systems available to study common fungal pathogens.

  2. Future research needs involving pathogens in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of groundwater by enteric pathogens has commonly been associated with disease outbreaks. Proper management and treatment of pathogen sources are important barriers to preventing groundwater contamination. However, non-point sources of pathogen contamination are frequently difficult to ...

  3. Pathogen detection using engineered bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartt, Abby E; Xu, Tingting; Jegier, Patricia; Carswell, Jessica J; Blount, Samuel A; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are bacterial viruses that can infect a broad or narrow range of host organisms. Knowing the host range of a phage allows it to be exploited in targeting various pathogens. Applying phages for the identification of microorganisms related to food and waterborne pathogens and pathogens of clinical significance to humans and animals has a long history, and there has to some extent been a recent revival in these applications as phages have become more extensively integrated into novel detection, identification, and monitoring technologies. Biotechnological and genetic engineering strategies applied to phages are responsible for some of these new methods, but even natural unmodified phages are widely applicable when paired with appropriate innovative detector platforms. This review highlights the use of phages as pathogen detector interfaces to provide the reader with an up-to-date inventory of phage-based biodetection strategies.

  4. Mucin dynamics and enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckin, Michael A; Lindén, Sara K; Sutton, Philip; Florin, Timothy H

    2011-04-01

    The extracellular secreted mucus and the cell surface glycocalyx prevent infection by the vast numbers of microorganisms that live in the healthy gut. Mucin glycoproteins are the major component of these barriers. In this Review, we describe the components of the secreted and cell surface mucosal barriers and the evidence that they form an effective barricade against potential pathogens. However, successful enteric pathogens have evolved strategies to circumvent these barriers. We discuss the interactions between enteric pathogens and mucins, and the mechanisms that these pathogens use to disrupt and avoid mucosal barriers. In addition, we describe dynamic alterations in the mucin barrier that are driven by host innate and adaptive immune responses to infection.

  5. Functional and pathogenic differences of Th1 and Th17 cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena S Domingues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is consensus that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE can be mediated by myelin specific T cells of Th1 as well as of Th17 phenotype, but the contribution of either subset to the pathogenic process has remained controversial. In this report, we compare functional differences and pathogenic potential of "monoclonal" T cell lines that recognize myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG with the same transgenic TCR but are distinguished by an IFN-γ producing Th1-like and IL-17 producing Th17-like cytokine signature. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CD4+ T cell lines were derived from the transgenic mouse strain 2D2, which expresses a TCR recognizing MOG peptide 35-55 in the context of I-A(b. Adoptive transfer of Th1 cells into lymphopenic (Rag2⁻/⁻ recipients, predominantly induced "classic" paralytic EAE, whereas Th17 cells mediated "atypical" ataxic EAE in approximately 50% of the recipient animals. Combination of Th1 and Th17 cells potentiated the encephalitogenicity inducing classical EAE exclusively. Th1 and Th17 mediated EAE lesions differed in their composition but not in their localization within the CNS. While Th1 lesions contained IFN-γ, but no IL-17 producing T cells, the T cells in Th17 lesions showed plasticity, substantially converting to IFN-γ producing Th1-like cells. Th1 and Th17 cells differed drastically by their lytic potential. Th1 but not Th17 cells lysed autoantigen presenting astrocytes and fibroblasts in vitro in a contact-dependent manner. In contrast, Th17 cells acquired cytotoxic potential only after antigenic stimulation and conversion to IFN-γ producing Th1 phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that both Th1 and Th17 lineages possess the ability to induce CNS autoimmunity but can function with complementary as well as differential pathogenic mechanisms. We propose that Th17-like cells producing IL-17 are required for the generation of atypical EAE whereas IFN-γ producing Th1 cells induce

  6. Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, A; Folta, P

    2006-07-27

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the

  7. Compositions and methods for pathogen transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Etr, Sahar; Farquar, George R.

    2016-01-26

    This disclosure provides a method for transporting a pathogen under ambient conditions, by culturing the pathogen with an amoeba under conditions that favor the incorporation of the pathogen into a trophozoite, starving the amoeba until it encysts, then culturing under conditions that favor conversion of the amoeba back to a trophozoite. In one aspect, the conditions that favor incorporation of the pathogen into the cyst of the amoeba comprises contacting the pathogen with the amoeba in an iron rich environment. Virus and/or bacteria are pathogens that can be transported by the disclosed method. Amoeba that are useful in the disclosed methods include, without limitation Acanthamoeba castellanii, Hartmannella vermiformis and Naegleria gruberi. The disclosed methods have utility in: transporting pathogens from military field hospitals and clinics to the laboratory; transporting pathogens from global satellite laboratories to clinical laboratories; long term storage of pathogens; enriching contaminated patient samples for pathogens of interest; biosurveillance and detection efforts.

  8. Metabolic traits of pathogenic streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenborg, Jörg; Goethe, Ralph

    2016-11-01

    Invasive and noninvasive diseases caused by facultative pathogenic streptococci depend on their equipment with virulence factors and on their ability to sense and adapt to changing nutrients in different host environments. The knowledge of the principal metabolic mechanisms which allow these bacteria to recognize and utilize nutrients in host habitats is a prerequisite for our understanding of streptococcal pathogenicity and the development of novel control strategies. This review aims to summarize and compare the central carbohydrate metabolic and amino acid biosynthetic pathways of a selected group of streptococcal species, all belonging to the naso-oropharyngeal microbiome in humans and/or animals. We also discuss the urgent need of comprehensive metabolomics approaches for a better understanding of the streptococcal metabolism during host-pathogen interaction. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Antigenic Variation in Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Guy H; Bankhead, Troy; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-02-01

    Antigenic variation is a strategy used by a broad diversity of microbial pathogens to persist within the mammalian host. Whereas viruses make use of a minimal proofreading capacity combined with large amounts of progeny to use random mutation for variant generation, antigenically variant bacteria have evolved mechanisms which use a stable genome, which aids in protecting the fitness of the progeny. Here, three well-characterized and highly antigenically variant bacterial pathogens are discussed: Anaplasma, Borrelia, and Neisseria. These three pathogens display a variety of mechanisms used to create the structural and antigenic variation needed for immune escape and long-term persistence. Intrahost antigenic variation is the focus; however, the role of these immune escape mechanisms at the population level is also presented.

  10. Acinetobacter: an underrated foodborne pathogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Angelo Maximo Batista de; Nascimento, Janaína Dos Santos

    2017-02-28

    The increasing prevalence of foodborne diseases observed in developing countries has been linked to a rise in the consumption of raw foods. However, unlike the classical pathogens that are commonly implicated in foodborne illnesses, members of the genus Acinetobacter are rarely associated with diarrheal disease, probably because of the difficulty in isolating these Gram-negative bacteria from food sources. Nevertheless, several species of Acinetobacter, especially A. baumannii, possess many of the characteristics associated with successful pathogens and exhibit a prodigious ability to acquire the multiple-drug resistance (MDR) phenotype. In this mini-review, we summarize the epidemiological data relating to MDR Acinetobacter and consider evidence suggesting that contaminated dairy products, along with raw fruit and vegetables, constitute extra-hospital reservoirs of this underrated pathogen, and may represent an increased risk to immunocompromised individuals and young children in healthcare settings.

  11. Infectious pathogens and bronchiolitis outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Camargo, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Bronchiolitis is a common early childhood illness and an important cause of morbidity, it is the number one cause of hospitalization among US infants. Bronchiolitis is also an active area of research, and recent studies have advanced our understanding of this illness. Although it has long been the conventional wisdom that the infectious etiology of bronchiolitis does not affect outcomes, a growing number of studies have linked specific pathogens of bronchiolitis (e.g., rhinovirus) to short- and long-term outcomes, such as future risk of developing asthma. The authors review the advent of molecular diagnostic techniques that have demonstrated diverse pathogens in bronchiolitis, and they review recent studies on the complex link between infectious pathogens of bronchiolitis and the development of childhood asthma.

  12. Pathogenicity of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. de Wit (Emmie); Y. Kawaoka (Yoshihiro); M.D. de Jong (Menno); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years, there has been an increase in outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in poultry. Occasionally, these outbreaks have resulted in transmission of influenza viruses to humans and other mammals, with symptoms ranging from conjunctivitis to pneumonia and death.

  13. New trends in emerging pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Niels

    2007-12-15

    The emergence of pathogens is the result of a number of impact in all parts of the food chain. The emerging technologies in food production explain how new pathogens can establish themselves in the food chain and compromise food safety. The impact of the food technology is analysed for several bacteria, such as Yersinia, Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter pullorum, Enterobacter sakazakii, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis, prions related to vCJD and others. The importance of the ability of many microbes to form VBNC forms is elaborated on. Research on culture independent methods may address this outstanding issue to the better understanding of emerging pathogens. The "demerging" of pathogens also occur, and examples of this are explained. The reaction of bacteria to stresses and sublethal treatments, and how exposure to one stress factor can confer resistance to other stresses, literally speaking causing contagious resistance, are explained. The implication of this e.g. in modern approaches of food preservation, such as Minimally processed Foods, is considerable. Intestinal colonization of EHEC may be regulated by Quorum sensing, and this ability of microbes plays an important role in the colonization of microbes in food and on food processing equipment, an important factor in the emergence of pathogens. The emergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as an opportunistic human pathogen, used for centuries for food and production of alcoholic beverages, calls for research in molecular tools to distinguish between probiotic and clinical strains. Cyclospora cayetanensis and Norovirus outbreaks can no longer be designated as emerging pathogens, they share however one characteristic in the epidemiology of emerging nature, the importance of the hygiene in the primary production stage, including supply of potable water, and the application of GMP and the HACCP principles in the beginning of the food chain. Hepatitis E virus is a potential emerging food borne

  14. Pathogen pollution and the emergence of a deadly amphibian pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Valerie J; Peterson, Anna C

    2012-11-01

    Imagine a single pathogen that is responsible for mass mortality of over a third of an entire vertebrate class. For example, if a single pathogen were causing the death, decline and extinction of 30% of mammal species (including humans), the entire world would be paying attention. This is what has been happening to the world's amphibians - the frogs, toads and salamanders that are affected by the chytrid fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (referred to as Bd), which are consequently declining at an alarming rate. It has aptly been described as the worst pathogen in history in terms of its effects on biodiversity (Kilpatrick et al. 2010). The pathogen was only formally described about 13 years ago (Longcore et al. 1999), and scientists are still in the process of determining where it came from and investigating the question: why now? Healthy debate has ensued as to whether Bd is a globally endemic organism that only recently started causing high mortality due to shifting host responses and/or environmental change (e.g. Pounds et al. 2006) or whether a virulent strain of the pathogen has rapidly disseminated around the world in recent decades, affecting new regions with a vengeance (e.g. Morehouse et al. 2003; Weldon et al. 2004; Lips et al. 2008). We are finally beginning to shed more light on this question, due to significant discoveries that have emerged as a result of intensive DNA-sequencing methods comparing Bd isolates from different amphibian species across the globe. Evidence is mounting that there is indeed a global panzootic lineage of Bd (BdGPL) in addition to what appear to be more localized endemic strains (Fisher et al. 2009; James et al. 2009; Farrer et al. 2011). Additionally, BdGPL appears to be a hypervirulent strain that has resulted from the hybridization of different Bd strains that came into contact in recent decades, and is now potentially replacing the less-virulent endemic strains of the pathogen (Farrer et al. 2011

  15. Biosignatures of Pathogen and Host

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitch, J P; Chromy, B A; Forde, C E; Garcia, E; Gardner, S N; Gu, P P; Kuczmarksi, T A; Melius, C F; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Milanovich, F P; Motin, V L; Ott, L L; Quong, A A; Quong, J N; Rocco, J M; Slezak, T R; Sokhansanj, B A; Vitalis, E A; Zemla, A T; McCready, P M

    2002-08-27

    In information theory, a signature is characterized by the information content as well as noise statistics of the communication channel. Biosignatures have analogous properties. A biosignature can be associated with a particular attribute of a pathogen or a host. However, the signature may be lost in backgrounds of similar or even identical signals from other sources. In this paper, we highlight statistical and signal processing challenges associated with identifying good biosignatures for pathogens in host and other environments. In some cases it may be possible to identify useful signatures of pathogens through indirect but amplified signals from the host. Discovery of these signatures requires new approaches to modeling and data interpretation. For environmental biosignal collections, it is possible to use signal processing techniques from other applications (e.g., synthetic aperture radar) to track the natural progression of microbes over large areas. We also present a computer-assisted approach to identify unique nucleic-acid based microbial signatures. Finally, an understanding of host-pathogen interactions will result in better detectors as well as opportunities in vaccines and therapeutics.

  16. Pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Run; Yang, Xia; Chen, Lu; Chang, Hong-tao; Liu, Hong-ying; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Xin-wei; Wang, Chuan-qing

    2014-01-01

    Shigellosis in chickens was first reported in 2004. This study aimed to determine the pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens and the possibility of cross-infection between humans and chickens. The pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens was examined via infection of three-day-old SPF chickens with Shigella strain ZD02 isolated from a human patient. The virulence and invasiveness were examined by infection of the chicken intestines and primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed Shigella can cause death via intraperitoneal injection in SPF chickens, but only induce depression via crop injection. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy revealed the Shigella can invade the intestinal epithelia. Immunohistochemistry of the primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells infected with Shigella showed the bacteria were internalized into the epithelial cells. Electron microscopy also confirmed that Shigella invaded primary chicken intestinal epithelia and was encapsulated by phagosome-like membranes. Our data demonstrate that Shigella can invade primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and chicken intestinal mucosa in vivo, resulting in pathogenicity and even death. The findings suggest Shigella isolated from human or chicken share similar pathogenicity as well as the possibility of human-poultry cross-infection, which is of public health significance.

  17. Pathogenic role of antiphospholipid antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, J. E.; de Groot, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is characterized by recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy in association with antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies. The pathogenic mechanisms in APS that lead to in vivo injury are incompletely understood. Recent evidence suggests that AP

  18. Pathogenicity of aseptic Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-hua; Ye, Jianren; Negi, Sapna; Xu, Xu-ling; Wang, Zhang-li; Ji, Jin-yi

    2012-01-01

    Pine wilt is a disease of pine (Pinus spp.) caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. However, the pathogenic mechanism of pine wilt disease (PWD) remains unclear. Although the PWN was thought to be the only pathogenic agent associated with this disease, a potential role for bacterial symbionts in the disease process was recently proposed. Studies have indicated that aseptic PWNs do not cause PWD in aseptic pine trees, while PWNs associated with bacteria cause wilting symptoms. To investigate the pathogenicity of the PWN and its associated bacteria, 3-month-old microcuttings derived from certain clones of Pinus densiflora Siebold & Zucc. produced in vitro were inoculated under aseptic conditions with aseptic PWNs, non-aseptic PWNs and bacteria isolated from the nematodes. Six-month-old aseptic P. densiflora microcuttings and 7-month-old P. massoniana seedlings were also inoculated under aseptic conditions with aseptic PWNs and non-aseptic PWNs. The results showed that the aseptic microcuttings and seedlings inoculated with aseptic PWNs or non-aseptic PWNs wilted, while those inoculated with bacterial isolates did not wilt. Nematodes were recovered from wilted microcuttings and seedlings inoculated with aseptic PWNs and non-aseptic PWNs, and the asepsis of nematodes recovered from aseptic PWN-inoculated microcuttings and seedlings was reconfirmed by culturing them in NB liquid medium at 30°C for more than 7 days. Taken together, the results indicate that the asepsis of PWN did not cause the loss of pathogenicity.

  19. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. The Evolution of Foodborne Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Ali, Galeb S.; Manning, Shannon D.

    Despite continuous advances in food safety and disease surveillance, control, and prevention, foodborne bacterial infections remain a major public health concern. Because foodborne pathogens are commonly exposed to multiple environmental stressors, such as low pH and antibiotics, most have evolved specific mechanisms to facilitate survival in adverse environments.

  1. Pathogenicity of aseptic Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-hua Zhu

    Full Text Available Pine wilt is a disease of pine (Pinus spp. caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. However, the pathogenic mechanism of pine wilt disease (PWD remains unclear. Although the PWN was thought to be the only pathogenic agent associated with this disease, a potential role for bacterial symbionts in the disease process was recently proposed. Studies have indicated that aseptic PWNs do not cause PWD in aseptic pine trees, while PWNs associated with bacteria cause wilting symptoms. To investigate the pathogenicity of the PWN and its associated bacteria, 3-month-old microcuttings derived from certain clones of Pinus densiflora Siebold & Zucc. produced in vitro were inoculated under aseptic conditions with aseptic PWNs, non-aseptic PWNs and bacteria isolated from the nematodes. Six-month-old aseptic P. densiflora microcuttings and 7-month-old P. massoniana seedlings were also inoculated under aseptic conditions with aseptic PWNs and non-aseptic PWNs. The results showed that the aseptic microcuttings and seedlings inoculated with aseptic PWNs or non-aseptic PWNs wilted, while those inoculated with bacterial isolates did not wilt. Nematodes were recovered from wilted microcuttings and seedlings inoculated with aseptic PWNs and non-aseptic PWNs, and the asepsis of nematodes recovered from aseptic PWN-inoculated microcuttings and seedlings was reconfirmed by culturing them in NB liquid medium at 30°C for more than 7 days. Taken together, the results indicate that the asepsis of PWN did not cause the loss of pathogenicity.

  2. Microbial Forensics and Plant Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    New awareness of the vulnerability of a nation's agricultural infrastructure to the intentional introduction of pathogens or pests has led to the enhancement of programs for prevention and preparedness. A necessary component of a balanced bio-security plan is the capability to determine whether an ...

  3. Pathogenicity, morphology, and differentiation of Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, N A

    2001-12-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is sight threatening corneal infection caused by pathogenic Acanthamoeba. Previous studies have shown the genotypic differences between pathogenic and non-pathogenic species/strains of Acanthamoeba. In this study, we examined the morphological differences between pathogenic and non-pathogenic species/strains using scanning electron microscopy. Pathogenic Acanthamoeba exhibited higher number of acanthopodia (structures associated with the binding of amoeba to the target cells) as compared to non-pathogens. In addition, interactions of amoeba with the corneal epithelial cells were studied. Only pathogenic amoeba exhibited adhesion to epithelial cells. Further results indicated that phagocytosis occurs in the pathogenic amoeba by the formation of amoebastome (characteristic of amoeba phagocyte). This study showed that Acanthamoeba phagocytosis may be both an efficient means of obtaining nutrients for the amoeba and a significant factor in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba infections.

  4. Neuroepigenetic regulation of pathogenic memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie E. Sillivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our unique collection of memories determines our individuality and shapes our future interactions with the world. Remarkable advances into the neurobiological basis of memory have identified key epigenetic mechanisms that support the stability of memory. Various forms of epigenetic regulation at the levels of DNA methylation, histone modification, and noncoding RNAs can modulate transcriptional and translational events required for memory processes. By changing the cellular profile in the brain’s emotional, reward, and memory circuits, these epigenetic modifications have also been linked to perseverant, pathogenic memories. In this review, we will delve into the relevance of epigenetic dysregulation to pathogenic memory mechanisms by focusing on 2 neuropsychiatric disorders perpetuated by aberrant memory associations: substance use disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. As our understanding improves, neuroepigenetic mechanisms may someday be harnessed to develop novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of these chronic, relapsing disorders.

  5. Bacteriophage biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Mustafa; Annapure, Uday S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacterial cells. Phages are categorized based on the type of their life cycle, the lytic cycle cause lysis of the bacterium with the release of multiple phage particles where as in lysogenic phase the phage DNA is incorporated into the bacterial genome. Lysogeny does not result in lysis of the host. Lytic phages have several potential applications in the food industry as biocontrol agents, biopreservatives and as tools for detecting pathogens. They have also been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics in animal health. Two unique features of phage relevant for food safety are that they are harmless to mammalian cells and high host specificity, keeping the natural microbiota undisturbed. However, the recent approval of bacteriophages as food additives has opened the discussion about 'edible viruses'. This article reviews in detail the application of phages for the control of foodborne pathogens in a process known as "biocontrol".

  6. Innate Defense against Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Rebecca A; Gaffen, Sarah L; Hise, Amy G; Brown, Gordon D

    2014-11-10

    Human fungal infections have been on the rise in recent years and proved increasingly difficult to treat as a result of the lack of diagnostics, effective antifungal therapies, and vaccines. Most pathogenic fungi do not cause disease unless there is a disturbance in immune homeostasis, which can be caused by modern medical interventions, disease-induced immunosuppression, and naturally occurring human mutations. The innate immune system is well equipped to recognize and destroy pathogenic fungi through specialized cells expressing a broad range of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This review will outline the cells and PRRs required for effective antifungal immunity, with a special focus on the major antifungal cytokine IL-17 and recently characterized antifungal inflammasomes.

  7. APDS: Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, R G; Brown, S; Burris, L; Colston, B; Jones, L; Makarewicz, T; Mariella, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Milanovich, F; Masarabadi, S; Venkateswaran, K; Marshall, G; Olson, D; Wolcott, D

    2002-02-14

    An early warning system to counter bioterrorism, the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) continuously monitors the environment for the presence of biological pathogens (e.g., anthrax) and once detected, it sounds an alarm much like a smoke detector warns of a fire. Long before September 11, 2001, this system was being developed to protect domestic venues and events including performing arts centers, mass transit systems, major sporting and entertainment events, and other high profile situations in which the public is at risk of becoming a target of bioterrorist attacks. Customizing off-the-shelf components and developing new components, a multidisciplinary team developed APDS, a stand-alone system for rapid, continuous monitoring of multiple airborne biological threat agents in the environment. The completely automated APDS samples the air, prepares fluid samples in-line, and performs two orthogonal tests: immunoassay and nucleic acid detection. When compared to competing technologies, APDS is unprecedented in terms of flexibility and system performance.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance of mastitis pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stephen P; Murinda, Shelton E

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotics are used extensively in the dairy industry to combat disease and to improve animal performance. Antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporin, streptomycin, and tetracycline are used for the treatment and prevention of diseases affecting dairy cows caused by a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Antibiotics are often administrated routinely to entire herds to prevent mastitis during the dry period. An increase in the incidence of disease in a herd generally results in increased use of antimicrobials, which in turn increases the potential for antibiotic residues in milk and the potential for increased bacterial resistance to antimicrobials. Continued use of antibiotics in the treatment and prevention of diseases of dairy cows will continue to be scrutinized. It is clear that strategies employing the prudent use of antimicrobials are needed. This clearly illustrates the importance of effective herd disease prevention and control programs. Based on studies published to date, scientific evidence does not support widespread, emerging resistance among mastitis pathogens to antibacterial drugs even though many of these antibiotics have been used in the dairy industry for treatment and prevention of disease for several decades. However, it is clear that use of antibiotics in dairy cows can contribute to increased antimicrobial resistance. While antimicrobial resistance does occur, we are of the opinion that the advantages of using antibiotics for the treatment of mastitis far outweigh the disadvantages. The clinical consequences of antimicrobial resistance of dairy pathogens affecting humans appear small. Antimicrobial resistance among dairy pathogens, particularly those found in milk, is likely not a human health concern as long as the milk is pasteurized. However, there are an increasing number of people who choose to consume raw milk. Transmission of an antimicrobial-resistant mastitis pathogen and/or foodborne pathogen to humans could occur

  9. The prevalence of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-16

    Apr 16, 2007 ... INTRODUCTION. Yersinia enterocolitica is emerging world wide as an ... significant food borne pathogen even though pathogenic isolates have seldom been .... The main risk factors for the morbidity and mortality of diarrhea ...

  10. Virulence Mechanisms of Enteroinvasive Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    enteroinvasive strain to initiate infection, it does abortion and death can also result from inges- not address other determinants of virulence. For tion of... abortions in domestic imal models have been used in the study of animals. Humans are the natural reservoirs of enteroinvasive pathogens. The ability of...clinical manifestation rier encountered by shigellae which are invad- is dysentery (36). These data suggest that an ing the colonic mucosa. The effectiveness

  11. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Thilo Martin

    Cautious optimism has arisen over recent decades with respect to the long struggle against bacteria, viruses, and parasites. This has been offset, however, by a fatal complacency stemming from previous successes such as the development of antimicrobial drugs, the eradication of smallpox, and global immunization programs. Infectious diseases nevertheless remain the world's leading cause of death, killing at least 17 million persons annually [61]. Diarrheal diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae or Shigella dysenteriae kill about 3 million persons every year, most of them young children: Another 4 million die of tuberculosis or tetanus. Outbreaks of diphtheria in Eastern Europe threatens the population with a disease that had previously seemed to be overcome. Efforts to control infectious diseases more comprehensively are undermined not only by socioeconomic conditions but also by the nature of the pathogenic organisms itself; some isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter have become so resistant to drugs by horizontal gene transfer that they are almost untreatable. In addition, the mechanism of genetic variability helps pathogens to evade the human immune system, thus compromising the development of powerful vaccines. Therefore detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity is absolutely necessary to develop new strategies against infectious diseases and thus to lower their impact on human health and social development.

  13. Emerging Food-borne Pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The epidemiology of foodborne diseases is changing. While in manydeveloping nations the efficient treatment of diarrhoeal diseases through oral rehydration has probably led to the prevention of many food related deaths, the underlying problems have not been solved. In these countries, the disease incidence of food-and waterborne disease is still increasing, and now data from other parts of the world indicate that new foodborne pathogens have emerged as important public health problems. Over the last two decades, bacterial infections caused by Campylobacter and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli have emerged, well-recognized pathogens, such as Salmonella enteritidis, have increased dramatically in disease incidence and important foodborne pathogens have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobial agents. The future strategy for prevention of foodborne disease should be founded in scientifically based evaluations of the whole food production chain ‘from farm to table’, including a description of the most important (risk) factors. Epidemiological studies of outbreaks as well as sporadic cases should be aimed at a better understanding of these factors. In terms of public health importance of the problem, the focus should be on the size of the problem, and the potential for improvement. The indications are that both in developed and developing countries there is significant potential for an improvement of the situation. With this aim in mind, international effort should focus on scientific assessments of the potential for risk reduction under different regional conditions.

  14. Emerging Food—borne pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JORGENSCHLUNDT

    2001-01-01

    The epidemiology of foodborne diseases is changing,While in many developing nations the efficient treatment of diarrhoeal diseases through oral rehydration has probably led to the prevention of many food related deaths,the underlying problems have not been solved.In these countries,the disease incidence of food-and waterborne disease is still increasing,and now data from other parts of the world indicate that new foodborne pathogens have emerged as important public health problems,Over the last two decades,bacterial infections caused by Campylobacter and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli have emerged,well-recognized pathogens.such as Salmonella enteritidis,have increased dramatically in disease incidence and important foodborne pathogens have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobial agents.The future strategy for prevention of foodborne disease should be founded in scienfifically based evaluations of the whole foor prodcution chain"from farm to table",including a description of the most important(risk) factors.Epidemiological studies of outbreaks as well as sporadic cases should be aimed at a better understanding of these factors.In terms of public health importance of the problem,the focus should be on the size of the problem,and the potential for improvement,The indications are that both in developed and developing countries there is significant potential for an improvement of the situation.With this aim in mind,international effort should focus on scientific assessments of the potential for risk reduction under different regional conditions.

  15. Programmed Pathogen Sense and Destroy Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-18

    detect the presence of pathogenic bacteria, report the identity of the pathogen with a coded output signal, and secrete specific bacteriocins /lysins...on the density of the pathogen. Figure 1. Fluorescence of receivers as a response to the pathogen density Bacteriocins are highly specific and...small portion (depending on the invasion dynamics) of the cells produces bacteriocins under stressful conditions, such as nutrient depletion

  16. [Cultivation of pathogenic free-living amoebae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Heng; Zhu, Huai-Min

    2009-08-01

    The isolation and culture of pathogenic free-living amoebae are useful in the diagnosis and research. This review focuses on the methods of isolation and cultivation of pathogenic free-living amoebae, including sample treatment, culture conditions, passage culture, pathogen detection, and maintenance.

  17. The making of a new pathogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stukenbrock, Eva; Bataillon, Thomas; Dutheil, Julien;

    2011-01-01

    affected M. graminicola to the highest extent, consistent with recent host specialization. Positive selection has prominently altered genes encoding secreted proteins and putative pathogen effectors supporting the premise that molecular host-pathogen interaction is a strong driver of pathogen evolution...

  18. Genetic variation and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt-Bergmans, van der C.J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a fungal pathogen of more than 200 hosts including a wide variety of economically important crops. Although many ecological and physiological studies on this destructive pathogen have been reported, not much is known about the molecular basis of the interaction of this pathogen w

  19. Epigenetic control of effectors in plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eGijzen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens display impressive versatility in adapting to host immune systems. Pathogen effector proteins facilitate disease but can become avirulence (Avr factors when the host acquires discrete recognition capabilities that trigger immunity. The mechanisms that lead to changes to pathogen Avr factors that enable escape from host immunity are diverse, and include epigenetic switches that allow for reuse or recycling of effectors. This perspective outlines possibilities of how epigenetic control of Avr effector gene expression may have arisen and persisted in plant pathogens, and how it presents special problems for diagnosis and detection of specific pathogen strains or pathotypes.

  20. Future research needs involving pathogens in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2017-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by enteric pathogens has commonly been associated with disease outbreaks. Proper management and treatment of pathogen sources are important prerequisites for preventing groundwater contamination. However, non-point sources of pathogen contamination are frequently difficult to identify, and existing approaches for pathogen detection are costly and only provide semi-quantitative information. Microbial indicators that are readily quantified often do not correlate with the presence of pathogens. Pathogens of emerging concern and increasing detections of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens in groundwater are topics of growing concern. Adequate removal of pathogens during soil passage is therefore critical for safe groundwater extraction. Processes that enhance pathogen transport (e.g., high velocity zones and preferential flow) and diminish pathogen removal (e.g., reversible retention and enhanced survival) are of special concern because they increase the risk of groundwater contamination, but are still incompletely understood. Improved theory and modeling tools are needed to analyze experimental data, test hypotheses, understand coupled processes and controlling mechanisms, predict spatial and/or temporal variability in model parameters and uncertainty in pathogen concentrations, assess risk, and develop mitigation and best management approaches to protect groundwater.

  1. Future research needs involving pathogens in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2016-12-01

    Contamination of groundwater by enteric pathogens has commonly been associated with disease outbreaks. Proper management and treatment of pathogen sources are important prerequisites for preventing groundwater contamination. However, non-point sources of pathogen contamination are frequently difficult to identify, and existing approaches for pathogen detection are costly and only provide semi-quantitative information. Microbial indicators that are readily quantified often do not correlate with the presence of pathogens. Pathogens of emerging concern and increasing detections of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens in groundwater are topics of growing concern. Adequate removal of pathogens during soil passage is therefore critical for safe groundwater extraction. Processes that enhance pathogen transport (e.g., high velocity zones and preferential flow) and diminish pathogen removal (e.g., reversible retention and enhanced survival) are of special concern because they increase the risk of groundwater contamination, but are still incompletely understood. Improved theory and modeling tools are needed to analyze experimental data, test hypotheses, understand coupled processes and controlling mechanisms, predict spatial and/or temporal variability in model parameters and uncertainty in pathogen concentrations, assess risk, and develop mitigation and best management approaches to protect groundwater.

  2. Future research needs involving pathogens in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2017-06-01

    Contamination of groundwater by enteric pathogens has commonly been associated with disease outbreaks. Proper management and treatment of pathogen sources are important prerequisites for preventing groundwater contamination. However, non-point sources of pathogen contamination are frequently difficult to identify, and existing approaches for pathogen detection are costly and only provide semi-quantitative information. Microbial indicators that are readily quantified often do not correlate with the presence of pathogens. Pathogens of emerging concern and increasing detections of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens in groundwater are topics of growing concern. Adequate removal of pathogens during soil passage is therefore critical for safe groundwater extraction. Processes that enhance pathogen transport (e.g., high velocity zones and preferential flow) and diminish pathogen removal (e.g., reversible retention and enhanced survival) are of special concern because they increase the risk of groundwater contamination, but are still incompletely understood. Improved theory and modeling tools are needed to analyze experimental data, test hypotheses, understand coupled processes and controlling mechanisms, predict spatial and/or temporal variability in model parameters and uncertainty in pathogen concentrations, assess risk, and develop mitigation and best management approaches to protect groundwater.

  3. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host.

  4. Nyctanthes arbortristis Against Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita G. Aggarwal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nature has provided a complete storehouse of knowledge of drug. Herbal drugs constitute a major part in all traditional systems of medicines. Since ancient times mankind has exploited nature for all kind of useful production and enjoyed the colors, flavors and fragrances of flowers, food etc. Rigveda, the book supplies curious information on this subject. Despite the importance of western medicines, towards the end of the 20th century there again began a revival of interest in traditional medicines not only in developing countries, but also in the developed countries. The resurgence of plant based medicine is mainly due to the increasing evidences of the health hazards associated with the indiscriminate use of the modern medicine such as antibiotic, steroids and other synthetic drug. The plants used in the traditional system of medicine of India and china are now receiving much scientific attention. With the continuous use of antibiotics, microorganisms have become resistant. So, it is necessary to evaluate, in a scientific base, the potential use of folk medicine for the treatment of infectious disease produced by common pathogens. Thus it was thought worthwhile to carry out the systematic chemical examination of Nyctanthes arbortristis. Studies had been conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of leaves of Nyctanthes arbortristis. It belongs to the family verbenaceae. The plant material was collected from herbal local nursery, and was stored for further studies. The different solvent extracts were prepared on the basis of polarity. Phytochemical analytical tests were carried out for preliminary investigation. Antimicrobial activities were evaluated using pathogenic microbes. The different solvent extracts of test material showed marked antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganism. The results showed that the test plant material was susceptible to different microorganism.

  5. [Pathogenicity and pneumococcal capsular genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E; García, P; López, R

    1994-01-01

    Pneumococci remain to be one of the most prominent human pathogens. Increasing efforts are being dedicated to the development of improved vaccines with wider specificity. Since a clear understanding of the genetics of capsular types in Streptococcus pneumoniae is missing, our efforts are oriented to characterize, at the molecular level, the genes involved in capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis. We have cloned and sequenced a chromosomal DNA fragment of a clinical isolate of type 3 pneumococcus and showed that it contains a type 3 specific gene as well as genes common to other serotypes.

  6. Molecular diagnostics of foodborne pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Trine

    of samples, an optimization of the total DNA extraction step was applied. Five different commercial available DNA extraction kits were evaluated and the MasterPure DNA Purification Kit was found to be suitable for the food and feed samples. The detection of B. cereusin food and feed samples was found...... or accidental contamination of food, feed and water supplies pose a threat to human health worldwide and the need for generic detection methods that can screen for many pathogens at the time are highly desirable. A metagenomics based direct 16S rDNA sequencing approach was evaluated as a diagnostic tool...

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Foodborne Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Brown, Eric; Knabel, Stephen J.

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the basic principles and advancements in the molecular epidemiology of foodborne pathogens. Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of infectious diseases and/or the dynamics of disease transmission. The goals of epidemiology include the identification of physical sources, routes of transmission of infectious agents, and distribution and relationships of different subgroups. Molecular epidemiology is the study of epidemiology at the molecular level. It has been defined as "a science that focuses on the contribution of potential genetic and environmental risk factors, identified at the molecular level, to the etiology, distribution and prevention of diseases within families and across populations".

  8. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzenitis, J M; Makarewicz, A J

    2009-01-13

    We developed, tested, and now operate a civilian biological defense capability that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) collects, prepares, reads, analyzes, and reports results of multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed PCR assays using Luminex{copyright} xMAP technology and flow cytometer. The mission we conduct is particularly demanding: continuous monitoring, multiple threat agents, high sensitivity, challenging environments, and ultimately extremely low false positive rates. Here, we introduce the mission requirements and metrics, show the system engineering and analysis framework, and describe the progress to date including early development and current status.

  9. Bacteriophage-Based Pathogen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Steven

    Considered the most abundant organism on Earth, at a population approaching 1031, bacteriophage, or phage for short, mediate interactions with myriad bacterial hosts that has for decades been exploited in phage typing schemes for signature identification of clinical, food-borne, and water-borne pathogens. With over 5,000 phage being morphologically characterized and grouped as to susceptible host, there exists an enormous cache of bacterial-specific sensors that has more recently been incorporated into novel bio-recognition assays with heightened sensitivity, specificity, and speed. These assays take many forms, ranging from straightforward visualization of labeled phage as they attach to their specific bacterial hosts to reporter phage that genetically deposit trackable signals within their bacterial hosts to the detection of progeny phage or other uniquely identifiable elements released from infected host cells. A comprehensive review of these and other phage-based detection assays, as directed towards the detection and monitoring of bacterial pathogens, will be provided in this chapter.

  10. Pathogenic mechanisms in centronuclear myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz eJungbluth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Centronuclear myopathies (CNMs are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited neuromuscular disorders characterized by clinical features of a congenital myopathy and abundant central nuclei as the most prominent histopathological feature. The most common forms of congenital myopathies with central nuclei have been attributed to X-linked recessive mutations in the MTM1 gene encoding myotubularin (X-linked myotubular myopathy, XLMTM, autosomal-dominant mutations in the DNM2 gene encoding dynamin-2 and the BIN1 gene encoding amphiphysin-2 (also named bridging integrator-1, BIN1, or SH3P9, and autosomal-recessive mutations in BIN1, the RYR1 gene encoding the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor, and the TTN gene encoding titin. Models to study and rescue the affected cellular pathways are now available in yeast, C. elegans, drosophila, zebrafish, mouse and dog. Defects in membrane trafficking have emerged as a key pathogenic mechanisms, with aberrant T-tubule formation, abnormalities of triadic assembly and disturbance of the excitation-contraction machinery the main downstream effects studied to date. Abnormal autophagy has recently been recognized as another important collateral of defective membrane trafficking in different genetic forms of CNM, suggesting an intriguing link to primary disorders of defective autophagy with overlapping histopathological features.The following review will provide an overview of clinical, histopathological and genetic aspects of the CNMs in the context of the key pathogenic mechanism, outline unresolved questions and indicate promising future lines of enquiry.

  11. Why is HIV a pathogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Anna; Weiss, Robin A

    2008-12-01

    The pathogenesis of HIV begins with a profound depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gut followed by a long period of clinically silent but dynamic virus replication and diversification with high host cell turnover before the onset of AIDS. The AIDS-defining opportunistic infections and tumors mark the end-point of a long balancing act between virus and host that occurs when CD4+ T cell numbers fall below a level that can sustain immunity. Comparative studies of lentivirus infections in other species show that AIDS is not an inevitable outcome of infection because simian immunodeficiency virus in natural hosts seldom causes disease. What distinguishes pathogenic from 'passenger' infection is a systemic activation of immune responses followed by destruction of the integrity of lymphoid follicles. Macrophage and dendritic cell infection also contribute to pathogenesis. Maedi-Visna virus infection in sheep, which targets these cells but not T lymphocytes, also leads to progressive disease and death that resembles the wasting and brain diseases of HIV without the T cell immunodeficiency. Thus, lessons from pathogenic and nonpathogenic lentivirus infections provide insight into the complex syndrome called AIDS.

  12. [Arcobacter: a foodborne emerging pathogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Gerardo; Arias, Maria Laura; Fernández, Heriberto

    2013-06-01

    In the last three decades, several emergent diseases affecting human beings have been identified, most of them from infectious origin including bacterial, viral, parasitic and even difficult to classify as spongiform encephalopathy. Most of these are zoonotic as it is the case of Arcobacter, currently considered as an emerging and food borne pathogen, of growing importance for public health. The increase in the prevalence and incidence of cases associated to this bacteria as well as in the number of actual researches and reports, suggest that the infection in human beings and animals has been underestimated due to a lack in knowledge about this bacteria and of a standardized isolation protocols, as well as the use of correct identification methods and techniques. Increasing trends in the isolation of Arcobacter from animal derivates used as food and from samples taken during production processes, cause an augment in public health awareness, since there is little knowledge about the pathogenic potential of Arcobacter species and the few focused in this bacterial group, show many different transmission routes and host species. Given this, the objective of the present review is to actualize the reader in the most important characteristics of this bacterium, including its morphology, distribution, classification, transmission, association with water, food, pets and animals, as well as the laboratory isolation techniques, virulence factors and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns.

  13. Pathogen evolution and the immunological niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobey, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    Host immunity is a major driver of pathogen evolution and thus a major determinant of pathogen diversity. Explanations for pathogen diversity traditionally assume simple interactions between pathogens and the immune system, a view encapsulated by the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. However, there is growing evidence that the complexity of many host-pathogen interactions is dynamically important. This revised perspective requires broadening the definition of a pathogen's immunological phenotype, or what can be thought of as its immunological niche. After reviewing evidence that interactions between pathogens and host immunity drive much of pathogen evolution, I introduce the concept of a pathogen's immunological phenotype. Models that depart from the SIR paradigm demonstrate the utility of this perspective and show that it is particularly useful in understanding vaccine-induced evolution. This paper highlights questions in immunology, evolution, and ecology that must be answered to advance theories of pathogen diversity. © 2014 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Potentially pathogenic, pathogenic, and allergenic moulds in the urban soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Dragutin A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of soil mould populations that can compromise the human immune system was evaluated in experimental plots located at different distances (100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 m from the main source of pollution - the Podgorica Aluminum Plant. Soil samples were collected in July and October 2008 from three different plot zones at a depth of 0-10 cm. The count of potentially pathogenic, keratinolytic and allergenic (melaninogenic moulds was assessed, which can significantly contribute to both diagnosis and prophylaxis. The count of medically important moulds was higher in the urban soil than in the unpolluted (control soil. Their count decreased with increasing distance from the main pollution source (PAP. Their abundance in the soil was considerably higher in autumn than in spring.

  15. Comparative Pathogenicity of United Kingdom Isolates of the Emerging Pathogen Candida auris and Other Key Pathogenic Candida Species

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida auris, first described in 2009, has since emerged as an important, multidrug-resistant, nosocomial agent of candidemia, with large outbreaks reported worldwide and high mortality rates associated with therapeutic failure. The current study employed C. auris isolates from a variety of centers in the United Kingdom to evaluate the pathogenicity of this emerging pathogen compared to that of other common pathogenic yeast species in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella infection m...

  16. Mucosal immunity to pathogenic intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Behnsen, Judith; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly dynamic environment in which the host constantly interacts with trillions of commensal microorganisms, known as the microbiota, and periodically interacts with pathogens of diverse nature. In this Review, we discuss how mucosal immunity is controlled in response to enteric bacterial pathogens, with a focus on the species that cause morbidity and mortality in humans. We explain how the microbiota can shape the immune response to pathogenic bacteria, and we detail innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that drive protective immunity against these pathogens. The vast diversity of the microbiota, pathogens and immune responses encountered in the intestines precludes discussion of all of the relevant players in this Review. Instead, we aim to provide a representative overview of how the intestinal immune system responds to pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Plants versus pathogens: an evolutionary arms race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jonathan P; Gleason, Cynthia A; Foley, Rhonda C; Thrall, Peter H; Burdon, Jeremy B; Singh, Karam B

    2010-05-20

    The analysis of plant-pathogen interactions is a rapidly moving research field and one that is very important for productive agricultural systems. The focus of this review is on the evolution of plant defence responses and the coevolution of their pathogens, primarily from a molecular-genetic perspective. It explores the evolution of the major types of plant defence responses including pathogen associated molecular patterns and effector triggered immunity as well as the forces driving pathogen evolution, such as the mechanisms by which pathogen lineages and species evolve. Advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling, stomatal regulation, R gene-effector interactions and host specific toxins are used to highlight recent insights into the coevolutionary arms race between pathogens and plants. Finally, the review considers the intriguing question of how plants have evolved the ability to distinguish friends such as rhizobia and mycorrhiza from their many foes.

  18. Plant and pathogen nutrient acquisition strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima, Urooj; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2015-01-01

    Nutrients are indispensable elements required for the growth of all living organisms including plants and pathogens. Phyllosphere, rhizosphere, apoplast, phloem, xylem, and cell organelles are the nutrient niches in plants that are the target of bacterial pathogens. Depending upon nutrients availability, the pathogen adapts various acquisition strategies and inhabits the specific niche. In this review, we discuss the nutrient composition of different niches in plants, the mechanisms involved ...

  19. Divergent and Convergent Evolution of Fungal Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yanfang; Xiao, Guohua; Zheng, Peng; Cen, Kai; Zhan, Shuai; Wang, Chengshu

    2016-05-12

    Fungal pathogens of plants and animals have multifarious effects; they cause devastating damages to agricultures, lead to life-threatening diseases in humans, or induce beneficial effects by reducing insect pest populations. Many virulence factors have been determined in different fungal pathogens; however, the molecular determinants contributing to fungal host selection and adaptation are largely unknown. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of seven ascomycete insect pathogens and performed the genome-wide analyses of 33 species of filamentous ascomycete pathogenic fungi that infect insects (12 species), plants (12), and humans (9). Our results revealed that the genomes of plant pathogens encode more proteins and protein families than the insect and human pathogens. Unexpectedly, more common orthologous protein groups are shared between the insect and plant pathogens than between the two animal group pathogens. We also found that the pathogenicity of host-adapted fungi evolved multiple times, and that both divergent and convergent evolutions occurred during pathogen-host cospeciation thus resulting in protein families with similar features in each fungal group. However, the role of phylogenetic relatedness on the evolution of protein families and therefore pathotype formation could not be ruled out due to the effect of common ancestry. The evolutionary correlation analyses led to the identification of different protein families that correlated with alternate pathotypes. Particularly, the effector-like proteins identified in plant and animal pathogens were strongly linked to fungal host adaptation, suggesting the existence of similar gene-for-gene relationships in fungus-animal interactions that has not been established before. These results well advance our understanding of the evolution of fungal pathogenicity and the factors that contribute to fungal pathotype formation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  20. Antibody-based resistance to plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillberg, S; Zimmermann, S; Zhang, M Y; Fischer, R

    2001-01-01

    Plant diseases are a major threat to the world food supply, as up to 15% of production is lost to pathogens. In the past, disease control and the generation of resistant plant lines protected against viral, bacterial or fungal pathogens, was achieved using conventional breeding based on crossings, mutant screenings and backcrossing. Many approaches in this field have failed or the resistance obtained has been rapidly broken by the pathogens. Recent advances in molecular biotechnology have made it possible to obtain and to modify genes that are useful for generating disease resistant crops. Several strategies, including expression of pathogen-derived sequences or anti-pathogenic agents, have been developed to engineer improved pathogen resistance in transgenic plants. Antibody-based resistance is a novel strategy for generating transgenic plants resistant to pathogens. Decades ago it was shown that polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies can neutralize viruses, bacteria and selected fungi. This approach has been improved recently by the development of recombinant antibodies (rAbs). Crop resistance can be engineered by the expression of pathogen-specific antibodies, antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins. The advantages of this approach are that rAbs can be engineered against almost any target molecule, and it has been demonstrated that expression of functional pathogen-specific rAbs in plants confers effective pathogen protection. The efficacy of antibody-based resistance was first shown for plant viruses and its application to other plant pathogens is becoming more established. However, successful use of antibodies to generate plant pathogen resistance relies on appropriate target selection, careful antibody design, efficient antibody expression, stability and targeting to appropriate cellular compartments.

  1. Peptide Antibiotics for ESKAPE Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thomas Thyge

    Multi-drug resistance to antibiotics represents a global health challenge that results in increased morbidity and mortality rates. The annual death-toll is >700.000 people world-wide, rising to ~10 million by 2050. New antibiotics are lacking, and few are under development as return on investment...... is considered poor compared to medicines for lifestyle diseases. According to the WHO we could be moving towards a post-antibiotic era in which previously treatable infections become fatal. Of special importance are multidrug resistant bacteria from the ESKAPE group (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus...... and toxicity by utilizing of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a whole animal model. This was carried out by testing of antimicrobial peptides targeting Gram-positive bacteria exemplified by the important human pathogen methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The peptide BP214 was developed from...

  2. The Candida Pathogenic Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Siobhán A.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida species are the most common causes of fungal infection. Approximately 90% of infections are caused by five species: Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei. Three (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis) belong to the CTG clade, in which the CTG codon is translated as serine and not leucine. C. albicans remains the most commonly isolated but is decreasing relative to the other species. The increasing incidence of C. glabrata is related to its reduced susceptibility to azole drugs. Genome analysis suggests that virulence in the CTG clade is associated with expansion of gene families, particularly of cell wall genes. Similar independent processes took place in the C. glabrata species group. Gene loss and expansion in an ancestor of C. glabrata may have resulted in preadaptations that enabled pathogenicity. PMID:25183855

  3. Insights into Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Gustavo M; Peleg, Anton Y

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter spp. have justifiably received significant attention from the public, scientific, and medical communities. Over recent years, Acinetobacter, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii, has become a "red-alert" human pathogen, primarily because of its exceptional ability to develop resistance to all currently available antibiotics. This characteristic is compounded by its unique abilities to survive in a diverse range of environments, including those within healthcare institutions, leading to problematic outbreaks. Historically, the virulence of the organism has been questioned, but recent clinical reports suggest that Acinetobacter can cause serious, life-threatening infections. Furthermore, its metabolic adaptability gives it a selective advantage in harsh hospital environments. This review focuses on current understanding of A. baumannii pathogenesis and the model systems used to study this interesting organism.

  4. Molecular detection of foodborne pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann

    of these pathogens in the food chain, in order to improve intervention strategies and make more effective the control of production lines and single food items. To serve this purpose, rapid and reliable detection and quantification methods are imperative. The culture-based standard methods currently applied...... for detection and enumeration of Salmonella and Campylobacter are time-consuming and laborious. They lack specificity and do not enable detection of viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacteria. The focus of the present thesis has been development and validation of PCR-based detection methods for Salmonella...... and Campylobacter. A conventional PCR-based method for detection of Campylobacter in chicken carcass rinse following 20 h of enrichment in Bolton broth was successfully compared to the ISO standard culture-based method (10272) on 68 naturally infected chickens. The method was subsequently validated on artificially...

  5. Pathogenic diversity of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégraud, F

    1997-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been shown to possess a very heterogeneous genoma despite its common phenotypic properties. Some characteristics relevant to pathogenesis have also been found to be heterogeneous. This is the case for adherence properties and the amount of urease produced, but it was not possible to relate these properties to disease entities. A vacuolating cytotoxin which alters epithelial cells has been found in about 60% of strains isolated from patients with ulcers versus 30% from those with gastritis only. The cagA gene can be used as a marker to detect the cag pathogenicity island. This DNA fragment seems to induce an increased inflammation in the gastric tissue via release of interleukin 8 by the epithelial cells. The association of this marker is strongly linked with ulcers compared with gastritis only (80% vs 55%, respectively). A number of other properties may be heterogeneous, but the low number of strains studied does not allow conclusions to be drawn.

  6. 抗细胞核自身抗原精子蛋白的抗体具有抗生育效果%The antibody against a nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein can result in reproductive failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Jian-Li Shi; Guo-Yan Cheng; Yan-Qing Hu; Chen Xu

    2009-01-01

    为了研究抗睾丸型细胞核自身抗原精子蛋白(tNASP)的抗体是否会影响生育,我们成功克隆表达了一段339 bp小鼠睾丸型细胞核自身抗原精子蛋白(mtNASP)的cDNA.本实验以小鼠为动物模型,着重研究重组mtNASP蛋白和合成肽htNASP393-408(人睾丸型细胞核自身抗原精子蛋白第393-408氨基酸序列)的抗生育效果.用mtNASP和htNASP393-408分别主动免疫小鼠,二者都能在小鼠体内产生高效价的抗体.然后用8-10周龄的小鼠进行精卵结合和精卵融合实验.结果显示在不同浓度的抗mtNASP抗体存在下,小鼠卵子与获能精子的精卵结合能力以及去透明带小鼠卵子和获能精子的精卵融合能力都有明显下降.分别免疫重组mtNASP蛋白和htNASP393-408合成肽的小鼠也都能产生明显的抗生育效果,而且用合成肽免疫的小鼠其抗生育效果是可逆的.我们的实验数据表明,用重组的mtNASP蛋白进行免疫可以产生很强的抗体反应并且抑制小鼠生育.%To study whether the antibody against the testis form of the nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (tNASP) could result in reproductive failure, we successfully cloned and expressed a 339-bp cDNA fragment of mouse tNASP (mtNASP). Using mouse as a model, recombinant mtNASP (rmtNASP) and a synthetic peptide, human tNASP393-408 (htNASP393-408), were investigated for their antifertility effect. Active immunization with rmtNASP or the synthesized peptide raised high antibody titers in the immunized mice. Sperm-egg binding and fusion assay were carried out in 8-10-week-old BALB/c mice. Sperm-egg binding and in vitro fertilization of mouse oocytes were inhibited by co-incubation of zona-free mouse oocytes with capacitated mouse spermatozoa in the presence of varying concentrations of the antisera against rmtNASP. There was a significant antifertility effect in animals immunized with rmtNASP or the synthesized peptide. The effect on fertility in the mice immunized

  7. Cloning and Sequencing of cDNA Encoding Islet Cell Autoantigen 69kD Protein from Chinese%国人 ICA69 基因 cDNA 的克隆及序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: It is reported that cDNA encoding human islet cell autoantigen 69kD protein (hiICA69) has been cloned, so to confirm the nucleotide sequences from the insulinoma cells of Chinese. Methods: cDNA encoding hiICA69 has been amplificated by PCR, from the cDNA library of Chinese insulinoma cells. The PCR product was inserted into the pSPORT 1 vector, and was subcloned into the pUC18 plasmid. After the positive colony was screened by the blue/white colony and the restriction analysis, the nucleotide sequences of the full - length cDNA were analysed by means of the dideoxy chain termination method. Resalts: The results showed that the amplified fragment contained 1449bp, encoded 483 - amino acids. For the sequencing analysis of ICA69 gene from the insulinoma in Mongolian race, the nucleotide sequence of the recombinant was coincident with that reported by Miyazaki and that from EMBL data's bank in addition to one difference of only base on the codon. The change located in the 416th base (A→T), which led to the change of one amino acid (Gln→Leu) . Conclusion: The gene obtained by the method of gene engineering and identified by means of sequence analysis would be able to lay a foundation for follow - up research.%目的:克隆国人胰岛细胞自身抗原 69kD 蛋白基因 ( hiICA69 ) 并经序列分析予以确证。方法:采用聚合酶链式反应技术,从中国人胰岛细胞瘤 cDNA 文库中扩增出 hiICA69 编码序列cDNA,将基因片段插入 pSPORT 1 质粒,进一步亚克隆到 pUCl8 载体中,经蓝白斑和限制性酶谱分析得以初步筛选后,双脱氧末端终止法对其全部核苷酸序列予以确定。结果:证实了 hiICA69 基因全长为 1449bp、编码 483 个氨基酸。与 pietropaolo 等报道的序列比较,仅在编码第 139 位氨基酸的密码子由 CAA→CTA,即由谷氨酰胺→亮氨酸,其余均与文献报道和 EMBL 核酸数据库提供的序列相同。结论:这一基因的获得和

  8. Dietary cholesterol modulates pathogen blocking by Wolbachia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric P Caragata

    Full Text Available The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis protects its hosts from a range of pathogens by limiting their ability to form infections inside the insect. This "pathogen blocking" could be explained by innate immune priming by the symbiont, competition for host-derived resources between pathogens and Wolbachia, or the direct modification of the cell or cellular environment by Wolbachia. Recent comparative work in Drosophila and the mosquito Aedes aegypti has shown that an immune response is not required for pathogen blocking, implying that there must be an additional component to the mechanism. Here we have examined the involvement of cholesterol in pathogen blocking using a system of dietary manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster in combination with challenge by Drosophila C virus (DCV, a common fly pathogen. We observed that flies reared on cholesterol-enriched diets infected with the Wolbachia strains wMelPop and wMelCS exhibited reduced pathogen blocking, with viral-induced mortality occurring 2-5 days earlier than flies reared on Standard diet. This shift toward greater virulence in the presence of cholesterol also corresponded to higher viral copy numbers in the host. Interestingly, an increase in dietary cholesterol did not have an effect on Wolbachia density except in one case, but this did not directly affect the strength of pathogen blocking. Our results indicate that host cholesterol levels are involved with the ability of Wolbachia-infected flies to resist DCV infections, suggesting that cholesterol contributes to the underlying mechanism of pathogen blocking.

  9. Coevolutionary immune system dynamics driving pathogen speciation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly J Schlesinger

    Full Text Available We introduce and analyze a within-host dynamical model of the coevolution between rapidly mutating pathogens and the adaptive immune response. Pathogen mutation and a homeostatic constraint on lymphocytes both play a role in allowing the development of chronic infection, rather than quick pathogen clearance. The dynamics of these chronic infections display emergent structure, including branching patterns corresponding to asexual pathogen speciation, which is fundamentally driven by the coevolutionary interaction. Over time, continued branching creates an increasingly fragile immune system, and leads to the eventual catastrophic loss of immune control.

  10. Sumoylation at the Host-Pathogen Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van G. Wilson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Many viral proteins have been shown to be sumoylated with corresponding regulatory effects on their protein function, indicating that this host cell modification process is widely exploited by viral pathogens to control viral activity. In addition to using sumoylation to regulate their own proteins, several viral pathogens have been shown to modulate overall host sumoylation levels. Given the large number of cellular targets for SUMO addition and the breadth of critical cellular processes that are regulated via sumoylation, viral modulation of overall sumoylation presumably alters the cellular environment to ensure that it is favorable for viral reproduction and/or persistence. Like some viruses, certain bacterial plant pathogens also target the sumoylation system, usually decreasing sumoylation to disrupt host anti-pathogen responses. The recent demonstration that Listeria monocytogenes also disrupts host sumoylation, and that this is required for efficient infection, extends the plant pathogen observations to a human pathogen and suggests that pathogen modulation of host sumoylation may be more widespread than previously appreciated. This review will focus on recent aspects of how pathogens modulate the host sumoylation system and how this benefits the pathogen.

  11. Centrality in the host-pathogen interactome is associated with pathogen fitness during infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crua Asensio, Núria; Muñoz Giner, Elisabet; de Groot, Natalia Sánchez; Torrent Burgas, Marc

    2017-01-01

    To perform their functions proteins must interact with each other, but how these interactions influence bacterial infection remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that connectivity in the host-pathogen interactome is directly related to pathogen fitness during infection. Using Y. pestis as a model organism, we show that the centrality-lethality rule holds for pathogen fitness during infection but only when the host-pathogen interactome is considered. Our results suggest that the importance of pathogen proteins during infection is directly related to their number of interactions with the host. We also show that pathogen proteins causing an extensive rewiring of the host interactome have a higher impact in pathogen fitness during infection. Hence, we conclude that hubs in the host-pathogen interactome should be explored as promising targets for antimicrobial drug design.

  12. Digital PCR for detection of citrus pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus trees are often infected with multiple pathogens of economic importance, especially those with insect or mite vectors. Real-time/quantitative PCR (qPCR) has been used for high-throughput detection and relative quantification of pathogens; however, target reference or standards are required. I...

  13. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal... products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The... vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype of...

  14. Arthropods vector grapevine trunk disease pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, P; Allsopp, E; Roets, F; Mostert, L; Halleen, F

    2014-10-01

    Arthropod-mediated dispersal of pathogens is known in many cropping systems but has never been demonstrated for grapevine trunk disease pathogens. Arthropods from vineyards were screened for the presence of pathogens associated with Petri disease and esca using cultural and molecular techniques. The ability of the most abundant pathogen-carrying species to inoculate healthy grapevine vascular tissues was also determined. Millipedes and ants were allowed to associate with a DsRed- Express-transformed Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, after which they were exposed to freshly pruned healthy grapevines under controlled conditions and wounds were monitored for subsequent infection. In addition, the possibility of millipede excreta, commonly found on pruning wounds in the field, to act as inoculum source was determined. A diverse arthropod fauna was associated with declining grapevines and many of these carried trunk disease pathogens. However, spiders, the ant Crematogaster peringueyi, and the millipede Ommattoiulus moreleti were the most abundant pathogen carriers. The ant and millipede species fed on pruning wound sap and effectively transmitted trunk disease pathogens. Millipede excreta contained viable spores of Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and may serve as an inoculum source. Numerous arthropods, including beneficial predators, are potential vectors of grapevine trunk disease pathogens. Our results highlight the need for an integrated approach, including targeted management of ants and millipedes at the time of pruning, to limit the spread of grapevine trunk diseases.

  15. Occurrence of root parsley pathogens inhabiting seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies on root parsley pathogens inhabiting seeds were conducted during 1981-1988 and in 1993. Filter paper method with prefreezing and keeping under light was used. Each test sample comprised 500 seeds. Pathogenicity of collected fungal isolates was tested following two laboratory methods. 238 seed samples were studied. 18 fungal species were found but only 7 proved to be important pathogens of root parsley. The most common inhabitants of root parsley seeds were Alternaria spp. A.allernata occurred on 74,8% of seeds but only a few isolates showed to be slightly pathogenic while A.petroselini and A.radicina were higly pathogenic and inhabited 11,4 and 4,2% of seeds, respectively. The second group of important pathogens were species of Fusarium found on 3,9% of seeds. F.avenaceum dominated as it comprised 48% of Fusarium isolates, the next were as follow: F.culmorum - 20%, F.equiseti - 15%, F.solani - 8%, F.oxysporum - 7% and F.dimerum -2%. Some fungi like Botrytis cinerea, Septoria petroselini and Phoma spp. inhabited low number of seeds, respectively O,4; 0,5 and 0,8%, but they were highly pathogenic to root parsley. The fungi: Bipolaris sorokiniana, Drechslera biseptata, Stemphylium botryosum and Ulocludium consortiale showed slight pathogenicity. They were isolated from 3,8% of seeds.

  16. Quorum Sensing of Periodontal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plančak, Darije; Musić, Larisa; Puhar, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    The term 'quorum sensing' describes intercellular bacterial communication which regulates bacterial gene expression according to population cell density. Bacteria produce and secrete small molecules, named autoinducers, into the intercellular space. The concentration of these molecules increases as a function of population cell density. Once the concentration of the stimulatory threshold is reached, alteration in gene expression occurs. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria possess different types of quorum sensing systems. Canonical LuxI/R-type/acyl homoserine lactone mediated quorum sensing system is the best studied quorum sensing circuit and is described in Gram-negative bacteria which employ it for inter-species communication mostly. Gram-positive bacteria possess a peptide-mediated quorum sensing system. Bacteria can communicate within their own species (intra-species) but also between species (inter-species), for which they employ an autoinducer-2 quorum sensing system which is called the universal language of the bacteria. Periodontal pathogenic bacteria possess AI-2 quorum sensing systems. It is known that they use it for regulation of biofilm formation, iron uptake, stress response and virulence factor expression. A better understanding of bacterial communication mechanisms will allow the targeting of quorum sensing with quorum sensing inhibitors to prevent and control disease.

  17. The evolution of pathogenic trypanosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie R. Stevens

    Full Text Available In the absence of a fossil record, the evolution of protozoa has until recently largely remained a matter for speculation. However, advances in molecular methods and phylogenetic analysis are now allowing interpretation of the "history written in the genes". This review focuses on recent progress in reconstruction of trypanosome phylogeny based on molecular data from ribosomal RNA, the miniexon and protein-coding genes. Sufficient data have now been gathered to demonstrate unequivocally that trypanosomes are monophyletic; the phylogenetic trees derived can serve as a framework to reinterpret the biology, taxonomy and present day distribution of trypanosome species, providing insights into the coevolution of trypanosomes with their vertebrate hosts and vectors. Different methods of dating the divergence of trypanosome lineages give rise to radically different evolutionary scenarios and these are reviewed. In particular, the use of one such biogeographically based approach provides new insights into the coevolution of the pathogens, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi, with their human hosts and the history of the diseases with which they are associated.

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis: a clonal pathogen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Enersen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of multilocus sequence typing (MLST in infectious disease research has allowed standardized typing of bacterial clones. Through multiple markers around the genome, it is possible to determine the sequence type (ST of bacterial isolates to establish the population structure of a species. For the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, the MLST scheme has been established at www.pubmlst.org/pgingivalis, and data from the database indicate a high degree of genetic diversity and a weakly clonal population structure comparable with Neisseria menigitidis. The major fimbriae (FimA have been held responsible for the adhesive properties of P. gingivalis and represent an important virulence factor. The fimA genotyping method (PCR based indicate that fimA genotype II, IV and Ib are associated with diseased sites in periodontitis and tissue specimens from cardiovascular disease. fimA genotyping of the isolates in the MLST database supports the association of genotypes II and IV with periodontitis. As a result of multiple positive PCR reactions in the fimA genotyping, sequencing of the fimA gene revealed only minor nucleotide variation between isolates of the same and different genotypes, suggesting that the method should be redesigned or re-evaluated. Results from several investigations indicate a higher intraindividual heterogeneity of P. gingivalis than found earlier. Detection of multiple STs from one site in several patients with “refractory” periodontitis, showed allelic variation in two housekeeping genes indicating recombination between different clones within the periodontal pocket.

  19. Algae as reservoirs for coral pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Sweet

    Full Text Available Benthic algae are associated with coral death in the form of stress and disease. It's been proposed that they release exudates, which facilitate invasion of potentially pathogenic microbes at the coral-algal interface, resulting in coral disease. However, the original source of these pathogens remains unknown. This study examined the ability of benthic algae to act as reservoirs of coral pathogens by characterizing surface associated microbes associated with major Caribbean and Indo-Pacific algal species/types and by comparing them to potential pathogens of two dominant coral diseases: White Syndrome (WS in the Indo-Pacific and Yellow Band Disease (YBD in the Caribbean. Coral and algal sampling was conducted simultaneously at the same sites to avoid spatial effects. Potential pathogens were defined as those absent or rare in healthy corals, increasing in abundance in healthy tissues adjacent to a disease lesion, and dominant in disease lesions. Potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected in both WS and YBD and were also present within the majority of algal species/types (54 and 100% for WS and YBD respectively. Pathogenic ciliates were associated only with WS and not YBD lesions and these were also present in 36% of the Indo-Pacific algal species. Although potential pathogens were associated with many algal species, their presence was inconsistent among replicate algal samples and detection rates were relatively low, suggestive of low density and occurrence. At the community level, coral-associated microbes irrespective of the health of their host differed from algal-associated microbes, supporting that algae and corals have distinctive microbial communities associated with their tissue. We conclude that benthic algae are common reservoirs for a variety of different potential coral pathogens. However, algal-associated microbes alone are unlikely to cause coral death. Initial damage or stress to the coral via other competitive mechanisms is

  20. Host-Pathogen Interactions: VII. Plant Pathogens Secrete Proteins which Inhibit Enzymes of the Host Capable of Attacking the Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albersheim, P; Valent, B S

    1974-05-01

    The results presented demonstrate that microbial pathogens of plants have the ability to secrete proteins which effectively inhibit an enzyme synthesized by the host; an enzyme whose substrate is a constituent of the cell wall of the pathogen. The system in which this was discovered is the anthracnose-causing fungal pathogen (Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) and its host, the French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). An endo-beta-1, 3-glucanase present in the bean leaves is specifically inhibited by a protein secreted by C. lindemuthianum. The cell walls of C. lindemuthianum are shown to be composed largely of a 1, 3-glucan.

  1. Comparative genome analysis of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Clavibacter strains reveals adaptations to their lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Załuga, Joanna; Stragier, Pieter; Baeyen, Steve; Haegeman, Annelies; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Maes, Martine; De Vos, Paul

    2014-05-22

    The genus Clavibacter harbors economically important plant pathogens infecting agricultural crops such as potato and tomato. Although the vast majority of Clavibacter strains are pathogenic, there is an increasing number of non-pathogenic isolates reported. Non-pathogenic Clavibacter strains isolated from tomato seeds are particularly problematic because they affect the current detection and identification tests for Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm), which is regulated with a zero tolerance in tomato seed. Their misidentification as pathogenic Cmm hampers a clear judgment on the seed quality and health. To get more insight in the genetic features linked to the lifestyle of these bacteria, a whole-genome sequence of the tomato seed-borne non-pathogenic Clavibacter LMG 26808 was determined. To gain a better understanding of the molecular determinants of pathogenicity, the genome sequence of LMG 26808 was compared with that of the pathogenic Cmm strain (NCPPB 382). The comparative analysis revealed that LMG 26808 does not contain plasmids pCM1 and pCM2 and also lacks the majority of important virulence factors described so far for pathogenic Cmm. This explains its apparent non-pathogenic nature in tomato plants. Moreover, the genome analysis of LMG 26808 detected sequences from a plasmid originating from a member of Enterobacteriaceae/Klebsiella relative. Genes received that way and coding for antibiotic resistance may provide a competitive advantage for survival of LMG 26808 in its ecological niche. Genetically, LMG 26808 was the most similar to the pathogenic Cmm NCPPB 382 but contained more mobile genetic elements. The genome of this non-pathogenic Clavibacter strain contained also a high number of transporters and regulatory genes. The genome sequence of the non-pathogenic Clavibacter strain LMG 26808 and the comparative analyses with other pathogenic Clavibacter strains provided a better understanding of the genetic bases of virulence and

  2. Periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K. Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been increasing attention paid in recent years to the possibility that oral bacterial infection, particularly periodontal disease may influence the initiation and or progression of systemic diseases. These studies confirm the observation that heart disease is the most commonly found systemic condition in patients with periodontal disease. Moreover, the literature has also highlighted substantial evidence indicating the presence of Gram-negative periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaques. Aim: This study intends to investigate the possible association between periodontal health and coronary artery disease by evaluating periodontal status, association between the periodontal plaque and coronary atheromatous plaques for presence of micro-organisms such as, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia. Materials and methods: A case-control study was designed with seven patients who had undergone coronary endarterectomy for cardiovascular disease and 28 controls. The periodontal examination for cases was performed 1 day before vascular surgery and the controls were clinically examined. The atheromatous plaque sample collected during endarterectomy and the intraoral plaque samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and T. forsythia. Results: The presence of periodontal bacteria DNA in coronary atheromatous plaques and sub-gingival plaque samples of the same patients was confirmed by this study. CONCLUSION A correlation was established between putative bacteria contributing to atheromatous plaques and species associated with periodontal disease. One particularly important study to be carried out is the investigation of a possible clinically meaningful reduction in coronary heart disease resulting from the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease.

  3. Waterborne Pathogens: Detection Methods and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor Yazmín Ramírez-Castillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Waterborne pathogens and related diseases are a major public health concern worldwide, not only by the morbidity and mortality that they cause, but by the high cost that represents their prevention and treatment. These diseases are directly related to environmental deterioration and pollution. Despite the continued efforts to maintain water safety, waterborne outbreaks are still reported globally. Proper assessment of pathogens on water and water quality monitoring are key factors for decision-making regarding water distribution systems’ infrastructure, the choice of best water treatment and prevention waterborne outbreaks. Powerful, sensitive and reproducible diagnostic tools are developed to monitor pathogen contamination in water and be able to detect not only cultivable pathogens but also to detect the occurrence of viable but non-culturable microorganisms as well as the presence of pathogens on biofilms. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA is a helpful tool to evaluate the scenarios for pathogen contamination that involve surveillance, detection methods, analysis and decision-making. This review aims to present a research outlook on waterborne outbreaks that have occurred in recent years. This review also focuses in the main molecular techniques for detection of waterborne pathogens and the use of QMRA approach to protect public health.

  4. Waterborne Pathogens: Detection Methods and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Castillo, Flor Yazmín; Loera-Muro, Abraham; Jacques, Mario; Garneau, Philippe; Avelar-González, Francisco Javier; Harel, Josée; Guerrero-Barrera, Alma Lilián

    2015-01-01

    Waterborne pathogens and related diseases are a major public health concern worldwide, not only by the morbidity and mortality that they cause, but by the high cost that represents their prevention and treatment. These diseases are directly related to environmental deterioration and pollution. Despite the continued efforts to maintain water safety, waterborne outbreaks are still reported globally. Proper assessment of pathogens on water and water quality monitoring are key factors for decision-making regarding water distribution systems’ infrastructure, the choice of best water treatment and prevention waterborne outbreaks. Powerful, sensitive and reproducible diagnostic tools are developed to monitor pathogen contamination in water and be able to detect not only cultivable pathogens but also to detect the occurrence of viable but non-culturable microorganisms as well as the presence of pathogens on biofilms. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is a helpful tool to evaluate the scenarios for pathogen contamination that involve surveillance, detection methods, analysis and decision-making. This review aims to present a research outlook on waterborne outbreaks that have occurred in recent years. This review also focuses in the main molecular techniques for detection of waterborne pathogens and the use of QMRA approach to protect public health. PMID:26011827

  5. The dawn of fungal pathogen genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin-Rong; Peng, You-Liang; Dickman, Martin B; Sharon, Amir

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have led to a remarkable increase in the number of sequenced fungal genomes. Several important plant pathogenic fungi are among those that have been sequenced or are being sequenced. Additional fungal pathogens are likely to be sequenced in the near future. Analysis of the available genomes has provided useful information about genes that may be important for plant infection and colonization. Genome features, such as repetitive sequences, telomeres, conserved syntenic blocks, and expansion of pathogenicity-related genes, are discussed in detail with Magnaporthe oryzae (M. grisea) and Fusarium graminearum as examples. Functional and comparative genomic studies in plant pathogenic fungi, although still in the early stages and limited to a few pathogens, have enormous potential to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in host-pathogen interactions. Development of advanced genomics tools and infrastructure is critical for efficient utilization of the vast wealth of available genome sequence information and will form a solid foundation for systems biology studies of plant pathogenic fungi.

  6. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Scott Cornman

    Full Text Available Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  7. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman, R Scott; Tarpy, David R; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  8. Laser inactivation of pathogenic viruses in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishkanich, Alexander; Zhevlakov, Alexander; Kascheev, Sergey; Sidorov, Igor; Ruzankina, Julia; Yakovlev, Alexey; Mak, Andrey

    2016-03-01

    Currently there is a situation that makes it difficult to provide the population with quality drinking water for the sanitary-hygienic requirements. One of the urgent problems is the need for water disinfection. Since the emergence of microorganisms that are pathogens transmitted through water such as typhoid, cholera, etc. requires constant cleansing of waters against pathogenic bacteria. In the water treatment process is destroyed up to 98% of germs, but among the remaining can be pathogenic viruses, the destruction of which requires special handling. As a result, the conducted research the following methods have been proposed for combating harmful microorganisms: sterilization of water by laser radiation and using a UV lamp.

  9. Microfluidic Systems for Pathogen Sensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ertl

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid pathogen sensing remains a pressing issue today since conventional identification methodsare tedious, cost intensive and time consuming, typically requiring from 48 to 72 h. In turn, chip based technologies, such as microarrays and microfluidic biochips, offer real alternatives capable of filling this technological gap. In particular microfluidic biochips make the development of fast, sensitive and portable diagnostic tools possible, thus promising rapid and accurate detection of a variety of pathogens. This paper will provide a broad overview of the novel achievements in the field of pathogen sensing by focusing on methods and devices that compliment microfluidics.

  10. Advances on Plant Pathogenic Mycotoxin Binding Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao-hua; DONG Jin-gao

    2002-01-01

    Toxin-binding protein is one of the key subjects in plant pathogenic mycotoxin research. In this paper, new advances in toxin-binding proteins of 10 kinds of plant pathogenic mycotoxins belonging to Helminthosporium ,Alternaria ,Fusicoccum ,Verticillium were reviewed, especially the techniques and methods of toxin-binding proteins of HS-toxin, HV-toxin, HMT-toxin, HC-toxin. It was proposed that the isotope-labeling technique and immunological chemistry technique should be combined together in research of toxin-binding protein, which will be significant to study the molecular recognition mechanism between host and pathogenic fungus.

  11. Real Time Detection of Foodborne Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, V.; Arshak, K.; Korostynka, O.; Vaseashta, Ashok; Adley, C.

    Contamination of foods by harmful bacteria by natural events or malicious intent poses a serious threat to public health and safety. This review introduces current technologies in detecting pathogens in food and foodborne illnesses. Causes of foodborne diseases and trends impacting foodborne diseases such as globalization and changes in micro-organisms, human populations, lifestyles, and climates are addressed. In addition, a review of the limitations in detecting pathogens with conventional technologies is presented. Finally, a review of nanostructured and nanomaterials based sensing technologies by pathogen, detection limits, and advantages is described.

  12. Pathogenic seed-borne fungi of triticale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of pathogenic fungi on 86 triticale seed samples was studied during the years 1992-1994. From each samples 400 seeds were tested using the blotter method with prefreezing and keeping under lights. In the greenhouse experiment pathogenicity of isolated fungi was evaluated. It was found that 20% of tested kernels were transmitting pathogenic fungi. Species of the genus Fusarium (including Microdochium nivale were isolated from 9,7 % of tested kernels, Drechslera tritici-repentis from 4,6 %, Stagonospora nodorum from 4,2 %, Bipolaris sorokiniana from 1,2%, Botryris cinerea from 0,9% and Drechslera dematioidea was noted sporadically.

  13. Microfluidic systems for pathogen sensing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairhofer, Jürgen; Roppert, Kriemhilt; Ertl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Rapid pathogen sensing remains a pressing issue today since conventional identification methodsare tedious, cost intensive and time consuming, typically requiring from 48 to 72 h. In turn, chip based technologies, such as microarrays and microfluidic biochips, offer real alternatives capable of filling this technological gap. In particular microfluidic biochips make the development of fast, sensitive and portable diagnostic tools possible, thus promising rapid and accurate detection of a variety of pathogens. This paper will provide a broad overview of the novel achievements in the field of pathogen sensing by focusing on methods and devices that compliment microfluidics.

  14. A simplified model of pathogenic pollution for managing beaches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simplified model of pathogenic pollution for managing beaches. ... key physical processes involved in mixing and dispersion of pathogenic pollution at ... Key words: beach-water quality model, pathogenic pollution, storm-water runoff, E. coli

  15. Zoledronic acid-associated symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE): report of baboon syndrome in a woman with recurrent metastatic breast cancer after receiving zoledronic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background:  Baboon syndrome is a distinctive skin reaction in which the patient typically develops erythematous buttocks that appear similar to those of a baboon.  The non-contact allergenic variant of baboon syndrome is also referred to as symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE).  Zoledronic acid is a bisphosphonate that is used in patients with metastatic cancer to prevent bone complications. Purpose:  Zoledronic acid-associated baboon syndrome is ...

  16. Promotion and inhibition of mutation in pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Samuel Devaraj

    2014-03-01

    Findings from this research may be used to prevent development of drug resistance, whether epigenetic or arising due to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA modification, in several pathogens, especially Mycobacterium tuberculosis through the co-administration of adenosine along with antibiotic treatment.

  17. Modulation of pathogen recognition by autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun eOh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an ancient biological process for maintaining cellular homeostasis by degradation of long-lived cytosolic proteins and organelles. Recent studies demonstrated that autophagy is availed by immune cells to regulate innate immunity. On the one hand, cells exert direct effector function by degrading intracellular pathogens; on the other hand, autophagy modulates pathogen recognition and downstream signaling for innate immune responses. Pathogen recognition via pattern recognition receptors induces autophagy. The function of phagocytic cells is enhanced by recruitment of autophagy-related proteins. Moreover, autophagy acts as a delivery system for viral replication complexes to migrate to the endosomal compartments where virus sensing occurs. In another case, key molecules of the autophagic pathway have been found to negatively regulate immune signaling, thus preventing aberrant activation of cytokine production and consequent immune responses. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the role of autophagy in pathogen recognition and modulation of innate immune responses.

  18. Moraxella catarrhalis: from emerging to established pathogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Verduin (Cees); C. Hol; A. Fleer; H. van Dijk (Hans); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractMoraxella catarrhalis (formerly known as Branhamella catarrhalis) has emerged as a significant bacterial pathogen of humans over the past two decades. During this period, microbiological and molecular diagnostic techniques have been developed and improved for M.

  19. Speciation in fungal and oomycete plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Silvia; Tabima, Javier F; Mideros, Maria F; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Matute, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    The process of speciation, by definition, involves evolution of one or more reproductive isolating mechanisms that split a single species into two that can no longer interbreed. Determination of which processes are responsible for speciation is important yet challenging. Several studies have proposed that speciation in pathogens is heavily influenced by host-pathogen dynamics and that traits that mediate such interactions (e.g., host mobility, reproductive mode of the pathogen, complexity of the life cycle, and host specificity) must lead to reproductive isolation and ultimately affect speciation rates. In this review, we summarize the main evolutionary processes that lead to speciation of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens and provide an outline of how speciation can be studied rigorously, including novel genetic/genomic developments.

  20. Moraxella catarrhalis: from emerging to established pathogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Verduin (Cees); C. Hol; A. Fleer; H. van Dijk (Hans); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractMoraxella catarrhalis (formerly known as Branhamella catarrhalis) has emerged as a significant bacterial pathogen of humans over the past two decades. During this period, microbiological and molecular diagnostic techniques have been developed and improved for M. catarrh

  1. Rhodococcus equi: A pathogen in immunocompetent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Dias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is an uncommon human pathogen known to cause lung infections in immunocompromised patients. We report two cases of Rhodococcus infections in immunocompetent individuals, who were treated successfully.

  2. Microgravity effects on pathogenicity of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-juan WANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity is one of the important environmental conditions during spaceflight. A series of studies have shown that many kinds of bacteria could be detected in space station and space shuttle. Space environment or simulated microgravity may throw a certain influence on those opportunistic pathogens and lead to some changes on their virulence, biofilm formation and drug tolerance. The mechanism of bacteria response to space environment or simulated microgravity has not been defined. However, the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq has been identified as a likely global regulator involved in the bacteria response to this environment. In addition, microgravity effects on bacterial pathogenicity may threaten astronauts' health. The present paper will focus on microgravity-induced alterations of pathogenicity and relative mechanism in various opportunistic pathogens.

  3. Genetic characterization of mango anthracnose pathogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9(26), pp. ... 2Molecular Plant Pathology Laboratory, CISH, Lucknow-227 017, India. ... Fruit anthracnose pathogens, C. gloeosporioides, Colletotrichum .... On leaves, lesions, brown to.

  4. Entamoeba dispar: Could it be pathogenic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    FabrÍcio Oliveira; Elisabeth Neumann; Maria Gomes; Marcelo Caliari

    2015-01-01

      Amebiasis is a disease caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. This ameba can colonize the human intestine and persist as a commensal parasite, similar to Entamoeba dispar, an ameba considered to be non-pathogenic...

  5. Comparative Pathogenicity of United Kingdom Isolates of the Emerging Pathogen Candida auris and Other Key Pathogenic Candida Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Andrew M; Szekely, Adrien; Johnson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Candida auris, first described in 2009, has since emerged as an important, multidrug-resistant, nosocomial agent of candidemia, with large outbreaks reported worldwide and high mortality rates associated with therapeutic failure. The current study employed C. auris isolates from a variety of centers in the United Kingdom to evaluate the pathogenicity of this emerging pathogen compared to that of other common pathogenic yeast species in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella infection model. We showed that C. auris isolates differ in their growth characteristics in vitro, with a proportion of isolates failing to release daughter cells after budding, resulting in the formation of large aggregates of cells that cannot be physically disrupted. Our results also demonstrate strain-specific differences in the behavior of C. auris in G. mellonella, with the aggregate-forming isolates exhibiting significantly less pathogenicity than their nonaggregating counterparts. Importantly, the nonaggregating isolates exhibited pathogenicity comparable to that of C. albicans, which is currently accepted as the most pathogenic member of the genus, despite the fact that C. auris isolates do not produce hyphae and produce only rudimentary pseudohyphae either in vitro or in G. mellonella. IMPORTANCE The incidence of invasive candidiasis, which includes candidemia and deep tissue infections, continues to rise and is associated with considerable mortality rates. Candida albicans remains the most common cause of invasive candidiasis, although the prevalence of non-albicans species has increased over recent years. Since its first description in 2009, Candida auris has emerged as a serious nosocomial health risk, with widespread outbreaks in numerous hospitals worldwide. However, despite receiving considerable attention, little is known concerning the pathogenicity of this emerging fungal pathogen. Here, using the Galleria mellonella insect systemic infection model, we show strain

  6. Pathogenicity gene variations within the order Entomophthorales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Lange, Lene

    Fungi within the order Entomophthorales (subphylum Entomophthoromycotina) are obligate biotrophic pathogens of arthropods with a remarkable narrow host range. Infection takes place through the cuticle when conidia hit a susceptible host, facilitated by enzymatic and mechanical mechanisms. In the ...... pathogenicity genes within genera Entomophthora and Pandora, using fungal genomic DNA originating from field-collected, infected insect host species of dipteran (flies, mosquitoes) or hemipteran (aphid) origin....

  7. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: Important pathogen in periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Perfecto, Donald; Profesor Auxiliar, Dpto de C. Básicas. Laboratorio de Microbiología UNMSM.; Moromi Nakata, Hilda; Profesor Principal Dpto. de C. Básicas. Laboratorio de Microbiología UNMSM.; Martínez Cadillo, Elba; Profesor Asociado Dpto. de C. Básicas. Laboratorio de Microbiología UNMSM.; Mendoza Rojas, Alejandro; Profesor Principal Dpto. de C. Básicas. Laboratorio de Microbiología UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a pathogen extensively studied in the clinical conditions of the Periodontitis, already identified in the early twentieth century. Over the years it has undergone changes in its denomination and multiple virulence factors that make it an important pathogen in the periodontal disease have been discovered, specifically in the localized Aggressive Periodontitis. This review tries to explain its morphology, virulence factors, culture and other important ch...

  8. The cuticle and plant defense to pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre eMetraux

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The cuticle provides a physical barrier against water loss and protects against irradiation, xenobiotics and pathogens. Components of the cuticle are perceived by invading fungi and activate developmental processes during pathogenesis. In addition, cuticle alterations of various types induce a syndrome of reactions that often results in resistance to necrotrophs. This article reviews the current knowledge on the role of the cuticle in relation to the perception of pathogens and activation of defenses.

  9. Aeromonas Hydrophila: A Re-Emerging Pathogen

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Lakshmanaperumalsamy, P.; Thayumanavan, T.; Subashkumar, R.

    been initiated by their importance as fish pathogens or as a potential pathogen of humans and have, therefore, tended to focus on commercial and sport fisheries and recreational waters. Mesophilic aeromonads are halotolerant and are associated... role of species of A. hydrophila as a cause of human infections. During monsoon season, increased incidence of A. hydrophila was reported (Vivekanandhan et al., 2004). The much higher incidence of Aeromonas sp. in foods purchased at retail outlets...

  10. The inheritance of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Cree, L.M.; Samuels, D.C.; Chinnery, P F

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial DNA mutations cause disease in >1 in 5000 of the population, and ~1 in 200 of the population are asymptomatic carriers of a pathogenic mtDNA mutation. Many patients with these pathogenic mtDNA mutations present with a progressive, disabling neurological syndrome that leads to major disability and premature death. There is currently no effective treatment for mitochondrial disorders, placing great emphasis on preventing the transmission of these diseases. An e...

  11. Identification of periodontal pathogens in atherosclerotic vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Larsen, Tove; Christiansen, Natalia

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that periodontitis may be associated with presence of atherosclerosis. DNA from periodontal pathogens has been detected in atherosclerotic lesions, but viable oral bacteria have not yet been isolated from atherosclerotic plaques. The purpose of the present study...... was to determine if viable oral bacteria could be isolated from atherosclerotic lesions and if DNA from periodontal pathogens could be detected by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques....

  12. Hydrologic modeling of pathogen fate and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Sarah M; Anderson, William B; Slawson, Robin M; Kouwen, Nicholas; Huck, Peter M

    2006-08-01

    A watershed-scale fate and transport model has been developed for Escherichia coli and several waterborne pathogens: Cryptosporidiumspp., Giardiaspp., Campylobacter spp, and E. coli O157:H7. The objectives were to determine the primary sources of pathogenic contamination in a watershed used for drinking water supply and to gain a greater understanding of the factors that most influence their survival and transport. To predict the levels of indicator bacteria and pathogens in surface water, an existing hydrologic model, WATFLOOD, was augmented for pathogen transport and tested on a watershed in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. The pathogen model considered transport as a result of overland flow, subsurface flow to tile drainage systems, and in-stream routing. The model predicted that most microorganisms entering the stream from land-based sources enter the stream from tile drainage systems rather than overland transport. Although the model predicted overland transport to be rare, when it occurred, it corresponded to the highest observed and modeled microbial concentrations. Furthermore, rapid increases in measured E. coli concentrations during storm events suggested that the resuspension of microorganisms from stream sediments may be of equal or greater importance than land-based sources of pathogens.

  13. Host-pathogen interactions during apoptosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seyed E Hasnain; Rasheeda Begum; K V A Ramaiah; Sudhir Sahdev; E M Shajil; Tarvinder K Taneja; Manjari Mohan; M Athar; Nand K Sah; M Krishnaveni

    2003-04-01

    Host pathogen interaction results in a variety of responses, which include phagocytosis of the pathogen, release of cytokines, secretion of toxins, as well as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent studies have shown that many pathogens exert control on the processes that regulate apoptosis in the host. The induction of apoptosis upon infection results from a complex interaction of parasite proteins with cellular host proteins. Abrogation of host cell apoptosis is often beneficial for the pathogen and results in a successful host invasion. However, in some cases, it has been shown that induction of apoptosis in the infected cells significantly imparts protection to the host from the pathogen. There is a strong correlation between apoptosis and the host protein translation machinery: the pathogen makes all possible efforts to modify this process so as to inhibit cell suicide and ensure that it can survive and, in some cases, establish latent infection. This review discusses the significance of various pathways/steps during virus-mediated modulation of host cell apoptosis.

  14. MHC polymorphism under host-pathogen coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghans, José A M; Beltman, Joost B; De Boer, Rob J

    2004-02-01

    The genes encoding major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules are among the most polymorphic genes known for vertebrates. Since MHC molecules play an important role in the induction of immune responses, the evolution of MHC polymorphism is often explained in terms of increased protection of hosts against pathogens. Two selective pressures that are thought to be involved are (1) selection favoring MHC heterozygous hosts, and (2) selection for rare MHC alleles by host-pathogen coevolution. We have developed a computer simulation of coevolving hosts and pathogens to study the relative impact of these two mechanisms on the evolution of MHC polymorphism. We found that heterozygote advantage per se is insufficient to explain the high degree of polymorphism at the MHC, even in very large host populations. Host-pathogen coevolution, on the other hand, can easily account for realistic polymorphisms of more than 50 alleles per MHC locus. Since evolving pathogens mainly evade presentation by the most common MHC alleles in the host population, they provide a selective pressure for a large variety of rare MHC alleles. Provided that the host population is sufficiently large, a large set of MHC alleles can persist over many host generations under host-pathogen coevolution, despite the fact that allele frequencies continuously change.

  15. Sexual reproduction of human fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitman, Joseph; Carter, Dee A; Dyer, Paul S; Soll, David R

    2014-08-01

    We review here recent advances in our understanding of sexual reproduction in fungal pathogens that commonly infect humans, including Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans/gattii, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Where appropriate or relevant, we introduce findings on other species associated with human infections. In particular, we focus on rapid advances involving genetic, genomic, and population genetic approaches that have reshaped our view of how fungal pathogens evolve. Rather than being asexual, mitotic, and largely clonal, as was thought to be prevalent as recently as a decade ago, we now appreciate that the vast majority of pathogenic fungi have retained extant sexual, or parasexual, cycles. In some examples, sexual and parasexual unions of pathogenic fungi involve closely related individuals, generating diversity in the population but with more restricted recombination than expected from fertile, sexual, outcrossing and recombining populations. In other cases, species and isolates participate in global outcrossing populations with the capacity for considerable levels of gene flow. These findings illustrate general principles of eukaryotic pathogen emergence with relevance for other fungi, parasitic eukaryotic pathogens, and both unicellular and multicellular eukaryotic organisms.

  16. Antibody-mediated resistance against plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Tabatabaie, Meisam; Twyman, Richard M; Schillberg, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Plant diseases have a significant impact on the yield and quality of crops. Many strategies have been developed to combat plant diseases, including the transfer of resistance genes to crops by conventional breeding. However, resistance genes can only be introgressed from sexually-compatible species, so breeders need alternative measures to introduce resistance traits from more distant sources. In this context, genetic engineering provides an opportunity to exploit diverse and novel forms of resistance, e.g. the use of recombinant antibodies targeting plant pathogens. Native antibodies, as a part of the vertebrate adaptive immune system, can bind to foreign antigens and eliminate them from the body. The ectopic expression of antibodies in plants can also interfere with pathogen activity to confer disease resistance. With sufficient knowledge of the pathogen life cycle, it is possible to counter any disease by designing expression constructs so that pathogen-specific antibodies accumulate at high levels in appropriate sub-cellular compartments. Although first developed to tackle plant viruses and still used predominantly for this purpose, antibodies have been targeted against a diverse range of pathogens as well as proteins involved in plant-pathogen interactions. Here we comprehensively review the development and implementation of antibody-mediated disease resistance in plants.

  17. Plant and pathogen nutrient acquisition strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urooj eFatima

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients are indispensable elements required for the growth of all living organisms including plants and pathogens. Phyllosphere, rhizosphere, apoplast, phloem, xylem and cell organelles are the nutrient niches in plants that are the target of bacterial pathogens. Depending upon nutrients availability, the pathogen adapts various acquisition strategies and inhabits the specific niche. In this review, we discuss the nutrient composition of different niches in plants, the mechanisms involved in the recognition of nutrient niche and the sophisticated strategies used by the bacterial pathogens for acquiring nutrients. We provide insight into various nutrient acquisition strategies used by necrotrophic, biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic bacteria. Specifically we discuss both modulation of bacterial machinery and manipulation of host machinery. In addition, we highlight the current status of our understanding about the nutrient acquisition strategies used by bacterial pathogens, namely targeting the sugar transporters that are dedicated for the plant’s growth and development. Bacterial strategies for altering the plant cell membrane permeability to enhance the release of nutrients are also enumerated along with in-depth analysis of molecular mechanisms behind these strategies. The information presented in this review will be useful to understand the plant-pathogen interaction in nutrient perspective.

  18. Adenoid Reservoir for Pathogenic Biofilm Bacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistico, L.; Kreft, R.; Gieseke, A.; Coticchia, J. M.; Burrows, A.; Khampang, P.; Liu, Y.; Kerschner, J. E.; Post, J. C.; Lonergan, S.; Sampath, R.; Hu, F. Z.; Ehrlich, G. D.; Stoodley, P.; Hall-Stoodley, L.

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms of pathogenic bacteria are present on the middle ear mucosa of children with chronic otitis media (COM) and may contribute to the persistence of pathogens and the recalcitrance of COM to antibiotic treatment. Controlled studies indicate that adenoidectomy is effective in the treatment of COM, suggesting that the adenoids may act as a reservoir for COM pathogens. To investigate the bacterial community in the adenoid, samples were obtained from 35 children undergoing adenoidectomy for chronic OM or obstructive sleep apnea. We used a novel, culture-independent molecular diagnostic methodology, followed by confocal microscopy, to investigate the in situ distribution and organization of pathogens in the adenoids to determine whether pathogenic bacteria exhibited criteria characteristic of biofilms. The Ibis T5000 Universal Biosensor System was used to interrogate the extent of the microbial diversity within adenoid biopsy specimens. Using a suite of 16 broad-range bacterial primers, we demonstrated that adenoids from both diagnostic groups were colonized with polymicrobial biofilms. Haemophilus influenzae was present in more adenoids from the COM group (P = 0.005), but there was no significant difference between the two patient groups for Streptococcus pneumoniae or Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, lectin binding, and the use of antibodies specific for host epithelial cells demonstrated that pathogens were aggregated, surrounded by a carbohydrate matrix, and localized on and within the epithelial cell surface, which is consistent with criteria for bacterial biofilms. PMID:21307211

  19. Environmental Variation Generates Environmental Opportunist Pathogen Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Jani; Kaitala, Veijo; Laakso, Jouni; Ruokolainen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Many socio-economically important pathogens persist and grow in the outside host environment and opportunistically invade host individuals. The environmental growth and opportunistic nature of these pathogens has received only little attention in epidemiology. Environmental reservoirs are, however, an important source of novel diseases. Thus, attempts to control these diseases require different approaches than in traditional epidemiology focusing on obligatory parasites. Conditions in the outside-host environment are prone to fluctuate over time. This variation is a potentially important driver of epidemiological dynamics and affect the evolution of novel diseases. Using a modelling approach combining the traditional SIRS models to environmental opportunist pathogens and environmental variability, we show that epidemiological dynamics of opportunist diseases are profoundly driven by the quality of environmental variability, such as the long-term predictability and magnitude of fluctuations. When comparing periodic and stochastic environmental factors, for a given variance, stochastic variation is more likely to cause outbreaks than periodic variation. This is due to the extreme values being further away from the mean. Moreover, the effects of variability depend on the underlying biology of the epidemiological system, and which part of the system is being affected. Variation in host susceptibility leads to more severe pathogen outbreaks than variation in pathogen growth rate in the environment. Positive correlation in variation on both targets can cancel the effect of variation altogether. Moreover, the severity of outbreaks is significantly reduced by increase in the duration of immunity. Uncovering these issues helps in understanding and controlling diseases caused by environmental pathogens.

  20. Global Expression Studies of Yersinia Pestis Pathogenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, E; Motin, V; Brubaker, R; Fitch, P

    2002-10-15

    The aim of these studies continues to be the investigation into the molecular mechanisms that underlie the virulence process in Yersinia pestis. In particular, the focus of this work centers on the identification of novel genes and pathways responsible for the pathogenic properties of this organism. In spite of more than four decades of intense investigation in this field, the dilemma as to what makes Y. pestis such a virulent and lethal pathogen remains unanswered. The method being employed makes use microarray technology (DNA chip) that enables the examination of the global activities of the whole complement of genes in this pathogen. Two primary resources available to the investigators (one directly obtained from a separate CBNP-funded project) make these studies possible: (1) Whole genome comparisons of the genes in Y. pestis and its near neighbors with attenuated or non pathogenic characteristics, and (2) the ability to duplicate in vitro, conditions that mimic the infection process of this pathogen. This year we have extended our studies from the original work of characterizing the global transcriptional regulation in Y. pestis triggered during temperature transition from 26 C to 37 C (roughly conditions found in the flea vector and the mammalian host, respectively) to studies of regulation encountered during shift between growth from conditions of neutral pH to acidic pH (the latter conditions, those mimic the environment found inside macrophages, a likely environment found by these cells during infection.). For this work, DNA arrays containing some 5,000 genes (the entire genome of Y. pestis plus those genes found uniquely in the enteropathogen, and near neighbor, Y. pseudotuberculosis) are used to monitor the simultaneous expression levels of each gene of known and unknown function in Y. pestis. Those genes that are up-regulate under the experimental conditions represent genes potentially involved in the pathogenic process. The ultimate role in

  1. Mental Health Disorders Associated with Foodborne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Declan J; Robertson, Lucy J

    2016-11-01

    Human infections with foodborne pathogenic organisms are relatively well described in terms of their overt physical symptoms, such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, vomiting, fever, and associated sequelae. Indeed, some of these are key for diagnosis and treatment, although it should be noted that, for some foodborne pathogens, the physical symptoms might be more diffuse, particularly those associated with some of the foodborne parasites. In contrast, the impact of these pathogens on mental health is less well described, and symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and general malaise are usually ignored when foodborne infections are recorded. Despite this, it is generally accepted that there are several psychiatric disorders of unknown etiology that may be associated with microbial pathogens. Depression, autism, hypochondriasis and anxiety, schizophrenia, and Tourette syndrome probably have multiple contributing causes, among which foodborne pathogens may play a decisive or contributory role, possibly sharing pathophysiological pathways with other environmental triggers. This review focuses on foodborne parasites and bacterial pathogens. Some foodborne parasites, such as metacestodes of Taenia solium and tissue cysts (bradyzoites) of Toxoplasma gondii , may affect mental health by directly infecting the brain. In contrast, bacterial infections and other parasitic infections may contribute to mental illness via the immune system and/or by influencing neurotransmission pathways. Thus, cytokines, for example, have been associated with depression and schizophrenia. However, infectious disease models for psychiatry require a more complete understanding of the relationship between psychiatric disorders and microbial triggers. This article reviews the current state of knowledge on the role of foodborne parasitic and bacterial pathogens in mental illness and identifies some of the gaps that should be addressed to improve diagnosis and treatment of mental health issues that are

  2. Susceptibility of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria ssp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, L.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility of four species of Naegleria amoebae to complement-mediated lysis was determined. The amoebicidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) and normal guinea pig serum (NGPS) for Naegleria amoebae was measured by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Release of radioactivity from amoebae labeled with {sup 3}H-uridine and visual observation with a compound microscope were used as indices of lysis. Susceptibility or resistance to complement-mediated lysis in vitro correlated with the in vivo pathogenic potential. Nonpathogenic Naegleria amoebae were lysed at a faster rate and at higher cell concentrations than were pathogenic amoebae. Electrophoretic analysis of NHS incubated with pathogenic or nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. demonstrated that amoebae activate the complement cascade resulting in the production of C3 and C5 complement cleavage products. Treatment with papain or trypsin for 1 h, but not with sialidase, increase the susceptibility of highly pathogenic, mouse-passaged N. fowleri to lysis. Treatment with actinomycin D, cycloheximide or various protease inhibitors for 4 h did not increase susceptibility to lysis. Neither a repair process involving de novo protein synthesis nor a complement-inactivating protease appear to account for the increase resistance of N. fowleri amoebae to complement-mediated lysis. A binding study with {sup 125}I radiolabeled C9 indicated that the terminal complement component does not remain stably bound to the membrane of pathogenic amoebae.

  3. Enteric pathogens and soil: a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Johanna; Toranzos, Gary A

    2003-03-01

    It is known that soil is a recipient of solid wastes able to contain enteric pathogens in high concentrations. Although the role of soil as a reservoir of certain bacterial pathogens is not in question, recent findings show that soil may have a larger role in the transmission of enteric diseases than previously thought. Many of the diseases caused by agents from soil have been well characterized, although enteric diseases and their link to soil have not been so well studied. Gastrointestinal infections are the most common diseases caused by enteric bacteria. Some examples are salmonellosis ( Salmonella sp.), cholera ( Vibrio cholerae), dysentery ( Shigella sp.) and other infections caused by Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia sp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and many other strains. Viruses are the most hazardous and have some of the lowest infectious doses of any of the enteric pathogens. Hepatitis A, hepatitis E, enteric adenoviruses, poliovirus types 1 and 2, multiple strains of echoviruses and coxsackievirus are enteric viruses associated with human wastewater. Among the most commonly detected protozoa in sewage are Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis and Cryptosporidium parvum. This article reviews the existing literature of more than two decades on waste disposal practices that favor the entry of enteric pathogens to soil and the possible consequent role of the soil as a vector and reservoir of enteric pathogens.

  4. PIML: the Pathogen Information Markup Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongqun; Vines, Richard R; Wattam, Alice R; Abramochkin, Georgiy V; Dickerman, Allan W; Eckart, J Dana; Sobral, Bruno W S

    2005-01-01

    A vast amount of information about human, animal and plant pathogens has been acquired, stored and displayed in varied formats through different resources, both electronically and otherwise. However, there is no community standard format for organizing this information or agreement on machine-readable format(s) for data exchange, thereby hampering interoperation efforts across information systems harboring such infectious disease data. The Pathogen Information Markup Language (PIML) is a free, open, XML-based format for representing pathogen information. XSLT-based visual presentations of valid PIML documents were developed and can be accessed through the PathInfo website or as part of the interoperable web services federation known as ToolBus/PathPort. Currently, detailed PIML documents are available for 21 pathogens deemed of high priority with regard to public health and national biological defense. A dynamic query system allows simple queries as well as comparisons among these pathogens. Continuing efforts are being taken to include other groups' supporting PIML and to develop more PIML documents. All the PIML-related information is accessible from http://www.vbi.vt.edu/pathport/pathinfo/

  5. Deconstructing host-pathogen interactions in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan Bier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the cellular mechanisms underlying host responses to pathogens have been well conserved during evolution. As a result, Drosophila can be used to deconstruct many of the key events in host-pathogen interactions by using a wealth of well-developed molecular and genetic tools. In this review, we aim to emphasize the great leverage provided by the suite of genomic and classical genetic approaches available in flies for decoding details of host-pathogen interactions; these findings can then be applied to studies in higher organisms. We first briefly summarize the general strategies by which Drosophila resists and responds to pathogens. We then focus on how recently developed genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screens conducted in cells and flies, combined with classical genetic methods, have provided molecular insight into host-pathogen interactions, covering examples of bacteria, fungi and viruses. Finally, we discuss novel strategies for how flies can be used as a tool to examine how specific isolated virulence factors act on an intact host.

  6. Insights from genomics into bacterial pathogen populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens impose a heavy burden of disease on human populations worldwide. The gravest threats are posed by highly virulent respiratory pathogens, enteric pathogens, and HIV-associated infections. Tuberculosis alone is responsible for the deaths of 1.5 million people annually. Treatment options for bacterial pathogens are being steadily eroded by the evolution and spread of drug resistance. However, population-level whole genome sequencing offers new hope in the fight against pathogenic bacteria. By providing insights into bacterial evolution and disease etiology, these approaches pave the way for novel interventions and therapeutic targets. Sequencing populations of bacteria across the whole genome provides unprecedented resolution to investigate (i within-host evolution, (ii transmission history, and (iii population structure. Moreover, advances in rapid benchtop sequencing herald a new era of real-time genomics in which sequencing and analysis can be deployed within hours in response to rapidly changing public health emergencies. The purpose of this review is to highlight the transformative effect of population genomics on bacteriology, and to consider the prospects for answering abiding questions such as why bacteria cause disease.

  7. Genomic transition to pathogenicity in chytrid fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Joneson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pathogen emergence is central to mitigating the impacts of novel infectious disease agents. The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd is an emerging pathogen of amphibians that has been implicated in amphibian declines worldwide. Bd is the only member of its clade known to attack vertebrates. However, little is known about the molecular determinants of - or evolutionary transition to - pathogenicity in Bd. Here we sequence the genome of Bd's closest known relative - a non-pathogenic chytrid Homolaphlyctis polyrhiza (Hp. We first describe the genome of Hp, which is comparable to other chytrid genomes in size and number of predicted proteins. We then compare the genomes of Hp, Bd, and 19 additional fungal genomes to identify unique or recent evolutionary elements in the Bd genome. We identified 1,974 Bd-specific genes, a gene set that is enriched for protease, lipase, and microbial effector Gene Ontology terms. We describe significant lineage-specific expansions in three Bd protease families (metallo-, serine-type, and aspartyl proteases. We show that these protease gene family expansions occurred after the divergence of Bd and Hp from their common ancestor and thus are localized to the Bd branch. Finally, we demonstrate that the timing of the protease gene family expansions predates the emergence of Bd as a globally important amphibian pathogen.

  8. Pathogenicity island mobility and gene content.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kelly Porter

    2013-10-01

    Key goals towards national biosecurity include methods for analyzing pathogens, predicting their emergence, and developing countermeasures. These goals are served by studying bacterial genes that promote pathogenicity and the pathogenicity islands that mobilize them. Cyberinfrastructure promoting an island database advances this field and enables deeper bioinformatic analysis that may identify novel pathogenicity genes. New automated methods and rich visualizations were developed for identifying pathogenicity islands, based on the principle that islands occur sporadically among closely related strains. The chromosomally-ordered pan-genome organizes all genes from a clade of strains; gaps in this visualization indicate islands, and decorations of the gene matrix facilitate exploration of island gene functions. A %E2%80%9Clearned phyloblocks%E2%80%9D method was developed for automated island identification, that trains on the phylogenetic patterns of islands identified by other methods. Learned phyloblocks better defined termini of previously identified islands in multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC BAA-2146, and found its only antibiotic resistance island.

  9. Antibiotic resistance in ocular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections of the eye are common and ophthalmologists are spoilt for choice with a variety of antibiotics available in the market. Antibiotics can be administered in the eye by a number of routes; topical, subconjunctival, subtenon and intraocular. Apart from a gamut of eye drops available, ophthalmologists also have the option of preparing fortified eye drops from parenteral formulations, thereby, achieving high concentrations; often much above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, of antibiotics in ocular tissues during therapy. Antibiotic resistance among ocular pathogens is increasing in parallel with the increase seen over the years in bacteria associated with systemic infections. Although it is believed that the rise in resistant ocular bacterial isolates is linked to the rise in resistant systemic pathogens, recent evidence has correlated the emergence of resistant bacteria in the eye to prior topical antibiotic therapy. One would like to believe that either of these contributes to the emergence of resistance to antibiotics among ocular pathogens. Until recently, ocular pathogens resistant to fluoroquinolones have been minimal but the pattern is currently alarming. The new 8-fluoroquinolone on the scene-besifloxacin, is developed exclusively for ophthalmic use and it is hoped that it will escape the selective pressure for resistance because of lack of systemic use. In addition to development of new antibacterial agents, the strategies to halt or control further development of resistant ocular pathogens should always include judicious use of antibiotics in the treatment of human, animal or plant diseases.

  10. Effects of rainfall acidification on plant pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, D. S.; Cowling, E. B.

    1978-01-01

    Wind-blown rain, rain splash, and films of free moisture play important roles in the epidemiology of many plant diseases. The chemical nature of the aqueous microenvironment at the infection court is a potentially significant factor in the successful dissemination, establishment, and survival of plant pathogenic microorganisms. Acidic rainfall has a potential for influencing not only the pathogen, but also the host organism, and the host-pathogen complex. Although host-pathogen interactions add a degree of complexity to the study of abiotic environmental stress of plants, it is our hope, through the use of a combination of general concepts, theoretical postulations, and experimental data, to describe the potential role that rainfall acidity may play in the often subtle balance between populations of plants and populations of plant pathogens. The direct effects of acidic precipitation on vegetation are becoming increasingly better understood. The indirect consequences of both acute and chronic exposure of vegetation to acidic precipitation are very complex, however. Their effect is variable in time, and involves a variety of potential interactions which are only partially understood.

  11. Advancing waterborne pathogen modelling: lessons from global nutrient export models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, L.C.; Hofstra, N.; Kroeze, C.; Medema, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Waterborne pathogens cause health problems worldwide. A global waterborne pathogen model could provide valuable new insights for data-sparse regions, by identifying pathogen hotspots and evaluating global change and risk management scenarios. Global waterborne pathogen modelling is not as advanced a

  12. Innate immunity in Drosophila: Pathogens and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind, Shubha

    2008-02-01

    Following in the footsteps of traditional developmental genetics, research over the last 15 years has shown that innate immunity against bacteria and fungi is governed largely by two NF-kappaB signal transduction pathways, Toll and IMD. Antiviral immunity appears to stem from RNA interference, whereas resistance against parasitoids is conferred by Toll signaling. The identification of these post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and the annotation of most Drosophila immunity genes have derived from functional genomic studies using "model" pathogens, intact animals and cell lines. The D. melanogaster host has thus provided the core information that can be used to study responses to natural microbial and metazoan pathogens as they become identified, as well as to test ideas of selection and evolutionary change. These analyses are of general importance to understanding mechanisms of other insect host-pathogen interactions and determinants of variation in host resistance.

  13. Caspase Work Model During Pathogen Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yah-bin Ma; Hui-yun Chang

    2011-01-01

    Caspases are an evolutionarily conserved family of aspartate-specific cystein-dependent proteases with essential functions in apoptosis and normally exist in ceils as inactive proenzymes.In addition to the inflammatory caspases,the initiator and effector caspases have been shown to have an important role in regulating the immune response,but are involved in different ways.We give a brief introduction on the benefit of apoptosis on the clearance of invasive pathogens,and the caspase functions involved in the immune response.Then we construct a working model of caspases during pathogen invasion.A detailed description of the three modes is given in the discussion.These three modes are regulated by different inhibitors,and there may be a novel way to treat intracellular pathogen and autoimmune diseases based on the specific inhibitors.

  14. Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Clinical Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fernández-García

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are prevalent in bacteria and archaea. Although not essential for normal cell growth, TA systems are implicated in multiple cellular functions associated with survival under stress conditions. Clinical strains of bacteria are currently causing major human health problems as a result of their multidrug resistance, persistence and strong pathogenicity. Here, we present a review of the TA systems described to date and their biological role in human pathogens belonging to the ESKAPE group (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter spp. and others of clinical relevance (Escherichia coli, Burkholderia spp., Streptococcus spp. and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Better understanding of the mechanisms of action of TA systems will enable the development of new lines of treatment for infections caused by the above-mentioned pathogens.

  15. Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance in ESKAPE Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirijan Santajit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species are the leading cause of nosocomial infections throughout the world. Most of them are multidrug resistant isolates, which is one of the greatest challenges in clinical practice. Multidrug resistance is amongst the top three threats to global public health and is usually caused by excessive drug usage or prescription, inappropriate use of antimicrobials, and substandard pharmaceuticals. Understanding the resistance mechanisms of these bacteria is crucial for the development of novel antimicrobial agents or other alternative tools to combat these public health challenges. Greater mechanistic understanding would also aid in the prediction of underlying or even unknown mechanisms of resistance, which could be applied to other emerging multidrug resistant pathogens. In this review, we summarize the known antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of ESKAPE pathogens.

  16. Biocontrol of Pathogens in the Meat Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Catherine M.; Rivas, Lucia; McDonnell, Mary J.; Duffy, Geraldine

    Bacterial foodborne zoonotic diseases are of major concern, impacting public health and causing economic losses for the agricultural-food sector and the wider society. In the United States (US) alone foodborne illness from pathogens is responsible for 76 million cases of illnesses each year (Mead et al., 1999). Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and Enterohaemorraghic Escherichia coli (EHEC; predominately serotype O157:H7) and Listeria monocytogenes are the most predominant foodborne bacterial pathogens reported in the developed world (United States Department of Agriculture, 2001). The importance of meat and meat products as a vehicle of foodborne zoonotic pathogens cannot be underestimated (Center for Disease Control, 2006; Gillespie, O’Brien, Adak, Cheasty, & Willshaw, 2005; Mazick, Ethelberg, Nielsen, Molbak, & Lisby, 2006; Mead et al., 2006).

  17. Effect of zinc on Entamoeba histolytica pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Robledo, G B; Carrero, J C; Ortiz-Ortiz, L

    1999-06-01

    The present study analyzes the effects of zinc on Entamoeba histolytica activity and on its pathogenicity. Metal activity was evaluated in vitro with regard to the parasite's viability, replication, and adhesion to epithelial cells and in vivo with regard to its pathogenicity. The results obtained in vitro show that zinc at 1.0 mM concentration does not affect amebic viability; however, it does decrease amebic replication and adhesion (P vivo studies performed on a model of experimental liver abscess in the hamster indicate that the intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of zinc at 48 h after the intrahepatic inoculation of amebic trophozoites significantly inhibits (P vivo as manifested by inhibition of amebic pathogenicity.

  18. Looking in ticks for human bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediannikov, O; Fenollar, F

    2014-12-01

    Ticks are considered to be second worldwide to mosquitoes as vectors of human diseases and the most important vectors of disease-causing pathogens in domestic and wild animals. A number of emerging tick-borne pathogens are already discovered; however, the proportion of undiagnosed infectious diseases, especially in tropical regions, may suggest that there are still more pathogens associated with ticks. Moreover, the identification of bacteria associated with ticks may provide new tool for the control of ticks and tick-borne diseases. Described here molecular methods of screening of ticks, extensive use of modern culturomics approach, newly developed artificial media and different cell line cultures may significantly improve our knowledge about the ticks as the agents of human and animal pathology.

  19. Histone Acetylation in Fungal Pathogens of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyun Jeon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation of histone lysine residues occurs in different organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals for the regulation of diverse cellular processes. With the identification of enzymes that create or reverse this modification, our understanding on histone acetylation has expanded at an amazing pace during the last two decades. In fungal pathogens of plants, however, the importance of such modification has only just begun to be appreciated in the recent years and there is a dearth of information on how histone acetylation is implicated in fungal pathogenesis. This review covers the current status of research related to histone acetylation in plant pathogenic fungi and considers relevant findings in the interaction between fungal pathogens and host plants. We first describe the families of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Then we provide the cases where histone acetylation was investigated in the context of fungal pathogenesis. Finally, future directions and perspectives in epigenetics of fungal pathogenesis are discussed.

  20. Threats and opportunities of plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, Petr; Vereecke, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria can have devastating effects on plant productivity and yield. Nevertheless, because these often soil-dwelling bacteria have evolved to interact with eukaryotes, they generally exhibit a strong adaptivity, a versatile metabolism, and ingenious mechanisms tailored to modify the development of their hosts. Consequently, besides being a threat for agricultural practices, phytopathogens may also represent opportunities for plant production or be useful for specific biotechnological applications. Here, we illustrate this idea by reviewing the pathogenic strategies and the (potential) uses of five very different (hemi)biotrophic plant pathogenic bacteria: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, Rhodococcus fascians, scab-inducing Streptomyces spp., and Pseudomonas syringae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Innate immunity in Drosophila: Pathogens and pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shubha Govind

    2008-01-01

    Following in the footsteps of traditional developmental genetics, research over the last 15 years has shown that innate immunity against bacteria and fungi is governed largely by two NF-κB signal transduction pathways, Toll and IMD. Antiviral immunity appears to stem from RNA interference, whereas resistance against parasitoids is conferred by Toll signaling. The identification of these post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and the annotation of most Drosophila immunity genes have derived from functional genomic studies using "model" pathogens, intact animals and cell lines. The D. melanogaster host has thus provided the core information that can be used to study responses to natural microbial and metazoan pathogens as they become identified, as well as to test ideas of selection and evolutionary change. These analyses are of general importance to understanding mechanisms of other insect host-pathogen interactions and determinants of variation in host resistance.

  2. Adenylate cyclases involvement in pathogenicity, a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costache, Adriana; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), one of the most important secondary messengers, is produced by adenylate cyclase (AC) from adenosine triphosphate (ATP). AC is a widespread enzyme, being present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although they have the same enzymatic activity (ATP cyclization), the structure of these proteins varies, depending on their function and the producing organism. Some pathogenic bacteria utilize these enzymes as toxins which interact with calmodulin (or another eukaryote activator), causing intense cAMP synthesis and disruption of infected cell functions. In contrast, other pathogenic bacteria benefit of augmentation of AC activity for their own function. Based on sequence analysis ofAC catalytic domain from two pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus anthracis and Bordetellapertussis) with known three-dimensional structures, a possible secondary structure for 1-255 amino acid fragment from Pseudomonas aeruginosa AC (with 80TKGFSVKGKSS90 as the ATP binding site) is proposed.

  3. Prevalences of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in mollusks from the Spanish Mediterranean Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Joven, Carmen; de Blas, Ignacio; Furones, M Dolores; Roque, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a well-recognized pathogen of humans. To better understand the ecology of the human-pathogenic variants of this bacterium in the environment, a study on the prevalence in bivalves of pathogenic variants (tlh+ and tdh+ and/or trh+) versus a non-pathogenic one (only tlh+ as species marker for V. parahaemolyticus), was performed in two bays in Catalonia, Spain. Environmental factors that might affect dynamics of both variants of V. parahaemolyticus were taken into account. The results showed that the global prevalence of total V. parahaemolyticus found in both bays was 14.2% (207/1459). It was, however, significantly dependent on sampling point, campaign (year) and bivalve species. Pathogenic variants of V. parahaemolyticus (tdh+ and/or trh+) were detected in 3.8% of the samples (56/1459), meaning that the proportion of bivalves who contained tlh gene were contaminated by pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains is 27.1% (56/207). Moreover, the presence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (trh+) was significantly correlated with water salinity, thus the probability of finding pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus decreased 1.45 times with every salinity unit (ppt) increased. Additionally, data showed that V. parahaemolyticus could establish close associations with Ruditapes spp. (P-value < 0.001), which could enhance the transmission of illness to human by pathogenic variants, when clams were eaten raw or slightly cooked. This study provides information on the abundance, ecology and characteristics of total and human-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus variants associated with bivalves cultured in the Spanish Mediterranean Coast.

  4. Adhesive threads of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antão Esther-Maria

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to adhere to host surfaces is by far the most vital step in the successful colonization by microbial pathogens. Colonization begins with the attachment of the bacterium to receptors expressed by cells forming the lining of the mucosa. Long hair like extracellular appendages called fimbriae, produced by most Gram-negative pathogens, mediate specific attachment to the epithelial cell surface. Associated with the fimbriae is a protein called an adhesin, which directs high-affinity binding to specific cell surface components. In the last couple of years, an enormous amount of research has been undertaken that deals with understanding how bacterial pathogens adhere to host cells. E. coli in all probability is one of the best studied free-living organisms. A group of E. coli called Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC including both human and animal pathogens like Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC, Newborn meningitic E. coli (NMEC and Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, have been found to harbour many fimbriae including Type 1 fimbriae, P fimbriae, curli fibres, S fimbriae, F1C fimbriae, Dr fimbriae, afimbrial adhesins, temperature-sensitive haemagglutinin and many novel adhesin gene clusters that have not yet been characterized. Each of these adhesins is unique due to the recognition of an adhesin-specific receptor, though as a group these adhesins share common genomic organization. A newly identified putative adhesin temporarily termed ExPEC Adhesin I, encoded by gene yqi, has been recently found to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of APEC infection, thus making it an interesting candidate for future research. The aim of this review is to describe the role of ExPEC adhesins during extraintestinal infections known till date, and to suggest the idea of investigating their potential role in the colonization of the host gut which is said to be a reservoir for ExPEC.

  5. Photoinactivation of major bacterial pathogens in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyong Jin Roh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant increases in the bacterial resistance to various antibiotics have been found in fish farms. Non-antibiotic therapies for infectious diseases in aquaculture are needed. In recent years, light-emitting diode technology has been applied to the inactivation of pathogens, especially those affecting humans. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of blue light (wavelengths 405 and 465 nm on seven major bacterial pathogens that affect fish and shellfish important in aquaculture. Results We successfully demonstrate inactivation activity of a 405/465-nm LED on selected bacterial pathogens. Although some bacteria were not fully inactivated by the 465-nm light, the 405-nm light had a bactericidal effect against all seven pathogens, indicating that blue light can be effective without the addition of a photosensitizer. Photobacterium damselae, Vibrio anguillarum, and Edwardsiella tarda were the most susceptible to the 405-nm light (36.1, 41.2, and 68.4 J cm−2, respectively, produced one log reduction in the bacterial populations, whereas Streptococcus parauberis was the least susceptible (153.8 J cm−2 per one log reduction. In general, optical density (OD values indicated that higher bacterial densities were associated with lower inactivating efficacy, with the exception of P. damselae and Vibrio harveyi. In conclusion, growth of the bacterial fish and shellfish pathogens evaluated in this study was inactivated by exposure to either the 405- or 465-nm light. In addition, inactivation was dependent on exposure time. Conclusions This study presents that blue LED has potentially alternative therapy for treating fish and shellfish bacterial pathogens. It has great advantages in aspect of eco-friendly treating methods differed from antimicrobial methods.

  6. Pseudomnas syringae: A pathogen of fruit trees in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Veljko Gavrilović

    2009-01-01

    Data about symptomatology, pathogenicity and bacteriological characteristics of Pseudomonas syringae, and PCR methods for fast and reliable detection of the pathogen are given in this paper. P. syringae has been experimentally proved as a pathogen of pear, apple, apricot, plum cherry, and raspberry, and pathogen strains have also been isolated from necrotic peach buds. Two pathogen varieties, syringae and morsprunorum, were found in our research in Serbia, the former being dominant on fruit t...

  7. Differentiation between a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris using PCR-RFLP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walther; Jørgensen, Thomas Rohde; Buchmann, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    A new method based on PCR-RFLP is presented. It is able to differentiate between the Danish non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris and the Norwegian pathogenic form.......A new method based on PCR-RFLP is presented. It is able to differentiate between the Danish non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris and the Norwegian pathogenic form....

  8. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  9. Controlling Pathogens and Allergens in Composting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The process options for control of pathogens in the windrow and ASP (aerated static pile) are considered based on indicator organisms for the incoming pathogens with MSW and sludge as feedstock. Some European process requirements for sanitisation are considered in relation to the actual conditions within a composting mass where temperatures across the mass vary from 70℃ to ambient. Improved control methodologies for the ASP using combinations of suck and blow are discussed together with short term use of elevated core temperatures (>70℃). The generation of Aspergillus fumigatus during composting is considered in relation to reducing the numbers in the windrow by changing the operating regime.

  10. Molecular techniques for characterisation of pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Marie-Louise

    Pathogens have always had a major interest to humans due to their central role in sickness and death. Influenza A annually kills at least 250,000 humans, and has been the cause of millions of further deaths during pandemic years in the past. Plague (Yersinia pestis) has been the cause of the Black...... capture for the detection of Y. pestis in samples from the Justinian plague (600 AD) as an attempt to detect this pathogen as a cause of death in the victims....

  11. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of oral pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A. C. M.; Seme, K.; Raangs, E.; Rurenga, P.; Singadji, Z.; Wekema-Mulder, G.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a bacterial disease that can be treated with systemic antibiotics. The aim of this study was to establish the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of five periodontal pathogens to six commonly used antibiotics in periodontics. A total of 247 periodontal bacterial isolates were tested

  12. Low-Incidence, High-Consequence Pathogens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-21

    Dr. Stephan Monroe, a deputy director at CDC, discusses the impact of low-incidence, high-consequence pathogens globally.  Created: 2/21/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  13. Host-pathogen interactions in typhoid fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on host-pathogen interactions in Salmonella Typhi and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections and explores the interplay between these bacteria and the innate immune system. Typhoid fever is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in low-income countries. With adequate

  14. Multivalent glycoconjugates as anti-pathogenic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardi, J.; Jiménez-Barbero, J.; Casnati, A.; Castro, C.; Darbre, T.; Fieschi, F.; Finne, J.; Funken, H.; Jaeger, K.E.; Lahmann, M.; Lindhorst, T.K.; Marradi, M.; Messner, P.; Molinaro, A.; Murphy, P.V.; Nativi, C.; Oscarson, S.; Penadés, S.; Peri, F.; Pieters, R.J.; Renaudet, O.; Reymond, J.L.; Richichi, B.; Rojo, J.; Sansone, F.; Schäffer, C.; Turnbull, W.B.; Velasco-Torrijos, T.; Vidal, S.; Vincent, S.; Wennekes, T.; Zuilhof, H.; Imberty, A.

    2013-01-01

    Multivalency plays a major role in biological processes and particularly in the relationship between pathogenic microorganisms and their host that involves protein-glycan recognition. These interactions occur during the first steps of infection, for specific recognition between host and bacteria, bu

  15. Cell entry by human pathogenic arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Jillian M; Kunz, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    The arenaviruses Lassa virus (LASV) in Africa and Machupo (MACV), Guanarito (GTOV) and Junin viruses (JUNV) in South America cause severe haemorrhagic fevers in humans with fatality rates of 15-35%. The present review focuses on the first steps of infection with human pathogenic arenaviruses, the interaction with their cellular receptor molecules and subsequent entry into the host cell. While similarities exist in genomic organization, structure and clinical disease caused by pathogenic Old World and New World arenaviruses these pathogens use different primary receptors. The Old World arenaviruses employ alpha-dystroglycan, a cellular receptor for proteins of the extracellular matrix, and the human pathogenic New World arenaviruses use the cellular cargo receptor transferrin receptor 1. While the New World arenavirus JUNV enters cells via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, evidence occurred for clathrin-independent entry of the prototypic Old World arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Upon internalization, arenaviruses are delivered to the endosome, where pH-dependent membrane fusion is mediated by the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While arenavirus GPs share characteristics with class I fusion GPs of other enveloped viruses, unusual mechanistic features of GP-mediated membrane fusion have recently been discovered for arenaviruses with important implications for viral entry.

  16. Use of Bacteriophages to control bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytic bacteriophages can provide a natural method and an effective alternative to antibiotics to reduce bacterial pathogens in animals, foods, and other environments. Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses which infect bacterial cells and eventually kill them through lysis, and represent the most abun...

  17. Host-pathogen interactions in typhoid fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on host-pathogen interactions in Salmonella Typhi and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections and explores the interplay between these bacteria and the innate immune system. Typhoid fever is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in low-income countries. With adequate

  18. Suppression of soil-borne plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agtmaal, van M.

    2015-01-01

    Soil borne plant pathogens considerably reduce crop yields worldwide and are difficult to control due to their ”masked” occurrence  in the heterogeneous soil environment. This hampers the efficacy of chemical - and microbiological control agents.   Outbreaks of crop diseas

  19. Plant Fungal Pathogens: Methods and Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolton, M.D.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the course of evolution, fungi have adapted to occupy specific niches, from symbiotically inhabiting the flora of the intestinal tract of mammals to saprophytic growth on leaf litter resting on the forest floor. In Plant Fungal Pathogens: Methods and Protocols, expert researchers in the field d

  20. Pathogenic human viruses in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Donaldson, Kim A.; Paul, J.H.; Rose, Joan B.

    2003-01-01

    This review addresses both historical and recent investigations into viral contamination of marine waters. With the relatively recent emergence of molecular biology-based assays, a number of investigations have shown that pathogenic viruses are prevalent in marine waters being impacted by sewage. Research has shown that this group of fecal-oral viral pathogens (enteroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses, rotaviruses, etc.) can cause a broad range of asymptomatic to severe gastrointestinal, respiratory, and eye, nose, ear, and skin infections in people exposed through recreational use of the water. The viruses and the nucleic acid signature survive for an extended period in the marine environment. One of the primary concerns of public health officials is the relationship between the presence of pathogens and the recreational risk to human health in polluted marine environments. While a number of studies have attempted to address this issue, the relationship is still poorly understood. A contributing factor to our lack of progress in the field has been the lack of sensitive methods to detect the broad range of both bacterial and viral pathogens. The application of new and advanced molecular methods will continue to contribute to our current state of knowledge in this emerging and

  1. 77 FR 34783 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule... importation of bird and poultry products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza... avian influenza (HPAI). On January 24, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 4046-4056...

  2. Surveys for Pathogens of Monoecious Hydrilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    purpose of the study presented herein was to survey some known populations of monoecious hydrilla and isolate potential fungal pathogens. MATERIALS ...sporulating species herein noted as dematiaceous (dark mycelium ) or moniliaceous (hyaline mycelium ) Ascomycetes (Table 1). The majority of the species

  3. Control of indigenous pathogenic bacteria in seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria indigenous to the aquatic and general environment are listed. Their distribution in nature, prevalence in seafood and the possibilities for growth of these organisms in various types of products are outlined These data, combined with what is known regarding the epidemiology...

  4. On putative periodontal pathogens: an epidemiological perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Rodrigo; Hujoel, Philippe; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    The current understanding on the role of microbiology on periodontitis causation is reviewed. An appraisal of the literature reveals several issues that have limited the attempts to investigate candidate periodontal pathogens as causes of periodontitis and confirms that only limited epidemiological evidence is available. Several aspects of the contemporary understanding on causal inference are discussed with examples for periodontitis.

  5. Novel Micro-organisms controlling plant pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Köhl, J

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to control of pathogen caused diseases on leaves, fruits and ears in plants, such as apple scab (Venturia inaequalis by treatment of plant with an isolate of Cladosporium cladosporioides. The treatment is effective in both prevention and treatment of the fungal infection

  6. PATHOGENS OF FISH AT LAKE ZIWAY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: Parasites and bacterial pathogens of fish at Lake Ziway, during. 1996~97 were .... abdominal lesions), 3 catfish (liver, kidney, gut content and skin bruising), 2 carp species .... birds, frogs, turtles and healthy fish (Roberts, 1989).

  7. EPCOT, NASA and plant pathogens in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R

    1996-01-01

    Cooperative work between NASA and Walt Disney World's EPCOT Land Pavilion is described. Joint efforts include research about allelopathy in multi-species plant cropping in CELSS, LEDs as light sources in hydroponic systems, and the growth of plant pathogens in space.

  8. Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution of a global pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Luísa C S; Visca, Paolo; Towner, Kevin J

    2014-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen and one of the six most important multidrug-resistant microorganisms in hospitals worldwide. This human pathogen is responsible for a vast array of infections, of which ventilator-associated pneumonia and bloodstream infections are the most common, and mortality rates can reach 35%. Community-acquired infections have also been reported, but few strains have been recovered from environmental sources and infection reservoirs external to the hospital have not been identified. The majority of A. baumannii infections are caused by two main population clones with worldwide distribution. Infection outbreaks are often associated with multidrug resistance, including the recent emergence of strains resistant to all available antibiotics. Nevertheless, A. baumannii virulence traits and pathogenic potential have mostly remained elusive. The recent expansion of A. baumannii sequenced genomes has permitted the development of large-array phylogenomic and phenotypic analyses, which can offer valuable insights into the evolution and adaptation of A. baumannii as a human pathogen. This review summarises these recent advances, with particular focus on A. baumannii evolutionary and genomic aspects, and proposes new avenues of research.

  9. Quantitative multiplex detection of pathogen biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Harshini; Xie, Hongzhi; Swanson, Basil I.; Martinez, Jennifer; Grace, Wynne K.

    2016-02-09

    The present invention addresses the simultaneous detection and quantitative measurement of multiple biomolecules, e.g., pathogen biomarkers through either a sandwich assay approach or a lipid insertion approach. The invention can further employ a multichannel, structure with multi-sensor elements per channel.

  10. Ewingella Americana: An Emerging True Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Ewingella americana have been rarely reported in the literature. Most of the cases that have been reported were among the immunocompromised patients. We report a case of E. americana causing osteomyelitis and septic arthritis of the shoulder joint in a previous intravenous drug abuser. The causative pathogen was identified by synovial fluid analysis and culture.

  11. Nanoscale glucan polymer network causes pathogen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, Dennis; Naumann, Marcel; Reimer, Rudolph; Voigt, Christian A

    2014-02-24

    Successful defence of plants against colonisation by fungal pathogens depends on the ability to prevent initial penetration of the plant cell wall. Here we report that the pathogen-induced (1,3)-β-glucan cell wall polymer callose, which is deposited at sites of attempted penetration, directly interacts with the most prominent cell wall polymer, the (1,4)-β-glucan cellulose, to form a three-dimensional network at sites of attempted fungal penetration. Localisation microscopy, a super-resolution microscopy technique based on the precise localisation of single fluorescent molecules, facilitated discrimination between single polymer fibrils in this network. Overexpression of the pathogen-induced callose synthase PMR4 in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana not only enlarged focal callose deposition and polymer network formation but also resulted in the exposition of a callose layer on the surface of the pre-existing cellulosic cell wall facing the invading pathogen. The importance of this previously unknown polymeric defence network is to prevent cell wall hydrolysis and penetration by the fungus. We anticipate our study to promote nanoscale analysis of plant-microbe interactions with a special focus on polymer rearrangements in and at the cell wall. Moreover, the general applicability of localisation microscopy in visualising polymers beyond plant research will help elucidate their biological function in complex networks.

  12. Carp erythrodermatitis: host defense-pathogen interaction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourreau, C.N.

    1990-01-01

    The outcome of a bacterial infection depends on the interaction between pathogen and host. The ability of the microbe to survive in the host depends on its invasive potential (i.e. spreading and multiplication), and its ability to obtain essential nutrients and to resist the host's defense syste

  13. Quantitative multiplex detection of pathogen biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Harshini; Xie, Hongzhi; Swanson, Basil I; Martinez, Jennifer; Grace, Wynne K

    2014-10-14

    The present invention addresses the simultaneous detection and quantitative measurement of multiple biomolecules, e.g., pathogen biomarkers through either a sandwich assay approach or a lipid insertion approach. The invention can further employ a multichannel, structure with multi-sensor elements per channel.

  14. Carp erythrodermatitis : host defense-pathogen interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourreau, C.N.

    1990-01-01

    The outcome of a bacterial infection depends on the interaction between pathogen and host. The ability of the microbe to survive in the host depends on its invasive potential (i.e. spreading and multiplication), and its ability to obtain essential nutrients and to resist the host'

  15. Rapid methods: the detection of foodborne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.; Hazeleger, W.C.

    2009-01-01

    Although bacteria are the first type of microorganisms that come to mind when discussing microbial food safety, they are by no means the only pathogenic foodborne microorganisms. Mycotoxin producing moulds, human enteric viruses, protozoan parasites and marine biotoxins are also of importance. Howev

  16. Control of indigenous pathogenic bacteria in seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria indigenous to the aquatic and general environment are listed. Their distribution in nature, prevalence in seafood and the possibilities for growth of these organisms in various types of products are outlined These data, combined with what is known regarding the epidemiology...

  17. Identification of periodontal pathogens in atherosclerotic vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Larsen, Tove; Christiansen, Natalia;

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that periodontitis may be associated with presence of atherosclerosis. DNA from periodontal pathogens has been detected in atherosclerotic lesions, but viable oral bacteria have not yet been isolated from atherosclerotic plaques. The purpose of the present study...

  18. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Miklós Pogány; Tamás Dankó; Evelin Kámán-Tóth; Ildikó Schwarczinger; Zoltán Bozsó

    2015-01-01

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is s...

  19. TEACHING HOSPITAL: COMMON BACTERIAL PATHOGENS SEEN.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-27

    Jun 27, 2006 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice ... Background: Bacterial infections are important causes of morbidity in the neonatal period. ... Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas are the least encountered in this series ... pathogens in pyogenic meningitis. .... skin infection 85 (10.5%) and diarrhea! vomiting.

  20. Rapid methods: the detection of foodborne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.; Hazeleger, W.C.

    2009-01-01

    Although bacteria are the first type of microorganisms that come to mind when discussing microbial food safety, they are by no means the only pathogenic foodborne microorganisms. Mycotoxin producing moulds, human enteric viruses, protozoan parasites and marine biotoxins are also of importance. Howev

  1. MARINE MAMMAL DISEASES: PATHOGENS AND PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide a concise overview of the pathogens and processes that alter the health of marine mammals. Viral disease is the most common etiology of significant mortality events in marine mammals. Discussion of viral disease focuses on effects in the ...

  2. Pathogenicity of P. terrestris on Maize Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Lević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenicity of P. terrestris was determined by the Knop’s medium slants method intest tubes. Isolates originated from the roots of maize (Zea mays L., barley (Hordeum vulgareL., Johnson grass (Sorghum halepense Pers., sorghum (Sorghum bicolour (L. Moench., garlic(Allium sativum L., onion (Allium cepa L., barnyard millet (Echinochloa crus-galli (L. P.Beauv.and green foxtail (Setaria viridis (L. P.B.. A fragment of a fungal colony, cultivated on PDA,was placed on the bottom of Knop’s medium slant in each test tube and then steriliseda maize seed was placed 2 cm away from the inoculum. After 21-day inoculation of seeds,the intensity of the development of symptoms on maize seedlings was estimated. The reddishor dark pigment on the root, mesocotyl and/or coleoptyl of seedlings was an indicatorfor the infection by the fungus under in vitro conditions. Based on the pathogenicity test,the isolates were classified into the following three groups: slightly (3 isolates, moderately(6 isolates and very pathogenic (6 isolates to maize seedlings. The obtained results showthat P. terrestris, originating from different hosts, can be a maize pathogen. These resultscan explain the high frequency and high incidence of this fungus on maize roots in Serbia.

  3. Paleogene radiation of a plant pathogenic mushroom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P A Coetzee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The global movement and speciation of fungal plant pathogens is important, especially because of the economic losses they cause and the ease with which they are able to spread across large areas. Understanding the biogeography and origin of these plant pathogens can provide insights regarding their dispersal and current day distribution. We tested the hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin of the plant pathogenic mushroom genus Armillaria and the currently accepted premise that vicariance accounts for the extant distribution of the species. METHODS: The phylogeny of a selection of Armillaria species was reconstructed based on Maximum Parsimony (MP, Maximum Likelihood (ML and Bayesian Inference (BI. A timeline was then placed on the divergence of lineages using a Bayesian relaxed molecular clock approach. RESULTS: Phylogenetic analyses of sequenced data for three combined nuclear regions provided strong support for three major geographically defined clades: Holarctic, South American-Australasian and African. Molecular dating placed the initial radiation of the genus at 54 million years ago within the Early Paleogene, postdating the tectonic break-up of Gondwana. CONCLUSIONS: The distribution of extant Armillaria species is the result of ancient long-distance dispersal rather than vicariance due to continental drift. As these finding are contrary to most prior vicariance hypotheses for fungi, our results highlight the important role of long-distance dispersal in the radiation of fungal pathogens from the Southern Hemisphere.

  4. Pathogen Inactivation Technologies: The Advent of Pathogen-Reduced Blood Components to Reduce Blood Safety Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Dana V; Schubert, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Pathogen inactivation technologies represent a shift in blood safety from a reactive approach to a proactive protective strategy. Commercially available technologies demonstrate effective killing of most viruses, bacteria, and parasites and are capable of inactivating passenger leukocytes in blood products. The use of pathogen inactivation causes a decrease in the parameters of products that can be readily measured in laboratory assays but that do not seem to cause any alteration in hemostatic effect of plasma or platelet transfusions. Effort needs to be made to further develop these technologies so that the negative quality impact is ameliorated without reducing the pathogen inactivation effectiveness.

  5. Antibiotic Susceptibility and Immunomodulatory Potential of Chosen Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sujatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Antibiotic susceptibility is still the best way for bacterial pathogen escape mechanism against immunity. Approach: In the present investigation, bacterial pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used to screen antibiotic susceptibility and immunomodulatory potential. Results: All the test pathogens were sensitive to all the test antibiotics 11±2 mm except penicillin. The conditions for the preparation of antigens of intact natural composition and conformation from pathogens (whole cell and heat killed, were determined using Swiss albino mice (Balb/C as experimental species. Immunomodulatory potential of test pathogens were screened using animal model. Test pathogen decreases the body weight comparing that of normal mice, some notable changes were also noted in activity, growth, water consumption, feed consumption. Antibody titre level in animal serum decreased upto 50% in whole cell pathogen and heat killed pathogen treated animals. Conclusion: The five pathogens administered animals, decrement in B-lymphocyte was much pronounced in Pseudomonas aeruginosa followed by Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella sp., Aeromonas hydrophila in the 5 week. Pathogen treated mice showed an IgG suppressive effect. It is found to be suppressive to T cell production, so induction in cell mediated immunity has confirmed pathogenic potential of test pathogens. All these test pathogenic strains were remarkably suppressing immune system of pathogen exposed animals.

  6. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Meyer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We here compared pathogenic (p and non-pathogenic (np isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1-A12 derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1-B12 derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. "Non-pathogenicity" included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while "pathogenicity" comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica.

  7. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Martin; Fehling, Helena; Matthiesen, Jenny; Lorenzen, Stephan; Schuldt, Kathrin; Bernin, Hannah; Zaruba, Mareen; Lender, Corinna; Ernst, Thomas; Ittrich, Harald; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2016-08-01

    We here compared pathogenic (p) and non-pathogenic (np) isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA)-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1-A12) derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1-B12) derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. "Non-pathogenicity" included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while "pathogenicity" comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP) activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica.

  8. Recent developments in pathogen detection arrays: implications for fungal plant pathogens and use in practica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, B.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The failure to adequately identify plant pathogens from culture-based morphological techniques has led to the development of culture-independent molecular approaches. Increasingly, diagnostic laboratories are pursuing fast routine methods that provide reliable identification, sensitive detection, an

  9. Pathogenicity of human high pathogenic H5N1 virus with different plaque property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-qiang LI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the pathogenicity of human high pathogenic H5N1 virus with different plaque property,and provide a new train of thought and basis for research on crossing species-genus transmission of avian influenza virus.Methods Variants with different plaque property(larger-and smaller-plaque variant were isolated from A/Beijing/01/03(H5N1(BJ01 by the plaque purification.Mice were inoculated intranasally(i.n. with each kind of isolated variant and monitored for 14 days to record and calculate the body weight change and the survival rate.The difference in pathogenicity of isolated variants was estimated with proper principle of statistics.Results The plaques of original strain of BJ01 virus were heterogeneous with various size and shape.Larger-plaque variants(L1 and L2 and smaller-plaque variants(S1,S2 and S3 were isolated separately.The pathogenicity was higher in S1 and S2 variants than in S3,L1 and L2 variants,and that of L2 variant was the lowest.Variants forming different plaques were heterogeneous in pathogenicity,and those forming same plaques were also heterogeneous in pathogenicity.Conclusion There is no linear correlation between the pathogenicity of variants and the size of plaque they formed.The variants with different pathogenicity could be isolated from the same H5N1 virus strain by plaque purification.These results would provide a basis for vaccine development and the studies on molecular mechanism of H5N1 virus.

  10. Polyamine Metabolism in Flax in Response to Treatment with Pathogenic and Non-pathogenic Fusarium Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioleta eWojtasik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Flax crop yield is limited by various environmental factors, but the largest crop losses worldwide are caused by Fusarium infection. Polyamines are one of the many metabolites possibly involved in the plant response to infection. However, in flax the polyamine composition, genes involved in polyamine synthesis, and their regulation, were previously unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the polyamine synthesis pathway in flax and its involvement in response to pathogen infection. It is well established that polyamines are essential for the growth and development of both plants and fungi, but their role in pathogen infection still remains unknown. In our study we correlated the expression of genes involved in polyamine metabolism with the polyamine levels in plant tissues and compared the results for flax seedlings treated with two pathogenic and one non-pathogenic strains of Fusarium. We observed an increase in the expression of genes participating in polyamine synthesis after fungal infection, and it was reflected in an increase of polyamine content in the plant tissues. The highest level of mRNA was characteristic for ornithine decarboxylase during infection with all tested Fusarium strains and the arginine decarboxylase gene during infection with the pathogenic strain of F. culmorum. The main polyamine identified in the flax was putrescine, and its level changed the most during infection. Moreover, the considerable increase in the cell wall-bound polyamines compared to the levels of free and conjugated polyamines may indicate that their main role during pathogen infection lies in strengthening of the cell wall. In vitro experiments showed that the polyamines inhibit Fusarium growth, which suggests that they play an important role in plant defence mechanisms. Furthermore, changes in metabolism and content of polyamines indicate different defence mechanisms activated in flax in response to infection by pathogenic and non-pathogenic

  11. Common features of opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkinham, Joseph O

    2015-04-24

    Recently it has been estimated that the annual cost of diseases caused by the waterborne pathogens Legionella pneumonia, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is $500 million. For the period 2001-2012, the estimated cost of hospital admissions for nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease, the majority caused by M. avium, was almost $1 billion. These three waterborne opportunistic pathogens are normal inhabitants of drinking water--not contaminants--that share a number of key characteristics that predispose them to survival, persistence, and growth in drinking water distribution systems and premise plumbing. Herein, I list and describe these shared characteristics that include: disinfectant-resistance, biofilm-formation, growth in amoebae, growth at low organic carbon concentrations (oligotrophic), and growth under conditions of stagnation. This review is intended to increase awareness of OPPPs, identify emerging OPPPs, and challenge the drinking water industry to develop novel approaches toward their control.

  12. Corynebacterium ulcerans, an emerging human pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Elena; Antunes, Camila A; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L; Burkovski, Andreas; Tauch, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    While formerly known infections of Corynebacterium ulcerans are rare and mainly associated with contact to infected cattle, C. ulcerans has become an emerging pathogen today. In Western Europe, cases of respiratory diphtheria caused by C. ulcerans have been reported more often than infections by Corynebacterium diphtheria, while systemic infections are also increasingly reported. Little is known about factors that contribute to host colonization and virulence of this zoonotic pathogen. Research in this field has received new impetus by the publication of several C. ulcerans genome sequences in the past years. This review gives a comprehensive overview of the basic knowledge of C. ulcerans, as well as the recent advances made in the analysis of putative virulence factors.

  13. The RAM network in pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputo, Sarah; Chabrier-Rosello, Yeissa; Luca, Francis C; Kumar, Anuj; Krysan, Damian J

    2012-06-01

    The regulation of Ace2 and morphogenesis (RAM) network is a protein kinase signaling pathway conserved among eukaryotes from yeasts to humans. Among fungi, the RAM network has been most extensively studied in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has been shown to regulate a range of cellular processes, including daughter cell-specific gene expression, cell cycle regulation, cell separation, mating, polarized growth, maintenance of cell wall integrity, and stress signaling. Increasing numbers of recent studies on the role of the RAM network in pathogenic fungal species have revealed that this network also plays an important role in the biology and pathogenesis of these organisms. In addition to providing a brief overview of the RAM network in S. cerevisiae, we summarize recent developments in the understanding of RAM network function in the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Pneumocystis spp.

  14. Formaldehyde stress responses in bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Houqian Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is the simplest of all aldehydes and is highly cytotoxic. Its use and associated dangers from environmental exposure have been well documented. Detoxification systems for formaldehyde are found throughout the biological world and they are especially important in methylotrophic bacteria, which generate this compound as part of their metabolism of methanol. Formaldehyde metabolizing systems can be divided into those dependent upon pterin cofactors, sugar phosphates and those dependent upon glutathione. The more prevalent thiol-dependent formaldehyde detoxification system is found in many bacterial pathogens, almost all of which do not metabolize methane or methanol. This review describes the endogenous and exogenous sources of formaldehyde, its toxic effects and mechanisms of detoxification. The methods of formaldehyde sensing are also described with a focus on the formaldehyde responsive transcription factors HxlR, FrmR and NmlR. Finally, the physiological relevance of detoxification systems for formaldehyde in bacterial pathogens is discussed.

  15. The floating (pathogenicity) island: a genomic dessert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Richard P.; Ram, Geeta

    2015-01-01

    Among the prokaryotic genomic islands (GIs) involved in horizontal gene transfer (HGT) are the classical pathogenicity islands, including the integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), the gene-transfer agents (GTAs), and the staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs), the primary focus of this review. While the ICEs and GTAs mediate HGT autonomously, the SaPIs are dependent on specific phages. The ICEs transfer primarily their own DNA the GTAs exclusively unlinked host DNA and the SaPIs combine the capabilities of both. Thus the SaPIs derive their importance from the genes they carry (their genetic cargo) and the genes they move. They act not only as versatile high frequency mobilizers, but also as mediators of phage interference, and consequently are major benefactors of their host bacteria. PMID:26744223

  16. Main Concerns of Pathogenic Microorganisms in Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørrung, Birgit; Andersen, Jens Kirk; Buncic, Sava

    Although various foods can serve as sources of foodborne illness, meat and meat products are important sources of human infections with a variety of foodborne pathogens, i.e. Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Verotoxigenic E. coli and, to some extent, Listeria monocytogenes. All these may be harboured in the gastrointestinal tract of food-producing animals. The most frequent chain of events leading to meat-borne illness involves food animals, which are healthy carriers of the pathogens that are subsequently transferred to humans through production, handling and consumption of meat and meat products. Occurrences of Salmonella spp., C. jejuni/coli, Y. enterocolitica and Verotoxigenic E. coli in fresh red meat vary relatively widely, although most often are between 1 and 10%, depending on a range of factors including the organism, geographical factors, farming and/or meat production practices.

  17. Evolutionary interaction networks of insect pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Jacobus J; Jensen, Annette B; Meyling, Nicolai V; Eilenberg, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Lineages of insect pathogenic fungi are concentrated in three major clades: Hypocreales (several genera), Entomophthoromycota (orders Entomophthorales and Neozygitales), and Onygenales (genus Ascosphaera). Our review focuses on aspects of the evolutionary biology of these fungi that have remained underemphasized in previous reviews. To ensure integration with the better-known domains of insect pathology research, we followed a conceptual framework formulated by Tinbergen, asking complementary questions on mechanism, ontogeny, phylogeny, and adaptation. We aim to provide an introduction to the merits of evolutionary approaches for readers with a background in invertebrate pathology research and to make the insect pathogenic fungi more accessible as model systems for evolutionary biologists. We identify a number of questions in which fundamental research can offer novel insights into the evolutionary forces that have shaped host specialization and life-history traits such as spore number and size, somatic growth rate, toxin production, and interactions with host immune systems.

  18. Molecular techniques for characterisation of pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Marie-Louise

    Pathogens have always had a major interest to humans due to their central role in sickness and death. Influenza A annually kills at least 250,000 humans, and has been the cause of millions of further deaths during pandemic years in the past. Plague (Yersinia pestis) has been the cause of the Black...... Death that was leading to the desertion of whole cities, and as a result was for centuries one of the most feared events in human life. For both of these organisms we generally have situations with only very small amounts of pathogen nucleic acids available, usually because many interesting samples...... are degraded, as these samples are historic or generally patient samples. In this thesis we have principally explored methods to extract genetic information from such degraded samples, using the modern ‘high-throughput’ techniques of second generation sequencing (SGS) and mass spectrometry (MS), coupled...

  19. Efficacy of Miswak on Oral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Sukkarwalla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral cavity harbors a diverse and abundant number of complex oral pathogens causing different oral diseases. The development of dental caries and periodontal diseases has been found to be closely associated with various gram positive and gram negative microrganisms. Miswak, a natural toothbrush, has been documented as a potent antibacterial aid and its use is encouraged in different countries because of its good taste, texture, availability, cost and beneficial effect on teeth and supporting tissues. Different researches have been carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of Miswak. This review encompasses the efficacy of Miswak on suppression of oral pathogens with respect to conducted on fungi as well as cariogenic, periodontal and endodontic bacteria.

  20. Parasites can enhance infections of fish with bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    In aquaculture systems, fish are commonly infected by multiple pathogens, including parasites. Parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) and bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri are two common pathogens of cultured channel catfish. The objectives were to 1) evaluate the susceptibility of Ich parasitize...

  1. The Genetic and Molecular Basis of Plant Resistance to Pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhang; Thomas Lubberstedt; Mingliang Xu

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens have evolved numerous strategies to obtain nutritive materials from their host,and plants in turn have evolved the preformed physical and chemical barriers as well as sophisticated two-tiered immune system to combat pathogen attacks.Genetically,plant resistance to pathogens can be divided into qualitative and quantitative disease resistance,conditioned by major gene(s) and multiple genes with minor effects,respectively.Qualitative disease resistance has been mostly detected in plant defense against biotrophic pathogens,whereas quantitative disease resistance is involved in defense response to all plant pathogens,from biotrophs,hemibiotrophs to necrotrophs.Plant resistance is achieved through interception of pathogen-derived effectors and elicitation of defense response.In recent years,great progress has been made related to the molecular basis underlying host-pathogen interactions.In this review,we would like to provide an update on genetic and molecular aspects of plant resistance to pathogens.

  2. Emergence and accumulation of novel pathogens suppress an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Kerry Bohl; Harmon, Philip F; Goss, Erica M; Clay, Keith; Luke Flory, S

    2016-04-01

    Emerging pathogens are a growing threat to human health, agriculture and the diversity of ecological communities but may also help control problematic species. Here we investigated the diversity, distribution and consequences of emerging fungal pathogens infecting an aggressive invasive grass that is rapidly colonising habitats throughout the eastern USA. We document the recent emergence and accumulation over time of diverse pathogens that are members of a single fungal genus and represent multiple, recently described or undescribed species. We also show that experimental suppression of these pathogens increased host performance in the field, demonstrating the negative effects of emerging pathogens on invasive plants. Our results suggest that invasive species can facilitate pathogen emergence and amplification, raising concerns about movement of pathogens among agricultural, horticultural, and wild grasses. However, one possible benefit of pathogen accumulation is suppression of aggressive invaders over the long term, potentially abating their negative impacts on native communities.

  3. Swainsonine biosynthesis genes in diverse symbiotic and pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainsonine, a cytotoxic fungal alkaloid and a potential cancer therapy drug, is produced by the insect pathogen and plant symbiont, Metarhizium robertsii, the clover pathogen Slafractonia leguminicola, locoweed symbionts belonging to Alternaria sect. Undifilum, and a recently discovered morning glo...

  4. The public health implications of pathogens in polluted aquatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Freshwater Biology ... Pathogen contamination in water sources and related diseases constitute major ... The problem is undoubtedly worse in developing world where there is higher public exposure to sources of pathogenic water ...

  5. Biocontrol interventions for inactivation of foodborne pathogens on produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-harvest interventions for control of foodborne pathogens on minimally processed foods are crucial for food safety. Biocontrol interventions have the primary objective of developing novel antagonists in combinations with physical and chemical interventions to inactivate pathogenic microbes. Ther...

  6. Control of extraintestinal foodborne pathogens using intervention technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years it has become apparent that emerging foodborne pathogens including Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC), Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae are associated with human health conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC...

  7. Pathogens spectrum of deep human mycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Kulko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes characteristics of two different etiology groups of deep human mycosis — extremely dangerous endemic deep mycoses (histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, penicilliosis due to Penicillium marneffei and opportunistic deep mycosis (candidiasis, cryptococcosis, aspergillosis, mucormycosis. Information on fungal pathogens and antifungal agents is presented. The own results of cultural studies obtained during pneumomycosis diagnosis in patients with tuberculosis are shown.

  8. Host-pathogen interactions in typhoid fever

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on host-pathogen interactions in Salmonella Typhi and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections and explores the interplay between these bacteria and the innate immune system. Typhoid fever is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in low-income countries. With adequate antibiotic treatment it has a low mortality rate. Melioidosis also commonly causes community-acquired sepsis in Southeast Asia and northern Australia but even with appropriate antibiotic treatment ...

  9. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  10. Surveys for Pathogens of Monoecious Hydrilla 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    hypothesized that the growth and reproductive habits were adaptations to northern climates, which suggests a temperate origin of the plant that was...it was only mildly pathogenic; but when it was inoculated onto plants that were endophyte-infected, the stressed plants usually died. These...Netherland, and Zack Banks for collecting monoecious hydrilla samples. Thanks also go to Michael Grodowitz and Lynde Dodd for reviewing the manuscript

  11. Comparative Phylogenomics of Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Whiston

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ascomycete Onygenales order embraces a diverse group of mammalian pathogens, including the yeast-forming dimorphic fungal pathogens Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides spp. and Blastomyces dermatitidis, the dermatophytes Microsporum spp. and Trichopyton spp., the spherule-forming dimorphic fungal pathogens in the genus Coccidioides, and many nonpathogens. Although genomes for all of the aforementioned pathogenic species are available, only one nonpathogen had been sequenced. Here, we enhance comparative phylogenomics in Onygenales by adding genomes for Amauroascus mutatus, Amauroascus niger, Byssoonygena ceratinophila, and Chrysosporium queenslandicum—four nonpathogenic Onygenales species, all of which are more closely related to Coccidioides spp. than any other known Onygenales species. Phylogenomic detection of gene family expansion and contraction can provide clues to fungal function but is sensitive to taxon sampling. By adding additional nonpathogens, we show that LysM domain-containing proteins, previously thought to be expanding in some Onygenales, are contracting in the Coccidioides-Uncinocarpus clade, as are the self-nonself recognition Het loci. The denser genome sampling presented here highlights nearly 800 genes unique to Coccidiodes, which have significantly fewer known protein domains and show increased expression in the endosporulating spherule, the parasitic phase unique to Coccidioides spp. These genomes provide insight to gene family expansion/contraction and patterns of individual gene gain/loss in this diverse order—both major drivers of evolutionary change. Our results suggest that gene family expansion/contraction can lead to adaptive radiations that create taxonomic orders, while individual gene gain/loss likely plays a more significant role in branch-specific phenotypic changes that lead to adaptation for species or genera.

  12. Identifying Airborne Pathogens in Time to Respond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-25

    Among the possible terrorist activities that might threaten national security is the release of an airborne pathogen such as anthrax. Because the potential damage to human health could be severe, experts consider 1 minute to be an operationally useful time limit for identifying the pathogen and taking action. Many commercial systems can identify airborne pathogenic microbes, but they take days or, at best, hours to produce results. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other U.S. government agencies are interested in finding a faster approach. To answer this national need, a Livermore team, led by scientist Eric Gard, has developed the bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) system--the only instrument that can detect and identify spores at low concentrations in less than 1 minute. BAMS can successfully distinguish between two related but different spore species. It can also sort out a single spore from thousands of other particles--biological and nonbiological--with no false positives. The BAMS team won a 2005 R&D 100 Award for developing the system. Livermore's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program funded the biomedical aspects of the BAMS project, and the Department of Defense's Technical Support Working Group and Defense Advanced Research Project Agency funded the biodefense efforts. Developing a detection system that can analyze small samples so quickly has been challenging. Livermore engineer Vincent Riot, who worked on the BAMS project, explains, ''A typical spore weighs approximately one-trillionth of a gram and is dispersed in the atmosphere, which contains naturally occurring particles that could be present at concentrations thousands of times higher. Previous systems also had difficulty separating benign organisms from those that are pathogenic but very similar, which has resulted in false alarms''.

  13. Latest developments in foodborne pathogen risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Membré, Jeanne Marie; Guillou, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological Risk Assessment (MRA) is a structured process for determining the public health risk associated with foodborne pathogens. In recent years, there has been a strong tendency in providing food safety decisions based upon quantitative assessment. Especially, variability and uncertainty inherent to biological processes have been integrated in food safety management through the use of powerful statistical and probabilistic techniques. Besides, recent developments in omic technologie...

  14. Pathogens spectrum of deep human mycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Kulko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article describes characteristics of two different etiology groups of deep human mycosis — extremely dangerous endemic deep mycoses (histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, penicilliosis due to Penicillium marneffei and opportunistic deep mycosis (candidiasis, cryptococcosis, aspergillosis, mucormycosis. Information on fungal pathogens and antifungal agents is presented. The own results of cultural studies obtained during pneumomycosis diagnosis in patients with tuberculosis are shown.

  15. Carp erythrodermatitis: host defense-pathogen interaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Pourreau, C.N.

    1990-01-01

    The outcome of a bacterial infection depends on the interaction between pathogen and host. The ability of the microbe to survive in the host depends on its invasive potential (i.e. spreading and multiplication), and its ability to obtain essential nutrients and to resist the host's defense system. On the other hand, the host's resistance to a bacterial attack depends on its physiological state, the intensity of the bacterial attack and the efficacy of the defense system to neutralize toxins a...

  16. Pathogenicity gene variations within the order Entomophthorales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Lange, Lene

    , conidia are produced and discharged when humidity gets high—usually during night. In an earlier secretome study of field-collected grain aphids (Sitobion avenae) infected with entomophthoralean fungi, a number of pathogenesis-related, secreted enzymes were discovered (Fungal Genetics and Biology 2011, vol...... pathogenicity genes within genera Entomophthora and Pandora, using fungal genomic DNA originating from field-collected, infected insect host species of dipteran (flies, mosquitoes) or hemipteran (aphid) origin....

  17. Swiss Army Pathogen: The Salmonella Entry Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Hume

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella causes disease in humans and animals ranging from mild self-limiting gastroenteritis to potentially life-threatening typhoid fever. Salmonellosis remains a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality globally, and hence imposes a huge socio-economic burden worldwide. A key property of all pathogenic Salmonella strains is the ability to invade non-phagocytic host cells. The major determinant of this invasiveness is a Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS, a molecular syringe that injects virulence effector proteins directly into target host cells. These effectors cooperatively manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to drive pathogen internalization. Salmonella does not only rely on these injected effectors, but also uses several other T3SS-independent mechanisms to gain entry into host cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the methods used by Salmonella for cell invasion, with a focus on the host signaling networks that must be coordinately exploited for the pathogen to achieve its goal.

  18. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  19. Pathogenic bacterial contaminations in hospital cafeteria foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanasena, Paweena; Somboonwatthanakul, Issaraporn

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to examine the pathogenic bacterial contaminations in foods sold in hospital cafeteria. A study was conducted between April and September of 2008 using cafeteria located in Mahasarakham provincial hospital, Thailand, as a study area. The cafeteria foods were evaluated for contaminations with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus faecalis, which have been earlier reported to cause nosocomial outbreaks. Of 33 different types of ready-to-eat foods, the majority (54.54%) were found to have bacteria >10(7) colony forming units per gram of food (cfu g(-1)), whereas 36.36% and only 9.10% of them were found to have bacteria at 10(6)-10(7) and cafeteria were contaminated with several pathogenic bacteria at unacceptable levels. Healthcare authorities should be more aware that ready-to-eat cafeteria foods that are heavily contaminated with pathogenic bacteria may be harmful to healthcare workers and visitors and may result in nosocomial infections of the patients.

  20. Emerging roles of pathogens in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklossy, Judith

    2011-09-20

    Chronic spirochetal infection can cause slowly progressive dementia, cortical atrophy and amyloid deposition in the atrophic form of general paresis. There is a significant association between Alzheimer disease (AD) and various types of spirochete (including the periodontal pathogen Treponemas and Borrelia burgdorferi), and other pathogens such as Chlamydophyla pneumoniae and herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1). Exposure of mammalian neuronal and glial cells and organotypic cultures to spirochetes reproduces the biological and pathological hallmarks of AD. Senile-plaque-like beta amyloid (Aβ) deposits are also observed in mice following inhalation of C. pneumoniae in vivo, and Aβ accumulation and phosphorylation of tau is induced in neurons by HSV-1 in vitro and in vivo. Specific bacterial ligands, and bacterial and viral DNA and RNA all increase the expression of proinflammatory molecules, which activates the innate and adaptive immune systems. Evasion of pathogens from destruction by the host immune reactions leads to persistent infection, chronic inflammation, neuronal destruction and Aβ deposition. Aβ has been shown to be a pore-forming antimicrobial peptide, indicating that Aβ accumulation might be a response to infection. Global attention and action is needed to support this emerging field of research because dementia might be prevented by combined antibiotic, antiviral and anti-inflammatory therapy.

  1. Distribution of pathogenic Naegleria spp in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiewcharoen, S; Junnu, V

    2001-01-01

    Research concerning the distribution, isolation, viability, ultrastructure, morphology and immunogenicity of Naegleria fowleri has been increasing in Thailand during 1988-2000. The distribution of the organism was carried out from 1985 to 1987 in Si Sa Ket and Ubon Rachathani Provinces, after the first fatal case was reported in Si Sa Ket. Since then in a 1998 survey of N. fowleri in stagnant water around industrial areas was carried out in Pathum Thani, Samut Prakan and Lopburi provinces. The results showed that 10% of pathogenic Naegleria belonged to species fowleri as characterized by morphology and the occurrence of pathogenesis in mice after nasal inoculation. In the same year, Nacapunchai et al (1999) determined the prevalence of amebae in aquatic habitat of human environments in five parts of Thailand during the summer. Fourteen percent of free living Naegleria spp were found in both soil and water resources. Recent studies of the ultrastructure, factors affecting the viability and SDS-PAGE electrophoretic patterns of 3 Thai strains of pathogenic Naegleria spp indicated their similarities in morphological characteristics of pathogenic reference control, Naegleria fowleri CDC VO 3081. Additional study using a genetic approach to species criteria using allozyme electrophoresis had been conducted.

  2. Clostridium difficile is an autotrophic bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köpke

    Full Text Available During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile.

  3. Combinatorial stresses kill pathogenic Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna; Cook, Emily; Jacobsen, Mette; You, Tao; Lenardon, Megan; Ames, Lauren; Barahona, Mauricio; Chandrasekaran, Komelapriya; Coghill, George; Goodman, Daniel; Gow, Neil A R; Grebogi, Celso; Ho, Hsueh-Lui; Ingram, Piers; McDonagh, Andrew; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Pang, Wei; Puttnam, Melanie; Radmaneshfar, Elahe; Romano, Maria Carmen; Silk, Daniel; Stark, Jaroslav; Stumpf, Michael; Thiel, Marco; Thorne, Thomas; Usher, Jane; Yin, Zhikang; Haynes, Ken; Brown, Alistair J P

    2012-10-01

    Pathogenic microbes exist in dynamic niches and have evolved robust adaptive responses to promote survival in their hosts. The major fungal pathogens of humans, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, are exposed to a range of environmental stresses in their hosts including osmotic, oxidative and nitrosative stresses. Significant efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the adaptive responses to each of these stresses. In the wild, cells are frequently exposed simultaneously to combinations of these stresses and yet the effects of such combinatorial stresses have not been explored. We have developed a common experimental platform to facilitate the comparison of combinatorial stress responses in C. glabrata and C. albicans. This platform is based on the growth of cells in buffered rich medium at 30°C, and was used to define relatively low, medium and high doses of osmotic (NaCl), oxidative (H(2)O(2)) and nitrosative stresses (e.g., dipropylenetriamine (DPTA)-NONOate). The effects of combinatorial stresses were compared with the corresponding individual stresses under these growth conditions. We show for the first time that certain combinations of combinatorial stress are especially potent in terms of their ability to kill C. albicans and C. glabrata and/or inhibit their growth. This was the case for combinations of osmotic plus oxidative stress and for oxidative plus nitrosative stress. We predict that combinatorial stresses may be highly significant in host defences against these pathogenic yeasts.

  4. New Pseudomonas spp. Are Pathogenic to Citrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Beiki

    Full Text Available Five putative novel Pseudomonas species shown to be pathogenic to citrus have been characterized in a screening of 126 Pseudomonas strains isolated from diseased citrus leaves and stems in northern Iran. The 126 strains were studied using a polyphasic approach that included phenotypic characterizations and phylogenetic multilocus sequence analysis. The pathogenicity of these strains against 3 cultivars of citrus is demonstrated in greenhouse and field studies. The strains were initially grouped phenotypically and by their partial rpoD gene sequences into 11 coherent groups in the Pseudomonas fluorescens phylogenetic lineage. Fifty-three strains that are representatives of the 11 groups were selected and analyzed by partial sequencing of their 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. The individual and concatenated partial sequences of the three genes were used to construct the corresponding phylogenetic trees. The majority of the strains were identified at the species level: P. lurida (5 strains, P. monteilii (2 strains, P. moraviensis (1 strain, P. orientalis (16 strains, P. simiae (7 strains, P. syringae (46 strains, distributed phylogenetically in at least 5 pathovars, and P. viridiflava (2 strains. This is the first report of pathogenicity on citrus of P. orientalis, P. simiae, P. lurida, P. moraviensis and P. monteilii strains. The remaining 47 strains that could not be identified at the species level are considered representatives of at least 5 putative novel Pseudomonas species that are not yet described.

  5. New Pseudomonas spp. Are Pathogenic to Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiki, Farid; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Rahimian, Heshmat; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Five putative novel Pseudomonas species shown to be pathogenic to citrus have been characterized in a screening of 126 Pseudomonas strains isolated from diseased citrus leaves and stems in northern Iran. The 126 strains were studied using a polyphasic approach that included phenotypic characterizations and phylogenetic multilocus sequence analysis. The pathogenicity of these strains against 3 cultivars of citrus is demonstrated in greenhouse and field studies. The strains were initially grouped phenotypically and by their partial rpoD gene sequences into 11 coherent groups in the Pseudomonas fluorescens phylogenetic lineage. Fifty-three strains that are representatives of the 11 groups were selected and analyzed by partial sequencing of their 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. The individual and concatenated partial sequences of the three genes were used to construct the corresponding phylogenetic trees. The majority of the strains were identified at the species level: P. lurida (5 strains), P. monteilii (2 strains), P. moraviensis (1 strain), P. orientalis (16 strains), P. simiae (7 strains), P. syringae (46 strains, distributed phylogenetically in at least 5 pathovars), and P. viridiflava (2 strains). This is the first report of pathogenicity on citrus of P. orientalis, P. simiae, P. lurida, P. moraviensis and P. monteilii strains. The remaining 47 strains that could not be identified at the species level are considered representatives of at least 5 putative novel Pseudomonas species that are not yet described.

  6. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Stephan; Schuldt, Kathrin; Bernin, Hannah; Zaruba, Mareen; Lender, Corinna; Ittrich, Harald; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2016-01-01

    We here compared pathogenic (p) and non-pathogenic (np) isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA)-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1–A12) derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1–B12) derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. “Non-pathogenicity” included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while “pathogenicity” comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP) activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica. PMID:27575775

  7. The Venturia Apple Pathosystem: Pathogenicity Mechanisms and Plant Defense Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopaljee Jha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Venturia inaequalis is the causal agent of apple scab, a devastating disease of apple. We outline several unique features of this pathogen which are useful for molecular genetics studies intended to understand plant-pathogen interactions. The pathogenicity mechanisms of the pathogen and overview of apple defense responses, monogenic and polygenic resistance, and their utilization in scab resistance breeding programs are also reviewed.

  8. PathogenMIPer: a tool for the design of molecular inversion probes to detect multiple pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhras Michael

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we describe PathogenMIPer, a software program for designing molecular inversion probe (MIP oligonucleotides for use in pathogen identification and detection. The software designs unique and specific oligonucleotide probes targeting microbial or other genomes. The tool tailors all probe sequence components (including target-specific sequences, barcode sequences, universal primers and restriction sites and combines these components into ready-to-order probes for use in a MIP assay. The system can harness the genetic variability available in an entire genome in designing specific probes for the detection of multiple co-infections in a single tube using a MIP assay. Results PathogenMIPer can accept sequence data in FASTA file format, and other parameter inputs from the user through a graphical user interface. It can design MIPs not only for pathogens, but for any genome for use in parallel genomic analyses. The software was validated experimentally by applying it to the detection of human papilloma virus (HPV as a model system, which is associated with various human malignancies including cervical and skin cancers. Initial tests of laboratory samples using the MIPs developed by the PathogenMIPer to recognize 24 different types of HPVs gave very promising results, detecting even a small viral load of single as well as multiple infections (Akhras et al, personal communication. Conclusion PathogenMIPer is a software for designing molecular inversion probes for detection of multiple target DNAs in a sample using MIP assays. It enables broader use of MIP technology in the detection through genotyping of pathogens that are complex, difficult-to-amplify, or present in multiple subtypes in a sample.

  9. The bacterial microbiome of dermacentor andersoni ticks influences pathogen susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticks are of medical and veterinary importance due to their ability to transmit pathogens to humans and animals. The Rocky Mountain wood tick, Dermacentor andersoni, is a vector of a number of pathogens, including Anaplasma marginale, which is the most widespread tick-borne pathogen of livestock. Al...

  10. Host-pathogen interactions: A cholera surveillance system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Aaron T.

    2016-02-22

    Bacterial pathogen-secreted proteases may play a key role in inhibiting a potentially widespread host-pathogen interaction. Activity-based protein profiling enabled the identification of a major Vibrio cholerae serine protease that limits the ability of a host-derived intestinal lectin to bind to the bacterial pathogen in vivo.

  11. [Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli--epidemiology, pathogenicity and antimicrobial resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Verocytotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) are one of the most common foodborne pathogen in human worldwide. High pathogenic potential of these organisms makes it often the cause of international outbreaks with numerous fatalities. This study presents the current knowledge on verocytotoxigenic E. coli: pathogenicity, drug resistance as well as the epidemiology of infections.

  12. Phylogeographic Diversity of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Hantaviruses in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miša Korva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Slovenia is a very diverse country from a natural geography point of view, with many different habitats within a relatively small area, in addition to major geological and climatic differences. It is therefore not surprising that several small mammal species have been confirmed to harbour hantaviruses: A. flavicollis (Dobrava virus, A. agrarius (Dobrava virus–Kurkino, M. glareolus (Puumala virus, S. areanus (Seewis virus,M. agrestis, M. arvalis and M. subterraneus (Tula virus. Three of the viruses, namely the Dobrava, Dobrava–Kurkino and Puumala viruses, cause disease in humans, with significant differences in the severity of symptoms. Due to changes in haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome cases (HFRS epidemiology, a detailed study on phylogenetic diversity and molecular epidemiology of pathogenic and non-pathogenic hantaviruses circulating in ecologically diverse endemic regions was performed. The study presents one of the largest collections of hantavirus L, M and S sequences obtained from hosts and patients within a single country. Several genetic lineages were determined for each hantavirus species, with higher diversity among non-pathogenic compared to pathogenic viruses. For pathogenic hantaviruses, a significant geographic clustering of human- and rodent-derived sequences was confirmed. Several geographic and ecological factors were recognized as influencing and limiting the formation of endemic areas.

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PATHOGENICITY AND FUNGICIDE TOLERANCE IN THE WHEAT PATHOGEN MYCOSPHAERELLA GRAMINICOLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siah, A; Deweer, C; Tisserant, B; Randoux, B; Halama, P; Reignault, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Septoria tritici blotch caused by Mycosphaerella graminicola (anamorph: Zymoseptoria tritici) is currently the most devastating disease on wheat crops worldwide, especially in regions with suitable climate conditions such as Western Europe. Pathogen control relies mainly on the use of fungicides and resistant cultivars. However, the durability of chemical and genetic control strategies is increasingly compromised in the field since the fungus frequently develops resistance to fungicides and overcomes host resistance. Here, we assessed the association between pathogenicity and fungicide tolerance in eighteen different M. graminicola strains isolated in 2009 from Northern France. These strains were chosen because they exhibited in preliminary experiments a wide range of in vitro tolerance levels against six demethylation inhibitors (epoxiconazole, cyproconazole, fluquinconazole, propiconazole, prothioconazole and pyrefenox). Inoculation of the Scorpion susceptible wheat cultivar in the greenhouse with these strains revealed a great variability in their pathogenicity levels (disease symptoms ranged from 0 to 66% of leaf area bearing pycnidia). Interestingly, strains with high fungicide tolerance levels caused overall the highest disease symptoms (45% of diseased leaf area on average) when compared to those with low fungicide tolerance levels (22% of diseased leaf area on average), thus confirming the association between pathogenicity level and fungicide tolerance in M. graminicola. The occurrence and selection in the field of fungal genotypes combining both pathogenicity and fungicide resistance should be taken into account in disease management strategies.

  14. [Application of pyrosequencing in detection of common pathogens in sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ziyou; Han, Hui; Zeng, Yong; Wu, Bingyi

    2013-07-01

    To apply pyrosequencing technique in the detection of the common pathogens in sepsis. The primers for amplification and sequencing in pyrosequencing were designed according to alignment of the bacterial 16S rRNA sequence. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted for pyrosequencing, and the pathogen species were determined according to the sequencing data obtained. Pyrosequencing effectively yielded the sequencing data of the 28 bp sequences of the pathogens and clearly distinguished the pathogen species of Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, Neisseria meningitides, and Salmonella, but failed to distinguish Staphylococcus epidermidis from Staphylococcus aureus. Pyrosequencing technique can effectively distinguish the common pathogens in sepsis at the species level.

  15. Strategies of Intracellular Pathogens for Obtaining Iron from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidia Leon-Sicairos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most microorganisms are destroyed by the host tissues through processes that usually involve phagocytosis and lysosomal disruption. However, some organisms, called intracellular pathogens, are capable of avoiding destruction by growing inside macrophages or other cells. During infection with intracellular pathogenic microorganisms, the element iron is required by both the host cell and the pathogen that inhabits the host cell. This minireview focuses on how intracellular pathogens use multiple strategies to obtain nutritional iron from the intracellular environment in order to use this element for replication. Additionally, the implications of these mechanisms for iron acquisition in the pathogen-host relationship are discussed.

  16. Pathogenic ecology: Where have all the pathogens gone? Anthrax: a classic case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Johnathan; Walker, Wes W.; Andrews, Carrie J.; De Los Santos, Amy; Adams, Roy N.; Bucholz, Matthew W.; McBurnett, Shelly D.; Fuentes, Vladimir; Rizner, Karon E.; Blount, Keith W.

    2009-05-01

    Pathogenic ecology is the natural relationship to animate and inanimate components of the environment that support the sustainment of a pathogen in the environment or prohibit its sustainment, or their interactions with an introduced pathogen that allow for the establishment of disease in a new environment. The anthrax bacterium in the spore form has been recognized as a highly likely biological warfare or terrorist agent. The purpose of this work was to determine the environmental reservoir of Bacillus anthracis between outbreaks of anthrax and to examine the potential factors influencing the conversion of the Bacillus anthracis from a quiescent state to the disease causing state. Here we provide environmental and laboratory data for the cycling of Bacillus anthracis in plants to reconcile observations that contradict the soil borne hypothesis of anthrax maintenance in the environment.

  17. Uncovering plant-pathogen crosstalk through apoplastic proteomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand eDelaunois

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens have evolved by developing different strategies to infect their host, which in turn have elaborated immune responses to counter the pathogen invasion. The apoplast, including the cell wall and extracellular space outside the plasma membrane, is one of the first compartments where pathogen-host interaction occurs. The plant cell wall is composed of a complex network of polysaccharides polymers and glycoproteins and serves as a natural physical barrier against pathogen invasion. The apoplastic fluid, circulating through the cell wall and intercellular spaces, provides a means for delivering molecules and facilitating intercellular communications. Some plant-pathogen interactions lead to plant cell wall degradation allowing pathogens to penetrate into the cells. In turn, the plant immune system recognizes microbial- or damage-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or DAMPs and initiates a set of basal immune responses, including the strengthening of the plant cell wall. The establishment of defense requires the regulation of a wide variety of proteins that are involved at different levels, from receptor perception of the pathogen via signaling mechanisms to the strengthening of the cell wall or degradation of the pathogen itself. A fine regulation of apoplastic proteins is therefore essential for rapid and effective pathogen perception and for maintaining cell wall integrity. This review aims to provide insight into analyses using proteomic approaches of the apoplast to highlight the modulation of the apoplastic protein patterns during pathogen infection and to unravel the key players involved in plant-pathogen interaction.

  18. Association and host selectivity in multi-host pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Malpica

    Full Text Available The distribution of multi-host pathogens over their host range conditions their population dynamics and structure. Also, host co-infection by different pathogens may have important consequences for the evolution of hosts and pathogens, and host-pathogen co-evolution. Hence it is of interest to know if the distribution of pathogens over their host range is random, or if there are associations between hosts and pathogens, or between pathogens sharing a host. To analyse these issues we propose indices for the observed patterns of host infection by pathogens, and for the observed patterns of co-infection, and tests to analyse if these patterns conform to randomness or reflect associations. Applying these tests to the prevalence of five plant viruses on 21 wild plant species evidenced host-virus associations: most hosts and viruses were selective for viruses and hosts, respectively. Interestingly, the more host-selective viruses were the more prevalent ones, suggesting that host specialisation is a successful strategy for multi-host pathogens. Analyses also showed that viruses tended to associate positively in co-infected hosts. The developed indices and tests provide the tools to analyse how strong and common are these associations among different groups of pathogens, which will help to understand and model the population biology of multi-host pathogens.

  19. Genetic islands in pome fruit pathogenic and non-pathogenic Erwinia species and related plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llop, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    New pathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Erwinia associated with pome fruit trees (Erwinia, E. piriflorinigrans, E. uzenensis) have been increasingly described in the last years, and comparative analyses have found that all these species share several genetic characteristics. Studies at different level (whole genome comparison, virulence genes, plasmid content, etc.) show a high intraspecies homogeneity (i.e., among E. amylovora strains) and also abundant similarities appear between the different Erwinia species: presence of plasmids of similar size in the pathogenic species; high similarity in several genes associated with exopolysaccharide production and hence, with virulence, as well as in some other genes, in the chromosomes. Many genetic similarities have been observed also among some of the plasmids (and genomes) from the pathogenic species and E. tasmaniensis or E. billingiae, two epiphytic species on the same hosts. The amount of genetic material shared in this genus varies from individual genes to clusters, genomic islands and genetic material that even may constitute a whole plasmid. Recent research on evolution of erwinias point out the horizontal transfer acquisition of some genomic islands that were subsequently lost in some species and several pathogenic traits that are still present. How this common material has been obtained and is efficiently maintained in different species belonging to the same genus sharing a common ecological niche provides an idea of the origin and evolution of the pathogenic Erwinia and the interaction with non-pathogenic species present in the same niche, and the role of the genes that are conserved in all of them.

  20. Identifying Pathogenicity Islands in Bacterial Pathogenomics Using Computational Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Che

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing technologies have made it possible to study bacteria through analyzing their genome sequences. For instance, comparative genome sequence analyses can reveal the phenomenon such as gene loss, gene gain, or gene exchange in a genome. By analyzing pathogenic bacterial genomes, we can discover that pathogenic genomic regions in many pathogenic bacteria are horizontally transferred from other bacteria, and these regions are also known as pathogenicity islands (PAIs. PAIs have some detectable properties, such as having different genomic signatures than the rest of the host genomes, and containing mobility genes so that they can be integrated into the host genome. In this review, we will discuss various pathogenicity island-associated features and current computational approaches for the identification of PAIs. Existing pathogenicity island databases and related computational resources will also be discussed, so that researchers may find it to be useful for the studies of bacterial evolution and pathogenicity mechanisms.

  1. Evolution and genome architecture in fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Mareike; Stukenbrock, Eva H

    2017-08-07

    The fungal kingdom comprises some of the most devastating plant pathogens. Sequencing the genomes of fungal pathogens has shown a remarkable variability in genome size and architecture. Population genomic data enable us to understand the mechanisms and the history of changes in genome size and adaptive evolution in plant pathogens. Although transposable elements predominantly have negative effects on their host, fungal pathogens provide prominent examples of advantageous associations between rapidly evolving transposable elements and virulence genes that cause variation in virulence phenotypes. By providing homogeneous environments at large regional scales, managed ecosystems, such as modern agriculture, can be conducive for the rapid evolution and dispersal of pathogens. In this Review, we summarize key examples from fungal plant pathogen genomics and discuss evolutionary processes in pathogenic fungi in the context of molecular evolution, population genomics and agriculture.

  2. Host-pathogen interaction in invasive Salmonellosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna K de Jong

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica infections result in diverse clinical manifestations. Typhoid fever, caused by S. enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A, is a bacteremic illness but whose clinical features differ from other Gram-negative bacteremias. Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS serovars cause self-limiting diarrhea with occasional secondary bacteremia. Primary NTS bacteremia can occur in the immunocompromised host and infants in sub-Saharan Africa. Recent studies on host-pathogen interactions in Salmonellosis using genome sequencing, murine models, and patient studies have provided new insights. The full genome sequences of numerous S. enterica serovars have been determined. The S. Typhi genome, compared to that of S. Typhimurium, harbors many inactivated or disrupted genes. This can partly explain the different immune responses both serovars induce upon entering their host. Similar genome degradation is also observed in the ST313 S. Typhimurium strain implicated in invasive infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Virulence factors, most notably, type III secretion systems, Vi antigen, lipopolysaccharide and other surface polysaccharides, flagella, and various factors essential for the intracellular life cycle of S. enterica have been characterized. Genes for these factors are commonly carried on Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPIs. Plasmids also carry putative virulence-associated genes as well as those responsible for antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs with Toll-like receptors (TLRs and NOD-like receptors (NLRs leads to inflammasome formation, activation, and recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, most notably interleukin (IL-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ. The gut microbiome may be an important modulator of this immune response. S. Typhimurium usually causes a local intestinal immune

  3. History of highly pathogenic avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, D J; Brown, I H

    2009-04-01

    The most widely quoted date for the beginning of the recorded history of avian influenza (AI) is 1878, when researchers first differentiated a disease of poultry (initially known as fowl plague but later renamed highly pathogenic avian influenza) from other diseases with high mortality rates. Current evidence indicates that highly pathogenic AI (HPAI) viruses arise through mutation after low pathogenicity AI viruses of H5 or H7 subtype are introduced into poultry. Between 1877 and 1958, a number of epizootics of HPAI occurred in most parts of the world. From 1959 to 1995, the emergence of HPAI viruses was recorded on 15 occasions, but losses were minimal. In contrast, between 1996 and 2008, HPAI viruses emerged at least 11 times and four of these outbreaks involved many millions of birds. Events during this recent period are overshadowed by the current epizootic of HPAI due to an H5N1 virus that has spread throughout Asia and into Europe and Africa, affecting over 60 countries and causing the loss of hundreds of millions of birds. All sectors of the poultry population have been affected, but free-range commercial ducks, village poultry, live bird markets and fighting cocks seem especially significant in the spread of the virus. The role of wild birds has been extensively debated but it is likely that both wild birds and domestic poultry are responsible for its spread. Even without these H5N1 outbreaks, the period 1995 to 2008 will be considered significant in the history of HPAI because of the vast numbers of birds that died or were culled in three of the other ten epizootics during this time.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Workshop Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, A

    2006-08-30

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the

  5. Campylobacter ureolyticus: an emerging gastrointestinal pathogen?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bullman, Susan

    2011-03-01

    A total of 7194 faecal samples collected over a 1-year period from patients presenting with diarrhoea were screened for Campylobacter spp. using EntericBio(®) , a multiplex-PCR system. Of 349 Campylobacter-positive samples, 23.8% were shown to be Campylobacter ureolyticus, using a combination of 16S rRNA gene analysis and highly specific primers targeting the HSP60 gene of this organism. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of C. ureolyticus in the faeces of patients presenting with gastroenteritis and may suggest a role for this organism as an emerging enteric pathogen.

  6. Russian vaccines against especially dangerous bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feodorova, Valentina A; Sayapina, Lidiya V; Corbel, Michael J; Motin, Vladimir L

    2014-01-01

    In response to the epidemiological situation, live attenuated or killed vaccines against anthrax, brucellosis, cholera, glanders, plague and tularemia were developed and used for immunization of at-risk populations in the Former Soviet Union. Certain of these vaccines have been updated and currently they are used on a selective basis, mainly for high risk occupations, in the Russian Federation. Except for anthrax and cholera these vaccines currently are the only licensed products available for protection against the most dangerous bacterial pathogens. Development of improved formulations and new products is ongoing. PMID:26038506

  7. Colletotrichum graminicola: a new corneal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterband, D C; Shah, M; Seedor, J A

    1997-05-01

    We report the first case of an ocular infection with the fungus Colletotrichum graminicola causing keratitis in a 27-year-old man. Twenty-four months after a postoperative course complicated by recurrent fungal keratitis requiring two penetrating keratoplasties, two anterior chamber washouts, a conjunctival flap, and medical treatment with topical natamycin, intracameral amphotericin B, and oral fluconazole. The patient has shown no signs of fungal recurrence despite a failed corneal graft. C. graminicola is a new corneal pathogen and should be included in the differential diagnosis of mycotic keratitis.

  8. Differentiation of pathogenic and saprophytic leptospira strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazovská, S; Kmety, E; Rak, J

    1984-09-01

    Comparative studies of 249 pathogenic and 80 saprophytic leptospira strains, including 2 strains of the illini type, using the 8-azaguanine test, growth at 13 degrees C and growth on trypticase soy broth revealed their good differentiating potency if the recommended conditions were carefully observed. The same results were obtained by a simple hemolytic test using sheep and rat blood cells, having the advantage of providing results within 24 h. This test is suggested to replace the 8-azaguanine and the growth test at 13 degrees C. In these investigations, the first European strain of the illini type was recognized.

  9. Essential metals at the host-pathogen interface: nutritional immunity and micronutrient assimilation by human fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Aaron; Wilson, Duncan

    2015-11-01

    The ability of pathogenic microorganisms to assimilate sufficient nutrients for growth within their hosts is a fundamental requirement for pathogenicity. However, certain trace nutrients, including iron, zinc and manganese, are actively withheld from invading pathogens in a process called nutritional immunity. Therefore, successful pathogenic species must have evolved specialized mechanisms in order to adapt to the nutritionally restrictive environment of the host and cause disease. In this review, we discuss recent advances which have been made in our understanding of fungal iron and zinc acquisition strategies and nutritional immunity against fungal infections, and explore the mechanisms of micronutrient uptake by human pathogenic fungi.

  10. Development of saliva-based exposure assays for detecting exposure to waterborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identifying which pathogens we are exposed to can be challenging because many types of pathogens can be found in water and many pathogens have similar symptoms. EPA scientists have developed a simple way to measure human exposure to waterborne pathogens.

  11. Transformation of the oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judelson, H S; Tyler, B M; Michelmore, R W

    1991-01-01

    A stable transformation procedure has been developed for Phytophthora infestans, an oomycete fungus that causes the late blight diseases of potato and tomato. This is the first description of reliable methods for transformation in an oomycete pathogen. Drug-resistant transformants were obtained by using vectors that contained bacterial genes for resistance to hygromycin B or G418 fused to promoters and terminators from the Hsp70 and Ham34 genes of the oomycete, Bremia lactucae. Using polyethylene glycol and CaCl2, vector DNA was introduced into protoplasts as a complex with cationic liposomes or with carrier DNA only. Transformants were obtained at similar frequencies with each combination of promoter and selectable marker and were confirmed by DNA and RNA hybridization and phosphotransferase assays. Transformation occurred through the integration of single or tandemly repeated copies of the plasmids into genomic DNA, conferring mitotically stable drug-resistant phenotypes. The sizes of the marker gene mRNAs in each transformant and the results of transcript mapping studies were consistent with the function of the B. lactucae regulatory sequences in P. infestans. A hygromycin-resistant transformant was tested and found to maintain pathogenicity, indicating that the gene transfer procedure will be useful for the molecular analysis of genes relevant to disease.

  12. Bacteriophage based probes for pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit; Arutyunov, Denis; Szymanski, Christine M; Evoy, Stephane

    2012-08-01

    Rapid and specific detection of pathogenic bacteria is important for the proper treatment, containment and prevention of human, animal and plant diseases. Identifying unique biological probes to achieve a high degree of specificity and minimize false positives has therefore garnered much interest in recent years. Bacteriophages are obligate intracellular parasites that subvert bacterial cell resources for their own multiplication and production of disseminative new virions, which repeat the cycle by binding specifically to the host surface receptors and injecting genetic material into the bacterial cells. The precision of host recognition in phages is imparted by the receptor binding proteins (RBPs) that are often located in the tail-spike or tail fiber protein assemblies of the virions. Phage host recognition specificity has been traditionally exploited for bacterial typing using laborious and time consuming bacterial growth assays. At the same time this feature makes phage virions or RBPs an excellent choice for the development of probes capable of selectively capturing bacteria on solid surfaces with subsequent quick and automatic detection of the binding event. This review focuses on the description of pathogen detection approaches based on immobilized phage virions as well as pure recombinant RBPs. Specific advantages of RBP-based molecular probes are also discussed.

  13. Vibrio parahaemolyticus- An emerging foodborne pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nelapati

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a halophilic gram negative, motile, oxidase positive, straight or curved rod-shaped, facultative anaerobic bacteria that occur naturally in the marine environment. They form part of the indigenous microflora of aquatic habitats of various salinity and are the major causative agents for some of the most serious diseases in fish, shellfish and penacid shrimp. This human pathogen causes acute gastroenteritis characterized by diarrhea, vomiting and abdominal cramps through consumption of contaminated raw fish or shellfish. V. parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of gastroenteritis due to the consumption of seafood worldwide. The incidence of V. parahaemolyticus infection has been increasing in many parts of the world, due to the emergence of O3:K6 serotype carrying the tdh gene which is responsible for most outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this organism is closely correlated with the Kanagawa phenomenon (KP + due to production of Kanagawa hemolysin or the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH. The TDH and TRH (TDH-related hemolysin encoded by tdh and trh genes are considered to be important virulence factors. [Vet. World 2012; 5(1.000: 48-63

  14. Cancer anorexia: new pathogenic and therapeutic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangiano, C; Laviano, A; Muscaritoli, M; Meguid, M M; Cascino, A; Rossi Fanelli, F

    1996-01-01

    During tumor growth, anorexia and reduced food intake markedly contribute to the development of malnutrition, thus worsening overall patients' survival. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of eating behavior may lead to new and more effective therapies, aiming at counteracting the detrimental effects of anorexia and reduced food intake on nutritional status and survival in cancer patients. Brain tryptophan and serotonin concentrations seem to play a pivotal role in the regulation of eating behavior. Increased brain serotonin activity is indeed associated with a reduction of food intake. It has been recently hypothesized that increased availability of tryptophan to the brain and the consequent increased serotonin activity may represent the pathogenic mechanism for cancer-associated anorexia. According to this hypothesis, the modulation of brain serotonin activity may result in an improvement of anorexia. Reducing brain tryptophan availability represents a possible mechanism to restore brain serotonin activity to normal. There is evidence that the oral administration of neutral amino acids competing with tryptophan for brain entry results in a significant improvement of cancer anorexia. The same treatment may also be effective in improving secondary anorexia, which is associated with other chronic illnesses, including renal and liver failure, sepsis, and so forth, sharing a similar pathogenic mechanism.

  15. Emerging bacterial pathogens: the past and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouga, M; Greub, G

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1950s, medical communities have been facing with emerging and reemerging infectious diseases, and emerging pathogens are now considered to be a major microbiologic public health threat. In this review, we focus on bacterial emerging diseases and explore factors involved in their emergence as well as future challenges. We identified 26 major emerging and reemerging infectious diseases of bacterial origin; most of them originated either from an animal and are considered to be zoonoses or from water sources. Major contributing factors in the emergence of these bacterial infections are: (1) development of new diagnostic tools, such as improvements in culture methods, development of molecular techniques and implementation of mass spectrometry in microbiology; (2) increase in human exposure to bacterial pathogens as a result of sociodemographic and environmental changes; and (3) emergence of more virulent bacterial strains and opportunistic infections, especially affecting immunocompromised populations. A precise definition of their implications in human disease is challenging and requires the comprehensive integration of microbiological, clinical and epidemiologic aspects as well as the use of experimental models. It is now urgent to allocate financial resources to gather international data to provide a better understanding of the clinical relevance of these waterborne and zoonotic emerging diseases.

  16. Genome sequence of the necrotrophic plant pathogen Pythium ultimum reveals original pathogenicity mechanisms and effector repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The P. ultimum DAOM BR144 (=CBS 805.95 = ATCC200006) genome (42.8 Mb) encodes 15,290 genes, and has extensive sequence similarity and synteny with related Phytophthora spp., including the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Whole transcriptome sequencing revealed expression of 86 % o...

  17. IbeR facilitates stress-resistance, invasion and pathogenicity of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Wang

    Full Text Available Systemic infections by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC are economically devastating to poultry industries worldwide. IbeR, located on genomic island GimA, was shown to serve as an RpoS-like regulator in rpoS gene mutation neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC RS218. However, the role of IbeR in pathogenicity of APEC carrying active RpoS has not yet been investigated. We showed that the APEC IbeR could elicit antibodies in infected ducks, suggesting that IbeR might be involved in APEC pathogenicity. To investigate the function of IbeR in APEC pathogenesis, mutant and complementation strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of ibeR led to attenuated virulence and reduced invasion capacity towards DF-1 cells, brains and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in vitro and in vivo. Bactericidal assays demonstrated that the mutant strain had impaired resistance to environmental stress and specific pathogen-free (SPF chicken serum. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR revealed that IbeR controlled expression of stress-resistance genes and virulence genes, which might led to the associated virulence phenotype.

  18. Differential apple transcriptomic responses to penicillium expansum (pathogen) and penicillium digitatum (non-host pathogen) infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penicillium expansum is the causal agent of blue mould of pome fruits and is responsible for important economical losses during postharvest handling in all producing countries. Although control of this pathogen can be achieved by using chemical fungicides, the appearance of resistant strains and in...

  19. Pathogenicity of three genetically diverse strains of PRRSV Type 1 in specific pathogen free pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadejek, Tomasz; Larsen, Lars E; Podgórska, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Studies from Eastern European countries proved that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus Type 1 (PRRSV-1) harbours high genetic diversity and that genetically divergent subtypes 2-4 circulate in this area. In the present study, we compared the pathogenicity of two different PRRSV-1...

  20. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  1. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  2. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic, and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.V.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  3. Pathogenicity and transmission of H5 and H7 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in mallards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild aquatic birds have been associated with the intercontinental spread of H5 subtype highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the A/goose/Guangdong/1/96 (Gs/GD) lineage during 2005, 2010 and 2014, but dispersion by wild waterfowl has not been implicated with spread of other HPAI viruses...

  4. Hazards from pathogenic microorganisms in land-disposed sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, T M; Pepper, I L; Gerba, C P

    1993-01-01

    Sewage sludge is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic compounds of biological and mineral origin that are precipitated from wastewater and sewage during primary, secondary, and tertiary sewage treatment. Present in these sludges are significant numbers of microorganisms that include viral, bacterial, protozoan, fungal, and helminth pathogens. The treatment of sludge to reduce biochemical oxygen demand, solids content, and odor is not always effective in reducing numbers of pathogens. This becomes a public health concern because the infectious dose for some of these pathogens may be as low as 1 particle (virus) to 50 organisms (Giardia). When sludge is applied to land for agricultural use and landfill compost, these pathogens can survive from days (bacteria) to months (viruses) to years (helminth eggs), depending on environmental conditions. Shallow aquifers can become contaminated with pathogens from sludge and, depending on groundwater flow, these organisms may travel significant distances from the disposal site. Communities that rely on groundwater for domestic use can become exposed to these pathogens, leading to a potential disease outbreak. Currently, methods to determine the risk of disease from pathogens in land-disposed sludge are inadequate because the sensitivity of pathogen detection is poor. The application of recombinant DNA technology (gene probes and polymerase chain reaction) to environmental samples may provide increased sensitivity for detecting specific pathogens in land-disposed sludge and greatly improved risk assessment models for our exposure to these sources of pathogens.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of development and pathogenesis in fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Akanksha; Jeon, Junhyun

    2017-08-01

    Evidently, epigenetics is at forefront in explaining the mechanisms underlying the success of human pathogens and in the identification of pathogen-induced modifications within host plants. However, there is a lack of studies highlighting the role of epigenetics in the modulation of the growth and pathogenicity of fungal plant pathogens. In this review, we attempt to highlight and discuss the role of epigenetics in the regulation of the growth and pathogenicity of fungal phytopathogens using Magnaporthe oryzae, a devastating fungal plant pathogen, as a model system. With the perspective of wide application in the understanding of the development, pathogenesis and control of other fungal pathogens, we attempt to provide a synthesized view of the epigenetic studies conducted on M. oryzae to date. First, we discuss the mechanisms of epigenetic modifications in M. oryzae and their impact on fungal development and pathogenicity. Second, we highlight the unexplored epigenetic mechanisms and areas of research that should be considered in the near future to construct a holistic view of epigenetic functioning in M. oryzae and other fungal plant pathogens. Importantly, the development of a complete understanding of the modulation of epigenetic regulation in fungal pathogens can help in the identification of target points to combat fungal pathogenesis. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  6. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp.

  7. Pharmacodynamics of marbofloxacin for calf pneumonia pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illambas, Joanna; Potter, Timothy; Cheng, Zhangrui; Rycroft, Andrew; Fishwick, John; Lees, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of the fluoroquinolone, marbofloxacin, were determined for the bovine respiratory tract pathogens Mannheima haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. For six pathogenic isolates of each organism, three in vitro indices of efficacy and potency were determined, namely, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and time-kill curves. Each parameter was determined in two matrices, Mueller Hinton Broth (MHB) and calf serum. For serum, MBC:MIC ratios were 2.7:1 (M. haemolytica) and 2.4:1 (P. multocida). The killing action of marbofloxacin had the characteristics of concentration dependency against M. haemolytica and co-dependency (on time and concentration) against P. multocida. To confirm the characteristics of the time-kill profiles, growth inhibition produced by marbofloxacin was also established ex vivo in three biological fluids, calf serum, exudate and transudate, harvested from a tissue cage model. The in vitro time-kill data were modelled with pharmacokinetic properties of marbofloxacin, established by intramuscular administration in calves at a dose of 2 mg/kg; three levels of activity, namely bacteriostatic, 3 log10 reduction and 4 log10 reduction in bacterial counts were determined. Mean AUC(24h)/MIC values (with percentage coefficients of variation indicating inter-isolate variability) for M. haemolytica, based on serum MICs, were 31.3 (41.6), 57.7 (42.4) and 79.2 (44.6) h, respectively. Corresponding values for MHB were 20.5 (58.0), 40.5 (51.8) and 51.2 (24.30) h, respectively. When allowance was made for binding of marbofloxacin to serum protein, the AUC(24h)/MIC values for serum were similar to those for MHB. Numerical AUC(24h)/MIC values for P. multocida were slightly lower than those obtained for M. haemolytica. These data establish for the first time inter-isolate variability in AUC(24h)/MIC values required for three levels of bacterial kill for two pathogenic species and thereby

  8. Parallel independent evolution of pathogenicity within the genus Yersinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Sandra; Connor, Thomas R.; Barquist, Lars; Walker, Danielle; Feltwell, Theresa; Harris, Simon R.; Fookes, Maria; Hall, Miquette E.; Petty, Nicola K.; Fuchs, Thilo M.; Corander, Jukka; Dufour, Muriel; Ringwood, Tamara; Savin, Cyril; Bouchier, Christiane; Martin, Liliane; Miettinen, Minna; Shubin, Mikhail; Riehm, Julia M.; Laukkanen-Ninios, Riikka; Sihvonen, Leila M.; Siitonen, Anja; Skurnik, Mikael; Falcão, Juliana Pfrimer; Fukushima, Hiroshi; Scholz, Holger C.; Prentice, Michael B.; Wren, Brendan W.; Parkhill, Julian; Carniel, Elisabeth; Achtman, Mark; McNally, Alan; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Yersinia has been used as a model system to study pathogen evolution. Using whole-genome sequencing of all Yersinia species, we delineate the gene complement of the whole genus and define patterns of virulence evolution. Multiple distinct ecological specializations appear to have split pathogenic strains from environmental, nonpathogenic lineages. This split demonstrates that contrary to hypotheses that all pathogenic Yersinia species share a recent common pathogenic ancestor, they have evolved independently but followed parallel evolutionary paths in acquiring the same virulence determinants as well as becoming progressively more limited metabolically. Shared virulence determinants are limited to the virulence plasmid pYV and the attachment invasion locus ail. These acquisitions, together with genomic variations in metabolic pathways, have resulted in the parallel emergence of related pathogens displaying an increasingly specialized lifestyle with a spectrum of virulence potential, an emerging theme in the evolution of other important human pathogens. PMID:24753568

  9. Social barriers to pathogen transmission in wild animal populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.

    1995-03-01

    Diseases and pathogens are receiving increasing recognition as sources of mortality in animal populations. Immune system strength is clearly important in fending off pathogen attack. Physical barriers to pathogen entry are also important. Various individual behaviors are efficacious in reducing contact with diseases and pests. This paper focuses on a fourth mode of defense: social barriers to transmission. Various social behaviors have pathogen transmission consequences. Selective pressures on these social behaviors may therefore exist. Effects on pathogen transmission of mating strategies, social avoidance, group size, group isolation, and other behaviors are explored. It is concluded that many of these behaviors may have been affected by selection pressures to reduce transmission of pathogens. 84 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Subversion of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa D Cunha

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to a notably high number of pathogenic microbes and is a broad innate immune response that effectively contributes to restriction of pathogen replication and generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of these platforms leads to caspase-1- and/or caspase-11-dependent secretion of proteins, including cytokines, and induction of a specific form of cell death called pyroptosis, which directly or indirectly contribute for restriction of pathogen replication. Not surprisingly, bona fide intracellular pathogens developed strategies for manipulation of cell death to guarantee intracellular replication. In this sense, the remarkable advances in the knowledge of the inflammasome field have been accompanied by several reports characterizing the inhibition of this platform by several pathogenic bacteria. Herein, we review some processes used by pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Francisella tularensis, Shigella flexneri, Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii to evade the activation of the inflammasome and the induction of pyroptosis.

  11. Pseudomnas syringae – a Pathogen of Fruit Trees in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko Gavrilović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Data about symptomatology, pathogenicity and bacteriological characteristics of Pseudomonas syringae, and PCR methods for fast and reliable detection of the pathogen are given in this paper. P. syringae has been experimentaly proved as a pathogen of pear, apple, apricot, plum cherry, and raspberry, and pathogen strains have also been isolated from necrotic peach buds. Two pathogen varieties, syringae and morsprunorum, were found in our research in Serbia, the former being dominant on fruit trees.The most reliable method for detection of this bacteria is PCR, using BOX and REP primers. This method has also revealed significant differences among the strains originating from fruit trees in Serbia. Thus, it was proved that the population of P. syringae in Serbia is heterogeneous, which is very important for future epidemiologocal studies. Control of this pathogen includes mechanical, cultural and chemical measures, but integrated approach is very important for sustainable control.

  12. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailao, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo; Silva Ferreira, Marcia Eliana da; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Leon-Narvaez, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasi...

  13. Discrimination between Host and Pathogens by the Complement System

    OpenAIRE

    Pangburn, Michael K.; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Cortes, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Pathogen-specific complement activation requires direct recognition of pathogens and/or the absence of complement control mechanisms on their surfaces. Antibodies direct complement activation to potential pathogens recognized by the cellular innate and adaptive immune systems. Similarly, the plasma proteins MBL and ficolins direct activation to microorganisms expressing common carbohydrate structures. The absence of complement control proteins permits amplification of complement by the altern...

  14. Survival of foodborne pathogens in natural cracked olive brines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Eduardo; Romero-Gil, Verónica; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Arroyo-López, Francisco Noé

    2016-10-01

    This work reports the survival (challenge tests) of foodborne pathogen species (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica) in Aloreña de Málaga table olive brines. The inhibitions were fit using a log-linear model with tail implemented in GInaFIT excel software. The olive brine had a considerable inhibitory effect on the pathogens. The residual (final) populations (Fp) after 24 h was below detection limit (olives for foodborne pathogenic microorganisms.

  15. Actionable, pathogenic incidental findings in 1,000 participants' exomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorschner, Michael O; Amendola, Laura M; Turner, Emily H; Robertson, Peggy D; Shirts, Brian H; Gallego, Carlos J; Bennett, Robin L; Jones, Kelly L; Tokita, Mari J; Bennett, James T; Kim, Jerry H; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Kim, Daniel S; Tabor, Holly K; Bamshad, Michael J; Motulsky, Arno G; Scott, C Ronald; Pritchard, Colin C; Walsh, Tom; Burke, Wylie; Raskind, Wendy H; Byers, Peter; Hisama, Fuki M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Jarvik, Gail P

    2013-10-01

    The incorporation of genomics into medicine is stimulating interest on the return of incidental findings (IFs) from exome and genome sequencing. However, no large-scale study has yet estimated the number of expected actionable findings per individual; therefore, we classified actionable pathogenic single-nucleotide variants in 500 European- and 500 African-descent participants randomly selected from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Exome Sequencing Project. The 1,000 individuals were screened for variants in 114 genes selected by an expert panel for their association with medically actionable genetic conditions possibly undiagnosed in adults. Among the 1,000 participants, 585 instances of 239 unique variants were identified as disease causing in the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD). The primary literature supporting the variants' pathogenicity was reviewed. Of the identified IFs, only 16 unique autosomal-dominant variants in 17 individuals were assessed to be pathogenic or likely pathogenic, and one participant had two pathogenic variants for an autosomal-recessive disease. Furthermore, one pathogenic and four likely pathogenic variants not listed as disease causing in HGMD were identified. These data can provide an estimate of the frequency (∼3.4% for European descent and ∼1.2% for African descent) of the high-penetrance actionable pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants in adults. The 23 participants with pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants were disproportionately of European (17) versus African (6) descent. The process of classifying these variants underscores the need for a more comprehensive and diverse centralized resource to provide curated information on pathogenicity for clinical use to minimize health disparities in genomic medicine.

  16. Evolution of Bacterial Pathogens within the Human Host

    OpenAIRE

    Bliven, Kimberly A.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2016-01-01

    Selective pressures within the human host, including interactions with innate and adaptive immune responses, exposure to medical interventions such as antibiotics, and competition with commensal microbiota all facilitate the evolution of bacterial pathogens. In this chapter, we present examples of pathogen strategies which emerged as a result of selective pressures within the human host niche, and discuss the resulting co-evolutionary ‘arms race’ between these organisms. In bacterial pathogen...

  17. Pathogenic Microorganisms from Raw Milk of Different Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Letiţia Oprean; Ramona Iancu; Eniko Gaşpar; Ecaterina Lengyel

    2011-01-01

    Milk is an ideal environment for microbial growth and for this reason the separation of some pathogens is very important. The analysis of milk regarding pathogenic microorganisms is a clear indicator of hygienic quality and this influences the dairy production. Samples of raw milk from cow, goat and sheep were analyzed for pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The microorganisms found in milk directly affect the human health and can cause a public illness if the unpasteur...

  18. Identification and characterization of peach pathogen Pseudomonas syringae

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilović, Veljko; Dolovac, Nenad; Trkulja, Nenad; Stevanović, Miloš; Živković, Svetlana; Poštić, Dobrivoj; Ivanović, Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is economically important plant pathogen, found on a number of hosts including fruit trees, field crops, vegetables and decorative plants. This phytopathogenic bacteria is becoming a quite widespread pathogen on the fruit trees in Serbia, causing significant economic loses. Up to now it was experimentally confirmed as a pathogen on the pear, apple, apricot, cherry, sour cherry, plum trees as well as raspberries. In this study Pseudomonas syringae was identificated as path...

  19. Actionable, Pathogenic Incidental Findings in 1,000 Participants’ Exomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorschner, Michael O.; Amendola, Laura M.; Turner, Emily H.; Robertson, Peggy D.; Shirts, Brian H.; Gallego, Carlos J.; Bennett, Robin L.; Jones, Kelly L.; Tokita, Mari J.; Bennett, James T.; Kim, Jerry H.; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A.; Kim, Daniel S.; Tabor, Holly K.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Motulsky, Arno G.; Scott, C. Ronald; Pritchard, Colin C.; Walsh, Tom; Burke, Wylie; Raskind, Wendy H.; Byers, Peter; Hisama, Fuki M.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Jarvik, Gail P.

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of genomics into medicine is stimulating interest on the return of incidental findings (IFs) from exome and genome sequencing. However, no large-scale study has yet estimated the number of expected actionable findings per individual; therefore, we classified actionable pathogenic single-nucleotide variants in 500 European- and 500 African-descent participants randomly selected from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Exome Sequencing Project. The 1,000 individuals were screened for variants in 114 genes selected by an expert panel for their association with medically actionable genetic conditions possibly undiagnosed in adults. Among the 1,000 participants, 585 instances of 239 unique variants were identified as disease causing in the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD). The primary literature supporting the variants’ pathogenicity was reviewed. Of the identified IFs, only 16 unique autosomal-dominant variants in 17 individuals were assessed to be pathogenic or likely pathogenic, and one participant had two pathogenic variants for an autosomal-recessive disease. Furthermore, one pathogenic and four likely pathogenic variants not listed as disease causing in HGMD were identified. These data can provide an estimate of the frequency (∼3.4% for European descent and ∼1.2% for African descent) of the high-penetrance actionable pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants in adults. The 23 participants with pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants were disproportionately of European (17) versus African (6) descent. The process of classifying these variants underscores the need for a more comprehensive and diverse centralized resource to provide curated information on pathogenicity for clinical use to minimize health disparities in genomic medicine. PMID:24055113

  20. Bacterial toxins as pathogen weapons against phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana edo Vale

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxins are virulence factors that manipulate host cell functions and take over the control of vital processes of living organisms to favour microbial infection. Some toxins directly target innate immune cells, thereby annihilating a major branch of the host immune response. In this review we will focus on bacterial toxins that act from the extracellular milieu and hinder the function of macrophages and neutrophils. In particular, we will concentrate on toxins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that manipulate cell signalling or induce cell death by either imposing direct damage to the host cells cytoplasmic membrane or enzymatically modifying key eukaryotic targets. Outcomes regarding pathogen dissemination, host damage and disease progression will be discussed.

  1. Bacterial Toxins as Pathogen Weapons Against Phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Vale, Ana; Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxins are virulence factors that manipulate host cell functions and take over the control of vital processes of living organisms to favor microbial infection. Some toxins directly target innate immune cells, thereby annihilating a major branch of the host immune response. In this review we will focus on bacterial toxins that act from the extracellular milieu and hinder the function of macrophages and neutrophils. In particular, we will concentrate on toxins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that manipulate cell signaling or induce cell death by either imposing direct damage to the host cells cytoplasmic membrane or enzymatically modifying key eukaryotic targets. Outcomes regarding pathogen dissemination, host damage and disease progression will be discussed.

  2. Microbiology and foodborne pathogens in honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, N T; Klein, G

    2017-06-13

    Honey has been considered a relatively safe foodstuff due to its compositional properties, with infant botulism caused by Clostridium botulinum being the most prominent health risk associated with it. Our review is focused on the honey microflora along the food chain and evaluates the pathogenic potential of those microorganisms found in honey. This product may contain a great variety of bacteria and, particularly, fungi that eventually entered the food chain at an early stage (e.g., via pollen). For many of these microorganisms, opportunistic infections in humans have been recorded (e.g., infections by Staphylococcus spp., Citrobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Hafnia alvei, Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., Trichoderma spp., Chaetomium spp.), although direct infections via honey were not registered.

  3. Free-living amoebae: pathogenicity and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, A

    1991-01-01

    Free-living amoebae causes three well-defined disease entities: (i) primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, caused by Naegleria fowleri, (ii) granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and (iii) chronic amoebic keratitis, caused by species of Acanthamoeba. Both Naegleria infections and chronic amoebic keratitis occur in healthy individuals while granulomatous amoebic encephalitis is often associated with patients with acquired immunodeficiencies. The different pathogenic behaviour of these organisms is associated with differences in life cycle, amoeboidal locomotion, enzyme composition (such as phospholipase A), and cytotoxins, as well as natural host immunity. Immunity against these amoebae (whether acquired or natural) involves a combination of complement, antibody and cell-mediated immunity. Evidence suggests that the major mechanisms of immunity against these amoebae is activation of phagocytic cells, especially neutrophils, by lymphokines and opsonization of the amoebae by antibody which promote an antibody dependent cellular destruction of the organism.

  4. Specialized Pathogen of a Social Insect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Małagocka, Joanna

    . The pattern of cadaver distribution is associated with ant density, i.e. fungus killed cadavers stay close to the nest and foraging trails. This indicates that manipulation is adaptive for the fungus, and that social exclusion of sick individuals, which has previously been reported in social insects, does......, on the other hand, are remarkably efficient at preventing disease, a trait which necessarily arose together with social organization. In the one known example of social insects, in this case wood ants of the genus Formica, being attacked by an entomophthoralean fungus – Pandora formicae, social behaviors...... provide a game changing component that shapes the interaction in quite a unique way. This thesis explores some of the aspects of biology of host-pathogen interaction between red wood ants, F. polyctena, and the fungus P. formicae. First, the taxonomy of the fungus is studied and some nomenclatural issues...

  5. Huntington's Disease: Pathogenic Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Dean J; Renoir, Thibault; Gray, Laura J; Hannan, Anthony J

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a tandem repeat disorder involving neurodegeneration and a complex combination of symptoms. These include psychiatric symptoms, cognitive deficits culminating in dementia, and the movement disorder epitomised by motor signs such as chorea. HD is caused by a CAG repeat expansion encoding an extended tract of the amino acid glutamine in the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion appears to induce a 'change of function', possibly a 'gain of function', in the huntingtin protein, which leads to various molecular and cellular cascades of pathogenesis. In the current review, we will briefly describe these broader aspects of HD pathogenesis, but will then focus on specific aspects where there are substantial bodies of experimental evidence, including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, glutamatergic dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, we will review recent preclinical therapeutic approaches targeting some of these pathogenic pathways, their clinical implications and future directions.

  6. Fungicide resistance assays for fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Gary A; Rivera, Viviana V

    2012-01-01

    Fungicide resistance assays are useful to determine if a fungal pathogen has developed resistance to a fungicide used to manage the disease it causes. Laboratory assays are used to determine loss of sensitivity, or resistance, to a fungicide and can explain fungicide failures and for developing successful fungicide recommendations in the field. Laboratory assays for fungicide resistance are conducted by measuring reductions in growth or spore germination of fungi in the presence of fungicide, or by molecular procedures. This chapter describes two techniques for measuring fungicide resistance, using the sugarbeet leaf spot fungus Cercospora beticola as a model for the protocol. Two procedures are described for fungicides from two different classes; growth reduction for triazole (sterol demethylation inhibitor; DMI) fungicides, and inhibition of spore germination for quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicides.

  7. Human metapneumovirus: a new respiratory pathogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Broor; P Bharaj; H S Chahar

    2008-11-01

    Human metapneumovirus is a recently recognized pathogen of acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) in children as well as elderly and immunocompromised adults. The virus belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae, sub family Pneumovirinae and genus Metapneumovirus. Through genetic analysis it has been characterized into two groups A and B which are further divided into four sub-lineages. The virus is difficult to grow in tissue culture and hence reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for N and L gene is the method of choice for diagnosis. The virus has been seen in all countries with seasonal distribution in winter months for temperate and spring/summer for tropical countries. F gene is the most conserved among different lineages and efforts are underway to design recombination vaccine using F gene.

  8. WHEAT PATHOGEN RESISTANCE AND CHITINASE PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Gregorová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The powdery mildew and leaf rust caused by Blumeria graminis and Puccinia recondita (respectively are common diseases of wheat throughout the world. These fungal diseases greatly affect crop productivity. Incorporation of effective and durable disease resistance is an important breeding objective for wheat improvement. We have evaluated resistance of four bread wheat (Triticum aestivum and four spelt wheat (Triticum spelta cultivars. Chitinases occurrence as well as their activity was determined in leaf tissues. There was no correlation between resistance rating and activity of chitinase. The pattern of chitinases reveals four isoforms with different size in eight wheat cultivars. A detailed understanding of the molecular events that take place during a plant–pathogen interaction is an essential goal for disease control in the future.

  9. Specialized Pathogen of a Social Insect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Małagocka, Joanna

    , on the other hand, are remarkably efficient at preventing disease, a trait which necessarily arose together with social organization. In the one known example of social insects, in this case wood ants of the genus Formica, being attacked by an entomophthoralean fungus – Pandora formicae, social behaviors...... provide a game changing component that shapes the interaction in quite a unique way. This thesis explores some of the aspects of biology of host-pathogen interaction between red wood ants, F. polyctena, and the fungus P. formicae. First, the taxonomy of the fungus is studied and some nomenclatural issues...... in the context of social immunity and response to disease. Ants normally remove dead nestmates and all other insects from their environment as prophylactic hygienic measure, and to use as protein source. I used behavioral choice experiments to assess whether persistent removal of Pandora-killed cadavers...

  10. Shellfish as reservoirs of bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Hariharan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to present an overview on bacterial pathogens associated with shellfish in Grenada and other countries including the authors’ experience. Although there have been considerable published work on vibrios, there is a lack of information on Salmonella serovars associated with various shellfish. In Grenada, for instance the blue land crabs collected from their habitats were found to harbor several Salmonella serovars. Also, it is notable that only minimal research has been done on shellfish such as conchs and whelks, which are common in the Caribbean and West Indies. Information on anaerobic bacteria, particularly, non-spore forming bacteria associated with shellfish, in general, is also scanty. This review re-examines this globally important topic based on the recent findings as well as past observations. Strategies for reduction of bacteria in oysters are briefly mentioned because of the fact that oysters are consumed commonly without complete cooking.

  11. Shellifsh as reservoirs of bacterial pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harry Hariharan; Victor Amadi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present an overview on bacterial pathogens associated with shellfish in Grenada and other countries including the authors’ experience. Although there have been considerable published work on vibrios, there is a lack of information on Salmonellaserovars associated with various shellfish. In Grenada, for instance the blue land crabs collected from their habitats were found to harbor severalSalmonellaserovars. Also, it is notable that only minimal research has been done on shellfish such as conchs and whelks, which are common in the Caribbean and West Indies. Information on anaerobic bacteria, particularly, non-spore forming bacteria associated with shellfish, in general, is also scanty. This review re-examines this globally important topic based on the recent findings as well as past observations. Strategies for reduction of bacteria in oysters are briefly mentioned because of the fact that oysters are consumed commonly without complete cooking.

  12. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2011-05-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  13. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis: Major Periodontopathic Pathogen Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mysak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe that is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and is a member of more than 500 bacterial species that live in the oral cavity. This anaerobic bacterium is a natural member of the oral microbiome, yet it can become highly destructive (termed pathobiont and proliferate to high cell numbers in periodontal lesions: this is attributed to its arsenal of specialized virulence factors. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of one of the main periodontal pathogens—Porphyromonas gingivalis. This bacterium, along with Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, constitute the “red complex,” a prototype polybacterial pathogenic consortium in periodontitis. This review outlines Porphyromonas gingivalis structure, its metabolism, its ability to colonize the epithelial cells, and its influence upon the host immunity.

  15. Burning mouth syndrome: pathogenic and therapeutic concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferensztajn, Ewa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic pain condition characterized by pain, burning sensations and dryness within an oral mucosa, without any clinical changes of the latter. It occurs approximately seven times more frequently in women, mostly in perimenopausal age. The psychiatric aspect of BMS is significant: the most frequent co-morbidities are depression and anxiety disorders, and a number of psychotropic drugs play an essential role in its treatment. In the present review, the most important pathogenic and treatment concepts of BMS have been discussed. The BMS may be similar to neuropathic pain and has some related pathogenic elements with fibromyalgia and the restless leg syndrome. In primary BMS, the features of presynaptic dysfunction of dopaminergic neurons and deficiency of endogenous dopamine levels have been demonstrated. Other neurotransmitters such as serotonin, noradrenaline, histamine as well as hormonal and inflammatory factors may also play a role in the pathogenesis of BMS. In the pharmacological treatment of BMS a variety of drugs have been used including benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, antidepressants and atypical antipsychotic drugs. In the final part of the paper, the possibility of using atypical antipsychotic drug, olanzapine, in the treatment of BMS has been discussed. In the context of the recent studies on this topic, a case of female patient with the BMS lasting more than ten years has been mentioned, in whom the treatment with olanzapine brought about a rapid and significant reduction of symptoms. The probable mechanism of the therapeutic effect of olanzapine in BMS can include its effect on dopaminergic receptors and probably also on histaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic ones.

  16. Water microbiology. Bacterial pathogens and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, João P S

    2010-10-01

    Water is essential to life, but many people do not have access to clean and safe drinking water and many die of waterborne bacterial infections. In this review a general characterization of the most important bacterial diseases transmitted through water-cholera, typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery-is presented, focusing on the biology and ecology of the causal agents and on the diseases' characteristics and their life cycles in the environment. The importance of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and emerging pathogens in drinking water-transmitted diseases is also briefly discussed. Microbiological water analysis is mainly based on the concept of fecal indicator bacteria. The main bacteria present in human and animal feces (focusing on their behavior in their hosts and in the environment) and the most important fecal indicator bacteria are presented and discussed (focusing on the advantages and limitations of their use as markers). Important sources of bacterial fecal pollution of environmental waters are also briefly indicated. In the last topic it is discussed which indicators of fecal pollution should be used in current drinking water microbiological analysis. It was concluded that safe drinking water for all is one of the major challenges of the 21st century and that microbiological control of drinking water should be the norm everywhere. Routine basic microbiological analysis of drinking water should be carried out by assaying the presence of Escherichia coli by culture methods. Whenever financial resources are available, fecal coliform determinations should be complemented with the quantification of enterococci. More studies are needed in order to check if ammonia is reliable for a preliminary screening for emergency fecal pollution outbreaks. Financial resources should be devoted to a better understanding of the ecology and behavior of human and animal fecal bacteria in environmental waters.

  17. Molecular Diagnosis of Pathogenic Sporothrix Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Messias Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a chronic (subcutaneous infection caused by thermodimorphic fungi in the order, Ophiostomatales. These fungi are characterized by major differences in routes of transmission, host predilections, species virulence, and susceptibilities to antifungals. Sporothrix species emerge in the form of outbreaks. Large zoonoses and sapronoses are ongoing in Brazil and China, respectively. Current diagnostic methods based on morphology and physiology are inaccurate due to closely related phenotypes with overlapping components between pathogenic and non-pathogenic Sporothrix. There is a critical need for new diagnostic tools that are specific, sensitive, and cost-effective.We developed a panel of novel markers, based on calmodulin (CAL gene sequences, for the large-scale diagnosis and epidemiology of clinically relevant members of the Sporothrix genus, and its relative, Ophiostoma. We identified specific PCR-based markers for S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, and O. stenoceras. We employed a murine model of disseminated sporotrichosis to optimize a PCR assay for detecting Sporothrix in clinical specimens.Primer-BLAST searches revealed candidate sequences that were conserved within a single species. Species-specific primers showed no significant homology with human, mouse, or microorganisms outside the Sporothrix genus. The detection limit was 10-100 fg of DNA in a single round of PCR for identifying S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii, S. globosa, S. mexicana, and S. pallida. A simple, direct PCR assay, with conidia as a source of DNA, was effective for rapid, low-cost genotyping. Samples from a murine model of disseminated sporotrichosis confirmed the feasibility of detecting S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii DNA in spleen, liver, lungs, heart, brain, kidney, tail, and feces of infected animals.This PCR-based method could successfully detect and identify a single species in samples from cultures and from clinical

  18. Molecular Diagnosis of Pathogenic Sporothrix Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, G. Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Background Sporotrichosis is a chronic (sub)cutaneous infection caused by thermodimorphic fungi in the order, Ophiostomatales. These fungi are characterized by major differences in routes of transmission, host predilections, species virulence, and susceptibilities to antifungals. Sporothrix species emerge in the form of outbreaks. Large zoonoses and sapronoses are ongoing in Brazil and China, respectively. Current diagnostic methods based on morphology and physiology are inaccurate due to closely related phenotypes with overlapping components between pathogenic and non-pathogenic Sporothrix. There is a critical need for new diagnostic tools that are specific, sensitive, and cost-effective. Methodology We developed a panel of novel markers, based on calmodulin (CAL) gene sequences, for the large-scale diagnosis and epidemiology of clinically relevant members of the Sporothrix genus, and its relative, Ophiostoma. We identified specific PCR-based markers for S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, and O. stenoceras. We employed a murine model of disseminated sporotrichosis to optimize a PCR assay for detecting Sporothrix in clinical specimens. Results Primer-BLAST searches revealed candidate sequences that were conserved within a single species. Species-specific primers showed no significant homology with human, mouse, or microorganisms outside the Sporothrix genus. The detection limit was 10–100 fg of DNA in a single round of PCR for identifying S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii, S. globosa, S. mexicana, and S. pallida. A simple, direct PCR assay, with conidia as a source of DNA, was effective for rapid, low-cost genotyping. Samples from a murine model of disseminated sporotrichosis confirmed the feasibility of detecting S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii DNA in spleen, liver, lungs, heart, brain, kidney, tail, and feces of infected animals. Conclusions This PCR-based method could successfully detect and identify a single species in samples

  19. Water Microbiology. Bacterial Pathogens and Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João P. S. Cabral

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Water is essential to life, but many people do not have access to clean and safe drinking water and many die of waterborne bacterial infections. In this review a general characterization of the most important bacterial diseases transmitted through water—cholera, typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery—is presented, focusing on the biology and ecology of the causal agents and on the diseases’ characteristics and their life cycles in the environment. The importance of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and emerging pathogens in drinking water-transmitted diseases is also briefly discussed. Microbiological water analysis is mainly based on the concept of fecal indicator bacteria. The main bacteria present in human and animal feces (focusing on their behavior in their hosts and in the environment and the most important fecal indicator bacteria are presented and discussed (focusing on the advantages and limitations of their use as markers. Important sources of bacterial fecal pollution of environmental waters are also briefly indicated. In the last topic it is discussed which indicators of fecal pollution should be used in current drinking water microbiological analysis. It was concluded that safe drinking water for all is one of the major challenges of the 21st century and that microbiological control of drinking water should be the norm everywhere. Routine basic microbiological analysis of drinking water should be carried out by assaying the presence of Escherichia coli by culture methods. Whenever financial resources are available, fecal coliform determinations should be complemented with the quantification of enterococci. More studies are needed in order to check if ammonia is reliable for a preliminary screening for emergency fecal pollution outbreaks. Financial resources should be devoted to a better understanding of the ecology and behavior of human and animal fecal bacteria in environmental waters.

  20. Nucleic acid association to human prostasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, I; Ronquist, G

    1990-01-01

    Human prostasomes isolated from seminal plasma were subjected to phenol extraction and then to absorbance (A) measurements at 260 nm (A260) and 280 nm (A280). The A260/A280 ratio was about 2 for prostasome extract and lower for seminal plasma extract, indicative of the presence of nucleic acid. The ratio of nucleic acid to protein in prostasomes was about 1:100, and the ratio in seminal plasma was 1:1,000. Hence nucleic acid is enriched in prostasomes (compared to seminal plasma of 10). Treatment of prostasome samples with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate resulted in an efficient dissociation of nucleic acid from prostasomes as demonstrated by electrophoresis. The association of nucleic acids of various sizes (range; 200 to 20,000 base pairs) to prostasome membranes was most probably genuine and not the result of contamination from spermatozoa, erythrocytes, leukocytes, or bacteria. The results of experiments employing nucleic acid-degrading enzymes favored the concept that double-stranded DNA but not RNA is present at the prostasome membrane surface.

  1. Pathogens distribution and drug sensitivity of chronic dacryocystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Yang Xie

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the pathogens and drug sensitivity of chronic dacryocystitis in order to provide evidence for clinical drug use.METHODS: Lacrimal secretion of 171 cases with chronic dacryocystitis was sampled for pathogenic bacteria culture identification and drug sensitivity test. Based on the results, the isolation rate of pathogens strains, the pathogens kind of chronic dacryoeystitis, main pathogens of chronic dacryocystitis, and sensitive drug for pathogens were analyzed.RESULTS: The isolation rate of pathogens strains was 76.61%(131 cases. The pathogens constituting the chronic dacryocystitis were predominantly gram-positive coccus,the percentage was 72.52%(95 cases, among which staphylococcus hominis occupied 27.48%(36 cases, staphylococcus epidermidis 16.79%(22 cases, streptococcus viridans 12.98%(17 cases. The majority of these bacteria were sensitive to cefoperazone-sulbactam, tobramycin, gentamicin and levofloxacin. For gram-positive coccus, cefoperazone-sulbactam, gentamicin and tobramycin were the most sensitive drug. For gram-negative bacilli, cefoperazone-sulbactam, tobramycin and levofloxacin were most sensitive drug.CONCLUSION: Staphylococcus hominis is the main pathogen of chronic dacryocystitis, tobramycin can be used as the first choice for local treatment of chronic dacryocystitis.

  2. Greater migratory propensity in hosts lowers pathogen transmission and impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Richard J; Altizer, Sonia; Bartel, Rebecca A

    2014-09-01

    Animal migrations are spectacular and migratory species have been shown to transmit pathogens that pose risks to human health. Although migration is commonly assumed to enhance pathogen dispersal, empirical work indicates that migration can often have the opposite effect of lowering disease risk. Key to assessing disease threats to migratory species is the ability to predict how migratory behaviour influences pathogen invasion success and impacts on migratory hosts, thus motivating a mechanistic understanding of migratory host-pathogen interactions. Here, we develop a quantitative framework to examine pathogen transmission in animals that undergo two-way directed migrations between wintering and breeding grounds annually. Using the case of a pathogen transmitted during the host's breeding season, we show that a more extreme migratory strategy (defined by the time spent away from the breeding site and the total distance migrated) lowers the probability of pathogen invasion. Moreover, if migration substantially lowers the survival probability of infected animals, then populations that spend comparatively less time at the breeding site or that migrate longer distances are less vulnerable to pathogen-induced population declines. These findings provide theoretical support for two non-exclusive mechanisms proposed to explain how seasonal migration can lower infection risk: (i) escape from habitats where parasite transmission stages have accumulated and (ii) selective removal of infected hosts during strenuous journeys. Our work further suggests that barriers to long-distance movement could increase pathogen prevalence for vulnerable species, an effect already seen in some animal species undergoing anthropogenically induced migratory shifts.

  3. Evolution of Bacterial Pathogens Within the Human Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliven, Kimberly A; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2016-02-01

    Selective pressures within the human host, including interactions with innate and adaptive immune responses, exposure to medical interventions such as antibiotics, and competition with commensal microbiota all facilitate the evolution of bacterial pathogens. In this chapter, we present examples of pathogen strategies that emerged as a result of selective pressures within the human host niche and discuss the resulting coevolutionary "arms race" between these organisms. In bacterial pathogens, many of the genes responsible for these strategies are encoded on mobile pathogenicity islands or plasmids, underscoring the importance of horizontal gene transfer in the emergence of virulent microbial species.

  4. Chapter A7. Section 7.3. Protozoan Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushon, Rebecca N.; Francy, Donna S.

    2003-01-01

    Protozoan pathogens are widely distributed in the aquatic environment. Cryptosporidium and Giardia are the principal protozoan pathogens that are known to affect the acceptability of water supplies for public use within the United States. A sampling program for protozoan pathogens should be conducted over an extended period of time because of cyclical and seasonal variations in their concentrations in the environment. This report provides information on the equipment, sampling protocols, and laboratory method that are in standard use by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel for the collection of data on protozoan pathogens.

  5. Integrated dataset of screening hits against multiple neglected disease pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Nwaka

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available New chemical entities are desperately needed that overcome the limitations of existing drugs for neglected diseases. Screening a diverse library of 10,000 drug-like compounds against 7 neglected disease pathogens resulted in an integrated dataset of 744 hits. We discuss the prioritization of these hits for each pathogen and the strong correlation observed between compounds active against more than two pathogens and mammalian cell toxicity. Our work suggests that the efficiency of early drug discovery for neglected diseases can be enhanced through a collaborative, multi-pathogen approach.

  6. Circumscription of the anthracnose pathogens Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and C. nigrum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fang Liu; Lei Cai; Pedro W. Crous; Ulrike Damm

    2013-01-01

    The anthracnose pathogen of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is usually identified as Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, while anthracnose of potato (Solanum tuberosum), peppers (Capsicum annuum), tomato (S. lycopersicum...

  7. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warinner, Christina; Rodrigues, João F Matias; Vyas, Rounak

    2014-01-01

    cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction...... of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, 'red complex' pathogens and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental...... calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity and diet, thereby extending direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past....

  8. The quantitative basis of the Arabidopsis innate immune system to endemic pathogens depends on pathogen genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corwin, Jason A; Copeland, Daniel; Feusier, Julie;

    2016-01-01

    The most established model of the eukaryotic innate immune system is derived from examples of large effect monogenic quantitative resistance to pathogens. However, many host-pathogen interactions involve many genes of small to medium effect and exhibit quantitative resistance. We used...... the Arabidopsis-Botrytis pathosystem to explore the quantitative genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system in a population of Arabidopsis thaliana. By infecting a diverse panel of Arabidopsis accessions with four phenotypically and genotypically distinct isolates of the fungal necrotroph B....... cinerea, we identified a total of 2,982 genes associated with quantitative resistance using lesion area and 3,354 genes associated with camalexin production as measures of the interaction. Most genes were associated with resistance to a specific Botrytis isolate, which demonstrates the influence...

  9. Comparative genomics and the evolution of pathogenicity in human pathogenic fungi.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Gary P

    2011-01-01

    Because most fungi have evolved to be free-living in the environment and because the infections they cause are usually opportunistic in nature, it is often difficult to identify specific traits that contribute to fungal pathogenesis. In recent years, there has been a surge in the number of sequenced genomes of human fungal pathogens, and comparison of these sequences has proved to be an excellent resource for exploring commonalities and differences in how these species interact with their hosts. In order to survive in the human body, fungi must be able to adapt to new nutrient sources and environmental stresses. Therefore, genes involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and transport and genes encoding secondary metabolites tend to be overrepresented in pathogenic species (e.g., Aspergillus fumigatus). However, it is clear that human commensal yeast species such as Candida albicans have also evolved a range of specific factors that facilitate direct interaction with host tissues. The evolution of virulence across the human pathogenic fungi has occurred largely through very similar mechanisms. One of the most important mechanisms is gene duplication and the expansion of gene families, particularly in subtelomeric regions. Unlike the case for prokaryotic pathogens, horizontal transfer of genes between species and other genera does not seem to have played a significant role in the evolution of fungal virulence. New sequencing technologies promise the prospect of even greater numbers of genome sequences, facilitating the sequencing of multiple genomes and transcriptomes within individual species, and will undoubtedly contribute to a deeper insight into fungal pathogenesis.

  10. The Quantitative Basis of the Arabidopsis Innate Immune System to Endemic Pathogens Depends on Pathogen Genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A Corwin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The most established model of the eukaryotic innate immune system is derived from examples of large effect monogenic quantitative resistance to pathogens. However, many host-pathogen interactions involve many genes of small to medium effect and exhibit quantitative resistance. We used the Arabidopsis-Botrytis pathosystem to explore the quantitative genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system in a population of Arabidopsis thaliana. By infecting a diverse panel of Arabidopsis accessions with four phenotypically and genotypically distinct isolates of the fungal necrotroph B. cinerea, we identified a total of 2,982 genes associated with quantitative resistance using lesion area and 3,354 genes associated with camalexin production as measures of the interaction. Most genes were associated with resistance to a specific Botrytis isolate, which demonstrates the influence of pathogen genetic variation in analyzing host quantitative resistance. While known resistance genes, such as receptor-like kinases (RLKs and nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs, were found to be enriched among associated genes, they only account for a small fraction of the total genes associated with quantitative resistance. Using publically available co-expression data, we condensed the quantitative resistance associated genes into co-expressed gene networks. GO analysis of these networks implicated several biological processes commonly connected to disease resistance, including defense hormone signaling and ROS production, as well as novel processes, such as leaf development. Validation of single gene T-DNA knockouts in a Col-0 background demonstrate a high success rate (60% when accounting for differences in environmental and Botrytis genetic variation. This study shows that the genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system is extremely complex and is likely able to sense and respond to differential virulence among pathogen

  11. Transcriptome profiling of soybean (Glycine max) roots challenged with pathogenic and non-pathogenic isolates of Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanubile, Alessandra; Muppirala, Usha K; Severin, Andrew J; Marocco, Adriano; Munkvold, Gary P

    2015-12-21

    Fusarium oxysporum is one of the most common fungal pathogens causing soybean root rot and seedling blight in U.S.A. In a recent study, significant variation in aggressiveness was observed among isolates of F. oxysporum collected from roots in Iowa, ranging from highly pathogenic to weakly or non-pathogenic isolates. We used RNA-seq analysis to investigate the molecular aspects of the interactions of a partially resistant soybean genotype with non-pathogenic/pathogenic isolates of F. oxysporum at 72 and 96 h post inoculation (hpi). Markedly different gene expression profiles were observed in response to the two isolates. A peak of highly differentially expressed genes (HDEGs) was triggered at 72 hpi in soybean roots and the number of HDEGs was about eight times higher in response to the pathogenic isolate compared to the non-pathogenic one (1,659 vs. 203 HDEGs, respectively). Furthermore, the magnitude of induction was much greater in response to the pathogenic isolate. This response included a stronger activation of defense-related genes, transcription factors, and genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis, secondary and sugar metabolism. The obtained data provide an important insight into the transcriptional responses of soybean-F. oxysporum interactions and illustrate the more drastic changes in the host transcriptome in response to the pathogenic isolate. These results may be useful in the developing new methods of broadening resistance of soybean to F. oxysporum, including the over-expression of key soybean genes.

  12. Pathogenic amoebae in power-plant cooling lakes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyndall, R.L.; Willaert, E.; Stevens, A.R.

    1981-06-01

    Cooling waters and associated algae and sediments from four northern and four southern/western electric power plants were tested for the presence of pathogenic amoebae. Unheated control waters and algae/sediments from four northern and five southern/western sites were also tested. When comparing results from the test versus control sites, a significantly higher proportion (P less than or equal to 0.05) of the samples from the test sites were positive for thermophilic amoeba, thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic Naegleria. The difference in number of samples positive for thermophilic Naegleria between heated and unheated waters, however, was attributable predominantly to the northern waters and algae/sediments. While two of four northern test sites yielded pathogenic Naegleria, seven of the eight isolates were obtained from one site. Seasonality effects relative to the isolation of the pathogen were also noted at this site. One pathogen was isolated from a southwestern test site. Pathogens were not isolated from any control sites. Some of the pathogenic isolates were analyzed serologically and classified as pathogenic Naegleria fowleri. Salinity, pH, conductivity, and bacteriological profiles did not obviously correlate with the presence or absence of pathogenic Naegleria. While thermal addition was significantly associated with the presence of thermophilic Naegleria (P less than or equal to 0.05), the data implicate other as yet undefined parameters associated with the presence of the pathogenic thermophile. Until further delineation of these parameters is effected, generalizations cannot be made concerning the effect of thermal impact on the growth of pathogenic amoeba in a particular cooling system.

  13. Migrate or evolve: options for plant pathogens under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sukumar

    2013-07-01

    Findings on climate change influence on plant pathogens are often inconsistent and context dependent. Knowledge of pathogens affecting agricultural crops and natural plant communities remains fragmented along disciplinary lines. By broadening the perspective beyond agriculture, this review integrates cross-disciplinary knowledge to show that at scales relevant to climate change, accelerated evolution and changing geographic distribution will be the main implications for pathogens. New races may evolve rapidly under elevated temperature and CO2 , as evolutionary forces act on massive pathogen populations boosted by a combination of increased fecundity and infection cycles under favourable microclimate within enlarged canopy. Changing geographic distribution will bring together diverse lineages/genotypes that do not share common ecological niche, potentially increasing pathogen diversity. However, the uncertainty of model predictions and a lack of synthesis of fragmented knowledge remain as major deficiencies in knowledge. The review contends that the failure to consider scale and human intervention through new technology are major sources of uncertainty. Recognizing that improved biophysical models alone will not reduce uncertainty, it proposes a generic framework to increase focus and outlines ways to integrate biophysical elements and technology change with human intervention scenarios to minimize uncertainty. To synthesize knowledge of pathogen biology and life history, the review borrows the concept of 'fitness' from population biology as a comprehensive measure of pathogen strengths and vulnerabilities, and explores the implications of pathogen mode of nutrition to fitness and its interactions with plants suffering chronic abiotic stress under climate change. Current and future disease management options can then be judged for their ability to impair pathogenic and saprophytic fitness. The review pinpoints improving confidence in model prediction by minimizing

  14. Modeling the intracellular pathogen-immune interaction with cure rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Balram; Dubey, Preeti; Dubey, Uma S.

    2016-09-01

    Many common and emergent infectious diseases like Influenza, SARS, Hepatitis, Ebola etc. are caused by viral pathogens. These infections can be controlled or prevented by understanding the dynamics of pathogen-immune interaction in vivo. In this paper, interaction of pathogens with uninfected and infected cells in presence or absence of immune response are considered in four different cases. In the first case, the model considers the saturated nonlinear infection rate and linear cure rate without absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells and without immune response. The next model considers the effect of absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells while all other terms are same as in the first case. The third model incorporates innate immune response, humoral immune response and Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) mediated immune response with cure rate and without absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells. The last model is an extension of the third model in which the effect of absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells has been considered. Positivity and boundedness of solutions are established to ensure the well-posedness of the problem. It has been found that all the four models have two equilibria, namely, pathogen-free equilibrium point and pathogen-present equilibrium point. In each case, stability analysis of each equilibrium point is investigated. Pathogen-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when basic reproduction number is less or equal to unity. This implies that control or prevention of infection is independent of initial concentration of uninfected cells, infected cells, pathogens and immune responses in the body. The proposed models show that introduction of immune response and cure rate strongly affects the stability behavior of the system. Further, on computing basic reproduction number, it has been found to be minimum for the fourth model vis-a-vis other models. The analytical findings of each model have been exemplified by

  15. Genomic Investigation into Strain Heterogeneity and Pathogenic Potential of the Emerging Gastrointestinal Pathogen Campylobacter ureolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullman, Susan; Lucid, Alan; Corcoran, Daniel; Sleator, Roy D.; Lucey, Brigid

    2013-01-01

    The recent detection and isolation of C. ureolyticus from patients with diarrhoeal illness and inflammatory bowel diseases warrants further investigation into its role as an emerging pathogen of the human gastrointestinal tract. Regarding the pathogenic mechanisms employed by this species we provide the first whole genome analysis of two C. ureolyticus isolates including the type strain. Comparative analysis, subtractive hybridisation and gene ontology searches against other Campylobacter species identifies the high degree of heterogenicity between C. ureolyticus isolates, in addition to the identification of 106 putative virulence associated factors, 52 of which are predicted to be secreted. Such factors encompass each of the known virulence tactics of pathogenic Campylobacter spp. including adhesion and colonisation (CadF, PEB1, IcmF and FlpA), invasion (ciaB and 16 virB-virD4 genes) and toxin production (S-layer RTX and ZOT). Herein, we provide the first virulence catalogue for C. ureolyticus, the components of which theoretically provide this emerging species with sufficient arsenal to establish pathology. PMID:24023611

  16. Pathogenicity of three genetically diverse strains of PRRSV Type 1 in specific pathogen free pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadejek, Tomasz; Larsen, Lars E; Podgórska, Katarzyna; Bøtner, Anette; Botti, Sara; Dolka, Izabella; Fabisiak, Michał; Heegaard, Peter M H; Hjulsager, Charlotte K; Huć, Tomasz; Kvisgaard, Lise K; Sapierzyński, Rafał; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-05-16

    Studies from Eastern European countries proved that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus Type 1 (PRRSV-1) harbours high genetic diversity and that genetically divergent subtypes 2-4 circulate in this area. In the present study, we compared the pathogenicity of two different PRRSV-1 subtype 2 strains and a strain representing PRRSV-1 subtype 1. Four groups of 8-week-old specific pathogen free pigs were either infected with subtype 2 strain ILI6, subtype 2 strain or BOR59, subtype 1 strain 18794, or mock inoculated. The most pronounced clinical signs were observed in pigs infected with BOR59. Pigs from both subtype 2 strain infected groups exhibited significantly elevated mean body temperatures on DPI 2 compared to the other two groups, the difference remaining significant up to DPI 13 for the BOR59 group, only. The pigs in the latter group also displayed significantly highest levels of early viremia together with the most rapid APP response. Overall, the results indicated that BOR59 strain can be considered a highly pathogenic strain, similarly to subtype 3 strains Lena and SU1-bel, while the virulence of the other subtype 2 strain ILI6 was intermediate between BOR59 and subtype 1 strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Distribution of indigenous bacterial pathogens and potential pathogens associated with roof-harvested rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, P H; De Kwaadsteniet, M; Cloete, T E; Khan, W

    2014-04-01

    The harvesting of rainwater is gaining acceptance among many governmental authorities in countries such as Australia, Germany, and South Africa, among others. However, conflicting reports on the microbial quality of harvested rainwater have been published. To monitor the presence of potential pathogenic bacteria during high-rainfall periods, rainwater from 29 rainwater tanks was sampled on four occasions (during June and August 2012) in a sustainable housing project in Kleinmond, South Africa. This resulted in the collection of 116 harvested rainwater samples in total throughout the sampling period. The identities of the dominant, indigenous, presumptive pathogenic isolates obtained from the rainwater samples throughout the sampling period were confirmed through universal 16S rRNA PCR, and the results revealed that Pseudomonas (19% of samples) was the dominant genus isolated, followed by Aeromonas (16%), Klebsiella (11%), and Enterobacter (9%). PCR assays employing genus-specific primers also confirmed the presence of Aeromonas spp. (16%), Klebsiella spp. (47%), Legionella spp. (73%), Pseudomonas spp. (13%), Salmonella spp. (6%), Shigella spp. (27%), and Yersinia spp. (28%) in the harvested rainwater samples. In addition, on one sampling occasion, Giardia spp. were detected in 25% of the eight tank water samples analyzed. This study highlights the diverse array of pathogenic bacteria that persist in harvested rainwater during high-rainfall periods. The consumption of untreated harvested rainwater could thus pose a potential significant health threat to consumers, especially children and immunocompromised individuals, and it is recommended that harvested rainwater be treated for safe usage as an alternative water source.

  18. Infectious bursal disease: evaluation of pathogenicity of commercial vaccines from Brazil in specific pathogen free chichens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HLS Moraes

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD is a chicken disease economically important for the poultry industry in function of the immune depression that it causes. Disease control is made with different vaccines and vaccination programs. In present work, the pathogenicity of 3 intermediate vaccines (I1, I2 and I3, 2 intermediate more pathogenic (IP1 and IP2 and 3 vaccines containing strong virus (F1, F2 and F3 was evaluated. Birds vaccinated with IP1, IP2, F1, F2 and F3 showed significantly lower bursa size in relation to control animals and animals vaccinated with I1, I2 and I3. On the other hand, vaccines I1 and I3 induced antibody titers higher than the control and lower than I2, IP1, IP2, F1, F2 and F3. Histological scores showed that vaccines I1, I2 and I3 induced similar injury degree, although I2 and I3 were not different from the control, whereas I1 was slightly different. Strong vaccines induced more pronounced lesions than the other tested vaccines. These findings suggest that strong vaccines are able to cause severe bursal injuries. However, bursometry and relative weight of the bursa of Fabricius were considered inadequate to evaluate vaccine pathogenicity. Moreover, strong vaccines induced higher antibody titers than the other vaccines, although some intermediate vaccines induced similar titers.

  19. Application of hyaluronic acid associated with botox in neck wrinkles%透明质酸和肉毒素联合运用治疗颈部皱纹

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈啸; 李平松

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the clinical effects of hyaluronic acid associated with botox in the treatment of neck wrinkles. Methods: Hyaluronic acid was injected subdermai to cure horizontal neck wrinkles. Botox was injected into skin to cure platysma banding. Results: All cases were followed 3 — 15 months after operation. There was no obvious wrinkles and folds during 1 year. Conclusions: The wrinkles and folds were immediately im-provemented and last at least 1 year. Swell and bruise was unconspicuous.%目的:探讨联合运用透明质酸和肉毒素治疗颈部皱纹的效果和优点.方法:透明质酸注射于颈部横向皱纹,肉毒素治疗颈阔肌垂直带.结果:治疗6-15月随访12例,临床效果满意.结论:联合运用透明质酸和肉毒素治疗颈部皱纹,效果迅速,治疗后没有明显的肿胀淤青,疗效较持久.

  20. Pathogen and biological contamination management in plant tissue culture: phytopathogens, vitro pathogens, and vitro pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassells, Alan C

    2012-01-01

    The ability to establish and grow plant cell, organ, and tissue cultures has been widely exploited for basic and applied research, and for the commercial production of plants (micro-propagation). Regardless of whether the application is for research or commerce, it is essential that the cultures be established in vitro free of biological contamination and be maintained as aseptic cultures during manipulation, growth, and storage. The risks from microbial contamination are spurious experimental results due to the effects of latent contaminants or losses of valuable experimental or commercial cultures. Much of the emphasis in culture contamination management historically focussed on the elimination of phytopathogens and the maintenance of cultures free from laboratory contamination by environmental bacteria, fungi (collectively referred to as "vitro pathogens", i.e. pathogens or environmental micro-organisms which cause culture losses), and micro-arthropods ("vitro pests"). Microbial contamination of plant tissue cultures is due to the high nutrient availability in the almost universally used Murashige and Skoog (Physiol Plant 15:473-497, 1962) basal medium or variants of it. In recent years, it has been shown that many plants, especially perennials, are at least locally endophytically colonized intercellularly by bacteria. The latter, and intracellular pathogenic bacteria and viruses/viroids, may pass latently into culture and be spread horizontally and vertically in cultures. Growth of some potentially cultivable endophytes may be suppressed by the high salt and sugar content of the Murashige and Skoog basal medium and suboptimal temperatures for their growth in plant tissue growth rooms. The management of contamination in tissue culture involves three stages: disease screening (syn. disease indexing) of the stock plants with disease and endophyte elimination where detected; establishment and pathogen and contaminant screening of established initial cultures

  1. USGS highly pathogenic avian influenza research strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M. Camille; Miles, A. Keith; Pearce, John M.; Prosser, Diann J.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-09-09

    Avian influenza viruses are naturally occurring in wild birds such as ducks, geese, swans, and gulls. These viruses generally do not cause illness in wild birds, however, when spread to poultry they can be highly pathogenic and cause illness and death in backyard and commercial farms. Outbreaks may cause devastating agricultural economic losses and some viral strains have the potential to infect people directly. Furthermore, the combination of avian influenza viruses with mammalian viruses can result in strains with the ability to transmit from person to person, possibly leading to viruses with pandemic potential. All known pandemic influenza viruses have had some genetic material of avian origin. Since 1996, a strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, H5N1, has caused infection in wild birds, losses to poultry farms in Eurasia and North Africa, and led to the deaths of several hundred people. Spread of the H5N1 virus and other influenza strains from China was likely facilitated by migratory birds. In December 2014, HPAI was detected in poultry in Canada and migratory birds in the United States. Since then, HPAI viruses have spread to large parts of the United States and will likely continue to spread through migratory bird flyways and other mechanisms throughout North America. In the United States, HPAI viruses have severely affected the poultry industry with millions of domestic birds dead or culled. These strains of HPAI are not known to cause disease in humans; however, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advise caution when in close contact with infected birds. Experts agree that HPAI strains currently circulating in wild birds of North America will likely persist for the next few years. This unprecedented situation presents risks to the poultry industry, natural resource management, and potentially human health. Scientific knowledge and decision support tools are urgently needed to understand factors affecting the persistence

  2. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J; Dzenitis, J

    2004-09-22

    Shaped like a mailbox on wheels, it's been called a bioterrorism ''smoke detector.'' It can be found in transportation hubs such as airports and subways, and it may be coming to a location near you. Formally known as the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System, or APDS, this latest tool in the war on bioterrorism was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to continuously sniff the air for airborne pathogens and toxins such as anthrax or plague. The APDS is the modern day equivalent of the canaries miners took underground with them to test for deadly carbon dioxide gas. But this canary can test for numerous bacteria, viruses, and toxins simultaneously, report results every hour, and confirm positive samples and guard against false positive results by using two different tests. The fully automated system collects and prepares air samples around the clock, does the analysis, and interprets the results. It requires no servicing or human intervention for an entire week. Unlike its feathered counterpart, when an APDS unit encounters something deadly in the air, that's when it begins singing, quietly. The APDS unit transmits a silent alert and sends detailed data to public health authorities, who can order evacuation and begin treatment of anyone exposed to toxic or biological agents. It is the latest in a series of biodefense detectors developed at DOE/NNSA national laboratories. The manual predecessor to APDS, called BASIS (for Biological Aerosol Sentry and Information System), was developed jointly by Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. That system was modified to become BioWatch, the Department of Homeland Security's biological urban monitoring program. A related laboratory instrument, the Handheld Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA), was first tested successfully at LLNL in September 1997. Successful partnering with private industry has been a key factor in the rapid advancement and deployment of

  3. Field application of pathogen detection technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Call, Douglas R.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Colburn, Heather A.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Jarman, Kristin H.

    2016-06-29

    Over the last 10 years there has been a significant increase in commercial products designed for field-based detection of microbial pathogens. This is due, in part, to the anthrax attacks in the United States in 2001, and the need for first responders to quickly identify the composition of suspected white powders and other potential biothreats. Demand for rapid detection is also driven by the need to ensure safe food, water, and environmental systems. From a technology perspective, rapid identification methods have largely capitalized on PCR and other molecular recognition techniques that can be deployed as robust field instrumentation. Examples of the relevant needs include the ability to: 1) declare a water distribution system free of microbial pathogens after a pipe/main break repair; 2) assess risks of contamination such as when produce production and processing plants are located near concentrated animal feeing operations; 3) evaluate the safety of ready-to-eat products; 4) determine the extent of potential serious disease outbreaks in remote and/or disaster stricken areas where access to clinical laboratories is not an immediate option; and 5) quickly assess credible biological terrorism events. Many of the principles underlying rapid detection methods are derived from methods for environmental microbiology, but there is a dearth of literature describing and evaluating field-based detection systems. Thus, the aims of this chapter are to: 1) summarize the different kinds of commercially available sampling kits and field-based biological detectors; 2) highlight some of the continued challenges of sample preparation to stimulate new research towards minimizing the impact of inhibitors on PCR-based detection systems; 3) describe our general rationale and statistically-based approach for instrument evaluation; 4) provide statistical and spatial guidelines for developing valid sampling plans; and 5) summarize some current needs and emerging technologies. This

  4. Molecular determinants of pathogen recognition and defense elicitation in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, is able to rapidly evolve to overcome resistance genes. The pathogen accomplishes this by secreting an arsenal of proteins, termed effectors, that function to modify host cells. Although hundreds of candidate effectors have been identified in ...

  5. Rapid identification and detection of pathogenic Fungi by padlock probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsui, C.K.M.; Wang, B.; Schoen, C.D.; Hamelin, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi are important pathogens of human diseases, as well as to agricultural crop and trees. Molecular diagnostics can detect diseases early, and improve identification accuracy and follow-up disease management. The use of padlock probe is effective to facilitate these detections and pathogen identif

  6. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the extracell

  7. Modelling animal waste pathogen transport from agricultural land to streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Soupir, Michelle L.; Ikenberry, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The transport of animal waste pathogens from crop land to streams can potentially elevate pathogen levels in stream water. Applying animal manure into crop land as fertilizers is a common practice in developing as well as in developed countries. Manure application into the crop land, however, can cause potential human health. To control pathogen levels in ambient water bodies such as streams, improving our understanding of pathogen transport at farm scale as well as at watershed scale is required. To understand the impacts of crop land receiving animal waste as fertilizers on stream's pathogen levels, here we investigate pathogen indicator transport at watershed scale. We exploited watershed scale hydrological model to estimate the transport of pathogens from the crop land to streams. Pathogen indicator levels (i.e., E. coli levels) in the stream water were predicted. With certain assumptions, model results are reasonable. This study can be used as guidelines for developing the models for calculating the impacts of crop land's animal manure on stream water.

  8. Sequencing the Major Mycosphaerella Pathogens of Wheat and Banana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kema, G.H.; Dunkle, L.D.; Churchill, A.C.; Carlier, J.; James, A.; Souza, M.T.; Crous, P.W.; Roux, N.; Lee, T.A. van der; Wiitenberg, A.; Lindquist, E.; Grigoriev, I.; Bristow, J.; Goodwin, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    Mycosphaerella is one of the largest genera of plant pathogenic fungi with more than 1,000 named species, many of which are important pathogens causing leaf spotting diseases in a wide variety of crops including cereals, citrus, banana, eucalypts, soft fruits, and horticultural crops. A few species

  9. Sequencing the Major Mycosphaerella Pathogens of Wheat and Banana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kema, G.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Mycosphaerella is one of the largest genera of plant-pathogenic fungi with more than 1,000 named species, many of which are important pathogens causing leaf spotting diseases in a wide variety of crops including cereals, citrus, banana, eucalypts, soft fruits and horticultural crops. A few species

  10. Pathogen reduction in minimally managed composting of bovine manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persistence of pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes in bovine feces and contaminated soils is an important risk factor in perpetuating the initial infection as well as re-infection of cattle and dissemination of pathogens throughout agricultural la...

  11. Carbohydrate-related enzymes of important Phytophthora plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Henk; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) form particularly interesting targets to study in plant pathogens. Despite the fact that many CAZymes are pathogenicity factors, oomycete CAZymes have received significantly less attention than effectors in the literature. Here we present an analysis of the CAZy

  12. Insights into Cross-Kingdom Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan W.B. Kirzinger

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant and human pathogens have evolved disease factors to successfully exploit their respective hosts. Phytopathogens utilize specific determinants that help to breach reinforced cell walls and manipulate plant physiology to facilitate the disease process, while human pathogens use determinants for exploiting mammalian physiology and overcoming highly developed adaptive immune responses. Emerging research, however, has highlighted the ability of seemingly dedicated human pathogens to cause plant disease, and specialized plant pathogens to cause human disease. Such microbes represent interesting systems for studying the evolution of cross-kingdom pathogenicity, and the benefits and tradeoffs of exploiting multiple hosts with drastically different morphologies and physiologies. This review will explore cross-kingdom pathogenicity, where plants and humans are common hosts. We illustrate that while cross-kingdom pathogenicity appears to be maintained, the directionality of host association (plant to human, or human to plant is difficult to determine. Cross-kingdom human pathogens, and their potential plant reservoirs, have important implications for the emergence of infectious diseases.

  13. Pathogenicity of Cryptosporidium parvum - evaluation of an animal infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Heidi L.; Bille-Hansen, Vivi; Lind, Peter

    2003-01-01

    With the intention of developing a standardised method for assessment of pathogenicity of Cryptosporidium parvum, the CPB-0 isolate was studied by propagation in 1-day-old calves followed by inoculation into specific pathogen free (SPF) piglets. The experiment was repeated. Diarrhoea and shedding...

  14. Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens in Hospitalized Syrian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Diana Faour; Hoffmann, Yoav; Shahar, Naama; Ocampo, Smadar; Salomon, Liora; Zonis, Zeev

    2017-01-01

    Since 2013, wounded and ill children from Syria have received treatment in Israel. Screening cultures indicated that multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens colonized 89 (83%) of 107 children. For 58% of MDR infections, the pathogen was similar to that identified during screening. MDR screening of these children is valuable for purposes of isolation and treatment. PMID:27618479

  15. Conidiobolus macrosporus (Entomophthorales), a mosquito pathogen in Central Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new fungal pathogen of Culicinae (Diptera: Culicidae) adults, Conidiobolus macrosporus (Ancylistaceae), was detected and isolated during a survey of mosquito pathogens close to the city of Aruanã, Goiás State of Brazil, in December 2014. The morphological characteristics of C. macrosporus are pres...

  16. Aptamer-Based Technologies in Foodborne Pathogen Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Teng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single stranded DNA or RNA ligands, which can be selected by a method called systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX; and they can specifically recognize and bind to their targets. These unique characteristics of aptamers offer great potentials in applications such as pathogen detection and biomolecular screening. Pathogen detection is the first and critical means in detecting and identifying the problems related to public health and food safety; and only the rapid, sensitive and efficient detection technologies can enable the users to make to accurate assessments on the risk of infections (humans and animals or contaminations (foods and other commodities caused by various pathogens. This article reviews the developments in the field of the aptamer-based approaches for pathogen detection, including whole-cell SELEX and Genomic SELEX. Nowadays, a variety of aptamer-based biosensors have been developed for pathogen detection. Thus, in this review, we also cover the development of aptamer-based biosensors including optical biosensors for multiple pathogen detection in multiple-labeling or label-free models such as fluorescence detection and surface plasmon resonance, electrochemical biosensors, and lateral chromatography test strips, and their applications in the pathogen detection and biomolecular screening. While notable progress has been made in the field in the last decade, challenges or drawbacks in their applications such as pathogen detection and biomolecular screening, remain to be overcome.

  17. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the

  18. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases activate nucleoside antibiotics in severely pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Shannon, O.; Clausen, A.R.;

    2007-01-01

    Common bacterial pathogens are becoming progressively more resistant to traditional antibiotics, representing a major public-health crisis. Therefore, there is a need for a variety of antibiotics with alternative modes of action. In our study, several nucleoside analogs were tested against...... alternative for combating pathogenic bacteria....

  19. IPM potentials of microbial pathogens and diseases of mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, L.P.S.; Ciancio, A.; Mukerji, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    An overview is given of diseases in mites, caused by infectious microorganisms. Many pathogens play an important role in the regulation of natural populations of mite populations and are for this reason subject of research on the feasibility to develop such pathogens to biological control agents. Se

  20. Pathogen-avoidance mechanisms and the stigmatization of obese people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Justin H.; Schaller, Mark; Crandall, Christian S.

    2007-01-01

    Humans possess pathogen-avoidance mechanisms that respond to the visual perception of morphological anomalies in others. We investigated whether obesity may trigger these mechanisms. Study I revealed that people who are chronically concerned about pathogen transmission have more negative attitudes

  1. Pathogen inactivation in cellular blood products by photodynamic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trannoy, Laurence Liliane

    2010-01-01

    The safety of blood transfusion can be increased by introducing methods that eliminate blood-borne pathogens such as viruses and bacteria. In this thesis, the use of photodynamic treatment (PDT) to inactivate pathogens in cellular blood products is described. Various photosensitizers, from phenothia

  2. Leaf rust of wheat: Pathogen biology, variation and host resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusts are important pathogens of angiosperms and gymnosperms. Rust fungi are among the most important pathogens of cereals. Cereal rusts are heteroecious and macrocyclic requiring two taxonomically unrelated hosts to complete a five spore stage life cycle. Cereal rust fungi are highly variable for v...

  3. The top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomycetes form a deep lineage of eukaryotic organisms that includes a large number of plant pathogens that threaten natural and managed ecosystems. We undertook a survey to query the community for their ranking of plant pathogenic oomycete taxa based on scientific and economic importance. In total, ...

  4. Pathogen removal using saturated sand colums supplemented with hydrochar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    This PhD study has evaluated hydrochars derived from biowastes as adsorbents for pathogen removal in water treatment. Pathogen removal experiments were conducted by carrying out breakthrough analysis using a simple sand filtration set-up. Glass columns packed by 10 cm sand bed supplemented with mino

  5. Mechanisms of PGPR-induced resistance against pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria can suppress diseases through antagonism between the bacteria and soilborne pathogens, as well as by inducing a systemic resistance in the plant against both root and foliar pathogens. Specific Pseudomonas strains induce systemic resistance in carnation, cucumber

  6. Disease burden of foodborne pathogens in the Netherlands, 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havelaar, Arie H.; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Mangen, Marie-Josee J.; Kemmeren, Jeanet M.; Verhoef, Linda P. B.; Vijgen, Sylvia M. C.; Wilson, Margaret; Friesema, Ingrid H. M.; Kortbeek, Laetitia M.; van Duynhoven, Yvonne T. H. P.; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2012-01-01

    To inform risk management decisions on control, prevention and surveillance of foodborne disease, the disease burden of foodborne pathogens is estimated using Disability Adjusted Life Years as a summary metric of public health. Fourteen pathogens that can be transmitted by food are included in the s

  7. IPM potentials of microbial pathogens and diseases of mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, L.P.S.; Ciancio, A.; Mukerji, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    An overview is given of diseases in mites, caused by infectious microorganisms. Many pathogens play an important role in the regulation of natural populations of mite populations and are for this reason subject of research on the feasibility to develop such pathogens to biological control agents.

  8. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the extracell

  9. Genetic diversity in the SIR model of pathogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordo, Isabel; Gomes, M Gabriela M; Reis, Daniel G; Campos, Paulo R A

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model for assessing the levels and patterns of genetic diversity in pathogen populations, whose epidemiology follows a susceptible-infected-recovered model (SIR). We model the population of pathogens as a metapopulation composed of subpopulations (infected hosts), where pathogens replicate and mutate. Hosts transmit pathogens to uninfected hosts. We show that the level of pathogen variation is well predicted by analytical expressions, such that pathogen neutral molecular variation is bounded by the level of infection and increases with the duration of infection. We then introduce selection in the model and study the invasion probability of a new pathogenic strain whose fitness (R(0)(1+s)) is higher than the fitness of the resident strain (R(0)). We show that this invasion probability is given by the relative increment in R(0) of the new pathogen (s). By analyzing the patterns of genetic diversity in this framework, we identify the molecular signatures during the replacement and compare these with those observed in sequences of influenza A.

  10. Genetic diversity in the SIR model of pathogen evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gordo

    Full Text Available We introduce a model for assessing the levels and patterns of genetic diversity in pathogen populations, whose epidemiology follows a susceptible-infected-recovered model (SIR. We model the population of pathogens as a metapopulation composed of subpopulations (infected hosts, where pathogens replicate and mutate. Hosts transmit pathogens to uninfected hosts. We show that the level of pathogen variation is well predicted by analytical expressions, such that pathogen neutral molecular variation is bounded by the level of infection and increases with the duration of infection. We then introduce selection in the model and study the invasion probability of a new pathogenic strain whose fitness (R(0(1+s is higher than the fitness of the resident strain (R(0. We show that this invasion probability is given by the relative increment in R(0 of the new pathogen (s. By analyzing the patterns of genetic diversity in this framework, we identify the molecular signatures during the replacement and compare these with those observed in sequences of influenza A.

  11. Diaporthe: a genus of endophytic, saprobic and plant pathogenic fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, R.R.; Glienke, C.; Videira, S.I.R.; Lombard, L.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    Diaporthe (Phomopsis) species have often been reported as plant pathogens, non-pathogenic endophytes or saprobes, commonly isolated from a wide range of hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to resolve the taxonomy and phylogeny of a large collection of Diaporthe species occurring on diver

  12. Enteric Pathogens Associated with Childhood Diarrhea in Tripoli-Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahouma, Amal; Klena, John D.; Krema, Zaineb; Abobker, Abdalwahed A.; Treesh, Khalid; Franka, Ezzedin; Abusnena, Omar; Shaheen, Hind I.; El Mohammady, Hanan; Abudher, Abdulhafid; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2011-01-01

    Stool samples from children < 5 years of age with diarrhea (N = 239) were examined for enteric pathogens using a combination of culture, enzyme-immunoassay, and polymerase chain reaction methods. Pathogens were detected in 122 (51%) stool samples; single pathogens were detected in 37.2% and co-pathogens in 13.8% of samples. Norovirus, rotavirus, and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) were the most frequently detected pathogens (15.5%, 13.4%, and 11.2%, respectively); Salmonella, adenovirus, and Aeromonas were detected less frequently (7.9%, 7.1%, and 4.2%). The most commonly detected DEC was enteroaggregative E. coli (5.4%). Resistance to ≥ 3 antimicrobials was observed in 60% (18/30) of the bacterial pathogens. Salmonella resistance to ciprofloxacin (63.1%) has become a concern. Enteric viral pathogens were the most significant causative agents of childhood diarrhea in Tripoli. Bacterial pathogens were also important contributors to pediatric diarrhea. The emergence of ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella represents a serious health problem that must be addressed by Libyan health authorities PMID:21633024

  13. Pathology smorgasboard: Biocontrol, pathogen movement, and recent fumigation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on soilborne pathogens, disease control, and new forest diseases of interest were presented at the Western Forest and Conservation Nursery Association meeting in 2016. Research topics included reduced-rate soil fumigation, Pythium diversity and biocontrol, pathogen movement among nurseries,...

  14. Aptamer-Based Technologies in Foodborne Pathogen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Jun; Yuan, Fang; Ye, Yingwang; Zheng, Lei; Yao, Li; Xue, Feng; Chen, Wei; Li, Baoguang

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded DNA or RNA ligands, which can be selected by a method called systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX); and they can specifically recognize and bind to their targets. These unique characteristics of aptamers offer great potentials in applications such as pathogen detection and biomolecular screening. Pathogen detection is the critical means in detecting and identifying the problems related to public health and food safety; and only the rapid, sensitive and efficient detection technologies can enable the users to make the accurate assessments on the risks of infections (humans and animals) or contaminations (foods and other commodities) caused by various pathogens. This article reviews the development in the field of the aptamer-based approaches for pathogen detection, including whole-cell SELEX and Genomic SELEX. Nowadays, a variety of aptamer-based biosensors have been developed for pathogen detection. Thus, in this review, we also cover the development in aptamer-based biosensors including optical biosensors for multiple pathogen detection by multiple-labeling or label-free models such as fluorescence detection and surface plasmon resonance, electrochemical biosensors and lateral chromatography test strips, and their applications in pathogen detection and biomolecular screening. While notable progress has been made in the field in the last decade, challenges or drawbacks in their applications such as pathogen detection and biomolecular screening remain to be overcome. PMID:27672383

  15. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers : best practice models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn CJ

    2016-01-01

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic m

  16. Lyophilization as a method for pathogens long term preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Mirjana B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyophilization (freeze-drying is one of the most suitable methods used for a long term preservation of pathogens. The aim of this paper was the application of lyophilization for storage of three significant plant pathogens: Fusarium graminearum, Helminthosporium gramineum, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. gylicinea, respectively. The plant material was collected continuously (during a four year period 2002-2006, depending on a plant development stage, from different localities in Vojvodina. Pathogens were isolated from diseased parts with characteristic symptoms, and placed on nutritive media specific for a certain pathogen, using standard phytopathological methods. Lyophilization was carried out in marked and coded ampoules by freezing and drying of pathogen suspension and nutritive medium. Revitalization of lyophilized isolates was done after four days. High percentage of revitalization was characteristic for all studied isolates, and it ranged from 85-92%, confirming that lyophilized pathogens would be capable of keeping viability for a long time in the collection. Besides above mentioned pathogens, there were 200 isolates in the collection, originating mostly from field and vegetable crops. Each isolate that was put into the Collection, was followed by all the necessary data such as: name of the pathogen, number of isolates, locality, host plant year of isolation, name of the researcher and other relevant data.

  17. SILAC-based comparative analysis of pathogenic Escherichia coli secretomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders; Borch, Jonas; Krogh, Thøger Jensen

    2015-01-01

    . In this study, we grew the pathogenic strains ETEC H10407, AIEC LF82 and the non-pathogenic reference strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in parallel and used SILAC to compare protein levels in OMVs and culture supernatant. We have identified well-known virulence factors from both AIEC and ETEC, thus validating our...

  18. Rapidly expanding range of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Dusek, Robert J.; Spackman, Erica

    2015-01-01

    The movement of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N8) virus across Eurasia and into North America and the virus’ propensity to reassort with co-circulating low pathogenicity viruses raise concerns among poultry producers, wildlife biologists, aviculturists, and public health personnel worldwide. Surveillance, modeling, and experimental research will provide the knowledge required for intelligent policy and management decisions.

  19. Oral cavity anaerobic pathogens in biofilm formation on voice prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertl, Kristina; Zijnge, Vincent; Zatorska, Beata; Leonhard, Matthias; Schneider-Stickler, Berit; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method has been used to identify oral anaerobic pathogens in biofilms on voice prostheses. The purpose of the present study was to determine the location of those pathogens inside the biofilms. METHODS: Biofilms of 15 voice prostheses were sampled

  20. Metabolism impacts upon Candida immunogenicity and pathogenicity at multiple levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, A.J.; Brown, G.D.; Netea, M.G.; Gow, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism is integral to the pathogenicity of Candida albicans, a major fungal pathogen of humans. As well as providing the platform for nutrient assimilation and growth in diverse host niches, metabolic adaptation affects the susceptibility of C. albicans to host-imposed stresses and antifungal

  1. The Top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamoun, Sophien; Furzer, Oliver; Jones, Jonathan D G; Judelson, Howard S; Ali, Gul Shad; Dalio, Ronaldo J D; Roy, Sanjoy Guha; Schena, Leonardo; Zambounis, Antonios; Panabières, Franck; Cahill, David; Ruocco, Michelina; Figueiredo, Andreia; Chen, Xiao-Ren; Hulvey, Jon; Stam, Remco; Lamour, Kurt; Gijzen, Mark; Tyler, Brett M; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Tomé, Daniel F A; Tör, Mahmut; Van Den Ackerveken, Guido; McDowell, John; Daayf, Fouad; Fry, William E; Lindqvist-Kreuze, Hannele; Meijer, Harold J G; Petre, Benjamin; Ristaino, Jean; Yoshida, Kentaro; Birch, Paul R J; Govers, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Oomycetes form a deep lineage of eukaryotic organisms that includes a large number of plant pathogens which threaten natural and managed ecosystems. We undertook a survey to query the community for their ranking of plant-pathogenic oomycete species based on scientific and economic importance. In tot

  2. Five Reasons to Consider Phytophthora infestans a Reemerging Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, W E; Birch, P R J; Judelson, H S; Grünwald, N J; Danies, G; Everts, K L; Gevens, A J; Gugino, B K; Johnson, D A; Johnson, S B; McGrath, M T; Myers, K L; Ristaino, J B; Roberts, P D; Secor, G; Smart, C D

    2015-07-01

    Phytophthora infestans has been a named pathogen for well over 150 years and yet it continues to "emerge", with thousands of articles published each year on it and the late blight disease that it causes. This review explores five attributes of this oomycete pathogen that maintain this constant attention. First, the historical tragedy associated with this disease (Irish potato famine) causes many people to be fascinated with the pathogen. Current technology now enables investigators to answer some questions of historical significance. Second, the devastation caused by the pathogen continues to appear in surprising new locations or with surprising new intensity. Third, populations of P. infestans worldwide are in flux, with changes that have major implications to disease management. Fourth, the genomics revolution has enabled investigators to make tremendous progress in terms of understanding the molecular biology (especially the pathogenicity) of P. infestans. Fifth, there remain many compelling unanswered questions.

  3. Pathogens in drinking water: Are there any new ones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reasoner, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1976 three newly recognized human pathogens have become familiar to the drinking water industry as waterborne disease agents. These are: the legionnaires disease agent, Legionella pneumophila and related species; and two protozoan pathogens, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum, both of which form highly disinfectant resistant cysts that are shed in the feces of infected individuals. The question frequently arises - are there other emerging waterborne pathogens that may pose a human health problem that the drinking water industry will have to deal with. The paper will review the current state of knowledge of the occurrence and incidence of pathogens and opportunistic pathogens other than Legionella, Giardia and Cryptosporidium in treated and untreated drinking water. Bacterial agents that will be reviewed include Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, Campylobacter, Mycobacterium, Yersinia and Plesiomonas. Aspects of detection of these agents including detection methods and feasibility of monitoring will be addressed.

  4. Contribution of respiratory pathogens to influenza-like illness consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollaerts, K; Antoine, J; Van Casteren, V; Ducoffre, G; Hens, N; Quoilin, S

    2013-10-01

    Influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) are caused by several respiratory pathogens. These pathogens show weak to strong seasonal activity implying seasonality in ILI consultations. In this paper, the contribution of pathogens to seasonality of ILI consultations was statistically modelled. Virological count data were first smoothed using modulation models for seasonal time series. Second, Poisson regression was used regressing ILI consultation counts on the smoothed time series. Using ratios of the estimated regression parameters, relative measures of the underreporting of pathogens were obtained. Influenza viruses A and B, parainfluenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) significantly contributed to explain the seasonal variation in ILI consultations. We also found that RSV was the least and influenza virus A is the most underreported pathogen in Belgian laboratory surveillance. The proposed methods and results are helpful in interpreting the data of clinical and laboratory surveillance, which are the essential parts of influenza surveillance.

  5. Metabolic crosstalk between host and pathogen: sensing, adapting and competing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Andrew J; Sassetti, Christopher M

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of bacterial pathogenesis is dominated by the cell biology of the host-pathogen interaction. However, the majority of metabolites that are used in prokaryotic and eukaryotic physiology and signalling are chemically similar or identical. Therefore, the metabolic crosstalk between pathogens and host cells may be as important as the interactions between bacterial effector proteins and their host targets. In this Review we focus on host-pathogen interactions at the metabolic level: chemical signalling events that enable pathogens to sense anatomical location and the local physiology of the host; microbial metabolic pathways that are dedicated to circumvent host immune mechanisms; and a few metabolites as central points of competition between the host and bacterial pathogens.

  6. Pathogenicity and treatment of Bartonella infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Raoult, Didier

    2014-07-01

    Bartonella spp. are responsible for emerging and re-emerging diseases around the world. The majority of human infections are caused by Bartonella henselae, Bartonella quintana and Bartonella bacilliformis, although other Bartonella spp. have also been associated with clinical manifestations in humans. The severity of Bartonella infection correlates with the patient's immune status. Clinical manifestations can range from benign and self-limited to severe and life-threatening disease. Clinical conditions associated with Bartonella spp. include local lymphadenopathy, bacteraemia, endocarditis, and tissue colonisation resulting in bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis hepatis. Without treatment, Bartonella infection can cause high mortality. To date, no single treatment is effective for all Bartonella-associated diseases. In the absence of systematic reviews, treatment decisions for Bartonella infections are based on case reports that test a limited number of patients. Antibiotics do not significantly affect the cure rate in patients with Bartonella lymphadenopathy. Patients with Bartonella spp. bacteraemia should be treated with gentamicin and doxycycline, but chloramphenicol has been proposed for the treatment of B. bacilliformis bacteraemia. Gentamicin in combination with doxycycline is considered the best treatment regimen for endocarditis, and erythromycin is the first-line antibiotic therapy for the treatment of angioproliferative lesions. Rifampicin or streptomycin can be used to treat verruga peruana. In this review, we present recent data and recommendations related to the treatment of Bartonella infections based on the pathogenicity of Bartonella spp.

  7. Inhibition of foodborne pathogens by pomegranate juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghayeghi, Koorosh; Shetty, Kalidas; Labbé, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    Pomegranates have health-promoting benefits because of their polyphenol constituents. Previous studies have demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of aqueous and organic extracts of pomegranate components and by-products. We sought to determine the antimicrobial activity against 40 foodborne pathogens representing eight bacterial species using juice itself. In addition, we sought to determine the synergistic antimicrobial activity between pomegranate juice and other plant products displaying antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial activity of pomegranate juice was dependent on the test organism, which varied to highly susceptible (four Gram-positive species) to unaffected (Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7). Two Gram-negative species, which were inhibited were Helicobacter pylori and Vibrio parahemolyticus. No synergistic antimicrobial activity was seen between pomegranate and either barberry, oregano, or cranberry. The antimicrobial activity of pomegranate juice is dependent on the test organism and extraction method. The sensitivity of H. pylori suggests that pomegranate juice may be an alternative or supplemental treatment for gastric ulcers caused by this organism.

  8. Pathogenic mechanisms in endometriosis-associated infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sajal; Goldberg, Jeffrey M; Aziz, Nabil; Goldberg, Eric; Krajcir, Natalie; Agarwal, Ashok

    2008-08-01

    To review the mechanisms by which endometriosis may affect reproductive function. Review of the English literature from 1986 to 2007 after searching Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane, and BIOSIS, as well as relevant meeting abstracts. Fertility research center and obstetrics and gynecology department in a tertiary care hospital. There is compelling evidence in the literature that endometriosis has detrimental effects on ovarian and tubal function and uterine receptivity, resulting in female infertility. The mechanisms of infertility associated with endometriosis remain controversial and include abnormal folliculogenesis, elevated oxidative stress, altered immune function, and hormonal milieu in the follicular and peritoneal environments, and reduced endometrial receptivity. These factors lead to poor oocyte quality, impaired fertilization, and implantation. Through unraveling the mechanisms by which endometriosis leads to infertility, researchers are sure to find a nonsurgical means to diagnose endometriosis, most likely through serum and peritoneal markers. Cytokines, interleukins, oxidative stress markers, and soluble cellular adhesion molecules all show potential to be used as a reliable marker for diagnosing endometriosis. After analyzing the pathogenic mechanisms of endometriosis, it seems that the future treatment of this entity may include cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, immunomodulators, or hormonal suppressive therapy to eliminate the need for surgical treatment of endometriosis.

  9. Reverse genetics approaches to combat pathogenic arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Juan C

    2008-12-01

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans, and evidence indicates that the worldwide-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. Moreover, arenaviruses pose a biodefense threat. No licensed anti-arenavirus vaccines are available, and current anti-arenavirus therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin, which is only partially effective and is associated with anemia and other side effects. Therefore, it is important to develop effective vaccines and better antiviral drugs to combat the dual threats of naturally occurring and intentionally introduced arenavirus infections. The development of arenavirus reverse genetic systems is allowing investigators to conduct a detailed molecular characterization of the viral cis-acting signals and trans-acting factors that control each of the steps of the arenavirus life cycle, including RNA synthesis, packaging and budding. Knowledge derived from these studies is uncovering potential novel targets for therapeutic intervention, as well as facilitating the establishment of assays to identify and characterize candidate antiviral drugs capable of interfering with specific steps of the virus life cycle. Likewise, the ability to generate predetermined specific mutations within the arenavirus genome and analyze their phenotypic expression would significantly contribute to the elucidation of arenavirus-host interactions, including the basis of their ability to cause severe HF. This, in turn, could lead to the development of novel, potent and safe arenavirus vaccines.

  10. APDS: The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindson, B; Makarewicz, A; Setlur, U; Henderer, B; McBride, M; Dzenitis, J

    2004-10-04

    We have developed and tested a fully autonomous pathogen detection system (APDS) capable of continuously monitoring the environment for airborne biological threat agents. The system was developed to provide early warning to civilians in the event of a bioterrorism incident and can be used at high profile events for short-term, intensive monitoring or in major public buildings or transportation nodes for long-term monitoring. The APDS is completely automated, offering continuous aerosol sampling, in-line sample preparation fluidics, multiplexed detection and identification immunoassays, and nucleic-acid based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and detection. Highly multiplexed antibody-based and duplex nucleic acid-based assays are combined to reduce false positives to a very low level, lower reagent costs, and significantly expand the detection capabilities of this biosensor. This article provides an overview of the current design and operation of the APDS. Certain sub-components of the ADPS are described in detail, including the aerosol collector, the automated sample preparation module that performs multiplexed immunoassays with confirmatory PCR, and the data monitoring and communications system. Data obtained from an APDS that operated continuously for seven days in a major U.S. transportation hub is reported.

  11. EXTRACELLULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF POTATO RING ROT PATHOGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafikova Т.N.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria, including phytopathogenic ones produce extracellular polysaccharides or exopolysaccharides which are universal molecules. Causal agent of potato ring rot, Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus, secretes exopolysaccharides which role in pathogenesis is poorly investigated. The aim of our research is to ascertain the composition and structure of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides. Exopolysaccharides of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus are determined to consist of 4-6 anionic and neutral components which have molecular weights from 700 kDa. Glucose is a major monomer of polysaccharides and arabinose, rhamnose and mannose are minor monomers. Glucose is present in α-Dglucopyranose and β-D-glucopyranose configurations. Calcium is determined to be a component of exopolysaccharides. Components of exopolysaccharides of potato ring rot pathogen are probably capableto associate via calcium ions and other ionic interactions that may result in a change of their physiological activity. Further studies of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides composition and structure can serve a base for the synthesis of their chemical analogues with elicitor action.

  12. Detection of pathogens from periodontal lesions

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    Malheiros Veruska de João

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To comparatively detect A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum from periodontal and healthy sites. METHODS: Subgingival clinical samples from 50 periodontitis adult patients and 50 healthy subjects were analyzed. Both organisms were isolated using a trypticase soy agar-bacitracin-vancomycin (TSBV medium and detected by PCR. Conventional biochemical tests were used for bacteria identification. RESULTS: A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum were isolated in 18% and 20% of the patients, respectively, and in 2% and 24% of healthy subjects. Among A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates, biotype II was the most prevalent. Primer pair AA was 100% sensitive in the detection of A. actinomycetemcomitans from both subject groups. Primers ASH and FU were also 100% sensitive to detect this organism in healthy subject samples. Primer pair FN5047 was more sensitive to detect F. nucleatum in patients or in healthy samples than primer 5059S. Primers ASH and 5059S were more specific in the detection of A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum, respectively, in patients and in healthy subject samples. CONCLUSIONS: PCR is an effective tool for detecting periodontal pathogens in subgingival samples, providing a faster and safer diagnostic tool of periodontal diseases. The method's sensitivity and specificity is conditioned by the choice of the set of primers used.

  13. KIR/HLA Interactions and Pathogen Immunity

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    Khaleel M. Jamil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is the first line of defence in response to pathogen infection. Natural killer (NK cells perform a vital role in this response with the ability to directly kill infected cells, produce cytokines, and cross-talk with the adaptive immune system. These effector functions are dependent on activation of NK cells which is determined by surface receptor interactions with ligands on target cells. Of these receptors, the polymorphic killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which interact with MHC class 1 (also highly polymorphic, are largely inhibitory, and exhibit substantial genetic diversity. The result is a significant variation of NK cell repertoire between individuals and also between populations, with a multitude of possible KIR:HLA combinations. As each KIR:ligand interaction may have differential effects on NK cell activation and inhibition, this diversity has important potential influences on the host response to infections. Genetic studies have demonstrated associations between specific KIR:ligand combinations and the outcome of viral (and other infections, in particular hepatitis C and HIV infection. Detailed functional studies are not required to define the mechanisms underpinning these disease associations.

  14. Biosensors for the Detection of Food Pathogens

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    Palmiro Poltronieri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Food pathogens frequently cause foodborne diseases. There is a need to rapidly identify the source of the bacteria in order to contain their spread and epidemics. A pre-enrichment culture or a direct culture on agar plate are standard microbiological methods. In this review, we present an update on alternative molecular methods to nucleic acid-based detection for species identification. Biosensor-based methods rely on the recognition of antigen targets or receptors by antibodies, aptamers or high-affinity ligands. The captured antigens may be then directly or indirectly detected through an antibody or high-affinity and high-specificity recognition molecule. Various different detection methods are discussed, from label-free sensors and immunosensors to fluorescence-based ones. Each method shows advantages and disadvantages in terms of equipment, sensitivity, simplicity and cost-effectiveness. Finally, lab-on-a-chip (LOC devices are introduced briefly, with the potential to be fast, sensitive and useful for on-site bacteria detection in food processing laboratories to check potential contamination by sample monitoring combined with a rapid pre-enrichment step.

  15. Moraxella catarrhalis as a respiratory pathogen

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    Naveen Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Moraxella catarrhalis is gaining significance as a pathogen over few decades because of increased rate of isolation in respiratory specimens and due to emergence of multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, appropriate antimicrobial agents are required for eradication and prevention of spread of the organism. Material and Methods: -The study was conducted over 1-year period inpatients of lower respiratory tract infections (L.R.T.I. in P.G.I.M.S. Rohtak (Haryana . Assessment of clinical significance of M.catarrhalis was ascertained on the basis of preformed criteria. Results: A total of 63 clinically significant M. catarrhalis were isolated from a tertiary care hospital. The isolates showed maximum resistance to cotrimoxazole (82.5%, pencillin (77.7%, and ampicillin (71.4% while susceptibility was maximum to cefotaxime (87.3% followed by tetracycline (85.7% ciprofloxacin (84.1%, erythromycin (80.9% amikacin (79.3%, gentamycin (77.7%, and cefazolin (76.2%. Multidrug resistance to >3 antimicrobials was seen in 22 (34.9% of cases. Conclusions: Predominant or pure growth of M.catarrhalis in throat swabs from cases of L.R.T.I. should be reported and treated by microbiologist and clinician respectively. Antibiotic therapy should be decided based on sensitivity report for rapid respose and recovery of patients.

  16. Removing pathogenic memories: a neurobiology of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centonze, Diego; Siracusano, Alberto; Calabresi, Paolo; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2005-10-01

    Experimental research examining the neural bases of nondeclarative memory has offered intriguing insight into how functional and dysfunctional implicit learning affects the brain. Long-term modifications of synaptic transmission, in particular, are currently considered the most plausible mechanism underlying memory trace encoding and compulsions, addiction, anxiety, and phobias. Therefore, an effective psychotherapy must be directed to erase maladaptive implicit memories and aberrant synaptic plasticity. This article describes the neurobiological bases of pathogenic memory disruption to provide some insight into how psychotherapy works. At least two mechanisms of unwanted memory erasing appear to be implicated in the effects of psychotherapy: inhibition of memory consolidation/reconsolidation and extinction. Behavioral evidence demonstrated that these two ways to forget are profoundly distinct in nature, and it is increasingly clear that their cellular, synaptic, and molecular underpinnings are different. Accordingly, the blockade of consolidation/reconsolidation erases memories by reversing the plasticity associated with memory maintenance, whereas extinction is a totally new form of plasticity that, similar to the plasticity underlying the old memory, requires protein synthesis-dependent synaptic remodeling.

  17. Control of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; Martínez-Rubio, Roser; Martí, Miguel; Chen, John; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Penadés, José R

    2012-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are a group of related 15-17 kb mobile genetic elements that commonly carry genes for superantigen toxins and other virulence factors. The key feature of their mobility is the induction of SaPI excision and replication by certain phages and their efficient encapsidation into specific small-headed phage-like infectious particles. Previous work demonstrated that chromosomal integration depends on the SaPI-encoded recombinase, Int. However, although involved in the process, Int alone was not sufficient to mediate efficient SaPI excision from chromosomal sites, and we expected that SaPI excision would involve an Xis function, which could be encoded by a helper phage or by the SaPI, itself. Here we report that the latter is the case. In vivo recombination assays with plasmids in Escherichia coli demonstrate that SaPI-coded Xis is absolutely required for recombination between the SaPI att(L) and att(R) sites, and that both sites, as well as their flanking SaPI sequences, are required for SaPI excision. Mutational analysis reveals that Xis is essential for efficient horizontal SaPI transfer to a recipient strain. Finally, we show that the master regulator of the SaPI life cycle, Stl, blocks expression of int and xis by binding to inverted repeats present in the promoter region, thus controlling SaPI excision.

  18. Ameobal pathogen mimivirus infects macrophages through phagocytosis.

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    Eric Ghigo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mimivirus, or Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV, a giant double-stranded DNA virus that grows in amoeba, was identified for the first time in 2003. Entry by phagocytosis within amoeba has been suggested but not demonstrated. We demonstrate here that APMV was internalized by macrophages but not by non-phagocytic cells, leading to productive APMV replication. Clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis pathways, as well as degradative endosome-mediated endocytosis, were not used by APMV to invade macrophages. Ultrastructural analysis showed that protrusions were formed around the entering virus, suggesting that macropinocytosis or phagocytosis was involved in APMV entry. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were required for APMV entry. Blocking macropinocytosis and the lack of APMV colocalization with rabankyrin-5 showed that macropinocytosis was not involved in viral entry. Overexpression of a dominant-negative form of dynamin-II, a regulator of phagocytosis, inhibited APMV entry. Altogether, our data demonstrated that APMV enters macrophages through phagocytosis, a new pathway for virus entry in cells. This reinforces the paradigm that intra-amoebal pathogens have the potential to infect macrophages.

  19. Actinobaculum schaalii an emerging pediatric pathogen?

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    Zimmermann Petra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actinobaculum schaalii was first described as a causative agent for human infection in 1997. Since then it has mainly been reported causing urinary tract infections (UTI in elderly individuals with underlying urological diseases. Isolation and identification is challenging and often needs molecular techniques. A. schaalii is increasingly reported as a cause of infection in humans, however data in children is very limited. Case presentation We present the case of an 8-month-old Caucasian boy suffering from myelomeningocele and neurogenic bladder who presented with a UTI. An ultrasound of the urinary tract was unremarkable. Urinalysis and microscopy showed an elevated leukocyte esterase test, pyuria and a high number of bacteria. Empiric treatment with oral co-trimoxazole was started. Growth of small colonies of Gram-positive rods was observed after 48 h. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene confirmed an A. schaalii infection 9 days later. Treatment was changed to oral amoxicillin for 14 days. On follow-up urinalysis was normal and urine cultures were negative. Conclusions A.schaalii is an emerging pathogen in adults and children. Colonization and subsequent infection seem to be influenced by the age of the patient. In young children with high suspicion of UTI who use diapers or in children who have known abnormalities of their urogenital tract, infection with A. schaalii should be considered and empiric antimicrobial therapy chosen accordingly.

  20. Conditionally pathogenic fungi in recreational waters

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    Matavulj Milan N.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of health and life conditions depends on various environmental factors. The exposition to organic and inorganic pollutants, as well as to the broad spectar of microorganisms is one of these factors. Medically important fungi have been increasing their number recently especially in urban and in recreational zones. Some of them, first of all molds and yeasts, are involved by different means in causing more or less serious diseases of man and animals. Frequency of alergic symptoms and human mycotic lesions increased significantly during last decades. Such phenomena have provoked more scientific attention recently. According to the available literature data, micro-fungi, causing mycoses and "environmental" fungi too could be considered as an important factor of health risk, being neglected and underestimated so far, especially in analyses of safe use of recreational waters and surrounding areas, among them swimming pools, river and sea beaches. On the basis of such statement there arises conclusion that water and ground of recreational zones could serve as vectors in transmission pathways of potentially or conditionally pathogenic fungi, being dangerous especially for immunocompromised individuals, which suggests inclusion of qualitative and quantitative composition of fungal community into a continual monitoring of hygienic status of recreational zones.