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Sample records for acid tetrahydrate implications

  1. Ice condensation on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate: Implications for polar stratospheric ice clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Fortin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of ice nucleation to form Type 2 PSCs is important for controlling the ice particle size and hence the possible dehydration in the polar winter stratosphere. This paper probes heterogeneous ice nucleation on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT. Laboratory experiments were performed using a thin-film, high-vacuum apparatus in which the condensed phase is monitored via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and water pressure is monitored with the combination of an MKS baratron and an ionization gauge. Results show that SAT is an efficient ice nucleus with a critical ice saturation ratio of S*ice = 1.3 to 1.02 over the temperature range 169.8-194.5 K. This corresponds to a necessary supercooling of 0.1-1.3 K below the ice frost point. The laboratory data is used as input for a microphysical/photochemical model to probe the effect that this heterogeneous nucleation mechanism could have on Type 2 PSC formation and stratospheric dehydration. In the model simulations, even a very small number of SAT particles (e.g., 10-3 cm-3 result in ice nucleation on SAT as the dominant mechanism for Type 2 PSC formation. As a result, Type 2 PSC formation is more widespread, leading to larger-scale dehydration. The characteristics of the clouds are controlled by the assumed number of SAT particles present, demonstrating that a proper treatment of SAT is critical for correctly modeling Type 2 PSC formation and stratospheric dehydration.

  2. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  3. 40 CFR 180.1121 - Boric acid and its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boric acid and its salts, borax... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1121 Boric acid and its... the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of the pesticidal chemical boric acid and...

  4. Growth and characterization of pure and lithium doped strontium tartrate tetrahydrate crystals by solution–gel technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Suresh Kumar; M H Rahim Kutty; M R Sudarsana Kumar; K Rajendra Babu

    2007-08-01

    The effect of lithium ion as dopant on the size and transparency of strontium tartrate tetrahydrate (SrC4H4O6.4H2O) crystals are presented in this paper. Growth of single crystals of undoped and lithium doped strontium tartrate tetrahydrate by controlled diffusion of strontium nitrate into the gel charged with tartaric acid at room temperature are narrated. The lithium ion enhances the size and transparency of the doped crystals. The crystal structure of the compound was confirmed by X-ray diffractometry and dopant concentration with ICP–atomic emission spectrometer system. Thermal decomposition of the grown crystals is investigated by TGA and DTA studies. The FTIR spectra of pure and doped crystals are recorded and analysed. Kurtz powder technique has been used to test SHG efficiency of the crystals.

  5. Thorium aspartate tetrahydrate precursor to ThO2: Comparison of hydrothermal and thermal conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, N.; Maynadié, J.; Mesbah, A.; Hidalgo, J.; Lauwerier, R.; Nkou Bouala, G. I.; Parrès-Maynadié, S.; Meyer, D.; Dacheux, N.; Podor, R.

    2017-04-01

    The synthesis of original crystalline thorium aspartate tetrahydrate, Th(C4NO4H6)4.4H2O, was performed using two different wet-chemistry routes, involving either L-asparagine or L-aspartic acid as complexing agent. Characterization of this compound through 13C NMR and PXRD led to confirm the terminal coordination mode of the aspartate group and to suggest a potential cubic lattice (Pn-3 space group). Vibrational spectroscopy data were also collected. The conversion of thorium aspartate tetrahydrate into thorium dioxide was further performed through classical high temperature heat treatment or under hydrothermal conditions. On the one hand, thermal treatment provided a pseudomorphic conversion which retained the starting morphology, and favored the increase of the average crystallite size, as well as the complete elimination of the residual carbon content. On the other, hydrothermal conversion could be used to tune the morphology of the final oxide, ThO2.nH2O microspheres being prepared when starting from L-asparagine.

  6. Preparation by a Rheological Phase Reaction Method and Thermal Decomposition Reaction Mechanism of Nickelous Salicylate Tetrahydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin-long; Yuan Liang-jie; Yang Yi-yong; Sun Ju-tang; Zhang Ke-li

    2003-01-01

    The single crystal nickel salicylate tetrahydrate was prepared with the rheological phase reaction method from nickelous hydroxide and salicylic acid. The crystal structure was determined. It is monoclinic, space group P21 /n, a =0.67874(3), b=0. 515 91(2), c=2. 313 30(9) nm, β=90.9286(17)°, V=0. 809 94(6) nm3, Z=2, ρcalcd =0. 065 0[I >2a(I)]. The thermal decomposition mechanism in an inert atmosphere was investigated via TG, DTG and DTA. The thermal decomposition products were characterized with IR and micro-powder X-ray diffraction method. A new coordination polymer (NiC6 H4O)n as an intermediate product and nanoscale metal nickel were obtained in the ranges of 364-429 ℃ and 429-680 ℃, respectively.

  7. Racemic calcium tartrate tetrahydrate [form (II)] in rat urinary stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bail, A; Bazin, D; Daudon, M; Brochot, A; Robbez-Masson, V; Maisonneuve, V

    2009-06-01

    The title compound, [Ca(C4H4O6)].4H2O, calcium tartrate tetrahydrate, is a new triclinic centrosymmetric form identified in rat kidney calculus. The crystal structure was determined from powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The four water molecules belong to one square face of the Ca-atom coordination (a square antiprism), the four O atoms of the second square face coming from two tartrate anions, building infinite chains alternating Ca atom polyhedra and tartrate anions along a, with the chains cross-linked by a network of hydrogen bonds.

  8. Preparation by a Rheological Phase Reaction Method and Thermal Decomposition Reaction Mechanism of Nickelous Salicylate Tetrahydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangJin-long; YuanLiang-jie; YangYi-yong; SunJu-tang; ZhangKe-li

    2003-01-01

    The single crystal nickel salicylate tetrahydrate was prepared with the rheological phase reaction method from nickelous hydroxide and salicylic acid. The crystal structure was determinecL It is monoclinic, space group P21/n, α=0.678 74(3), b=0. 515 91(2), c=2. 313 30(9) nm, β=90.9286(17)°,V=0. 809 94(6) nm3, Z=2, ρcalod =1. 661 g· cm-3. Final R indices: R=0. 027 9 and ωR=0.065 0[Ⅰ>2σ(Ⅰ)]. The thermal decomposition mechanism in an inert atmosphere was investigated via TG, DTG and DTA. The thermal decomposition products were characterized with IR and micro-powder X-ray diffraction method. A new coordination polymer ( NiC6 H4 O)n as an intermediate product and nanoscale metal nickel were obtained in the ranges of 364-429℃ and 429-680℃, respectively.

  9. X-ray powder diffraction data and unit cells of ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Put, J.W. van; Verkroost, T.W.; Sonneveld, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    X-Ray powder diffraction data and unit cell parameters of industrially produced, as well as bench scale prepared, ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate are reported and compared with current Powder Data file (PDF) (1989) patterns. A least-squares refinement resulted in two slightly different unit cell

  10. Synthesis, characterization and thermal behavior of tetrakis(melamine2+) bis(melamine+) pentakis(monohydrogenphosphate) tetrahydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youcef, Hakima Ait; Chafaa, Salah; Doufnoune, Rachida; Douadi, Tahar

    2016-11-01

    A new organic-inorganic salt, tetrakis (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazin-1,3-diium) bis (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazin-1-ium) pentakis (monohydrogenphosphate) tetrahydrate, 4C3H8N6+2. 2C3H7N6+. 5HPO42-. 4H2O was synthesized through the reaction of melamine and phosphoric acid in an acidic medium HCl/H2O. It was then characterized by X-ray diffraction. The title compound crystallizes in monoclinic system with non-centrosymetric space group P 21 with lattice parameters a = 11.3008 Å, b = 20.9798 Å, c = 12.2679 Å, α = 90°, β = 117.236°, γ = 90°, Z = 2 and V = 2586.10 (Å)3. The UV-vis absorption spectrum UV-vis showed that the crystal has a good optical transmittance in the entire visible region with a lower cut off wavelength of 290 nm. The vibrational frequencies of various functional groups present in the crystal were identified by FT-IR analysis. The chemical structure of the compound was also confirmed by 1H, 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopy. TGA-DTA analysis revealed that the materials have a good thermal stability without any melting.

  11. Biotechnological production of gluconic acid: future implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Om V; Kumar, Raj

    2007-06-01

    Gluconic acid (GA) is a multifunctional carbonic acid regarded as a bulk chemical in the food, feed, beverage, textile, pharmaceutical, and construction industries. The favored production process is submerged fermentation by Aspergillus niger utilizing glucose as a major carbohydrate source, which accompanied product yield of 98%. However, use of GA and its derivatives is currently restricted because of high prices: about US$ 1.20-8.50/kg. Advancements in biotechnology such as screening of microorganisms, immobilization techniques, and modifications in fermentation process for continuous fermentation, including genetic engineering programmes, could lead to cost-effective production of GA. Among alternative carbohydrate sources, sugarcane molasses, grape must show highest GA yield of 95.8%, and banana must may assist reducing the overall cost of GA production. These methodologies would open new markets and increase applications of GA.

  12. On the growth of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X Sahaya Shajan; C Mahadevan

    2004-08-01

    Calcium tartrate single crystals were grown using silica gel as the growth medium. Calcium formate mixed with formic acid was taken as the supernatant solution. It was observed that the nucleation density was reduced and the size of the crystals was improved to a large extent compared to the conventional way of growing calcium tartrate crystals with calcium chloride. The role played by formate–formic acid on the growth of crystals is discussed. The grown crystals were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), microhardness measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results obtained are compared with the previous work.

  13. Hexaaquamanganese(II bis[hydrogen (4-aminophenylarsonate] tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Smith

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the structure of the complex salt formed from the reaction of manganese(II acetate with (4-aminophenylarsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid, [Mn(H2O6](C6H7AsNO32·4H2O, the centrosymmetric Mn(H2O6 coordination polyhedron has slightly distorted octahedral stereochemistry, with the two hydrogen (4-aminophenylarsonate anions and the four water molecules of solvation related by inversion. Extensive O—H...O, O—H...N and N—H...O hydrogen bonds link all species, giving an overall three-dimensional supramolecular structure, which also has weak π–π ring interactions [minimum ring-centroid separation = 3.7304 (15 Å]. The structure is isotypic with that of the Mg salt.

  14. Aqueous citric acid as a promising cleaning agent of whey evaporators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; P. Johansen, Nikolaj; Garcia, André Castilho

    2017-01-01

    Scale in evaporators for lactose production was identified as mainly calcium citrate tetrahydrate with phosphate contaminations. Dissolution of 3.00 g of scale in aqueous solutions of 0.100, 0.500, and 1.00 mol L−1 citric acid with final volumes of 100, 50, and 25 mL was investigated. The highest...... concentration of citric acid was the most effective for all the investigated volumes. From the citric acid solutions, spontaneously supersaturated in calcium citrate tetrahydrate during scale dissolution in the smaller volumes for all citric acid concentrations, calcium citrate tetrahydrate slowly precipitated...... in acceptable purity for technical use. Dissolution efficiency of aqueous solutions of 0.200 mol L−1 nitric acid combined with 0.100, 0.500, and 1.00 mol L−1 citric acid with final volumes of 100, 50, and 25 mL showed synergistic effect especially for the higher concentrations and lower volumes of two acids...

  15. Implications of impaired ketogenesis in fatty acid oxidation disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olpin, Simon Edward

    2004-03-01

    Long-chain fatty acids are important sources of respiratory fuel for many tissues and during fasting the rate of hepatic production of ketone bodies is markedly increased. Many extra hepatic tissues utilize ketone bodies in the fasted state with the advantage that glucose is "spared" for more vital tissues like the brain. This glucose sparing effect of ketones is especially important in infants where there is a high proportional glucose utilization in cerebral tissue. The first reported inherited defect affecting fatty acid oxidation was described in 1973 and to date about 15 separate disorders have been described. Although individually rare, cumulatively fatty acid oxidation defects are relatively common, have major consequences for affected individuals and their families, and carry significant health care implications. The major biochemical consequence of fatty acid oxidation defects is an inability of extra hepatic tissues to utilize fatty acids as an energy source with absent or limited hepatic capacity to generate ketones. Clinically patients usually present in infancy with acute life-threatening hypoketotic hypoglycaemia, liver disease, hyperammonaemia and cerebral oedema, with or without cardiac involvement, usually following a period of catabolic stress. Chronically there may be muscle involvement with hypotonia or exercise intolerance with or without cardiomyopathy. Treatment is generally by the avoidance of fasting, frequent carbohydrate rich feeds and for long-chain defects, the replacement of long-chain dietary fats with medium-chain formulae. Novel approaches to treatment include the use of d,l-3-hydoxybutyrate or heptanoate as an alternative energy source.

  16. Properties of the Sodium Naproxen-Lactose-Tetrahydrate Co-Crystal upon Processing and Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sovago, Ioana; Wang, Wenbo; Qiu, Danwen

    2016-01-01

    naproxen-lactose-tetrahydrate co-crystal and the co-amorphous mixture of sodium, naproxen, and lactose was investigated. The structure of the co-crystal is described using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structural analysis revealed a monoclinic lattice, space group P21, with the asymmetric unit...... containing one molecule of lactose, one of naproxen, sodium, and four water molecules. Upon heating, it was observed that the co-crystal transforms into a co-amorphous system due to the loss of its crystalline bound water. Dehydration and co-amorphization were studied using synchrotron X-ray radiation......Co-crystals and co-amorphous systems are two strategies to improve the physical properties of an active pharmaceutical ingredient and, thus, have recently gained considerable interest both in academia and the pharmaceutical industry. In this study, the behavior of the recently identified sodium...

  17. Thermal Decomposition and Dehydration Kinetics of Tetra(piperidinium)Octamolybdate Tetrahydrate in Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KU Zong-Jun; ZHANG Zhong-Hai; ZHANG Zhi-Guo; WANG Li-Na; ZHANG Ke-Li

    2008-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of tetra(piperidinium)octamolybdate tetrahydrate,[CsH10NH2]4[Mo8O26]·4H2O,was investigated in air by means of TG-DTG/DTA.DSC,TG-IR and SEM.TG-DTG/DTA curves showed that the decomposition proceeded through three well-defined steps with DTA peaks closely corresponding to mass loss obtained.Kinetics analysis of its dehydration step Was performed under non-isothermal conditions.The dehydrationactivation energy was calculated through Friedman and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa(FWO)methods,and the best-fit dehydration kinetic model function was estimated through the multiple linear regression method.The activation energy for the dehydration step of[C5H10NH2]4[MosO26]·4H2O was 139.7 kJ/mol.The solid particles became smaller accompanied by the thermal decomposition of the title compound.

  18. Crystal structure of [2-(triethylammonioethyl][(2,4,6-triisopropylphenylsulfonyl]amide tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Golz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The zwitterionic title compound, C23H42N2O2S·4H2O, crystallized as a tetrahydrate from a solution of N-[(2,4,6-triisopropylphenylsulfonyl]aziridine in triethylamine, diethyl ether and pentane in the presence of moist air. It is formed by a nucleophillic ring-opening that is assumed to be reversible. The molecular structure shows a major disorder of the triisopropylphenyl group over two equally occupied locations. An interesting feature is the uncommon hydrate structure, exhibiting a tape-like motif which can be classified as a transition of the one-dimensional T4(26(2 motif into the two-dimensional L4(65(76(8 motif.

  19. Spectral, mechanical, thermal, optical and solid state parameters, of metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-CO(II) tetrahydrate crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandran, Senthilkumar [Centre for Crystal Growth, Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India); Jagan, R. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Paulraj, Rajesh, E-mail: rajeshp@ssn.edu.in [Centre for Crystal Growth, Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India); Ramasamy, P. [Centre for Crystal Growth, Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate single crystals have been grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. The crystal structure and the unit cell parameters were analyzed from the X-ray diffraction studies. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that the grown crystal belongs to triclinic system with the space group P-1. Functional groups in bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. The peak observed at 663 cm{sup −1} is assigned to the (Co–O) stretching vibrations. The optical transmission of the crystal was studied by UV–vis–NIR spectral analysis. The photoluminescence emission studies were carried out for the title compound in a wide wavelength range between 350 nm and 550 nm at 303 K. Mechanical strength was tested by Vickers microhardness test. The laser damage threshold value has been determined using Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. At various frequencies and temperatures the dielectric behavior of the material was investigated. Solid state parameters such as plasma energy, Penn gap, Fermi energy and electronic polarizability were evaluated. Photoconductivity measurements were carried out for the grown crystal in the presence of DC electric field at room temperature. Thermal stability and decomposition of the crystal were studied by TG–DTA. The weight loss of the title compound occurs in different steps. - Graphical abstract: Molecular structure of the bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate drawn at 40% ellipsoid probability level. - Highlights: • Bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate single crystal is grown by slow evaporation method. • Structural and optical properties were discussed. • The title complex crystal is thermally stable up to 91 °C. • Plasma energy, Fermi energy and electronic polarizability are evaluated. • It exhibits positive photoconductivity.

  20. Antibacterial Effect of Potassium Tetraborate Tetrahydrate against Soft Rot Disease Agent Pectobacterium carotovorum in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Firas A; Arif, Mohammad; Alvarez, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    Soft rot caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum is one of most common bacterial diseases occurring in fruits and vegetables worldwide, yet consumer-acceptable options for post-harvest disease management are still insufficient. We evaluated the effect of potassium tetraborate tetrahydrate (B4K2O7.4H2O) (PTB) on the growth of P. carotovorum using strain BA17 as a representative of high virulence. Complete inhibition of bacterial growth was achieved by treatment with PTB at 100 mM both at pH 9.2 and after adjustment to pH 7.0. Bactericidal activity was quantified and validated by counting fluorescently labeled live and dead bacterial cells using flow cytometry, and reconfirmed using qPCR with high-affinity photoreactive DNA binding dye propidium monoazide (PMA). The results of flow cytometry, qPCR, and culturing confirmed that bacterial cells were killed following exposure to PTB at 100 mM. Bacterial cell membranes were damaged following a 5-min treatment and extrusion of cytoplasmic material from bacterial cells was observed using electronic transmission microscopy. Soft rot incidence on inoculated tomato fruit was significantly reduced by dipping infected fruits in PTB at 100 mM for 5 min and no lesions developed following a 10-min treatment. PTB does not pose a hazard to human health and is an effective alternative to other bactericides and antibiotics for controlling soft rot disease of tomato caused by P. carotovorum.

  1. Antibacterial Effect of Potassium Tetraborate Tetrahydrate against Soft Rot Disease Agent Pectobacterium carotovorum in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas A. Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Soft rot caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum is one of most common bacterial diseases occurring in fruits and vegetables worldwide, yet consumer-acceptable options for post-harvest disease management are still insufficient. We evaluated the effect of potassium tetraborate tetrahydrate (B4K2O7.4H2O (PTB on the growth of P. carotovorum using strain BA17 as a representative of high virulence. Complete inhibition of bacterial growth was achieved by treatment with PTB at 100 mM both at pH 9.2 and after adjustment to pH 7.0. Bactericidal activity was quantified and validated by counting fluorescently labeled live and dead bacterial cells using flow cytometry, and reconfirmed using qPCR with high-affinity photoreactive DNA binding dye propidium monoazide (PMA. The results of flow cytometry, qPCR, and culturing confirmed that bacterial cells were killed following exposure to PTB at 100 mM. Bacterial cell membranes were damaged following a 5-min treatment and extrusion of cytoplasmic material from bacterial cells was observed using electronic transmission microscopy. Soft rot incidence on inoculated tomato fruit was significantly reduced by dipping infected fruits in PTB at 100 mM for 5 min and no lesions developed following a 10-min treatment. PTB does not pose a hazard to human health and is an effective alternative to other bactericides and antibiotics for controlling soft rot disease of tomato caused by P. carotovorum.

  2. Solubility of triuranyl diphosphate tetrahydrate (TDT) and Na autunite at 23 and 50 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Clark, Sue B.

    2010-11-01

    In this report we present experimental solubility data for well-characterized triuranyl diphosphate tetrahydrate (TDT: (UO2)(3)(PO4)(2)center dot 4H(2)O) and Na autunite (Na[UO2PO4]center dot xH(2)O) at 23 and 50 degrees C in NaClO4-HClO4 solutions at pC(H+) = 2. Duplicate samples of TDT in 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 5.0 in solutions were equilibrated at 23 and 50 degrees C. TDT solid was synthesized and characterized with ICP-OES, ATR-IR and powder XRD before and after solubility experiments. The pH of the suspensions were monitored throughout the experiments. Equilibrium was achieved from undersaturation with respect to TDT and oversaturation for Na autunite. Steady-state conditions were achieved in all cases within 82 d. TDT was unstable at ionic strengths above 0.1 m, where its complete conversion to Na autunite was observed. The ion-interaction model was used to interpret the experimental solubility data. The solubility product, log K-sp, for TDT was determined to be -49.7 and -51.3 at 23 and 50 degrees C respectively. log K for Na autunite was determined to be -24.4 (23 degrees C) and -24.1 +/- 0.2 (50 degrees C).

  3. Solubility of triuranyl diphosphate tetrahydrate (TDT) and Na autunite at 23 and 50 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, C.R.; Clark, S.B. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Felmy, A.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-07-01

    In this report we present experimental solubility data for well-characterized triuranyl diphosphate tetrahydrate (TDT: (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} . 4H{sub 2}O) and Na autunite (Na[UO{sub 2}PO{sub 4}] . xH{sub 2}O) at 23 and 50 C in NaClO{sub 4}-HClO{sub 4} solutions at pC{sub H1} = 2. Duplicate samples of TDT in 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 5.0 m solutions were equilibrated at 23 and 50 C. TDT solid was synthesized and characterized with ICP-OES, ATR-IR and powder XRD before and after solubility experiments. The pH of the suspensions were monitored throughout the experiments. Equilibrium was achieved from undersaturation with respect to TDT and oversaturation for Na autunite. Steady-state conditions were achieved in all cases within 82 d. TDT was unstable at ionic strengths above 0.1 m, where its complete conversion to Na autunite was observed. The ion-interaction model was used to interpret the experimental solubility data. The solubility product, log K{sub sp}, for TDT was determined to be -49.7 and -51.3 at 23 and 50 C respectively. log K{sub sp} for Na autunite was determined to be -24.4 (23 C) and -24.1 {+-} 0.2 (50 C). (orig.)

  4. Surface tungsten reduction during thermal decomposition of ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate in oxidising atmosphere: A paradox?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fait, Martin J.G., E-mail: martin.fait@catalysis.de [Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V., Albert-Einstein-Strasse 29a, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Radnik, Jörg [Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V., Albert-Einstein-Strasse 29a, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Lunk, Hans-Joachim [2858 Lake RD, Towanda, PA 18848 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • Detection of reduced tungsten ions at the solid’s surface in oxidising atmosphere. • Detection of gaseous ammonia liberated as oxidising agent. • Detection of ammonia’s oxidation products. • Quantification of the ammonia/tungsten redox process. - Abstract: The interaction of ammonia, liberated during thermal decomposition of ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate in oxidising atmosphere, with tungsten has been studied employing a conventional microbalance combined with MS (Setaram’s instrument Sensys). Applying XPS a partial reduction of tungsten at the surface with the minimal tungsten oxidation number of +5.3 for a sample generated at 293 °C was detected. The balancing oxidation of ammonia to nitrogen/nitrogen oxides has been proven by MS. An amount of 0.049 mol e{sup −} per mol W was transferred which resulted in an ammonia conversion degree from 2.1 mol% (NO{sub 2} formation) to 3.0 mol% (N{sub 2} formation).

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure and photochemistry of Hexakis(butan-1-aminium) heptamolybdate(VI) tetrahydrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAVITA S KHANDOLKAR; ASHISH R NAIK; CHRISTIAN NÄTHER; WOLFGANG BENSCH; BIKSHANDARKOILR SRINIVASAN

    2016-11-01

    The synthesis, crystal structure, spectral characterization, photochemistry, electrochemical and thermal studies of the hexakis(butan-1-aminium) heptamolybdate(VI) tetrahydrate (1) are reported. Dissolution of a mixed mono-hepta compound (BuNH₃)₈[(Mo₇O₂₄)(MoO₄)]·3H₂O in water results in its transformation to the title compound viz., (BuNH₃)₆ [Mo₇O₂₄]·4H₂O 1 (BuNH₃ = butan-1-aminium). The structure of the title compound consists of two crystallographically unique [Mo₇O₂₄]⁶⁻ anions, twelve independent (BuNH₃)⁺ cations and eight unique lattice water molecules, all of which are interlinked with the aid of three varieties of Hbonding interactions. Solar irradiation of 1 results in the formation of a bis(μ2-oxo) bridged diheptamolybdateproduct. Electrochemical studies reveal the role of 1 in the photodimerization process. Thermal decomposition of 1 results in the formation of crystalline α-MoO₃.

  6. Properties of the Sodium Naproxen-Lactose-Tetrahydrate Co-Crystal upon Processing and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovago, Ioana; Wang, Wenbo; Qiu, Danwen; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Bond, Andrew D; Löbmann, Korbinian

    2016-04-19

    Co-crystals and co-amorphous systems are two strategies to improve the physical properties of an active pharmaceutical ingredient and, thus, have recently gained considerable interest both in academia and the pharmaceutical industry. In this study, the behavior of the recently identified sodium naproxen-lactose-tetrahydrate co-crystal and the co-amorphous mixture of sodium, naproxen, and lactose was investigated. The structure of the co-crystal is described using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structural analysis revealed a monoclinic lattice, space group P21, with the asymmetric unit containing one molecule of lactose, one of naproxen, sodium, and four water molecules. Upon heating, it was observed that the co-crystal transforms into a co-amorphous system due to the loss of its crystalline bound water. Dehydration and co-amorphization were studied using synchrotron X-ray radiation and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Subsequently, different processing techniques (ball milling, spray drying, and dehydration) were used to prepare the co-amorphous mixture of sodium, naproxen, and lactose. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) revealed the amorphous nature of the mixtures after preparation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed that the blends were single-phase co-amorphous systems as indicated by a single glass transition temperature. The samples were subsequently tested for physical stability under dry (silica gel at 25 and 40 °C) and humid conditions (25 °C/75% RH). The co-amorphous samples stored at 25 °C/75% RH quickly recrystallized into the co-crystalline state. On the other hand, the samples stored under dry conditions remained physically stable after five months of storage, except the ball milled sample stored at 40 °C which showed signs of recrystallization. Under these dry conditions, however, the ball-milled co-amorphous blend crystallized into the individual crystalline components.

  7. Spectral, mechanical, thermal, optical and solid state parameters, of metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-CO(II) tetrahydrate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Senthilkumar; Jagan, R.; Paulraj, Rajesh; Ramasamy, P.

    2015-10-01

    Metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate single crystals have been grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. The crystal structure and the unit cell parameters were analyzed from the X-ray diffraction studies. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that the grown crystal belongs to triclinic system with the space group P-1. Functional groups in bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. The peak observed at 663 cm-1 is assigned to the (Co-O) stretching vibrations. The optical transmission of the crystal was studied by UV-vis-NIR spectral analysis. The photoluminescence emission studies were carried out for the title compound in a wide wavelength range between 350 nm and 550 nm at 303 K. Mechanical strength was tested by Vickers microhardness test. The laser damage threshold value has been determined using Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. At various frequencies and temperatures the dielectric behavior of the material was investigated. Solid state parameters such as plasma energy, Penn gap, Fermi energy and electronic polarizability were evaluated. Photoconductivity measurements were carried out for the grown crystal in the presence of DC electric field at room temperature. Thermal stability and decomposition of the crystal were studied by TG-DTA. The weight loss of the title compound occurs in different steps.

  8. Aqueous solubility of calcium citrate and interconversion between the tetrahydrate and the hexahydrate as a balance between endothermic dissolution and exothermic complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous solubility of calcium citrate tetrahydrate was found to decrease with increasing temperature, while solubility of hexahydrate increased with a transition temperature at 51.6 °C. Excess citrate increased calcium citrate solubility but decreased the calcium ion activity of the saturated sol...

  9. Trans fatty acid isomers from hydrogenated fats: The controversy about health implications

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, Alfonso; King, Judith; Nieto, Susana

    1995-01-01

    Wherever there is a double bond in a fatty acid, there is also a possibility for isomerization. Under partial hydrogenation triacylglycerols composing oils'double bonds may change from cis to trans configuration, therefore products derived from hydrogenated oils such as margarines, shortenings and other industrial fats show high content of trans fatty acid isomers. The health implications of trans fatty acids in our d...

  10. Uric acid increases erythrocyte aggregation: Implications for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloop, Gregory D; Bialczak, Jessica K; Weidman, Joseph J; St Cyr, J A

    2016-10-05

    Uric acid may be a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, although the data conflict and the mechanism by which it may cause cardiovascular disease is uncertain. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that uric acid, an anion at physiologic pH, can cause erythrocyte aggregation, which itself is associated with cardiovascular disease. Normal erythrocytes and erythrocytes with a positive direct antiglobulin test for surface IgG were incubated for 15 minutes in 14.8 mg/dL uric acid. Erythrocytes without added uric acid were used as controls. Erythrocytes were then examined microscopically for aggregation. Aggregates of up to 30 erythrocytes were noted when normal erythrocytes were incubated in uric acid. Larger aggregates were noted when erythrocytes with surface IgG were incubated in uric acid. Aggregation was negligible in controls. These data show that uric acid causes erythrocyte aggregation. The most likely mechanism is decreased erythrocyte zeta potential. Erythrocyte aggregates will increase blood viscosity at low shear rates and increase the risk of atherothrombosis. In this manner, hyperuricemia and decreased zeta potential may be risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  11. Health Implications of High Dietary Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, E.; Wall, R.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; R. P. Ross; Stanton, C.

    2012-01-01

    Omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (e.g., arachidonic acid (AA)) and omega-3 (n-3) PUFA (e.g., eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)) are precursors to potent lipid mediator signalling molecules, termed “eicosanoids,” which have important roles in the regulation of inflammation. In general, eicosanoids derived from n-6 PUFA are proinflammatory while eicosanoids derived from n-3 PUFA are anti-inflammatory. Dietary changes over the past few decades in the intake of n-6 and n-3 PUFA show str...

  12. Acid Vapor Weathering of Apatite and Implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausrath, E. M.; Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2008-03-01

    Acid vapor experiments containing apatite, olivine, glass, and a mixture of these phases suggest that secondary phosphates brushite, strengite and others may have formed. Similar reactions may have formed similar minerals in Paso Robles.

  13. The omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio: health implications

    OpenAIRE

    Simopoulos Artemis P.

    2010-01-01

    Today, Western diets are characterized by a higher omega-6 and a lower omega-3 fatty acid intake, whereas during the Paleolithic period when human’s genetic profile was established, there was a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Their balance is an important determinant for brain development and in decreasing the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and other autoimmune and possibly neurodegenerative diseases. Both omega-6 and omega-3...

  14. The omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio: health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simopoulos Artemis P.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, Western diets are characterized by a higher omega-6 and a lower omega-3 fatty acid intake, whereas during the Paleolithic period when human’s genetic profile was established, there was a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Their balance is an important determinant for brain development and in decreasing the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and other autoimmune and possibly neurodegenerative diseases. Both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids influence gene expression. Because of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in their metabolic pathways, blood levels of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids are determined by both endogenous metabolism and dietary intake making the need of balanced dietary intake essential for health and disease prevention. Whether an omega-6/omega-3 ratio of 3:1 to 4:1 could prevent the pathogenesis of many diseases induced by today’s Western diets (AFSSA, 2010, a target of 1:1 to 2:1 appears to be consistent with studies on evolutionary aspects of diet, neurodevelopment, and genetics. A target of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio of 1:1 to 2:1 appears to be consistent with studies on evolutionary aspects of diet, neurodevelopment and genetics. A balanced ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is important for health and in the prevention of CHD and possibly other chronic diseases.

  15. Acid-base metabolism: implications for kidney stones formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The physiology and pathophysiology of renal H+ ion excretion and urinary buffer systems are reviewed. The main focus is on the two major conditions related to acid-base metabolism that cause kidney stone formation, i.e., distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) and abnormally low urine pH with subsequent uric acid stone formation. Both the entities can be seen on the background of disturbances of the major urinary buffer system, NH3+ NH4+. On the one hand, reduced distal tubular secretion of H+ ions results in an abnormally high urinary pH and either incomplete or complete dRTA. On the other hand, reduced production/availability of NH4+ is the cause of an abnormally low urinary pH, which predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Most recent research indicates that the latter abnormality may be a renal manifestation of the increasingly prevalent metabolic syndrome. Despite opposite deviations from normal urinary pH values, both the dRTA and uric acid stone formation due to low urinary pH require the same treatment, i.e., alkali. In the dRTA, alkali is needed for improving the body's buffer capacity, whereas the goal of alkali treatment in uric acid stone formers is to increase the urinary pH to 6.2-6.8 in order to minimize uric acid crystallization.

  16. Deprotonated Dicarboxylic Acid Homodimers: Hydrogen Bonds and Atmospheric Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Valiev, Marat; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2016-03-31

    Dicarboxylic acids represent an important class of water-soluble organic compounds found in the atmosphere. In this work we are studying properties of dicarboxylic acid homodimer complexes (HO2(CH2)nCO2-[HO2(CH2)nCO2H], n = 0-12), as potentially important intermediates in aerosol formation processes. Our approach is based on experimental data from negative ion photoelectron spectra of the dimer complexes combined with updated measurements of the corresponding monomer species. These results are analyzed with quantum-mechanical calculations, which provide further information about equilibrium structures, thermochemical parameters associated with the complex formation, and evaporation rates. We find that upon formation of the dimer complexes the electron binding energies increase by 1.3–1.7 eV (30.0–39.2 kcal/mol), indicating increased stability of the dimerized complexes. Calculations indicate that these dimer complexes are characterized by the presence of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds with high binding energies and are thermodynamically favorable to form with low evaporation rates. Comparison with previously studied HSO4-[HO2(CH2)2CO2H] complex (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 779-785) shows that HO2(CH2)2CO2-[HO2(CH2)2CO2H] has very similar thermochemical properties. These results imply that dicarboxylic acids not only can contribute to the heterogeneous complexes formation involving sulfuric acid and dicarboxylic acids, but also can promote the formation of homogenous complexes by involving dicarboxylic acids themselves.

  17. Understanding atmospheric peroxyformic acid chemistry: observation, modeling and implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence and importance of peroxyformic acid (PFA in the atmosphere has been under controversy. We present here, for the first time, the observation data for PFA from four field measurements carried out in China. These data provided powerful evidence that PFA can stay in the atmosphere, typically in dozens of pptv level. The relationship between PFA and other detected peroxides was examined. The results showed that PFA had a strong positive correlation with its homolog, peroxyacetic acid, due to their similar sources and sinks. Through an evaluation of PFA production and removal rates, we proposed that the reactions between peroxyformyl radical (HC(OO2 and formaldehyde or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2 were likely to be the major source and degradation into formic acid (FA was likely to be the major sink for PFA. Based on a box model evaluation, we proposed that the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry was a major source for FA under low NOx conditions. Furthermore, it is found that the impact of the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry on radical cycling was dependent on the yield of HC(OO2 radical from HC(O + O2 reaction. When this yield exceeded 50%, the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry should not be neglected for calculating the radical budget. To make clear the exact importance of HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry in the atmosphere, further kinetic, field and modeling studies are required.

  18. Atmospheric chemistry of carboxylic acids: microbial implication versus photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaïtilingom, M.; Charbouillot, T.; Deguillaume, L.; Maisonobe, R.; Parazols, M.; Amato, P.; Sancelme, M.; Delort, A.-M.

    2011-02-01

    Clouds are multiphasic atmospheric systems in which the dissolved organic compounds, dominated by carboxylic acids, are subject to multiple chemical transformations in the aqueous phase. Among them, solar radiation, by generating hydroxyl radicals (•OH), is considered as the main catalyzer of the reactivity of organic species in clouds. We investigated to which extent the active biomass existing in cloud water represents an alternative route to the chemical reactivity of carboxylic acids. Pure cultures of seventeen bacterial strains (Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Clavibacter, Frigoribacterium, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas and Rhodococcus), previously isolated from cloud water and representative of the viable community of clouds were first individually incubated in two artificial bulk cloud water solutions at 17 °C and 5 °C. These solutions mimicked the chemical composition of cloud water from "marine" and "continental" air masses, and contained the major carboxylic acids existing in the cloud water (i.e. acetate, formate, succinate and oxalate). The concentrations of these carboxylic compounds were monitored over time and biodegradation rates were determined. In average, they ranged from 2 ×10-19 for succinate to 1 × 10-18 mol cell-1 s-1 for formate at 17 °C and from 4 × 10-20 for succinate to 6 × 10-19 mol cell-1 s-1 for formate at 5 °C, with no significant difference between "marine" and "continental" media. In parallel, irradiation experiments were also conducted in these two artificial media to compare biodegradation and photodegradation of carboxylic compounds. To complete this comparison, the photodegradation rates of carboxylic acids by •OH radicals were calculated from literature data. Inferred estimations suggested a significant participation of microbes to the transformation of carboxylic acids in cloud water, particularly for acetate and succinate (up to 90%). Furthermore, a natural cloud water sample was incubated (including its indigenous microflora

  19. Phytic acid and phytase: implications for protein utilization by poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowieson, A J; Acamovic, T; Bedford, M R

    2006-05-01

    The effect of the ingestion of myo-inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) and phytase (EC 3.1.3.26) on the digestibility of casein was investigated using growing broiler chickens. A total of 64 female Ross broilers were used in a precision feeding study. One group of 8 birds was fed a solution of glucose to estimate endogenous losses. Seven groups, each of 8 birds, were fed either casein, casein + 1,000 units of phytase activity (FTU), casein + 2,000 FTU, casein + 0.5 g of IP6, casein + 0.5 g of IP6 + 1,000 FTU, casein + 1 g of IP6, or casein + 1 g of IP6 + 1,000 FTU. The excretion of DM, amino acids, nitrogen, minerals, and phytate-phosphorus was determined over a 48-h period and nutrient digestibility coefficients were calculated. Casein was found to be highly digestible, with true coefficients of DM, N, and amino acid digestibility of between 0.85 and 1.0. However, the ingestion of IP6 reduced (P IP6 with phytase improved (P IP6 with no supplemental phytase. The excretion of endogenous minerals was increased (P IP6 and reduced (P IP6 with phytase. In the absence of exogenous phytase, the recovery of phytate-P in excreta was approximately 80%. However, the recovery of phytate-P was significantly reduced by the addition of exogenous phytase to the IP6/casein mixture. It can be concluded that the ingestion of IP6 reduces the digestibility coefficients of amino acids and the metabolizability of nitrogen of casein. This is likely to be mediated partially through increased endogenous losses. However, the addition of phytase can partially ameliorate the detrimental effects of IP6 on protein utilization.

  20. Molecular targeting of acid ceramidase: implications to cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Youssef H; Jenkins, Russell W; Korman, John B; Liu, Xiang; Obeid, Lina M; Norris, James S; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2008-08-01

    Increasingly recognized as bioactive molecules, sphingolipids have been studied in a variety of disease models. The impact of sphingolipids on cancer research facilitated the entry of sphingolipid analogues and enzyme modulators into clinical trials. Owing to its ability to regulate two bioactive sphingolipids, ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate, acid ceramidase (AC) emerges as an attractive target for drug development within the sphingolipid metabolic pathway. Indeed, there is extensive evidence supporting a pivotal role for AC in lipid metabolism and cancer biology. In this article, we review the current knowledge of the biochemical properties of AC, its relevance to tumor promotion, and its molecular targeting approaches.

  1. Adsorption of Aspartic Acid onto Rutile: Implications for Biochirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, C. F.; Jonsson, C. M.; Jonsson, C. L.; Sverjensky, D. A.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Mineral surfaces may have facilitated the concentration and polymerization of simple biomolecules into macromolecules while promoting the development of biochirality. In this study, rutile and aspartic acid (Asp) were investigated as a possible system in this scenario. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to examine the adsorption of Asp as a function of total concentration and pH. A constant background electrolyte of 0.1 M NaCl was applied to the system, and all solutions were purged with argon gas to eliminate carbon dioxide contamination. Asp adsorbs onto rutile to the highest extent over the pH range 3-5.5 suggesting that an acidic environment is required for the adsorption between Asp and rutile to occur in significant amounts. This pH range of maximum adsorption is constrained between the isoelectric point of Asp and the point of zero charge of rutile, which indicates that electrostatic effects are influencing Asp adsorption. Both the L- and D- enantiomers of Asp were individually adsorbed onto the rutile surface to determine the potential of the system for chiral selection. Preliminary results indicate that D-Asp may possibly adsorb in greater amounts than L-Asp at higher Asp total concentrations. This trend is unexpected as the growth planes dominating the rutile are achiral, and a more thorough study is required to validate this difference in adsorption. Nevertheless, this result may provide insight on the emergence of chiral selection in macromolecules within what might be a predominantly achiral prebiotic system.

  2. A REVIEW ON ACID BASE STATUS IN DAIRY COWS: IMPLICATIONS OF DIETARY CATION-ANION BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Afzaal, M. Nisa, M. A. Khan and M. Sarwar

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The acid base status of a dairy cow is maintained within a narrow range. The key mechanisms involving blood, cells and lungs, perform this function. Although other minerals have an impact on acid base metabolism, the minerals used in dietary cation-anion balance (DCAB namely sodium (Na, potassium (K and chloride (Cl have the greatest effect. Hence, acid base status implicates other biological functions of dairy cows. Low DCAB prepartum reduces the incidence of milk fever and increases the productivity by simmering down the severity of hypocalcaemia. High DCAB diets have proved to increase dry mater and water intake and production and to mitigate the effects of heat stress.

  3. Implication of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilzer, Allison; Park, Yeonhwa

    2012-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has drawn significant attention in the last two decades for its variety of biologically beneficial effects. CLA reduces body fat, cardiovascular diseases and cancer, and modulates immune and inflammatory responses as well as improves bone mass. It has been suggested that the overall effects of CLA are the results of interactions between two major isomers, cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12. This review will primarily focus on current CLA publications involving humans, which are also summarized in the tables. Along with a number of beneficial effects of CLA, there are safety considerations for CLA supplementation in humans, which include effects on liver functions, milk fat depression, glucose metabolism, and oxidative stresses.

  4. Dehydration Kinetics of Zinc Phosphate Tetrahydrate α-Zn3(PO4)2·4H2O Nanoparticle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN,Ai-Qun; WU,Jian; HUANG,Zai-Yin; ZHOU,Ze-Guang; WEN,Yan-Xuan; TONG,Zhang-Fa

    2007-01-01

    TG-DTG technique and Harcourt-Esson integrated equation were used to study the dehydration process of zinc phosphate tetrahydrate α-Zn3(PO4)2·4H2O nanoparticle and its thermal decomposition kinetics. The results show that there are three stages of dehydration between 300 and 800 K during the thermal decomposition of α-Zn3(PO4)2·4H2O nanoparticle. The first stage is controlled by chemical reaction with an activation energy of 69.48 Kj·mol-1 and a pre-exponential factor of 1.77×106s-1. The second is controlled by nucleation and growth with an activation energy of 78.74 Kj·mol-1 and a pre-exponential factor of 5.86×109s-1. The third is controlled by nucleation and growth with an activation energy of 141.5 kJnnor1 and a pre-exponential factor of 1.01 × 1012 s-1. The kinetic compensative effects not only exist in Arrhenius equation but also in Harcourt-Esson equation. Activation energy E is dependent on both the decomposition fraction a and temperature T.

  5. Persistent circulating unmetabolised folic acid in a setting of liberal voluntary folic acid fortification. Implications for further mandatory fortification?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Steven W

    2009-08-01

    of 50 blood donors (unfasted (CI: 88.0%–99.9%, comprising 2.25% of total plasma folate, Conclusion While the levels of circulatory unmetabolised folic acid reported are low, it is persistently present in women immediately after caesarean section who were fasting indicating that there would be a constant/habitual exposure of existing tumours to folic acid, with the potential for accelerated growth. Mandatory fortification might exacerbate this. This has implications for those with responsibility for drafting legislating in this area.

  6. Persistent circulating unmetabolised folic acid in a setting of liberal voluntary folic acid fortification. Implications for further mandatory fortification?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Mary R

    2012-02-01

    (unfasted) (CI: 88.0%-99.9%), comprising 2.25% of total plasma folate, CONCLUSION: While the levels of circulatory unmetabolised folic acid reported are low, it is persistently present in women immediately after caesarean section who were fasting indicating that there would be a constant\\/habitual exposure of existing tumours to folic acid, with the potential for accelerated growth. Mandatory fortification might exacerbate this. This has implications for those with responsibility for drafting legislating in this area.

  7. Persistent circulating unmetabolised folic acid in a setting of liberal voluntary folic acid fortification. Implications for further mandatory fortification?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Mary R

    2009-01-01

    (unfasted) (CI: 88.0%-99.9%), comprising 2.25% of total plasma folate, CONCLUSION: While the levels of circulatory unmetabolised folic acid reported are low, it is persistently present in women immediately after caesarean section who were fasting indicating that there would be a constant\\/habitual exposure of existing tumours to folic acid, with the potential for accelerated growth. Mandatory fortification might exacerbate this. This has implications for those with responsibility for drafting legislating in this area.

  8. Human placenta metabolizes fatty acids: implications for fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders and maternal liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Prem; Bennett, Michael J; Sadovsky, Yoel; Nelson, D Michael; Rakheja, Dinesh; Strauss, Arnold W

    2003-06-01

    The role of fat metabolism during human pregnancy and in placental growth and function is poorly understood. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders in an affected fetus are associated with maternal diseases of pregnancy, including preeclampsia, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and the hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome called HELLP. We have investigated the developmental expression and activity of six fatty acid beta-oxidation enzymes at various gestational-age human placentas. Placental specimens exhibited abundant expression of all six enzymes, as assessed by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses, with greater staining in syncytiotrophoblasts compared with other placental cell types. beta-Oxidation enzyme activities in placental tissues were higher early in gestation and lower near term. Trophoblast cells in culture oxidized tritium-labeled palmitate and myristate in substantial amounts, indicating that the human placenta utilizes fatty acids as a significant metabolic fuel. Thus human placenta derives energy from fatty acid oxidation, providing a potential explanation for the association of fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders with maternal liver diseases in pregnancy.

  9. Cost implications of alternative sources of (n-3) fatty acid consumption in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Eileen T; Luo, Hanqi; Ausman, Lynne M

    2012-03-01

    The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 provides authoritative advice on what Americans should eat to stay healthy. These guidelines provide a quantitative recommendation to consume 250 mg/d of (n-3) fatty acids (also known as omega-3 fatty acids). To achieve this goal, Americans would need to more than triple the amount of EPA and DHA currently consumed. This paper assessed the cost implications of increased levels of EPA and DHA from marine and nonmarine food sources using data from the 2007-2008 NHANES, USDA nutrient data base, and the USDA Center for the Nutrition Policy and Promotion food price data. Stearidonic acid (SDA)-enhanced soybean oil is a lower cost alternative to commonly consumed marine food as a source of EPA. In addition, given that SDA-enhanced soybean oil is intended to be used as an ingredient in a variety of products, this may enable consumers to increase consumption of EPA through commonly consumed foods.

  10. N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids through the Lifespan: Implication for Psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusceddu, Matteo M; Kelly, Philip; Stanton, Catherine; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G

    2016-12-01

    The impact of lifetime dietary habits and their role in physical, mental, and social well-being has been the focus of considerable recent research. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as a dietary constituent have been under the spotlight for decades. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids constitute key regulating factors of neurotransmission, neurogenesis, and neuroinflammation and are thereby fundamental for development, functioning, and aging of the CNS. Of note is the fact that these processes are altered in various psychiatric disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Relevant literature was identified through a search of MEDLINE via PubMed using the following words, "n-3 PUFAs," "EPA," and "DHA" in combination with "stress," "cognition," "ADHD," "anxiety," "depression," "bipolar disorder," "schizophrenia," and "Alzheimer." The principal focus was on the role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids throughout the lifespan and their implication for psychopathologies. Recommendations for future investigation on the potential clinical value of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids were examined. The inconsistent and inconclusive results from randomized clinical trials limits the usage of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in clinical practice. However, a body of literature demonstrates an inverse correlation between omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels and quality of life/ psychiatric diseases. Specifically, older healthy adults showing low habitual intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids benefit most from consuming them, showing improved age-related cognitive decline. Although further studies are required, there is an exciting and growing body of research suggesting that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may have a potential clinical value in the prevention and treatment of psychopathologies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  11. Implications for global climate change from microbially-produced acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlund, K. L.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Warren, L. A.

    2009-05-01

    Microbial catalysis of sulphur cycling in acid mine drainage (AMD) environments is well known but the reaction pathways are poorly characterised. These reaction pathways involve both acid-consuming and acid- generating steps, with important consequences for overall AMD production as well as sulphur and carbon global biogeochemical cycles. Mining-associated sulphuric acid has been implicated in climate change through the weathering of carbonate minerals resulting in the release of 29 Tg C/year as carbon dioxide. Understanding of microbial AMD generation is based predominantly on studies of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans despite the knowledge that other environmentally common strains of bacteria are also active sulphur oxidizers and that microbial consortia are likely very important in environmental processes. Using an integrated experimental approach including geochemical experimentation, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we document a novel syntrophic sulphur metabolism involving two common mine bacteria: autotrophic sulphur oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and heterotrophic Acidiphilium spp. The proposed sulphur geochemistry associated with this bacterial consortium produces 40-90% less acid than expected based on abiotic AMD models, with significant implications for both AMD mitigation and AMD carbon flux modelling. The two bacterial strains are specifically spatially segregated within a macrostructure of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) that provides the necessary microgeochemical conditions for coupled sulphur oxidation and reduction reactions. STXM results identify multiple sulphur oxidation states associated with the pods, indicating that they are the sites of active sulphur disproportionation and recycling. Recent laboratory experimentation using type culture strains of the bacteria involved in pod-formation suggesting that this phenomenon is likely to be widespread in environments

  12. Comparative biological potency of acidic sulfate aerosols: implications for the interpretation of laboratory and field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R B; Chen, L C

    1994-04-01

    Biological responses to inhaled acid sulfates result from the deposition of hydrogen ion (H+) on airway surfaces. Thus, effects from sulfuric acid and ammonium bisulfate, the two major ambient species, have been assumed to be the same for a given H+ concentration within the exposure atmosphere, assuming similar respiratory tract deposition patterns. However, recent inhalation studies have indicated that sulfuric acid is disproportionately potent compared to ammonium bisulfate when the H+ content of the exposure atmosphere is considered, suggesting that some factors following inhalation affect the amount of H+ contacting airway surfaces. This study assessed a mechanism potentially underlying this phenomenon, namely, the extent of neutralization by respiratory tract ammonia. This was evaluated using a physical model system designed to mimic transit of these aerosols in the upper respiratory tract of the animal model used in this laboratory, the rabbit. The results suggest that for equal exposure quantities of H+, more acid would be deposited when sulfuric acid is inhaled than when ammonium bisulfate is inhaled. Furthermore, results from a series of in vitro exposures of tracheal epithelial cells to sulfuric acid and ammonium bisulfate aerosols indicated that the biological response is a function of the total mass (ionic) concentration of H+ deliverable to the cells or the total extractable H+ per particle. The results of this study have possible implications for ambient monitoring of particulate-associated strong acidity, suggesting that it may be necessary to specilate such measures into the relative amounts of H+ as sulfuric acid or ammonium bisulfate in order to most accurately relate atmospheric acid levels to observed health effects. In addition, since much of the ambient particulate-associated H+ exists as sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate mixtures rather than pure compounds, H(+)-associated health effects from controlled exposure studies of sulfuric acid may

  13. Determination of aqueous acid-dissociation constants of aspartic acid using PCM/DFT method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang-Aroon, Wichien; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    Determination of acid-dissociation constants, pKa, of aspartic acid in aqueous solution, using density functional theory calculations combined with the conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) and with integral-equation-formalism polarizable continuum model (IEFPCM) based on the UAKS and UAHF radii, was carried out. The computed pKa values derived from the CPCM and IEFPCM with UAKS cavity model of bare structures of the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p)-optimized tetrahydrated structures of aspartic acid species are mostly close to the experimental pKa values.0

  14. Maternal micronutrients (folic acid and vitamin B(12)) and omega 3 fatty acids: implications for neurodevelopmental risk in the rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Suchitra; Kale, Anvita; Dangat, Kamini; Sable, Pratiksha; Kulkarni, Asmita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2012-01-01

    Altered maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B(12)) are suggested to be at the heart of intra-uterine programming of adult diseases. We have recently described interactions of folic acid, vitamin B(12) and docosahexaenoic acid in one carbon metabolism that is considered to play a key role in regulation oxidative stress and chromatin methylation. However its impact on fetal oxidative stress and brain fatty acid levels has been relatively unexplored. The present study examined the effect of imbalance in maternal micronutrients (folic acid and vitamin B(12)) and maternal omega 3 fatty acid supplementation on oxidative stress parameters and brain fatty acids and in the offspring at birth. Pregnant female rats were divided into six groups at two levels of folic acid both in the presence and absence of vitamin B(12). Both the vitamin B(12) deficient groups were supplemented with omega 3 fatty acid. Oxidative stress marker (malondialdehyde) and polyunsaturated fatty acid profiles in plasma and brain were analyzed in dam and offspring at d20. Our results for the first time indicate that imbalance in maternal micronutrients (excess maternal folic acid supplementation on a B(12) deficient diet) increases (pacid supplementation was able to restore (p<0.05) the levels of brain DHA in both the vitamin B(12) deficient groups. Our data has implications for implications for neurodevelopmental disorders since micronutrients and DHA are important modulators for neural functioning.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of amorphous MoS2nanofiber bundles via acidification of ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate

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    Tharamani CN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMoS2nanofiber bundles have been prepared by hydrothermal method using ammonium molybdate with sulfur source in acidic medium and maintained at 180 °C for several hours. The obtained black crystalline products are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The PXRD pattern of the sample can be readily indexed as hexagonal 2H-MoS2. FTIR spectrum of the MoS2shows the band at 480 cm−1corresponds to the γas(Mo-S. SEM/TEM images of the samples exhibit that the MoS2nanofiber exist in bundles of 120–300 nm in diameter and 20–25 μm in length. The effects of temperature, duration and other experimental parameters on the morphology of the products are investigated.

  16. Are humans prone to autoimmunity? Implications from evolutionary changes in hominin sialic acid biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varki, Ajit

    2017-09-01

    Given varied intrinsic and extrinsic challenges to the immune system, it is unsurprising that each evolutionary lineage evolves distinctive features of immunoreactivity, and that tolerance mechanisms fail, allowing autoimmunity. Humans appear prone to many autoimmune diseases, with mechanisms both genetic and environmental. Another rapidly evolving biological system involves sialic acids, a family of monosaccharides that are terminal caps on cell surface and secreted molecules of vertebrates, and play multifarious roles in immunity. We have explored multiple genomic changes in sialic acid biology that occurred in human ancestors (hominins), some with implications for enhanced immunoreactivity, and hence for autoimmunity. Human ancestors lost the enzyme synthesizing the common mammalian sialic acid Neu5Gc, with an accumulation of the precursor sialic acid Neu5Ac. Resulting changes include an enhanced reactivity by some immune cells and increased ability of macrophages to kill bacteria, at the cost of increased endotoxin sensitivity. There are also multiple human-specific evolutionary changes in inhibitory and activating Siglecs, immune cell receptors that recognize sialic acids as "self-associated molecular patterns" (SAMPs) to modulate immunity, but can also be hijacked by pathogen molecular mimicry of SAMPs. Altered expression patterns and fixed or polymorphic SIGLEC pseudogenization in humans has modulated both innate and adaptive immunity, sometimes favoring over-reactivity. Meanwhile, dietary intake of Neu5Gc (derived primarily from red meats) allows metabolic incorporation of this non-human molecule into human cells--apparently the first example of "xeno-autoimmunity" involving "xeno-autoantigen" interactions with circulating "xeno-autoantibodies". Taken together, some of these factors may contribute to the apparent human propensity for autoimmunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Trans fatty acid isomers from hydrogenated fats: The controversy about health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenzuela, Alfonso

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Wherever there is a double bond in a fatty acid, there is also a possibility for isomerization. Under partial hydrogenation triacylglycerols composing oils'double bonds may change from cis to trans configuration, therefore products derived from hydrogenated oils such as margarines, shortenings and other industrial fats show high content of trans fatty acid isomers. The health implications of trans fatty acids in our diet is now a concern of controversy, because it has been demonstrated that its metabolic behaviour is as saturated fats. Trans fatty acids increase LDL-cholesterol and simultaneously decrease HDL-cholesterol, being considered both parameters as atherogenics. The oleochemical industry has developed several strategies to reduce the trans fatty acid content of hydrogenated oils, and now margarines and other hydrogenated derived products with low trans fatty acids content can be obtained from the retail market.

    Toda vez que exista un doble enlace en un ácido graso, existe la posibilidad de formación de estructuras isómeras. La hidrogenación parcial de los dobles enlaces de los triglicéridos que forman un aceite puede cambiar la isomería de estos enlaces desde la configuración cisa la configuración trans,por lo cual aquellos productos derivados de la hidrogenación de aceites, tales como las margarinas, las mantecas y otras grasas industriales, presentarán altos contenidos de ácidos grasos con isomería trans.Las implicaciones para la salud derivadas del consumo de ácidos grasos trans en la dieta, son en la actualidad motivo de muchas controversias, ya que se ha demostrado que los ácidos grasostrans se comportan biológicamente como ácidos grasos saturados. Los ácidos grasos transaumentan el colesterol-LDL y disminuyen simultáneamente el colesterol-HDL, siendo consideradas ambas situaciones como aterogénicas. La industria

  18. Oleanolic Acid Alters Multiple Cell Signaling Pathways: Implication in Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žiberna, Lovro; Šamec, Dunja; Mocan, Andrei; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Bishayee, Anupam; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Sureda, Antoni; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, much attention has been paid to diet and dietary supplements as a cost-effective therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of a myriad of chronic and degenerative diseases. Rapidly accumulating scientific evidence achieved through high-throughput technologies has greatly expanded the understanding about the multifaceted nature of cancer. Increasingly, it is being realized that deregulation of spatio-temporally controlled intracellular signaling cascades plays a contributory role in the onset and progression of cancer. Therefore, targeting regulators of oncogenic signaling cascades is essential to prevent and treat cancer. A plethora of preclinical and epidemiological evidences showed promising role of phytochemicals against several types of cancer. Oleanolic acid, a common pentacyclic triterpenoid, is mainly found in olive oil, as well as several plant species. It is a potent inhibitor of cellular inflammatory process and a well-known inducer of phase 2 xenobiotic biotransformation enzymes. Main molecular mechanisms underlying anticancer effects of oleanolic acid are mediated by caspases, 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2, matrix metalloproteinases, pro-apoptotic Bax and bid, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt1/mechanistic target of rapamycin, reactive oxygen species/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, cluster of differentiation 1, CKD4, s6k, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, as well as aforementioned signaling pathways . In this work, we critically review the scientific literature on the molecular targets of oleanolic acid implicated in the prevention and treatment of several types of cancer. We also discuss chemical aspects, natural sources, bioavailability, and safety of this bioactive phytochemical. PMID:28300756

  19. Oleanolic Acid Alters Multiple Cell Signaling Pathways: Implication in Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovro Žiberna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, much attention has been paid to diet and dietary supplements as a cost-effective therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of a myriad of chronic and degenerative diseases. Rapidly accumulating scientific evidence achieved through high-throughput technologies has greatly expanded the understanding about the multifaceted nature of cancer. Increasingly, it is being realized that deregulation of spatio-temporally controlled intracellular signaling cascades plays a contributory role in the onset and progression of cancer. Therefore, targeting regulators of oncogenic signaling cascades is essential to prevent and treat cancer. A plethora of preclinical and epidemiological evidences showed promising role of phytochemicals against several types of cancer. Oleanolic acid, a common pentacyclic triterpenoid, is mainly found in olive oil, as well as several plant species. It is a potent inhibitor of cellular inflammatory process and a well-known inducer of phase 2 xenobiotic biotransformation enzymes. Main molecular mechanisms underlying anticancer effects of oleanolic acid are mediated by caspases, 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2, matrix metalloproteinases, pro-apoptotic Bax and bid, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt1/mechanistic target of rapamycin, reactive oxygen species/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, cluster of differentiation 1, CKD4, s6k, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, as well as aforementioned signaling pathways . In this work, we critically review the scientific literature on the molecular targets of oleanolic acid implicated in the prevention and treatment of several types of cancer. We also discuss chemical aspects, natural sources, bioavailability, and safety of this bioactive phytochemical.

  20. Fat content, energy value and fatty acid profile of donkey milk during lactation and implications for human nutrition

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    Martemucci Giovanni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aims Milk contains numerous nutrients. The content of n-3 fatty acids, the n-6/n-3 ratio, and short- and medium-chain fatty acids may promote positive health effects. In Western societies, cow’s milk fat is perceived as a risk factor for health because it is a source of a high fraction of saturated fatty acids. Recently, there has been increasing interest in donkey’s milk. In this work, the fat and energetic value and acidic composition of donkey’s milk, with reference to human nutrition, and their variations during lactation, were investigated. We also discuss the implications of the acidic profile of donkey’s milk on human nutrition. Methods Individual milk samples from lactating jennies were collected 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 and 210days after foaling, for the analysis of fat, proteins and lactose, which was achieved using an infrared milk analyser, and fatty acids composition by gas chromatography. Results The donkey’s milk was characterised by low fat and energetic (1719.2kJ·kg-1 values, a high polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA content of mainly α-linolenic acid (ALA and linoleic acid (LA, a low n-6 to n-3 FA ratio or LA/ALA ratio, and advantageous values of atherogenic and thrombogenic indices. Among the minor PUFA, docosahesaenoic (DHA, eicosapentanoic (EPA, and arachidonic (AA acids were present in very small amounts ( The fatty acid patterns were affected by the lactation stage and showed a decrease (P Conclusions The high level of unsaturated/saturated fatty acids and PUFA-n3 content and the low n-6/n-3 ratio suggest the use of donkey’s milk as a functional food for human nutrition and its potential utilisation for infant nutrition as well as adult diets, particular for the elderly.

  1. Cd and Ni transport and accumulation in the halophyte Sesuvium portulacastrum: implication of organic acids in these processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahar eGhnaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The implication of organic acids in Cd and Ni translocation was studied in the halophyte species Sesuvium portulacastrum. Citric, fumaric, malic and ascorbic acids were separated and quantified by HPLC technique in shoots, roots and xylem saps of plants grown on nutrient solutions added with 50 µM Cd, 100 µM Ni and the combination of 50 µM Cd + 100 µM Ni. Results showed that Cd had no significant impact on biomass production while Ni and the combination of both metals drastically affected plant development. Cadmium and Ni concentrations in tissues and xylem sap were higher in plants individually exposed to heavy metal application than in those subjected to the combined treatment Cd + Ni, suggesting a possible competition between these metals for absorption. Both metals applied separately or in combination induced an increase in citrate concentration in shoots and xylem sap but a decrease of this concentration in the roots. However a minor relationship was observed between metal application and fumaric, malic and ascorbic acids. Both observations suggest the implication of citric acid in Cd, Ni translocation and shoot accumulation in S. portulacastrum. The relatively high accumulation of citric acid in xylem sap and shoot of S. portulacastrum could be involved in metal chelation and thus contributes to heavy metal tolerance in this species.

  2. Synthesis of barbituric acid containing nucleotides and their implications for the origin of primitive informational polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungi, Chaitanya V; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Chugh, Jeetender; Rajamani, Sudha

    2016-07-27

    Given that all processes in modern biology are encoded and orchestrated by polymers, the origin of informational molecules had to be a crucial and significant step in the origin of life on Earth. An important molecule in this context is RNA that is thought to have allowed the transition from chemistry to biology. However, the RNA molecule is comprised of intramolecular bonds which are prone to hydrolysis, especially so under the harsh conditions of the early Earth. Furthermore, the formation of nucleotides with extant bases and their subsequent polymerization have both been problematic, to say the least. Alternate heterocycles, in contrast, have resulted in nucleosides in higher yields, suggesting a viable and prebiotically relevant solution to the longstanding "nucleoside problem". In the present study, we have synthesized a nucleotide using ribose 5'-monophosphate (rMP) and barbituric acid (BA), as the base analog, using dry-heating conditions that are thought to be prevalent in several regimes of the early Earth. Polymerization of the resultant monomers, i.e. BA-nucleotides, was also observed when dehydration-rehydration cycles were carried out at low pH and high temperature. The resulting RNA-like oligomers have intact bases unlike in reactions that were carried out with canonical nucleotides, which resulted in abasic sites under acidic conditions due to cleavage of the N-glycosidic linkages. Furthermore, the incorporation of BA directly into preformed sugar-phosphate backbones was also observed when rMP oligomers were subjected to heating with BA. The results from our aforementioned experiments provide preliminary evidence that BA could have been a putative precursor of modern nucleobases, which could have been incorporated into primitive informational polymers that predated the molecules of an RNA world. Moreover, they also highlight that the prebiotic soup, which would have been replete with alternate heterocycles, could have allowed the sampling of other

  3. Microbial ecology of a novel sulphur cycling consortia from AMD: implications for acid generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiselle, L. M.; Norlund, K. L.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Warren, L. A.

    2009-05-01

    Recent work1 identified a novel microbial consortia consisting of two bacterial strains common to acid mine drainage (AMD) environments (autotrophic sulphur oxidizer Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and heterotrophic Acidiphilium spp.) in an environmental enrichment from a mine tailings lake. The two strains showed a specific spatial arrangement within an EPS macrostructure or "pod" allowing linked metabolic redox cycling of sulphur. Sulphur species characterisation of the pods using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) indicated that autotrophic tetrathionate disproportionation by A. ferrooxidans producing colloidal elemental sulphur (S0) is coupled to heterotrophic S0 reduction by Acidiphilium spp. Geochemical modelling of the microbial sulphur reactions indicated that if they are widespread in AMD environments, then global AMD-driven CO2 liberation from mineral weathering have been overestimated by 40-90%1. Given the common co-occurrence of these two bacteria in AMD settings, the purpose of this study was to evaluate if these pods could be induced in the laboratory by pure strains and if so, whether their combined sulphur geochemistry mimicked the previous findings. Laboratory batch experiments assessed the development of pods with pure strain type cultures (A. ferrooxidans ATCC 19859 with mixotroph Acidiphilium acidophilum ATCC 738 or strict heterotroph Acp. cryptum ATCC 2158) using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging. The microbial sulphur geochemistry was characterized under autotrophic conditions identical to those used with the environmental AMD enrichment in which the pods were discovered. Results showed that the combined pure strain A. ferrooxidans and Acp. acidophilum form pods identical in structure to the AMD enrichment. To test the hypothesis that these pods form for mutual metabolic benefit, experiments were performed amending pure strain and AMD enrichment bacterial treatments with organic carbon and/or additional sulphur to

  4. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  5. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  6. Meaningful differences in spectral performance, thermal behavior, and heterogeneous catalysis between ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate and its adduct of beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Le Xin; Wang, Mang; Dang, Zheng; Du, Fang Yun

    2010-03-11

    A novel molecule-ion adduct of ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate (AMT) with beta-cyclodextrin (CD) was prepared in this work. Significant differences in spectral properties between AMT and the adduct AMT-beta-CD were observed by a series of experimental probes, such as powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that, although the crystal growth of AMT-beta-CD was dominated by the molecular stacking of AMT, the size and morphology of the adduct were rather different from those seen in free AMT. The difference in stacking forms was attributed to the contribution of the molecule-ion interaction between AMT and beta-CD. A drastic improvement in thermal stability of AMT and beta-CD after adduct formation was observed by thermogravimetry analysis, which was confirmed by controlled sintering measurements. This revealed that the adduct interaction between them played an important role in mediating the thermal decomposition process of the adducted components. Furthermore, our results indicated that AMT and its adduct had a different performance in the catalytic desulfurization of thiophene and its derivatives. The fact that the catalytic efficiency of AMT was decreased after adduct formation implied there was a complexation between AMT and beta-CD. Besides, several unusual molecular ions--NH(3)(+), NH(2)(+), and NH(+)--were simultaneously found with gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry of free AMT.

  7. Growth, Optical, Mechanical, Dielectric and Theoretical Studies on Potassium Pentaborate Tetrahydrate (KB_5O_8·4H_2O) Single Crystal by Modified Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Justin Raj; S. Krishnan; S. Dinakaran; J. Mary Linet; R. Uthrakumar; R. Robert; Jerome Das

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinear optical single crystal of potassium pentaborate tetrahydrate (KB_5O_8·4H_2O) has been grown from aqueous solution by using unidirectional crystal growth method of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) with a due modification in the growth assembly. Potassium pentaborate crystal of 60 mm length and 10 mm diameter has been grown along (100) plane with a growth rate of 3 mm per day within a period of 20 days. The grown crystal was subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to confirm that the crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system. Some fundamental data such as valance electron plasma energy, Penn gap, Fermi energy and electronic polarizability of the grown crystal were calculated. The presence of borate in the grown crystal was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The optical transmission property of the grown crystal was analyzed using ultra violet (UV) visible spectral analysis. Surface morphology of the growth plane was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical strength of the crystals was found out using Vickers microhardness test along the growth axis. Frequency dependent dielectric constant of the grown crystal was studied for various temperatures along (100) plane.

  8. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: Implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Cao, Fang; Lee, Meehye

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls, and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C values of particle phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly larger than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors. The values are consistently less negative in oxalic acid (C2, average -14.1‰), glyoxylic acid (-13.8‰), pyruvic acid (-19.4‰), glyoxal (-13.5‰), and methylglyoxal (-18.6‰) compared to other organic species (e.g., palmitic acid, -26.3‰), which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during atmospheric oxidation of pre-aged precursors (e.g., isoprene) and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after the evaporation of clouds or wet aerosols. The δ13C values of C2 is positively correlated with C2 to organic carbon ratio, indicating that photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation during long-range atmospheric transport. The isotopic results also suggest that aqueous phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is a major formation process of oxalic acid via the intermediates such as glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photochemically aged in the western North Pacific rim.

  9. Fish oil prevents essential fatty acid deficiency and enhances growth: clinical and biochemical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbosch, Robert A M; Lee, Sang; Arsenault, Danielle A; Andersson, Charlotte; Gura, Kathleen M; Bistrian, Bruce R; Puder, Mark

    2008-05-01

    Fish oil, a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, has never been used as the sole source of lipid in clinical practice for fear of development of essential fatty acid deficiency, as it lacks the believed requisite levels of linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid. The objectives of this study were to establish biochemical standards for fish oil as the sole fat and to test the hypothesis that fish oil contains adequate amounts of omega-6 fatty acids to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency. Forty mice were divided into 2 groups that were either pair fed or allowed to eat ad libitum. In each group, 4 subgroups of 5 mice were fed 1%, 5%, and 10% fish oil diets by weight or a control soybean diet for 9 weeks. Blood was collected at 4 time points, and fatty acid analysis was performed. Food intake and weight status were monitored. All groups but the pair-fed 1% fish oil group gained weight, and the 5% fish oil group showed the highest caloric efficiency in both pair-fed and ad libitum groups. Fatty acid profiles for the 1% fish oil group displayed clear essential fatty acid deficiency, 5% fish oil appeared marginal, and 10% and soybean oil diets were found to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency. Fish oil enhances growth through higher caloric efficiency. We established a total omega-6 fatty acid requirement of between 0.30% and 0.56% of dietary energy, approximately half of the conventionally believed 1% as linoleic acid. This can presumably be attributed to the fact that fish oil contains not only a small amount of linoleic acid, but also arachidonic acid, which has greater efficiency to meet omega-6 fatty acid requirements.

  10. Omega-hydroxylation of phytanic acid in rat liver microsomes: implications for Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komen, J C; Duran, M; Wanders, R J A

    2004-07-01

    The 3-methyl-branched fatty acid phytanic acid is degraded by the peroxisomal alpha-oxidation route because the 3-methyl group blocks beta-oxidation. In adult Refsum disease (ARD), peroxisomal alpha-oxidation is defective, which is caused by mutations in the gene coding for phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase in the majority of ARD patients. As a consequence, phytanic acid accumulates in tissues and body fluids. This study focuses on an alternative route of phytanic acid degradation, omega-oxidation. The first step in omega-oxidation is hydroxylation at the omega-end of the fatty acid, catalyzed by a member of the cytochrome P450 multienzyme family. To study this first step, the formation of hydroxylated intermediates was studied in rat liver microsomes incubated with phytanic acid and NADPH. Two hydroxylated metabolites of phytanic acid were formed, omega- and (omega-1)-hydroxyphytanic acid (ratio of formation, 5:1). The formation of omega-hydroxyphytanic acid was NADPH dependent and inhibited by imidazole derivatives. These results indicate that phytanic acid undergoes omega-hydroxylation in rat liver microsomes and that an isoform of cytochrome P450 catalyzes the first step of phytanic acid omega-oxidation.

  11. Diverse physiological effects of long-chain saturated fatty acids: implications for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flock, Michael R; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the metabolism of long-chain saturated fatty acids and the ensuing effects on an array of metabolic events. Individual long-chain saturated fatty acids exhibit unique biological properties. Dietary saturated fat absorption varies depending on chain-length and the associated food matrix. The in-vivo metabolism of saturated fatty acids varies depending on the individual fatty acid and the nutritional state of the individual. A variety of fatty acid metabolites are formed, each with their own unique structure and properties that warrant further research. Replacing saturated fatty acids with unsaturated fatty acids improves the blood lipid profile and reduces cardiovascular disease risk, although the benefits depend on the specific saturated fatty acid(s) being replaced. Acknowledging the complexity of saturated fatty acid metabolism and associated metabolic events is important when assessing their effects on cardiovascular disease risk. Investigating the biological effects of saturated fatty acids will advance our understanding of how they affect cardiovascular disease risk.

  12. Effects of bile acids on human airway epithelial cells: implications for aerodigestive diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Aldhahrani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux and aspiration have been associated with chronic and end-stage lung disease and with allograft injury following lung transplantation. This raises the possibility that bile acids may cause lung injury by damaging airway epithelium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bile acid challenge using the immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B. The immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B was cultured. A 48-h challenge evaluated the effect of individual primary and secondary bile acids. Post-challenge concentrations of interleukin (IL-8, IL-6 and granulocyte−macrophage colony-stimulating factor were measured using commercial ELISA kits. The viability of the BEAS-2B cells was measured using CellTiter-Blue and MTT assays. Lithocholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid were successfully used to stimulate cultured BEAS-2B cells at different concentrations. A concentration of lithocholic acid above 10 μmol·L−1 causes cell death, whereas deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid above 30 μmol·L−1 was required for cell death. Challenge with bile acids at physiological levels also led to a significant increase in the release of IL-8 and IL6 from BEAS-2B. Aspiration of bile acids could potentially cause cell damage, cell death and inflammation in vivo. This is relevant to an integrated gastrointestinal and lung physiological paradigm of chronic lung disease, where reflux and aspiration are described in both chronic lung diseases and allograft injury.

  13. CLINICAL IMPLICATION OF FATTY ACID CHANGES IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY GOUT ASSOCIATED WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

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    N. N. Kushnarenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study blood levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs and adenyl nucleotides, and fatty acids levels in lipids of erythrocyte membranes in patients with primary gout associated with arterial hypertension (HT. Material and methods. 175 male patients with primary gout were included in the study. According to 24-hour blood pressure (BP monitoring results patients were split into two groups: 74 patients with normal BP (group 1 and 101 patients with HT (group 2. 29 healthy age-comparable subjects were included into control group. Uric acid, total NEFAs and glycerol blood levels were studied in all patients. Adenyl nucleotides (ATP , ADP and AMP levels were determined in erythrocytes. Higher fatty acid levels were specified in lipids of erythrocyte membranes, including the following acids: myristinic (С14:0, palmitinic (С16:0, stearic (С18:0, pentadecanic (С15:0, heptadecanic (С17:0, pentadecenic (С15:1, heptadecenic (С17:1, palmitooleic (С16:1, oleic (С18:1, linoleic (С18:2ω6, α-linolenic (С18:3ω3, γ-linolenic (С18:3ω6, dihomo-γ-linolenic (С20:3ω6, arachidonic (С20:4ω6, eicosapentaenoic (С20:5ω3, and docosapentaenoic (С22:5ω3. Results and discussion. Hypertensive patients with gout demonstrated higher NEFAs blood level and greater changes in ATP-ADP-AMP system than normotensive gout patients and healthy subjects as well as 2.2 and 3.7 times higher NEFAs/ATP ratio, respectively. In hypertensive patients with primary gout the composition of fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes lipids changed due to increase in saturated fatty acids amount and decrease in unsaturated fatty acids amount, at that monoenic acid levels increased while polyenic acid levels decreased in unsaturated acids composition. Hypertensive patients with gout shown 1.3 and 2.5 times less levels of ω-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA than normotensive gout patients and healthy subjects, respectively. At the same time ω-6 PUFA levels changed in

  14. Fatty acids in mountain gorilla diets: implications for primate nutrition and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Whitney B; Petzinger, Christina; Power, Michael L; Hyeroba, David; Rothman, Jessica M

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about the fatty acid composition of foods eaten by wild primates. A total of 18 staple foods that comprise 97% of the annual dietary intake of the mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei) were analyzed for fatty acid concentrations. Fruits and herbaceous leaves comprise the majority of the diet, with fruits generally having a higher mean percentage of fat (of dry matter; DM), as measured by ether extract (EE), than herbaceous leaves (13.0% ± SD 13.0% vs. 2.3 ± SD 0.8%). The mean daily EE intake by gorillas was 3.1% (DM). Fat provided ≈14% of the total dietary energy intake, and ≈22% of the dietary non-protein energy intake. Saturated fatty acids accounted for 32.4% of the total fatty acids in the diet, while monounsaturated fatty acids accounted for 12.5% and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) accounted for 54.6%. Both of the two essential PUFA, linoleic acid (LA, n-6) and α-linolenic acid (ALA, n-3), were found in all of the 17 staple foods containing crude fat and were among the three most predominant fatty acids in the diet: LA (C18:2n-6) (30.3%), palmitic acid (C16:0) (23.9%), and ALA (C18:3n-3) (21.2%). Herbaceous leaves had higher concentrations of ALA, while fruit was higher in LA. Fruits provided high amounts of fatty acids, especially LA, in proportion to their intake due to the higher fat concentrations; despite being low in fat, herbaceous leaves provided sufficient ALA due to the high intake of these foods. As expected, we found that wild mountain gorillas consume a diet lower in EE, than modern humans. The ratio of LA:ALA was 1.44, closer to agricultural paleolithic diets than to modern human diets. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Microbial export of lactic and 3-hydroxypropanoic acid : implications for industrial fermentation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maris, AJA; Konings, WN; Pronk, Jack T.; Dijken, J.P. van

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid and 3-hydroxypropanoic acid are industrially relevant microbial products. This paper reviews the current knowledge on export of these compounds from microbial cells and presents a theoretical analysis of the bioenergetics of different export mechanisms. It is concluded that export can be

  16. Peracetic acid degradation in freshwater aquaculture systems and possible practical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Meinelt, Thomas; Straus, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a highly reactive peroxygen compound with wide-ranging antimicrobial effects and is considered an alternative sanitizer to formaldehyde. Products containing PAA are available in solution with acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide to maintain the stability of the chemical...

  17. Microbial export of lactic and 3-hydroxypropanoic acid : implications for industrial fermentation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maris, AJA; Konings, WN; Pronk, Jack T.; Dijken, J.P. van

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid and 3-hydroxypropanoic acid are industrially relevant microbial products. This paper reviews the current knowledge on export of these compounds from microbial cells and presents a theoretical analysis of the bioenergetics of different export mechanisms. It is concluded that export can be

  18. Oxidation of resin acids in colophony (rosin) and its implications for patch testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhra, S; Foulds, I S; Gray, C N

    1998-08-01

    Commercial preparations of colophony (rosin) used for patch testing are made from unmodified rosin in pet. and may be stored for some considerable time before being used. This would be satisfactory if the composition and dermatological activity of the preparations were both reproducible and stable, but investigations by the authors have shown that the resin acids undergo progressive and substantial oxidation and that the dermatological activity of the preparations increases significantly with time. This may be a cause of inconsistent patch test results unless the composition can be stabilized. Gas liquid chromatography (GLC) analysis of a raw rosin sample and its commercial patch test preparation has shown that they both contained the same resin acids, but the concentration of the abietic type resin acids was found to be lower in the patch test preparations. The degradation of resin acids is due to their atmospheric oxidation, which may occur during the preparation and storage of the commercial rosin patch test preparation. The susceptibility of individual resin acids to atmospheric oxidation was demonstrated by analysing a sample of raw Portuguese gum rosin, which was then left exposed to air and light. Most of the resin acids were found to undergo oxidation at a rate which gradually diminished. More importantly, it is presumed that the concentration of oxidized resin acids increased correspondingly, and these have been shown to be more dermatologically active than the unoxidised resin acids. The rate of decrease of resin acid concentration was found to be in the following order: neoabietic>levopimaric and palustric>abietic>dehydroabetic acid. The pimaric type resin acids were found to be relatively inert to atmospheric oxidation when compared with the abietic type resin acids. Patch testing with the resulting partly oxidized Portuguese rosin produced positive reactions at a 35% higher frequency than the raw Portuguese rosin. The study demonstrates that the

  19. Specific Growth Rate Determines the Sensitivity of Escherichia coli to Lactic Acid Stress: Implications for Predictive Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Lindqvist

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the hypothesis that sensitivity of Escherichia coli to lactic acid at concentrations relevant for fermented sausages (pH 4.6, 150 mM lactic acid, aw=0.92, temperature = 20 or 27°C increases with increasing growth rate. For E. coli strain 683 cultured in TSB in chemostat or batch, subsequent inactivation rates when exposed to lactic acid stress increased with increasing growth rate at harvest. A linear relationship between growth rate at harvest and inactivation rate was found to describe both batch and chemostat cultures. The maximum difference in T90, the estimated times for a one-log reduction, was 10 hours between bacteria harvested during the first 3 hours of batch culture, that is, at different growth rates. A 10-hour difference in T90 would correspond to measuring inactivation at 33°C or 45°C instead of 37°C based on relationships between temperature and inactivation. At similar harvest growth rates, inactivation rates were lower for bacteria cultured at 37°C than at 15–20°C. As demonstrated for E. coli 683, culture conditions leading to variable growth rates may contribute to variable lactic acid inactivation rates. Findings emphasize the use and reporting of standardised culture conditions and can have implications for the interpretation of data when developing inactivation models.

  20. Effet protecteur des acides gras contre le stress oxydatif : Implication en physiopathologie vasculaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negre-Salvayre Anne

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress play a major role in the genesis and the evolution of vascular pathologies. Recent data suggest that redox mechanisms are involved in the signaling network of vascular cells and the physiology of the vascular wall. Experimental cell models allow to analyse the biological effect of pro-oxidants, and the regulation exerted by antioxidants and cytoprotective agents. Fatty acids play a complex role in atherosclerosis, since they exhibit both anti and proatherogenic properties, as function of their concentration and insaturation level. Beside their role in cell metabolism and mitochondrial b-oxidation, fatty acids activate various signaling pathways, and could modulate intracellular oxidative stress via an uncoupling effect on mitochondria. We report here that fatty acids protect against mitochondrial oxidative stress by activating cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPX activity. This effect is independent of the chain length and unsaturation level. EGF receptor is activated by fatty acids and involved in their protective effect against mitochondrial oxidative stress and GPX activation, and similar protective results are observed with EGF. Oleic acid and EGF protect DNA against the formation of 8oxodG lesions occurring subsequently to oxidative stress. Taken together, this new ‘antioxidant’ and cytoprotective property of fatty acids and EGF could participate to the stabilization of atherosclerotic plaque, and the more general anti-atherogenic properties of oleic acid.

  1. O-Toluic Acid Monomer and Monohydrate: Rotational Spectra, Structures, and Atmospheric Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Elijah G.; Zenchyzen, Brandi L. M.; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Clusters of carboxylic acids with water, sulfuric acid, and other atmospheric species potentially increase the rate of new particle formation in the troposphere. Here, we present high-resolution pure rotational spectra of o-toluic acid and its complex with water in the range of 5-14 GHz, measured with a cavity-based molecular beam Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. In both the monomer and the complex, the carboxylic acid functional group adopts a syn- conformation, with the acidic proton oriented away from the aromatic ring. In the complex, water participates in two hydrogen bonds, forming a six-membered intermolecular ring. Despite its large calculated c-dipole moment, no c-type transitions were observed for the complex, because of a large amplitude "wagging" motion of the unbound hydrogen of water, similar to the case of the benzoic acid-water complex. No methyl internal rotation splittings were observed, consistent with a high barrier (7 kJ mol-1) calculated for the monomer at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Using statistical thermodynamics, experimental rotational constants were combined with a theoretical frequency analysis and binding energy to give an estimate of the percentage of hydrated acid in the atmosphere under various conditions. F. Riccobono, et al., Science, 344, 717 (2014). R. Zhang, et al., Science, 304, 1487 (2004). E. G. Schnitzler and W. Jäger, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 16, 2305 (2014).

  2. Ion Irradiation of Sulfuric Acid: Implications for its Stability on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) detected regions on Europa's surface containing distorted H2O bands. This distortion likely indicates that there are other molecules mixed with the water ice. Based on spectral comparison, some of the leading possibilities are sulfuric acid, salts. or possibly H3O(+). Previous laboratory studies have shown that sulfuric acid can be created by irradiation of H2OSO2 mixtures, and both molecules are present on Europa. In this project, we were interested in investigating the radiation stability of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and determining its lifetime on the surface of Europa.

  3. Nitrogen dioxide-dependent oxidation of uric acid in the human oral cavity under acidic conditions: implications for its occurrence in acidic dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2010-06-21

    The pH in dental plaque falls to below 5 after the ingestion of foods, and it may remain low if acid-tolerant bacteria grow in the plaque. Certain nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity can proliferate in dental plaque at low pH, and nitrite is detected in such plaque. In acidic dental plaque, NO(2) can be produced by self-decomposition of nitrous acid and also by peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of nitrite, and it may oxidize uric acid, a major antioxidant in the oral cavity. Under experimental conditions that simulate oral cavity, the oxidation of uric acid by nitrite and by nitrite/peroxidase systems was much more rapid at pH 5 than at pH 7, suggesting the more rapid production of NO(2) in dental plaque at lower pH. We propose that if the pH of plaque developed in a dental crevice decreased, NO(2) and other nitrogen oxides produced in the plaque would diffuse into the adjoining gingival tissues. The results of this study seem to contribute to the understanding of the induction of periodontal diseases in the context of nitrite-dependent production of nitrogen oxides in acidic dental plaque.

  4. Microbial export of lactic and 3-hydroxypropanoic acid: implications for industrial fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maris, Antonius J A; Konings, Wil N; van Dijken, Johannes P; Pronk, Jack T

    2004-10-01

    Lactic acid and 3-hydroxypropanoic acid are industrially relevant microbial products. This paper reviews the current knowledge on export of these compounds from microbial cells and presents a theoretical analysis of the bioenergetics of different export mechanisms. It is concluded that export can be a key constraint in industrial production, especially under the conditions of high product concentration and low extracellular pH that are optimal for recovery of the undissociated acids. Under these conditions, the metabolic energy requirement for product export may equal or exceed the metabolic energy yield from product formation. Consequently, prolonged product formation at low pH and at high product concentrations requires the involvement of alternative, ATP-yielding pathways to sustain growth and maintenance processes, thereby reducing the product yield on substrate. Research on export mechanisms and energetics should therefore be an integral part of the development of microbial production processes for these and other weak acids.

  5. Resveratrol and Omega 3 fatty acid: Its implications in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibhuti B Kakoti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review aimed at summarizing the major therapeutic roles of resveratrol and omega-3 fatty acids along with their related pathways. This article reviews some of the key studies involving the health benefits of resveratrol and omega 3 fatty acids. Oxidative stress has been considered as one of the most important pathophysiological factor associated with various cardiovascular disease conditions. Resveratrol with the potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties has been proven to be a significantly protective compound in restoring the normal cardiac health. A plethora of research also demonstrated the reduction of the risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension and stroke, and their complications by omega-3 fatty acids derived from fish and fish oils. This review describes the potential cardioprotective role of resveratrol and omega 3 fatty acids in ameliorating the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress.

  6. Selective adsorption of L- and D-amino acids on calcite: Implications for biochemical homochirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, R. M.; Filley, T. R.; Goodfriend, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of biochemical homochirality was a key step in the origin of life, yet prebiotic mechanisms for chiral separation are not well constrained. Here we demonstrate a geochemically plausible scenario for chiral separation of amino acids by adsorption on mineral surfaces. Crystals of the common rock-forming mineral calcite (CaCO(3)), when immersed in a racemic aspartic acid solution, display significant adsorption and chiral selectivity of d- and l-enantiomers on pairs of mirror-related crystal-growth surfaces. This selective adsorption is greater on crystals with terraced surface textures, which indicates that d- and l-aspartic acid concentrate along step-like linear growth features. Thus, selective adsorption of linear arrays of d- and l-amino acids on calcite, with subsequent condensation polymerization, represents a plausible geochemical mechanism for the production of homochiral polypeptides on the prebiotic Earth.

  7. Patterns and dynamics of neutral lipid fatty acids in ants - implications for ecological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosumek, Félix B; Brückner, Adrian; Blüthgen, Nico; Menzel, Florian; Heethoff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Trophic interactions are a fundamental aspect of ecosystem functioning, but often difficult to observe directly. Several indirect techniques, such as fatty acid analysis, were developed to assess these interactions. Fatty acid profiles may indicate dietary differences, while individual fatty acids can be used as biomarkers. Ants are among the most important terrestrial animal groups, but little is known about their lipid metabolism, and no study so far used fatty acids to study their trophic ecology. We set up a feeding experiment with high- and low-fat food to elucidate patterns and dynamics of neutral lipid fatty acids (NLFAs) assimilation in ants. We asked whether dietary fatty acids are assimilated through direct trophic transfer, how diet influences NLFA total amounts and patterns over time, and whether these assimilation processes are similar across species and life stages. Ants fed with high-fat food quickly accumulated specific dietary fatty acids (C18:2n6, C18:3n3 and C18:3n6), compared to ants fed with low-fat food. Dietary fat content did not affect total body fat of workers or amounts of fatty acids extensively biosynthesized by animals (C16:0, C18:0, C18:1n9). Larval development had a strong effect on the composition and amounts of C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1n9. NLFA compositions reflected dietary differences, which became more pronounced over time. Assimilation of specific dietary NLFAs was similar regardless of species or life stage, but these factors affected dynamics of other NLFAs, composition and total fat. We showed that ants accumulated certain dietary fatty acids via direct trophic transfer. Fat content of the diet had no effect on lipids stored by ants, which were able to synthesize high amounts of NLFAs from a sugar-based diet. Nevertheless, dietary NLFAs had a strong effect on metabolic dynamics and profiles. Fatty acids are a useful tool to study trophic biology of ants, and could be applied in an ecological context, although factors that

  8. Supply Chain Modeling for Fluorspar and Hydrofluoric Acid and Implications for Further Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    analysis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS supply chain , model, fluorspar, hydrofluoric acid, shortfall, substitution, Defense Logistics Agency, National Defense...unlimited. IDA Document D-5379 Log: H 15-000099 INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES 4850 Mark Center Drive Alexandria, Virginia 22311-1882 Supply Chain ...E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document D-5379 D. Sean Barnett Jerome Bracken Supply Chain Modeling for Fluorspar and Hydrofluoric Acid and

  9. Short-chain fatty acid fermentation products of the gut microbiome: implications in autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests potential, but unproven, links between dietary, metabolic, infective, and gastrointestinal factors and the behavioral exacerbations and remissions of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Propionic acid (PPA) and its related short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are fermentation products of ASD-associated bacteria (Clostridia, Bacteriodetes, Desulfovibrio). SCFAs represent a group of compounds derived from the host microbiome that are plausibly linked to ASDs and can induce wid...

  10. Stability of free and mineral-protected nucleic acids: Implications for the RNA world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, Jacob B.; Coveney, Peter V.; Christopher Greenwell, H.

    2012-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the structural stability of three different nucleic acids intercalated within a magnesium aluminium layered double hydroxide (LDH) mineral, at varying degrees of hydration, and free in aqueous solution. The nucleotides investigated are ribose nucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA), all in duplex form. Our simulations show that DNA has enhanced Watson-Crick hydrogen-bonding when intercalated within the LDH clay interlayers, compared with intercalated RNA and PNA, whilst the reverse trend is found for the nucleic acids in bulk water. The tendency for LDH to alter the stability of the three nucleic acids persists for higher temperature and pressure conditions. The uncharged protein backbone of PNA is found to have a detrimental effect on the overall stability of the duplex, as it experiences a greatly reduced electrostatic interaction with the charged LDH sheets compared to RNA and DNA. Assuming an RNA world, in which RNA preceded the DNA/protein world, at some point in time DNA must have taken over the role as the information storage molecule from RNA. These results suggest that a mineral based origin of life may have favoured DNA as the information-storage biomolecule over potentially competing RNA and PNA, providing a route to modern biology from the RNA world.

  11. Photo-oxidation of Acetone to Formic Acid in Synthetic Air and Its Atmospheric Implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Aparajeo; Chatterjee, Piyali; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2015-07-23

    Acetone photo-oxidation in synthetic air under exposure of 311 nm ultraviolet light has been studied, and the photo-oxidation products are identified by means of infrared spectroscopy. Analysis reveals that formic acid is one of the major products, although there have been debates in the past concerning the authenticity of formation of this acid in synthetic air via the photo-oxidation pathway. The quantum yield of formation of this acid is similar to that of other major photoproducts like methanol, formaldehyde, and carbon monoxide. The reaction yield, however, decreases with an increase in total air pressure in the reaction cell, but it is still significant at pressures relevant to tropospheric conditions. A kinetic model has been used to simulate the measured reaction kinetics, and the quantum yields predicted by the model are found to be consistent with the measured yields for different durations of light exposure. The same model has also been used to investigate the effect of atmospheric nitric oxide on the fate of formation of this acid in the troposphere. Although nitric oxide is known to be a quencher of peroxy radicals, the precursors of formaldehyde and formic acid in acetone photo-oxidation, but our model predicts that this oxide plays a positive role in the overall reaction kinetics for production of this acid in the troposphere.

  12. Composition and hygroscopicity of aerosol particles at Mt. Lu in South China: Implications for acid precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weijun; Chi, Jianwei; Shi, Zongbo; Wang, Xinfeng; Chen, Bin; Wang, Yan; Li, Tao; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Daizhou; Wang, Zifa; Shi, Chune; Liu, Liangke; Wang, Wenxing

    2014-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of aerosol particles were studied at Mt. Lu, an elevated site (115°59‧E, 29°35‧N, 1165 m) within the acid precipitation area. Northeast winds transport copious amounts of air pollutants and water vapor from the Yangtze River Delta into this acid precipitation area. NH4+ and SO42- are the dominant ions in PM2.5 and determine aerosol acidity. Individual particle analysis shows abundant S-rich and metals (i.e. Fe-, Zn-, Mn-, and Pb-rich) particles. Unlike aerosol particles in North China and urban areas, there are little soot and mineral particles at Mt. Lu. Lack of mineral particles contributed to the higher acidity in precipitation in the research area. Nano-sized spherical metal particles were observed to be embedded in 37% of S-rich particles. These metal particles were likely originated from heavy industries and fired-power plants. Hygroscopic experiments show that most particles start to deliquesce at 73-76% but organic coating lowers the particle deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) to 63-73%. The DRHs of these aerosol particles are clearly smaller than that of pure ammonium sulfate particles which is 80%. Since RH in ambient air was relatively high, ranging from 65% to 85% during our study period, most particles at our sampling site were in liquid phase. Our results suggest that liquid phase reactions in aerosol particles may contribute to SO2 to sulfuric acid conversion in the acid precipitation area.

  13. Tetra-aqua-bis[(1-ammonio-1-phosphono-ethyl)phospho-nato]zinc(II) tetra-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudko, A; Bon, V; Kozachkova, A; Pekhnyo, V

    2009-03-28

    The title compound, [Zn(C(2)H(8)NO(6)P(2))(2)(H(2)O)(4)]·4H(2)O, was synthesized by the reaction of ZnCl(2) with 1-amino-ethane-1,1-diyldiphospho-nic acid in aqueous solution. The asymmetric unit contains one-half of the complex and two water mol-ecules of solvation. The Zn atom occupies a special position on an inversion centre. This results in a slightly distorted octa-hedral coordination environment, which consists of the O atoms from two phospho-nic acids and four water mol-ecules. The crystal structure displays N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding, which creates a three-dimensional network.

  14. Binding modes of aromatic ligands to mammalian heme peroxidases with associated functional implications: crystal structures of lactoperoxidase complexes with acetylsalicylic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, and benzylhydroxamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit K; Singh, Nagendra; Sinha, Mau; Bhushan, Asha; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2009-07-24

    The binding and structural studies of bovine lactoperoxidase with three aromatic ligands, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), salicylhydoxamic acid (SHA), and benzylhydroxamic acid (BHA) show that all the three compounds bind to lactoperoxidase at the substrate binding site on the distal heme side. The binding of ASA occurs without perturbing the position of conserved heme water molecule W-1, whereas both SHA and BHA displace it by the hydroxyl group of their hydroxamic acid moieties. The acetyl group carbonyl oxygen atom of ASA forms a hydrogen bond with W-1, which in turn makes three other hydrogen-bonds, one each with heme iron, His-109 N(epsilon2), and Gln-105 N(epsilon2). In contrast, in the complexes of SHA and BHA, the OH group of hydroxamic acid moiety in both complexes interacts with heme iron directly with Fe-OH distances of 3.0 and 3.2A respectively. The OH is also hydrogen bonded to His-109 N(epsilon2) and Gln-105N(epsilon2). The plane of benzene ring of ASA is inclined at 70.7 degrees from the plane of heme moiety, whereas the aromatic planes of SHA and BHA are nearly parallel to the heme plane with inclinations of 15.7 and 6.2 degrees , respectively. The mode of ASA binding provides the information about the mechanism of action of aromatic substrates, whereas the binding characteristics of SHA and BHA indicate the mode of inhibitor binding.

  15. Manipulating the sulfur amino acid content of the early diet and its implications for long-term health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, William D

    2002-02-01

    Epidemiological studies of human populations show that poor growth in utero predisposes an individual to the later development of type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and hypertension in adulthood. This phenomenon is not confined to man; feeding pregnant rats diets moderately deficient in protein has a similar effect, programming the adult blood pressure and glucose metabolism of the offspring. A restriction in the amino acid supply was thought to cause poor fetal growth. However, recent experiments have shown that this is not the case and instead have implicated the metabolism of the S-containing amino acids. Many semi-synthetic experimental diets contain an imbalance in S-containing amino acids, forcing the animal to synthesise a sizeable part of its cysteine requirement from methionine. Unfortunately, when the diet is low in protein, the oxidation of amino acids is reduced, perturbing methionine metabolism and increasing levels of homocysteine. It is this interaction between protein content and composition of the diet which influences neonatal viability and may also determine the long-term health of the offspring. An excess of homocysteine is known to affect levels of two of the main mediators of cellular methylation reactions, S-adenosyl methionine and methylene tetrahydrofolate. S-adenosyl methionine is the methyl donor for the methylation of newly-synthesised DNA, regulating chromatin assembly and gene expression. The balance between S-adenosyl methionine and the methylated derivatives of folic acid may be critical for the development of differentiating cells and the long-term regulation of gene expression.

  16. Chloroethene dechlorination in acidic groundwater: Implications for combining fenton's treatment with natural attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Singletary , Michael A.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2007-01-01

    A sulfuric acid leak in 1988 at a chloroethene-contaminated groundwater site at the Naval Air Station Pensacola has resulted in a long-term record of the behavior of chloroethene contaminants at low pH and a unique opportunity to assess the potential impact of source area treatment technologies, which involve acidification of the groundwater environment (e.g., Fenton's-based in situ chemical oxidation), on downgradient natural attenuation processes. The greater than 75 percent decrease in trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations and the shift in contaminant composition toward predominantly reduced daughter products (dichloroethene [DCE] and vinyl chloride [VC]) that were observed along a 30-m groundwater flow path characterized by highly acidic conditions (pH = 3.5 ± 0.4) demonstrated that chloroethene reductive dechlorination can continue to be efficient under persistent acidic conditions. The detection of Dehalococcoides-type bacteria within the sulfuric acid/chloroethene co-contaminant plume was consistent with biotic chloroethene reductive dechlorination. Microcosm studies conducted with 14C-TCE and 14C-VC confirmed biotic reductive dechlorination in sediment collected from within the sulfuric acid/chloroethene co-contaminant plume. Microcosms prepared with sediment from two other locations within the acid plume, however, demonstrated only a limited mineralization to 14CO2 and 14CO, which was attributed to abiotic degradation because no significant differences were observed between experimental and autoclaved control treatments. These results indicated that biotic and abiotic mechanisms contributed to chloroethene attenuation in the acid plume at NAS Pensacola and that remediation techniques involving acidification of the groundwater environment (e.g., Fenton's-based source area treatment) do not necessarily preclude efficient chloroethene degradation.

  17. Loss of N-glycolylneuraminic acid in humans: Mechanisms, consequences, and implications for hominid evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varki, A

    2001-01-01

    The surface of all mammalian cells is covered with a dense and complex array of sugar chains, which are frequently terminated by members of a family of molecules called sialic acids. One particular sialic acid called N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) is widely expressed on most mammalian tissues, but is not easily detectable on human cells. In fact, it provokes an immune response in adult humans. The human deficiency of Neu5Gc is explained by an inactivating mutation in the gene encoding CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in generating Neu5Gc in cells of other mammals. This deficiency also results in an excess of the precursor sialic acid N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) in humans. This mutation appears universal to modern humans, occurred sometime after our last common ancestor with the great apes, and happens to be one of the first known human-great ape genetic differences with an obvious biochemical readout. While the original selection mechanisms and major biological consequences of this human-specific mutation remain uncertain, several interesting clues are currently being pursued. First, there is evidence that the human condition can explain differences in susceptibility or resistance to certain microbial pathogens. Second, the functions of some endogenous receptors for sialic acids in the immune system may be altered by this difference. Third, despite the lack of any obvious alternate pathway for synthesis, Neu5Gc has been reported in human tumors and possibly in human fetal tissues, and traces have even been detected in normal human tissues. One possible explanation is that this represents accumulation of Neu5Gc from dietary sources of animal origin. Finally, a markedly reduced expression of hydroxylase in the brains of other mammals raises the possibility that the human-specific mutation of this enzyme could have played a role in human brain evolution.

  18. Dissolved total hydrolyzable enantiomeric amino acids in precipitation: Implications on bacterial contributions to atmospheric organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ge; Kim, Guebuem; Kim, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Yu-Sik; Kim, Young Il

    2015-03-01

    We analyzed dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and dissolved enantiomeric amino acids in precipitation samples collected at two sites in Korea over a one-year period. The average concentrations of DOC, DON, and total hydrolyzable amino acids at Seoul (an inland urban area) were lower than those at Uljin (a coastal rural area). The different bulk compositions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) at these two sites (reflected by qualitative indicators) were mainly attributed to differences in contributing sources. The D-enantiomers of four individual amino acids (aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine) were ubiquitously present, with average enantiomeric (D/L) ratios of 0.34, 0.26, 0.21, and 0.61 for Seoul, and 0.18, 0.11, 0.09, and 0.31 for Uljin, respectively. The much higher D/L ratios observed at Seoul than at Uljin might result from more advanced diagenetic stages as well as higher contributions from bacteria inhabiting terrestrial environments. The C- and N-normalized yields of D-alanine in DOM of our samples were found to be comparable to literature values reported for aquatic systems, where a significant portion of DOM was suggested to be of bacterial origin. Our study suggests that bacteria and their remnants might constitute an important fraction of OM in the atmosphere, contributing significantly to the quality of atmospheric OM and its post-depositional bioavailability in the surface ecosystems.

  19. Thermal decarboxylation of acetic acid: Implications for origin of natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on the thermal decarboxylation of solutions of acetic acid at 200??C and 300??C were carried out in hydrothermal equipment allowing for on-line sampling of both the gas and liquid phases for chemical and stable-carbon-isotope analyses. The solutions had ambient pH values between 2.5 and 7.1; pH values and the concentrations of the various acetate species at the conditions of the experiments were computed using a chemical model. Results show that the concentrations of acetic acid, and not total acetate in solution, control the reaction rates which follow a first order equation based on decreasing concentrations of acetic acid with time. The decarboxylation rates at 200??C (1.81 ?? 10-8 per second) and 300??C (8.17 ?? 10-8 per second) and the extrapolated rates at lower temperatures are relatively high. The activation energy of decarboxylation is only 8.1 kcal/mole. These high decarboxylation rates, together with the distribution of short-chained aliphatic acid anions in formation waters, support the hypothesis that acid anions are precursors for an important portion of natural gas. Results of the ??13C values of CO2, CH4, and total acetate show a reasonably constant fractionation factor of about 20 permil between CO2 and CH4 at 300??C. The ??13C values of CO2 and CH4 are initially low and become higher as decarboxylation increases. ?? 1983.

  20. Chemical stability of acid rock drainage treatment sludge and implications for sludge management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny M. McDonald; John A. Webb; Jeff Taylor [La Trobe University, Vic. (Australia). Environmental Geoscience

    2006-03-15

    To assess the chemical stability of sludges generated by neutralizing acid rock drainage (ARD) with alkaline reagents, synthetic ARD was treated with hydrated lime (batch and high-density sludge process), limestone, and two proprietary reagents (KB-1 and Bauxsol). The amorphous metal hydroxide sludge produced was leached using deionized water, U.S. EPA methods (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure), and the new strong acid leach test (SALT), which leaches the sludge with a series of sulfuric acid extractant solutions; the pH decreases by {approximately} 1 pH unit with each test, until the final pH is {approximately}2. Sludges precipitated by all reagents had very similar leachabilities except for KB-1 and Bauxsol, which released more aluminum. SALT showed that lowering the pH of the leaching solution mobilized more metals from the sludges. Iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc began to leach at pH 2.5-3, {approximately}4.5, {approximately}5.5, and 6-6.5, respectively. The leachability of ARD treatment sludges is determined by the final pH of the leachate. A higher neutralization potential (e.g., a greater content of unreacted neutralizing agent) makes sludges inherently more chemically stable. Thus, when ARD or any acidic metalliferous wastewater is treated, a choice must be made between efficient reagent use and resistance to acid attack. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Atmospheric Implications of Aqueous Solvation on the Photochemistry of Pyruvic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed Harris, A. E.; Ervens, B.; Shoemaker, R.; Kroll, J. A.; Rapf, R.; Griffith, E. C.; Monod, A.; Vaida, V.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of aerosol from organic compounds is under investigation in order to better predict the overall radiative forcing from atmospheric aerosols and their influence on global climate. One possible formation pathway for secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which is now becoming more widely accepted, is from bulk aqueous photoreactions in atmospheric particles that create low volatility compounds. These products may remain particulate upon droplet evaporation, increasing SOA mass in the atmosphere. SOA formed in this manner may account for some of the discrepancy between measured and predicted amounts of SOA. This presentation will describe the photochemistry of pyruvic acid, an α-keto acid found in the atmosphere, in aqueous solutions representative of solutes in fogs, clouds, and wet aerosols. Solvation of pyruvic acid in water changes the photodissociation mechanism and products from that of the gas phase. The photoproducts from the aqueous phase are higher in molecular weight and therefore possible SOA precursors. Further, these polymers partition to the surface of water and are expected to modify the the surface properties of atmospheric aerosols that determine the kinetics of water uptake. The reaction mechanism of pyruvic acid as a function of its environment and concentration will be presented along with the kinetics obtained for the photochemistry in aqueous solution. These results are used as input in an atmospheric model to evaluate the atmospheric consequences of solvation of pyruvic acid on its atmospheric reactivity and its role as a global sink.

  2. Meteoritic Input of Amino Acids and Nucleobases: Methodology and Implications for the Origins of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    The discoveries of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in many meteorites over the last 40 years have revolutionized the Astrobiology field. A variety of non-terrestrial amino acids similar to those found in life on Earth have been detected in meteorites. A few amino acids have even been found with chiral excesses, suggesting that meteorites could have contributed to the origin of homochirality in life on Earth. In addition to amino acids, which have been productively studied for years, sugar-like molecules, activated phosphates, and nucleobases have also been determined to be indigenous to numerous meteorites. Because these molecules are essential for life as we know it, and meteorites have been delivering them to the Earth since accretion, it is plausible that the origin(s) of life on Earth were aided by extraterrestrially-synthesized molecules. Understanding the origins of life on Earth guides our search for life elsewhere, helping to answer the question of whether biology is unique to Earth. This tutorial review focuses on meteoritic amino acids and nucleobases, exploring modern analytical methods and possible formation mechanisms. We will also discuss the unique window that meteorites provide into the chemistry that preceded life on Earth, a chemical record we do not have access to on Earth due to geologic recycling of rocks and the pervasiveness of biology across the planet. Finally, we will address the future of meteorite research, including asteroid sample return mIssIons.

  3. Nicotinic acid receptor abnormalities in human skin cancer: implications for a role in epidermal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yira Bermudez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic UV skin exposure leads to epidermal differentiation defects in humans that can be largely restored by pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid. Nicotinic acid has been identified as a ligand for the human G-protein-coupled receptors GPR109A and GPR109B that signal through G(i-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. We have examined the expression, cellular distribution, and functionality of GPR109A/B in human skin and skin derived epidermal cells. RESULTS: Nicotinic acid increases epidermal differentiation in photodamaged human skin as judged by the terminal differentiation markers caspase 14 and filaggrin. Both GPR109A and GPR109B genes are transcribed in human skin and in epidermal keratinocytes, but expression in dermal fibroblasts is below limits of detection. Receptor transcripts are greatly over-expressed in squamous cell cancers. Receptor protein in normal skin is prominent from the basal through granular layers of the epidermis, with cellular localization more dispersive in the basal layer but predominantly localized at the plasma membrane in more differentiated epidermal layers. In normal human primary and immortalized keratinocytes, nicotinic acid receptors show plasma membrane localization and functional G(i-mediated signaling. In contrast, in a squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line, receptor protein shows a more diffuse cellular localization and the receptors are nearly non-functional. CONCLUSIONS: The results of these studies justify future genetic and pharmacological intervention studies to define possible specific role(s of nicotinic acid receptors in human skin homeostasis.

  4. Amino acid composition analysis of human secondary transport proteins and implications for reliable membrane topology prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidijam, Massoud; Azizpour, Sonia; Patching, Simon G

    2016-07-08

    Secondary transporters in humans are a large group of proteins that transport a wide range of ions, metals, organic and inorganic solutes involved in energy transduction, control of membrane potential and osmotic balance, metabolic processes and in the absorption or efflux of drugs and xenobiotics. They are also emerging as important targets for development of new drugs and as target sites for drug delivery to specific organs or tissues. We have performed amino acid composition (AAC) and phylogenetic analyses and membrane topology predictions for 336 human secondary transport proteins and used the results to confirm protein classification and to look for trends and correlations with structural domains and specific substrates and/or function. Some proteins showed statistically high contents of individual amino acids or of groups of amino acids with similar physicochemical properties. One recurring trend was a correlation between high contents of charged and/or polar residues with misleading results in predictions of membrane topology, which was especially prevalent in Mitochondrial Carrier family proteins. We demonstrate how charged or polar residues located in the middle of transmembrane helices can interfere with their identification by membrane topology tools resulting in missed helices in the prediction. Comparison of AAC in the human proteins with that in 235 secondary transport proteins from Escherichia coli revealed similar overall trends along with differences in average contents for some individual amino acids and groups of similar amino acids that are presumed to result from a greater number of functions and complexity in the higher organism.

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids: a review of the effects on adiponectin and leptin and potential implications for obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B; Steyn, F; Davies, P S W; Vitetta, L

    2013-12-01

    An increase in adiposity is associated with altered levels of biologically active proteins. These include the hormones adiponectin and leptin. The marked change in circulating concentrations of these hormones in obesity has been associated with the development of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Variations in dietary lipid consumption have also been shown to impact obesity. Specifically, omega-3 fatty acids have been correlated with the prevention of obesity and subsequent development of chronic disease sequalae. This review explores animal and human data relating to the effects of omega-3 fatty acids (marine lipids) on adiponectin and leptin, considering plausible mechanisms and potential implications for obesity management. Current evidence suggests a positive, dose-dependent relationship between omega-3 fatty acid intake and circulating levels of adiponectin. In obese subjects, this may translate into a reduced risk of developing cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In non-obese subjects, omega-3 is observed to decrease circulating levels of leptin; however, omega-3-associated increases in leptin levels have been observed in obese subjects. This may pose benefits in the prevention of weight regain in these subjects following calorie restriction.

  6. Marine omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids: From mechanisms to clinical implications in heart failure and arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, Tobias; Alter, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Therapeutic implications of marine omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) in cardiovascular disease are still discussed controversially. Several clinical trials report divergent findings and thus leave ambiguity on the meaning of oral omega-3 therapy. Potential prognostic indications of HUFA treatment have been predominantly studied in coronary artery disease, sudden cardiac death, ventricular arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation and heart failure of various origin. It is suspected that increased ventricular wall stress is crucially involved in the prognosis of heart failure. Increased wall stress and an unfavorable myocardial remodeling is associated with an increased risk of arrhythmias by stretch-activated membrane ion channels. Integration of HUFA into the microenvironment of cardiomyocyte ion channels lead to allosteric changes and increase the electrical stability. Increased ventricular wall stress appears to be involved in the local myocardial as well as in the hepatic fatty acid metabolism, i.e. a cardio-hepatic syndrome. Influences of an altered endogenous HUFA metabolism and an inverse shift of the fatty acid profile was underrated in the past. A better understanding of these interacting endogenous mechanisms appears to be required for interpreting the findings of recent experimental and clinical studies. The present article critically reviews major studies on basic pathophysiological mechanisms and treatment effects in clinical trials.

  7. Enteric short-chain fatty acids: microbial messengers of metabolism, mitochondria, and mind: implications in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick F. MacFabe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical observations suggest that gut and dietary factors transiently worsen and, in some cases, appear to improve behavioral symptoms in a subset of persons with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, but the reason for this is unclear. Emerging evidence suggests ASDs are a family of systemic disorders of altered immunity, metabolism, and gene expression. Pre- or perinatal infection, hospitalization, or early antibiotic exposure, which may alter gut microbiota, have been suggested as potential risk factors for ASD. Can a common environmental agent link these disparate findings? This review outlines basic science and clinical evidence that enteric short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, present in diet and also produced by opportunistic gut bacteria following fermentation of dietary carbohydrates, may be environmental triggers in ASD. Of note, propionic acid, a major SCFA produced by ASD-associated gastrointestinal bacteria (clostridia, bacteroides, desulfovibrio and also a common food preservative, can produce reversible behavioral, electrographic, neuroinflammatory, metabolic, and epigenetic changes closely resembling those found in ASD when administered to rodents. Major effects of these SCFAs may be through the alteration of mitochondrial function via the citric acid cycle and carnitine metabolism, or the epigenetic modulation of ASD-associated genes, which may be useful clinical biomarkers. It discusses the hypothesis that ASDs are produced by pre- or post-natal alterations in intestinal microbiota in sensitive sub-populations, which may have major implications in ASD cause, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  8. Proton transport in triflic acid hydrates studied via path integral car-parrinello molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Robin L; Paddison, Stephen J; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2009-12-31

    The mono-, di-, and tetrahydrates of trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, which contain characteristic H(3)O(+), H(5)O(2)(+), and H(9)O(4)(+) structures, provide model systems for understanding proton transport in materials with high perfluorosulfonic acid density such as perfluorosulfonic acid membranes commonly employed in hydrogen fuel cells. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that protons in these solids are predisposed to transfer to the water most strongly bound to sulfonate groups via a Grotthuss-type mechanism, but quickly return to the most solvated defect structure either due to the lack of a nearby species to stabilize the new defect or a preference for the proton to be maximally hydrated. Path integral molecular dynamics of the mono- and dihydrate reveal significant quantum effects that facilitate proton transfer to the "presolvated" water or SO(3)(-) in the first solvation shell and increase the Zundel character of all the defects. These trends are quantified in free energy profiles for each bonding environment. Hydrogen bonding criteria for HOH-OH(2) and HOH-O(3)S are extracted from the two-dimensional potential of mean force. The quantum radial distribution function, radius of gyration, and root-mean-square displacement position correlation function show that the protonic charge is distributed over two or more water molecules. Metastable structural defects with one excess proton shared between two sulfonate groups and another Zundel or Eigen type cation defect are found for the mono- and dihydrate but not for the tetrahydrate crystal. Results for the tetrahydrate native crystal exhibit minor differences at 210 and 250 K. IR spectra are calculated for all native and stable defect structures. Graph theory techniques are used to characterize the chain lengths and ring sizes in the hydrogen bond network. Low conductivities when limited water is present may be attributable to trapping of protons between SO(3)(-) groups and the increased

  9. A Review of Salam Phase Transition in Protein Amino Acids Implication for Biomolecular Homochirality

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, F; Bai, Fan; Wang, Wenqing

    2002-01-01

    The origin of chirality, closely related to the evolution of life on the earth, has long been debated. In 1991, Abdus Salam suggested a novel approach to achieve biomolecular homochirality by a phase transition. In his subsequent publication, he predicted that this phase transition could eventually change D-amino acids to L-amino acids as C -H bond would break and H atom became a superconductive atom. Since many experiments denied the configuration change in amino acids, Salam hypothesis aroused suspicion. This paper is aimed to provide direct experimental evidence of a phase transition in alanine, valine single crystals but deny the configuration change of D- to L- enantiomers. New views on Salam phase transition are presented to revalidate its great importance in the origin of homochirality.

  10. Nitrogen Deposition Via N+ Implantation:Implications for Primordial Amino Acids Synthesis Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; SHI Huaibin; WANG Xiangqin; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper amino acids synthesis in aqueous solution induced by ion implantation,which was possibly ubiquitous on primitive Earth,is investigated.As a discharge using a graphite rod as the anode under a nitrogen atmosphere was performed against ammonia water,it was found that three kinds of amino acids were produced.They were glycine,serine and alanine.By introducing ion implantation into the carboxylate solution,ammonia and amino acids were also formed via nitrogen deposition/fixation.Another isotopic experiment showed that both OH and H radicals played a crucial role in the arc-discharge-promoted reactions in aqueous solution Therefore,we believe that the impact of ions in the original atmospheric conditions might have functioned as a promoter in the chemical origin and evolution of life.

  11. Amino acid racemization in amber-entombed insects: implications for DNA preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bada, J. L.; Wang, X. S.; Poinar, H. N.; Paabo, S.; Poinar, G. O.

    1994-01-01

    DNA depurination and amino acid racemization take place at similar rates in aqueous solution at neutral pH. This relationship suggests that amino acid racemization may be useful in accessing the extent of DNA chain breakage in ancient biological remains. To test this suggestion, we have investigated the amino acids in insects entombed in fossilized tree resins ranging in age from 10(4). These results suggest that in amber insect inclusions DNA depurination rates would also likely be retarded in comparison to aqueous solution measurements, and thus DNA fragments containing many hundreds of base pairs should be preserved. This conclusion is consistent with the reported successful retrieval of DNA sequences from amber-entombed organisms.

  12. Atmospheric sulphuric acid and aerosol formation: implications from atmospheric measurements for nucleation and early growth mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the formation and early growth of atmospheric secondary aerosol particles building on atmospheric measurements. The measurements were part of the QUEST 2 campaign which took place in spring 2003 in Hyytiälä (Finland. During the campaign numerous aerosol particle formation events occurred of which 15 were accompanied by gaseous sulphuric acid measurements. Our detailed analysis of these 15 events is focussed on nucleation and early growth (to a diameter of 3 nm of fresh particles. It revealed that new particle formation seems to be a function of the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration to the power from one to two when the time delay between the sulphuric acid and particle number concentration is taken into account. From the time delay the growth rates of freshly nucleated particles from 1 nm to 3 nm were determined. The mean growth rate was 1.2 nm/h and it was clearly correlated with the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration. We tested two nucleation mechanisms – recently proposed cluster activation and kinetic type nucleation – as possible candidates to explain the observed dependences, and determined experimental nucleation coefficients. We found that some events are dominated by the activation mechanism and some by the kinetic mechanism. Inferred coefficients for the two nucleation mechanisms are the same order of magnitude as chemical reaction coefficients in the gas phase and they correlate with the product of gaseous sulphuric acid and ammonia concentrations. This indicates that besides gaseous sulphuric acid also ammonia has a role in nucleation.

  13. Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of

  14. Acid base activity of live bacteria: Implications for quantifying cell wall charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Jacqueline; van Lith, Yvonne; Laverman, Anniet M.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    To distinguish the buffering capacity associated with functional groups in the cell wall from that resulting from metabolic processes, base or acid consumption by live and dead cells of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens was measured in a pH stat system. Live cells exhibited fast consumption of acid (pH 4) or base (pH 7, 8, 9, and 10) during the first few minutes of the experiments. At pH 5.5, no acid or base was required to maintain the initial pH constant. The initial amounts of acid or base consumed by the live cells at pH 4, 8, and 10 were of comparable magnitudes as those neutralized at the same pHs by intact cells killed by exposure to gamma radiation or ethanol. Cells disrupted in a French press required higher amounts of acid or base, due to additional buffering by intracellular constituents. At pH 4, acid neutralization by suspensions of live cells stopped after 50 min, because of loss of viability. In contrast, under neutral and alkaline conditions, base consumption continued for the entire duration of the experiments (5 h). This long-term base neutralization was, at least partly, due to active respiration by the cells, as indicated by the build-up of succinate in solution. Qualitatively, the acid-base activity of live cells of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis resembled that of S. putrefaciens. The pH-dependent charging of ionizable functional groups in the cell walls of the live bacteria was estimated from the initial amounts of acid or base consumed in the pH stat experiments. From pH 4 to 10, the cell wall charge increased from near-zero values to about -4 × 10 -16 mol cell -1 and -6.5 × 10 -16 mol cell -1 for S. putrefaciens and B. subtilis, respectively. The similar cell wall charging of the two bacterial strains is consistent with the inferred low contribution of lipopolysaccharides to the buffering capacity of the Gram-negative cell wall (of the order of 10%).

  15. Recent Advances in Nucleic Acid Binding Aspects of Berberine Analogs and Implications for Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Debipreeta; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is one of the most widely known alkaloids belonging to the protoberberine group exhibiting myriad therapeutic properties. The anticancer potency of berberine appears to derive from its multiple actions including strong interaction with nucleic acids exhibiting adenine-thymine base pair specificity, inhibition of the enzymes topoisomerases and telomerases, and stabilizing the quadruplex structures. It was realized that the development of berberine as a potential anticancer agent necessitates enhancing its nucleic acid binding efficacy through appropriate structural modifications. More recently a number of such approaches have been attempted in various laboratories with great success. Several derivatives have been synthesized mostly with substitutions at the 8, 9 and 13 positions of the isoquinoline chromophore, and studied for enhanced nucleic acid binding activity. In this article, we present an up to date review of the details of the interaction of berberine and several of its important synthetic 8, 9 and 13 substituted derivatives with various nucleic acid structures reported recently. These studies provide interesting knowledge on the mode, mechanism, sequence and structural specificity of the binding of berberine derivatives and correlate structural and energetic aspects of the interaction providing better understanding of the structure- activity relations for designing and development of berberine based therapeutic agents with higher efficacy and therapeutic potential.

  16. Bioavailability of xenobiotics in unsaturated soils – implications for nucleic acid based stable isotope probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of stable isotopes to label phylogenetically informative biomolecules (phospholipid fatty acids, DNA, or RNA), typically referred to as stable isotope probing (SIP) has the potential of providing definitive evidence that a detected population is active in a specific process, if that process ...

  17. The acid-base profile of a contemporary set of drugs: implications for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manallack, D T

    2009-10-01

    Acid-base ionization constant (pK(a)) values have considerable influence on the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of therapeutic substances. A set of 907 drugs was examined to determine the proportion of drugs that contain an ionizable group and the distribution of their pK(a) values. Using this contemporary set of compounds it was found that 64% of these compounds contained an ionizable group. Within this group of ionizable compounds, 34% contained a single basic group while only 20% contained a single acidic functional group. The single acid and single base containing substances were investigated further to examine the distributions of their pK(a) values. These data are discussed and analyzed with a focus on the entire set as well as central nervous system, non-central nervous system and oral drugs. The findings from this research will prompt pharmaceutical companies to assess the constitution of their screening libraries, such that focus is placed on the proportion of ionizable substances, the ratio of acids to bases and the distribution of pK(a) values.

  18. Chikusetsu saponin IVa regulates glucose uptake and fatty acid oxidation: implications in antihyperglycemic and hypolipidemic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwen; Zhang, Tiejun; Cui, Jia; Jia, Na; Wu, Yin; Xi, Miaomiao; Wen, Aidong

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate antidiabetic effects and molecular mechanisms of the chemical Chikusetsu saponin IVa (CHS) that isolated from root bark of Aralia taibaiensis, which has multiple pharmacological activity, such as relieving rheumatism, promoting blood circulation to arrest pain and antidiabetic action. Rats with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and insulin-resistant myocytes were used. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were quantified by immunoblotting. Assays of glucose uptake, fatty acid oxidation, glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1) activity were performed. Chronic oral administration of CHS effectively decreases blood glucose, triglyceride, free fatty acid (FFA) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels in T2DM rats. In both normal and insulin-resistant C2C12 myocytes, CHS activates AMPK, and increases glucose uptake or fatty acid oxidation through enhancing membrane translocation of GLUT4 or CPT-1 activity respectively. Knockdown of AMPK significantly diminishes the effects of CHS on glucose uptake and fatty acid oxidation. CHS is a novel AMPK activator that is capable of bypassing defective insulin signalling and could be useful for the treatment of T2DM or other metabolic disorders. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. Volatile disinfection byproducts resulting from chlorination of uric acid: implications for swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Lushi; E, Yue; Li, Jing; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2014-03-18

    Cyanogen chloride (CNCl) and trichloramine (NCl3) are important disinfection byproducts in chlorinated swimming pools. However, some unknowns exist regarding the precursors of their formation. In this study, uric acid is shown to be an efficient precursor to formation of CNCl and NCl3. The molar yields of CNCl and NCl3 were observed to be as high as 44% (pH = 6.0, chlorine/precursor molar ratio [Cl/P] = 6.4) and 108% (pH = 7.0, Cl/P = 30), respectively, both being strong functions of Cl/P, pH, and temperature. Analysis of swimming pool water samples, combined with the results of experiments involving chlorination of uric acid, and chlorination of body fluid analog mixtures, indicated that uric acid chlorination may account for a large fraction of CNCl formation in swimming pools. Moreover, given that uric acid introduction to pools is attributable to urination, a voluntary action for most swimmers, these findings indicate important benefits to pool water and air chemistry that could result from improved hygiene habits on the part of swimmers.

  20. Nutritional implications of trans fatty acids during perinatal period, in French pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boue Carole

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Some studies have demonstrated the transfer of trans fatty acids (TFA across the human placenta. It was suggested that TFA might disturb the metabolism of essential fatty acids (EFA in fetus and consequently might affect intrauterine human growth more or less according to the TFA intake level of the mother. In this context, the objective of this study was to assess, for French pregnant women, possible impact of their TFA intake on parameters of their term infants: 1/ TFA composition of the umbilical cord (plasma lipids and parietal phospholipids, 2/ birth weight and head circumference. The TFA composition of maternal and umbilical plasma lipids, and parietal phospholipids of umbilical cord were determined by gas chromatography, associated with a thin-layer chromatography for the phospholipids. Because TFA content of adipose tissue is a reliable biochemical indicator of the usual TFA intake level, maternal adipose tissue was also analyzed. Trans fatty acid (TFA percentage was significantly higher (p = 0.001 in maternal (0.9% of total fatty acids than in umbilical plasma total lipids (0.6% thus confirming their placental passage. Moreover, trans isomer pattern of cord plasma lipids was different from the maternal’s one, especially regarding trans isomers of linoleic acid (9c,12c-18:2. Percentage values of 9c,13t + 9t,12t and 9t,12c isomers were respectively, 2 and 3 times higher (p < 0.001 in umbilical than in maternal plasma (Except trans 16:1 acids. All trans isomers observed in umbilical plasma lipids were detected in both parietal and vessel (vein and arteries phospholipids of umbilical cord. Nevertheless, 9c13t + 9t12t isomer mix level was significantly higher (p < 0.001 in artery than in vein TPL. Moreover, in artery TPL, percentage value of 9c13t+9t12t isomer mix was inversely correlated (r = - 0.703, p = 0.003 with arachidonic acid content. Nevertheless, for this French population, there was no relation between either weight or head

  1. Surface modification of mineral dust particles by sulphuric acid processing: implications for CCN and IN abilities

    OpenAIRE

    P. Reitz; C. Spindler; T. F. Mentel; Poulain, L.; H. Wex; K. Mildenberger; D. Niedermeier; Hartmann, S.; T. Clauss; F. Stratmann; R. C. Sullivan; Demott, P. J.; Petters, M. D.; Sierau, B.; Schneider, J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of coated mineral dust particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) was investigated at LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator) during the FROST1- and FROST2-campaigns (Freezing of dust). Sulphuric acid was condensed on the particles which afterwards were optionally humidified, treated with ammonia vapour and/or heat. By means of aerosol mass spectrometry we found evidence that processi...

  2. Surface modification of mineral dust particles by sulphuric acid processing: implications for ice nucleation abilities

    OpenAIRE

    P. Reitz; C. Spindler; T. F. Mentel; Poulain, L.; H. Wex; K. Mildenberger; D. Niedermeier; Hartmann, S.; T. Clauss; F. Stratmann; R. C. Sullivan; Demott, P. J.; Petters, M. D.; Sierau, B.; Schneider, J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of coated mineral dust particles to act as ice nuclei (IN) was investigated at LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator) during the FROST1- and FROST2-campaigns (Freezing of dust). Sulphuric acid was condensed on the particles which afterwards were optionally humidified, treated with ammonia vapour and/or heat. By means of aerosol mass spectrometry we found evidence that processing of mineral dust particles with su...

  3. Sulfate Mineral Formation from Acid-Weathered Phyllosilicates: Implications for the Aqueous History of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, P. I.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars are thought to have formed under neutral to alkaline conditions during Mars' earliest Noachian geologic era (approx. 4.1-3.7 Gya). Sulfate formation, on the other hand, requires more acidic conditions which are thought to have occurred later during Mars' Hesperian era (approx. 3.7-3.0 Gya). Therefore, regions on Mars where phyllosilicates and sulfates are found in close proximity to each other provide evidence for the geologic and aqueous conditions during this global transition. Both phyllosilicates and sulfates form in the presence of water and thus give clues to the aqueous history of Mars and its potential for habitability. Phyllosilicates that formed during the Noachian era may have been weathered by the prevailing acidic conditions that characterize the Hesperian. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to characterize the alteration products resulting from acid-sulfate weathered phyllosilicates in laboratory experiments. This study focuses on two phyllosilicates commonly identified with sulfates on Mars: nontronite and saponite. We also compare our results to observations of phyllosilicates and sulfates on Mars to better understand the formation process of sulfates in close proximity to phyllosilicates on Mars and constrain the aqueous conditions of these regions on Mars.

  4. The implication of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in retinal physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acar Niyazi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal tissues such as the retina and the brain are characterized by their high content in phospholipids. In the retina, phospholipids can account for until 80% of total lipids and are mainly composed by species belonging to phosphatidyl-choline and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine sub-classes. Within fatty acids esterified on retinal phospholipids, omega-3 PUFAs are major components since docosahexaenoic acid (DHA can represent until 50% of total fatty acids in the photoreceptor outer segments. For long time, DHA is known to play a major role in membrane function and subsequently in visual processes by affecting permeability, fluidity, thickness and the activation of membrane-bound proteins. Today, more and more studies show that PUFAs from the omega-3 series may also operate as protective factors in retinal vascular and immuno-regulatory processes, in maintaining the physiologic redox balance and in cell survival. They may operate within complex systems involving eicosanoids, angiogenic factors, inflammatory factors and matrix metalloproteinases. This new and emerging concept based on the interrelationship of omega-3 PUFAs with neural and vascular structure and function appears to be essential when considering retinal diseases of public health significance such as age-related macular degeneration.

  5. Branched chain fatty acid content of United States retail cow's milk and implications for dietary intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran-Ressler, R R; Sim, D; O'Donnell-Megaro, A M; Bauman, D E; Barbano, D M; Brenna, J T

    2011-07-01

    Branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) have recently been shown to be a major component of the normal human newborn gastrointestinal tract and have long been known to be a component of human milk. Ruminant food products are major sources of fat in the American diet, but there are no studies of milkfat BCFA content in retail milk. We report here the profile and concentrations of BCFA in a representative sampling of retail milk in the 48 contiguous United States (US), and their estimated intake in the American diet. Conventionally produced whole fluid milk samples were obtained from 56 processing plants across the contiguous 48 states. Retail milk samples contain exclusively iso- and anteiso-BCFA with 14-18 carbons. BCFA were 2.05 ± 0.14%, w/w of milkfat fatty acids (mean ± SD), and anteiso-BCFA comprised more than half this total. Based on these data and USDA food availability data, the average per capita BCFA intake of Americans is estimated to be about 220 mg/d from dairy; if current dietary recommendations were followed, BCFA intake would be about 400 mg/d. Adding intake from beef consumption, these estimates rise to approximately 400 and 575 mg/d, respectively. These results indicate that BCFA intake is a substantial fraction of daily fat intake, in amounts exceeding those of many bioactive fatty acids.

  6. Colloidal behavior of goethite nanoparticles modified with humic acid and implications for aquifer reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Saldarriaga Hernandez, Laura Andrea; Bianco, Carlo; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2017-03-01

    Nanosized colloids of iron oxide adsorb heavy metals, enhance the biodegradation of contaminants, and represent a promising technology to clean up contaminated aquifers. Goethite particles for aquifer reclamation were recently synthesized with a coating of humic acids to reduce aggregation. This study investigates the stability and the mobility in porous media of this material as a function of aqueous chemistry, and it identifies the best practices to maximize the efficacy of the related remediation. Humic acid-coated nanogoethite (hydrodynamic diameter ˜90 nm) displays high stability in solutions of NaCl, consistent with effective electrosteric stabilization. However, particle aggregation is fast when calcium is present and, to a lesser extent, also in the presence of magnesium. This result is rationalized with complexation phenomena related to the interaction of divalent cations with humic acid, inducing rapid flocculation and sedimentation of the suspensions. The calcium dose, i.e., the amount of calcium ions with respect to solids in the dispersion, is the parameter governing stability. Therefore, more concentrated slurries may be more stable and mobile in the subsurface than dispersions of low particle concentration. Particle concentration during field injection should be thus chosen based on concentration and proportion of divalent cations in groundwater.

  7. Expression of D-myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase in soybean. Implications for phytic acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegeman, C E; Good, L L; Grabau, E A

    2001-04-01

    Phytic acid, a phosphorylated derivative of myo-inositol, functions as the major storage form of phosphorus in plant seeds. Myo-inositol phosphates, including phytic acid, play diverse roles in plants as signal transduction molecules, osmoprotectants, and cell wall constituents. D-myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS EC 5.5.1.4) catalyzes the first step in de novo synthesis of myo-inositol. A soybean (Glycine max) MIPS cDNA (GmMIPS1) was isolated by reverse transcriptase-PCR using consensus primers designed from highly conserved regions in other plant MIPS sequences. Southern-blot analysis and database searches indicated the presence of at least four MIPS genes in the soybean genome. Northern-blot and immunoblot analyses indicated higher MIPS expression and accumulation in immature seeds than in other soybean tissues. MIPS was expressed early in the cotyledonary stage of seed development. The GmMIPS1 expression pattern suggested that it encodes a MIPS isoform that functions in seeds to generate D-myo-inositol-3-phosphate as a substrate for phytic acid biosynthesis.

  8. Two-Component Regulatory Systems – implication in the quorum sensing mechanisms and bacteriocin production in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia–Mara Ditu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For lactic acid bacteria, the mechanisms of quorum sensing and response are mediated by peptides or pheromones that interfere with the synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AMP called bacteriocins, when these molecules reach a certain critical level of concentration. Generally, the synthesis and activity of pheromones is adjusted by means of a two-component regulatory system. The observation that some microorganisms, in particular lactic acid bacteria, produce bacteriocins according to the cell density, has led to the discovery of the involvement of QS mechanisms in the synthesis of these peptides. Bacteriocins synthesis is inducible, the process requiring the extracellular accumulation of peptides that functions as chemical messengers activators of bacteriocins synthesis. This minireview presents the molecular architecture and functions of two-component regulatory systems and ABC transporters implicated in the synthesis and secretion of nisin, one of the most studied bacteriocin. The elucidation of the intimate mechanisms of bacteriocins synthesis is equally of biotechnological and medical importance, opening interesting perspectives for the development of improved technologies for the production of bacteriocins with good yields, and also, for increasing the beneficial anti-infective roles of probiotic bacteria when administered in vivo.

  9. Inositol phosphates compete with nucleic acids for binding to bovine leukemia virus matrix protein: implications for deltaretroviral assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualley, Dominic F; Lackey, Crystal M; Paterson, Justin P

    2013-08-01

    The matrix (MA) domain of retroviral Gag proteins plays a crucial role in virion assembly. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a lentivirus, the presence of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate triggers a conformational change allowing the MA domain to bind the plasma membrane (PM). In this study, the MA protein from bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was used to investigate the mechanism of viral Gag binding to the membrane during replication of a deltaretrovirus. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the binding affinity of MA for two RNA constructs derived from the BLV genome as well as for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The importance of electrostatic interactions and the ability of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) to compete with nucleic acids for binding to MA were also investigated. Our data show that IP6 effectively competes with RNA and DNA for BLV MA binding, while [NaCl] of greater than 100 mM is required to produce any observable effect on DNA-MA binding. These results suggest that BLV assembly may be highly dependent on the specific interaction of the MA domain with components of the PM, as observed previously with HIV-1. The mode of MA binding to nucleic acids and the implications for BLV assembly are discussed.

  10. Short-chain fatty acid fermentation products of the gut microbiome: implications in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick F. MacFabe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests potential, but unproven, links between dietary, metabolic, infective, and gastrointestinal factors and the behavioral exacerbations and remissions of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. Propionic acid (PPA and its related short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs are fermentation products of ASD-associated bacteria (Clostridia, Bacteriodetes, Desulfovibrio. SCFAs represent a group of compounds derived from the host microbiome that are plausibly linked to ASDs and can induce widespread effects on gut, brain, and behavior. Intraventricular administration of PPA and SCFAs in rats induces abnormal motor movements, repetitive interests, electrographic changes, cognitive deficits, perseveration, and impaired social interactions. The brain tissue of PPA-treated rats shows a number of ASD-linked neurochemical changes, including innate neuroinflammation, increased oxidative stress, glutathione depletion, and altered phospholipid/acylcarnitine profiles. These directly or indirectly contribute to acquired mitochondrial dysfunction via impairment in carnitine-dependent pathways, consistent with findings in patients with ASDs. Of note, common antibiotics may impair carnitine-dependent processes by altering gut flora favoring PPA-producing bacteria and by directly inhibiting carnitine transport across the gut. Human populations that are partial metabolizers of PPA are more common than previously thought. PPA has further bioactive effects on neurotransmitter systems, intracellular acidification/calcium release, fatty acid metabolism, gap junction gating, immune function, and alteration of gene expression that warrant further exploration. These findings are consistent with the symptoms and proposed underlying mechanisms of ASDs and support the use of PPA infusions in rats as a valid animal model of the condition. Collectively, this offers further support that gut-derived factors, such as dietary or enteric bacterially produced SCFAs, may be plausible

  11. Acidic mammalian chitinase and the eye: implications for ocular inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eBucolo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Chitinases have an important role in the defence of organisms against chitin containing parasites. An acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase has been detected in epithelial cells in lung tissue samples taken from patients with asthma as well as in conjunctival epithelium of patients with inflammatory ocular diseases. Particularly, elevated AMCase activity has been observed in ocular tissues of patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis, seasonal allergic conjunctivitis, and in patients affected by dry eye syndrome. This enzyme is induced via a TH2-specific, IL-13-dependent pathway. AMCase may thus be a key mediator of IL-13-induced responses in TH2-driven inflammatory ocular diseases.

  12. Distinct roles of specific fatty acids in cellular processes: implications for interpreting and reporting experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, Matthew J.; Hoy, Andrew J.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma contains a variety of long-chain fatty acids (FAs), such that about 35% are saturated and 65% are unsaturated. There are countless examples that show how different FAs impart specific and unique effects, or even opposing actions, on cellular function. Despite these differing effects, palmitate (C16:0) is regularly used to represent “FAs” in cell based experiments. Although palmitate can be useful to induce and study stress effects in cultured cells, these effects in isolation are not p...

  13. Acid-base and electrolyte abnormalities in heart failure: pathophysiology and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, Caterina; Brucculeri, Salvatore; Caimi, Gregorio

    2015-07-01

    Electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities are a frequent and potentially dangerous complication in subjects with congestive heart failure. This may be due either to the pathophysiological alterations present in the heart failure state leading to neurohumoral activation (stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathoadrenergic stimulation), or to the adverse events of therapy with diuretics, cardiac glycosides, and ACE inhibitors. Subjects with heart failure may show hyponatremia, magnesium, and potassium deficiencies; the latter two play a pivotal role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias. The early identification of these alterations and the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms are very useful for the management of these patients.

  14. Freezing of sulfuric and nitric acid solutions: Implications for polar stratospheric cloud formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo Gonzalez, Dara

    2000-12-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) play an important role in ozone chemistry during the polar winter. The magnitude of their effect depends on their phase, composition and formation mechanism, which are not fully understood yet. In order to understand how liquid PSCs freeze, two apparatus were designed to study the freezing behavior of small drops using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and an optical microscope. Sulfuric acid aqueous drops with composition of 10 to 50 wt % were studied with the FTIR apparatus. The surface on which the drops stand caused heterogeneous nucleation of ice, but not of the sulfuric acid hydrates. The more concentrated solutions (>40 wt %) supercooled to 130 K without freezing. Below 150 K these solutions formed an amorphous solid, which liquefied upon warming. Drops with composition of 40 to 64 wt % HNO3 were prepared and their phase transitions were detected with the optical microscope apparatus. Freezing temperatures of the drops were determined and homogeneous nucleation rates of nitric acid dihydrate (JNAD) and nitric acid trihydrate (JNAT) between 170 and 190 K were calculated. JNAT and JNAD depend predominantly on the saturation of the solid in the liquid solution: higher saturation ratios correspond to higher nucleation rates. Classical nucleation theory was used to parameterize this relation. Since the saturation ratios of NAD and NAT vary with temperature and composition in different ways, NAT or NAD can form preferentially under different conditions. Evidence was found that NAD catalyzes the nucleation of NAT below ~183 K. Mullite, cristobalite and alumina were tested as possible heterogeneous nuclei of volcanic origin for PSCs. They catalyze freezing of NAD and NAT at temperatures below 179 K, which are too low to be stratospherically important. The results suggest that the largest drops in a PSC will freeze homogeneously if the stratospheric temperature remains below the NAT condensation temperature for more

  15. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zahardis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS: the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the commonly observed aldehyde and organic acid products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal is described. The relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide oligomers and polymers, and their formation is in accord with solution and liquid-phase ozonolysis. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, the main atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids are presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semi-solids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas-phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that

  16. Does aging change docosahexaenoic acid homeostasis? Implications for the challenge to cognitive health in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellano Christian-Alexandre

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies fairly convincingly suggest that higher intake of fish and omega-3 fatty acids present in fish is associated with reduced risk for age-related cognitive decline (ARCD. Normally, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in plasma is positively associated with DHA intake. However, despite being associated with lower fish and DHA intake, unexpectedly, ARCD is not consistently associated with lower plasma DHA. Furthermore, DHA is often slightly but significantly higher in plasma and erythrocytes in the elderly without ARCD compared to young adults. Higher plasma DHA in the elderly may be a sign that their fish or DHA intake is higher but we show here that various aspects of DHA homeostasis also change with age. Our supplementation and tracer studies show that DHA metabolism, e.g. transit through the plasma and apparent retroconversion but not beta-oxidation, is different in healthy elderly compared to healthy young adults. Apolipoprotein E4 increases the risk of ARCD, possibly in part because it changes DHA homeostasis. Therefore, independent of differences in fish intake, changing DHA homeostasis may contribute to making the elderly more susceptible to cognitive decline despite them having similar or sometimes higher plasma DHA than in younger adults.

  17. Branched-chain amino acids and ammonia metabolism in liver disease: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The rationale for recommendation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) in treatment of liver failure is based on their unique pharmacologic properties, stimulatory effect on ammonia detoxification to glutamine (GLN), and decreased concentrations in liver cirrhosis. Multiple lines of evidence have shown that the main cause of the BCAA deficiency in liver cirrhosis is their consumption in skeletal muscle for synthesis of glutamate, which acts as a substrate for ammonia detoxification to GLN and that the BCAA administration to patients with liver failure may exert a number of positive effects that may be more pronounced in patients with marked depression of BCAA levels. On the other hand, due to the stimulatory effect of BCAA on GLN synthesis, BCAA supplementation may lead to enhanced ammonia production from GLN breakdown in the intestine and the kidneys and thus exert harmful effects on the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, to enhance therapeutic effectiveness of the BCAA in patients with liver injury, their detrimental effect on ammonia production, which is negligible in healthy people and/or patients with other disorders, should be avoided. In treatment of hepatic encephalopathy, simultaneous administration of the BCAA (to correct amino acid imbalance and promote ammonia detoxification to GLN) with α-ketoglutarate (to inhibit GLN breakdown to ammonia in enterocytes) and/or phenylbutyrate (to enhance GLN excretion by the kidneys) is suggested. Attention should be given to the type of liver injury, gastrointestinal bleeding, signs of inflammation, and the dose of BCAA.

  18. Effect of quinolinic acid on human astrocytes morphology and functions: implications in Alzheimer's disease

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    Brew Bruce J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QUIN is synthesized through the kynurenine pathway (KP by activated monocyte lineage cells. QUIN is likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of several major neuroinflammatory diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD. The presence of reactive astrocytes, astrogliosis, increased oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines are important pathological hallmarks of AD. We assessed the stimulatory effects of QUIN at low physiological to high excitotoxic concentrations in comparison with the cytokines commonly associated with AD including IFN-γ and TNF-α on primary human astrocytes. We found that QUIN induces IL-1β expression, a key mediator in AD pathogenesis, in human astrocytes. We also explored the effect of QUIN on astrocyte morphology and functions. At low concentrations, QUIN treatment induced concomitantly a marked increase in glial fibrillary acid protein levels and reduction in vimentin levels compared to controls; features consistent with astrogliosis. At pathophysiological concentrations QUIN induced a switch between structural protein expressions in a dose dependent manner, increasing VIM and concomitantly decreasing GFAP expression. Glutamine synthetase (GS activity was used as a functional metabolic test for astrocytes. We found a significant dose-dependent reduction in GS activity following QUIN treatment. All together, this study showed that QUIN is an important factor for astroglial activation, dysregulation and cell death with potential relevance to AD and other neuroinflammatory diseases.

  19. Boric acid permeation in forward osmosis membrane processes: modeling, experiments, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xue; Tang, Chuyang Y; Gu, Yangshuo; She, Qianhong; Qi, Saren

    2011-03-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) is attracting increasing interest for its potential applications in desalination. In FO, permeation of contaminants from feed solution into draw solution through the semipermeable membrane can take place simultaneously with water diffusion. Understanding the contaminants transport through and rejection by FO membrane has significant technical implications in the way to separate clean water from the diluted draw solution. In this study, a model was developed to predict boron flux in FO operation. A strong agreement between modeling results and experimental data indicates that the model developed in this study can accurately predict the boron transport through FO membranes. Furthermore, the model can guide the fabrication of improved FO membranes with decreased boron permeability and structural parameter to minimize boron flux. Both theoretical model and experimental results demonstrated that when membrane active layer was facing draw solution, boron flux was substantially greater compared to the other membrane orientation due to more severe internal concentration polarization. In this investigation, for the first time, rejection of contaminants was defined in FO processes. This is critical to compare the membrane performance between different membranes and experimental conditions.

  20. Quantitative nucleic acid amplification methods and their implications in clinical virology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mini P; Galhotra, Shipra; Saigal, Karnika; Kumar, Archit; Ratho, Radha Kanta

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a number of techniques have been approved for quantification of viral nucleic acids in clinical samples. Viral load (VL) tests have considerable importance in the management of patients and are widely used in routine diagnosis. In clinical virology, VL testing are important to monitor the antiviral treatment, to initiate preemptive therapy, to understand pathogenesis, and to evaluate the infectivity. These tests have now become a part of many diagnostic and treatment guidelines. Considering the various challenges for in-house viral testing related to the standardization, validation, and precision; they are gradually being replaced by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) cleared tests. This review summarizes the various viral quantification methods and also discusses the clinical applicability of these in human immunodeficiency virus, Hepatitis B virus, Hepatitis C virus, Cytomegalovirus, and Epstein Barr virus infected patients. Further the challenges and future perspectives of VL testing have also been discussed.

  1. Quantitative nucleic acid amplification methods and their implications in clinical virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mini P; Galhotra, Shipra; Saigal, Karnika; Kumar, Archit; Ratho, Radha Kanta

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a number of techniques have been approved for quantification of viral nucleic acids in clinical samples. Viral load (VL) tests have considerable importance in the management of patients and are widely used in routine diagnosis. In clinical virology, VL testing are important to monitor the antiviral treatment, to initiate preemptive therapy, to understand pathogenesis, and to evaluate the infectivity. These tests have now become a part of many diagnostic and treatment guidelines. Considering the various challenges for in-house viral testing related to the standardization, validation, and precision; they are gradually being replaced by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) cleared tests. This review summarizes the various viral quantification methods and also discusses the clinical applicability of these in human immunodeficiency virus, Hepatitis B virus, Hepatitis C virus, Cytomegalovirus, and Epstein Barr virus infected patients. Further the challenges and future perspectives of VL testing have also been discussed.

  2. Modeling of peptides containing D-amino acids: implications on cyclization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongye, Austin B.; Li, Yangmei; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Yu, Yongping; Houghten, Richard A.; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina

    2009-09-01

    Cyclic peptides are therapeutically attractive due to their high bioavailability, potential selectivity, and scaffold novelty. Furthermore, the presence of D-residues induces conformational preferences not followed by peptides consisting of naturally abundant L-residues. Therefore, comprehending how amino acids induce turns in peptides, subsequently facilitating cyclization, is significant in peptide design. Here, we performed 20-ns explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations for three diastereomeric peptides with stereochemistries: LLLLL, LLLDL, and LDLDL. Experimentally LLLLL and LDLDL readily cyclize, whereas LLLDL cyclizes in low yield. Simulations at 310 K produced conformations with inter-terminal hydrogen bonds that correlated qualitatively with the experimental cyclization trend. Energies obtained for representative structures from quantum chemical (B3LYP/PCM/cc-pVTZ//HF/6-31G*) calculations predicted pseudo-cyclic and extended conformations as the most stable for LLLLL and LLLDL, respectively, in agreement with the experimental data. In contrast, the most stable conformer predicted for peptide LDLDL was not a pseudo-cyclic structure. Moreover, D-residues preferred the experimentally less populated αL rotamers even when simulations were performed at a higher temperature and with strategically selected starting conformations. Energies calculated with molecular mechanics were consistent only with peptide LLLLL. Thus, the conformational preferences obtained for the all L-amino acid peptide were in agreement with the experimental observations. Moreover, refinement of the force field is expected to provide far-reaching conformational sampling of peptides containing D-residues to further develop force field-based conformational-searching methods.

  3. Extracellular matrix assembly in extreme acidic eukaryotic biofilms and their possible implications in heavy metal adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera, Angeles [Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir Km 4, Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: aguileraba@inta.es; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia [Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir Km 4, Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); San Martin-Uriz, Patxi [Centro de Biologia Molecular (UAM-CSIC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Amils, Ricardo [Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir Km 4, Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Biologia Molecular (UAM-CSIC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-30

    To evaluate the importance of the extracellular matrix in relation to heavy metal binding capacity in extreme acidic environments, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) composition of 12 biofilms isolated from Rio Tinto (SW, Spain) was analyzed. Each biofilm was composed mainly by one or two species of eukaryotes, although other microorganisms were present. EPS ranged from 130 to 439 mg g{sup -1} biofilm dry weight, representing between 15% and the 40% of the total biofilm dry weight (DW). Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in the amount of total EPS extracted from biofilms dominated by the same organism at different sampling points. The amount of EPS varied among different biofilms collected from the same sampling location. Colloidal EPS ranged from 42 to 313 mg g{sup -1} dry weight; 10% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Capsular EPS ranged from 50 to 318 mg g{sup -1} dry weight; 5% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Seven of the 12 biofilms showed higher amounts of capsular than colloidal EPS (p < 0.05). Total amount of EPS decreased when total cell numbers and pH increased. There was a positive correlation between EPS concentration and heavy metal concentration in the water. Observations by low temperature scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) revealed the mineral adsorption in the matrix of EPS and onto the cell walls. EPS in all biofilms were primarily composed of carbohydrates, heavy metals and humic acid, plus small quantities of proteins and DNA. After carbohydrates, heavy metals were the second main constituents of the extracellular matrix. Their total concentrations ranged from 3 to 32 mg g{sup -1} biofilm dry weight, reaching up to 16% of the total composition. In general, the heavy metal composition of the EPS extracted from the biofilms closely resembled the metal composition of the water from which the biofilms were collected.

  4. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zahardis

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS: the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the primary products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal is described. Anomalies in the relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide polymers. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, a series of atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids is presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semisolids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that oxidatively processed particulate may contribute to indirect forcing of radiation. Other effects, including the potential

  5. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in Acidic Geothermal Environments and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesle, M.; Beam, J.; Jay, Z.; Bodle, B.; Bogenschutz, E.; Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be produced in natural waters via photochemical reactions between dissolved oxygen, organic carbon and light. Other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are potentially formed in environments with high concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe(II), ~10-100 μM) by reaction between H2O2 and Fe(II) (i.e., Fenton chemistry). Thermophilic archaea and bacteria inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats have defense mechanisms against both extracellular and intracellular peroxide, such as peroxiredoxins (which can degrade H2O2) and against other ROS, such as superoxide dismutases. Biological cycling of H2O2 is not well understood in geothermal ecosystems, and geochemical measurements combined with molecular investigations will contribute to our understanding of microbial response to oxidative stress. We measured H2O2 and other dissolved compounds (Fe(II), Fe(III), H2S, O2), as well as photon flux, pH and temperature, over time in surface geothermal waters of several acidic springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY (Beowulf Spring and One Hundred Spring Plain). Iron-oxide mats were sampled in Beowulf Spring for on-going analysis of metatranscriptomes and RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response gene transcription (e.g., superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, and peroxidases). In situ analyses show that H2O2 concentrations are lowest in the source waters of sulfidic systems (ca. 1 μM), and increase by two-fold in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III)-oxide mat formation (ca. 2 - 3 μM). Channel transects confirm increases in H2O2 as a function of oxygenation (distance). The temporal dynamics of H2O2, O2, Fe(II), and H2S in Beowulf geothermal waters were also measured during a diel cycle, and increases in H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux. These results suggest that photochemical reactions may contribute to changes in H2O2. We hypothesize that increases in H2O2 and O2

  6. Resolvins and omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids: Clinical implications in inflammatory diseases and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Kazuki; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-07-16

    Inflammation is a central process in several disorders and contributes to cancer progression. Inflammation involves a complex cascade of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signaling events with protein and lipid mediators. Recent advances in lipid detection have revealed the importance of lipid mediators in inflammation. Omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) are found naturally in fish oil and have been extensively studied in multiple inflammatory diseases with improved outcomes. Resolvins are thought to be the active metabolites of ω-3 PUFA, and are responsible for facilitating the resolving phase of acute inflammation. Clinically, resolvins have been associated with resolution of acute kidney injury and acute lung injury, micro and macro vascular response to injury, and inhibition of microglia-activated inflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to inflammatory diseases, ω-3 PUFA and resolvins appear to modulate cancer progression. ω-3 PUFA intake has been associated with reduced inflammation in colorectal cancer, and favorable phenotype in breast cancer. Resolvins offer promising therapeutic potential as they may modulate inflammation with minimal side-effects, in contrast to currently available anti-inflammatory medications. This review describes the roles of ω-3 PUFA and resolvins in the inflammatory cascade, various inflammatory diseases, and specific cancers. Additionally, it will discuss the clinical therapeutic potential of resolvins as targets in inflammatory diseases and cancers.

  7. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pss; Yallapu, Murali M; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B; Kumar, Santosh

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described.

  8. Biophysical implications of sphingosine accumulation in membrane properties at neutral and acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Eva; Carreira, Ana C; de Almeida, Rodrigo F M; Silva, Liana C

    2014-05-08

    Sphingosine (Sph) is a simple lipid involved in the regulation of several biological processes. When accumulated in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartments, Sph causes changes in ion signaling and membrane trafficking, leading to the development of Niemann-Pick disease type C. Little is known about Sph interaction with other lipids in biological membranes; however, understanding the effect of Sph in the physical state of membranes might provide insights into its mode of action. Using complementary established fluorescence approaches, we show that Sph accumulation leads to the formation of Sph-enriched gel domains in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and POPC/sphingomyelin (SM)/cholesterol (Chol) model membranes. These domains are more easily formed in membrane models mimicking the neutral pH plasma membrane environment (PM) as compared to the acidic lysosomal membrane environment (LM), where higher Sph concentrations (or lower temperatures) are required. Electrophoretic light scattering measurements further revealed that in PM-raft models (POPC/SM/Chol), Sph is mainly neutral, whereas in LM models, the positive charge of Sph leads to electrostatic repulsion, reducing the Sph ability to form gel domains. Thus, formation of Sph-enriched domains in cellular membranes might be strongly regulated by Sph charge.

  9. Sequestration and bioavailability of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in soils: Implications for their underestimated risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lixia; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhao, Shuyan; Ma, Xinxin

    2016-12-01

    Different from typical hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs), perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are more soluble in water and less partitioned to soil than the HOCs. It remains unclear whether and to what extent PFAAs could be sequestrated in soil. In this study, sequential extraction of PFAAs in soil and bioaccumulation of PFAAs in earthworm were carried out to understand the sequestration and bioavailability of PFAAs in soils with different soil organic matter (SOM) and aged for different time periods (7 and 47d). Sequestration occurred in different degrees depending on the amount and compositions of SOM in soil, structural properties of PFAAs and aging time. Surprisingly, in one peat soil with high fraction of organic carbon (foc, 59%), the PFAAs were completely sequestrated in the soil. Aging might lead to further sequestration of PFAAs in soil with relatively lower foc. As a consequence of sequestration, the bioavailability of PFAAs in peat soils was reduced 3-10 times compared to that in the plain farmland soil. However, the sequestrated PFAAs were still bioaccumulative in earthworms to some extent. The results indicated that the risk of PFAAs in field soil with high content of SOM could be underestimated if only free PFAAs using mild solvent extraction were monitored.

  10. Trans fatty acids: effects on cardiometabolic health and implications for policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micha, R; Mozaffarian, D

    2008-01-01

    In both developed and developing countries, trans fatty acids (TFA) are largely consumed from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils. This article focuses on TFA as a modifiable dietary risk factor for cardiovascular disease, reviewing the evidence for lipid and non-lipid effects; the relations of trans fat intake with clinical endpoints; and current policy and legislative issues. In both observational cohort studies and randomized clinical trials, TFA adversely affect lipid profiles (including raising LDL and triglyceride levels, and reducing HDL levels), systemic inflammation, and endothelial function. More limited but growing evidence suggests that TFA also exacerbate visceral adiposity and insulin resistance. These potent effects of TFA on a multitude of cardiovascular risk factors are consistent with the strong associations seen in prospective cohort studies between TFA consumption and risk of myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease (CHD) death. The documented harmful effects of TFA along with the feasibility of substituting partially hydrogenated vegetable oils with healthy alternatives indicate little reason for continued presence of industrially produced TFA in food preparation and manufacturing or in home cooking fats/oils. A comprehensive strategy to eliminate the use of industrial TFA in both developed and developing countries, including education, food labeling, and policy and legislative initiatives, would likely prevent tens of thousands of CHD events worldwide each year.

  11. Reactions between Criegee Intermediates and the Inorganic Acids HCl and HNO3 : Kinetics and Atmospheric Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Murray, Craig

    2016-08-22

    Criegee intermediates (CIs) are a class of reactive radicals that are thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry through reactions with trace species that can lead to aerosol particle formation. Recent work has suggested that water vapor is likely to be the dominant sink for some CIs, although reactions with trace species that are sufficiently rapid can be locally competitive. Herein, we use broadband transient absorption spectroscopy to measure rate constants for the reactions of the simplest CI, CH2 OO, with two inorganic acids, HCl and HNO3 , both of which are present in polluted urban atmospheres. Both reactions are fast; at 295 K, the reactions of CH2 OO with HCl and HNO3 have rate constants of 4.6×10(-11)  cm(3)  s(-1) and 5.4×10(-10)  cm(3)  s(-1) , respectively. Complementary quantum-chemical calculations show that these reactions form substituted hydroperoxides with no energy barrier. The results suggest that reactions of CIs with HNO3 in particular are likely to be competitive with those with water vapor in polluted urban areas under conditions of modest relative humidity.

  12. Effects of intravaginal lactic acid bacteria on bovine endometrium: Implications in uterine health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genís, Sandra; Bach, Àlex; Arís, Anna

    2017-05-01

    Infection and inflammation of the endometrium after calving compromise uterine health, contributing to decreased reproductive efficiency in dairy cows. Twenty multiparous cows were distributed in two groups and treated intra-vaginally with a combination of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) composed by Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pedioccocus acidilactici, and Lactobacillus reuteri, or with a sterile carrier (CON) twice per week during 3 wk. At the slaughterhouse, vaginal and endometrial swabs were taken for E. coli and Lactobacillus quantification. Endometriums were collected and cut forming explants that were analyzed for the expression of 10 genes related to innate immunity and infection or submitted to an ex vivo inflammation model. In the ex vivo experiment, explants were infected with E. coli or inflammated by treating them with IL-1β and also E. coli. The secretion of IL-8, IL-1β, and IL-6 was evaluated by ELISA in the supernatants of the ex vivo cultures. Lactobacillus counts did not differ between endometria of LAB and CON cows, although E. coli vaginal counts tended to be lower in LAB than in CON cows. The expression of B-defensins and MUC1, indicators of infected uterus, was down-regulated in explants of LAB-treated cows. No differences were observed between LAB and CON explants in the ex vivo inflammation experiment. These results indicate that the vaginal application of the LAB combination used herein was unable to reach the endometrium and regulating the innate immunity at uterine level when applied into the vagina; however, it may be capable of modulating the pathogenic environment in the vaginal tract. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Astragaloside IV ameliorates 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis implicating regulation of energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xu-Guang; Sun, Kai; Liu, Yu-Ying; Yan, Li; Wang, Ming-Xia; Fan, Jing-Yu; Mu, Hong-Na; Li, Chong; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Chuan-She; Han, Jing-Yan

    2017-02-02

    Dysfunction of energy metabolism is involved in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study was designed to investigate the potential of astragaloside IV (ASIV), an active ingredient of Radix Astragalus, to ameliorate colonic mucosal injury, with focusing on the implication of energy restoration in the underlying mechanism. Experimental colitis model was established in rats by injecting 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) through anus. After 24 hours, ASIV was administrated once daily by gavage for 6 days. On day 1 and day 7, colon tissue was collected for macroscopic and histological examination, ELISA, Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. TNBS impaired colonic mucosa with an injured epithelial architecture, increased inflammatory cell infiltration, and decreased colonic blood flow. Lgr5 positive cell number in crypt and β-catenin nuclear translocation were down-regulated by TNBS treatment. TNBS induced epithelial F-actin disruption and junctional protein degradation. Furthermore, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and ATP synthase subunit β expression in the colon tissue were significantly decreased after TNBS stimulation. All of the aforementioned alterations were relieved by ASIV post-treatment. The present study revealed that ASIV promoted mucosal healing process in TNBS-induced colitis, which was most likely attributed to regulating energy metabolism.

  14. Role of Sigma Receptor in Cocaine-Mediated Induction of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein: Implications for HAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Yao, Honghong; Chen, Xufeng; Cai, Yu; Callen, Shannon; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-03-01

    Cocaine abuse has been shown to accelerate the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-associated neurological disorders (HANDs) partially through increasing neuroinflammatory response mediated by activated astrocytes; however, the detailed molecular mechanism of cocaine-mediated astrocyte activation is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrated increased astrogliosis in the cortical regions of brains from HIV(+) cocaine abusers compared with the HIV(+) group without cocaine abuse. We next sought to explore whether cocaine exposure could result in increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a filament protein critical for astrocyte activation. Exposure of cocaine to astrocytes resulted in rapid translocation of sigma receptor to the plasma membrane with subsequent activation of downstream signaling pathways. Using a pharmacological approach, we provide evidence that cocaine-mediated upregulation of GFAP expression involved activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling with subsequent downstream activation of the early growth response gene 1 (Egr-1). Egr-1 activation, in turn, caused transcriptional regulation of GFAP. Corroboration of these findings in vivo demonstrated increased expression of GFAP in the cortical region of mice treated with cocaine compared with the saline injected controls. A thorough understanding of how cocaine mediates astrogliosis could have implications for the development of therapeutic interventions aimed at HIV-infected cocaine abusers.

  15. Implication of abscisic acid on ripening and quality in sweet cherries: differential effects during pre- and postharvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica eTijero

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sweet cherry, a non-climacteric fruit, is usually cold-stored during postharvest to prevent over-ripening. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of abscisic acid (ABA on fruit growth and ripening of this fruit, considering as well its putative implication in over-ripening and effects on quality. We measured the endogenous concentrations of ABA during the ripening of sweet cherries (Prunus avium L. var. Prime Giant collected from orchard trees and in cherries exposed to 4ºC and 23ºC during 10d of postharvest. Furthermore, we examined to what extent endogenous ABA concentrations were related to quality parameters, such as fruit biomass, anthocyanin accumulation and levels of vitamins C and E. Endogenous concentrations of ABA in fruits increased progressively during fruit growth and ripening on the tree, to decrease later during postharvest at 23ºC. Cold treatment, however, increased ABA levels and led to an inhibition of over-ripening. Furthermore, ABA levels positively correlated with anthocyanin and vitamin E levels during preharvest, but not during postharvest. We conclude that ABA plays a major role in sweet cherry development, stimulating its ripening process and positively influencing quality parameters during preharvest. The possible influence of ABA preventing over-ripening in cold-stored sweet cherries is also discussed.

  16. Implication of Abscisic Acid on Ripening and Quality in Sweet Cherries: Differential Effects during Pre- and Post-harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijero, Verónica; Teribia, Natalia; Muñoz, Paula; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    Sweet cherry, a non-climacteric fruit, is usually cold-stored during post-harvest to prevent over-ripening. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of abscisic acid (ABA) on fruit growth and ripening of this fruit, considering as well its putative implication in over-ripening and effects on quality. We measured the endogenous concentrations of ABA during the ripening of sweet cherries (Prunus avium L. var. Prime Giant) collected from orchard trees and in cherries exposed to 4°C and 23°C during 10 days of post-harvest. Furthermore, we examined to what extent endogenous ABA concentrations were related to quality parameters, such as fruit biomass, anthocyanin accumulation and levels of vitamins C and E. Endogenous concentrations of ABA in fruits increased progressively during fruit growth and ripening on the tree, to decrease later during post-harvest at 23°C. Cold treatment, however, increased ABA levels and led to an inhibition of over-ripening. Furthermore, ABA levels positively correlated with anthocyanin and vitamin E levels during pre-harvest, but not during post-harvest. We conclude that ABA plays a major role in sweet cherry development, stimulating its ripening process and positively influencing quality parameters during pre-harvest. The possible influence of ABA preventing over-ripening in cold-stored sweet cherries is also discussed. PMID:27200070

  17. Arsenic-rich acid mine water with extreme arsenic concentration: mineralogy, geochemistry, microbiology, and environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzlan, Juraj; Plášil, Jakub; Škoda, Radek; Gescher, Johannes; Kögler, Felix; Rusznyak, Anna; Küsel, Kirsten; Neu, Thomas R; Mangold, Stefan; Rothe, Jörg

    2014-12-02

    Extremely arsenic-rich acid mine waters have developed by weathering of native arsenic in a sulfide-poor environment on the 10th level of the Svornost mine in Jáchymov (Czech Republic). Arsenic rapidly oxidizes to arsenolite (As2O3), and there are droplets of liquid on the arsenolite crust with high As concentration (80,000-130,000 mg·L(-1)), pH close to 0, and density of 1.65 g·cm(-1). According to the X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the frozen droplets, most of the arsenic is As(III) and iron is fully oxidized to Fe(III). The EXAFS spectra on the As K edge can be interpreted in terms of arsenic polymerization in the aqueous solution. The secondary mineral that precipitates in the droplets is kaatialaite [Fe(3+)(H2AsO4)3·5H2O]. Other unusual minerals associated with the arsenic lens are běhounekite [U(4+)(SO4)2·4H2O], štěpite [U(4+)(AsO3OH)2·4H2O], vysokýite [U(4+)[AsO2(OH)2]4·4H2O], and an unnamed phase (H3O)(+)2(UO2)2(AsO4)2·nH2O. The extremely low cell densities and low microbial biomass have led to insufficient amounts of DNA for downstream polymerase chain reaction amplification and clone library construction. We were able to isolate microorganisms on oligotrophic media with pH ∼ 1.5 supplemented with up to 30 mM As(III). These microorganisms were adapted to highly oligotrophic conditions which disabled long-term culturing under laboratory conditions. The extreme conditions make this environment unfavorable for intensive microbial colonization, but our first results show that certain microorganisms can adapt even to these harsh conditions.

  18. Chemopreventive and renal protective effects for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA: implications of CRP and lipid peroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darweish MM

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fish oil-derived ω-3 fatty acids, like docosahexanoic (DHA, claim a plethora of health benefits. We currently evaluated the antitumor effects of DHA, alone or in combination with cisplatin (CP in the EAC solid tumor mice model, and monitored concomitant changes in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, lipid peroxidation (measured as malondialdehyde; MDA and leukocytic count (LC. Further, we verified the capacity of DHA to ameliorate the lethal, CP-induced nephrotoxicity in rats and the molecular mechanisms involved therein. Results EAC-bearing mice exhibited markedly elevated LC (2-fold, CRP (11-fold and MDA levels (2.7-fold. DHA (125, 250 mg/kg elicited significant, dose-dependent reductions in tumor size (38%, 79%; respectively, as well as in LC, CRP and MDA levels. These effects for CP were appreciably lower than those of DHA (250 mg/kg. Interestingly, DHA (125 mg/kg markedly enhanced the chemopreventive effects of CP and boosted its ability to reduce serum CRP and MDA levels. Correlation studies revealed a high degree of positive association between tumor growth and each of CRP (r = 0.85 and leukocytosis (r = 0.89, thus attesting to a diagnostic/prognostic role for CRP. On the other hand, a single CP dose (10 mg/kg induced nephrotoxicity in rats that was evidenced by proteinuria, deterioration of glomerular filtration rate (GFR, -4-fold, a rise in serum creatinine/urea levels (2–5-fold after 4 days, and globally-induced animal fatalities after 7 days. Kidney-homogenates from CP-treated rats displayed significantly elevated MDA- and TNF-α-, but reduced GSH-, levels. Rats treated with DHA (250 mg/kg, but not 125 mg/kg survived the lethal effects of CP, and showed a significant recovery of GFR; while their homogenates had markedly-reduced MDA- and TNF-α-, but -increased GSH-levels. Significant association was detected between creatinine level and those of MDA (r = 0.81, TNF-α r = 0.92 and GSH (r = -0

  19. Structure of barium perrhenate tetrahydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macicek, J.; Todorov, T. (Inst. of Applied Mineralogy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria))

    1992-04-15

    Ba(ReO{sub 4}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O, M{sub r}=709.80, monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/n, a=7.376(2), b=12.452(2), c=12.173(1) A, {beta}=90.04(1)deg. The metrically pseudo-orthorhombic structure has the approximate space group symmetry Pmmb (No. 62). Ba cations constitute a distorted hexagonal close-packed motif with 12 Ba-Ba distances ranging from 7.115 to 7.601 A. Along with Re atoms they are disposed on the pseudo-mirror plane (d{sub 200}=3.688 A). The coordination polyhedron of Ba is a distorted tetradecahedron with Ba-O distances with 2.831(7)-2.953(7) A. Two non-equivalent ReO{sub 4} tetrahedra have irregular geometry, Re-O 1.709(8)-1.743(8) A for Re(1), 1.709(8)-1.729(9) A for Re(2). The structure may be looked upon as composed of buckled {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}(Ba(ReO{sub 4}){sub 2}) layers coinciding with the (002) plane (d{sub 002}=6.087 A). The layers are interlinked by a Ba-O bond and an extensive system of hydrogen bonds with the participation of water molecules. (orig./GSCH).

  20. Turnover rates of fatty acid and amino acid in the coelomic fluid of the sea star Asterias rubens: Implications for the route of nutrient translocation during vitellogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, P.A.; Beijnink, F.B.; Sluis, I. van der

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. The turnover of fatty acid and amino acid in the coelomic fluid of the sea star Asterias rubens was quantified by intra-coelomic injection of radiolabelled oleic acid and L-leucine which had half times of 2 and 10 min, respectively. 2. 2. The molar composition of the amino acids of the cell-f

  1. Turnover rates of fatty acid and amino acid in the coelomic fluid of the sea star Asterias rubens: Implications for the route of nutrient translocation during vitellogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, P.A.; Beijnink, F.B.; Sluis, I. van der

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. The turnover of fatty acid and amino acid in the coelomic fluid of the sea star Asterias rubens was quantified by intra-coelomic injection of radiolabelled oleic acid and L-leucine which had half times of 2 and 10 min, respectively. 2. 2. The molar composition of the amino acids of the cell-f

  2. High abundances of oxalic, azelaic, and glyoxylic acids and methylglyoxal in the open ocean with high biological activity: Implication for secondary OA formation from isoprene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Fu, Pingqing

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric dicarboxylic acids (DCA) are a ubiquitous water-soluble component of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), affecting the Earth's climate. Despite the high abundances of oxalic acid and related compounds in the marine aerosols, there is no consensus on what controls their distributions over the open ocean. Marine biological productivity could play a role in the production of DCA, but there is no substantial evidence to support this hypothesis. Here we present latitudinal distributions of DCA, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls in the marine aerosols from the remote Pacific. Their concentrations were found several times higher in more biologically influenced aerosols (MBA) than less biologically influenced aerosols. We propose isoprene and unsaturated fatty acids as sources of DCA as inferred from significantly higher abundances of isoprene-SOA tracers and azelaic acid in MBA. These results have implications toward the reassessment of climate forcing feedbacks of marine-derived SOA.

  3. Acid-sulfate mixtures from Río Tinto, Spain: Spectral masking relationships and implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull-Hearth, Selby; van Venrooy, Alexis; Caroline Clark, M.; Cvitkovic, Adriana

    2016-06-01

    Most sulfate minerals form only in specific pH conditions, making them useful markers of past environmental conditions on Mars. However, interpreting past environments requires a full understanding of the suite of minerals present, a task which is complicated by the fact that some minerals can spectrally mask others in the visible- to near-infrared (VNIR, 0.4-2.5 μm). Here, we report VNIR spectra of two-phase mineral combinations obtained from the Río Tinto acid mine drainage system of southern Spain. Our results show that in VNIR reflectance spectroscopy: (1) copiapite masks rhomboclase and partially masks melanterite; (2) coquimbite masks copiapite, jarosite, and rhomboclase; (3) at wavelengths 1.2 μm, gypsum masks these minerals; (4) unlike copiapite, jarosite, or melanterite, halotrichite masks gypsum completely; (5) in two-phase mixtures of copiapite and jarosite, both phases are evident. No consistent VNIR relationship is observed in two-phase mixtures of melanterite and halotrichite, suggesting that microtextures are likely more important than optical properties in determining VNIR reflectance. We also show that the shorter wavelengths are more sensitive to the presence of both phases: even in mixtures where one phase is masking another, both phases usually impact absorptions in the 0.75-0.95 μm region. This region may therefore be useful in remotely identifying mineral mixtures on Mars. These results have implications for several regions on Mars: most notably, they imply that the jarosite exposures reported at Mawrth Vallis may be jarosite-copiapite mixtures.

  4. Equilibrative nucleoside (ENTs) and cationic amino acid (CATs) transporters: implications in foetal endothelial dysfunction in human pregnancy diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanello, Paola; Escudero, Carlos; Sobrevia, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Gestational diabetes (GD, characterized by abnormal D-glucose metabolism), intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, a disease associated with reduced oxygen delivery (hypoxia) to the foetus), and preeclampsia (PE, a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure, proteinuria and increased vascular resistance), induce foetal endothelial dysfunction with implications in adult life and increase the risk of vascular diseases. Synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and uptake of L-arginine (the NO synthase (NOS) substrate) and adenosine (a vasoactive endogenous nucleoside) by the umbilical vein endothelium is altered in pregnancies with GD, IUGR or PE. Mechanisms underlying these alterations include differential expression of equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs), cationic amino acid transporters (CATs), and NOS. Modulation of ENTs, CATs, and NOS expression and activity in endothelium involves protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases p42 and p44 (p42/44(mapk)), calcium, and phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3k), among others. Elevated extracellular D-glucose and hypoxia alter human endothelial function. However, information regarding the transcriptional modulation of ENTs, CATs, and NOS is limited. This review focuses on the effect of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involved in the modulation of ENTs and CATs, and NOS expression and activity, and the consequences for foetal endothelial function in GD, IUGR and PE. The available information will contribute to a better understanding of the cell and molecular basis of the altered vascular endothelial function in these pregnancy diseases and will emphasize the key role of this type of epithelium in placental function and the normal foetal development and growth.

  5. Amino acid and carbohydrate tradeoffs by honey bee nectar foragers and their implications for plant-pollinator interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksma, Harmen P; Oxman, Karmi L; Shafir, Sharoni

    2014-10-01

    Honey bees are important pollinators, requiring floral pollen and nectar for nutrition. Nectar is rich in sugars, but contains additional nutrients, including amino acids (AAs). We tested the preferences of free-flying foragers between 20 AAs at 0.1% w/w in sucrose solutions in an artificial meadow. We found consistent preferences amongst AAs, with essential AAs preferred over nonessential AAs. The preference of foragers correlated negatively with AA induced deviations in pH values, as compared to the control. Next, we quantified tradeoffs between attractive and deterrent AAs at the expense of carbohydrates in nectar. Bees were attracted by phenylalanine, willing to give up 84units sucrose for 1unit AA. They were deterred by glycine, and adding 100 or more units of sucrose could resolve to offset 1unit AA. In addition, we tested physiological effects of AA nutrition on forager homing performance. In a no-choice context, caged bees showed indifference to 0.1% proline, leucine, glycine or phenylalanine in sucrose solutions. Furthermore, flight tests gave no indication that AA nutrition affected flight capacity directly. In contrast, low carbohydrate nutrition reduced the performance of bees, with important methodological implications for homing studies that evaluate the effect of substances that may affect imbibition of sugar solution. In conclusion, low AA concentrations in nectar relative to pollen suggest a limited role in bee nutrition. Most of the 20 AAs evoked a neutral to a mild deterrent response in bees, thus it seems unlikely that bees respond to AAs in nectar as a cue to assess nutritional quality. Nonetheless, free choice behavior of foraging bees is influenced, for instance by phenylalanine and glycine. Thus, AAs in nectar may affect plant-pollinator interactions and thereby exhibit a selective pressure on the flora in the honey bee habitat.

  6. Role of amino acid insertions on intermolecular forces between arginine peptide condensed DNA helices: implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRouchey, Jason E; Rau, Donald C

    2011-12-09

    In spermatogenesis, chromatin histones are replaced by arginine-rich protamines to densely compact DNA in sperm heads. Tight packaging is considered necessary to protect the DNA from damage. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing protamine-DNA assemblies and their dependence on amino acid content, the effect of neutral and negatively charged amino acids on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces was studied using model peptides containing six arginines. We have previously observed that the neutral amino acids in salmon protamine decrease the net attraction between protamine-DNA helices compared with the equivalent homo-arginine peptide. Using osmotic stress coupled with x-ray scattering, we have investigated the component attractive and repulsive forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance as a function of the chemistry, position, and number of the amino acid inserted. Neutral amino acids inserted into hexa-arginine increase the short range repulsion while only slightly affecting longer range attraction. The amino acid content alone of salmon protamine is enough to rationalize the forces that package DNA in sperm heads. Inserting a negatively charged amino acid into hexa-arginine dramatically weakens the net attraction. Both of these observations have biological implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm heads.

  7. Molecular distributions of dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls in biomass burning aerosols: implications for photochemical production and degradation in smoke layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hoffer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols in the size class <2.5 μm (6 daytime and 9 nighttime samples were collected at a pasture site in Rondônia, Brazil, during the intensive biomass burning period of 16–26 September 2002 as part of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate (LBA-SMOCC. Homologous series of dicarboxylic acids (C2–C11 and related compounds (ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls were identified using gas chromatography (GC and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Among the species detected, oxalic acid was found to be the most abundant, followed by succinic, malonic and glyoxylic acids. Average concentrations of total dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls in the aerosol samples were 2180, 167 and 56 ng m−3, respectively. These are 2–8, 3–11 and 2–16 times higher, respectively, than those reported in urban aerosols, such as in 14 Chinese megacities. Higher ratios of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds to biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan and K+ were found in the daytime than in the nighttime, suggesting the importance of photochemical production. On the other hand, higher ratios of oxalic acid to other dicarboxylic acids and related compounds normalized to biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan and K+ in the daytime provide evidence for the possible degradation of dicarboxylic acids (≥C3 in this smoke-polluted environment. Assuming that these and related compounds are photo-chemically oxidized to oxalic acid in the daytime, and given their linear relationship, they could account for, on average, 77% of the formation of oxalic acid. The remaining portion of oxalic acid may have been directly emitted from biomass burning as suggested by a good correlation with the biomass burning tracers (K+, CO and ECa and organic carbon (OC. However, photochemical production from other precursors could not be excluded.

  8. PPAR/RXR Regulation of Fatty Acid Metabolism and Fatty Acid -Hydroxylase (CYP4 Isozymes: Implications for Prevention of Lipotoxicity in Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Hardwick

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty liver disease is a common lipid metabolism disorder influenced by the combination of individual genetic makeup, drug exposure, and life-style choices that are frequently associated with metabolic syndrome, which encompasses obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and insulin resistant diabetes. Common to obesity related dyslipidemia is the excessive storage of hepatic fatty acids (steatosis, due to a decrease in mitochondria -oxidation with an increase in both peroxisomal -oxidation, and microsomal -oxidation of fatty acids through peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs. How steatosis increases PPAR activated gene expression of fatty acid transport proteins, peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid -oxidation and -oxidation of fatty acids genes regardless of whether dietary fatty acids are polyunsaturated (PUFA, monounsaturated (MUFA, or saturated (SFA may be determined by the interplay of PPARs and HNF4 with the fatty acid transport proteins L-FABP and ACBP. In hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis, the -oxidation cytochrome P450 CYP4A gene expression is increased even with reduced hepatic levels of PPAR. Although numerous studies have suggested the role ethanol-inducible CYP2E1 in contributing to increased oxidative stress, Cyp2e1-null mice still develop steatohepatitis with a dramatic increase in CYP4A gene expression. This strongly implies that CYP4A fatty acid -hydroxylase P450s may play an important role in the development of steatohepatitis. In this review and tutorial, we briefly describe how fatty acids are partitioned by fatty acid transport proteins to either anabolic or catabolic pathways regulated by PPARs, and we explore how medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA CYP4A and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA CYP4F -hydroxylase genes are regulated in fatty liver. We finally propose a hypothesis that increased CYP4A expression with a decrease in CYP4F genes may promote the progression of steatosis to

  9. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soils: Implications for the survival of exogenous organic material during impact delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Karen L. F.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    1996-01-01

    Using a sensitive high performance liquid chromatography technique, we have analyzed both the hot water extract and the acid hydrolyzed hot water extract of lunar soil collected during the Apollo 17 mission. Both free amino acids and those derived from acid labile precursors are present at a level of roughly 15 ppb. Based on the D/L amino acid ratios, the free alanine and aspartic acid observed in the hot water extract can be entirely attributed to terrestrial biogenic contamination. However, in the acid labile fraction, precursors which yield amino acids are apparently present in the lunar soil. The amino acid distribution suggests that the precursor is probably solar wind implanted HCN. We have evaluated our results with regard to the meteoritic input of intact organic compounds to the moon based on an upper limit of ≤ 0.3 ppb for α-aminoisobutyric acid, a non-protein amino acid which does not generally occur in terrestrial organisms and which is not a major amino acid produced from HCN, but which is a predominant amino acid in many carbonaceous chondrites. We find that the survival of exogenous organic compounds during lunar impact is ≤ 0.8%. This result represents an example of minimum organic impact survivability. This is an important first step toward a better understanding of similar processes on Earth and on Mars, and their possible contribution to the budget of prebiotic organic compounds on the primitive Earth.

  10. The dietary fatty acids of patients with coronary artery disease and controls in Curacao - Implications for primary and secondary prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, DAJ; vanderDijs, FPL; Leerink, CB; Steward, HN; Kroon, TAJ; Suverkropp, GHJ; Romer, JWP; vanDoormaal, JJ; Muskiet, FAJ

    1997-01-01

    Patients with coronary artery disease are advised to augment their dietary linoleic acid intakes at the expense of saturated fatty acids. We investigated whether the dietary linoleic acid intake of 57 patients with coronary artery disease (47 males, 10 females; ages 61 +/- 10 years) in Curacao is hi

  11. A Reexamination of Amino Acids in Lunar Soils: Implications for the Survival of Exogenous Organic Material During Impact Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Karen L. F.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    1996-01-01

    Using a sensitive high performance liquid chromatography technique, we have analyzed both the hot water extract and the acid hydrolyzed hot water extract of lunar soil collected during the Apollo 17 mission. Both free amino acids and those derived from acid labile precursors are present at a level of roughly 15 ppb. Based on the D/L amino acid ratios, the free alanine and aspartic acid observed in the hot water extract can be entirely attributed to terrestrial biogenic contamination. However, in the acid labile fraction, precursors which yield amino acids are apparently present in the lunar soil. The amino acid distribution suggests that the precursor is probably solar wind implanted HCN. We have evaluated our results with regard to the meteoritic input of intact organic compounds to the moon based on an upper limit of less than or equal to 0.3 ppb for alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, a non-protein amino acid which does not generally occur in terrestrial organisms and which is not a major amino acid produced from HCN, but which is a predominant amino acid in many carbonaceous chondrites. We find that the survival of exogenous organic compounds during lunar impact is less than or equal to 0.8%. This result represents an example of minimum organic impact survivability. This is an important first step toward a better understanding of similar processes on Earth and on Mars, and their possible contribution to the budget of prebiotic organic compounds on the primitive Earth.

  12. Radionuclide concentrations in raw and purified phosphoric acids from Brazil and their processing wastes: implications for radiation exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Conceição, Fabiano Tomazini; Antunes, Maria Lúcia Pereira; Durrant, Steven F

    2012-02-01

    Radionuclides from the U and Th natural series are present in alkaline rocks, which are used as feedstock in Brazil for the production of raw phosphoric acid, which can be considered as a NORM (naturally occurring radioactive material). As a result of the purification of raw phosphoric acid to food-grade phosphoric acid, two by-products are generated, i.e., solid and liquid wastes. Taking this into account, the main aim of this study was to evaluate the fluxes of natural radionuclide in the production of food-grade phosphoric acids in Brazil, to determine the radiological impact caused by ingestion of food-grade phosphoric acid, and to evaluate the solid waste environmental hazards caused by its application in crop soils. Radiological characterization of raw phosphoric acid, food-grade phosphoric acid, solid waste, and liquid waste was performed by alpha and gamma spectrometry. The (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra, and (232)Th activity concentrations varied depending on the source of raw phosphoric acid. Decreasing radionuclides activity concentrations in raw phosphoric acids used by the producer of the purified phosphoric acid were observed as follows: Tapira (raw phosphoric acid D) > Catalão (raw phosphoric acids B and C) > Cajati (raw phosphoric acid A). The industrial purification process produces a reduction in radionuclide activity concentrations in food-grade phosphoric acid in relation to raw phosphoric acid produced in plant D and single raw phosphoric acid used in recent years. The most common use of food-grade phosphoric acid is in cola soft drinks, with an average consumption in Brazil of 72 l per person per year. Each liter of cola soft drink contains 0.5 ml of food-grade phosphoric acid, which gives an annual average intake of 36 ml of food-grade phosphoric acid per person. Under these conditions, radionuclide intake through consumption of food-grade phosphoric acid per year per person via cola soft drinks is not hazardous to human health in Brazil

  13. Breakdown kinetics of C-hydroxymethyl beta-dicarbonyl derivatives of carbon acids: implications in the bioconversion rate of C-phosphoryloxymethyl prodrugs of carbon acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhareshwar, Sundeep S; Stella, Valentino J

    2009-05-01

    The kinetics of conversion of C-hydroxymethyl derivatives of pharmaceutically relevant beta-dicarbonyl carbon acids of two series, pyrazolidin-3,5-diones and inden-1,3-diones, and a model carbon acid back to the respective carbon acids were studied as a function of pH at 25 degrees C and an ionic strength of 0.15 M. This is a somewhat surprising reaction since it involves the facile breakdown of a carbon-carbon bond. The slopes of the pH-rate profiles for the dehydroxymethylation were approximately unity, which along with the lack of buffer catalysis, indicates a specific-base mechanism involving spontaneous breakdown of the oxymethyl anion. This breakdown generates the conjugate base of the respective carbon acids. Thus within a series, there exists a correlation between the second-order rate constant for dehydroxymethylation and the pK(a) of the corresponding carbon acid with a shorter conversion/dehydroxymethylation half-life (at all given pH values) with decreasing pK(a) of the parent carbon acid. The increasing acidity of the carbon acid affords an increase in the leaving group ability of the carbanion, and therefore facilitation of the rate-determining unimolecular carbon-carbon bond cleavage. Since the hydroxymethyl derivative is an intermediate in the bioconversion of C-phosphoryloxymethyl prodrugs of carbon acids, also under study, the relationship allows one to reasonably predict how facile the dehydroxymethylation would be for any new beta-dicarbonyl carbon acid.

  14. Molecular distributions of dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls in biomass burning aerosols: implications for photochemical production and degradation in smoke layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kundu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols in the size class <2.5 μm (6 daytime and 9 nighttime samples were collected at a pasture site in Rondônia, Brazil, during the intensive biomass burning period of 16–26 September 2002 as part of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate (LBA-SMOCC. Homologous series of dicarboxylic acids (C2–C11 and related compounds (ketocarboxylic acids and dicarbonyls were identified using gas chromatography and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Among the species detected, oxalic acid was found to be the most abundant, followed by succinic, malonic and glyoxylic acids. Average concentrations of total dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls in the aerosol samples were 2180, 167 and 56 ng m−3, respectively. These are 2–8, 3–11 and 2–16 times higher, respectively, than those reported in urban aerosols, such as in 14 Chinese megacities. Higher ratios of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds to biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan and K+ were found in the daytime than in the nighttime, suggesting an importance of photochemical production. On the other hand, higher ratios of oxalic acid to other dicarboxylic acids and related compounds normalized to biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan and K+ in the daytime provide evidence for the possible degradation of dicarboxylic acids (≥C3 in this smoke-polluted environment. Assuming that these and related compounds are photochemically oxidized to oxalic acid in the daytime and given their linear relationship, they could account for, on average, 77% of the formation of oxalic acid. The remaining portion of oxalic acid may have been directly emitted from biomass burning as suggested by a good correlation with the biomass burning tracers (K+, CO and ECa and organic carbon (OC. However, photochemical production from other precursors

  15. High rate of deficiency in the amino acids tryptophan and histidine in people with wounds: implication for nutrient targeting in wound management--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Beryl; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2009-02-01

    Malnutrition resulting from inadequate protein, energy, or micronutrient intake has been identified as an independent risk factor for the development of pressure ulcers in older adult patients and is associated with increased morbidity and death. To assess the relationship between albumin, the standard biochemical marker of nutritional adequacy, and amino acid status in people with wounds. The authors performed tests for serum albumin, prealbumin, and amino acid profiles on 18 consecutive hospital patients with wounds and 7 patients without wounds. A low level of the essential amino acids tryptophan and histidine was a common finding in older people with wounds. Of the 18 consecutive wound cases, 16 (88.9%) were found to be deficient in tryptophan, histidine, or both. Moreover, levels were generally found to be lower than those in the group without wounds. The levels of all other amino acids were essentially normal for all patients. Finally, although serum albumin is often used as a surrogate marker of amino acid adequacy or nutritional status, clinically abnormal albumin had poor specificity (63.2%), poor sensitivity (60.7%), and low positive predictive value (70.8%) for the identification of a low tryptophan or histidine level. People with wounds are a relatively at-risk group and are likely to be overlooked in terms of micronutrient deficiencies, and these findings have important implications in terms of potential specific targeting of nutrient supplementation.

  16. Integrated removal of inorganic contaminants from acid mine drainage using BOF slag, lime, soda ash and reverse osmosis (RO): Implication for the production of drinking water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available , Finland IMWA 2017Mine Water and Circular Economy Wolkersdorfer C, Sartz L, Sillanpää M, Häkkinen A (Editors) Integrated removal of inorganic contaminants from Acid Mine Drainage using BOF Slag, Lime, Soda ash and Reverse Osmosis (RO): Implication... was reduced from 18000 to 4000 mg/L hence requiring another purification technology. Hardness was reduced using lime and soda ash. Reverse Osmosis (RO) was used to further clean the water to drinking standard. A single pass two element RO system...

  17. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, glyoxylic acid and glyoxal in tropical aerosols: implications for photochemical processes of organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelyus L. Mkoma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropical aerosols of PM2.5 and PM10 were collected at a rural site in Morogoro, Tanzania (East Africa, and analysed for stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C of dicarboxylic acids (C2–C9, glyoxylic acid (ωC2 and glyoxal (Gly using gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometer. PM2.5 samples showed that δ13C of oxalic (C2 acid are largest (mean, −18.3±1.7‰ followed by malonic (C3, −19.6±1.0‰ and succinic (C4, −21.8±2.2‰ acids, whereas those in PM10 are a little smaller: −19.9±3.1‰ (C2, −20.2±2.7‰ (C3 and −23.3±3.2‰ (C4. The δ13C of C2–C4 diacids showed a decreasing trend with an increase in carbon numbers. The higher δ13C values of oxalic acid can be explained by isotopic enrichment of 13C in the remaining C2 due to the atmospheric decomposition of oxalic acid or its precursors. δ13C of ωC2 and Gly that are precursors of oxalic acid also showed larger values (mean, −22.5‰ and −20.2‰, respectively in PM2.5 than those (−26.7‰ and −23.7‰ in PM10. The δ13C values of ωC2 and Gly are smaller than those of C2 in both PM2.5 and PM10. On the other hand, azelaic acid (C9; mean, −28.5‰ is more depleted in 13C, which is consistent with the previous knowledge; that is, C9 is produced by the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids emitted from terrestrial higher plants. A significant enrichment of 13C in oxalic acid together with its negative correlations with relative abundance of C2 in total diacids and ratios of water-soluble organic carbon and organic carbon further support that a photochemical degradation of oxalic acid occurs during long-range transport from source regions.

  18. A genome-wide association study of kynurenic acid in cerebrospinal fluid: implications for psychosis and cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellgren, C M; Kegel, M E; Bergen, S E; Ekman, C J; Olsson, S; Larsson, M; Vawter, M P; Backlund, L; Sullivan, P F; Sklar, P; Smoller, J W; Magnusson, P K E; Hultman, C M; Walther-Jallow, L; Svensson, C I; Lichtenstein, P; Schalling, M; Engberg, G; Erhardt, S; Landén, M

    2016-01-01

    Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the glia-derived N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KYNA) have consistently been implicated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study based on CSF KYNA in bipolar disorder and found support for an association with a common variant within 1p21.3. After replication in an independent cohort, we linked this genetic variant—associated with reduced SNX7 expression—to positive psychotic symptoms and executive function deficits in bipolar disorder. A series of post-mortem brain tissue and in vitro experiments suggested SNX7 downregulation to result in a caspase-8-driven activation of interleukin-1β and a subsequent induction of the brain kynurenine pathway. The current study demonstrates the potential of using biomarkers in genetic studies of psychiatric disorders, and may help to identify novel drug targets in bipolar disorder. PMID:26666201

  19. Andrastin A and barceloneic acid metabolites, protein farnesyl transferase inhibitors from Penicillium alborcoremium: chemotaxonomic significance and pathological implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overy, David Patrick; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Dalsgaard, P.W.;

    2005-01-01

    of a barceloneic acid being produced as a secondary metabolite. Tissue extracts created following pathogenicity trials involving P. albocoremium and Allium cepa confirmed the production of these five metabolites in planta. Barceloneic acid B was found to be biologically active against a P388 murine leukemia cell...

  20. The coordination complex structures and hydrogen bonding in the three-dimensional alkaline earth metal salts (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) of (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2017-01-01

    (4-Aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) is used as an antihelminth in veterinary applications and was earlier used in the monosodium salt dihydrate form as the antisyphilitic drug atoxyl. Examples of complexes with this acid are rare. The structures of the alkaline earth metal (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) complexes with (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) have been determined, viz. hexaaquamagnesium bis[hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonate] tetrahydrate, [Mg(H2O)6](C6H7AsNO3)·4H2O, (I), catena-poly[[[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ2-hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ(2)O:O']-[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ2-hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ(2)O:O

  1. Clay-Nucleic Acid Complexes: Characteristics and Implications for the Preservation of Genetic Material in Primeval Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Marco; Bramanti, Emilia; Morassi Bonzi, Laura; Luigi Orioli, Pier; Vettori, Cristina; Gallori, Enzo

    1999-05-01

    The equilibrium adsorption of three nucleic acids: chromosomal DNA, supercoiled plasmid DNA, and 25S rRNA, on the clay minerals, montmorillonite (M) and kaolinite (K), were studied. Adsorption of the nucleic acid on the clays was rapid and maximal after 90 min of contact time. Chromosomal DNA was adsorbed to a greater extent than plasmid DNA and RNA, and the adsorption was also greater on M than on K. Adsorption isotherms were of the L type, and a plateau was reached with all the complexes, with the exception of chromosomal DNA adsorbed on M. To determine where nucleic acids are adsorbed on clay minerals and the nature of the interaction, complexes were studied by X-ray diffraction (X-RD), electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. X-RD showed that nucleic acids did not penetrate the clay, indicating that the adsorption occurred primarily on the external surfaces of clay particles, as also suggested by electron microscopy observations. FT-IR spectra of clay-tightly bound nucleic acid complexes showed absorption bands that indicate a variation of the nucleic acids status as a consequence of their adsorption on clay. Data obtained suggested that the formation of clay-nucleic acid complex could have an important role in the preservation of genetic material in primeval habitats.

  2. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of total carbon, dicarboxylic acids and glyoxylic acid in the tropical Indian aerosols: Implications for sources and photochemical processing of organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Swaminathan, T.; Tachibana, Eri

    2011-09-01

    The tropical Indian aerosols (PM10) collected on day- and nighttime bases in winter and summer, 2007 from Chennai (13.04°N; 80.17°E) were studied for stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of total carbon (TC), individual dicarboxylic acids (C2-C9) and glyoxylic acid (ωC2). δ13C values of TC ranged from -23.9‰ to -25.9‰ (-25.0 ± 0.6‰; n = 49). Oxalic (C2) (-17.1 ± 2.5‰), malonic (C3) (-20.8 ± 1.8‰), succinic (C4) (-22.5 ± 1.5‰) and adipic (C6) (-20.6 ± 4.1‰) acids and ωC2 acid (-22.4 ± 5.5‰) were found to be more enriched with 13C compared to TC. In contrast, suberic (C8) (-29.4 ± 1.8‰), phthalic (Ph) (-30.1 ± 3.5‰) and azelaic (C9) (-28.4 ± 5.8‰) acids showed smaller δ13C values than TC. Based on comparisons of δ13C values of TC in Chennai aerosols to those (-24.7 ± 2.2‰) found in unburned cow-dung samples collected from Chennai and isotopic signatures of the particles emitted from point sources, we found that biofuel/biomass burning are the major sources of carbonaceous aerosols in South and Southeast Asia. The decrease in δ13C values of C9 diacid by about 5‰ from winter to summer suggests that tropical plant emissions also significantly contribute to organic aerosol in this region. Significant increase in δ13C values from C4 to C2 diacids in Chennai aerosols could be attributed for their photochemical processing in the tropical atmosphere during long-range transport from source regions.

  3. Modulation of phenytoin teratogenicity and embryonic covalent binding by acetylsalicylic acid, caffeic acid, and alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone: implications for bioactivation by prostaglandin synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, P.G.; Zubovits, J.T.; Wong, S.T.; Molinari, L.M.; Ali, S.

    1989-02-01

    Teratogenicity of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin is thought to involve its bioactivation by cytochromes P-450 to a reactive arene oxide intermediate. We hypothesized that phenytoin also may be bioactivated to a teratogenic free radical intermediate by another enzymatic system, prostaglandin synthetase. To evaluate the teratogenic contribution of this latter pathway, an irreversible inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip), was administered to pregnant CD-1 mice at 9:00 AM on Gestational Days 12 and 13, 2 hr before phenytoin, 65 mg/kg ip. Other groups were pretreated 2 hr prior to phenytoin administration with either the antioxidant caffeic acid or the free radical spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). Caffeic acid and PBN were given ip in doses that respectively were up to 1.0 to 0.05 molar equivalents to the dose of phenytoin. Dams were killed on Day 19 and the fetuses were assessed for teratologic anomalies. A similar study evaluated the effect of ASA on the in vivo covalent binding of radiolabeled phenytoin administered on Day 12, in which case dams were killed 24 hr later on Day 13. ASA pretreatment produced a 50% reduction in the incidence of fetal cleft palates induced by phenytoin (p less than 0.05), without significantly altering the incidence of resorptions or mean fetal body weight. Pretreatment with either caffeic acid or PBN resulted in dose-related decreases in the incidence of fetal cleft palates produced by phenytoin, with maximal respective reductions of 71 and 82% at the highest doses of caffeic acid and PBN (p less than 0.05).

  4. Three types of mycolic acid from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Brévanne: implications for structure-function relationships in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubiana, R; Berlan, J; Sato, H; Strain, M

    1979-01-01

    Saponification of the chloroform-soluble wax from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Brévanne led to the isolation of three classes of mycolic acid containing characteristic functional groups along the methylene backbone: type alpha (two cyclopropane rings); type beta (methoxyl, methyl, and cyclopropane); and type gamma (ketone, methyl, and cyclopropane). The structures of these acids were elucidated principally by mass spectrometry. The high mass region of the keto mycolate is presented showing the meromycolal and molecular ion regions. This is first time a molecular peak for this mycolic acid has been reported. The structure of the keto mycolate was further substantiated by study of the mass spectral fragmentation of its dithioketal derivative. Within each type of acid, a series of homologs was encountered, varying according to the number of methylene units in the backbone chain. Chromatographic and infrared spectrophotometric evidence is presented for the alkali-induced isomerization of the three types of mycolates. Images PMID:110779

  5. Stability toward High Energy Radiation of Non-Proteinogenic Amino Acids: Implications for the Origins of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Hafez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of non-proteinogenic amino acids, most of them found quite commonly in the meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites, were subjected to solid state radiolysis in vacuum to a total radiation dose of 3.2 MGy corresponding to 23% of the total dose expected to be taken by organic molecules buried in asteroids and meteorites since the beginning of the solar system 4.6 × 109 years ago. The radiolyzed amino acids were studied by FT-IR spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and by polarimety and Optical Rotatory Dispersion (ORD. It is shown that an important fraction of each amino acid is able to “survive” the massive dose of radiation, while the enantiomeric excess is partially preserved. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that it is unsurprising to find amino acids even in enantiomeric excess in carbonaceous chondrites.

  6. Thermal effects on the growth and fatty acid composition of four harmful algal bloom species: Possible implications for ichthyotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Bonggil; Ju, Se-Jong; Ko, Ah-Ra; Choi, Keun-Hyung; Jung, Seung Won; Jang, Pung-Guk; Jang, Min-Chul; Moon, Chang Ho; Shin, Kyoungsoon

    2016-09-01

    Little is known regarding how harmful algal bloom species respond to different temperatures in terms of fatty acid production. This study examined the effects of temperature on the growth rates, cell volumes, and fatty acid concentrations and compositions of four harmful algal bloom species (HABs), Akashiwo sanguinea, Alexandrium tamarense, Chattonella ovata, and Prorocentrum minimum. The HABs species were cultured at 15, 20, 25, and 30°C in a nutrient-enriched medium. Three of the species maintained optimal growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, but A. tamarense did not. The cell volumes of each species showed little change over the temperature range. The total fatty acid concentrations in A. sanguinea, A. tamarense and C. ovata decreased as the temperature increased, but P. minimum showed no trend in this respect. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), the key biochemical components that maintain cell membrane fluidity and which are associated with toxicity, decreased in both concentration and proportion of total fatty acids as temperature increased, except in A. sanguinea, in which the proportion of PUFAs to the total fatty acids increased. These reductions in PUFA concentration and proportion could reduce cell membrane fluidity and toxicity in HABs; however, enhanced growth and/or ruptured cells, which are considered more toxic than intact cells, could compensate for the reduced per-cell toxicity. This phenomenon might impact on the marine ecosystem and aquaculture industry.

  7. Amino Acids in Asteroids and Comets: Implications for the Origin of Life on Earth and Possibly Elsewhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Meteorites provide a record of the chemical processes that occurred in the early solar system before life began on Earth. The delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and their fragments to the Earth and other planetary bodies in our solar system could have been an important source of the prebiotic organic inventory needed for the emergence of life. Amino acids are essential components of proteins and enzymes in life on Earth and these prebiotic organic compounds have been detected in a wide variety of carbon-rich meteorites, the majority of which have been determined to be extraterrestrial in origin. In addition, many amino acids are structurally chiral (they possess handedness) and with a few very rare exceptions, only left handed (L) amino acids are found in biology, while all known abiotic syntheses of amino acids result in equal mixtures of left and right handed (LD) amino acids. The discovery of a significant left handed amino acid imbalance of up to 20% in several different carbonaceous meteorites, could point toward a possible prebiotic contribution to the origin of biological homochirality by the exogenous delivery of extraterrestrial organic material to the early Earth. In this talk, I will focus on recent state-of-the-art measurements of the distribution, chirality, and isotopic composition of amino acids in meteorites and cometary samples carried out at the Goddard Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory. Results from the analyses of a variety of Antarctic meteorites, samples from comet Wild 2 returned by the STARDUST mission, and meteorite fragments of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta recovered from northern Sudan will be discussed

  8. Bile salt/acid induction of DNA damage in bacterial and mammalian cells: implications for colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandell, R L; Bernstein, C

    1991-01-01

    Two bile salts, sodium chenodeoxycholate and sodium deoxycholate, induced a DNA repair response in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Similarly, a bile acid and a bile salt, chenodeoxycholic acid and sodium deoxycholate, induced DNA repair (indicated by unscheduled DNA synthesis) in human foreskin fibroblasts. Also, DNA repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were found to be more sensitive than normal cells to killing by bile salts. In particular, mutant UV4 CHO cells, defective in DNA excision repair and DNA cross-link removal, were more sensitive to sodium chenodeoxycholate, and mutant EM9 CHO cells, defective in strand-break rejoining, were more sensitive to sodium deoxycholate than wild-type cells. These results indicate that bile salts/acid damage DNA of both bacterial and mammalian cells in vivo. Previous epidemiological studies have shown that colon cancer incidence correlates with fecal bile acid levels. The findings reported here support the hypothesis that bile salts/acids have an etiologic role in colon cancer by causing DNA damage.

  9. Do mitochondria regulate cellular iron homeostasis through citric acid and haem production? Implications for cancer and other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S

    2003-01-01

    Citric acid is produced industrially by depriving Aspergillus niger of iron. The lack of Fe deactivates mitochondrial aconitase and interrupts the krebs cycle, causing the mitochondria to release citric acid as a siderophore (an Fe getter). When the mitochondrion has plenty of Fe and the cell has enough ATP, aerobic phosphorylation stops and fatty acid or haem synthesis take place, when the cell has plenty of haem, haem synthesis stops. Since most of the Fe activity in the cell is related to the mitochondria, I hypothesise that in the animal cell when the mitochondria are low in Fe, citric acid acts as a signal that triggers the production of transferrin receptor messenger RNA (TrR mRNA) in the nucleus, which in the absence of Fe causes the expression of transferrin receptor. When the cell has plenty of Fe, cytosolic aconitase detaches itself from the transferrin receptor and ferritin mRNA stopping expression of the former and initiating expression of the latter. The detached cytosolic aconitase transforms the citric acid, blocking the production of the transferrin receptor mRNA.

  10. Utilization of Snail (Achatina fulica Shell Waste for Synthesis of Calcium Tartrate Tetrahydrate (CaC4H4O6.4H2O Single Crystals in Silica Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Sakdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Snail (Achatina fulica shell waste is massively produced by many home industries in Indonesia, especially in East Java. The snail shell is known for high calcium; therefore it is potential to be used as calcium source of supernatant in the synthesis of piezoeletric material, such as single crystal of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate (CaTT. The aim of this research is to study the synthesis and characterization of CaTT or CaC4H4O6.4H2O from snail shell waste in silica gel. Supernatant solution of CaCl2 was prepared from CaO, which previously made by calcinating the shell at 1000°C, and then reacted with HCl 1,5M. Synthesis of CaTT was conducted in a single-tube reaction at room temperature in which silica gel was used as growth medium with gelling time of 10 days and growth time of 2 weeks. The pH of gel and CaCl2 concentration were varied, 3.00; 3.50; 4.00; 4.50; 5.00; and 0.27; 0.36; 0.45; 0.54 M respectively, in order to obtain optimum condition of the synthesis, which is indicated from crystal yields. The synthesized crystals were characterized by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry (AAS, infrared spectroscopy (IR and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD. Experimental data shows that optimum condition was obtained at pH of 3.50 and [CaCl2] of 0.45M with yield of 69.37%. The obtained single crystal has clear color and octahedral-like shape with size ranged between 4 – 9 mm. Analysis data by FTIR and powder XRD confirmed that the obtained crystal was CaTT single crystals with crystal system of orthorhombic.

  11. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Reveals Thermodynamic Advantage of Organic Acids in Facilitating Formation of Bisulfate Ion Clusters: Atmospheric Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Lin, Wei; Deng, Shihu; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Weijun; Paesani, Francesco; Wang, Xue B.

    2013-03-07

    Recent lab and field measurements have indicated critical roles of organic acids in enhancing new atmospheric aerosol formation. Such findings have stimulated theoretical studies with the aim of understanding interaction of organic acids with common aerosol nucleation precursors like bisulfate (HSO4-). In this Letter, we report a combined negative ion photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of molecular clusters formed by HSO4- with succinic acid (SUA, HO2C(CH2)2CO2H), HSO4-(SUA)n (n = 0-2), along with HSO4-(H2O)n and HSO4-(H2SO4)n. It is found that one SUA molecule can stabilize HSO4- by ca. 39 kcal/mol, triple the corresponding value that one water molecule is capable of (ca. 13 kcal/mol). Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations reveal the most plausible structures of these clusters and attribute the stability of these clusters due to formation of strong hydrogen bonds. This work provides direct experimental evidence showing significant thermodynamic advantage by involving organic acid molecules to promote formation and growth in bisulfate clusters and aerosols.

  12. Acyl-ACP thioesterases from Camelina sativa: cloning, enzymatic characterization and implication in seed oil fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Manuel Fernando; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases are intraplastidial enzymes that terminate de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in the plastids of higher plants by hydrolyzing the thioester bond between ACP and the fatty acid synthesized. Free fatty acids are then esterified with coenzyme A prior to being incorporated into the glycerolipids synthesized through the eukaryotic pathway. Acyl-ACP thioesterases belong to the TE14 family of thioester-active enzymes and can be classified as FatAs and FatBs, which differ in their amino acid sequence and substrate specificity. Here, the FatA and FatB thioesterases from Camelina sativa seeds, a crop of interest in plant biotechnology, were cloned, sequenced and characterized. The mature proteins encoded by these genes were characterized biochemically after they were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. C. sativa contained three different alleles of both the FatA and FatB genes. These genes were expressed most strongly in expanding tissues in which lipids are very actively synthesized, such as developing seed endosperm. The CsFatA enzyme displayed high catalytic efficiency on oleoyl-ACP and CsFatB acted efficiently on palmitoyl-ACP. The contribution of these two enzymes to the synthesis of C. sativa oil was discussed in the light of these results.

  13. Studies of heteropoly acid/polyvinylidenedifluoride-hexafluoroproylene composite membranes and implication for the use of heteropoly acids as the proton conducting component in a fuel cell membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malers, Jennifer L.; Sweikart, Mary-Ann [Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Horan, James L. [Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Turner, John A. [Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Herring, Andrew M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2007-10-11

    Complete polarization curves for a number of heteropoly acids (HPAs), H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}, {alpha}-H{sub 3}P{sub 2}W{sub 18}O{sub 62}, H{sub 6}P{sub 2}W{sub 21}O{sub 71}, and H{sub 6}As{sub 2}W{sub 21}O{sub 69} as the only proton conducting component are presented for the first time. Both thin pellets of HPA and composite membranes of 1:1 (w/w) of HPA and polyvinylidenedifluoride-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) are investigated. Although the pellets are somewhat variable, the HPA phase changes can be observed by electrochemistry and these materials show promise for solid acid fuel cell performance at >200 C. The high proton conductivities reported for HPAs at RT are demonstrated in fuel cells using HPA/PVDF-HFP composites with limiting current densities as high as 1.6 A cm{sup -2} using dry O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. Moderate fuel cell activity is demonstrated for {alpha}-H{sub 3}PW{sub 18}O{sub 62} at 120 C and 25%RH. Unfortunately all of the materials studied were somewhat porous and the open circuit potentials observed were somewhat low. We were also able to show that an HPA fuel cell could be shorted by reduction of the HPA to a heteropoly blue under exceptional circumstances. (author)

  14. Studies of heteropoly acid/polyvinylidenedifluoride-hexafluoroproylene composite membranes and implication for the use of heteropoly acids as the proton conducting component in a fuel cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malers, Jennifer L.; Sweikart, Mary-Ann; Horan, James L.; Turner, John A.; Herring, Andrew M.

    Complete polarization curves for a number of heteropoly acids (HPAs), H 3PW 12O 40, α-H 3P 2W 18O 62, H 6P 2W 21O 71, and H 6As 2W 21O 69 as the only proton conducting component are presented for the first time. Both thin pellets of HPA and composite membranes of 1:1 (w/w) of HPA and polyvinylidenedifluoride-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) are investigated. Although the pellets are somewhat variable, the HPA phase changes can be observed by electrochemistry and these materials show promise for solid acid fuel cell performance at >200 °C. The high proton conductivities reported for HPAs at RT are demonstrated in fuel cells using HPA/PVDF-HFP composites with limiting current densities as high as 1.6 A cm -2 using dry O 2 and H 2. Moderate fuel cell activity is demonstrated for α-H 3PW 18O 62 at 120 °C and 25%RH. Unfortunately all of the materials studied were somewhat porous and the open circuit potentials observed were somewhat low. We were also able to show that an HPA fuel cell could be shorted by reduction of the HPA to a heteropoly blue under exceptional circumstances.

  15. Expression of Mitochondrial Branched-Chain Aminotransferase and α-Keto-Acid Dehydrogenase in Rat Brain: Implications for Neurotransmitter Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Thomas Cole

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, metabolism of the essential branched chain amino acids (BCAAs leucine, isoleucine and valine, is regulated in part by protein synthesis requirements. Excess BCAAs are catabolized or excreted. The first step in BCAA catabolism is catalyzed by the branched chain aminotransferase (BCAT isozymes, mitochondrial BCATm and cytosolic BCATc. A product of this reaction, glutamate, is the major excitatory neurotransmitter and precursor of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter -aminobutyric acid (GABA. The BCATs are thought to participate in an α-keto-acid nitrogen shuttle that provides nitrogen for synthesis of glutamate from -ketoglutarate. The branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC catalyzes the second and first irreversible step in BCAA metabolism, which is oxidative decarboxylation of the branched-chain α-keto acid (BCKA products of the BCAT reaction. Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD results from genetic defects in BCKDC, which leads to accumulation of toxic levels of BCAAs and BCKAs that result in brain swelling. Immunolocalization of BCATm and BCKDC in rats revealed that BCATm is present in astrocytes in white matter and in neuropil, while BCKDC is expressed only in neurons. BCATm appears uniformly distributed in astrocyte cell bodies throughout the brain. The segregation of BCATm to astrocytes and BCKDC to neurons provides further support for the existence of a BCAA-dependent glial-neuronal nitrogen shuttle since the data show that BCKAs produced by glial BCATm must be exported to neurons. Additionally, the neuronal localization of BCKDC suggests that MSUD is a neuronal defect involving insufficient oxidation of BCKAs, with secondary effects extending beyond the neuron.

  16. A fish is not a fish: patterns in fatty acid composition of aquatic food may have had implications for hominin evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joordens, Josephine C A; Kuipers, Remko S; Wanink, Jan H; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2014-12-01

    From c. 2 Ma (millions of years ago) onwards, hominin brain size and cognition increased in an unprecedented fashion. The exploitation of high-quality food resources, notably from aquatic ecosystems, may have been a facilitator or driver of this phenomenon. The aim of this study is to contribute to the ongoing debate on the possible role of aquatic resources in hominin evolution by providing a more detailed nutritional context. So far, the debate has focused on the relative importance of terrestrial versus aquatic resources while no distinction has been made between different types of aquatic resources. Here we show that Indian Ocean reef fish and eastern African lake fish yield on average similarly high amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (AA). Hence a shift from exploiting tropical marine to freshwater ecosystems (or vice versa) would entail no material difference in dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) availability. However, a shift to marine ecosystems would likely mean a major increase in access to brain-selective micronutrients such as iodine. Fatty fish from marine temperate/cold waters yield twice as much DHA and four times as much EPA as tropical fish, demonstrating that a latitudinal shift in exploitation of African coastal ecosystems could constitute a significant difference in LC-PUFA availability with possible implications for brain development and functioning. We conclude that exploitation of aquatic food resources could have facilitated the initial moderate hominin brain increase as observed in fossils dated to c. 2 Ma, but not the exceptional brain increase in later stages of hominin evolution. We propose that the significant expansion in hominin brain size and cognition later on may have been aided by strong directional selecting forces such as runaway sexual selection of intelligence, and nutritionally supported by exploitation of high-quality food resources in stable and

  17. Dipeptide Formation from Amino Acid Monomer Induced by keV Ion Irradiation: An Implication for Physicochemical Repair by Radiation Itself

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; YUAN Hang; WANG Xiangqin; YU Zengliang

    2008-01-01

    An identification of Phe dipeptide from L-phenylalanine monomers after keV nitro-gen and argon ion implantation, by using the HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) and LC-MS(liquid chromatography mass spectrometer) methods is reported. The results showed a similar yield behavior for both ion species, namely: 1) the yield of dipeptides under alkalescent conditions was distinctly higher than that under acidic or neutral conditions; 2) for different ion species, the dose-yield curves tracked a similar trend which was called a counter-saddle curve. The dipeptide formation may implicate a recombination repair mechanism of damaged biomolecules that energetic ions have left in their wake. Accordingly a physicochemical self-repair mechanism by radiation itself for the ion-beam radiobiological effects is proposed.

  18. Crystal Structure of Okadaic Acid Binding Protein 2.1: A Sponge Protein Implicated in Cytotoxin Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehara, Haruhiko; Makino, Marie; Kodama, Koichiro; Konoki, Keiichi; Ito, Takuhiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Fukuzawa, Seketsu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tachibana, Kazuo

    2015-07-06

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a marine polyether cytotoxin that was first isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai. OA is a potent inhibitor of protein serine/threonine phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A, and the structural basis of phosphatase inhibition has been well investigated. However, the role and mechanism of OA retention in the marine sponge have remained elusive. We have solved the crystal structure of okadaic acid binding protein 2.1 (OABP2.1) isolated from H. okadai; it has strong affinity for OA and limited sequence homology to other proteins. The structure revealed that OABP2.1 consists of two α-helical domains, with the OA molecule deeply buried inside the protein. In addition, the global fold of OABP2.1 was unexpectedly similar to that of aequorin, a jellyfish photoprotein. The presence of structural homologues suggested that, by using similar protein scaffolds, marine invertebrates have developed diverse survival systems adapted to their living environments.

  19. Element mobility during pyrite weathering: implications for acid and heavy metal pollution at mining-impacted sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Long; Wang, Rucheng; Chen, Fanrong; Xue, Jiyue; Zhang, Peihua; Lu, Jianjun

    2005-11-01

    Based on back scattered electron images and electron micro-probe analysis results, four alteration layers, including a transition layer, a reticulated ferric oxide layer, a nubby ferric oxide layer and a cellular ferric oxide layer, were identified in the naturally weathering products of pyrite. These layers represent a progressive alteration sequence of pyrite under weathering conditions. The cellular ferric oxide layer correlates with the strongest weathering phase and results from the dissolution of nubby ferric oxide by acidic porewater. Leaching coefficient was introduced to better express the response of element mobility to the degree of pyrite weathering. Its variation shows that the mobility of S, Co and Bi is stronger than As, Cu and Zn. Sulfur in pyrite is oxidized to sulfuric acid and sulfate that are basically released into to porewater, and heavy metals Co and Bi are evidently released by acid dissolution. As, Cu and Zn are enriched in ferric oxide by adsorption and by co-precipitation, but they would re-release to the environment via desorption or dissolution when porewater pH becomes low enough. Consequently, Co, Bi, As, Cu and Zn may pose a substantial impact on water quality. Considering that metal mobility and its concentration in mine waste are two important factors influencing heavy metal pollution at mining-impacted sites, Bi and Co are more important pollutants in this case.

  20. Rhizosphere bacterial carbon turnover is higher in nucleic acids than membrane lipids: implications for understanding soil carbon cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish A. Malik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Using a pulse-chase 13CO2 plant labeling experiment we compared the flow of plant carbon into macromolecular fractions of root-associated soil microorganisms. Time dependent 13C dilution patterns in microbial cellular fractions were used to calculate their turnover time. The turnover times of microbial biomolecules were found to vary: microbial RNA (19 h and DNA (30 h turned over fastest followed by chloroform fumigation extraction-derived soluble cell lysis products (14 d, while phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs had the slowest turnover (42 d. PLFA/NLFA 13C analyses suggest that both mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi are dominant in initial plant carbon uptake. In contrast, high initial 13C enrichment in RNA hints at bacterial importance in initial C uptake due to the dominance of bacterial derived RNA in total extracts of soil RNA. To explain this discrepancy, we observed low renewal rate of bacterial lipids, which may therefore bias lipid fatty acid based interpretations of the role of bacteria in soil microbial food webs. Based on our findings, we question current assumptions regarding plant-microbe carbon flux and suggest that the rhizosphere bacterial contribution to plant assimilate uptake could be higher. This highlights the need for more detailed quantitative investigations with nucleic acid biomarkers to further validate these findings.

  1. Microbial degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid: Insight into the enzymes and catabolic genes involved, their regulation and biotechnological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Trefault, Nicole; Olaniran, Ademola Olufolahan

    2016-01-01

    A considerable progress has been made to understand the mechanisms of biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). 2,4-D biodegradation pathway has been elucidated in many microorganisms including Cupriavidus necator JMP134 (previously known as Wautersia eutropha, Ralstonia eutropha and Alcaligenes eutrophus) and Pseudomonas strains. It generally involves the side chain removal of 2,4-D by α-ketoglutarate-dependent 2,4-D dioxygenase (tfdA) to form 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP); hydroxylation of 2,4-DCP by 2,4-DCP hydroxylase (tfdB) to form dichlorocatechol; ortho or meta cleavage of dichlorocatechol by chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase (tfdC) to form 2,4-dichloro-cis,cis-muconate; conversion of 2,4-dichloro-cis,cis-muconate to 2-chlorodienelactone by chloromuconate cycloisomerase (tfdD); conversion of 2-chlorodienelactone to 2-chloromaleylacetate by chlorodienelactone hydrolase (tfdE) and, finally, conversion of 2-chloromaleylacetate to 3-oxoadepate via maleylacetate by chloromaleylacetate reductase and maleylacetate reductase (tfdF), respectively, which is funnelled to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The latest review on microbial breakdown of 2,4-D, other halogenated aromatic pesticides, and related compounds was compiled by Haggblom, however, a considerable progress has been made in this area of research since then. Thus, this review focuses on the recent advancement on 2,4-D biodegradation, the enzymes, and genes involved and their biotechlogical implications.

  2. Impacts of changing food webs in Lake Ontario: Implications of dietary fatty acids on growth of alewives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, R.J.; Demarche, C.J.; Honeyfield, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    Declines in the abundance and condition of Great Lakes Alewives have been reported periodically during the last two decades, and the reasons for these declines remain unclear. To better understand how food web changes may influence Alewife growth and Wisconsin growth model predictions, we fed Alewives isocaloric diets high in omega-6 fatty acids (corn oil) or high in omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil). Alewives were fed the experimental diets at either 1% ("low ration") or 3% ("high ration") of their wet body weight per day. After six weeks, Alewives maintained on the high ration diets were significantly larger than those fed the low ration diets. Moreover, Alewives given the high ration fish oil diet were significantly larger than those maintained on the high ration corn oil diet after six weeks of growth. Body lipid, energy density and total body energy of Alewives on the high ration diets were significantly higher than those fed the low ration diets, and total body energy was significantly higher in Alewives given the high ration fish oil diet compared to those on the high ration corn oil diet. The current Wisconsin bioenergetics model underestimated growth and overestimated food consumption by Alewives in our study. Alewife thiaminase activity was similar among treatment groups. Overall, our results suggest that future food web changes in Lake Ontario, particularly if they involve decreases in the abundance of lipid rich prey items such as Mysis, may reduce Alewife growth rates and total body energy due to reductions in the availability of dietary omega-3 fatty acids. ?? 2011 AEHMS.

  3. The implications of particle energy and acidic media on gross alpha and gross beta determination using liquid scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata-Garcia, D. [Laboratori de Radiologia Ambiental (LRA), Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1-11 Planta 3, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Llaurado, M., E-mail: montse.llaurado@ub.edu [Laboratori de Radiologia Ambiental (LRA), Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1-11 Planta 3, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rauret, G. [Laboratori de Radiologia Ambiental (LRA), Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1-11 Planta 3, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    The interaction of humans with radioactivity present in the environment from natural and artificial sources necessitates an evaluation of its risk on human health. Gross alpha and gross beta activities can provide a rapid evaluation of the radioactive content of a sample and can be simultaneously determined by using liquid scintillation counters. However, calibration of the liquid scintillation counter is required and is affected by many factors, such as particle energy and the acidity of the media. This study investigates what effect the particle energy used for calibration has on misclassification and how to account for this misclassification in routine measurements. The variability in measurement produced by the final pH, as well as any acids used in sample treatment, was also studied. These results showed that the most commonly used acid for these types of analyses, HNO{sub 3}, produced a high amount of misclassifications at very low pH. The results improved when HCl was used to adjust the sample to low pH. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the effect of alpha and beta energies on PSA optimisation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum PSA shifts to higher values as the alpha energy increases. Beta energies do not affect it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the effect of pH on the simultaneous determination of gross alpha/beta activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HNO{sub 3} produces a high amount of misclassification at very low pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results improve when HCl is used to adjust the sample to low pH.

  4. Tannerella forsythia strains display different cell-surface nonulosonic acids: biosynthetic pathway characterization and first insight into biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Valentin; Janesch, Bettina; Windwarder, Markus; Maresch, Daniel; Braun, Matthias L; Megson, Zoë A; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Goneau, Marie-France; Sharma, Ashu; Altmann, Friedrich; Messner, Paul; Schoenhofen, Ian C; Schäffer, Christina

    2016-12-16

    Tannerella forsythia is an anaerobic, Gram-negative periodontal pathogen. A unique O-linked oligosaccharide decorates the bacterium's cell surface proteins and was shown to modulate the host immune response. In our study, we investigated the biosynthesis of the nonulosonic acid (NulO) present at the terminal position of this glycan. A bioinformatic analysis of T. forsythia genomes revealed a gene locus for the synthesis of pseudaminic acid (Pse) in the type strain ATCC 43037 while strains FDC 92A2 and UB4 possess a locus for the synthesis of legionaminic acid (Leg) instead. In contrast to the NulO in ATCC 43037, which has been previously identified as a Pse derivative (5-N-acetimidoyl-7-N-glyceroyl-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-l-glycero-l-manno-NulO), glycan analysis of strain UB4 performed in this study indicated a 350-Da, possibly N-glycolyl Leg (3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-NulO) derivative with unknown C5,7 N-acyl moieties. We have expressed, purified and characterized enzymes of both NulO pathways to confirm these genes' functions. Using capillary electrophoresis (CE), CE-mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, our studies revealed that Pse biosynthesis in ATCC 43037 essentially follows the UDP-sugar route described in Helicobacter pylori, while the pathway in strain FDC 92A2 corresponds to Leg biosynthesis in Campylobacter jejuni involving GDP-sugar intermediates. To demonstrate that the NulO biosynthesis enzymes are functional in vivo, we created knockout mutants resulting in glycans lacking the respective NulO. Compared to the wild-type strains, the mutants exhibited significantly reduced biofilm formation on mucin-coated surfaces, suggestive of their involvement in host-pathogen interactions or host survival. This study contributes to understanding possible biological roles of bacterial NulOs.

  5. The Implications of Fe2O3 and TiO2 Nanoparticles on the Removal of Trichloroethylene by Activated Carbon in the Presence and Absence of Humic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The implications of Fe2O3 and TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) on a granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorber and their impact on the removal of Trichloroethylene (TCE) were investigated in the presence of humic acid (HA). The surface charge of the GAC and NPs was obtained in the presence...

  6. The essential oil of bergamot enhances the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters in the hippocampus of rat: implication of monoterpene hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Luigi A; Rombolà, Laura; Pelle, Cinzia; Corasaniti, Maria T; Zappettini, Simona; Paudice, Paolo; Bonanno, Giambattista; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2007-04-01

    The effects of bergamot essential oil (BEO) on the release of amino acid neurotransmitters in rat hippocampus have been studied by in vivo microdialysis and by in vitro superfusion of isolated nerve terminals. Intraperitoneal administration of BEO (100microl/kg) significantly elevated the extracellular concentration of aspartate, glycine and taurine in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. A dose-relation study generated a bell-shaped curve. When perfused into the hippocampus via the dialysis probe (20microl/20min), BEO produced a significant increase of extracellular aspartate, glycine, taurine as well as of GABA and glutamate. The augmentation of all amino acids was Ca(2+)-independent. Focally injected 1:1 diluted BEO preferentially caused extracellular increase of glutamate. Interestingly, this release appeared to be strictly Ca(2+)-dependent. BEO concentration-dependently enhanced the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from superfused hippocampal synaptosomes. Similar results were obtained by monitoring the BEO-evoked release of endogenous glutamate. At relatively high concentrations, the BEO-induced [(3)H]d-aspartate release was almost entirely prevented by the glutamate transporter blocker dl-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartic acid (DL-TBOA) and was Ca(2+)-independent. At relatively low concentrations the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate was only in part ( approximately 50%) DL-TBOA-sensitive and Ca(2+)-independent; the remaining portion of release was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+). Interestingly, the monoterpene hydrocarbon-free fraction of the essential oil appeared to be inactive while the bergapten-free fraction superimposed the releasing effect of BEO supporting the deduction that psoralens may not be implicated. To conclude, BEO contains into its volatile fraction still unidentified monoterpene hydrocarbons able to stimulate glutamate release by transporter reversal and/or by exocytosis, depending on the dose administered.

  7. Ácidos graxos trans: implicações nutricionais e fontes na dieta Trans fatty acids: nutritional implications and sources in the diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Antunes Martin

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo revisa as principais fontes de ácidos graxos trans na dieta e as implicações nutricionais da ingestão elevada destes isômeros. São apresentados resumidamente os métodos analíticos utilizados na identificação e quantificação dos ácidos graxos trans, sendo abordados as suas vantagens e desvantagens. Os alimentos que empregam gordura parcialmente hidrogenada na sua produção, são fontes importantes de isômeros trans na dieta da maior parte da população em países industrializados. Este estudo compara os níveis de ácidos graxos trans em gorduras hidrogenadas, margarinas e batatas frita, analisados em diversos países, incluindo o Brasil. Esta avaliação indica a presença de níveis elevados de isômeros trans em alimentos produzidos no Brasil.This article review the main sources of trans fatty acids in the diet and nutritional implications of the high intake of these isomers. Analytical methods for the identification and quantification of trans fatty acids are presented briefly with regard to advantages and drawbacks of each method. Foods make with partially hidrogenated fats are important sources of trans isomers in the diets of most people in industrialized countries. It is made a comparison between levels of trans fatty acids in shortenings, margarines and potato chips evaluated in Brazil and in other countries. High levels of trans isomers are noted in Brazilian foods.

  8. Propane-1,3-diammonium bis[aquachlorido(4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato-κ3O2,N,O6mercurate(II] tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Aghabozorg

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of mercury(II chloride dihydrate, propane-1,3-diamine and 4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid in a 1:1:1 molar ratio in aqueous solution, resulted in the formation of the title compound, (C3H12N2[Hg(C7H3NO5Cl(H2O]2·4H2O or (pnH2[Hg(hypydcCl(H2O]2·4H2O (where pn is propane-1,3-diamine and hypydcH2 is 4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid. The metal atom is coordinated by one chloride group, one water molecule cis to the chloride ligand and one (hypydc2− ligand. The coordinated water molecule is almost perpendicular to the plane of the aromatic ring of (hypydc2−. The geometry of the resulting HgClNO3 coordination can be described as distorted square-pyramidal. This structure also contains propane-1,3-diammonium (site symmetry 2 as a counter-ion and four uncoordinated water molecules. There is a wide range of non-covalent interactions consisting of hydrogen bonding [of the types O—H...O, N—H...O and C—H...O, with D...A ranging from 2.548 (5 to 3.393 (6 Å] and ion pairing.

  9. Clinical Implications of 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid in the Kidney, Liver, Lung and Brain: An Emerging Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshenawy, Osama H.; Shoieb, Sherif M.; Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O.S.

    2017-01-01

    Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) is an important pathway for the formation of eicosanoids. The ω-hydroxylation of AA generates significant levels of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in various tissues. In the current review, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in the kidney, liver, lung, and brain during physiological and pathophysiological states. Moreover, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in tumor formation, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In the kidney, 20-HETE is involved in modulation of preglomerular vascular tone and tubular ion transport. Furthermore, 20-HETE is involved in renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and polycystic kidney diseases. The role of 20-HETE in the liver is not clearly understood although it represents 50%–75% of liver CYP-dependent AA metabolism, and it is associated with liver cirrhotic ascites. In the respiratory system, 20-HETE plays a role in pulmonary cell survival, pulmonary vascular tone and tone of the airways. As for the brain, 20-HETE is involved in cerebral I/R injury. Moreover, 20-HETE has angiogenic and mitogenic properties and thus helps in tumor promotion. Several inhibitors and inducers of the synthesis of 20-HETE as well as 20-HETE analogues and antagonists are recently available and could be promising therapeutic options for the treatment of many disease states in the future. PMID:28230738

  10. [Formation and environmental implications of iron-enriched precipitates derived from natural neutralization of acid mine drainage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue-Fei; Xie, Yue; Zhou, Li-Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) and its natural neutralizing products in Wangjiatan iron mine were collected and analyzed by using spectroscopic and electron microanalytic methods. The results show that after natural neutralization of AMD by surface water of the stream, acidity and electric conductivity of AMD are both decreased. While for dissolved elements, no other element is obviously decreased except for Fe3+, SO4(2-), and Ca2+. For precipitates formed by natural neutralization, Fe is enriched and ferrihydrite is the main iron mineral, with little amount of goethite and fibroferrite contained in downstream precipitates. To ferrihydrite, 2-line and 6-line ferrihydrite are the main mineral type in upstream and downstream precipitates, respectively. Furthermore, for all precipitates, two layers are observed. In outer layer 2-line ferrihydrite is the main mineral, while in inner layer 6-line ferrihydrite and goethite are the main minerals. Ferrihydrite dominated precipitates are favorable in immobilizing toxic and hazardous elements. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pH and the concentration of SO4(2-) are decisive factors for ferrihydrite formation. The ferrihydrite translocation and its attenuation for toxic elements are, to a great extent, affected by hydrodynamics in neutralization zone.

  11. Eukaryotic stromatolite builders in acid mine drainage: Implications for Precambrian iron formations and oxygenation of the atmosphere?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography, Geology & Anthropology

    2002-07-01

    Biological activity of Euglena mutabilis, an acidophilic, photosynthetic protozoan, contributes to the formation of Fe-rich stromatolites in acid mine drainage systems. E. mutabilis is the dominant microbe in bright green benthic mats (biofilm), coating drainage channels at abandoned coal mine sites in Indiana. It builds biolaminates through phototactic and aerotactic behavior, similar to prokaryotes, by moving through precipitates that periodically cover the mats. E. mutabilis also contributes to formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by (1) intracellularly storing Fe compounds released after death, contributing to the solid material of stromatolites and acting as nucleation sites for precipitation of authigenic Fe minerals, and (2) generating 02 via photosynthesis that further facilitates precipitation of reduced Fe, any excess 02 not consumed by Fe precipitation being released to the atmosphere. Recognition of E. mutabilis-dominated biofilm in acidic systems raises a provocative hypothesis relating processes involved in formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by E. mutabilis to those responsible for development of Precambrian stromatolitic Fe formations and oxygenation of the early atmosphere.

  12. Mechanism of poly(acrylic acid) acceleration of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin: implications for the design of novel heparin mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Bernhard H; Cheang, Kai I; Desai, Umesh R

    2005-08-11

    The bridging mechanism of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin is a dominant mechanism contributing a massive approximately 2500-fold acceleration in the reaction rate and is also a key reason for the clinical usage of heparin. Our recent study of the antithrombin-activating properties of a carboxylic acid-based polymer, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), demonstrated a surprisingly high acceleration in thrombin inhibition (Monien, B. H.; Desai, U. R. J. Med. Chem. 2005, 48, 1269). To better understand this interesting phenomenon, we have studied the mechanism of PAA-dependent acceleration in antithrombin inhibition of thrombin. Competitive binding studies with low-affinity heparin and a heparin tetrasaccharide suggest that PAA binds antithrombin in both the pentasaccharide- and the extended heparin-binding sites, and these results are corroborated by molecular modeling. The salt-dependence of the K(D) of the PAA-antithrombin interaction shows the formation of five ionic interactions. In contrast, the contribution of nonionic forces is miniscule, resulting in an interaction that is significantly weaker than that observed for heparins. A bell-shaped profile of the observed rate constant for antithrombin inhibition of thrombin as a function of PAA concentration was observed, suggesting that inhibition proceeds through the "bridging" mechanism. The knowledge gained in this mechanistic study highlights important rules for the rational design of orally available heparin mimics.

  13. Clinical Implications of 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid in the Kidney, Liver, Lung and Brain: An Emerging Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama H. Elshenawy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA is an important pathway for the formation of eicosanoids. The ω-hydroxylation of AA generates significant levels of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE in various tissues. In the current review, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in the kidney, liver, lung, and brain during physiological and pathophysiological states. Moreover, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in tumor formation, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In the kidney, 20-HETE is involved in modulation of preglomerular vascular tone and tubular ion transport. Furthermore, 20-HETE is involved in renal 19 ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury and polycystic kidney diseases. The role of 20-HETE in the liver is not clearly understood although it represents 50%–75% of liver CYP-dependent AA metabolism, and it is associated with liver cirrhotic ascites. In the respiratory system, 20-HETE plays a role in pulmonary cell survival, pulmonary vascular tone and tone of the airways. As for the brain, 20-HETE is involved in cerebral I/R injury. Moreover, 20-HETE has angiogenic and mitogenic properties and thus helps in tumor promotion. Several inhibitors and inducers of the synthesis of 20-HETE as well as 20-HETE analogues and antagonists are recently available and could be promising therapeutic options for the treatment of many disease states in the future.

  14. Selective Adsorption and Chiral Amplification of Amino Acids in Vermiculite Clay -Implications for the origin of biochirality

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Donald G; Jakschitz, Thomas; Rode, Bernd M

    2010-01-01

    Smectite clays are hydrated layer silicates that, like micas, occur naturally in abundance. Importantly, they have readily modifiable interlayer spaces that provide excellent sites for nanochemistry. Vermiculite is one such smectite clay and in the presence of small chain-length alkyl-NH3Cl ions, forms sensitive, 1-D ordered model clay systems with expandable nano-pore inter-layer regions. These inter-layers readily adsorb organic molecules. N-propyl NH3Cl vermiculite clay gels were used to determine the adsorption of alanine, lysine and histidine by chiral HPLC. The results show that during reaction with fresh vermiculite interlayers, significant chiral enrichment of either L- and D-enantiomers occurs depending on the amino acid. Chiral enrichment of the supernatant solutions is up to about 1% per pass. In contrast, addition to clay interlayers already reacted with amino acid solutions resulted in little or no change in D/L ratio during the time of the experiment. Adsorption of small amounts of amphiphilic o...

  15. Correlation for the estimation of the density of fatty acid esters fuels and its implications. A proposed Biodiesel Cetane Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapuerta, Magín; Rodríguez-Fernández, José; Armas, Octavio

    2010-09-01

    Biodiesel fuels (methyl or ethyl esters derived from vegetables oils and animal fats) are currently being used as a means to diminish the crude oil dependency and to limit the greenhouse gas emissions of the transportation sector. However, their physical properties are different from traditional fossil fuels, this making uncertain their effect on new, electronically controlled vehicles. Density is one of those properties, and its implications go even further. First, because governments are expected to boost the use of high-biodiesel content blends, but biodiesel fuels are denser than fossil ones. In consequence, their blending proportion is indirectly restricted in order not to exceed the maximum density limit established in fuel quality standards. Second, because an accurate knowledge of biodiesel density permits the estimation of other properties such as the Cetane Number, whose direct measurement is complex and presents low repeatability and low reproducibility. In this study we compile densities of methyl and ethyl esters published in literature, and proposed equations to convert them to 15 degrees C and to predict the biodiesel density based on its chain length and unsaturation degree. Both expressions were validated for a wide range of commercial biodiesel fuels. Using the latter, we define a term called Biodiesel Cetane Index, which predicts with high accuracy the Biodiesel Cetane Number. Finally, simple calculations prove that the introduction of high-biodiesel content blends in the fuel market would force the refineries to reduce the density of their fossil fuels.

  16. Total antioxidant and ascorbic acid content of fresh fruits and vegetables: implications for dietary planning and food preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Yim Tong; Tomlinson, Brian; Benzie, Iris F F

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence links high intake of ascorbic acid (AA) and other antioxidant micronutrients to health promotion. It would be useful to know the overall, or 'total' antioxidant capacity of foods, to establish the contribution of AA to this, and to assess how this information may translate into dietary intakes to meet the new US daily reference intake for AA. In this study, the total antioxidant capacity, as the ferric reducing-antioxidant power (FRAP) value, and AA content of thirty-four types of fruits and vegetables were measured using a modified version of the FRAP assay, known as FRASC. This measures AA (reduced form only) simultaneously with the FRAP value. Results covered a wide range: 880-15940 micromol/kg fresh wet weight and food production, preparation, preservation, and aid dietary choices to increase antioxidant and AA intake. Furthermore, FRASC will facilitate bioavailability studies of antioxidants from different foods of known antioxidant capacity and AA content.

  17. Oxidation of formic acid by oxyanions of chlorine and its implications to the Viking Labeled Release experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, P.; Navarro-gonzalez, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Viking Landers that arrived on Mars in 1976 carried out three biological experiments designed to investigate if there was microbial life. These were the Gas-Exchange, Pyrolitic Release and Labeled Release experiments. The three experiments yielded positive responses but the Labeled Release experiment had a kinetic response indicative of microbial activity. The experiment consisted of adding a broth of nutrients (formic acid, glycolic acid, glycine, D- and L-alanine and D- and L-lactic acid uniformly marked with 14C) to martian soil samples. The results were surprising; the nutrients were consumed releasing radioactive gases in a manner that is compatible by terrestrial microorganisms. The existence of Martian life was contradicted by soil chemical analysis that indicated the absence of organic compounds above the detection limits of parts per billion (ppb). Instead the positive response of the Labeled Release Experiment was attributed to the existence of peroxides and/or superoxides in the Martian soils that destroyed the nutrients upon contact. Recently, the Phoenix mission that landed in the Martian Arctic in 2008 revealed the presence of a highly oxidized form of the element chlorine in the soil: perchlorate. Perchlorate is thought to have formed in the Martian atmosphere by the oxidation of chloride from volcanic sources with ozone. Therefore perchlorate is formed by the stepwise oxidation of hypochlorite, chlorite and chlorate. These oxyanions of chlorine are powerful oxidizers that may exist in the Martian soil and may have reacted with the nutrients of the Labeled Release Experiment. This paper aims to better understand these results by designing experiments to determine the kinetics of decomposition of formic acid to carbon dioxide with different oxidized forms of chlorine by headspace technique in gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC / MS). Previous studies done in the laboratory showed that only hypochlorite quantitatively reacted with

  18. Propane-1,2-diammonium bis(pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato-κ3O,N,O′nickelate(II tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghadermazi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of nickel(II nitrate hexahydrate, propane-1,2-diamine and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid in a 1:2:2 molar ratio in aqueous solution resulted in the formation of the title compound, (C3H12N2[Ni(C7H3NO42]·4H2O or (p-1,2-daH2[Ni(pydc2]·4H2O (where p-1,2-da is propane-1,2-diamine and pydcH2 is pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid. The geometry of the resulting NiN2O4 coordination can be described as distorted octahedral. Considerable C=O...π stacking interactions are observed between the carboxylate C=O groups and the pyridine rings of the (pydc2− fragments, with O...π distances of 3.1563 (12 and 3.2523 (12 Å and C=O...π angles of 95.14 (8 and 94.64 (8°. In the crystal structure, a wide range of non-covalent interactions, consisting of hydrogen bonding [O—H...O, N—H...O and C—H...O, with D...A distances ranging from 2.712 (2 to 3.484 (2 Å], ion pairing, π–π [centroid-to-centroid distance = 3.4825 (8 Å] and C=O...π stacking, connect the various components to form a supramolecular structure.

  19. A survey of mangiferin and hydroxycinnamic acid ester accumulation in coffee (Coffea) leaves: biological implications and uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Claudine; Mondolot, Laurence; Rakotondravao, Arsene; Bidel, Luc P. R.; Gargadennec, Annick; Couturon, Emmanuel; La Fisca, Philippe; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Jay-Allemand, Christian; Davis, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The phenolic composition of Coffea leaves has barely been studied, and therefore this study conducts the first detailed survey, focusing on mangiferin and hydroxycinnamic acid esters (HCEs). Methods Using HPLC, including a new technique allowing quantification of feruloylquinic acid together with mangiferin, and histochemical methods, mangiferin content and tissue localization were compared in leaves and fruits of C. pseudozanguebariae, C. arabica and C. canephora. The HCE and mangiferin content of leaves was evaluated for 23 species native to Africa or Madagascar. Using various statistical methods, data were assessed in relation to distribution, ecology, phylogeny and use. Key Results Seven of the 23 species accumulated mangiferin in their leaves. Mangiferin leaf-accumulating species also contain mangiferin in the fruits, but only in the outer (sporophytic) parts. In both leaves and fruit, mangiferin accumulation decreases with ageing. A relationship between mangiferin accumulation and UV levels is posited, owing to localization with photosynthetic tissues, and systematic distribution in high altitude clades and species with high altitude representatives. Analyses of mangiferin and HCE content showed that there are significant differences between species, and that samples can be grouped into species, with few exceptions. These data also provide independent support for various Coffea lineages, as proposed by molecular phylogenetic analyses. Sampling of the hybrids C. arabica and C. heterocalyx cf. indicates that mangiferin and HCE accumulation may be under independent parental influence. Conclusions This survey of the phenolic composition in Coffea leaves shows that mangiferin and HCE accumulation corresponds to lineage recognition and species delimitation, respectively. Knowledge of the spectrum of phenolic accumulation within species and populations could be of considerable significance for adaptation to specific environments. The potential

  20. Ice nucleation of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles and implication for cloud properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; Sanders, Cassandra; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-01

    Ice nucleation properties of atmospherically relevant dust minerals coated with soluble materials are not yet well understood. We determined ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw; 75 to 110%) for five different mineral dust types: (1) Arizona test dust, (2) illite, (3) montmorillonite, (4) K-feldspar, and (5) quartz. The particles were dry dispersed and size selected at 200 nm, and we determined the fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw. Under water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability. Under water-supersaturated conditions, however, we did not observe a significant coating effect (i.e., the bare and coated dust particles had nearly similar nucleating properties). X-ray diffraction patterns of the coated particles indicated that acid treatment altered the crystalline nature of the surface and caused structural disorder; thus, we concluded that the lack of such structured order reduced the ice nucleation efficiency of the coated particles in deposition ice nucleation mode. In addition, our single column model results show that coated particles significantly modify cloud properties such as ice crystal number concentration and ice water content compared to bare particles in water-subsaturated conditions. However, in water-supersaturated conditions, cloud properties differ only at warmer temperatures. These modeling results imply that future aged dust particle simulations should implement coating parameterizations to accurately predict cloud properties.

  1. Selective adsorption and chiral amplification of amino acids in vermiculite clay-implications for the origin of biochirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Donald G; Fitz, Daniel; Jakschitz, T; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-01-21

    Smectite clays are hydrated layer silicates that, like micas, occur naturally in abundance. Importantly, they have readily modifiable interlayer spaces that provide excellent sites for nanochemistry. Vermiculite is one such smectite clay and in the presence of small chain-length alkyl-NH(3)Cl ions forms sensitive, 1-D ordered model clay systems with expandable nano-pore inter-layer regions. These inter-layers readily adsorb organic molecules. n-Propyl NH(3)Cl vermiculite clay gels were used to determine the adsorption of alanine, lysine and histidine by chiral HPLC. The results show that during reaction with fresh vermiculite interlayers, significant chiral enrichment of either L- and D-enantiomers occurs depending on the amino acid. Chiral enrichment of the supernatant solutions is up to about 1% per pass. In contrast, addition to clay interlayers already reacted with amino acid solutions resulted in little or no change in D/L ratio during the time of the experiment. Adsorption of small amounts of amphiphilic organic molecules in clay inter-layers is known to produce Layer-by-Layer or Langmuir-Blodgett films. Moreover atomistic simulations show that self-organization of organic species in clay interlayers is important. These non-centrosymmetric, chirally active nanofilms may cause clays to act subsequently as chiral amplifiers, concentrating organic material from dilute solution and having different adsorption energetics for D- and L-enantiomers. The additional role of clays in RNA oligomerization already postulated by Ferris and others, together with the need for the organization of amphiphilic molecules and lipids noted by Szostak and others, suggests that such chiral separation by clays in lagoonal environments at normal biological temperatures might also have played a significant role in the origin of biochirality.

  2. Analysis of GTPases carrying hydrophobic amino acid substitutions in lieu of the catalytic glutamine: implications for GTP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rajeev; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Mishra, Shambhavi; Prakash, Balaji

    2005-05-01

    Ras superfamily GTP-binding proteins regulate important signaling events in the cell. Ras, which often serves as a prototype, efficiently hydrolyzes GTP in conjunction with its regulator GAP. A conserved glutamine plays a vital role in GTP hydrolysis in most GTP-binding proteins. Mutating this glutamine in Ras has oncogenic effects, since it disrupts GTP hydrolysis. The analysis presented here is of GTP-binding proteins that are a paradox to oncogenic Ras, since they have the catalytic glutamine (Glncat) substituted by a hydrophobic amino acid, yet can hydrolyze GTP efficiently. We term these proteins HAS-GTPases. Analysis of the amino acid sequences of HAS-GTPases reveals prominent presence of insertions around the GTP-binding pocket. Homology modeling studies suggest an interesting means to achieve catalysis despite the drastic hydrophobic substitution replacing the key Glncat of Ras-like GTPases. The substituted hydrophobic residue adopts a "retracted conformation," where it is positioned away from the GTP, as its role in catalysis would be unproductive. This conformation is further stabilized by interactions with hydrophobic residues in its vicinity. These interacting residues are strongly conserved and hydrophobic in all HAS-GTPases, and correspond to residues Asp92 and Tyr96 of Ras. An experimental support for the "retracted conformation" of Switch II arises from the crystal structures of Ylqf and hGBP1. This conformation allows us to hypothesize that, unlike in classical GTPases, catalytic residues could be supplied by regions other than the Switch II (i.e., either the insertions or a neighboring domain).

  3. Nutritional epigenetics with a focus on amino acids: implications for the development and treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Kaiji; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings from human and animal studies indicate that maternal undernutrition or overnutrition affects covalent modifications of the fetal genome and its associated histones that can be carried forward to subsequent generations. An adverse outcome of maternal malnutrition is the development of metabolic syndrome, which is defined as a cluster of disorders including obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and insulin resistance. The transgenerational impacts of maternal nutrition are known as fetal programming, which is mediated by stable and heritable alterations of gene expression through covalent modifications of DNA and histones without changes in DNA sequences (namely, epigenetics). The underlying mechanisms include chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation (occurring at the 5'-position of cytosine residues within CpG dinucleotides), histone modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and sumoylation) and expression and activity of small noncoding RNAs. The enzymes catalyzing these reactions include S-adenosylmethionine-dependent DNA and protein methyltransferases, DNA demethylases, histone acetylase (lysine acetyltransferase), general control nonderepressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferase (a superfamily of acetyltransferase) and histone deacetylase. Amino acids (e.g., glycine, histidine, methionine and serine) and vitamins (B6, B12 and folate) play key roles in provision of methyl donors for DNA and protein methylation. Therefore, these nutrients and related metabolic pathways are of interest in dietary treatment of metabolic syndrome. Intervention strategies include targeting epigenetically disturbed metabolic pathways through dietary supplementation with nutrients (particularly functional amino acids and vitamins) to regulate one-carbon-unit metabolism, antioxidative reactions and gene expression, as well as protein methylation and acetylation. These mechanism-based approaches may

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in High-Temperature Acidic Geothermal Springs and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaux M. Meslé

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, superoxide (O2•-, and hydroxyl radicals (OH• are produced in natural waters via ultraviolet (UV light-induced reactions between dissolved oxygen (O2 and organic carbon, and further reaction of H2O2 and Fe(II (i.e., Fenton chemistry. The temporal and spatial dynamics of H2O2 and other dissolved compounds [Fe(II, Fe(III, H2S, O2] were measured during a diel cycle (dark/light in surface waters of three acidic geothermal springs (Beowulf Spring, One Hundred Springs Plain, and Echinus Geyser Spring; pH = 3–3.5, T = 68–80°C in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park. In situ analyses showed that H2O2 concentrations were lowest (ca. 1 μM in geothermal source waters containing high dissolved sulfide (and where oxygen was below detection and increased by 2-fold (ca. 2–3 μM in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III-oxide mat formation down the water channel. Small increases in dissolved oxygen and H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux, but not consistently across all springs sampled. Iron-oxide microbial mats were sampled for molecular analysis of ROS gene expression in two primary autotrophs of acidic Fe(III-oxide mat ecosystems: Metallosphaera yellowstonensis (Archaea and Hydrogenobaculum sp. (Bacteria. Expression (RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response genes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, peroxidases of the primary autotrophs were used to evaluate possible changes in transcription across temporal, spatial, and/or seasonal samples. Data presented here documented the presence of H2O2 and general correlation with dissolved oxygen. Moreover, two dominant microbial populations expressed ROS response genes throughout the day, but showed less expression of key genes during peak sunlight. Oxidative stress response genes (especially external peroxidases were highly-expressed in microorganisms within Fe(III-oxide mat communities, suggesting a significant role for these proteins during survival and growth in

  5. Antimicrobial Effects of Free Nitrous Acid on Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Implications for Sulfide-Induced Corrosion of Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shu-Hong; Ho, Jun Yuan; Fan, Lu; Richardson, David J; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L

    2016-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sewers causes odor problems and asset deterioration due to the sulfide-induced concrete corrosion. Free nitrous acid (FNA) was recently demonstrated as a promising antimicrobial agent to alleviate hydrogen sulfide production in sewers. However, details of the antimicrobial mechanisms of FNA are largely unknown. Here, we report the multiple-targeted antimicrobial effects of FNA on the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough by determining the growth, physiological, and gene expression responses to FNA exposure. The activities of growth, respiration, and ATP generation were inhibited when exposed to FNA. These changes were reflected in the transcript levels detected during exposure. The removal of FNA was evident by nitrite reduction that likely involved nitrite reductase and the poorly characterized hybrid cluster protein, and the genes coding for these proteins were highly expressed. During FNA exposure, lowered ribosome activity and protein production were detected. Additionally, conditions within the cells were more oxidizing, and there was evidence of oxidative stress. Based on an interpretation of the measured responses, we present a model depicting the antimicrobial effects of FNA on D. vulgaris These findings provide new insight for understanding the responses of D. vulgaris to FNA and will provide a foundation for optimal application of this antimicrobial agent for improved control of sewer corrosion and odor management.IMPORTANCE Hydrogen sulfide produced by SRB in sewers causes odor problems and results in serious deterioration of sewer assets that requires very costly and demanding rehabilitation. Currently, there is successful application of the antimicrobial agent free nitrous acid (FNA), the protonated form of nitrite, for the control of sulfide levels in sewers (G. Jiang et al., Water Res 47:4331-4339, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2013.05.024). However, the details of the

  6. Kinetics of the esterification of active pharmaceutical ingredients containing carboxylic acid functionality in polyethylene glycol: formulation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Moesgaard, Birthe; Østergaard, Jesper

    2014-08-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are attractive as excipients in the manufacture of drug products because they are water soluble and poorly immunogenic. They are used in various pharmaceutical preparations. However, because of their terminal hydroxyl groups, PEGs can participate in esterification reactions. In this study, kinetics of two active pharmaceutical ingredients, cetirizine and indomethacin possessing carboxylic acid functionality, has been studied in PEG 400 and PEG 1000 at 50 °C, 60 °C, 70 °C, and 80 °C. HPLC-UV was applied for the determination of concentrations in the kinetic studies, whereas HPLC-MS was used to identify reaction products. The esterification reactions were observed to be reversible. A second-order reversible kinetic model was applied and rate constants were determined. The rate constants demonstrated that cetirizine was esterified about 240 times faster than indomethacin at 80 °C. The shelf-life for cetirizine in a PEG 400 formulation at 25 °C expressed as t(95%) was predicted to be only 30 h. Further, rate constants for esterification of cetirizine in PEG 1000 in relation to PEG 400 decreased by a factor of 10, probably related to increased viscosity. However, it is important to be aware of this drug-excipient interaction, as it can reduce the shelf-life of a low-average molecular weight PEG formulation considerably.

  7. Lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries for the Chinese electric bike market and implications on future technology advancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Burke, Andrew F.; Wei, Xuezhe

    China has been experiencing a rapid increase in battery-powered personal transportation since the late 1990s due to the strong growth of the electric bike and scooter (i.e. e-bike) market. Annual sales in China reached 17 million bikes year -1 in 2006. E-bike growth has been in part due to improvements in rechargeable valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery technology, the primary battery type for e-bikes. Further improvements in technology and a transition from VRLA to lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries will impact the future market growth of this transportation mode in China and abroad. Battery performance and cost for these two types are compared to assess the feasibility of a shift from VRLA to Li-ion battery e-bikes. The requirements for batteries used in e-bikes are assessed. A widespread shift from VRLA to Li-ion batteries seems improbable in the near future for the mass market given the cost premium relative to the performance advantages of Li-ion batteries. As both battery technologies gain more real-world use in e-bike applications, both will improve. Cell variability is a key problematic area to be addressed with VRLA technology. For Li-ion technology, safety and cost are the key problem areas which are being addressed through the use of new cathode materials.

  8. Lead Isotope Compositions of Acid Residues from Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for Heterogeneous Shergottite Source Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical studies of shergottites suggest that their parental magmas reflect mixtures between at least two distinct geochemical source reservoirs, producing correlations between radiogenic isotope compositions and trace element abundances. These correlations have been interpreted as indicating the presence of a reduced, incompatible element- depleted reservoir and an oxidized, incompatible- element-enriched reservoir. The former is clearly a depleted mantle source, but there is ongoing debate regarding the origin of the enriched reservoir. Two contrasting models have been proposed regarding the location and mixing process of the two geochemical source reservoirs: (1) assimilation of oxidized crust by mantle derived, reduced magmas, or (2) mixing of two distinct mantle reservoirs during melting. The former requires the ancient Martian crust to be the enriched source (crustal assimilation), whereas the latter requires isolation of a long-lived enriched mantle domain that probably originated from residual melts formed during solidification of a magma ocean (heterogeneous mantle model). This study conducts Pb isotope and trace element concentration analyses of sequential acid-leaching fractions (leachates and the final residues) from the geochemically depleted olivine-phyric shergottite Tissint. The results suggest that the Tissint magma is not isotopically uniform and sampled at least two geochemical source reservoirs, implying that either crustal assimilation or magma mixing would have played a role in the Tissint petrogenesis.

  9. Lipoic acid and haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movements: Implications for prophylactic antioxidant use in tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Joshua; Andreazza, Ana C; Navaid, Bushra; Wilson, Virginia S; Teo, Celine; Nesarajah, Yasika; Wilson, Alan A; Nobrega, José N; Fletcher, Paul J; Remington, Gary

    2017-01-04

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD), a potentially irreversible antipsychotic (AP)-related movement disorder, is a risk with all currently available antipsychotics. AP-induced vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) in rats, a preclinical model of TD, can be attenuated by antioxidant-based treatments although there is a shortage of well-designed studies. Lipoic acid (LA) represents a candidate antioxidant for the treatment of oxidative stress-related nervous system disorders; accordingly, its effects on AP-induced VCMs and striatal oxidative stress were examined. Rats treated with haloperidol decanoate (HAL; 21mg/kg every 3weeks, IM) for 12weeks were concurrently treated with LA (10 or 20mg/kg, PO). VCMs were assessed weekly by a blinded rater, and locomotor activity was evaluated as were striatal lipid peroxidation markers and serum HAL levels. VCMs were decreased by the lower dose (nonsignificant), whereas a significant increase was recorded with the higher dose of LA. HAL decreased locomotor activity and this was unaffected by LA. Striatal malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in HAL-treated rats were reduced by both LA doses, while 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) levels were predictive of final VCM scores (averaged across weeks 10-12). Study limitations include differences between antipsychotics in terms of oxidative stress, LA dosing, choice of biomarkers for lipid peroxidation, and generalizability to TD in humans. Collectively, current preclinical evidence does not support a "protective" role for antioxidants in preventing TD or its progression, although clinical evidence offers limited evidence supporting such an approach.

  10. Regulatory issues related to functional foods and natural health products in Canada: possible implications for manufacturers of conjugated linoleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Kelley C

    2004-06-01

    The Canadian Food and Drugs Act and Regulations, through its definitions of food and drug, currently restricts health-related claims for foods, food ingredients, and natural health products (NHPs). Over the past few decades, scientific research has led to a large body of information that demonstrates the benefits for health of many food and NHP ingredients. Health Canada recognized the constraints of the current regulatory environment and started to develop regulations related to the allowance of health claims for functional foods and NHPs, including those foods and NHPs that would contain conjugated linoleic acid isomers. Health Canada has 3 initiatives under way in the area of health claims for foods: 1) to adopt the generic health claims of the United States within a Canadian context, 2) to develop scientific standards of evidence and a guidance document for supporting the validity of product-specific claims, and 3) to develop an overall regulatory framework for functional foods. In 2000, Health Canada announced approval for the use of 5 generic diet-related health claims: sodium and hypertension, calcium and osteoporosis, saturated and trans fat and cholesterol and coronary artery disease, fruits and vegetables and cancer, and sugar alcohols and dental caries. Under a separate initiative, Natural Health Products Regulations were published in the Canada Gazette Part II on June 18, 2003. The NHP Regulations came into force on January 1, 2004, with a transition period ranging from 2 y (for site licensing) to 6 y (for product licensing, for products already issued a drug identification number).

  11. NUCLEOSYNTHETIC TUNGSTEN ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN ACID LEACHATES OF THE MURCHISON CHONDRITE: IMPLICATIONS FOR HAFNIUM-TUNGSTEN CHRONOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, Christoph; Wieler, Rainer [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, Clausiusstrasse 25, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Kleine, Thorsten [Institut fuer Planetologie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Dauphas, Nicolas, E-mail: burkhardt@erdw.ethz.ch [Origins Laboratory, Department of the Geophysical Sciences and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Progressive dissolution of the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite with acids of increasing strengths reveals large internal W isotope variations that reflect a heterogeneous distribution of s- and r-process W isotopes among the components of primitive chondrites. At least two distinct carriers of nucleosynthetic W isotope anomalies must be present, which were produced in different nucleosynthetic environments. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates follows a linear trend that is consistent with a mixing line between terrestrial W and a presumed s-process-enriched component. The composition of the s-enriched component agrees reasonably well with that predicted by the stellar model of s-process nucleosynthesis. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates provides a means for correcting the measured {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W of Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI) for nucleosynthetic anomalies using the isotopic variations in {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W. This new correction procedure is different from that used previously, and results in a downward shift of the initial {epsilon}{sup 182}W of CAI to -3.51 {+-} 0.10 (where {epsilon}{sup 182}W is the variation in 0.01% of the {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W ratio relative to Earth's mantle). This revision leads to Hf-W model ages of core formation in iron meteorite parent bodies that are {approx}2 Myr younger than previously calculated. The revised Hf-W model ages are consistent with CAI being the oldest solids formed in the solar system, and indicate that core formation in some planetesimals occurred within {approx}2 Myr of the beginning of the solar system.

  12. ELEVATED LEVELS OF KYNURENIC ACID DURING GESTATION PRODUCE NEUROCHEMICAL, MORPHOLOGICAL, AND COGNITIVE DEFICITS IN ADULTHOOD: IMPLICATIONS FOR SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershing, Michelle L.; Bortz, David M.; Pocivavsek, Ana; Fredericks, Peter J.; Jørgensen, Christinna V.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Leuner, Benedetta; Schwarcz, Robert; Bruno, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an endogenous negative modulator of alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs), are elevated in the brains of patients with schizophrenia (SZ). We reported that increases of brain KYNA in rats, through dietary exposure to its precursor kynurenine from embryonic day (ED)15 to postnatal day (PD) 21, result in neurochemical and cognitive deficits in adulthood. The present experiments focused on the effects of prenatal exposure to elevated kynurenine on measures of prefrontal excitability known to be impaired in SZ. Pregnant dams were fed a mash containing kynurenine (100 mg/day; progeny = EKYNs) from ED15 until ED22. Controls were fed an unadulterated mash (progeny = ECONs). The dietary loading procedure elevated maternal and fetal plasma kynurenine (2223% and 693% above controls, respectively) and increased fetal KYNA (forebrain; 500% above controls) on ED21. Elevations in forebrain KYNA disappeared after termination of the loading (PD2), but KYNA levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were unexpectedly increased again when measured in adults (PD56-80; 75% above controls). We also observed changes in several markers of prefrontal excitability, including expression of the α7nAChR (22% and 17% reductions at PD2 and PD56-80), expression of mGluR2 (31% and 24% reductions at ED21 and PD56-80), dendritic spine density (11–14% decrease at PD56-80), subsensitive mesolimbic stimulation of glutamate release in PFC, and reversal/extra-dimensional shift deficits in the prefrontally-mediated set-shifting task. These results highlight the deleterious impact of elevated KYNA levels during sensitive periods of early development, which model the pathophysiological and cognitive deficits seen in SZ. PMID:25446576

  13. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Udrescu, Corina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Tanguy, Ronan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Ruffion, Alain [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Sotton, Marie-Pierre [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Devonec, Marian [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Colombel, Marc [Department of Urology, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA.

  14. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate B cell activity in pre-clinical models: Implications for the immune response to infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Jarrett; Gowdy, Kymberly M; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2016-08-15

    B cell antigen presentation, cytokine production, and antibody production are targets of pharmacological intervention in inflammatory and infectious diseases. Here we review recent pre-clinical evidence demonstrating that pharmacologically relevant levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from marine fish oils influence key aspects of B cell function through multiple mechanisms. N-3 PUFAs modestly diminish B cell mediated stimulation of classically defined naïve CD4(+) Th1 cells through the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II pathway. This is consistent with existing data showing that n-3 PUFAs suppress the activation of Th1/Th17 cells through direct effects on helper T cells and indirect effects on antigen presenting cells. Mechanistically, n-3 PUFAs lower antigen presentation and T cell signaling by disrupting the formation of lipid microdomains within the immunological synapse. We then review data to show that n-3 PUFAs boost B cell activation and antibody production in the absence and presence of antigen stimulation. This has potential benefits for several clinical populations such as the aged and obese that have poor humoral immunity. The mode of action by which n-3 PUFA boost B cell activation and antibody production remains unclear, but may involve Th2 cytokines, enhanced production of specialized proresolving lipid mediators, and targeting of protein lateral organization in lipid microdomains. Finally, we highlight evidence to show that different n-3 PUFAs are not biologically equivalent, which has implications for the development of future interventions to target B cell activity.

  15. Peroxyacetic acid in urban and rural atmosphere: concentration, feedback on PAN-NOx cycle and implication on radical chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetic acid (PAA is one of the most important atmospheric organic peroxides, which have received increasing attention for their potential contribution to the oxidation capacity of the troposphere and the formation of secondary aerosols. We report here, for the first time, a series of data for atmospheric PAA concentrations at urban and rural sites, from five field campaigns carried out in China in summer 2006, 2007 and 2008. For these five measurements, daytime mean (08:00–20:00 LT PAA concentrations on sunlit days were 21.4–148.0 pptv with a maximum level of ~1 ppbv. The various meteorological and chemical parameters influencing PAA concentrations were examined using Principal Factor Analysis. This statistical analysis shows that the local photochemical production was the major source of PAA, and its concentration increased with increasing temperature, solar radiation and ozone but decreased with increasing NOx (NO and NO2, CO, SO2, and relative humidity. Based on the dataset, several issues are highlighted in this study: (i Because PAA is a product from the photochemical oxidation of some specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs that lead to acetyl peroxy radicals, the importance of various VOCs with respect to the PAA formation is therefore ranked using the incremental reactivity method. (ii The contribution of PAN thermal degradation to PAA formation under conditions of different NOx concentrations is estimated based on the chemical kinetics analysis. The result shows that PAN seems to play an important role in the formation of PAA when the NO/NO2 concentration ratio was less than 0.2 and PAA would correspondingly have feedback on the PAN-NOx cycle. (iii PAA and other peroxides, such as methyl hydroperoxide (MHP and H2O2, usually exhibited a similar asymmetric shape typically shifted to the afternoon. However, under some conditions, H2O2 diurnal cycle was out of phase with MHP and PAA. The combination of linear regression and

  16. Peroxyacetic acid in urban and rural atmosphere: concentration, feedback on PAN-NOx cycle and implication on radical chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Li

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetic Acid (PAA is one of important atmospheric organic peroxides, which have received increasing attention for their potential contribution to the oxidation capacity of the troposphere and the formation of secondary aerosols. We report here that, for the first time, a series of data for atmospheric PAA concentrations at urban and rural sites, from five field campaigns carried out in China in summer 2006, 2007 and 2008. For these five measurements, daytime mean PAA concentrations on sunlit days were 0.02–0.14 ppbv with a maximum level of ~1 ppbv. The various meteorological and chemical parameters influencing PAA concentrations were examined using the Principal Factor Analysis. This statistical analysis shows that the local photochemical production was the major source of PAA, and its concentration increased with increasing temperature, solar radiation and ozone but decreased with increasing NOx (NO and NO2, CO, SO2, and relative humidity. Based on the dataset, several issues are highlighted in this study: (i because PAA is a product from the photochemical oxidation of some specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs that lead to acetyl peroxy radicals, the importance of various VOCs with respect to the PAA formation is therefore ranked using the incremental reactivity method. (ii The contribution of PAN thermal degradation to PAA formation under conditions of different NOx concentrations is estimated based on the chemical kinetics analysis. The result shows that PAN seems to play an important role in the formation of PAA when the NO/NO2 concentration ratio was less than 0.2 and PAA would correspondingly have feedback on the PAN-NOx cycle. (iii PAA and other peroxides, such as methyl hydroperoxide (MHP and H2O2, usually exhibited a similar asymmetric shape typically shifted to the afternoon. However, at a high SO2 level, H2O2 showed a profile different from those of MHP and PAA. The combination of linear regression and chemical kinetics

  17. Scavenging of free-radical metabolites of aniline xenobiotics and drugs by amino acid derivatives: toxicological implications of radical-transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Karim; Baghdasarian, Argishti; Narwaley, Malyaj; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-12-16

    is proposed between aminocarboxylates and arylamine free radicals via the carboxylic group-linked tertiary nitrogen of the deprotonated amino acid derivatives. These findings may have significant implications for the biological fate of arylamine xenobiotic and drug free-radical metabolites.

  18. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eric P; Vasquez, Ernesto E; Scott, William G

    2014-09-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid-base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK(a) of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK(a) and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the potential

  19. Kinetic and product studies of Criegee intermediate reactions with halogenated and non-halogenated carboxylic acids and their implications in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Rotavera, Brandon; Eskola, Arkke; Taatjes, Craig; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley; Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Criegee intermediates are important species formed during the ozonolysis of alkenes. Direct measurement and modelling studies have shown that reactions of stabilized Criegee intermediates with species like SO2 and NO2 may have a significant effect in tropospheric chemistry.[1, 2] Reaction rates of Criegee intermediates with simple carboxylic acids like HCOOH and CH3COOH have been shown to be near the collision limit and may be a significant sink for these otherwise stable species in the atmosphere.[3, 4] Results obtained from our time-resolved Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) apparatus[5] for reactions of the Criegee intermediates, CH2OO and (CH3)2COO with various halogenated (CF3COOH, CF3CF2COOH, CClF2COOH and CHCl2COOH) and non-halogenated (HCOOH and CH3COOH) carboxylic acids will be presented, together with Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) based on these observations. Structure characterization of the products from these reactions using the Multiplexed PhotoIonization Mass Spectrometry (MPIMS) apparatus[1,3] as well as implications for Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation, assessed using the global atmospheric model STOCHEM, will also be discussed. Bibliography 1. O. Welz, J. D. Savee, D. L. Osborn, S. S. Vasu, C. J. Percival, D. E. Shallcross and C. A. Taatjes, Science, 2012, 335, 204-207. 2. C. J. Percival, O. Welz, A. J. Eskola, J. D. Savee, D. L. Osborn, D. O. Topping, D. Lowe, S. R. Utembe, A. Bacak, G. McFiggans, M. C. Cooke, P. Xiao, A. T. Archibald, M. E. Jenkin, R. G. Derwent, I. Riipinen, D. W. K. Mok, E. P. F. Lee, J. M. Dyke, C. A. Taatjes and D. E. Shallcross, Faraday Discuss., 2013, 165, 45-73. 3. O. Welz, A. J. Eskola, L. Sheps, B. Rotavera, J. D. Savee, A. M. Scheer, D. L. Osborn, D. Lowe, A. M. Booth, P. Xiao, M. A. H. Khan, C. J. Percival, D. E. Shallcross and C. A. Taatjes, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2014, 53, 4547-4550. 4. M. D. Hurley, M. P. S. Andersen, T. J. Wallington, D. A. Ellis, J. W. Martin and S. A. Mabury, J. Phys. Chem. A

  20. The binding of Aβ1-42 to lipid rafts of RBC is enhanced by dietary docosahexaenoic acid in rats: Implicates to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Hossain, Shahdat; Katakura, Masanori; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Shido, Osamu

    2015-06-01

    Once amyloid β peptides (Aβs) of the Alzheimer's disease build up in blood circulation, they are capable of binding to red blood cell (RBC) and inducing hemolysis of RBC. The mechanisms of the interactions between RBC and Aβ are largely unknown; however, it is very important for the therapeutic target of Aβ-induced hemolysis. In the present study, we investigated whether Aβ1-42 interacts with caveolin-1-containing detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) of RBC and whether the interaction could be modulated by dietary pre-administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). DHA pre-administration to rats inhibited hemolysis by Aβ1-42. This activity was accompanied by increased DHA levels and membrane fluidity and decreased cholesterol level, lipid peroxidation, and reactive oxygen species in the RBCs of the DHA-pretreated rats, suggesting that the antioxidative property of DHA may rescue RBCs from oxidative damage by Aβ1-42. The level of caveolin-1 was augmented in the DRMs of DHA-pretreated rats. Binding between Aβ1-42 and DRMs of RBC significantly increased in DHA-rats. When fluorescently labeled Aβ1-42 (TAMRA-Aβ1-42) was directly infused into the bloodstream, it again occupied the caveolin-1-containing DRMs of the RBCs from the DHA-rats to a greater extent, indicating that circulating Aβs interact with the caveolin-1-rich lipid rafts of DRMs and the interaction is stronger in the DHA-enriched RBCs. The levels of TAMRA-Aβ1-42 also increased in liver DRMs, whereas it decreased in plasma of DHA-pretreated rats. DHA might help clearance of circulating Aβs by increased lipid raft-dependent degradation pathways and implicate to therapies in Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Protein/energy ratios of current diets in developed and developing countries compared with a safe protein/energy ratio: implications for recommended protein and amino acid intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, D Joe; Jackson, Alan A

    2004-05-01

    Revised estimates of protein and amino acid requirements are under discussion by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)/World Health Organizaion (WHO), and have been proposed in a recent report on Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) from the USA. The nature and magnitude of these requirements are not entirely resolved, and no consideration has been given to the potential influence of metabolic adaptation on dietary requirements. We have examined the implications of these new values, and of the conceptual metabolic framework in which they are used, for defining the nutritional adequacy of protein intakes in developed and developing countries. We have expressed proposed values for protein requirements in relation to energy requirements, predicted for physical activity levels of 1.5, 1.75 and 2.0 times basal metabolic rate, in order to generate reference ratios for protein energy/total energy (reference P/E ratio) as a function of age, body weight, gender and physical activity level. Proposed values for amino acid requirements have been used to adjust the available digestible P/E ratio of foods and diets for protein quality. Focusing on the diets of UK omnivores and vegetarians and on diets in India, the risk of protein deficiency is evaluated from a comparison of P/E ratios of metabolic requirements with protein-quality-adjusted P/E ratios of intakes. A qualitative and conservative estimate of risk of deficiency is made by comparing the adjusted P/E ratio of the intake with a reference P/E ratio calculated for age, body weight, gender and physical activity according to FAO/WHO/United Nations University. A semi-quantitative estimate of risk of deficiency has also been made by the cut point approach, calculated as the proportion of the intake distribution below the mean P/E ratio of the requirement. Values for the quality-adjusted P/E ratio of the diet range from 0.126 for the UK omnivore diet to 0.054 for a rice-based diet of adults in West Bengal, which is lysine

  2. Study of interactions of L-aspartic acid and L-glutamic acid with some metal acetates through volumetric behaviour over the temperature range (288.15 to 318.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banipal, Tarlok S. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143 005 (India)], E-mail: tsbanipal@yahoo.com; Singh, Kultar [Department of Applied Chemistry, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143 005 (India); Banipal, Parampaul K. [Department of Chemistry, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143 005 (India); Kaur, Jasbir [Department of Applied Chemistry, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143 005 (India)

    2008-07-15

    Apparent molar volumes, V{sub 2,{phi}}, of L-aspartic acid and L-glutamic acid have been determined in aqueous solutions of (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0) mol . kg{sup -1} of lithium acetate dihydrate, magnesium acetate tetrahydrate, and calcium acetate at T = (288.15, 298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K by density measurements. The data have been used to calculate partial molar volume, V{sub 2}{sup 0}, and transfer function, {delta}{sub t}V{sup 0}, at infinite dilution from water to aqueous solutions of co-solutes by applying the correction due to ionisation of amino acids. Partial molar expansibilities, V{sub E}{sup 0}, hydration numbers, n{sub H}, and interaction coefficients of amino acids have also been determined. The dependence of above thermodynamic functions on concentration, temperature and nature of co-solute has been discussed in terms of various interactions taking place between hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of amino acids and ions of co-solutes. Further, a comparison between present work and data reported in the literature for neutral amino acids DL-alanine, DL-{alpha}-amino-n-butyric acid and their corresponding hydroxy derivatives, L-serine and L-threonine in aqueous solutions of these co-solutes has been made.

  3. Dimethoate modifies enhanced UV-B effects on growth, photosynthesis and oxidative stress in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) seedlings: implication of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay Pratap; Kumar, Jitendra; Singh, Samiksha; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2014-11-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate implication of salicylic acid (SA) in regulation of dimethoate (30 and 150 ppm designated as D1 and D2, respectively) and enhanced UV-B radiation (ambient + supplemental; ambient + 4.0 kJ m(-2) and ambient + 8.0 kJ m(-2), designated as UV-B1 and UV-B2, respectively) induced responses in mung bean seedlings. Seeds of Vigna radiata L. cv. Narendra 1 were surface sterilized, washed thoroughly and soaked for 24 h in sterilized distilled water. Soaked seeds were sown in acid washed sterilized sand filled in plastic trays, and incubated in dark at 26 ± 2 °C for 2 days. The seedlings were grown in growth chamber at 26 ± 2 °C with 12 h photoperiod (350 µmol photons m(-2 )s(-1), PAR) and watered regularly. Six day old seedlings of equal size were gently transferred in 0.2 strength Rorison nutrient medium (pH 6.8) for acclimatization. Thereafter, dimethoate (30 and 150 ppm designated as D1 and D2, respectively) and enhanced UV-B radiation treatments were given. On the 12th day, seedlings of each set were harvested and various parameters related to growth, pigments, photosynthesis, oxidative stress and antioxidant system were analyzed. The D2 dose of dimethoate and UV-B1 and UV-B2 alone and together significantly (P < 0.05) declined growth, photosynthetic pigments and photosynthesis (Fv/Fm and qP except NPQ) which were accompanied by significant decrease in SA level. Similarly, D2 and UV-B also enhanced (P < 0.05) accumulation of reactive oxygen species and concomitantly damaging effects on lipids, proteins and membrane stability were observed. In contrast, in SA-pretreated seedlings damaging impacts of D2, UV-B1 and UV-B2 alone and together were significantly (P < 0.05) alleviated. Besides this, interestingly D1 dose of dimethoate alone had stimulatory effect on growth and it also ameliorated damaging effects of both the doses of UV-B. The activity of superoxide dismutase was

  4. In silico analysis of amino acid biosynthesis and proteolysis in Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2038 and the implications for bovine milk fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huajun; Liu, Enuo; Hao, Pei; Konno, Tomonobu; Oda, Munehiro; Ji, Zai-Si

    2012-08-01

    The amino acid biosynthesis pathway and proteolytic system of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2038 (L. bulgaricus 2038), a mainstay of large-scale yogurt production, were modeled based on its genomic sequence. L. bulgaricus 2038 retains more potential for amino acid synthesis and a more powerful proteolytic system than other L. bulgaricus strains, but favors amino acid uptake over de novo synthesis. Free amino acids and peptides in bovine milk provide the main nitrogen sources; whey is more important than casein for L. bulgaricus during fermentation. Free amino acids are imported by amino acid permeases and by ABC-type transport systems whereas exogenous oligopeptides are imported by ABC-type proteins only. Histidine is neither synthesized nor imported singly, which might explain why L. bulgaricus cannot grow in synthetic media.

  5. Effects of phytanic acid on the vitamin E status, lipid composition and physical properties of retinal cell membranes: implications for adult Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S P; Johnson, A W; Muller, D P

    2001-12-01

    Adult Refsum disease is an inherited disorder in which phytanic acid accumulates in tissues and serum. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of this condition. The molecular distortion hypothesis suggests that phytanic acid may alter membrane composition and structure, thereby affecting membrane function(s). The anti-metabolite hypothesis suggests that an accumulation of phytanic acid in membranes may interfere with vitamin E function. These two hypotheses were investigated by studying the effects of modulating phytanic acid and alpha-tocopherol concentrations on the fatty acid composition and certain physical parameters of cultured retinal cells. Results showed that (a) the phospholipid fraction of retinal cells readily incorporated phytanic acid, (b) the incorporation of phytanic acid increased membrane fluidity, (c) there was no competition for uptake between phytanic acid and alpha-tocopherol, and (d) the incorporation of phytanic acid did not increase the susceptibility of membranes to lipid peroxidation in vitro. These results obtained with cultured retinal cells suggest that the molecular distortion hypothesis, but not the anti-metabolite hypothesis, could explain the pathogenesis of adult Refsum disease. In vitro tissue culture models can, however, only approximate to the much more complex situation that occurs in vivo.

  6. An ortholog of farA of Aspergillus nidulans is implicated in the transcriptional activation of genes involved in fatty acid utilization in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poopanitpan, Napapol; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki [Department of Biotechnology, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi 1-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Ohta, Akinori, E-mail: aaohta@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi 1-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} POR1 is a Yarrowia lipolytica ortholog of farA involved in fatty acid response in A. nidulans. {yields} Deletion of POR1 caused growth defects on fatty acids. {yields} {Delta}por1 strain exhibited defects in the induction of genes involved in fatty acid utilization. -- Abstract: The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica effectively utilizes hydrophobic substrates such as fatty acids and n-alkanes. To identify a gene(s) regulating fatty acid utilization in Y. lipolytica, we first studied homologous genes to OAF1 and PIP2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but their disruption did not change growth on oleic acid at all. We next characterized a Y. lipolytica gene, POR1 (primary oleate regulator 1), an ortholog of farA encoding a transcriptional activator that regulates fatty acid utilization in Aspergillus nidulans. The deletion mutant of POR1 was defective in the growth on various fatty acids, but not on glucose, glycerol, or n-hexadecane. It exhibited slight defect on n-decane. The transcriptional induction of genes involved in {beta}-oxidation and peroxisome proliferation by oleate was distinctly diminished in the {Delta}por1 strains. These data suggest that POR1 encodes a transcriptional activator widely regulating fatty acid metabolism in Y. lipolytica.

  7. Fatty acid profiles of marine benthic microorganisms isolated from the continental slope of bay of bengal: a possible implications in the benthic Food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Surajit; Lyla, P. S.; Khan, S. Ajmal

    2007-12-01

    Marine bacteria, actinomycetes and fungal strains were isolated from continental slope sediment of the Bay of Bengal and studied for fatty acid profile to investigate their involvement in the benthic food-web. Fifteen different saturated and unsaturated fatty acids from bacterial isolates, 14 from actinomycetes and fungal isolates were detected. The total unsaturated fatty acids in bacterial isolates ranged from 11.85 to 37.26%, while the saturated fatty acid ranged between 42.34 and 80.74%. In actinomycetes isolates, total unsaturated fatty acids varied from 27.86 to 38.85% and saturated fatty acids ranged from 35.29 to 51.25%. In fungal isolates unsaturated fatty acids ranged between 44.62 and 65.52% while saturated FA ranged from 20.80 to 46.30%. The higher percentages of unsaturated fatty acids from the microbial isolates are helpful in anticipating the active participation in the benthic food-web of Bay of Bengal.

  8. Characterization of Cg10062 from Corynebacterium glutamicum : Implications for the evolution of cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase activity in the tautomerase superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Serrano, Hector; Person, Maria D.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2008-01-01

    A 149-amino acid protein designated Cg10062 is encoded by a gene from Corynebacterium glutamicum. The physiological function of Cg10062 is unknown, and the gene encoding this protein has no obvious genomic context. Sequence analysis links Cg10062 to the cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-Caa

  9. Spectroscopic study on biological mackinawite (FeS) synthesized by ferric reducing bacteria (FRB) and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB): Implications for in-situ remediation of acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Liu, Jing; Dong, Faqin

    2017-02-01

    Mackinawite (FeS), widespread in low temperature aquatic environments, is generally considered to be the first Fe sulfide formed in sedimentary environments which has shown effective immobilization of heavy metals and toxic oxyanions through various sorption reactions. The spectroscopic study researches on mackinawite formed by FRB and SRB and its environmental implication for in-situ remediation of acid mine drainage where contains large amounts of Fe3 + and SO42 -. The XRD result of biologically synthetic particles shows that these particles are mainly composed of mackinawite (FeS0.9). The Raman peaks observed at 208, 256, 282, 298 cm- 1 are attributed to Fesbnd S stretching vibrations of mackinawite. The Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) reveals that the diagnostic bands of low intensity for these FeS particles occur at 412-425 cm- 1 and 607-622 cm- 1, which are assigned to the stretching vibrations of Ssbnd S and Fesbnd S bonds. The Raman and IR vibrations from organic components both confirm that these particles are biogenic origin. The IR spectra of biologically synthesized mackinawite for different aging times show that the nano-sized particles mackinwate will be completely oxidized within 10 h. All these findings have good implications for in-situ remediation of acid mine drainage.

  10. Implications of down regulation of rcsA and rcsA-regulated colanic acid biosynthesis genes in increased acid sensitivity and enhanced curli and biofilm production in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 strain 86-24, originally linked to a disease outbreak in the western USA in 1982, exhibits acid resistance as indicated by its ability to survive exposure to acidic conditions (pH2.5) for several hours. The strain 86-24 is a poor biofilm producer ...

  11. Stability of Aspartic Acid at 77°K under Gamma Radiation in a Comet Cores Simulation: Implications for Chemical Evolution Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Meléndez-López

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of organic matter in a simulated primitive environment (terrestrial or extraterrestrial has been widely studied. The stability of organic matter of biological significance, exposed to energy fields in primitive conditions, is equally important in the context of chemical evolution. We present a detailed analysis of the stability of prebiotic organic molecules under the effect of ionizing radiation at a low temperature, simulating a comet core. The laboratory simulation consists of icy phases of prototype organic matter and a mineral in a physical mixture. This chemical system was irradiated with gamma radiation at 77°K. The icy phases are methanol, formic acid, and aspartic acid in aqueous solution, in the presence of sodium montmorillonite as silicates surface.Our results show the stability of aspartic acid in this comet core simulation. We have been identified some radiolytic products of this mixture: ethylene glycol, glycolaldehyde, formamide, alanine, glycine and succinic acid. The products were identified by Gas Chromatography (GC and High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray IonizationMass Spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS. The protection role of the clay in the radiolysis of aspartic acid was observed in this mixture. This result may be due to an energy transfer from the clay. At pH=4, aspartic acid is adsorbed onto the clay at the interlayer channel as is shown in the X-ray diffractograms (XRD.

  12. Maternal intake of flaxseed-based diet (Linum usitatissimum) on hippocampus fatty acid profile: implications for growth, locomotor activity and spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Flavia Spreafico; de Souza, Amanda Santos; do Carmo, Maria das Graças Tavares; Boaventura, Gilson Teles

    2011-10-01

    To investigate flaxseed as a partial source of protein and an exclusive source of lipids and fibers in the development of the central nervous system by analyzing hippocampal fatty acid composition and cognitive and locomotor functions. Experimental diets were given to dams during preconception, pregnancy, and lactation and to their pups after weaning. Female Wistar rats were separated into three groups according to experimental diet: a control group (CG) and a flaxseed group (FG), fed ad libitum diets, and a modified control group (MCG), pair-fed with the FG. After weaning, the pups received their mothers' diets. After 30 d, eight males from each group were tested in a Morris water maze to assess learning, memory, and motor function. The offspring of FG dams showed a lower body mass than CG dams, probably due to non-nutritional factors and an imbalance between ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids of the seed, and displayed a higher concentration of α-linolenic acid, possibly suggesting inhibition of arachidonic acid synthesis. The content of docosahexaenoic acid in the hippocampus was higher in the FG followed by the MCG compared with the CG. Hippocampal docosahexaenoic acid content correlated with better spatial memory performance in the FG, whereas arachidonic acid content correlated with longer time in solving the task. Flaxseed during perinatal and postweaning periods improves spatial memory to the detriment of growth. These findings indicate that there must be caution in encouraging the maternal intake of flaxseed during pregnancy and lactation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Caffeic Acid Expands Anti-Tumor Effect of Metformin in Human Metastatic Cervical Carcinoma HTB-34 Cells: Implications of AMPK Activation and Impairment of Fatty Acids De Novo Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszka-Czochara, Malgorzata; Konieczny, Pawel; Majka, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of cancer treatments is often limited and associated with substantial toxicity. Appropriate combination of drug targeting specific mechanisms may regulate metabolism of tumor cells to reduce cancer cell growth and to improve survival. Therefore, we investigated the effects of anti-diabetic drug Metformin (Met) and a natural compound caffeic acid (trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, CA) alone and in combination to treat an aggressive metastatic human cervical HTB-34 (ATCC CRL­1550) cancer cell line. CA at concentration of 100 µM, unlike Met at 10 mM, activated 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). What is more, CA contributed to the fueling of mitochondrial tricarboxylic acids (TCA) cycle with pyruvate by increasing Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDH) activity, while Met promoted glucose catabolism to lactate. Met downregulated expression of enzymes of fatty acid de novo synthesis, such as ATP Citrate Lyase (ACLY), Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS), Fatty Acyl-CoA Elongase 6 (ELOVL6), and Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1 (SCD1) in cancer cells. In conclusion, CA mediated reprogramming of glucose processing through TCA cycle via oxidative decarboxylation. The increased oxidative stress, as a result of CA treatment, sensitized cancer cells and, acting on cell biosynthesis and bioenergetics, made HTB-34 cells more susceptible to Met and successfully inhibited neoplastic cells. The combination of Metformin and caffeic acid to suppress cervical carcinoma cells by two independent mechanisms may provide a promising approach to cancer treatment. PMID:28230778

  14. Caffeic Acid Expands Anti-Tumor Effect of Metformin in Human Metastatic Cervical Carcinoma HTB-34 Cells: Implications of AMPK Activation and Impairment of Fatty Acids De Novo Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszka-Czochara, Malgorzata; Konieczny, Pawel; Majka, Marcin

    2017-02-21

    The efficacy of cancer treatments is often limited and associated with substantial toxicity. Appropriate combination of drug targeting specific mechanisms may regulate metabolism of tumor cells to reduce cancer cell growth and to improve survival. Therefore, we investigated the effects of anti-diabetic drug Metformin (Met) and a natural compound caffeic acid (trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, CA) alone and in combination to treat an aggressive metastatic human cervical HTB-34 (ATCC CRL-1550) cancer cell line. CA at concentration of 100 µM, unlike Met at 10 mM, activated 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). What is more, CA contributed to the fueling of mitochondrial tricarboxylic acids (TCA) cycle with pyruvate by increasing Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDH) activity, while Met promoted glucose catabolism to lactate. Met downregulated expression of enzymes of fatty acid de novo synthesis, such as ATP Citrate Lyase (ACLY), Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS), Fatty Acyl-CoA Elongase 6 (ELOVL6), and Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1 (SCD1) in cancer cells. In conclusion, CA mediated reprogramming of glucose processing through TCA cycle via oxidative decarboxylation. The increased oxidative stress, as a result of CA treatment, sensitized cancer cells and, acting on cell biosynthesis and bioenergetics, made HTB-34 cells more susceptible to Met and successfully inhibited neoplastic cells. The combination of Metformin and caffeic acid to suppress cervical carcinoma cells by two independent mechanisms may provide a promising approach to cancer treatment.

  15. Generation of deviation parameters for amino acid singlets, doublets and triplets from three-dimensional structures of proteins and its implications for secondary structure prediction from amino acid sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S A Mugilan; K Veluraja

    2000-03-01

    We present a new method, secondary structure prediction by deviation parameter (SSPDP) for predicting the secondary structure of proteins from amino acid sequence. Deviation parameters (DP) for amino acid singlets, doublets and triplets were computed with respect to secondary structural elements of proteins based on the dictionary of secondary structure prediction (DSSP)-generated secondary structure for 408 selected non-homologous proteins. To the amino acid triplets which are not found in the selected dataset, a DP value of zero is assigned with respect to the secondary structural elements of proteins. The total number of parameters generated is 15,432, in the possible parameters of 25,260. Deviation parameter is complete with respect to amino acid singlets, doublets, and partially complete with respect to amino acid triplets. These generated parameters were used to predict secondary structural elements from amino acid sequence. The secondary structure predicted by our method (SSPDP) was compared with that of single sequence (NNPREDICT) and multiple sequence (PHD) methods. The average value of the percentage of prediction accuracy for α-helix by SSPDP, NNPREDICT and PHD methods was found to be 57%, 44% and 69% respectively for the proteins in the selected dataset. For -strand the prediction accuracy is found to be 69%, 21% and 53% respectively by SSPDP, NNPREDICT and PHD methods. This clearly indicates that the secondary structure prediction by our method is as good as PHD method but much better than NNPREDICT method.

  16. The Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Production and Cell Migration in Human Immune Cells: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Shinto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In multiple sclerosis (MS, compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity contributes to inflammatory T cell migration into the central nervous system. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 is associated with BBB disruption and subsequent T cell migration into the CNS. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on MMP-9 levels and T cell migration. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy controls were pretreated with two types of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Cell supernatants were used to determine MMP-9 protein and activity levels. Jurkat cells were pretreated with EPA and DHA and were added to fibronectin-coated transwells to measure T cell migration. EPA and DHA significantly decreased MMP-9 protein levels, MMP-9 activity, and significantly inhibited human T cell migration. The data suggest that omega-3 fatty acids may benefit patients with multiple sclerosis by modulating immune cell production of MMP-9.

  17. Effect of ensiling treatment on secondary compounds and amino acid profile of tropical forage legumes, and implications for their pig feeding potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Siriwan D; Hoedtke, Sandra; Avila, Patricia; Heinritz, Sonja N; Zeyner, Annette

    2014-04-01

    Smallholders in the tropics depend on local protein supplements to balance pig diets. Thus, various tropical forage legumes are a potential feeding option. Ensiling allows converting forages into a ready-to-feed-out choice, but the lactic acid fermentation may influence various (anti)nutritional components. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sucrose (SU) and a tropical Lactobacillus plantarum strain (LAB) as ensiling treatments (control, SU, LAB, LAB + SU) on the potential nutrient availability of 10 forage legume species. Ensiling commonly reduced antinutritional compounds such as tannins (by 49-84%) and trypsin inhibitory activity (by 74-78%), as well as oxalic acid (by 51-100%). An improved potential absorbability of protein and minerals for pigs is thus inferred. There was no major loss in total amino acids. In general, the species effect was stronger than the treatment effect. A clear effect of the treatments SU, LAB and LAB + SU over all 10 forage species was only observed for oxalic acid, single amino acids and trypsin inhibitory activity. Ensiling is a viable option to enhance nutrient utilization of tropical forages for pigs. Species-specific treatment of forage legumes is recommended. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Ex-vivo changes in amino acid concentrations from blood stored at room temperature or on ice: implications for arginine and taurine measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeil Yvette R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of the plasma concentrations of arginine and other amino acids is important for understanding pathophysiology, immunopathology and nutritional supplementation in human disease. Delays in processing of blood samples cause a change in amino acid concentrations, but this has not been precisely quantified. We aimed to describe the concentration time profile of twenty-two amino acids in blood from healthy volunteers, stored at room temperature or on ice. Methods Venous blood was taken from six healthy volunteers and stored at room temperature or in an ice slurry. Plasma was separated at six time points over 24 hours and amino acid levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results Median plasma arginine concentrations decreased rapidly at room temperature, with a 6% decrease at 30 minutes, 25% decrease at 2 hours and 43% decrease at 24 hours. Plasma ornithine increased exponentially over the same period. Plasma arginine was stable in blood stored on ice, with a Conclusion Plasma arginine concentrations in stored blood fall rapidly at room temperature, but remain stable on ice for at least 24 hours. Blood samples taken for the determination of plasma amino acid concentrations either should be placed immediately on ice or processed within 30 minutes of collection.

  19. Erythrocyte fatty acid profiles and plasma homocysteine, folate and vitamin B6 and B12 in recurrent depression: Implications for co-morbidity with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assies, Johanna; Mocking, Roel J T; Lok, Anja; Koeter, Maarten W J; Bockting, Claudi L H; Visser, Ieke; Pouwer, François; Ruhé, Henricus G; Schene, Aart H

    2015-10-30

    Oxidative stress induced interactions between fatty acid (FA) and one-carbon metabolism may be involved in co-occurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), which have been scarcely studied together. In 137 recurrent MDD-patients vs. 73 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, we simultaneously measured key components of one-carbon metabolism in plasma (homocysteine, folate, vitamins B6 and B12), and of FA-metabolism in red blood cell membranes [main polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (AA) and structural FA-indices (chain length, unsaturation, peroxidation)]. Results show significant positive associations of folate with EPA, DHA, and the peroxidation index, which were similar in patients and controls. After correction for confounders, these associations were lost except for EPA. Associations between B-vitamins and FA-parameters were non-significant, but also similar in patients and controls. Homocysteine and DHA were significantly less negatively associated in patients than in controls. In conclusion, these data indicate similarities but also differences in associations between parameters of one-carbon and FA-metabolism in recurrent MDD patients vs. controls, which may reflect differences in handling of oxidative stress. Further research should test the consequences of these differences, particularly the premature development of CVD in MDD.

  20. Gaseous ion-composition measurements in the young exhaust plume of jet aircraft at cruising altitudes. Implications for aerosols and gaseous sulfuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, F.; Wohlfrom, K.H.; Klemm, M.; Schneider, J.; Gollinger, K. [Max-Planck-Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Schumann, U.; Busen, R. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    Mass spectrometric measurements were made in the young exhaust plume of an Airbus (A310) at cruising altitudes at distances between 400 and 800 m behind the Airbus (averaged plume age: 3.4 sec). The measurements indicate that gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) number densities were less than 1.3 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} which is smaller than the expected total sulfuric acid. Hence the missing sulfuric acid must have been in the aerosol phase. These measurements also indicate a total aerosol surface area density A{sub T} {<=} 5.4 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} per cm{sup 3} which is consistent with simultaneously measured soot and water contrail particles. However, homogeneous nucleation leading to (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub x}(H{sub 2}O){sub y}-clusters can not be ruled out. (author) 16 refs.

  1. Experimental Acid Weathering of Fe-Bearing Mars Analog Minerals and Rocks: Implications for Aqueous Origin of Hematite-Bearing Sediments in Meridiani Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Koster, A. M.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    A working hypothesis for Meridiani evaporite formation involves the evaporation of fluids derived from acid weathering of Martian basalts and subsequent diagenesis [1, 2]. However, there are no reported experimental studies for the formation of jarosite and gray hematite (spherules), which are characteristic of Meridiani rocks from Mars analog precursor minerals. A terrestrial analog for hematite spherule formation from basaltic rocks under acidic hydrothermal conditions has been reported [3], and we have previously shown that the hematite spherules and jarosite can be synthetically produced in the laboratory using Fe3+ -bearing sulfate brines under hydrothermal conditions [4]. Here we expand and extend these studies by reacting Mars analog minerals with sulfuric acid to form Meridiani-like rock-mineral compositions. The objective of this study is to provide environmental constraints on past aqueous weathering of basaltic materials on Mars.

  2. Abiotic oxidation of pyrite by Fe(III) in acidic media and its implications for sulfur isotope measurements of lattice-bound sulfate in sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumdar, A.; Goldberg, T.; Strauss, H

    from our pure pyrite oxidation experiments show that in a solution of acidic pH, the amount of sulfate formed is very similar under both oxygenated and oxygen-free experimental conditions which is suggestive of the dominant role of Fe sup(3+) in pyrite...

  3. Role of reduced lipoic acid in the redox regulation of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) activity. Implications for mitochondrial oxidative stress and nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Philip; Hink, Ulrich; Oelze, Matthias; Schuppan, Swaantje; Schaeuble, Karin; Schildknecht, Stefan; Ho, Kwok K; Weiner, Henry; Bachschmid, Markus; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2007-01-05

    Chronic therapy with nitroglycerin results in a rapid development of nitrate tolerance, which is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species. We have recently shown that mitochondria are an important source of nitroglycerin-induced oxidants and that the nitroglycerin-bioactivating mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase is oxidatively inactivated in the setting of tolerance. Here we investigated the effect of various oxidants on aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and its restoration by dihydrolipoic acid. In vivo tolerance in Wistar rats was induced by infusion of nitroglycerin (6.6 microg/kg/min, 4 days). Vascular reactivity was measured by isometric tension studies of isolated aortic rings in response to nitroglycerin. Chronic nitroglycerin infusion lead to impaired vascular responses to nitroglycerin and decreased dehydrogenase activity, which was corrected by dihydrolipoic acid co-incubation. Superoxide, peroxynitrite, and nitroglycerin itself were highly efficient in inhibiting mitochondrial and yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, which was restored by dithiol compounds such as dihydrolipoic acid and dithiothreitol. Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide were rather insensitive inhibitors. Our observations indicate that mitochondrial oxidative stress (especially superoxide and peroxynitrite) in response to organic nitrate treatment may inactivate aldehyde dehydrogenase thereby leading to nitrate tolerance. Glutathionylation obviously amplifies oxidative inactivation of the enzyme providing another regulatory pathway. Furthermore, the present data demonstrate that the mitochondrial dithiol compound dihydrolipoic acid restores mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase activity via reduction of a disulfide at the active site and thereby improves nitrate tolerance.

  4. Erythrocyte fatty acid profiles and plasma homocysteine, folate and vitamin B-6 and B-12 in recurrent depression : Implications for co-morbidity with cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assies, Johanna; Mocking, Roel J. T.; Lok, Anja; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Visser, Ieke; Pouwer, Francois; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Schene, Aart H.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced interactions between fatty acid (FA) and one-carbon metabolism may be involved in co-occurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), which have been scarcely studied together. In 137 recurrent MDD-patients vs. 73 age- and sex-matched healthy c

  5. Effect of thenardite on the direct detection of aromatic amino acids: implications for the search for life in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doc Richardson, C.; Hinman, Nancy W.; Scott, Jill R.

    2009-10-01

    With the discovery of Na-sulphate minerals on Mars and Europa, recent studies using these minerals have focused on their ability to assist in the detection of bio/organic signatures. This study further investigates the ability of thenardite (Na2SO4) to effectively facilitate the ionization and identification of aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan) using a technique called geomatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in conjunction with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. This technique is based on the ability of a mineral host to facilitate desorption and ionization of bio/organic molecules for detection. Spectra obtained from each aromatic amino acid alone and in combination with thenardite show differences in ionization mechanism and fragmentation patterns. These differences are due to chemical and structural differences between the aromatic side chains of their respective amino acid. Tyrosine and tryptophan when combined with thenardite were observed to undergo cation-attachment ([M+Na]+), due to the high alkali ion affinity of their aromatic side chains. In addition, substitution of the carboxyl group hydrogen by sodium led to formation of [M-H+Na]Na+ peaks. In contrast, phenylalanine mixed with thenardite showed no evidence of Na+ attachment. Understanding how co-deposition of amino acids with thenardite can affect the observed mass spectra is important for future exploration missions that are likely to use laser desorption mass spectrometry to search for bio/organic compounds in extraterrestrial environments.

  6. Effect of Thenardite on the Direct Detection of Aromatic Amino Acids: Implications for the Search for Life in the Solar System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Jill R. Scott

    2009-10-01

    With the discovery of Na-sulfate minerals on Mars and Europa, recent studies using these minerals have focused on their ability to assist in the detection of bio/organic signatures. This study further investigates the ability of thenardite (Na2SO4) to effectively facilitate the ionization and identification of aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) using a technique called geomatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (GALDI) in conjunction with a Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). This technique is based on the ability of a mineral host to facilitate the ionization and detection of bio/organic molecules. Spectra obtained from each aromatic amino acid alone and in combination with thenardite show differences in ionization mechanism and fragmentation patterns. These differences are due to chemical and structural differences between the aromatic side chains of their respective amino acid. Tyrosine and tryptophan when combined with thenardite were observed to undergo cation-attachment ([M+Na]+), due to the high alkali affinity of their aromatic side chains. Subsequent cation substitution of the carboxyl group led to formation double cation-attached peaks ([M-H+Na]Na+). In contrast, phenylalanine mixed with thenardite showed no evidence of Na+ interaction. Understanding how codeposition of amino acids with thenardite can affect the observed mass spectra is important for future exploration missions that are likely to use laser desorption mass spectrometry to search for bio/organic compounds in extraterrestrial environments.

  7. Amino Acids and Stable Carbon Isotope Distributions in Taihu Lake, China, Over the Last 15,000 Years, and Their Paleoecological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinquan, Wang; Jinling, Liu

    2000-03-01

    Amino acid, organic nitrogen, and stable carbon isotope (13C/12C) profiles through a core from East Taihu Lake are interpreted in terms of paleoecology and paleoclimate over the last ca. 15,000 yr. Lower amino acid contents and higher δ13C values at the base of the core represent a cool and arid climate, and coincide with low organic productivity. A marked increase in total amino acids and organic nitrogen, with a decrease in δ13C values from 193 to 90 cm (ca. 6500-6000 yr B.P.), indicates a warmer and moist climate, and greater organic productivity. Amino acids then decrease in abundance, while δ13C values increase progressively, beginning at 73 cm (ca. 6000 yr B.P.), reflecting cooling and lower organic productivity. The average δ13C values from a core from West Taihu Lake are evidently higher than values from East Taihu Lake. The latter may reflect a stream environment, whereas the high δ13C values from West Taihu Lake likely reflect autotrophic carbon sources and a lacustrine environment since 11,000 yr B.P.

  8. Computational Investigation and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange of the Fixed Charge Derivative Tris(2,4,6-Trimethoxyphenyl)Phosphonium: Implications for the Aspartic Acid Cleavage Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Kristin A.; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Vorpagel, Erich R.

    2005-05-25

    Aspartic acid (Asp)-containing peptides with the fixed charge derivative tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl) phosphonium (tTMP-P+) were explored computationally and experimentally by H/D exchange and fragmentation studies in order to probe the phenomenon of selective cleavage C-terminal to Asp in the absence of a ''mobile'' proton. Ab initio modeling of the tTMP-P+ electrostatic potential demonstrates the positive charge is distributed on the phosphonium group and therefore is not initiating or directing fragmentation as would a ''mobile'' proton. Geometry optimizations and vibrational analyses of different aspartic acid conformations show the aspartic acid structure with a hydrogen bond between the side chain hydroxy and backbone carbonyl lies 2.8 kcal/mol above the lowest energy conformer. In reactions with D2O, the phosphonium-derived doubly charged peptide (H+)P+LDIFSDF rapidly exchanges all 12 of its exchangeable hydrogens for deuterium and also displays a non-exchanging population. With no added proton, P+LDIFSDF exchanges a maximum of four of eleven exchangeable hydrogens for deuterium. No exchange is observed when all acidic groups are converted to the corresponding methyl esters. Together, these H/D exchange results indicate that the acidic hydrogens are ''mobile locally'' because they are able to participate in exchange even in the absence of an added proton. Fragmentation of two distinct (H+)P+LDIFSDF ion populations shows the non-exchanging population displays selective cleavage, while the exchanging population fragments more evenly across the peptide backbone. This result demonstrates that H/D exchange can sometimes distinguish between and provide a means of separation of different protonation motifs, and that these protonation motifs can have an effect on the fragmentation.

  9. Water-soluble ions species of size-resolved aerosols: Implications for the atmospheric acidity in São Paulo megacity, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Filho, Marcelo; Pedrotti, Jairo J.; Fornaro, Adalgiza

    2016-11-01

    Over the last decade, an increase of ammonium salts in atmospheric deposition has been reported worldwide, especially in megacities. The present study aims to give a better comprehension analysis about particulate matter acidity in São Paulo megacity (MASP), Brazil. Size-resolved aerosols were sampled in MASP, during 2012 winter, showing a bimodal mass concentration distribution, with sulfate concentration exceeding 3.40 μg m- 3, which accounted for over 25% of PM0.56 mass. Regarding the relative distribution of ionic species, 90% of NH4+ levels, were restricted to smaller than 1 μm diameter range. The average neutralization index for PM < 1 μm was 0.62, which indicated an ammonia-limiting atmosphere due to partial neutralization of atmospheric acids. Particles of the accumulation mode presented more acid behavior than other aerosol fractions, with pH value as low as 4.15 in PM0.56. The total neutralization index registered the lowest value for PM0.56, but it did not respond promptly to aerosol variations as the E-AIM model predictions. The highest discrepancies between the acidity proxies occurred in the smaller fractions of particulate matter, especially in the after-filter (AF) stage (diameter < 0.020 μm). In addition, AF stage had the highest contribution to PM total mass, about 14% for all the stages analyzed. Such contribution indicates that acidity in ultrafine particles are still mixed for the MASP and need further investigation.

  10. Distribution of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria across a coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS environment: implications for passive bioremediation by tidal inundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen eLing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS constitute a serious and global environmental problem. Oxidation of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air generates sulfuric acid with consequently negative impacts on coastal and estuarine ecosystems. Tidal inundation represents one current treatment strategy for CASS, with the aim of neutralizing acidity by triggering microbial iron- and sulfate-reduction and inducing the precipitation of iron-sulfides. Although well-known functional guilds of bacteria drive these processes, their distributions within CASS environments, as well as their relationships to tidal cycling and the availability of nutrients and electron acceptors, are poorly understood. These factors will determine the long-term efficacy of passive CASS remediation strategies. Here we studied microbial community structure and functional guild distribution in sediment cores obtained from ten depths ranging from 0-20 cm in three sites located in the supra-, inter- and sub-tidal segments, respectively, of a CASS-affected salt marsh (East Trinity, Cairns, Australia. Whole community 16S rRNA gene diversity within each site was assessed by 454 pyrotag sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in the context of local hydrological, geochemical and lithological factors. The results illustrate spatial overlap, or close association, of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in an environment rich in organic matter and controlled by parameters such as acidity, redox potential, degree of water saturation, and mineralization. The observed spatial distribution implies the need for empirical understanding of the timing, relative to tidal cycling, of various terminal electron-accepting processes that control acid generation and biogeochemical iron and sulfur cycling.

  11. Isotypic Mn(II) and Fe(II) binuclear complexes of the ligand 5,6-bis-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazine-2,3-di-carb-oxy-lic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Monserrat; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen

    2016-10-01

    The title isotypic complexes, bis-[μ-5,6-bis-(pyridin-2-yl)pyrazine-2,3-di-carboxylato]-κ(4)N(1),O(2),N(6):O(3);κ(4)O(3):N(1),O(2),N(6)-bis-[di-aqua-manganese(II)] tetra-hydrate, [Mn2(C16H8N4O4)2(H2O)4]·4H2O, (I), and bis-[μ-5,6-bis-(pyridin-2-yl)pyrazine-2,3-di-carboxyl-ato]-κ(4)N(1),O(2),N(6):O(3);κ(4)O(3):N(1),O(2),N(6)-bis-[di-aqua-iron(II)] tetrahydrate, [Fe2(C16H8N4O4)2(H2O)4]·4H2O, (II), are, respectively, the mangan-ese(II) and iron(II) complexes of the ligand 5,6-bis-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazine-2,3-di-carb-oxy-lic acid. The complete mol-ecule of each complex is generated by inversion symmetry. Each metal ion is coordinated by a pyrazine N atom, a pyridine N atom, two carboxyl-ate O atoms, one of which is bridging, and two water O atoms. The metal atoms have MN2O4 coordination geometries and the complexes have a cage-like structure. In the crystals of both compounds, the complexes are linked by O-H⋯O and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds involving the coordinating water mol-ecules, forming chains along [100]. These chains are linked by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving the non-coordinating water mol-ecules, forming layers parallel to (011). The layers are linked by pairs of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and offset π-π inter-actions, so forming a hydrogen-bonded three-dimensional framework.

  12. Selective modification of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform profile in skeletal muscle in hyperthyroidism: implications for the regulatory impact of glucose on fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, M C; Lall, H S; Harris, R A; Holness, M J

    2000-11-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK1-4) regulate glucose oxidation through inhibitory phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). Immunoblot analysis with antibodies raised against recombinant PDK isoforms demonstrated changes in PDK isoform expression in response to experimental hyperthyroidism (100 microg/100 g body weight; 3 days) that was selective for fast-twitch vs slow-twitch skeletal muscle in that PDK2 expression was increased in the fast-twitch skeletal muscle (the anterior tibialis) (by 1. 6-fold; P lactate --> glucose (Cori) and glucose --> alanine --> glucose cycles. We also propose that enhanced relative expression of the pyruvate-insensitive PDK isoform (PDK4) in skeletal muscle in hyperthyroidism uncouples glycolytic flux from pyruvate oxidation, sparing pyruvate for non-oxidative entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thereby supporting entry of acetyl-CoA (derived from fatty acid oxidation) into the TCA cycle.

  13. Identification of a conserved protein involved in anaerobic unsaturated fatty acid synthesis in Neiserria gonorrhoeae: implications for facultative and obligate anaerobes that lack FabA

    OpenAIRE

    Isabella, Vincent M.; Clark, Virginia L.

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of the facultative anaerobe, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, revealed that many genes of unknown function were induced under anaerobic conditions. Mutation of one such gene, NGO1024, encoding a protein belonging to the 2-nitropropane dioxygenase-like superfamiliy of proteins, was found to result in an inability of gonococci to grow anaerobically. Anaerobic growth of an NG1024 mutant was restored upon supplementation with unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), but not with the saturated ...

  14. Fatty acids, epicatechin-dimethylgallate, and rutin interact with buckwheat starch inhibiting its digestion by amylase: implications for the decrease in glycemic index by buckwheat flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2010-12-08

    Glycemic indexes of bread made from mixtures of wheat flour and buckwheat flour are lower than those made from wheat flour. To discuss the mechanism of the buckwheat flour-dependent decrease in glycemic indexes, the formation of a starch-iodine complex and amylase-catalyzed digestion of starch were studied using buckwheat flour itself and buckwheat flour from which fatty acids, rutin, and proanthocyanidins including flavan-3-ols had been extracted. Absorbance due to the formation of a starch-iodine complex was larger in extracted than control flour, and starch in extracted flour was more susceptible to pancreatin-induced digestion than starch in control flour. Fatty acids, which were found in the buckwheat flour extract, bound to amylose in the extracted flour, inhibiting its digestion by pancreatin. Rutin and epicatechin-dimethylgallate, which were also found in the extract, bound to both amylose and amylopectin in the extracted flour, inhibiting their digestion induced by pancreatin. We discussed from these results that the lower glycemic indexes of bread made from mixtures of wheat flour and buckwheat flour were due to binding of fatty acids, rutin, and epicatechin-dimethylgallate, which were contained in buckwheat flour, to wheat flour starch.

  15. First discovery of two polyketide synthase genes for mitorubrinic acid and mitorubrinol yellow pigment biosynthesis and implications in virulence of Penicillium marneffei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C Y Woo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome of P. marneffei, the most important thermal dimorphic fungus causing respiratory, skin and systemic mycosis in China and Southeast Asia, possesses 23 polyketide synthase (PKS genes and 2 polyketide synthase nonribosomal peptide synthase hybrid (PKS-NRPS genes, which is of high diversity compared to other thermal dimorphic pathogenic fungi. We hypothesized that the yellow pigment in the mold form of P. marneffei could also be synthesized by one or more PKS genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All 23 PKS and 2 PKS-NRPS genes of P. marneffei were systematically knocked down. A loss of the yellow pigment was observed in the mold form of the pks11 knockdown, pks12 knockdown and pks11pks12 double knockdown mutants. Sequence analysis showed that PKS11 and PKS12 are fungal non-reducing PKSs. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector/electrospray ionization-quadruple time of flight-mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS analysis of the culture filtrates of wild type P. marneffei and the pks11 knockdown, pks12 knockdown and pks11pks12 double knockdown mutants showed that the yellow pigment is composed of mitorubrinic acid and mitorubrinol. The survival of mice challenged with the pks11 knockdown, pks12 knockdown and pks11pks12 double knockdown mutants was significantly better than those challenged with wild type P. marneffei (P<0.05. There was also statistically significant decrease in survival of pks11 knockdown, pks12 knockdown and pks11pks12 double knockdown mutants compared to wild type P. marneffei in both J774 and THP1 macrophages (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The yellow pigment of the mold form of P. marneffei is composed of mitorubrinol and mitorubrinic acid. This represents the first discovery of PKS genes responsible for mitorubrinol and mitorubrinic acid biosynthesis. pks12 and pks11 are probably responsible for sequential use in the biosynthesis of mitorubrinol and mitorubrinic acid

  16. Seasonal variation in fatty acid composition of seston and the copepod Calanus sinicus (Brodsky, 1962) in Jiaozhou Bay and its trophic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Mengtan; LI Chaolun; SUN Song

    2011-01-01

    The fatty acid compositions of seston and Calanus sinicus were investigated to study trophic relationships in Jiaozhou Bay.Principal component analysis was carried out to ordinate the fatty acid patterns of seston in stations and months.The results showed that diatoms were most abundant in the phytoplankton at station A5 (located in the northwest of the bay:36°9′N,120°20′E) and least abundant at station D7 (located outside of the bay:35°59′N,120°26′E).By contrast,dinoflagellates were most abundant at station D7 and least abundant at station A5.According to the annual variations of 16:1 ω7 and 18:4ω3/16:1ω7,diatoms flourished mainly in spring and summer,while dinoflagellates bloomed exclusively in summer.A distinctive feature of the fatty acid composition of C.sinicus was the prevalence of 20:5ω3and 22:6ω3.The higher content of 16:1ω7 over 18:4ω3 in females indicated that diatoms contributed more than dinoflagellates to the diet of C.sinicus.The feeding intensity of C.sinicus on diatoms was higher in spring and autumn than in other seasons.The herbivorous indicators 20:1 and 22:1 were comparatively low,suggesting that besides phytoplankton,C.sinicus might feed on a wider range of particles including organic detritus,bacteria and small copepods.

  17. Effects of Si/Al Ratio on Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts: Implications for the active Cu species and the Roles of Brønsted Acidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng; Washton, Nancy M.; Wang, Yilin; Kollar, Marton; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-09-03

    Cu/SSZ-13 catalysts with three Si/Al ratios of 6, 12 and 35 were synthesized with Cu incorporation via solution ion exchange. The implications of varying Si/Al ratios on the nature of the multiple Cu species that can be present in the SSZ-13 zeolite are a major focus of this work, as highlighted by the results of a variety of catalyst characterization and reaction kinetics measurements. Specifically, catalysts were characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), NH3 temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), and DRIFTS and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Catalytic properties were examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation, and standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) reactions on selected catalysts under differential conditions. Besides indicating possible variably active multiple Cu species for these reactions, the measurements are also used to untangle some of the complexities caused by the interplay between redox of Cu ion centers and Brønsted acidity. All three reactions appear to follow a redox reaction mechanism, yet the roles of Brønsted acidity are quite different. For NO oxidation, increasing Si/Al ratio lowers Cu redox barriers, thus enhancing reaction rates. Brønsted acidity appears to play essentially no role for this reaction. For standard NH3-SCR, residual Brønsted acidity plays a significant beneficial role at both low- and high-temperature regimes. For NH3 oxidation, no clear trend is observed suggesting both Cu ion center redox and Brønsted acidity play important and perhaps competing roles. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of

  18. Spatial variability of mercury and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the European perch (Perca fluviatilis) - Implications for risk-benefit analyses of fish consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Ursula; Palviainen, Marjo; Eronen, Aslak; Piirainen, Sirpa; Laurén, Ari; Akkanen, Jarkko; Kankaala, Paula

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the spatial variability of risks and benefits of consuming fish from humic and clear lakes. Mercury in fish is a potential risk for human health, but risk assessment may be confounded by selenium, which has been suggested to counterbalance mercury toxicity. In addition to the risks, fish are also rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which are known to be beneficial for cardiovascular health and brain cognitive function in humans. We found that the concentrations of EPA + DHA and mercury in European perch (Perca fluviatilis) vary spatially and are connected with lake water chemistry and catchment characteristics. The highest mercury concentrations and the lowest EPA + DHA concentrations were found in perch from humic lakes with high proportion of peatland (30-50%) in the catchment. In addition, the ratio of selenium to mercury in perch muscle was ≥1 suggesting that selenium may counterbalance mercury toxicity. The observed variation in mercury and EPA + DHA content in perch from different lakes indicate that the risks and benefits of fish consumption vary spatially, and are connected with lake water chemistry and catchment characteristics. In general, consumption of perch from humic lakes exposed humans to greater risks (higher concentrations of mercury), but provided less benefits (lower concentrations of EPA + DHA) than consumption of perch from clear lakes.

  19. Bioavailability of gallic acid and catechins from grape seed polyphenol extract is improved by repeated dosing in rats: implications for treatment in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruzzi, Mario G; Lobo, Jessica K; Janle, Elsa M; Cooper, Bruce; Simon, James E; Wu, Qing-Li; Welch, Cara; Ho, Lap; Weaver, Connie; Pasinetti, Giulio M

    2009-01-01

    The present study explored the bioavailability and brain deposition of a grape seed polyphenolic extract (GSPE) previously found to attenuate cognitive deterioration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Plasma pharmacokinetic response of major GSPE phenolic components was measured following intragastric gavage of 50, 100, and 150 mg GSPE per kg body weight. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis identified gallic acid (GA), catechin (C), and epicatechin (EC) in plasma of rats gavaged acutely with GSPE. Additionally, 4-methylgallic acid (4-OMeGA), 3'-methylcatechin (3'-OMeC), and 3'-methylepicatechin (3'-OMeEC) were identified as circulating metabolites of GSPE phenolic constituents. Cmax for individual GSPE constituents and their metabolites increased in a dose-dependent fashion (with increasing GSPE oral dose). Repeated daily exposure to GSPE was found to significantly increase bioavailability (defined as plasma AUC0-8h) of GA, C, and EC by 198, 253, and 282% relative to animals receiving only a single acute GSPE dose. EC and C were not detectable in brain tissues of rats receiving a single GSPE dose but reached levels of 290.7 +/-45.9 and 576.7 +/- 227.7 pg/g in brain tissues from rats administered GSPE for 10 days. This study suggests that brain deposition of GA, C, and EC is affected by repeated dosing of GSPE.

  20. Fatty acid signatures of stomach oil and adipose tissue of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) in Alaska: Implications for diet analysis of Procellariiform birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.W.; Iverson, S.J.; Springer, A.M.; Hatch, Shyla A.

    2007-01-01

    Procellariiforms are unique among seabirds in storing dietary lipids in both adipose tissue and stomach oil. Thus, both lipid sources are potentially useful for trophic studies using fatty acid (FA) signatures. However, little is known about the relationship between FA signatures in stomach oil and adipose tissue of individuals or whether these signatures provide similar information about diet and physiology. We compared the FA composition of stomach oil and adipose tissue biopsies of individual northern fulmars (N = 101) breeding at three major colonies in Alaska. Fatty acid signatures differed significantly between the two lipid sources, reflecting differences in dietary time scales, metabolic processing, or both. However, these signatures exhibited a relatively consistent relationship between individuals, such that the two lipid sources provided a similar ability to distinguish foraging differences among individuals and colonies. Our results, including the exclusive presence of dietary wax esters in stomach oil but not adipose tissue, are consistent with the notion that stomach oil FA signatures represent lipids retained from prey consumed during recent foraging and reflect little metabolic processing, whereas adipose tissue FA signatures represent a longer-term integration of dietary intake. Our study illustrates the potential for elucidating short- versus longer-term diet information in Procellariiform birds using different lipid sources. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Development of cellular hypertrophy by 8-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in the human ventricular cardiomyocyte, RL-14 cell line, is implicated by MAPK and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maayah, Zaid H; Abdelhamid, Ghada; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have established the role of mid-chain hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (mid-chain HETEs) in the development of cardiovascular disease. Among these mid-chains, 8-HETE has been reported to have a proliferator and proinflammatory action. However, whether 8-HETE can induce cardiac hypertrophy has never been investigated before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential hypertrophic effect of 8-HETE in the human ventricular cardiomyocytes, RL-14 cells, and to explore the mechanism(s) involved. Our results showed that 8-HETE induced cellular hypertrophy in RL-14 cells as evidenced by the induction of cardiac hypertrophy markers ANP, BNP, α-MHC, and β-MHC in a concentration- and time-dependent manner as well as the increase in cell surface area. Mechanistically, 8-HETE was able to induce the NF-κB activity as well as it significantly induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. The induction of cellular hypertrophy was associated with a proportional increase in the formation of dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) parallel to the increase of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) enzyme activity. Blocking the induction of NF-κB, ERK1/2, and sEH signaling pathways significantly inhibited 8-HETE-induced cellular hypertrophy. Our study provides the first evidence that 8-HETE induces cellular hypertrophy in RL-14 cells through MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent mechanism

  2. Interactions of methylamine and ammonia with atmospheric nucleation precursor H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and common organic acids: Thermodynamics and atmospheric implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, L.; Bai, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Nadykto, A. B., E-mail: anadykto@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Applied Mathematics, Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per. 1, Moscow 127055 (Russian Federation); Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Interactions of the two common atmospheric bases, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and methylamine MA (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}), which are considered to be important stabilizers of binary clusters in the Earth’s atmosphere, with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the key atmospheric precursor, and 14 common atmospheric organic acids (COA) (formic (CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}), acetic (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}), oxalic (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}), malonic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), succinic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 4}), glutaric acid (C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O{sub 4}), adipic (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}O{sub 4}), benzoic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}COOH), phenylacetic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}COOH), pyruvic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 3}), maleic acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), malic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 5}), tartaric (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}) and pinonic acid (C{sub 10}H{sub 16}O{sub 3})) have been studied using the composite high-accuracy G3MP2 method. The thermodynamic stability of mixed (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), (COA)(B1) and (COA)(B2) dimers and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) trimers, where B1 and B2 represent methylamine (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), respectively, have been investigated and their impacts on the thermodynamic stability of clusters containing H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} have been analyzed. It has been shown that in many cases the interactions of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} with COA, ammonia and methylamine lead to the formation of heteromolecular dimers and trimers, which are certainly more stable than (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 2} and (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 3}. It has also been found that free energies of (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})+ CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}⇔(COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})(CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) reactions exceed 10-15 kcal mol{sup −1}. This is a clear indication that mixed trimers composed of COA, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and methylamine are very stable and can thus serve as possible nucleation sites. The present study leads us to conclude that the interactions of COA coexisting with H

  3. Molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of saturated fatty acids within one sedimentary profile in the Shenhu, northern South China Sea: Source implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Mao, Shengyi; Wu, Nengyou; Sun, Yongge; Guan, Hongxiang

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions of saturated fatty acids (SaFAs) in one 300 cm long sedimentary profile, which was named as Site4B in Shenhu, northern South China Sea. The concentrations of total SaFAs in sediments ranged from 1.80 to 10.16 μg/g (μg FA/g dry sediment) and showed an even-over-odd predominance in the carbon chain of C12 to C32, mostly with n-C16 and n-C18 being the two major components. The short-chain fatty acids (ScFAs; n-C12 to n-C18) mainly from marine microorganisms had average δ13C values of -26.7‰ to -28.2‰, whereas some terrigenous-sourced long-chain fatty acids (LcFAs; n-C21 to n-C32) had average δ13C values of -29.6‰ to -34.1‰. The other LcFAs (n-C24 & n-C26 ∼ n-C28; average δ13C values are -26.1‰ to -28.0‰) as well as n-C19 and n-C20 SaFAs (average δ13C values are -29.1‰ and -29.3‰, respectively) showed a mixed signal of carbon isotope compositions. The relative bioproductivity calculation (marine vs. terrigenous) demonstrated that most of organic carbon accumulation throughout the sedimentary profile was contributed by marine organism. The high marine productivity in Shenhu, South China Sea may be related to the hydrocarbon seepage which evidenced by diapiric structures. Interestingly, there is a sever fluctuation of terrigenous inputs around the depth of 97 cm below the seafloor (bsf), probably resulting from the influence of the Dansgaard-Oeschger events and the Younger Dryas event as revealed by 14C age measurements.

  4. Retinoic acid isomers up-regulate ATP binding cassette A1 and G1 and cholesterol efflux in rat astrocytes: implications for their therapeutic and teratogenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Costa, Lucio G; Guizzetti, Marina

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that retinoids may be effective in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, although exposure to an excess of retinoids during gestation causes teratogenesis. Cholesterol is essential for brain development, but high levels of cholesterol have been associated with Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that retinoic acid may affect cholesterol homeostasis in rat astrocytes, which regulate cholesterol distribution in the brain, through the up-regulation of cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette (Abc)a1 and Abcg1. Tretinoin, 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis-RA), 9-cis-RA, and the selective retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist methoprene significantly increased cholesterol efflux induced by cholesterol acceptors and protein levels of Abca1 by 2.3- (± 0.25), 3.6- (± 0.42), 4.1- (± 0.5), and 1.75- (± 0.43) fold, respectively, and Abcg1 by 2.1- (± 0.26), 2.2- (± 0.33), 2.5- (± 0.23), and 2.2- (± 0.21) fold, respectively. 13-cis-RA and 9-cis-RA also significantly increased mRNA levels of Abca1 (maximal induction 7.3 ± 0.42 and 2.7 ± 0.17, respectively) and Abcg1 (maximal induction 2.0 ± 0.18 and 1.8 ± 0.09, respectively), and the levels of membrane-bound Abca1 (2.5 ± 0.3 and 2.5 ± 0.40-fold increase, respectively), whereas they significantly decreased intracellular cholesterol content without affecting cholesterol synthesis. The effect of 9-cis-RA on cholesterol homeostasis in astrocytes can be ascribed to the activation of RXR, whereas the effects of 13-cis-RA and tretinoin were independent of either RXRs or retinoic acid receptors. These findings suggest that retinoids affect cholesterol homeostasis in astrocytes and that this effect may be involved in both their therapeutic and teratogenic actions.

  5. Dicarboxylic acids, metals and isotopic compositions of C and N in atmospheric aerosols from inland China: implications for dust and coal burning emission and secondary aerosol formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.; Xie, M.; Hu, S.; Gao, S.; Tachibana, E.; Kawamura, K.

    2010-07-01

    Dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10), metals, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and stable isotopic compositions of total carbon (TC) and total nitrogen (TN) were determined for PM10 samples collected at three urban and one suburban sites of Baoji, an inland city of China, during winter and spring 2008. Oxalic acid (C2) was the dominant diacid, followed by succinic (C4) and malonic (C3) acids. Total diacids in the urban and suburban areas were 1546±203 and 1728±495 ng m-3 during winter and 1236±335 and 1028±193 ng m-3 during spring. EC in the urban and the suburban atmospheres were 17±3.8 and 8.0±2.1 μg m-3 during winter and 20±5.9 and 7.1±2.7 μg m-3 during spring, while OC at the urban and suburban sites were 74±14 and 51±7.9 μg m-3 in winter and 51±20 and 23±6.1 μg m-3 in spring. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) accounted for 38±16% of OC in winter and 28±18% of OC in spring, suggesting an enhanced photochemical production of secondary organic aerosols in winter under an inversion layer development. Total metal elements in winter and spring were 34±10 and 61±27 μg m-3 in the urban air and 18±7 and 32±23 μg m-3 in the suburban air. A linear correlation (r2>0.8 in winter and r2>0.6 in spring) was found between primary organic carbon (POC) and Ca2+/Fe, together with a strong dependence of pH value of sample extracts on water-soluble inorganic carbon, suggesting fugitive dust as an important source of the airborne particles. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), sulfate, and Pb in the samples well correlated each other (r2>0.6) in winter, indicating an importance of emissions from coal burning for house heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of TC (δ13C) became higher with an increase in the concentration ratios of C2/OC due to aerosol aging. In contrast, nitrogen isotope compositions of TN (δ15N) became lower with an increases in the mass ratios of NH4+/PM10 and NO3-/PM10, which is possibly caused by an enhanced adsorption and

  6. Dietary intervention increases n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscle membrane phospholipids of obese subjects. Implications for insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, S.B.; Madsbad, S.; Høy, Carl-Erik

    2006-01-01

    Objective Cross-sectional studies suggest that the fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids in skeletal muscle cell membrane may modulate insulin sensitivity in humans. We examined the impact of a hypocaloric low-fat dietary intervention on membrane FA composition and insulin sensitivity...... analysis that included changes in weight, fat mass, waist circumference, plasma lipids, PUFA, SFA and long-chain PUFAn-3 indicated that SFA and long-chain PUFAn-3 were independent predictors of HOMA-IR (R-2 = 0.33, P fat dietary intervention programme increased....... Design Muscle membrane FA profiles were determined in muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies from 21 obese subjects before and after 6 months of dietary restriction. Diet instructions emphasized low intake of FA of marine origin by recommending lean fish and prohibiting fatty fish and fish oil supplements...

  7. Identification of a novel malonyl-CoA IC(50) for CPT-I: implications for predicting in vivo fatty acid oxidation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brennan K; Perry, Christopher G R; Koves, Timothy R; Wright, David C; Smith, Jeffrey C; Neufer, P Darrell; Muoio, Deborah M; Holloway, Graham P

    2012-11-15

    Published values regarding the sensitivity (IC(50)) of CPT-I (carnitine palmitoyltransferase I) to M-CoA (malonyl-CoA) inhibition in isolated mitochondria are inconsistent with predicted in vivo rates of fatty acid oxidation. Therefore we have re-examined M-CoA inhibition kinetics under various P-CoA (palmitoyl-CoA) concentrations in both isolated mitochondria and PMFs (permeabilized muscle fibres). PMFs have an 18-fold higher IC(50) (0.61 compared with 0.034 μM) in the presence of 25 μM P-CoA and a 13-fold higher IC(50) (6.3 compared with 0.49 μM) in the presence of 150 μM P-CoA compared with isolated mitochondria. M-CoA inhibition kinetics determined in PMFs predicts that CPT-I activity is inhibited by 33% in resting muscle compared with >95% in isolated mitochondria. Additionally, the ability of M-CoA to inhibit CPT-I appears to be dependent on P-CoA concentration, as the relative inhibitory capacity of M-CoA is decreased with increasing P-CoA concentrations. Altogether, the use of PMFs appears to provide an M-CoA IC(50) that better reflects the predicted in vivo rates of fatty acid oxidation. These findings also demonstrate that the ratio of [P-CoA]/[M-CoA] is critical for regulating CPT-I activity and may partially rectify the in vivo disconnect between M-CoA content and CPT-I flux within the context of exercise and Type 2 diabetes.

  8. Identification of a novel malonyl-CoA IC50 for CPT-1: implications for predicting in vivo fatty acid oxidation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brennan K.; Perry, Christopher G.R.; Koves, Timothy R.; Wright, David C.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Muoio, Deborah M.; Holloway, Graham P.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Published values regarding the sensitivity (IC50) of carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPT-I) to malonyl-CoA (M-CoA) inhibition in isolated mitochondria are inconsistent with predicted in vivo rates of fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, we have re-examined M-CoA inhibition kinetics under varying palmitoyl-CoA (P-CoA) concentrations in both isolated mitochondria and permeabilized muscle fibres (PMF). PMF have an 18-fold higher IC50 (0.61 vs 0.034 μM) in the presence of 25 μM P-CoA and a 13-fold higher IC50 (6.3 vs 0.49 μM) in the presence of 150 μM P-CoA compared to isolated mitochondria. M-CoA inhibition kinetics determined in PMF predicts that CPT-I activity is inhibited by 33% in resting muscle compared to >95% in isolated mitochondria. Additionally, the ability of M-CoA to inhibit CPT-I appears to be dependent on P-CoA concentration, as the relative inhibitory capacity of M-CoA is decreased with increasing P-CoA concentrations. Altogether, the use of PMF appears to provide a M-CoA IC50 that better reflects the predicted in vivo rates of fatty acid oxidation. These findings also demonstrate the ratio of [P-CoA]/[M-CoA] is critical for regulating CPT-I activity and may partially rectify the in vivo disconnect between M-CoA content and CPT-I flux within the context of exercise and type II diabetes. PMID:22928974

  9. Geochemistry and microbial community composition across a range of acid mine drainage impact and implications for the Neoarchean-Paleoproterozoic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havig, Jeff R.; Grettenberger, Christen; Hamilton, Trinity L.

    2017-06-01

    Streams impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD, also known as acid rock drainage) represent local environmental and ecological disasters; however, they may also present an opportunity to study microbial communities in environments analogous to past conditions. Neoarchean continents had streams and rivers replete with detrital pyrites. Following the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, Cyanobacteria colonized streams and rivers on continental surfaces. The combination of labile detrital pyrite grains and locally produced O2 generated by Cyanobacteria produced ideal conditions for pyrite oxidation similar to that found at modern AMD-impacted sites. To explore the connection of modern sites to ancient conditions, we sampled sites that exhibited a range of AMD-impact (e.g., pH from 2.1 to 7.9 [Fe2+] up to 5.2 mmol/L [SO42-] from 0.3 to 52.4 mmol/L) and found (i) nearly all analytes correlated to sulfate concentration; (ii) all sites exhibited the predominance of a single taxon most closely related to Ferrovum myxofaciens, an Fe-oxidixing betaproteoabacterium capable of carbon and nitrogen fixation, and (iii) signs of potential inorganic carbon limitation and nitrogen cycling. From these findings and building on the work of others, we present a conceptual model of continental surfaces during the Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic linking local O2 production to pyrite oxidation on continental surfaces to sulfate production and delivery to nearshore environments. The delivery of sulfate drives sulfate reduction and euxinia—favoring anoxygenic photosynthesis over cyanobacterial O2 generation in near-continent/shelf marine environments.

  10. Effect of glucose on the fatty acid composition of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 during 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid degradation: implications for lipid-based stable isotope probing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Thomas Z; Dignac, Marie-France; Barriuso, Enrique; Mariotti, André

    2011-10-01

    Combining lipid biomarker profiling with stable isotope probing (SIP) is a powerful technique for studying specific microbial populations responsible for the degradation of organic pollutants in various natural environments. However, the presence of other easily degradable substrates may induce significant physiological changes by altering both the rate of incorporation of the target compound into the biomass and the microbial lipid profiles. In order to test this hypothesis, Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacterium, was incubated with [(13)C]2,4-D, [(13)C]glucose, or mixtures of both substrates alternatively labeled with (13)C. C. necator JMP134 exhibited a preferential use of 2,4-D over glucose. The isotopic analysis showed that glucose had only a small effect on the incorporation of the acetic chain of 2,4-D into the biomass (at days 2 and 3) and no effect on that of the benzenic ring. The addition of glucose did change the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition. However, the overall FAME isotopic signature reflected that of the entire biomass. Compound-specific individual isotopic analyses of FAME composition showed that the (13)C-enriched FAME profiles were slightly or not affected when tracing the 2,4-D acetic chain or 2,4-D benzenic ring, respectively. This batch study is a necessary step for validating the use of lipid-based SIP methods in complex environments.

  11. Effect of Glucose on the Fatty Acid Composition of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 during 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Degradation: Implications for Lipid-Based Stable Isotope Probing Methods▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Thomas Z.; Dignac, Marie-France; Barriuso, Enrique; Mariotti, André

    2011-01-01

    Combining lipid biomarker profiling with stable isotope probing (SIP) is a powerful technique for studying specific microbial populations responsible for the degradation of organic pollutants in various natural environments. However, the presence of other easily degradable substrates may induce significant physiological changes by altering both the rate of incorporation of the target compound into the biomass and the microbial lipid profiles. In order to test this hypothesis, Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacterium, was incubated with [13C]2,4-D, [13C]glucose, or mixtures of both substrates alternatively labeled with 13C. C. necator JMP134 exhibited a preferential use of 2,4-D over glucose. The isotopic analysis showed that glucose had only a small effect on the incorporation of the acetic chain of 2,4-D into the biomass (at days 2 and 3) and no effect on that of the benzenic ring. The addition of glucose did change the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition. However, the overall FAME isotopic signature reflected that of the entire biomass. Compound-specific individual isotopic analyses of FAME composition showed that the 13C-enriched FAME profiles were slightly or not affected when tracing the 2,4-D acetic chain or 2,4-D benzenic ring, respectively. This batch study is a necessary step for validating the use of lipid-based SIP methods in complex environments. PMID:21856833

  12. Dicarboxylic acids, metals and isotopic compositions of C and N in atmospheric aerosols from inland China: implications for dust and coal burning emission and secondary aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dicarboxylic acids (C2–C10, metals, elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, and stable isotopic compositions of total carbon (TC and total nitrogen (TN were determined for PM10 samples collected at three urban and one suburban sites of Baoji, an inland city of China, during winter and spring 2008. Oxalic acid (C2 was the dominant diacid, followed by succinic (C4 and malonic (C3 acids. Total diacids in the urban and suburban areas were 1546±203 and 1728±495 ng m−3 during winter and 1236±335 and 1028±193 ng m−3 during spring. EC in the urban and the suburban atmospheres were 17±3.8 and 8.0±2.1 μg m−3 during winter and 20±5.9 and 7.1±2.7 μg m−3 during spring, while OC at the urban and suburban sites were 74±14 and 51±7.9 μg m−3 in winter and 51±20 and 23±6.1 μg m−3 in spring. Secondary organic carbon (SOC accounted for 38±16% of OC in winter and 28±18% of OC in spring, suggesting an enhanced photochemical production of secondary organic aerosols in winter under an inversion layer development. Total metal elements in winter and spring were 34±10 and 61±27 μg m−3 in the urban air and 18±7 and 32±23 μg m−3 in the suburban air. A linear correlation (r2>0.8 in winter and r2>0.6 in spring was found between primary organic carbon (POC and Ca2+/Fe, together with a strong dependence of pH value of sample extracts on water-soluble inorganic carbon, suggesting fugitive dust as an important source of the airborne particles. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, sulfate, and Pb in the samples well correlated each other (r2>0.6 in winter, indicating an importance of emissions from coal burning for house heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of TC (δ13C became higher with an increase

  13. Interactions between cadmium and lead with acidic soils: Experimental evidence of similar adsorption patterns for a wide range of metal concentrations and the implications of metal migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, O.S. [GET-CNRS-UPS-IRD-UMR 5563, 14, Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Probst, A., E-mail: anne.probst@ensat.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie fonctionnelle et Environnement), ENSAT, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); CNRS, EcoLab, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); Leviel, E. [GET-CNRS-UPS-IRD-UMR 5563, 14, Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Liao, B. [International College, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha 410004 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption experiments of Cd and Pb in acid soils (China, France). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large pH conditions and large range of metal concentrations were considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar dependencies between metals concentration in solution and metal adsorbed on the surface were predicted using Langmuir and Freundlich equations and surface complexation model (SCM). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No competition between Cd and Pb detected at pH 5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal adsorption capacity is two orders of magnitude higher than limit value for soil protection. - Abstract: The importance of high- and low-affinity surface sites for cadmium and lead adsorption in typical European and Asian soils was investigated. Adsorption experiments on surface and deep horizons of acidic brown (Vosges, France) and red loess soils (Hunan, China) were performed at 25 Degree-Sign C as a function of the pH (3.5-8) and a large range of metal concentrations in solution (10{sup -9}-10{sup -4} mol l{sup -1}). We studied the adsorption kinetics using a Cd{sup 2+}-selective electrode and desorption experiments as a function of the solid/solution ratio and pH. At a constant solution pH, all samples exhibited similar maximal adsorption capacities (4.0 {+-} 0.5 {mu}mol/g Cd and 20 {+-} 2 {mu}mol/g Pb). A constant slope of adsorbed-dissolved concentration dependence was valid over 5 orders of magnitude of metal concentrations. Universal Langmuir and Freundlich equations and the SCM formalism described the adsorption isotherms and the pH-dependent adsorption edge over very broad ranges of metal concentrations, indicating no high- or low-affinity sites for metal binding at the soil surface under these experimental conditions. At pH 5, Cd and Pb did not compete, in accordance with the SCM. The metal adsorption ability exceeded the value for soil protection by two orders of magnitude, but only critical load guarantees soil

  14. Non-enzymatic modifications of prostaglandin H synthase 1 affect bifunctional enzyme activity - Implications for the sensitivity of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassassir, Hassan; Siewiera, Karolina; Talar, Marcin; Stec-Martyna, Emilia; Pawlowska, Zofia; Watala, Cezary

    2016-06-25

    Due to its ability to inhibit the blood platelet PGHS-1, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, Aspirin(®)) is widely used as a preventive agent in atherothrombotic diseases. However, its beneficial effects seem to be lower in diabetic patients, suggesting that protein glycation may impair effective ASA-mediated acetylation process. On the other hand, it is proposed that ASA can prevent some of the late complications of diabetes by lowering the extent of glycation at protein free amino groups. The aim of this work was to evaluate the extents of non-enzymatic N-glycosylation (glycation) and acetylation of blood platelet PGHS-1 (COX-1) and the competition between glycation and acetylation was investigated in order to demonstrate how these two reactions may compete against platelet PGHS-1. When PGHS-1 was incubated with glycating/acetylating agents (glucose, Glu; 1,6-bisphosphofructose, 1,6-BPF; methylglyoxal, MGO, acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), the enzyme was modified in 13.4 ± 1.6, 5.3 ± 0.5, 10.7 ± 1.2 and 6.4 ± 1.1 mol/mol protein, respectively, and its activity was significantly reduced. The prior glycation/carbonylation of PGHS-1 with Glu, 1,6-BPF or MGO decreased the extent of acetylation from 6.4 ± 1.1 down to 2.5 ± 0.2, 3.6 ± 0.3 and 5.2 ± 0.2 mol/mol protein, respectively, but the enzyme still remained susceptible to the subsequent inhibition of its activity with ASA. When PGHS-1 was first acetylated with ASA and then incubated with glycating/carbonylating agents, we observed the following reductions in the enzyme modifications: from 13.4 ± 1.6 to 8.7 ± 0.6 mol/mol protein for Glu, from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 3.9 ± 0.3 mol/mol protein for 1,6-BPF and from 10.7 ± 1.2 to 7.5 ± 0.5 mol/mol protein for MGO, however subsequent glycation/carbonylation did not significantly affect PGHS-1 function. Overall, our outcomes allow to better understand the structural aspects of the chemical competition between glycation and acetylation of PGHS-1.

  15. Binding of Shewanella FadR to the fabA fatty acid biosynthetic gene: implications for contraction of the fad regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huimin; Zheng, Beiwen; Gao, Rongsui; Feng, Youjun

    2015-09-01

    The Escherichia coli fadR protein product, a paradigm/prototypical FadR regulator, positively regulates fabA and fabB, the two critical genes for unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis. However the scenario in the other Ɣ-proteobacteria, such as Shewanella with the marine origin, is unusual in that Rodionov and coworkers predicted that only fabA (not fabB) has a binding site for FadR protein. It raised the possibility of fad regulon contraction. Here we report that this is the case. Sequence alignment of the FadR homologs revealed that the N-terminal DNA-binding domain exhibited remarkable similarity, whereas the ligand-accepting motif at C-terminus is relatively-less conserved. The FadR homologue of S. oneidensis (referred to FadR_she) was over-expressed and purified to homogeneity. Integrative evidence obtained by FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) and chemical cross-linking analyses elucidated that FadR_she protein can dimerize in solution, whose identity was determined by MALDI-TOF-MS. In vitro data from electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggested that FadR_she is almost functionally-exchangeable/equivalent to E. coli FadR (FadR_ec) in the ability of binding the E. coli fabA (and fabB) promoters. In an agreement with that of E. coli fabA, S. oneidensis fabA promoter bound both FadR_she and FadR_ec, and was disassociated specifically with the FadR regulatory protein upon the addition of long-chain acyl-CoA thioesters. To monitor in vivo effect exerted by FadR on Shewanella fabA expression, the native promoter of S. oneidensis fabA was fused to a LacZ reporter gene to engineer a chromosome fabA-lacZ transcriptional fusion in E. coli. As anticipated, the removal of fadR gene gave about 2-fold decrement of Shewanella fabA expression by β-gal activity, which is almost identical to the inhibitory level by the addition of oleate. Therefore, we concluded that fabA is contracted to be the only one member of fad regulon in the context of fatty acid

  16. Clinical validation of a novel diagnostic HIV-2 total nucleic acid qualitative assay using the Abbott m2000 platform: Implications for complementary HIV-2 nucleic acid testing for the CDC 4th generation HIV diagnostic testing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming; Wong, Audrey J S; Raugi, Dana N; Smith, Robert A; Seilie, Annette M; Ortega, Jose P; Bogusz, Kyle M; Sall, Fatima; Ba, Selly; Seydi, Moussa; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S; Coombs, Robert W

    2017-01-01

    The 2014 CDC 4th generation HIV screening algorithm includes an orthogonal immunoassay to confirm and discriminate HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies. Additional nucleic acid testing (NAT) is recommended to resolve indeterminate or undifferentiated HIV seroreactivity. HIV-2 NAT requires a second-line assay to detect HIV-2 total nucleic acid (TNA) in patients' blood cells, as a third of untreated patients have undetectable plasma HIV-2 RNA. To validate a qualitative HIV-2 TNA assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HIV-2-infected Senegalese study participants. We evaluated the assay precision, sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic performance of an HIV-2 TNA assay. Matched plasma and PBMC samples were collected from 25 HIV-1, 30 HIV-2, 8 HIV-1/-2 dual-seropositive and 25 HIV seronegative individuals. Diagnostic performance was evaluated by comparing the outcome of the TNA assay to the results obtained by the 4th generation HIV screening and confirmatory immunoassays. All PBMC from 30 HIV-2 seropositive participants tested positive for HIV-2 TNA including 23 patients with undetectable plasma RNA. Of the 30 matched plasma specimens, one was HIV non-reactive. Samples from 50 non-HIV-2 infected individuals were confirmed as non-reactive for HIV-2 Ab and negative for HIV-2 TNA. The agreement between HIV-2 TNA and the combined immunoassay results was 98.8% (79/80). Furthermore, HIV-2 TNA was detected in 7 of 8 PBMC specimens from HIV-1/HIV-2 dual-seropositive participants. Our TNA assay detected HIV-2 DNA/RNA in PBMC from serologically HIV-2 reactive, HIV indeterminate or HIV undifferentiated individuals with undetectable plasma RNA, and is suitable for confirming HIV-2 infection in the HIV testing algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Implications of the role of reactive cystein in arginine kinase: reactivation kinetics of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-modified arginine kinase reactivated by dithiothreitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ji-Cheng; Cheng, Yuan; Hui, En-Fu; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2004-04-30

    The reduction of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-modified arginine kinase by dithiothreitol has been investigated using the kinetic theory of the substrate reaction during modification of enzyme activity. The results show that the modified arginine kinase can be fully reactivated by an excess concentration of dithiothreitol in a monophasic kinetic course. The presence of ATP or the transition-state analog markedly slows the apparent reactivation rate constant, while arginine shows no effect. The results of ultraviolet (UV) difference and intrinsic fluorescence spectra indicate that the substrate arginine-ADP-Mg2+ can induce conformational changes of the modified enzyme but adding NO3- cannot induce further changes that occur with the native enzyme. The reactive cysteines' location and role in the catalysis of arginine kinase are discussed. It is suggested that the cysteine may be located in the hinge region of the two domains of arginine kinase. The reactive cysteine of arginine kinase may play an important role not in the binding to the transition-state analog but in the conformational changes caused by the transition-state analog.

  18. Occurrence of phthalate diesters (phthalates), p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters (parabens), bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) and their derivatives in indoor dust from Vietnam: Implications for exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tri Manh; Minh, Tu Binh; Kumosani, Taha A; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-02-01

    Phthalate diesters (phthalates), esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens), and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) are used in personal care products, food packages, household products, or pharmaceuticals. These compounds possess endocrine-disrupting potentials and have been reported to occur in the environment. Nevertheless, no previous studies have reported the occurrence of these compounds in indoor dust from Vietnam. In this study, nine phthalates, six parabens, and four BADGEs were determined in indoor dust samples collected from Hanoi, Hatinh, Hungyen, and Thaibinh, in Vietnam. Total concentrations of phthalates, parabens, and BADGEs in indoor dust ranged from 3440 to 106,000 ng/g (median: 22,600 ng/g), 40-840 ng/g (median: 123 ng/g), and 23 to 1750 ng/g (median: 184 ng/g), respectively. Based on the measured median concentration of phthalates, parabens, and BADGEs in indoor dust, we estimated human exposure doses to these compounds through indoor dust ingestion for various age groups. The exposure doses to phthalates, parabens, and BADGEs decreased with age and ranged from 19.4 to 90.4 ng/kg-bw/d, 0.113-0.528 ng/kg-bw/d, and 0.158-0.736 ng/kg-bw/d, respectively. This is the first study on the occurrence and human exposure of phthalates, parabens, and BADGEs in indoor dust from Vietnam.

  19. Fabrication of Poly-l-lactic Acid/Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate Composite Scaffolds with High Mechanical Strength—Implications for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Tanataweethum

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolds were fabricated from poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA/dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD composite by indirect casting. Sodium citrate and PLLA were used to improve the mechanical properties of the DCPD scaffolds. The resulting PLLA/DCPD composite scaffold had increased diametral tensile strength and fracture energy when compared to DCPD only scaffolds (1.05 vs. 2.70 MPa and 2.53 vs. 12.67 N-mm, respectively. Sodium citrate alone accelerated the degradation rate by 1.5 times independent of PLLA. Cytocompatibility of all samples were evaluated using proliferation and differentiation parameters of dog-bone marrow stromal cells (dog-BMSCs. The results showed that viable dog-BMSCs attached well on both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD composite surfaces. In both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD conditioned medium, dog-BMSCs proliferated well and expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity indicating cell differentiation. These findings indicate that incorporating both sodium citrate and PLLA could effectively improve mechanical strength and biocompatibility without increasing the degradation time of calcium phosphate cement scaffolds for bone tissue engineering purposes.

  20. Fabrication of Poly-l-lactic Acid/Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate Composite Scaffolds with High Mechanical Strength—Implications for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanataweethum, Nida; Liu, Wai Ching; Scott Goebel, W.; Li, Ding; Chu, Tien Min

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds were fabricated from poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)/dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) composite by indirect casting. Sodium citrate and PLLA were used to improve the mechanical properties of the DCPD scaffolds. The resulting PLLA/DCPD composite scaffold had increased diametral tensile strength and fracture energy when compared to DCPD only scaffolds (1.05 vs. 2.70 MPa and 2.53 vs. 12.67 N-mm, respectively). Sodium citrate alone accelerated the degradation rate by 1.5 times independent of PLLA. Cytocompatibility of all samples were evaluated using proliferation and differentiation parameters of dog-bone marrow stromal cells (dog-BMSCs). The results showed that viable dog-BMSCs attached well on both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD composite surfaces. In both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD conditioned medium, dog-BMSCs proliferated well and expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity indicating cell differentiation. These findings indicate that incorporating both sodium citrate and PLLA could effectively improve mechanical strength and biocompatibility without increasing the degradation time of calcium phosphate cement scaffolds for bone tissue engineering purposes. PMID:26556380

  1. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: Implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis. PMID:25245072

  2. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection in ex vivo cervical tissue model of human vagina by palmitic acid; implications for a microbicide development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 80% of all new HIV-1 infections are acquired through sexual contact. Currently, there is no clinically approved microbicide, indicating a clear and urgent therapeutic need. We recently reported that palmitic acid (PA is a novel and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and entry. Mechanistically, PA inhibits HIV-1 infection by binding to a novel pocket on the CD4 receptor and blocks efficient gp120-to-CD4 attachment. Here, we wanted to assess the ability of PA to inhibit HIV-1 infection in cervical tissue ex vivo model of human vagina, and determine its effect on Lactobacillus (L species of probiotic vaginal flora. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results show that treatment with 100-200 µM PA inhibited HIV-1 infection in cervical tissue by up to 50%, and this treatment was not toxic to the tissue or to L. crispatus and jensenii species of vaginal flora. In vitro, in a cell free system that is independent of in vivo cell associated CD4 receptor; we determined inhibition constant (Ki to be ∼2.53 µM. SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate utility of PA as a model molecule for further preclinical development of a safe and potent HIV-1 entry microbicide inhibitor.

  3. Periodontal health status and implication of periodic acid-Schiff diastase - a key in exfoliative cytology among diabetics mellitus patients: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Aesha; Parakh, Mayank Kumar; Kumar, Satish Muthu; Nachiammai, N; Sriram, K

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study are: (i) To determine if periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-Diastase is an effective tool to diagnose DM noninvasively, (ii) to use three different types of staining procedures to identify the staining pattern over the exfoliated cells of normal and diabetic patients, (iii) to study the periodontal health status of DM and normal subjects. Basic questions regarding the demographic data were asked, following which community periodontal index (CPI) was recorded. Oral smears were collected from clinically normal buccal mucosa of 150 patients using wooden tongue spatulas. The subjects were asked to gargle their mouth with water and the wooden spatula was scraped at the site from buccal mucosa. The smears were spread evenly on a dry clean glass slide and fixed immediately with absolute ethyl alcohol. Three slides were prepared for each of the patients. PAS, PAS with diastase digestion, and Papanicolaou staining were performed and examined under a microscope. Average CPI for study subjects was 3.2 and control subjects was 2.1. The average loss of attachment was 1.1 in the study group and 0.2 in the control group (P - 0.00) and the result are statistically highly significant. All the 150 cases (100%) were positive for PAS staining, while PAS-diastase (PAS-D) staining showed positivity only for normal subjects and was negative (100%) in the diabetic group (P - 0.00) and the result are statistically highly significant. Results of our study showed that exfoliative cytology of the oral cavity, when stained with PAS and PAS-D, can be used as an effective screening and diagnostic tool for DM patients.

  4. Oleanolic acid modulates the immune-inflammatory response in mice with experimental autoimmune myocarditis and protects from cardiac injury. Therapeutic implications for the human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, R; Cordova, C; San Román, J A; Gutierrez, B; Cachofeiro, V; Nieto, M L

    2014-07-01

    Myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are inflammatory diseases of the myocardium, for which appropriate treatment remains a major clinical challenge. Oleanolic acid (OA), a natural triterpene widely distributed in food and medicinal plants, possesses a large range of biological effects with beneficial properties for health and disease prevention. Several experimental approaches have shown its cardioprotective actions, and OA has recently been proven effective for treating Th1 cell-mediated inflammatory diseases; however, its effect on inflammatory heart disorders, including myocarditis, has not yet been addressed. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of OA in prevention and treatment of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM). The utility of OA was evaluated in vivo through their administration to cardiac α-myosin (MyHc-α614-629)-immunized BALB/c mice from day 0 or day 21 post-immunization to the end of the experiment, and in vitro through their addition to stimulated-cardiac cells. Prophylactic and therapeutic administration of OA dramatically decreased disease severity: the heart weight/body weight ratio as well as plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide and myosin-specific autoantibodies production were significantly reduced in OA-treated EAM animals, compared with untreated ones. Histological heart analysis showed that OA-treatment diminished cell infiltration, fibrosis and dystrophic calcifications. OA also decreased proliferation of cardiac fibroblast in vitro and attenuated calcium and collagen deposition induced by relevant cytokines of active myocarditis. Furthermore, in OA-treated EAM mice the number of Treg cells and the production of IL-10 and IL-35 were markedly increased, while proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines were significantly reduced. We demonstrate that OA ameliorates both developing and established EAM by promoting an antiinflammatory cytokine profile and by interfering with the

  5. Vertical distributions of bound saturated fatty acids and compound-specific stable carbon isotope compositions in sediments of two lakes in China: implication for the influence of eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lifang; Xiong, Yongqiang; Wu, Fengchang; Li, Qiuhua; Lin, Tian; Giesy, John P

    2014-11-01

    Lakes Dianchi (DC) and Bosten (BST) were determined to be at different stages of eutrophication, by use of total organic carbon content, bulk carbon isotopic composition, bulk nitrogen isotopic composition, and bound saturated fatty acid (BSFA) concentrations in sediment cores. A rapid increase in the supply of organic matter (OM) to DC began after the 1950s, while the environment and trophic status of BST remained constant as indicated by characteristics of OM input to sediments. The BSFA ratios of nC14 + nC16 + nC18/nC24 + nC26 + nC28 increase upward from 7 to 13 in the DC core, which are significantly greater than those from BST (2 to 3). This result is consistent with algae or bacteria being the dominant contribution of the OM increase induced by eutrophication in DC. The positive shift of nC16 compound-specific δ (13)C in the upper section might be an indicator of excess algal productivity, which was observed in the two lakes. The positive shifts of compound-specific δ (13)C of other BSFAs were also observed in the upper section of the core only from DC. The observed trends of compound-specific δ(13)C of BSFA originated from different sources became more consistent, which reflected the intensified eutrophication had profoundly affected production and preservation of OM in DC. The results observed for BST indicated that accumulation of algae did not affect the entire aquatic ecosystem until now.

  6. Binding of 3,4,5,6-Tetrahydroxyazepanes to the Acid-[beta]-glucosidase Active Site: Implications for Pharmacological Chaperone Design for Gaucher Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orwig, Susan D.; Tan, Yun Lei; Grimster, Neil P.; Yu, Zhanqian; Powers, Evan T.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Lieberman, Raquel L. (Scripps); (GIT)

    2013-03-07

    Pharmacologic chaperoning is a therapeutic strategy being developed to improve the cellular folding and trafficking defects associated with Gaucher disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by point mutations in the gene encoding acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase). In this approach, small molecules bind to and stabilize mutant folded or nearly folded GCase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), increasing the concentration of folded, functional GCase trafficked to the lysosome where the mutant enzyme can hydrolyze the accumulated substrate. To date, the pharmacologic chaperone (PC) candidates that have been investigated largely have been active site-directed inhibitors of GCase, usually containing five- or six-membered rings, such as modified azasugars. Here we show that a seven-membered, nitrogen-containing heterocycle (3,4,5,6-tetrahydroxyazepane) scaffold is also promising for generating PCs for GCase. Crystal structures reveal that the core azepane stabilizes GCase in a variation of its proposed active conformation, whereas binding of an analogue with an N-linked hydroxyethyl tail stabilizes GCase in a conformation in which the active site is covered, also utilizing a loop conformation not seen previously. Although both compounds preferentially stabilize GCase to thermal denaturation at pH 7.4, reflective of the pH in the ER, only the core azepane, which is a mid-micromolar competitive inhibitor, elicits a modest increase in enzyme activity for the neuronopathic G202R and the non-neuronopathic N370S mutant GCase in an intact cell assay. Our results emphasize the importance of the conformational variability of the GCase active site in the design of competitive inhibitors as PCs for Gaucher disease.

  7. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sung You

    Full Text Available Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  8. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae Sung; Frey, John W; Hornberger, Troy A

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA) may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k) T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  9. The Effect of Limited Diffusion and Wet–Dry Cycling on Reversible Polymerization Reactions: Implications for Prebiotic Synthesis of Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G. Higgs

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing problem for the origins of life is that polymerization of many biopolymers, including nucleic acids and peptides, is thermodynamically unfavourable in aqueous solution. If bond making and breaking is reversible, monomers and very short oligomers predominate. Recent experiments have shown that wetting and drying cycles can overcome this problem and drive the formation of longer polymers. In the dry phase, bond formation is favourable, but diffusion is restricted, and bonds only form between monomers that are initially close together. In the wet phase, some of the bonds are hydrolyzed. However, repositioning of the molecules allows new bonds to form in the next dry phase, leading to an increase in mean polymer length. Here, we consider a simple theoretical model that explains the effect of cycling. There is an equilibrium length distribution with a high mean length that could be achieved if diffusion occurred freely in the dry phase. This equilibrium is inaccessible without diffusion. A single dry cycle without diffusion leads to mean lengths much shorter than this. Repeated cycling leads to a significant increase in polymerization relative to a single cycle. In the most favourable case, cycling leads to the same equilibrium length distribution as would be achieved if free diffusion were possible in the dry phase. These results support the RNA World scenario by explaining a potential route to synthesis of long RNAs; however, they also imply that cycling would be beneficial to the synthesis of other kinds of polymers, including peptides, where bond formation involves a condensation reaction.

  10. Fatty Acid Binding Protein 7 Is a Molecular Marker in Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Salivary Glands: Implications for Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janyaporn Phuchareon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC is an aggressive malignant neoplasm of the salivary glands. Its diagnosis is difficult due to overlapping features with other salivary tumors. Gene expression analysis may complement traditional diagnostic methods. We searched gene expression patterns in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database and in our tumor and normal samples. The biologic and prognostic potential of the identified genes was analyzed. The GEO data set of primary xenografted ACCs revealed that expression of five genes, engrailed homeobox 1 (EN1, fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, hemoglobin epsilon 1, MYB, and versican (VCAN, was dramatically increased. mRNA expression of EN1, FABP7, MYB, and VCAN distinguished our sporadic ACCs from normal tissues and benign tumors. FABP7 expression appeared to be regulated differently from EN1 and MYB and was crossly correlated with poor prognosis in our ACC cohort. Immunohistochemistry showed that FABP7 protein was predominantly expressed in the nucleus of myoepithelial cells of both tubular and cribriform subtypes. In contrast, in the solid subtype, which is often associated with a lower survival rate, FABP7 protein was uniformly expressed in cancerous cells. One case with cribriform architecture and the highest level of FABP7 mRNA showed strong FABP7 staining in both duct-type epithelial and myoepithelial cells, suggesting that diffuse expression of FABP7 protein might be related to aggressive tumor behavior and poor prognosis. We propose FABP7 as a novel biomarker in ACC. The molecule may be useful in diagnosis and for identifying more effective therapies targeting this protein or upstream molecules that regulate it.

  11. Modeled hydraulic redistribution in tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations: the implications of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kailiang; Foster, Adrianna

    2016-04-01

    Past studies have largely focused on hydraulic redistribution (HR) in trees, shrubs, and grasses, and recognized its role in interspecies interactions. HR in plants that conduct crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), however, remains poorly investigated, as does the effect of HR on transpiration in different vegetation associations (i.e., tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations). We have developed a mechanistic model to investigate the net direction and magnitude of HR at the patch scale for tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations at the growing season to yearly timescale. The modeling results show that deep-rooted CAM plants in CAM-grass associations could perform hydraulic lift at a higher rate than trees in tree-grass associations in a relatively wet environment, as explained by a significant increase in grass transpiration rate in the shallow soil layer, balancing a lower transpiration rate by CAM plants. By comparison, trees in tree-CAM associations may perform hydraulic descent at a higher rate than those in tree-grass associations in a dry environment. Model simulations also show that hydraulic lift increases the transpiration of shallow-rooted plants, while hydraulic descent increases that of deep-rooted plants. CAM plants transpire during the night and thus perform HR during the day. Based on these model simulations, we suggest that the ability of CAM plants to perform HR at a higher rate may have different effects on the surrounding plant community than those of plants with C3 or C4 photosynthetic pathways (i.e., diurnal transpiration).

  12. Variation of physicochemical properties of drinking water treatment residuals and Phoslock(®) induced by fulvic acid adsorption: Implication for lake restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhui; Jiang, He-Long; Xu, Huacheng; Yin, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    The use of phosphorus (P) inactivating agents to reduce internal P loading from sediment for lake restoration has attracted increasing attention. Reasonably, the physicochemical properties of P inactivating agents may vary with the interference of various environmental factors, leading to the change of control effectiveness and risks. In this study, the effect of fulvic acid (FA) adsorption on the properties of two agents, drinking water treatment residuals (DWTRs) and Phoslock®, was investigated. The results showed that after adsorption, there was little change for the main structures of DWTRs and Phoslock®, but the thermostability of Phoslock®, as well as the particle size and settleability of the two agents decreased. The specific surface area and pore volume of DWTRs also decreased, while those of Phoslock® increased. Further analysis indicated that aluminum and iron in DWTRs were stable during FA adsorption, but a substantial increase of lanthanum release from Phoslock® was observed, in particular at first (P < 0.01). Moreover, the P immobilization capability of DWTRs had little change after FA adsorption, while the capability of Phoslock® after FA adsorption decreased in solutions (P < 0.001) and sediments (P < 0.1); interestingly, from the view of engineering application, the performance of Phoslock® was not substantially affected. Overall, each P inactivating agent had its own particular responses of the physicochemical properties to environment factors, and detailed investigations on the applicability of each agent were essential before practical application.

  13. The effects of secular calcium and magnesium concentration changes on the thermodynamics of seawater acid/base chemistry: Implications for Eocene and Cretaceous ocean carbon chemistry and buffering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Mathis P.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Higgins, John A.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2015-05-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+]. We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20 mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increasing seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  14. Mixed effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the host transcriptome and proteome and their implications for HIV reactivation from latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Cory H; Johnston, Harvey E; Moesker, Bastiaan; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Margolis, David M; Richman, Douglas D; Spina, Celsa A; Garbis, Spiros D; Woelk, Christopher H; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda

    2015-11-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) has been assessed in clinical trials as part of a "shock and kill" strategy to cure HIV-infected patients. While it was effective at inducing expression of HIV RNA ("shock"), treatment with SAHA did not result in a reduction of reservoir size ("kill"). We therefore utilized a combined analysis of effects of SAHA on the host transcriptome and proteome to dissect its mechanisms of action that may explain its limited success in "shock and kill" strategies. CD4+ T cells from HIV seronegative donors were treated with 1μM SAHA or its solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 24h. Protein expression and post-translational modifications were measured with iTRAQ proteomics using ultra high-precision two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Gene expression was assessed by Illumina microarrays. Using limma package in the R computing environment, we identified 185 proteins, 18 phosphorylated forms, 4 acetylated forms and 2982 genes, whose expression was modulated by SAHA. A protein interaction network integrating these 4 data types identified the HIV transcriptional repressor HMGA1 to be upregulated by SAHA at the transcript, protein and acetylated protein levels. Further functional category assessment of proteins and genes modulated by SAHA identified gene ontology terms related to NFκB signaling, protein folding and autophagy, which are all relevant to HIV reactivation. In summary, SAHA modulated numerous host cell transcripts, proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins, which would be expected to have very mixed effects on the induction of HIV-specific transcription and protein function. Proteome profiling highlighted a number of potential counter-regulatory effects of SAHA with respect to viral induction, which transcriptome profiling alone would not have identified. These observations could lead to a more informed selection and design of other HDACi with a more refined targeting profile, and

  15. Accurate distance determination of nucleic acids via Förster resonance energy transfer: implications of dye linker length and rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindbert, Simon; Kalinin, Stanislav; Nguyen, Hien; Kienzler, Andrea; Clima, Lilia; Bannwarth, Willi; Appel, Bettina; Müller, Sabine; Seidel, Claus A M

    2011-03-02

    In Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments, the donor (D) and acceptor (A) fluorophores are usually attached to the macromolecule of interest via long flexible linkers of up to 15 Å in length. This causes significant uncertainties in quantitative distance measurements and prevents experiments with short distances between the attachment points of the dyes due to possible dye-dye interactions. We present two approaches to overcome the above problems as demonstrated by FRET measurements for a series of dsDNA and dsRNA internally labeled with Alexa488 and Cy5 as D and A dye, respectively. First, we characterize the influence of linker length and flexibility on FRET for different dye linker types (long, intermediate, short) by analyzing fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decays. For long linkers, we describe a straightforward procedure that allows for very high accuracy of FRET-based structure determination through proper consideration of the position distribution of the dye and of linker dynamics. The position distribution can be quickly calculated with geometric accessible volume (AV) simulations, provided that the local structure of RNA or DNA in the proximity of the dye is known and that the dye diffuses freely in the sterically allowed space. The AV approach provides results similar to molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and is fully consistent with experimental FRET data. In a benchmark study for ds A-RNA, an rmsd value of 1.3 Å is achieved. Considering the case of undefined dye environments or very short DA distances, we introduce short linkers with a propargyl or alkenyl unit for internal labeling of nucleic acids to minimize position uncertainties. Studies by ensemble time correlated single photon counting and single-molecule detection show that the nature of the linker strongly affects the radius of the dye's accessible volume (6-16 Å). For short propargyl linkers, heterogeneous dye environments are observed on the millisecond time scale. A

  16. INTRAHIPPOCAMPAL ADMINISTRATION OF IBOTENIC ACID INDUCED CHOLINERGIC DYSFUNCTION via NR2A/NR2B EXPRESSION: IMPLICATIONS OF RESVERATROL AGAINST ALZHEIMER DISEASE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chennakesavan eKarthick

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although several drugs revealed moderate amelioration of symptoms, none of them have sufficient potency to prevent or reverse the progression towards Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathology. Resveratrol (RSV, a polyphenolic compound has shown an outstanding therapeutic effect on a broad spectrum of diseases like age-associated neurodegeneration, inflammation etc. The present study was thus conducted to assess the therapeutic efficacy of RSV in ameliorating the deleterious effects of Ibotenic acid (IBO in male Wistar rats. Stereotactic intrahippocampal administration of IBO (5µg/µl lesioned rats impairs cholinergic transmission, learning and memory performance that is rather related to AD and thus chosen as a suitable model to understand the drug efficacy in preventing AD pathophysiology. Since IBO is an agonist of glutamate, it is expected to exhibit an excitotoxic effect by altering glutamatergic receptors like NMDA receptor. The current study displayed significant alterations in the mRNA expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors, and further it is surprising to note that cholinergic receptors decreased in expression particularly α7-nAChR with increased m1AChR. RSV administration (20mg/kg body weight, i.p significantly reduced these changes in IBO induced rats. Glutamatergic and cholinergic receptor alterations were associated with significant changes in the behavioral parameters of rats induced by IBO. While RSV improved spatial learning performance, attenuated immobility and improvised open field activity in IBO induced rats. NR2B activation in the present study might mediate cell death through oxidative stress that form the basis of abnormal behavioral pattern in IBO induced rats. Interestingly, RSV that could efficiently encounter oxidative stress have significantly decreased stress markers viz., nitrite, PCO, and MDA levels by enhancing antioxidant status. Histopathological analysis displayed significant reduction in the

  17. Intrahippocampal Administration of Ibotenic Acid Induced Cholinergic Dysfunction via NR2A/NR2B Expression: Implications of Resveratrol against Alzheimer Disease Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, Chennakesavan; Periyasamy, Sabapathy; Jayachandran, Kesavan S; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy

    2016-01-01

    Although several drugs revealed moderate amelioration of symptoms, none of them have sufficient potency to prevent or reverse the progression toward Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenolic compound has shown an outstanding therapeutic effect on a broad spectrum of diseases like age-associated neurodegeneration, inflammation etc. The present study was thus conducted to assess the therapeutic efficacy of RSV in ameliorating the deleterious effects of Ibotenic acid (IBO) in male Wistar rats. Stereotactic intrahippocampal administration of IBO (5 μg/μl) lesioned rats impairs cholinergic transmission, learning and memory performance that is rather related to AD and thus chosen as a suitable model to understand the drug efficacy in preventing AD pathophysiology. Since IBO is an agonist of glutamate, it is expected to exhibit an excitotoxic effect by altering glutamatergic receptors like NMDA receptor. The current study displayed significant alterations in the mRNA expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors, and further it is surprising to note that cholinergic receptors decreased in expression particularly α7-nAChR with increased m1AChR. RSV administration (20 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) significantly reduced these changes in IBO induced rats. Glutamatergic and cholinergic receptor alterations were associated with significant changes in the behavioral parameters of rats induced by IBO. While RSV improved spatial learning performance, attenuated immobility, and improvised open field activity in IBO induced rats. NR2B activation in the present study might mediate cell death through oxidative stress that form the basis of abnormal behavioral pattern in IBO induced rats. Interestingly, RSV that could efficiently encounter oxidative stress have significantly decreased stress markers viz., nitrite, PCO, and MDA levels by enhancing antioxidant status. Histopathological analysis displayed significant reduction in the hippocampal

  18. Comparison of tandem mass spectrometry and amino acid analyzer for phenylalanine and tyrosine monitoring--implications for clinical management of patients with hyperphenylalaninemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groselj, Urh; Murko, Simona; Zerjav Tansek, Mojca; Kovac, Jernej; Trampus Bakija, Alenka; Repic Lampret, Barbka; Battelino, Tadej

    2015-01-01

    Regular and accurate monitoring of blood phenylalanine (Phe) and tyrosine (Tyr) levels is prerequisite for a successful management of patients with hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA). We aimed to compare the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and the amino acid analyzer (AAA) as methods to measure blood Phe and Tyr levels and Phe/Tyr ratio. Venous blood samples were collected for the AAA analysis, using Pinnacle PCX (Pickering Laboratories), with HPLC Series 1200 (Agilent). Capillary blood was spotted directly on filter paper (Whatman 903) for the MS/MS analysis, using 3200 QTrap AB SCIEX and Perkin Elmer Series 200 HPLC system. The Bland-Altman test was used to compare agreement between the methods and Pearson correlation coefficient to assess the association between the methods. 207 pairs of measurements were performed. The Phe levels (range 0-2500μM) obtained by the MS/MS were on average 26.1% (SD 13.9%) lower compared to those obtained by the AAA. The Tyr levels by the MS/MS were on average 15.5% (SD 20.6%) lower. The Phe/Tyr ratio by the MS/MS was on average 10.6% (SD 15.9%) lower. The Pearson correlation coefficients for Phe (range 0-2500μM), Tyr and the Phe/Tyr ratio were 0.984 (p<0.001), 0.841 (p<0.001) and 0.987 (p<0.001) respectively. When monitoring blood Phe and Tyr levels in patients with HPA, clinicians need to be informed about the method used. Due to the considerable inter-assay variability, a single method is preferable for long-term follow-up of patients. When using MS/MS, on average 26% lower blood Phe levels were obtained as compared to the AAA. The guidelines and recommendations on HPA management should take into consideration the differences in laboratory methods. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. γ-Hydroxybutyric acid induces actions via the GABAB receptor in arousal and motor control-related nuclei: implications for therapeutic actions in behavioral state disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmeier, K A; Vardar, B; Christensen, M H

    2013-09-17

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is used as an effective therapeutic for reducing the hypersomnolence and cataplexy (loss of motor control) of the sleeping disorder, narcolepsy, with an immediate pharmacologic behavioral action of inducing a natural sleep-like state. Despite its clinical use, few studies have examined the cellular actions of this drug on behavioral state-related neurons. Therefore, we monitored GHB-induced responses using calcium imaging within the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) and the dorsal raphe (DR), two pontine nuclei important in state and motor control. In addition, we recorded GHB-induced membrane responses using whole cell, patch clamp electrophysiology of immunohistochemically-identified principal neurons within these nuclei. GHB induced GABAB receptor-mediated rises in calcium in neurons of the LDT and the DR. However, the pattern and amplitude of calcium rises differed greatly between these two nuclei. GHB induced GABAB receptor antagonist-sensitive outward currents/hyperpolarizations in immunohistochemically-identified cholinergic LDT and serotonergic DR neurons. However, GHB had this action in a greater proportion of DR cells than LDT neurons. Further, larger inhibitory currents were induced in DR cells when compared to the amplitude of GHB-induced current in LDT-responding cells. Finally, NCS-382 and HOCPCA, a reported antagonist and agonist specific to activity at the putative GHB receptor, respectively, with no demonstrated binding at the GABAB receptor, failed to block GHB-induced effects or elicit any discernible electrophysiological action when applied alone, indicating a lack of involvement of a GHB receptor in mediating GHB actions. Taken together, our data support the conclusion that GHB may be exerting its actions on state and motor control, in part, via an acutely mediated strong inhibition of serotonergic DR neurons and a more modest inhibitory action on a smaller proportion of LDT cholinergic neurons. Given the roles played by

  20. Effect of different feeding strategies in intensive dairy farming systems on milk fatty acid profiles, and implications on feeding costs in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borreani, G; Coppa, M; Revello-Chion, A; Comino, L; Giaccone, D; Ferlay, A; Tabacco, E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the fatty acid (FA) profile of milk from intensive dairy farming systems in the Po Plain (Italy) to estimate the costs of the adopted feeding strategies and to simulate the effect of supplementary premiums on the basis of milk FA composition on milk income. Twenty dairy farms with 5 different feeding strategies were studied: 3 corn silage-based systems in which cows were supplemented with a great proportion (CCH), a medium proportion (CCM), or without commercial concentrate mix (CC0), and 2 systems in which part of corn silage was replaced with grass or legume silage (HF) or with fresh herbage (G), cut and fed indoors. Bulk milk was sampled and lactating cow performance, feeding strategies and forage characteristics were recorded through a survey, 3 times during a year. The milk FA supplementary premium was calculated considering C18:3n-3 and saturated FA (SFA) concentrations, and ratio of total cis C18:1 isomers to C16:0. The CCH, CCM, and CC0 systems bought most of their dairy cow feeds off farm, which allowed them to increase milk production to 35,000 L/yr per hectare. Their low dry matter and crude protein self-sufficiency led to higher feeding costs per liter of milk (from €0.158 to €0.184), and highest income over feed cost was achieved only for milk yield performance greater than 10,000 kg/cow per year. The use of homegrown forages in HF and G increased dry matter and crude protein self-sufficiency and reduced the feeding costs per liter of milk from 9 to 22%, compared with the other studied systems, making HF and G feeding economically competitive, even for a lower milk yield per cow. The studied systems highlighted a remarkable variation in FA profiles. The concentrations of C16:0 and SFA were the highest in CCH (31.53 and 67.84 g/100g of FA) and G (31.23 and 68.45 g/100g of FA), because of the larger proportion of commercial concentrate mix in the cow diet. The concentrations of C16:0 and SFA were the lowest in

  1. Effect of domoic acid on brain amino acid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, R; Arufe, M C; Arias, B; Alfonso, M

    1995-03-01

    The administration of Domoic Acid (Dom) in a 0.2 mg/kg i.p. dose induces changes in the levels of amino acids of neurochemical interest (Asp, Glu, Gly, Tau, Ala, GABA) in different rat brain regions (hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, striatum, cortex and midbrain). The most affected amino acid is the GABA, the main inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitter, whereas glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid, is not affected. The rat brain regions that seem to be the main target of the Dom action belong to the limbic system (hippocampus, amygdala). The possible implication of the amino acids in the actions of Dom is also discussed.

  2. Acidic deposition ("acid rain")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, R. Kent; LaRoe, Edward T.; Farris, Gaye S.; Puckett, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.; Mac, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Acidic deposition, or "acid rain," describes any form of precipitation, including rain, snow, and fog, with a pH of 5.5 or below (Note: pH values below 7 are acidic; vinegar has a pH of 3). It often results when the acidity of normal precipitation is increased by sulfates and nitrates that are emitted into the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. This form of airborne contamination is considered harmful, both directly and indirectly, to a host of plant and animal species.Although acid rain can fall virtually anywhere, ecological damages in environmentally sensitive areas downwind of industrial and urban emissions are a major concern. This includes areas that have a reduced capacity to neutralize acid inputs because of low alkalinity soils and areas that contain species with a low tolerance to acid conditions. To determine the distribution of acidic deposition and evaluate its biological effects, research and monitoring are being conducted by the federal government with support from states, universities, and private industry.            The national extent of the acid rain problem has been estimated by sampling water from 3,000 lakes and 500 streams (Irving 1991), representing more than 28,000 lakes and 56,000 stream reaches with a total of 200,000 km (125,000 mi). Some particularly sensitive areas, such as the Adirondack Mountain region, have been more intensively sampled and the biota examined in detail for effects from acidity.         To identify trends in aquatic ecosystems, present and historical survey data on water chemistry and associated biota are compared. In lakes, the chemical and biological history and pH trends may be inferred or reconstructed in some cases by examining assemblages of fossil diatoms and aquatic invertebrates in the sediment layers. In terrestrial ecosystems, vegetation damage is surveyed and effects of acidic deposition to plants and animals are determined from laboratory and field exposure experiments. Natural

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of Zellweger syndrome by measurement of very long chain fatty acid (C26 : 0) β-oxidation in cultured chorionic villous fibroblasts: Implications for early diagnosis of other peroxisomal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R.J.A.; Wijland, M.J.A. van; Roermund, C.W.T. van; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Bosch, H. van den; Tager, J.M.; Nijenhuis, A.; Tromp, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper we show that cultured chorionic villous fibroblasts efficiently catalyse the peroxisomal β-oxidation of hexacosanoic acid (cerotic acid), a saturated very long chain fatty acid containing 26 carbon atoms. Hexacosanoic β-oxidation was found to be strongly impaired in cultured chorionic

  4. Diaquabis(1,3-propanediaminenickel(II squarate tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Temel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Ni(C3H10N22(H2O2](C4O4·4H2O, contains one-half of the diaquabis(1,3-propanediaminenickel(II cation, one-half of the centrosymmetric squarate anion and two uncoordinated water molecules. In the cation, the NiII atom is located on a crystallographic inversion centre and has a slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The six-membered chelate ring adopts a chair conformation. O—H...O hydrogen bonds link the cation and anion through the water molecule, while N—H...O hydrogen bonds link the cation and anion and cation and water molecules. In the crystal structure, intermolecular O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules into a three-dimensional network structure.

  5. Crystal structure of tetraguanidinium [hexahydrogen hexaarsenato(Vtetravanadate(V] tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T. A. Harrison

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The complete polyoxidometallate anion in the title compound, (CH6N34[H6V4As6O30]·4H2O, is generated by crystallographic inversion symmetry. The polyhedral building units are distorted VO6 octahedra and AsO3OH tetrahedra. The VO6 units feature a short formal V=O double bond and are linked by a common edge. Two such V2O6 double octahedral units are linked by four isolated AsO3OH tetrahedra to complete the anion, which features two internal O—H...O hydrogen bonds. In the crystal, O—H...O hydrogen bonds between the polyoxidometallate anions generate (01-1 sheets. The sheets are connected by cation-to-cluster N—H...O hydrogen bonds, and cation-to-water N—H...O links also occur. The O atom of one of the water molecules is disordered over two sites in a 0.703 (17:0.297 (17 ratio.

  6. Hexaaquazinc(II dichloride bis(hexamethylenetetramine tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Zn(H2O6]Cl2·2C6H12N4·4H2O, has been prepared under mild hydrothermal conditions. The ZnII atom, located on a centre of symmetry, is coordinated by six water molecules in a distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The hexamethylenetetramine molecule is not coordinated to ZnII but links the Zn complexes via three O—H...N hydrogen bonds. The remaining N atom of the hexamethylenetetramine molecule is hydrogen-bonded to a solvent water molecule. In the crystal structure, intermolecular O—H...O, O—H...N and O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds link the components into a three-dimensional network.

  7. Hexaaquazinc(II) dichloride bis(hexamethylenetetramine) tetrahydrate

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Wu; Ya Wen Xuan; Xin Jian Yao

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, [Zn(H2O)6]Cl2·2C6H12N4·4H2O, has been prepared under mild hydrothermal conditions. The ZnII atom, located on a centre of symmetry, is coordinated by six water molecules in a distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The hexamethylenetetramine molecule is not coordinated to ZnII but links the Zn complexes via three O—H...N hydrogen bonds. The remaining N atom of the hexamethylenetetramine molecule is hydrogen-bonded to a solvent water molecule. In the crys...

  8. Hexaaquacopper(II dichloride bis(hexamethylenetetramine tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Lin Li

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Cu(H2O6]Cl2·2C6H12N4·4H2O, was prepared under mild hydrothermal conditions. The asymmetric unit consists of one half of the [Cu(H2O6]2+ cation, a hexamethylenetetramine molecule, two solvent water molecules and a chloride ion. The formula unit is generated by crystallographic inversion symmetry. The Cu atom lies on a crystallographic inversion centre. It is in a slightly distorted octahedral coordination environment. In the crystal structure, intermolecular O—H...O, O—H...N and O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds link the components into a three-dimensional network.

  9. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of a New Cadmium(Ⅱ) Complex Bridged by Endo-norbornene-cis-5,6-dicarboxylic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiao-Qing; HU Mao-Lin; CHEN Fan

    2007-01-01

    A polynuclear complex [Cd(endc)(H2O)]n·nH2O (endc = endo-norbomene-cis5,6-dicarboxylate anion) has been synthesized by the hydrothermal reaction of cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate with endo-norbomene-cis-5,6-dicarboxylic acid in 1:1 molar ratio,and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction.It crystallizes in monoclinic,space group P21/c with a = 1.16471(7),b = 0.95334(7),c = 0.91109(9) nm,Z = 4,V= 1.01035(14)nm3,Dc.= 2.160 g/cm3,μ= 2.172 mm-1,F(000) = 648,R =0.0302 and wR = 0.0752.According to structural analysis,each Cd(Ⅱ) ion is coordinated to six O atoms from three endc anions and one water molecule,giving a distorted octahedral geometry.Two- dimensional layer arrangement of the title complex is constructed from the bridging nature of endc.It is worth notice that adjacent two-dimensional layers are joined together to form a three-dimensional supramolecular framework via intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions.

  10. Proton transport in triflic acid pentahydrate studied via ab initio path integral molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Robin L; Paddison, Stephen J; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2011-06-16

    Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid hydrates provide a well-defined system to study proton dissociation and transport in perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, typically used as the electrolyte in hydrogen fuel cells, in the limit of minimal water. The triflic acid pentahydrate crystal (CF(3)SO(3)H·5H(2)O) is sufficiently aqueous that it contains an extended three-dimensional water network. Despite it being extended, however, long-range proton transport along the network is structurally unfavorable and would require considerable rearrangement. Nevertheless, the triflic acid pentahydrate crystal system can provide a clear picture of the preferred locations of local protonic defects in the water network, which provides insights about related structures in the disordered, low-hydration environment of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the proton defect is most likely to transfer to the closest water that has the expected presolvation and only contains water in its first solvation shell. Unlike the tetrahydrate of triflic acid (CF(3)SO(3)H·4H(2)O), there is no evidence of the proton preferentially transferring to a water molecule bridging two of the sulfonate groups. However, this could be an artifact of the crystal structure since the only such water molecule is separated from the proton by long O-O distances. Hydrogen bonding criteria, using the two-dimensional potential of mean force, are extracted. Radial distribution functions, free energy profiles, radii of gyration, and the root-mean-square displacement computed from ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations reveal that quantum effects do significantly extend the size of the protonic defect and increase the frequency of proton transfer events by nearly 15%. The calculated IR spectra confirm that the dominant protonic defect mostly exists as an Eigen cation but contains some Zundel ion characteristics. Chain lengths and ring sizes determined from the

  11. Thermodynamics and crystal chemistry of rhomboclase, (H5O2)Fe(SO4)2·2H2O, and the phase (H3O)Fe(SO4)2 and implications for acid mine drainage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majzlan, Juraj; Grevel, Klaus Dieter; Kiefer, Boris

    2017-01-01

    The system Fe2O3-SO3-H2O contains the most important minerals of acid mine drainage (AMD), iron oxides, and iron sulfates. For geochemical modeling of the AMD systems, reliable thermodynamic data for these phases are needed. In this work, we have determined thermodynamic data for the most acidic ...

  12. Getting folic acid nutrition right

    Science.gov (United States)

    The two articles in this issue of the journal provide some definitive answers to questions relating to folic acid exposure and folate nutritional status of the US population in the post-fortification era, and, by implication, pose other questions. Most convincingly, these reports, which are based la...

  13. Valproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by increasing the amount of a ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as valproic acid to treat various conditions ...

  14. Amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  15. Obeticholic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  16. Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  17. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  18. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  19. Ethacrynic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  20. Aminocaproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  1. Aspartic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: avocado, asparagus, and molasses. Animal sources of aspartic acid include: ...

  2. Inversion of the stereochemical configuration (3S, 5S)-clavaminic acid into (3R, 5R)-clavulanic acid: A computationally-assisted approach based on experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Malule, Howard; Restrepo, Albeiro; Cardona, Wilson; Junne, Stefan; Neubauer, Peter; Rios-Estepa, Rigoberto

    2016-04-21

    Clavulanic acid (CA), a potent inhibitor of β-lactamase enzymes, is produced by Streptomyces clavuligerus (Sc) cultivation processes, for which low yields are commonly obtained. Improved knowledge of the clavam biosynthetic pathway, especially the steps involved in the inversion of 3S-5S into 3R-5R stereochemical configuration, would help to eventually identify bottlenecks in the pathway. In this work, we studied the role of acetate in CA biosynthesis by a combined continuous culture and computational simulation approach. From this we derived a new model for the synthesis of N-acetyl-glycyl-clavaminic acid (NAG-clavam) by Sc. Acetylated compounds, such as NAG-clavam and N-acetyl-clavaminic acid, have been reported in the clavam pathway. Although the acetyl group is present in the β-lactam intermediate NAG-clavam, it is unknown how this group is incorporated. Hence, under the consideration of the experimentally proven accumulation of acetate during CA biosynthesis, and the fact that an acetyl group is present in the NAG-clavam structure, a computational evaluation of the tentative formation of NAG-clavam was performed for the purpose of providing further understanding. The proposed reaction mechanism consists of two steps: first, acetate reacts with ATP to produce a reactive acylphosphate intermediate; second, a direct nucleophilic attack of the terminal amino group of N-glycyl-clavaminic on the carbonyl carbon of the acylphosphate intermediate leads to a tetrahydral intermediate, which collapses and produces ADP and N-acetyl-glycyl-clavaminic acid. The calculations suggest that for the proposed reaction mechanism, the reaction proceeds until completion of the first step, without the direct action of an enzyme, where acetate and ATP are involved. For this step, the computed activation energy was ≅2.82kcal/mol while the reaction energy was ≅2.38kcal/mol. As this is an endothermic chemical process with a relatively small activation energy, the reaction rate

  3. Uric acid and antioxidant effects of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boban, Mladen; Modun, Darko

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this article is to review the role of uric acid in the context of antioxidant effects of wine and its potential implication to human health. We described and discussed the mechanisms of increase in plasma antioxidant capacity after consumption of moderate amounts of wine. Because this effect is largely contributed by acute elevation in plasma uric acid, we paid special attention to wine constituents and metabolic processes that are likely to be involved in uric acid elevation.

  4. Uric Acid and Antioxidant Effects of Wine

    OpenAIRE

    Boban, Mladen; Modun, Darko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the role of uric acid in the context of antioxidant effects of wine and its potential implication to human health. We described and discussed the mechanisms of increase in plasma antioxidant capacity after consumption of moderate amounts of wine. Because this effect is largely contributed by acute elevation in plasma uric acid, we paid special attention to wine constituents and metabolic processes that are likely to be involved in uric acid elevation.

  5. Self-limited uptake of α-pinene-oxide to acidic aerosol: the effects of liquid-liquid phase separation and implications for the formation of secondary organic aerosol and organosulfates from epoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Drozd

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The reactive uptake of α-pinene oxide (αPO to acidic sulfate aerosol was studied under humid conditions in order to gain insight into the effects of liquid-liquid phase separation on aerosol heterogeneous chemistry and further elucidate the formation of secondary organic aerosol and organosulfates from epoxides. A continuous flow environmental chamber was used to monitor changes in diameter of monodisperse, deliquesced, acidic sulfate particles exposed to αPO at 30 and 50% RH. In order to induce phase separation and probe potential limits to particle growth from acidic uptake, αPO was introduced over a wide range of concentrations, from 200 ppb to 5 ppm. Uptake was observed to be highly dependent on initial aerosol pH. Significant uptake of αPO to aerosol was observed with initial pH Kp ranged from 0.2–1.6 × 10−4 m3 μg−1 and were correlated to initial particle acidity and particle organic content; particles with higher organic content had lower partition coefficients. Effective uptake coefficients (γ ranged from 0.4 to 4.7 × 10−5 and are much lower than recently reported for uptake to bulk solutions. In experiments in which αPO was added to bulk H2SO4 solutions, phase separation was observed for mass loadings similar to those observed with particles, and product distributions were dependent on acid concentration. Liquid-liquid phase separation in bulk experiments, along with our observations of decreased uptake to particles with the largest growth factors, suggest an organic coating forms upon uptake to particles, limiting reactive uptake.

  6. Expression of the human UGT1 locus in transgenic mice by 4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)-2-pyrimidinylthioacetic acid (WY-14643) and implications on drug metabolism through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senekeo-Effenberger, Kathy; Chen, Shujuan; Brace-Sinnokrak, Erin; Bonzo, Jessica A; Yueh, Mei-Fei; Argikar, Upendra; Kaeding, Jenny; Trottier, Jocelyn; Remmel, Rory P; Ritter, Joseph K; Barbier, Olivier; Tukey, Robert H

    2007-03-01

    The UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A genes in humans have been shown to be differentially regulated in a tissue-specific fashion. Transgenic mice carrying the human UGT1 locus (Tg-UGT1) were recently created, demonstrating that expression of the nine UGT1A genes closely resembles the patterns of expression observed in human tissues. In the present study, UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, and UGT1A6 have been identified as targets of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha in human hepatocytes and Tg-UGT1 mice. Oral administration of the PPARalpha agonist 4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)-2-pyrimidinylthioacetic acid (pirinixic acid, WY-14643) to Tg-UGT1 mice led to induction of these proteins in either the liver, gastrointestinal tract, or kidney. The levels of induced UGT1A3 gene transcripts in liver and UGT1A4 protein in small intestine correlated with induced lamotrigine glucuronidation activity in these tissues. With UGT1A3 previously identified as the major human enzyme involved in human C24-glucuronidation of lithocholic acid (LCA), the dramatic induction of liver UGT1A3 RNA in Tg-UGT1 mice was consistent with the formation of LCA-24G in plasma. Furthermore, PPAR-responsive elements (PPREs) were identified flanking the UGT1A1, UGT1A3, and UGT1A6 genes by a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, specific binding to PPARalpha and retinoic acid X receptor alpha, and functional response of the concatenated PPREs in HepG2 cells overexpressing PPARalpha. In conclusion, these results suggest that oral fibrate treatment in humans will induce the UGT1A family of proteins in the gastrointestinal tract and liver, influencing bile acid glucuronidation and first-pass metabolism of other drugs that are taken concurrently with hypolipidemic therapy.

  7. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  8. Acid drainages of the pyritic sterile from the Pocos de Caldas uranium mine: environmental interpretation and implications; Drenagens acidas do esteril piritoso da mina de uranio de Pocos de Caldas: interpretacao e implicacoes ambientais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vicente Paulo de

    1995-12-01

    Considering the planned closure of the first uranium mine and milling plant operating in Brazil, located in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, in the State of Minas Gerais, in the next two years, there is the need to obtain basic information for its decommissioning. Special attention has been directed to the following critical areas: open pit, tailing, dam and waste rock piles, because these are the main sources of acid drainage generation. These waters cannot be allowed to flow in the external environment because in addition to sulphuric acid, there is a number of elements in concentration above those allowed by regulations. Among the waste piles (bota-foras BF) two of them BF-4 and BF-8, are in a process of acid generation, thus requiring more attention. The objective of this work was to simulate at the laboratory scale the oxidation and the reduction zones of BF-4. The experiments were conducted in acrylic columns, where the waste sample was kept under aerated and saturated conditions, in different columns. The control of the chemical (solubilized chemical species), physico-chemical (redox potential, pH, conductivity) and biological (bacterial activity) parameters has been carried out on the acid solutions generated by the chemical and biological reactions that occur at the waste. Although the results refer to a four month period, some relevant points can be highlighted, which will serve as a basis for further research. The mineralogical characterization identified the existence of other sulphides associated to pyrite with lower oxidation potential than the latter. The results obtained with the biological characterization for the two conditions studied revealed that the bacterial activity is more intense in the region in contact with air, than in saturated region. (author) 30 refs., 29 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Electron transfer in acetohydroxy acid synthase as a side reaction of catalysis. Implications for the reactivity and partitioning of the carbanion/enamine form of (alpha-hydroxyethyl)thiamin diphosphate in a "nonredox" flavoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittmann, Kai; Schröder, Kathrin; Golbik, Ralph; McCourt, Jennifer; Kaplun, Alexander; Duggleby, Ronald G; Barak, Ze'ev; Chipman, David M; Hübner, Gerhard

    2004-07-13

    Acetohydroxy acid synthases (AHAS) are thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) and FAD-dependent enzymes that catalyze the first common step of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in plants, bacteria, and fungi. Although the flavin cofactor is not chemically involved in the physiological reaction of AHAS, it has been shown to be essential for the structural integrity and activity of the enzyme. Here, we report that the enzyme-bound FAD in AHAS is reduced in the course of catalysis in a side reaction. The reduction of the enzyme-bound flavin during turnover of different substrates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was characterized by stopped-flow kinetics using the intrinsic FAD absorbance. Reduction of enzyme-bound FAD proceeds with a net rate constant of k' = 0.2 s(-1) in the presence of oxygen and approximately 1 s(-1) under anaerobic conditions. No transient flavin radicals are detectable during the reduction process while time-resolved absorbance spectra are recorded. Reconstitution of the binary enzyme-FAD complex with the chemically synthesized intermediate 2-(hydroxyethyl)-ThDP also results in a reduction of the flavin. These data provide evidence for the first time that the key catalytic intermediate 2-(hydroxyethyl)-ThDP in the carbanionic/enamine form is not only subject to covalent addition of 2-keto acids and an oxygenase side reaction but also transfers electrons to the adjacent FAD in an intramolecular redox reaction yielding 2-acetyl-ThDP and reduced FAD. The detection of the electron transfer supports the idea of a common ancestor of acetohydroxy acid synthase and pyruvate oxidase, a homologous ThDP- and FAD-dependent enzyme that, in contrast to AHASs, catalyzes a reaction that relies on intercofactor electron transfer.

  10. Effect of encapsulation in the anion receptor pocket of sub-domain IIA of human serum albumin on the modulation of pKa of warfarin and structurally similar acidic guests: a possible implication on biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Shubhashis; Halder, Mintu

    2014-01-05

    Supramolecular and bio-supramolecular host assisted pKa shift of biologically relevant acidic guests, warfarin and coumarin 343, has been monitored using both steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The anion receptors present in sub-domain IIA of human serum albumin (HSA) stabilize the anionic form of the guest and thereby shift pKa towards acidic range. On the other hand, the preferential binding of the neutral form of guests in the non-polar hydrophobic cavity of β-cyclodextrin results in up-shifted pKa. This shifting of pKa of drugs like warfarin, etc., whose therapeutic activity depends on the position of the acid-base equilibrium in human system, is of great importance in pharmacokinetics. The release of the active form of such drugs from macrocyclic carrier and subsequent distribution through the carrier protein should depend on the modulation of the overall pKa window brought about by the encapsulation in these hosts. Present work also suggests that properly optimized encapsulation in appropriate receptor pocket can enhance the bioavailability of drugs. This work also opens up the possibility to use HSA as encapsulator, instead of traditional cyclodextrins or other polymeric hosts, since such system may overcome toxicity as well as biocompatibility issues.

  11. Analytical Methods for Environmental Risk Assessment of Acid Sulfate Soils: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of acid sulfate soil risk is an important step for acid sulfate soil management and its reliability depends very much on the suitability and accuracy of various analytical methods for estimating sulfide-derived potential acidity, actual acidity and acid-neutralizing capacity in acid sulfate soils. This paper critically reviews various analytical methods that are currently used for determination of the above parameters, as well as their implications for environmental risk assessment of acid sulfate soils.

  12. On the structure of the C2H4O2 neutrals (acetic acid versus 1,1-dihydroxyethene) generated from ionized n-hexanoic acid and n-butyl acetate in the gas phase. Implications for the mechanism of the McLafferty rearrangement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Terlouw, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Results are reported of CIDI and NRMS experiments which show that the C2H4O2 neutral co-generated with C4H+√8 from the metastable n-hexanoic acid ion and the n-butyl acetate molecular ion is acetic acid and not its stable enol, CH2C(OH)2. This is in marked contrast to the structure of the C2H4O+√2 i

  13. The clinical implication of serum free fatty acid in patients with Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis%非酒精性脂肪性肝炎患者血清游离脂肪酸的检测及其临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红山; 朱德东; 李德周

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical implication of serum free fatty acid in patients with Non - alcoholic steatohepatitis. Methods; Serum free fatty acid contents in patients with non - alcoholic steatohepatitis and healthy individuals were measured by biochemical kits, the expression difference of free fatty acid among patients with non -alcoholic steatohepatitis were analyzed. The value and significance of serum free fatty acids in non - alcoholic steatohepatitis were studied through correlation analysis of serum free fatty acid content and liver/spleen CT value and serum liver damage indicators (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and γ - glutamyl transpeptidase) , serum lipids (triglyceride, total cholesterol, low - density lipoprotein cholesterol) . Results: The serum free fatty acid contents were higher in patients with non - alcoholic steatohepatitis as compared to healthy individuals, there were significant difference in patients with varying degrees of steatohepatitis ( F - 447. 581, P < 0. 01 ) . Serum free fatty acid contents were negatively correlated with liver/spleen CT value, while positively correlated with activity of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and γ - glutamyl transpeptidase in serum, triglyceride, total cholesterol, low - density lipoprotein cholesterol contents in serum. Conclusion: Serum free fatty acid contents in patients with non - alcoholic steatohepatitis significantly increased. Serum free fatty acid detection had certain clinical significance in disease diagnosis and the severity judgment.%目的:探讨血清游离脂肪酸在非酒精性脂肪性肝炎中的价值.方法:通过检测非酒精性脂肪性肝炎患者和健康对照者血清游离脂肪酸水平,分析在不同病情时血清游离脂肪酸含量的差异;通过对血清游离脂肪酸含量与肝/脾CT值、血清肝损伤指标(ALT、AST、GGT)、血脂指标(TG、TC、LDL-C)的相关性分析,探讨血清游离脂肪酸在

  14. Ice photochemistry as a source of amino acids and other organic molecules in meteorites, and implications for the origin of life and the search for life in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Max

    2005-01-01

    The tons of extraterrestrial organic material that come to the Earth every day probably helped to made the Earth habitable, and possibly played a role in the origin of life. At the astrochemistry lab (http://www.astrochem.orq) we investigate the formation and distribution of organic molecules in space and consider the impact such molecules may have on the habitability of planets and the search for life in the Solar System. The organic compounds in meteorites include amino acids, aromatics of various sorts including purine and pyrimidine bases, and fatty acids that form bi-layer vesicles. The origin of many of these species remains mysterious, but in recent years we and others have performed experiments that suggest low temperature radiation chemistry could account for the presence and deuterium enrichment of many of these molecules. . I will present our laboratory experiments that show the viability of low temperature radiation chemistry as a source of organic molecules such as;amino acids (Nature, 2002, 416, 401-403), amphiphiles (Astrobiology, 2003, 2, 371, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 2001, 98, 815), quinones (Science, 1999, 283, 1135) and other functionalized aromatic compounds (Meteoritics, 2001, 36, 351 ; Astrophysical Journal., 2003, 582, L25), some of which were invoked as potential biomarkers in the Alan Hills 84001 Martian meteorite. Understanding how components of proteins and DNA could form in sterile space environments is also of relevance to our search for life elsewhere in the Solar System, the great task now ahead of NASA. If we find evidence of Life elsewhere in the Solar System it will probably be in form of chemical biomarkers, quintessentially biological molecules that indicate the presence of micro-organisms. While most people think of molecules such as amino acids, and nucleo-bases as good candidate biomarkers, these molecules are produced non-biotically in space and are expected to be present on the surface of other planets even in the absence of

  15. A Carbonic Anhydrase Serves as an Important Acid-Base Regulator in Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Exposed to Elevated CO2: Implication for Physiological Responses of Mollusk to Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudan; Wang, Mengqiang; Jia, Zhihao; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Anguo; Song, Linsheng

    2017-02-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have been demonstrated to play an important role in acid-base regulation in vertebrates. However, the classification and modulatory function of CAs in marine invertebrates, especially their responses to ocean acidification remain largely unknown. Here, a cytosolic α-CA (designated as CgCAII-1) was characterized from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and its molecular activities against CO2 exposure were investigated. CgCAII-1 possessed a conserved CA catalytic domain, with high similarity to invertebrate cytoplasmic or mitochondrial α-CAs. Recombinant CgCAII-1 could convert CO2 to HCO3(-) with calculated activity as 0.54 × 10(3) U/mg, which could be inhibited by acetazolamide (AZ). The mRNA transcripts of CgCAII-1 in muscle, mantle, hepatopancreas, gill, and hemocytes increased significantly after exposure to elevated CO2. CgCAII-1 could interact with the hemocyte membrane proteins and the distribution of CgCAII-1 protein became more concentrated and dense in gill and mantle under CO2 exposure. The intracellular pH (pHi) of hemocytes under CO2 exposure increased significantly (p ocean acidification and participate in acid-base regulation. Such cytoplasmic CA-based physiological regulation mechanism might explain other physiological responses of marine organisms to OA.

  16. Impaired long-chain fatty acid metabolism in mitochondria causes brain vascular invasion by a non-neurotropic epidemic influenza A virus in the newborn/suckling period: implications for influenza-associated encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dengfu; Kuwajima, Masamichi; Chen, Ye; Shiota, Mayumi; Okumura, Yuushi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kido, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    The neuropathogenesis of influenza-associated encephalopathy in children and Reye's syndrome remains unclear. A surveillance effort conducted during 2000-2003 in South-West Japan reveals that almost all fatal and handicapped influenza-associated encephalopathy patients exhibit a disorder of mitochondrial beta-oxidation with elevated serum acylcarnitine ratios (C(16:0)+C(18:1))/C(2). Here we show invasion by a non-neurotropic epidemic influenza A H3N2 virus in cerebral capillaries with progressive brain edema after intranasal infection of mice having impaired mitochondrial beta-oxidation congenitally or posteriorly in the newborn/ suckling periods. Mice genetically lacking of carnitine transporter OCTN2, resulting in carnitine deficiency and impaired beta-oxidation, exhibited significant higher virus-genome numbers in the brain, accumulation of virus antigen exclusively in the cerebral capillaries and increased brain vascular permeability compared to in wild type mice. Mini-plasmin, which proteolytically potentiates influenza virus multiplication in vivo and destroys the blood-brain barrier, accumulated with virus antigen in the brain capillaries of OCTN2-deficient mice but only a little in wild-type mice. These results suggest that the impaired mitochondrial beta-oxidation changes the susceptibility to a non-neurotropic influenza A virus as to multiplication in the brain capillaries and to cause brain edema. These pathological findings in the brain of mice having impaired mitochondrial beta-oxidation after influenza virus infection may have implications for human influenza-associated encephalopathy.

  17. Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damage. 10 Do I need folic acid after menopause? Yes. Women who have gone through menopause still need 400 micrograms of folic acid every ... United States: 2003–2006 . American Journal of Clinical Nutrition; 91(1): 231–237. Hamner, H.C., Cogswell, ...

  18. Incorporation and distribution of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in cultured human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1986-02-01

    Human keratinocytes in culture were labelled with /sup 14/C-dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid or /sup 14/C-eicosapentaenoic acid. All three eicosanoid precursor fatty acids were effectively incorporated into the cells. In phospholipids most of the radioactivity was recovered, in neutral lipids a substantial amount, and as free unesterified fatty acids only a minor amount. Most of the radioactivity was found in phosphatidylethanolamine which was also the major phospholipid as measured by phosphorous assay. The incorporation of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid into lipid subfractions was essentially similar. Eicosapentaenoic acid was, however, much less effectively incorporated into phosphatidylinositol + phosphatidylserine and, correspondingly, more effectively into triacylglycerols as compared to the two other precursor fatty acids. Once incorporated, the distribution of all three precursor fatty acids was relatively stable, and only minor amounts of fatty acids were released into the culture medium during short term culture (two days). Our study demonstrates that eicosanoid precursor fatty acids are avidly taken up by human keratinocytes and esterified into membrane lipids. The clinical implication of this finding is that dietary manipulations might be employed to cause changes in the fatty acid composition of keratinocytes.

  19. Anti-hepatitis B core antigen testing with detection and characterization of occult hepatitis B virus by an in-house nucleic acid testing among blood donors in Behrampur, Ganjam, Orissa in southeastern India: implications for transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panigrahi Rajesh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection might transmit viremic units into the public blood supply if only hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg testing is used for donor screening. Our aim was to evaluate the prevalence of occult HBV infection among the HBsAg negative/antiHBc positive donations from a highly HIV prevalent region of India. Methods A total of 729 HBsAg negative donor units were included in this study. Surface gene and precore region were amplified by in house nucleic acid test (NAT for detection of occult HBV infection and surface gene was analyzed after direct sequencing. Results A total of 220 (30.1% HBsAg negative donors were antiHBc positive, of them 66 (30% were HBV DNA positive by NAT. HBV DNA positivity among 164 antiHBc only group, was 27.1% and among 40 antiHBs positive group was 30.0%. HBV/D (93.3% was predominant and prevalence of both HBV/C and HBV/A was 3.3%. Single or multiple amino acids substitutions were found in 95% samples. Conclusion Thus, a considerable number of HBV infected donors remain undiagnosed, if only HBsAg is used for screening. Addition of antiHBc testing for donor screening, although will lead to rejection of a large number of donor units, will definitely eliminate HBV infected donations and help in reducing HBV transmission with its potential consequences, especially among the immunocompromised population. The HBV genetic diversity found in this donor population are in accordance with other parts of India.

  20. High resolution crystal structure of rat long chain hydroxy acid oxidase in complex with the inhibitor 4-carboxy-5-[(4-chlorophenyl)sulfanyl]-1, 2, 3-thiadiazole. Implications for inhibitor specificity and drug design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhi-wei; Vignaud, Caroline; Jaafar, Adil; Lévy, Bernard; Guéritte, Françoise; Guénard, Daniel; Lederer, Florence; Mathews, F. Scott (CNRS-UMR); (WU-MED)

    2012-05-24

    Long chain hydroxy acid oxidase (LCHAO) is responsible for the formation of methylguanidine, a toxic compound with elevated serum levels in patients with chronic renal failure. Its isozyme glycolate oxidase (GOX), has a role in the formation of oxalate, which can lead to pathological deposits of calcium oxalate, in particular in the disease primary hyperoxaluria. Inhibitors of these two enzymes may have therapeutic value. These enzymes are the only human members of the family of FMN-dependent L-2-hydroxy acid-oxidizing enzymes, with yeast flavocytochrome b{sub 2} (Fcb2) among its well studied members. We screened a chemical library for inhibitors, using in parallel rat LCHAO, human GOX and the Fcb2 flavodehydrogenase domain (FDH). Among the hits was an inhibitor, CCPST, with an IC{sub 50} in the micromolar range for all three enzymes. We report here the crystal structure of a complex between this compound and LCHAO at 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. In comparison with a lower resolution structure of this enzyme, binding of the inhibitor induces a conformational change in part of the TIM barrel loop 4, as well as protonation of the active site histidine. The CCPST interactions are compared with those it forms with human GOX and those formed by two other inhibitors with human GOX and spinach GOX. These compounds differ from CCPST in having the sulfur replaced with a nitrogen in the five-membered ring as well as different hydrophobic substituents. The possible reason for the {approx}100-fold difference in affinity between these two series of inhibitors is discussed. The present results indicate that specificity is an issue in the quest for therapeutic inhibitors of either LCHAO or GOX, but they may give leads for this quest.

  1. Simulating hypoxia-induced acidic environment in cancer cells facilitates mobilization and redox-cycling of genomic copper by daidzein leading to pro-oxidant cell death: implications for the sensitization of resistant hypoxic cancer cells to therapeutic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Ahmad, Aamir; Bhat, Showket H; Khan, Husain Y; Zubair, Haseeb; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, Sheikh M

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of action involved in the anti-cancer activity of daidzein and identification of cancer specific micro-environment as therapeutic target of this secondary metabolite derived from soy. Our data indicated that daidzein induces cellular DNA breakage, anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We demonstrated that such a daidzein-induced anti-cancer action involves a copper-dependant pathway in which endogenous copper is mobilized by daidzein and redox-cycled to generate reactive oxygen species which act as an upstream signal leading to pro-oxidant cell death. Further in the context of hypoxia being a resistant factor against standard therapies and that an effect secondary to hypoxia is the intracellular acidification, we show that the anticancer activity of daidzein is modulated positively in acidic pH but copper-specific chelator is still able to inhibit daidzein activity. Moreover, an experimental setup of hypoxia mimic (cobalt chloride) revealed an enhanced sensitivity of cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of daidzein which was neutralized in the presence of neocuproine. The findings support a paradigm shift from the conventional antioxidant property of dietary isoflavones to molecules capable of initiating a pro-oxidant signaling mediated by reactive oxygen species. Further, the clinical relevance of such an action mechanism in cancer chemoprevention is also proposed. This study identified endogenous copper as a molecular target and acidic pH as a modulating factor for the therapeutic activity of daidzein against cancer. The evidence presented highlights the potential of dietary agents as adjuvants to standard therapeutic regimens.

  2. Revisión de las implicaciones clínicas del ácido zoledrónico en el tratamiento del dolor Clinical implications of zoledronic acid for the treatment of pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Vidal

    2006-11-01

    tiempo de perfusión, aumentando al aumentar la velocidad de perfusión. Estudios in vitro e in vivo han demostrado que la tolerabilidad renal del ácido zoledrónico es mayor que la del pamidronato. En los ensayos clínicos en pacientes con metástasis óseas e hipercalcemia de origen tumoral, el ácido zoledrónico presentó un perfil de seguridad aceptable. Los acontecimientos adversos comunicados con más frecuencia fueron: síndrome seudogripal, reacciones gastrointestinales, anemia, debilidad, tos, disnea y edema. Coste efectividad: El costo económico de las complicaciones esqueléticas relacionadas con la neoplasia es muy elevado, contribuyendo al incremento del coste la radioterapia ósea y el ingreso hospitalario. No obstante existe una gran variabilidad de los costos en pacientes con cáncer en estadio avanzado, lo que dificulta la obtención de resultados. Discusión: Teniendo en cuenta la evidencia existente de la actividad antitumoral que posee el ácido zoledrónico, debemos centrarnos en el conocimiento de los mecanismos implicados y poder determinar la dosis más efectiva para poder maximizar este potencial efecto antitumoral. Los objetivos que debemos plantearnos ahora ante un paciente diagnosticado de metástasis ósea, se basan en establecer el momento adecuado de inicio de tratamiento con ácido zoledrónico así como la duración del mismo en función de la respuesta terapéutica.Introduction: Bone approximately represents 40% of cancer recurrences , with a higher incidence in patients with múltiple myeloma, breast, lung and prostate cancer. Bone pain is the most frequent and considerably affects patients´ life quality. Although resolution is not possible, symptom control is. Biphosphonates are powerful inhibitors of normal and pathological bone resorption and have an important effect on bone metastasis. Zoledronic acid is the most frequently used biphosphonate for this purpose. It has been approved for the prevention of complications related to

  3. Micelle-bound structures and dynamics of the hinge deleted analog of melittin and its diastereomer: implications in cell selective lysis by D-amino acid containing antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Rathi; Bhunia, Anirban; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2010-02-01

    Melittin, the major component of the honey bee venom, is a 26-residue hemolytic and membrane active peptide. Structures of melittin determined either in lipid environments by NMR or by use of X-ray demonstrated two helical regions at the N- and C-termini connected by a hinge or a bend at the middle. Here, we show that deletion of the hinge residues along with two C-terminal terminal Gln residues (Q25 and Q26), yielding a peptide analog of 19-residue or Mel-H, did not affect antibacterial activity but resulted in a somewhat reduced hemolytic activity. A diastereomer of Mel-H or Mel-(d)H containing d-amino acids [(d)V5, (d)V8, (d)L11 and (d)K16] showed further reduction in hemolytic activity without lowering antibacterial activity. We have carried out NMR structures, dynamics (H-D exchange and proton relaxation), membrane localization by spin labeled lipids, pulse-field-gradient (PFG) NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles, as a mimic to eukaryotic membrane, to gain insights into cell selectivity of these melittin analogs. PFG-NMR showed Mel-H and Mel-(d)H both were similarly partitioned into DPC micelles. ITC demonstrated that Mel-H and Mel-(d)H interact with DPC with similar affinity. The micelle-bound structure of Mel-H delineated a straight helical conformation, whereas Mel-(d)H showed multiple beta-turns at the N-terminus and a short helix at the C-terminus. The backbone amide-proton exchange with solvent D(2)O demonstrated a large difference in dynamics between Mel-H and Mel-(d)H, whereby almost all backbone protons of Mel-(d)H showed a much faster rate of exchange as compared to Mel-H. Proton T(1) relaxation had suggested a mobile backbone of Mel-(d)H peptide in DPC micelles. Resonance perturbation by paramagnetic lipids indicated that Mel-H inserted deeper into DPC micelles, whereas Mel-(d)H is largely located at the surface of the micelle. Taken together, results presented in this study demonstrated that the

  4. Folic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taking a specific nutritional supplement, containing vitamin B3 (nicotinamide), a compound isolated from grains (azelaic acid), zinc, ... lung cancer in most people. A type of skin cancer called melanoma. Limited research suggests that taking ...

  5. Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... B-complex vitamin needed by the body to manufacture red blood cells. A deficiency of this vitamin ... prepared from dried yeast, fruit, and fresh leafy green vegetables to increase the folic acid in your ...

  6. Contamination of Acetic and Formic Acids in Water and Its Implications for the Study of Carboxylic Acids in Snow and Ice%超纯水中甲酸、乙酸污染的实验研究及其对雪冰有机酸测定的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚檀栋; 孙维贞; 蒲健长; 田立德; 焦克勤

    2000-01-01

    塑料容器是降水中生物有机酸研究的常用样品储集器.极地冰芯和粒雪样品钻取中也常用聚乙烯塑料袋盛装,且常常采用双封口方式保存. 这种样品保存方式和样品暴露于大气一样,都会造成样品中有机酸含量的污染. 定量研究上述污染是准确分析降水中有机酸含量的前提和基础. 以超纯水为主要实验样品,对聚乙烯塑料容器和空气的甲酸、乙酸污染的研究表明,甲酸、乙酸的污染主要来自聚乙烯塑料袋的热塑封口过程,而聚乙烯塑料桶的影响不明显. 塑料袋热塑封口造成的乙酸污染在相同条件下是甲酸的18倍左右. 空气对甲酸、乙酸也存在着污染,但其影响远低于聚乙烯塑料袋. 因此,在雪冰甲酸、乙酸的研究中,其融样过程必须避开塑料制品,尤其是聚乙烯塑料袋. 此外,加大待测样品量(体积或重量)也可以一定程度地减小雪冰融化样品的甲酸、乙酸的污染.%FSPlastics are widely used as containers for storing precipitation samples for the analysis of organic acids. Polyethylene bags are also employed to contain ice and firn samples extracted from the polar regions and double sealed for transportation. The utilization of the containers leads to the contamination of organic acids as atmosphere does with the samples exposed. Making sense quantitatively of the contamination is basically the prerequisite for studies of the organic acids in precipitation. An experimental study of acetic and formic contamination to double deionized water from plastic container and air was performed in laboratory. The result shows that the plastic container, especially the polyethylene bag is a significant source of the contamination, which occurred mainly in the process of the thermal plastic seal. While the solid polyethylene flask, of which no thermal seal is needed to keep the water inside free of the air outside, remains an undetectable source of

  7. cis-4-Decenoic and decanoic acids impair mitochondrial energy, redox and Ca(2+) homeostasis and induce mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in rat brain and liver: Possible implications for the pathogenesis of MCAD deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; da Silva, Janaína Camacho; Wajner, Alessandro; Godoy, Kálita Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Rafael Teixeira; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of octanoic (OA), decanoic (DA) and cis-4-decenoic (cDA) acids, as well as by their carnitine by-products. Untreated patients present episodic encephalopathic crises and biochemical liver alterations, whose pathophysiology is poorly known. We investigated the effects of OA, DA, cDA, octanoylcarnitine (OC) and decanoylcarnitine (DC) on critical mitochondrial functions in rat brain and liver. DA and cDA increased resting respiration and diminished ADP- and CCCP-stimulated respiration and complexes II-III and IV activities in both tissues. The data indicate that these compounds behave as uncouplers and metabolic inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Noteworthy, metabolic inhibition was more evident in brain as compared to liver. DA and cDA also markedly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, NAD(P)H content and Ca(2+) retention capacity in Ca(2+)-loaded brain and liver mitochondria. The reduction of Ca(2+) retention capacity was more pronounced in liver and totally prevented by cyclosporine A and ADP, as well as by ruthenium red, demonstrating the involvement of mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) and Ca(2+). Furthermore, cDA induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver mitochondria and increased hydrogen peroxide formation in brain, suggesting the participation of oxidative damage in cDA-induced alterations. Interestingly, OA, OC and DC did not alter the evaluated parameters, implying lower toxicity for these compounds. Our results suggest that DA and cDA, in contrast to OA and medium-chain acylcarnitines, disturb important mitochondrial functions in brain and liver by multiple mechanisms that are possibly involved in the neuropathology and liver alterations observed in MCAD deficiency.

  8. Altered expression of retinoic acid (RA) receptor mRNAs in the fetal mouse secondary palate by all-trans and 13-cis RAs: implications for RA-induced teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitoh, H; Mori, C; Nishimura, Y; Shiota, K

    1998-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is mandatory for various biological processes and normal embryonic development but is teratogenic at high concentrations. In rodents, one of the major malformations induced by RA is cleft palate (CP). RA mediates its effects by RA receptors (RARs), but the expression patterns of RARs in the developing palate are still unclear. We investigated the normal expression of RAR alpha, beta, and gamma messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in the fetal mouse secondary palate and the effects of all-trans and 13-cis RAs on the expression of RAR mRNAs by Northern blot analysis. RAR alpha (2.8, 3.8 kb), RAR beta (3.3 kb), and RAR gamma (3.7 kb) mRNAs were detected in the fetal palate on gestational days (GD) 12.5-14.5. The expression of RAR alpha and gamma mRNAs did not show apparent sequential changes, but that of RAR beta mRNA increased at GD 13.5. Treatment of pregnant mice with 100 mg/kg all-trans RA induced CP in 94% of the fetuses and elevated the levels of RAR beta and gamma mRNAs in the fetal palate. The up-regulation of RAR beta mRNA by all-trans RA was more marked than that of RAR gamma mRNA. Treatment with 100 mg/kg 13-cis RA induced CP in only 19% of the fetuses. Although 13-cis RA elevated the RAR beta and gamma mRNA levels in fetal palates, its up-regulation was slower and less marked than that induced by all-trans RA. These findings indicate that the induction of RAR beta mRNA in the fetal palate correlates well with the tissue concentration of all-trans RA after RA treatment, and RAR beta may be one of the most influential candidate molecules for RA-induced teratogenesis.

  9. Dual Role of Hydrophobic Racemic Thioesters of α-Amino Acids in the Generation of Isotactic Peptides and Co-peptides in Water; Implications for the Origin of Homochirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illos, Roni A.; Clodic, Gilles; Bolbach, Gerard; Weissbuch, Isabelle; Lahav, Meir

    2010-02-01

    Thioesters of α-amino acids are considered as plausible monomers for the generation of the primeval peptides. DL-Leucine-thioethyl esters (LeuSEt), where the L-enantiomer was tagged with deuterium atoms, undergo polycondensation in water or in bicarbonate or imidazole buffer solutions to yield mainly heterochiral (atactic) peptides and diketopiperazine, as analyzed by MALDI-TOF and ESI mass-spectrometry. In variance, when polymerization of DL(d10) -Leu, first activated with N,N'-carbonyldiimidazole, then initiated with ethanethiol or with DL(d3) -LeuSEt yielded a library of peptides up to 30 detectable residues where those of homochiral sequence (isotactic) are the dominant diastereoisomers. At these conditions, racemic β-sheets are formed and operate as stereoselective templates in the process of chain-elongation. Isotopic L: L(d10)-Leu co-peptides were obtained in the polymerization of L(d10)-Leu with L-LeuSEt. By contrast, mixtures of oligo- D-Leu and oligo- L(d10)-Leu were obtained in the polymerization of mixtures of D-LeuSEt with activated L(d10)-Leu. Isotactic co-peptides containing Leu and Val residues were formed in the polymerization of mixtures of activated DL(d8)-Val with DL(d3) -LeuSEt in water, implying that the racemic β-sheets exert regio-enantio-selection but not chemo-selection. A reaction pathway is suggested, where LeuSEt operates both as initiator of the reaction as well as a multimer.

  10. Elevated Cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in Macaques Following Early Life Stress (ELS and Inverse Association with Hippocampal Volume: Preliminary Implications for Serotonin-Related Function in Mood and Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Coplan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early life stress (ELS is cited as a risk for mood and anxiety disorders, potentially through altered serotonin neurotransmission. We examined the effects of ELS, utilizing the variable foraging demand (VFD macaque model, on adolescent monoamine metabolites. We sought to replicate an increase in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA observed in two previous VFD cohorts. We hypothesized that elevated cisternal 5-HIAA was associated with reduced neurotrophic effects , conceivably due to excessive negative feedback at somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. A putatively decreased serotonin neurotransmission would be reflected by reductions in hippocampal volume and white matter (WM fractional anisotropy (FA. Methods: When infants were 2-6 months of age, bonnet macaque mothers were exposed to VFD. We employed cisternal CSF taps to measure monoamine metabolites in VFD (N = 22 and non-VFD (N = 14 offspring (mean age = 2.61 years. Metabolites were correlated with hippocampal volume obtained by MRI and WM FA by diffusion tensor imaging in young adulthood in 17 males [10 VFD (mean age = 4.57 years].Results: VFD subjects exhibited increased CSF 5-HIAA compared to non-VFD controls. An inverse correlation between right hippocampal volume and 5-HIAA was noted in VFD- but not controls. CSF HVA and MHPG correlated inversely with hippocampal volume only in VFD. CSF 5-HIAA correlated inversely with FA of the WM tracts of the anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC only in VFD. Conclusions: Elevated cisternal 5-HIAA in VFD may reflect increased dorsal raphe serotonin, potentially inducing excessive autoreceptor activation, inducing a putative serotonin deficit in terminal fields. Resultant reductions in neurotrophic activity are reflected by smaller right hippocampal volume. Convergent evidence of reduced neurotrophic activity in association with high CSF 5-HIAA in VFD was reflected by reduced FA of the ALIC.

  11. Ibotenic acid and thioibotenic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    with the conformations preferred by the ligands upon docking to mGlu1 and models of the other mGlu subtypes, we propose that unlike other subtypes, group III mGlu receptor binding sites require a ligand conformation at an energy level which is prohibitively expensive for ibotenic acid, but not for thioibotenic acid....... These studies demonstrate how subtle differences in chemical structures can result in profound differences in pharmacological activity....

  12. Effects of grid alloy on the properties of positive-plate corrosion layers in lead/acid batteries. Implications for premature capacity loss under repetitive deep-discharge cycling service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenkamp, A. F.; Constanti, K. K.; Koop, M. J.; Apateanu, L.; Calabek, M.; Micka, K.

    1994-02-01

    Premature capacity loss (PCL) has been demonstrated consistently by the deep-discharge cycling of three-plate lead/acid cells configured with an excess of electrolyte. A capacity loss of approximately 2% per cycle was observed with cells based on tin-free, lead-calcium positive grids, under both constant-current and constant-voltage charging. The current that flows during constant-voltage charging decreases markedly within the first few cycles. This coincides with the establishment of an appreciable corrosion layer on the grid, and also with the onset of severe capacity loss. Significantly, there is no corresponding build-up of lead sulfate within the porous mass. With constant-current charging, a change in the overcharge factor, from 1.1 to 1.2, approximately doubles the rate of capacity loss. The corrosion products in lead-calcium plates exhibit a bi-layered structure: an outer corrosion layer of PbO2 and an inner layer in which the composition approaches PbO. These materials are prone to fracture and separation, especially between the two layers. Cells based on lead-antimony positive grids also suffer PCL, but the rate of capacity loss (approximately 1% per cycle) is less than that observed for the lead-calcium analogues. The current under constant-voltage charging of lead-antimony cells also decreases during the first few charge/discharge cycles, yet, this effect is over-shadowed by an increase in current due to the effects of antimony migration. Increasing the level of overcharge under constant-current charging produces only a slight reduction in cycle life. In regions close to the grid, PbO-like material is much less abundant than in lead-calcium plates. The corrosion products are composed mainly of PbO2, and are more coherent under stress. Resistance at the grid/porous material interface, measured in situ, increases greatly during discharge for plates based on lead-calcium grids, but much less for the corresponding lead-antimony plates. This tends to

  13. Structure and reactivity of As(III)- and As(V)-rich schwertmannites and amorphous ferric arsenate sulfate from the Carnoulès acid mine drainage, France: Comparison with biotic and abiotic model compounds and implications for As remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillot, Fabien; Morin, Guillaume; Juillot, Farid; Bruneel, Odile; Casiot, Corinne; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Wang, Yuheng; Lebrun, Sophie; Aubry, Emmanuel; Vlaic, Gilberto; Brown, Gordon E.

    2013-03-01

    Poorly ordered nanocrystalline hydroxysulfate minerals of microbial origin, such as schwertmannite, Fe8O8(OH)6SO4, are important arsenic scavengers in sulfate-rich acid mine drainage (AMD) environments. However, despite the fact that As(III) and As(V) have been shown to sorb on schwertmannite, little is known about the actual mechanism of arsenic scavenging processes after microbial Fe(II) oxidation in AMD environments. The major focus of the present study is to determine the molecular-level structure of poorly ordered As(III) and As(V) bearing Fe oxyhydroxysulfate minerals from the Carnoulès AMD, France, which exhibits exceptional As(III) concentrations. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy were used to compare field samples with a large set of synthetic analogs prepared via biotic or abiotic pathways, with As/Fe ratios typical of minerals and mineraloids ranging from nanocrystalline schwertmannite to amorphous hydroxysulfate compounds. Our results yield further evidence for the poisoning effect of As(V) in limiting the nucleation of schwertmannite. For initial dissolved As(V)/Fe(III) molar ratios ⩾0.2, amorphous Fe(III)-As(V) hydroxysulfate forms, with a local structure consistent with that of amorphous ferric arsenate. EXAFS data for this amorphous material are consistent with corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra to which AsO4 tetrahedra attach via double-corner 2C linkages. For As(V)/Fe(III) molar ratios lower than 0.2, As(V) binds to schwertmannite via 2C surface complexes. In contrast with the As(V)-containing samples, As(III) has a lower affinity for schwertmannite following its nucleation, as this mineral phase persists up to an initial As(III)/Fe(III) molar ratio of 0.6. EXAFS data indicate that during the precipitation process, As(III) forms dominantly 2C surface complexes on schwertmannite surfaces, likely on the sides of double-chains of Fe(III)(O,OH)6 octahedra, with a smaller proportion of edge

  14. Amino Acids in the Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Brinton, Karen L. F.; McDonald, Gene D.

    1999-08-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, β -alanine, and γ -amino-n-butyric acid (γ -ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  15. Intuitionistic implication without disjunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renardel de Lavalette, Gerard R.; Hendriks, Alex; Jongh, Dick H.J. de

    2012-01-01

    We investigate fragments of intuitionistic propositional logic containing implication but not disjunction. These fragments are finite, but their size grows superexponentially with the number of generators. Exact models are used to characterize the fragments.

  16. Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  17. Perfluorooctanoic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogt, P.; Wexler, P.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, 335-67-1) is used in fluoropolymer production and firefighting foams and persists in the environment. Human exposure to PFOA is mostly through the diet. PFOA primarily affects the liver and can cause developmental and reproductive toxic effects in test animals.

  18. Arginine-dependent acid-resistance pathway in Shigella boydii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ability to survive the low pH of the human stomach is considered be an important virulent determinant. Acid tolerance of Shigella boydii 18 CDPH, the strain implicated in an outbreak may have played an important role in surviving the acidic food (bean salad). The strain was capable of inducing arg...

  19. Two cytosolic protein families implicated in lipid-binding: main structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoentgen, F; Bucquoy, S; Seddiqi, N; Jollès, P

    1993-12-01

    1. According to the important biological role of fatty acids and phospholipids in cell membranes, two cytosolic proteins implicated in their binding and transport in brain were considered, namely: Fatty Acid-Binding Protein and basic 21 kDa protein. 2. They were reviewed as well as their related protein families. 3. Although the two protein groups do not present significant sequence homologies, they share several similar properties and might thus be implicated in common physiological functions.

  20. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Klaus Peter; Petersen, Morten; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective...

  1. The association of urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and vanillylmandelic acid in patients with generalized anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, M J; Noyes, R; Woodman, C; Laukes, C

    1995-01-01

    There is evidence that serotonin and norepinephrine are in some way involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders. Urinary levels of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and the norepinephrine metabolite vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) were measured in 46 patients with generalized anxiety disorder. There was a significant association between urinary levels of 5-HIAA and VMA: r = 0.79; p = 0.0001. Possible implications of this finding are discussed.

  2. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  3. Genetic Variation in Bile Acid Metabolism: Implications for Lipoprotein Homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    Erfelijke factoren spelen een belangrijke rol bij de balans van cholesterol in het lichaam. Een belangrijke manier om cholesterol af te breken, is door het in de lever om te zetten in galzuren. Hierbij is het enzym CYP7A1 snelheidsbepalend. Het doel van de studies in dit proefschrift was het onderzo

  4. Apparent hydrogen consumption in acid reactors: observations and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinamarca, C; Bakke, R

    2009-01-01

    Investigations of hydrogen production by dark fermentation have received increasing attention as a green fuel production process. Research focus is mainly on yields and rates of hydrogen production under different operation conditions. The importance of hydrogen consumption is addressed here, based on results from lab-scale reactors. Experiments were run using mixed cultures and a variety of operating conditions: HRT 6-40 hours; temperature 25-55 degrees C. Initial hydrogen yields between 0.8-1.5 mol H(2)/mol glucose and approximately 50% H(2) in headspace was observed, followed by a decrease in hydrogen production as the culture matures, resulting in hydrogen yields down to 0.02 mol H(2)/mol glucose. It is concluded that hydrogen or "hydrogen equivalents" consumption is significant, especially in reactors with high biomass concentration and/or high sludge age. Sustainable H(2) production by dark fermentation alone is therefore not likely to be developed. The results suggest that it is possible to control and avoid significant H(2) production in dark fermentation. Minimizing H(2) production can be useful in preparation of organic feed for other bio-fuel production processes, such as methanogenic processes and bio-electrochemical H(2) production.

  5. Psoriasis : implications of biologics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecluse, L.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the end of 2004 several specific immunomodulating therapies: ‘biologic response modifiers’ or ‘biologics’ have been registered for moderate to severe psoriasis in Europe. This thesis is considering the implications of the introduction of the biologics for psoriasis patients, focusing on safety

  6. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluorhydric acid ... stomach, or intestine have holes (perforations) from the acid. ... Hydrofluoric acid is especially dangerous. The most common accidents involving hydrofluoric acid cause severe burns on the skin ...

  7. Dehydroabietic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ping Rao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound [systematic name: (1R,4aS,10aR-7-isopropyl-1,4a-dimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydrophenanthrene-1-carboxylic acid], C20H28O2, has been isolated from disproportionated rosin which is obtained by isomerizing gum rosin with a Pd-C catalyst.. Two crystallographically independent molecules exist in the asymmetric unit. In each molecule, there are three six-membered rings, which adopt planar, half-chair and chair conformations. The two cyclohexane rings form a trans ring junction with the two methyl groups in axial positions. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  8. [Gut microbiota: Description, role and pathophysiologic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, C; Quévrain, E

    2016-06-01

    The human gut contains 10(14) bacteria and many other micro-organisms such as Archaea, viruses and fungi. Studying the gut microbiota showed how this entity participates to gut physiology and beyond this to human health, as a real "hidden organ". In this review, we aimed to bring information about gut microbiota, its structure, its roles and its implication in human pathology. After bacterial colonization in infant, intestinal microbial composition is unique for each individual although more than 95% can be assigned to four major phyla. The use of culture independent methods and more recently the development of high throughput sequencing allowed to depict precisely gut microbiota structure and diversity as well as its alteration in diseases. Gut microbiota is implicated in the maturation of the host immune system and in many fundamental metabolic pathways including sugars and proteins fermentation and metabolism of bile acids and xenobiotics. Imbalance of gut microbial populations or dysbiosis has important functional consequences and is implicated in many digestive diseases (inflammatory bowel diseases, colorectal cancer, etc.) but also in obesity and autism. These observations have led to a surge of studies exploring therapeutics which aims to restore gut microbiota equilibrium such as probiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation. But recent research also investigates biological activity of microbial products which could lead to interesting therapeutics leads. Copyright © 2015 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Epigenetics: ambiguities and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, Karola; Griffiths, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Everyone has heard of 'epigenetics', but the term means different things to different researchers. Four important contemporary meanings are outlined in this paper. Epigenetics in its various senses has implications for development, heredity, and evolution, and also for medicine. Concerning development, it cements the vision of a reactive genome strongly coupled to its environment. Concerning heredity, both narrowly epigenetic and broader 'exogenetic' systems of inheritance play important roles in the construction of phenotypes. A thoroughly epigenetic model of development and evolution was Waddington's aim when he introduced the term 'epigenetics' in the 1940s, but it has taken the modern development of molecular epigenetics to realize this aim. In the final sections of the paper we briefly outline some further implications of epigenetics for medicine and for the nature/nurture debate.

  10. Primal implication as encryption

    OpenAIRE

    Krupski, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    We propose a "cryptographic" interpretation for the propositional connectives of primal infon logic introduced by Y. Gurevich and I. Neeman and prove the corresponding soundness and completeness results. Primal implication $\\imp{\\varphi}{\\psi}$ corresponds to the encryption of $\\psi$ with a secret key $\\varphi$, primal disjunction $\\vp{\\varphi}{\\psi}$ is a group key and $\\bot$ reflects some backdoor constructions such as full superuser permissions or a universal decryption key. For the logic ...

  11. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D P; Bada, J L; Brinton, K L; McDonald, G D

    1999-08-03

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  12. Nickel inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W; Brant, Kelly A; Fabisiak, James P; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-08-07

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation-the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy-in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with l-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 h), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis.

  13. Whole body acid-base modeling revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Troels; Nielsen, Søren

    2017-04-01

    The textbook account of whole body acid-base balance in terms of endogenous acid production, renal net acid excretion, and gastrointestinal alkali absorption, which is the only comprehensive model around, has never been applied in clinical practice or been formally validated. To improve understanding of acid-base modeling, we managed to write up this conventional model as an expression solely on urine chemistry. Renal net acid excretion and endogenous acid production were already formulated in terms of urine chemistry, and we could from the literature also see gastrointestinal alkali absorption in terms of urine excretions. With a few assumptions it was possible to see that this expression of net acid balance was arithmetically identical to minus urine charge, whereby under the development of acidosis, urine was predicted to acquire a net negative charge. The literature already mentions unexplained negative urine charges so we scrutinized a series of seminal papers and confirmed empirically the theoretical prediction that observed urine charge did acquire negative charge as acidosis developed. Hence, we can conclude that the conventional model is problematic since it predicts what is physiologically impossible. Therefore, we need a new model for whole body acid-base balance, which does not have impossible implications. Furthermore, new experimental studies are needed to account for charge imbalance in urine under development of acidosis.

  14. Uric acid as a mediator of diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalal, Diana I; Maahs, David M; Hovind, Peter

    2011-01-01

    evidence has emerged in the past decade to suggest uric acid is an inflammatory factor and may play a role in endothelial dysfunction. This has lead our group and others to explore the role of uric acid in the onset and progression of DN. In this review, we highlight some of the animal and human studies...... that implicate uric acid in DN. Based on the evidence we review, we conclude the need for properly planned randomized controlled studies to decrease uric acid levels and assess the impact of such therapy on diabetic kidney disease....

  15. Rosacea, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Azelaic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    David A. Jones

    2009-01-01

    Rosacea is a common skin condition thought to be primarily an inflammatory disorder. Neutrophils, in particular, have been implicated in the inflammation associated with rosacea and mediate many of their effects through the release of reactive oxygen species. Recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathophysiology of rosacea has been recognized. Many effective agents for rosacea, including topical azelaic acid and topical metronidazole, have anti-inflammatory properties. in-vitro...

  16. Amino acids in the sedimentary humic and fulvic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.

    to the coastal sedimentary humic acids implying higher association of amino acids with the carbonaceous and fine grained sedimentary humic acids. Both the humic and fulvic acids are composed of neutral, acidic, basic, aromatic and sulphur containing amino acids....

  17. Ab initio investigations of the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of atmospherically relevant strong acids

    OpenAIRE

    Partanen, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Sulfuric and hydrochloric acids participate in several important chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere. Due to its tendency to react with water molecules, sulfuric acid is an important factor in cloud formation and related phenomena. Hydrochloric acid is heavily implicated in stratospheric ozone depletion because of its role as a temporary reservoir for chlorine radicals. In this thesis, the thermodynamics and dynamics of these two acids are investigated. The dynamic part focuse...

  18. Studies on the fatty acids of the red alga Chondria armata (Kutz.) okamura

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Govenkar, M.B.; Wahidullah, S.

    of arachidonic acid in algae. Phytochemis- try 8: 190721915. Roessler, P. G. 1990. Environmental control of glycerolipid metabolism in microalgae; commercial implication and future research direction. J. Phycol. 26: 3932399. Rosell, K. G. and L. M. Srivastava...

  19. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  20. Plasma amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  1. Uric acid test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  2. POLYELEOSTEARIC ACID VESICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zichen; XIE Ximng; FAN Qinghua; FANG Yifei

    1992-01-01

    α-Eleostearic acid and β-eleostearic acid formed vesicles in aqueous medium when an ethanol solutionofeleostearic acid was injected rapidly into a vigorously vortexed aqueous phase. Formation of the vesicles was demonstrated by electron microscopic observation and bromothymol blue encapsulation experiments. Polymerizations of the eleostearic acids in the formed vesicles carried out by UV irradiation produced poly-α-eleostearic acid and poly-β-eleostearic acid vesicles.

  3. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  4. A new hypotensive polyunsaturated fatty acid dietary combination regulates oleic acid accumulation by suppression of stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 gene expression in the SHR model of genetic hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellenger, J.; Bellenger, S.; Clement, L.; Mandard, S.J.; Diot, C.; Poisson, J.P.; Narce, M.

    2004-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are known to repress SCD-1 gene expression, key enzyme of monounsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. Alterations of the monounsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio have been implicated in various diseases related to the metabolic syndrome, including hypertension. We

  5. A new hypotensive polyunsaturated fatty acid dietary combination regulates oleic acid accumulation by suppression of stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 gene expression in the SHR model of genetic hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellenger, J.; Bellenger, S.; Clement, L.; Mandard, S.J.; Diot, C.; Poisson, J.P.; Narce, M.

    2004-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are known to repress SCD-1 gene expression, key enzyme of monounsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. Alterations of the monounsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio have been implicated in various diseases related to the metabolic syndrome, including hypertension. We

  6. Stereoselective synthesis of unsaturated α-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Roberto; Jeanne-Julien, Louis; René, Adeline; Martinez, Jean; Cavelier, Florine

    2015-06-01

    Stereoselective synthesis of unsaturated α-amino acids was performed by asymmetric alkylation. Two methods were investigated and their enantiomeric excess measured and compared. The first route consisted of an enantioselective approach induced by the Corey-Lygo catalyst under chiral phase transfer conditions while the second one involved the hydroxypinanone chiral auxiliary, both implicating Schiff bases as substrate. In all cases, the use of a prochiral Schiff base gave higher enantiomeric excess and yield in the final desired amino acid.

  7. Concomitant action of structural elements and receptor phosphorylation determines arrestin-3 interaction with the free fatty acid receptor FFA4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Adrian J; Hudson, Brian D; Shimpukade, Bharat;

    2014-01-01

    In addition to being nutrients, free fatty acids act as signaling molecules by activating a family of G protein-coupled receptors. Among these is FFA4, previously called GPR120, which responds to medium and long chain fatty acids, including health-promoting ω-3 fatty acids, which have been implic...

  8. Implications of recent MINER$\

    CERN Document Server

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Among the most important tasks of neutrino oscillation experiments is correctly estimating the parent neutrino energy from the by-products of their interactions. Large uncertainties in our current understanding of such processes can significantly hamper this effort. We explore several recent measurements made using the \\mnv{} detector in the few-GeV NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab: the differential cross-section vs. $Q^2$ for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, the differential cross-sections vs. pion angle and pion kinetic energy for resonant single charged pion production, and the differential cross-sections vs. pion angle and kinetic energy for coherent pion production. We furthermore discuss their implications for energy reconstruction in oscillation measurements.

  9. Implications of social structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Josefine Bohr

    Social systems in nature are characterised by heterogeneous social structures. The pattern of social interactions or associations between individuals within populations (i.e. their social network) is typically non-random. Such structuring may have important implications for the expression......, we investigate empirically the role of the social environment of individuals for their communication patterns. Our study species is a song bird, the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus). The results suggest that individual communication in this species is influenced by features of the local...... social environment of the individual. In the last two studies, we investigate the role of social structure for cooperation in a classic natural system for behavioural research, the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), by means of computer simulations. Cooperation contradicts evolutionary theory...

  10. Complexation and molecular modeling studies of europium(III)-gallic acid-amino acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Mohamed; Khan, Imran; Coutinho, João A P

    2016-04-01

    With many metal-based drugs extensively used today in the treatment of cancer, attention has focused on the development of new coordination compounds with antitumor activity with europium(III) complexes recently introduced as novel anticancer drugs. The aim of this work is to design new Eu(III) complexes with gallic acid, an antioxida'nt phenolic compound. Gallic acid was chosen because it shows anticancer activity without harming health cells. As antioxidant, it helps to protect human cells against oxidative damage that implicated in DNA damage, cancer, and accelerated cell aging. In this work, the formation of binary and ternary complexes of Eu(III) with gallic acid, primary ligand, and amino acids alanine, leucine, isoleucine, and tryptophan was studied by glass electrode potentiometry in aqueous solution containing 0.1M NaNO3 at (298.2 ± 0.1) K. Their overall stability constants were evaluated and the concentration distributions of the complex species in solution were calculated. The protonation constants of gallic acid and amino acids were also determined at our experimental conditions and compared with those predicted by using conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation (COSMO-RS) model. The geometries of Eu(III)-gallic acid complexes were characterized by the density functional theory (DFT). The spectroscopic UV-visible and photoluminescence measurements are carried out to confirm the formation of Eu(III)-gallic acid complexes in aqueous solutions.

  11. Nutrition & health implications of palm oil in Indian diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoorunissa

    1995-11-01

    To boost the edible oil production and attain self-sufficiency, one of the long-term strategies undertaken by the Indian government is promotion of palm oil production through oil palm cultivation. Compared to other traditional oils (except coconut oil) used in India, palm oil and palmolein have high saturated fatty acids and low linoleic acid levels. Studies conducted to evaluate the nutritional and health implications of substituting other oils with palmolein show that despite having low linoleic acid, the use of palm oil may not adversely affect the linoleic acid status of Indian population. Substitution of groundnut oil with palmolein in cereal based lactovegetarian diets providing about 30 per cent total fat calories, doubles the saturated fatty acids and reduces by half the linoleic acid content. The effects of this substitution in volunteers from the middle income group did not raise serum cholesterol and aggregability of platelets indicating that palm oil may not produce the deleterious effects associated with saturated fatty acids. The tocols present in palm oil are natural biological antioxidants and can therefore augment the antioxidant potential of Indian diets. Red palm oil is the richest natural source of carotenes which are powerful biological antioxidants. The major carotene in red palm oil is beta-carotene. Therefore, red palm oil can be used to prevent vitamin A deficiency which is widespread in India.

  12. Physiological functions and pathogenic potential of uric acid: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid is synthesized mainly in the liver, intestines and the vascular endothelium as the end product of an exogenous pool of purines, and endogenously from damaged, dying and dead cells, whereby nucleic acids, adenine and guanine, are degraded into uric acid. Mentioning uric acid generates dread because it is the established etiological agent of the severe, acute and chronic inflammatory arthritis, gout and is implicated in the initiation and progress of the metabolic syndrome. Yet, uric acid is the predominant anti-oxidant molecule in plasma and is necessary and sufficient for induction of type 2 immune responses. These properties may explain its protective potential in neurological and infectious diseases, mainly schistosomiasis. The pivotal protective potential of uric acid against blood-borne pathogens and neurological and autoimmune diseases is yet to be established.

  13. Acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen protect against oxidative neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, H; Maharaj, D S; Daya, S

    2006-09-01

    Due to the implication of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disorders we decided to investigate the antioxidant properties of acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen either alone or in combination. The thiobarbituric acid assay (TBA) and the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay were used to investigate quinolinic acid (QA)-induced: lipid peroxidation and superoxide anion generation in the rat hippocampus, in vivo. The study also shows, using cresyl violet staining, the preservation of structural integrity of neuronal cells following treatment with acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen in QA-lesioned rat hippocampus. Furthermore the study sought to determine whether these agents have any effect on endogenous (QA) formation. This study shows that acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen inhibit QA-induced superoxide anion generation, lipid peroxidation and cell damage, in vivo, in the rat hippocampus. In addition these agents inhibit the enzyme, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid oxygenase (3-HAO), responsible for the synthesis of endogenous QA.

  14. Surface Propensity of Atmospherically Relevant Amino Acids Studied by XPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Alexandra; Gomes, Anderson Herbert de Abreu; Araújo, Oscar Cardoso; de Brito, Arnaldo Naves; Bjorneholm, Olle

    2017-03-30

    Amino acids constitute an important fraction of the water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) compounds in aerosols and are involved in many processes in the atmosphere. In this work, we applied XPS to study aqueous solutions of four amino acids: glycine, alanine, valine and methionine, in their zwitterionic forms. We found that amino acids with hydrophilic side chains and smaller size, GLY and ALA, tend to stay in the bulk of the liquid, while the hydrophobic and bigger amino acids, VAL and MET, are found to concentrate more on the surface. We found experimental evidences that the amino acids have preferential orientation relative to the surface, with the hydrophobic side chain being closer to the surface than the hydrophilic carboxylate group. The observed amino acid surface propensity has implications in atmospheric science as the surface interaction play a central role in cloud droplet formation, and they should be considered in climate models.

  15. Acid stress in the pathology of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardolo, Fabio L M; Gaston, Benjamin; Hunt, John

    2004-04-01

    Although alteration of airway pH may serve an innate host defense capacity, it also is implicated in the pathophysiology of obstructive airway diseases. Acid-induced asthma appears in association with gastroesophageal reflux after accidental inhalation of acid (fog, pollution, and workplace exposure) and in the presence of altered airway pH homeostasis. Endogenous and exogenous exposures to acids evoke cough, bronchoconstriction, airway hyperreactivity, microvascular leakage, and heightened production of mucous, fluid, and nitric oxide. Abnormal acidity of the airways is reflected in exhaled breath assays. The intimate mechanisms of acid-induced airway obstruction are dependent on activation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves. Protons activate these nerves with the subsequent release of tachykinins (major mediators of this pathway) that, in conjunction with kinins, nitric oxide, oxygen radicals, and proteases, modulate diverse aspects of airway dysfunction and inflammation. The recognition that acid stress might initiate or exacerbate airway obstructive symptomatology has prompted the consideration of new therapies targeting pH homeostasis.

  16. Amino acids allosterically regulate the thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Tobias; Spinka, Michael; Tittmann, Kai; Schütz, Anja; Golbik, Ralph; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Hübner, Gerhard; König, Stephan

    2008-02-29

    The gene rv0853c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv codes for a thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase (MtKDC), an enzyme involved in the amino acid degradation via the Ehrlich pathway. Steady state kinetic experiments were performed to determine the substrate specificity of MtKDC. The mycobacterial enzyme was found to convert a broad spectrum of branched-chain and aromatic alpha-keto acids. Stopped-flow kinetics showed that MtKDC is allosterically activated by alpha-keto acids. Even more, we demonstrate that also amino acids are potent activators of this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme. Thus, metabolic flow through the Ehrlich pathway can be directly regulated at the decarboxylation step. The influence of amino acids on MtKDC catalysis was investigated, and implications for other thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are discussed.

  17. Synthesis of a stable gold hydrosol by the reduction of chloroaurate ions by the amino acid, aspartic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saikat Mandal; P R Selvakannan; Sumant Phadtare; Renu Pasricha; Murali Sastry

    2002-10-01

    Development of reliable protocols for the synthesis of nanoparticles of well-defined sizes and good monodispersity is an important aspect of nanotechnology. In this paper, we present details of the synthesis of gold nanoparticles of good monodispersity by the reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions by the amino acid, aspartic acid. The colloidal gold solution thus formed is extremely stable in time, indicating electrostatic stabilization via nanoparticle surface-bound amino acid molecules. This observation has been used to modulate the size of the gold nanoparticles in solution by varying the molar ratio of chloroaurate ions to aspartic acid in the reaction medium. Characterization of the aspartic acid-reduced gold nanoparticles was carried out by UV-visible spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The use of amino acids in the synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticle in water has important implications in the development of new protocols for generation of bioconjugate materials.

  18. FATTY ACID COMPOSITION AND TOCOPHEROL CONTENT OF PUMPKIN SEED OIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumpkin seed oil (PSO) has high tocopherol content (TC) and unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) making it well-suited for improving human nutrition. PSO has been implicated in preventing prostate growth, retarding hypertension, mitigating hypercholesterolemia and arthritis, improved bladder compliance, a...

  19. Gas-phase Acidities of Aspartic Acid, Glutamic Acid, and their Amino Acid Amides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H; Velazquez, Hector A; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2007-02-14

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or ΔGacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage’s importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3–4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  20. Long-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids associate with development of premature infants up to 18 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandvik, Birgitta; Ntoumani, Eleni; Lundqvist-Persson, Cristina; Sabel, Karl-Göran

    2016-04-01

    Myelination is important perinatally and highly dependent on long-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, nowadays often supplemented, inhibit oleic acid synthesis. Using data from a premature cohort, we studied if nervonic, lignoceric and oleic acids correlated to growth and early development up to 18 months corrected age. Small for gestational age infants had lower concentrations than infants appropriate for gestational age. Only oleic acid was negatively correlated to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Oleic and lignoceric acids correlated to social interaction at one month, and nervonic acid to mental, psychomotor and behavioral development at 6, 10 and 18 months, also when adjusted for several confounders. Negative association between oleic acid and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids suggests inhibition of delta-9 desaturase, and nervonic acid´s divergent correlation to lignoceric and oleic acids suggests different metabolism in neonatal period. Our results may have implications for the supplementation of premature infants.

  1. Poly[[tetraaquatetrakis[μ3-5-(pyridine-4-carboxamidoisophthalato]cobalt(IIdigadolinium(III] tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Zhi Kuang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the centrosymmetric polymeric title compound, {[CoGd2(C14H8N2O54(H2O4]·4H2O}n, the GdIII cation is coordinated by one water molecule and four pyridine-4-carboxamidoisophthalate (L anions in a distorted square-antiprismatic arrangement, while the CoII cation, located on an inversion center, is coordinated by two pyridyl-N atoms, two carboxylate-O atoms and two water molecules in a distorted octahedral geometry. The asymmetric unit contains two anionic L ligands: one bridges two Gd cations and one Co cation through two carboxyl groups and one pyridine-N atom; the other bridges two Gd cations and one Co cation through two carboxyl groups and the uncoordinated pyridine-N atom is hydrogen-bonded to the adjacent coordinated water molecule. Extensive O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds are present in the crystal structure.

  2. Poly[[tetraaquatetrakis[μ3-5-(pyridine-4-carboxamidoisophthalato]cobalt(IIdiholmium(III] tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fang Deng

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the centrosymmetric polymeric title compound, {[CoHo2(C14H8N2O54(H2O4]·4H2O}n, the HoIII ion is coordinated by one water molecule and four 5-(pyridine-4-carboxamidoisophthalate (L ligands in a distorted square-antiprismatic arrangement. The CoII ion, located on an inversion center, is coordinated by two pyridine N atoms, two carboxylate O atoms and two water molecules in a distorted octahedral geometry. One L ligand bridges two Ho ions and one Co ion through two carboxylate groups and one pyridine N atom. The other L ligand bridges two Ho ions and one Co ion through two carboxylate groups, while the uncoordinated pyridine N atom accepts a hydrogen bond from an adjacent coordinated water molecule. Extensive O—H...O, N—H...O and O—H...N hydrogen bonding is present in the crystal.

  3. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Tetraaquacopper(II) Bis(5-fluorouracil-1-acetate) Tetrahydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-Dong; HU Mao-Lin

    2006-01-01

    The title compound, [Cu(C6H4N2O4F)2(H2O)4]·4(H2O) I, has been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction method. It crystallizes in monoclinic, space group P21/c with a = 8.3041(17), b = 12.045(2), c = 11.077(2) (A), β = 92.567(3)o, V = 1106.8(4)(A)3, Mr = 581.89, Z = 2, Dc = 1.746 g/cm3, F(000) = 598, μ(MoKα) = 1.090 mm-1, the final R = 0.0296 and wR = 0.0806 for 3195 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I). In the centrosymme- tric compound I, each Cu(II) ion is coordinated by six O atoms from two 5-fluorouracil-1-acetate anions and four water molecules, forming a six-coordinated octahedral environment. N-H…O and O-H…O hydrogen-bonding interactions are observed in the structure, leading to the formation of a three-dimensional network.

  4. Tris(1,10-phenanthroline-κ2N,N′nickel(II dinitrate tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Tabatabaee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [Ni(C12H8N23](NO32·4H2O, the NiII ion is octahedrally coordinated by three bidentate 1,10-phenanthroline ligands, each forming a five-membered chelate ring. In the crystal, O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds are present between the complex cations, nitrate anions and water molecules. O—H...O hydrogen bonds between the uncoordinated water molecules lead to the formation of a four-membered ring water cluster, with a planar configuration. There were an additional five grossly disordered water molecules in the asymmetric unit, which were removed by the subroutine SQUEEZE; these were were excluded in the calculation of the molecular weight, etc. π–π stacking interactions between the aromatic rings are also observed [centroid–centroid distances = 3.697 (2, 3.728 (2 and 3.761 (2 Å].

  5. Tetraaquabis(3,5-dinitrobenzoato-κO1)magnesium tetrahydrate

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In the structure of the title compound, [Mg(C7H3N2O6)2(H2O)4]·4H2O, the slightly distorted octahedral MgO6 coordination polyhedron comprises two trans-related carboxylate O-atom donors from mononodentate 3,5-dinitrobenzoate ligands, and four water molecules. The coordinating water molecules and the four water molecules of solvation give both intra- and inter-unit O—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions with carboxylate, water and nitro O-atom acceptors, forming a three-dimensional st...

  6. Diaqua­bis(1,3-propane­diamine)nickel(II) squarate tetrahydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Ersin; Erer, Hakan; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Ni(C3H10N2)2(H2O)2](C4O4)·4H2O, contains one-half of the diaqua­bis(1,3-propane­diamine)nickel(II) cation, one-half of the centrosymmetric squarate anion and two uncoordinated water mol­ecules. In the cation, the NiII atom is located on a crystallographic inversion centre and has a slightly distorted octa­hedral coordination geometry. The six-membered chelate ring adopts a chair conformation. O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the cation and anion through the water mol­ecule, while N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the cation and anion and cation and water mol­ecules. In the crystal structure, inter­molecular O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules into a three-dimensional network structure. PMID:21582677

  7. Hexaaquamagnesium(II bis{5-[3-(1H-tetrazol-5-ylphenyl]tetrazolide} tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fang Qiao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Mg(H2O6](C8H5N82·4H2O, contains one half of the centrosymmetric dication, one anion and two water molecules. The MgII ion is coordinated by six water molecules in a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. In the anion, the two five-membered heterocycles are twisted from the central benzene ring by 4.34 (11 and 3.20 (10°. In the crystal, O—H...N, O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds generate a three-dimensional network.

  8. Poly[[diaquabis(μ2-4,4′-bipyridylcobalt(II] dinitrate tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Lehleh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, {[Co(C10H8N22(H2O2](NO32·4H2O}n, (C10H8N2 = 4,4′-bipyridine = 4,4′-bpy is a layered coordination polymer built up from a cationic square grid extending in (101 enclosing uncoordinating nitrate ions and water molecules. The CoII ion has site symmetry 2 and one of the 4,4′-bpy ligands is generated by twofold symmetry [two N atoms and two C atoms lie on the rotation axis and the dihedral angle between the pyridine rings is 45.66 (5°]. The other 4,4′-bpy ligand is generated by a crystallographic inversion center. The CoII ion exhibits a slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry defined by two O atoms of two coordinating water molecules and four N atoms from four bridging 4,4′-bpy ligands. The structure is consolidated by O—H...O, C—H...O and C—H...N hydrogen bonds.

  9. Octaaquabis(μ2-1H-pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxylatotricopper(II tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Gang Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the trinucler CuII complex molecule of the title compound, [Cu3(C5HN2O42(H2O8]·4H2O, the central CuII atom is located on an inversion centre and is coordinated in a distorted octahedral geometry. The equatorial sites are occupied by two N and two O atoms from two pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxylate ligands and the axial positions are occupied by two water molecules. The two other symmetry-related CuII atoms are pentacoordinated and assume a square-pyramidal geometry. In the crystal structure, coordinated and uncoordinated water molecules and carboxylate O atoms are linked by O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  10. Pyridinium diaqua-bis-(methyl-enediphospho-nato-κO,O')chromate(III) tetra-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Merwe, Kina; Visser, Hendrik G; Venter, J A

    2010-07-24

    In the title complex, (C(5)H(6)N)[Cr(CH(4)O(6)P(2))(2)(H(2)O)(2)]·4H(2)O, the Cr(III) atom, lying on an inversion centre, is coordinated by two bidentate methyl-ene diphospho-nate ligands and two water molecules in a distorted octa-hedral coordination geometry. The pyridinium cation is located on an inversion centre, with an N atom and a C atom sharing a position each at a half occupancy. A three-dimensional network is constructed by O-H⋯O, N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the pyridin-ium cation, complex anion and uncoordinated water mol-ecules.

  11. Gas-phase acidities of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and their amino acid amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H.; Velazquez, Hector Adam; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2007-09-01

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or [Delta]Gacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage's importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3-4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  12. Implications of antisocial parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torry, Zachary D; Billick, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Antisocial behavior is a socially maladaptive and harmful trait to possess. This can be especially injurious for a child who is raised by a parent with this personality structure. The pathology of antisocial behavior implies traits such as deceitfulness, irresponsibility, unreliability, and an incapability to feel guilt, remorse, or even love. This is damaging to a child's emotional, cognitive, and social development. Parents with this personality makeup can leave a child traumatized, empty, and incapable of forming meaningful personal relationships. Both genetic and environmental factors influence the development of antisocial behavior. Moreover, the child with a genetic predisposition to antisocial behavior who is raised with a parental style that triggers the genetic liability is at high risk for developing the same personality structure. Antisocial individuals are impulsive, irritable, and often have no concerns over their purported responsibilities. As a parent, this can lead to erratic discipline, neglectful parenting, and can undermine effective care giving. This paper will focus on the implications of parents with antisocial behavior and the impact that this behavior has on attachment as well as on the development of antisocial traits in children.

  13. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  14. A ladder coordination polymer based on Ca(2+) and (4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonic acid): crystal structure and solution-state NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatramaiah, Nutalapati; Mendes, Ricardo F; Silva, Artur M S; Tomé, João P C; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2016-09-01

    The preparation of coordination polymers (CPs) based on either transition metal centres or rare-earth cations has grown considerably in recent decades. The different coordination chemistry of these metals allied to the use of a large variety of organic linkers has led to an amazing structural diversity. Most of these compounds are based on carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing ligands. More recently, a wide range of molecules containing phosphonic acid groups have been reported. For the particular case of Ca(2+)-based CPs, some interesting functional materials have been reported. A novel one-dimensional Ca(2+)-based coordination polymer with a new organic linker, namely poly[[diaqua[μ4-(4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonato)][μ3-(4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonato)]dicalcium(II)] tetrahydrate], {[Ca2(C8H4N2O6P2)2(H2O)2]·4H2O}n, has been prepared at ambient temperature. The crystal structure features one-dimensional ladder-like ∞(1)[Ca2(H2cpp)2(H2O)2] polymers [H2cpp is (4,5-dicyano-1,2-phenylene)bis(phosphonate)], which are created by two distinct coordination modes of the anionic H2cpp(2-) cyanophosphonate organic linkers: while one molecule is only bound to Ca(2+) cations via the phosphonate groups, the other establishes an extra single connection via a cyano group. Ladders close pack with water molecules through an extensive network of strong and highly directional O-H...O and O-H...N hydrogen bonds; the observed donor-acceptor distances range from 2.499 (5) to 3.004 (6) Å and the interaction angles were found in the range 135-178°. One water molecule was found to be disordered over three distinct crystallographic positions. A detailed solution-state NMR study of the organic linker is also provided.

  15. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  16. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  17. Neutrino Experiments and Their Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in solar, reactor, and accelerator neutrino physics are reviewed. Implications for neutrino physics, solar physics, nuclear two-body physics, and r-process nucleosynthesis are briefly discussed.

  18. Tuberculosis: the implications for anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetics Supplement: Tuberculosis: the implications for anaesthesia. S Afr Fam Pract 2014 .... quicker results (within two hours), as well as information on rifampicin .... management of patients with active tuberculosis.21. Elective surgery ...

  19. MARITIME VIOLENCE : IMPLICATIONS TO MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Nurulizwan Ahmad Zubir

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Maritime Piracy has been a serious threat to the international community especially in the SoutheastAsia region. This threat has caused tremendous implications towards the world economy, environment,political stability of the nations involved because 45% of the shipping company passes through theSoutheast Asia. The worrying fact is that these attacks were committed by terrorists as well as traditionalmaritime pirates. This paper examines on the implications of maritime crime in M...

  20. A CRADLE TO GATE LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF THE BIOPOLYMER POLYLACTIC ACID: LOOKING BEYOND GLOBAL WARMING AND FOSSIL FUEL USE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derived from corn, the biopolymer polylactic acid (PLA) has recently emerged in the marketplace and is advertised as a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based polymers. Research into the environmental implications of biobased production has focused primarily on global warming...

  1. A CRADLE TO GATE LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF THE BIOPOLYMER POLYLACTIC ACID: LOOKING BEYOND GLOBAL WARMING AND FOSSIL FUEL USE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derived from corn, the biopolymer polylactic acid (PLA) has recently emerged in the marketplace and is advertised as a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based polymers. Research into the environmental implications of biobased production has focused primarily on global warming...

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of ...

  3. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant ...

  4. Lactic acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  5. Catalytic Synthesis Lactobionic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Borodina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles are obtained, characterized and deposited on the carrier. Conducted catalytic synthesis of lactobionic acid from lactose. Received lactobionic acid identify on the IR spectrum.

  6. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  7. Facts about Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Partners About Us Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English (US) Español ( ... a woman needs 400 micrograms (mcg) every day. Facts About Folic Acid Download and print this fact ...

  8. Azelaic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  9. Folic Acid Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Information For… Media Policy Makers Folic Acid Quiz Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... button beside the question. Good Luck! 1. Folic acid is: A a B vitamin B a form ...

  10. Role of potassium in acid secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John P Geibel

    2005-01-01

    Potassium (K+) ions are critical for the activation and catalytic cycle of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase, resulting in the secretion of hydrochloric acid into the parietal cell canaliculus. As both symptom, severity and esophageal mucosal damage in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are related to the degree of acid exposure, K+ is a logical target for approaches to inhibit acid production.The probable K+ binding site on the gastric H+,K+-ATPase has recently been described and studies are elucidating how K+ activates the enzyme. K+ channels in the apical membrane of the parietal cell are implicated in the recycling of K+ and, to date, three potential K+ channels (KCNQ1, Kir2.1 and Kir4.1) have been identified. The channels represent theoretical sites for agents to control acid secretion but it will be difficult to develop selective blockers. An alternative strategy is to prevent K+ from activating gastric H+,K+-ATPase; the potassiumcompetitive acid blocker (P-CAB) class inhibits acidsecretion by binding at or near the K+ binding site.Ongoing research is further defining the role of K+ in the functioning of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase, as well as determining the clinical utility of agents directed toward this important cation.

  11. Importance of endogenous kynurenic acid in brainm catecholaminergic processes and in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Erhardt, Sophie

    2001-01-01

    Kynurenic acid is a metabolite of tryptophan and the only known naturally occurring NMethylD-Aspartic acid (NMDA)-receptor antagonist (at the co-agonist glycine site) in the human brain. The aim of the present work was to investigate the physiological and pharmacological significance of endogenous kvnurenic acid as well as its putative pathophysiological implications. For this purpose in vivo extracellular single unit recording from rat brain catecholamine neurons were u...

  12. Fatty acids as modulators of neutrophil recruitment, function and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Hosana G; Takeo Sato, Fabio; Curi, Rui; Vinolo, Marco A R

    2016-08-15

    Neutrophils are well-known to act in the destruction of invading microorganisms. They have also been implicated in the activation of other immune cells including B- and T-lymphocytes and in the resolution of inflammation and tissue regeneration. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the circulation from where they migrate to tissues to perform their effector functions. Neutrophils are in constant contact with fatty acids that can modulate their function, activation and fate (survival or cell death) through different mechanisms. In this review, the effects of fatty acids pertaining to five classes, namely, long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs), short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and omega-3 (n-3), omega-6 (n-6) and omega-9 (n-9) unsaturated fatty acids, on neutrophils and the relevance of these effects for disease development are discussed.

  13. First intl symposium on acid precipitation and the forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultberg, H.; Grahn, O.; Pough, F.H.; Parsons, J.D.; McFee, W.W.; Hornbeck, J.W.; Mayer, R.

    1977-03-01

    Ion separation of acid air pollutants out of snow causes sudden, deep pH drops in lakes and running waters at an early stage of snowmelting. These pH drops have drastic effects on fish populations and are considered the main cause of changes in the microflora already at an early stage of acidification. Effects of acid precipitation on: salamanders, various aquatic ecosystems, and the soils of forests surrounding the lakes are discussed. Seasonal patterns in acidity of precipitation and their implications for forest stream ecosystems are examined. The acidity of throughfall precipitation is found to increase with the filtering of sulfur and nitrogen from the atmosphere by trees. As a consequence of acidification, losses of nutrients occur in the soils, and the growth patterns of the trees are affected. Methods of dealing with acid rainfall and the damaging effects of forest and aquatic ecosystems are described. (numerous diagrams, drawings, graphs, maps, photos, references, tables)

  14. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  15. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  16. Stomach acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour (mEq/ ...

  17. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Acid Lipase Disease Information Page What research is being ... research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency. Additional research studies hope to identify ...

  18. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  19. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  20. Relativistic effects on acidities and basicities of Brønsted acids and bases containing gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Ilmar A; Burk, Peeter; Kasemets, Kalev; Koppel, Ivar

    2013-11-07

    It is usually believed that relativistic effects as described by the Dirac-Schrödinger equation (relative to the classical or time-independent Schrödinger equation) are of little importance in chemistry. A closer look, however, reveals that some important and widely known properties (e.g., gold is yellow, mercury is liquid at room temperature) stem from relativistic effects. So far the influence of relativistic effects on the acid-base properties has been mostly ignored. Here we show that at least for compounds of gold such omission is completely erroneous and would lead to too high basicity and too low acidity values with errors in the range of 25-55 kcal mol(-1) (or 20 to 44 powers of ten in pK(a) units) in the gas-phase. These findings have important implications for the design of new superstrong acids and bases, and for the understanding of gold-catalysed reactions.

  1. Role of hepatocyte S6K1 in palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance and in oleic acid-induced protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Muntané, Jordi; Kozma, Sara C; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-06-01

    The excess of saturated free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, that induces lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, has been implicated in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also associated with insulin resistance. By contrast, oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, attenuates the effects of palmitic acid. We evaluated whether palmitic acid is directly associated with both insulin resistance and lipoapoptosis in mouse and human hepatocytes and the impact of oleic acid in the molecular mechanisms that mediate both processes. In human and mouse hepatocytes palmitic acid at a lipotoxic concentration triggered early activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related kinases, induced the apoptotic transcription factor CHOP, activated caspase 3 and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. These effects concurred with decreased IR/IRS1/Akt insulin pathway. Oleic acid suppressed the toxic effects of palmitic acid on ER stress activation, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance. Besides, oleic acid suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of S6K1. This protection was mimicked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of S6K1 in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the activation of S6K1 by palmitic acid as a common and novel mechanism by which its inhibition by oleic acid prevents ER stress, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

  2. GHB Abuse Trends and Use in Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault: Implications for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) has become increasingly popular on the campuses of American colleges and universities. In this paper, the characteristics of GHB and the effects of both voluntary and involuntary abuse are described. Further, implications for prevention efforts related to involuntary GHB ingestion and GHB-facilitated rape are…

  3. Demospongic Acids Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Barnathan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The well-known fatty acids with a D5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C16–C32 and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C18–C19. Finally, the D5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs. This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between D5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs.

  4. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  5. [Biosynthesis of adipic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li; Chen, Wujiu; Yuan, Fei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-10-01

    Adipic acid is a six-carbon dicarboxylic acid, mainly for the production of polymers such as nylon, chemical fiber and engineering plastics. Its annual demand is close to 3 million tons worldwide. Currently, the industrial production of adipic acid is based on the oxidation of aromatics from non-renewable petroleum resources by chemo-catalytic processes. It is heavily polluted and unsustainable, and the possible alternative method for adipic acid production should be developed. In the past years, with the development of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, green and clean biotechnological methods for adipic acid production attracted more attention. In this study, the research advances of adipic acid and its precursor production are reviewed, followed by addressing the perspective of the possible new pathways for adipic acid production.

  6. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  7. Effect of Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids on Cl- Adsorption by Variable Charge Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ren-Kou; ANG Ma-Li; WANG Qiang-Sheng; JI Guo-Liang1

    2004-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids exist widely in soils and have been implicated in many soil processes.The objective of the present paper was to evaluate effect of two LMW organic acids, citric acid and oxalic acid, on Cl- adsorption by three variable charge soils, a latosol, a lateritic red soil and a red soil, using a batch method. The results showed that the presence of citric acid and oxalic acid led to a decrease in Cl- adsorption with larger decreases for citric acid. Among the different soils Gl- adsorption in the lateritic red soil and the red soil was more affected by both the LMW organic acids than that in the latosol.

  8. Longitudinal profiles of 15 serum bile acids in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribe, Rachel M; Dann, Anthony T; Kenyon, Anna P; Seed, Paul; Shennan, Andrew H; Mallet, Anthony

    2010-03-01

    Increased maternal serum bile acids are implicated in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Individual bile acid profiles and their relationship with disease progression, however, remain unknown. The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the temporal changes in bile acids in normal pregnancy and in pregnancies complicated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and pruritus gravidarum. A validated method for the evaluation of 15 bile acids (conjugated and unconjugated) in a single serum sample was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) with an electrospray interface. Bile acid concentrations were assessed in samples (16 weeks of gestation to 4 weeks postpartum) from women with, or who later developed, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (n=63) and were compared with those from normal pregnant women (n=26) and from women with pruritus gravidarum (n=43). Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy was associated with a predominant increase in cholic acid conjugated with taurine and glycine, from 24 weeks of pregnancy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment (> or =21 days, n=15) significantly reduced serum taurocholic and taurodeoxycholic acid concentrations (Ppregnancy and pregnancy associated with pruritus gravidarum. The bile acid profiles and effects of treatment by UDCA implicate a role for taurine-conjugated bile acids in the syndrome of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. [corrected] With regard to individual bile acid profiles, pruritus gravidarum is a disorder quite distinct from intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

  9. Acid-Base Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S

    2015-12-07

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3(-) and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3(-) is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys.

  10. THE ACTUAL IMPLICATIONS OF INFLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murăriţa Ilie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors have started from the idea that inflationary phenomenon is a companion, the cause and the effect of the globalization of poverty in the broader context of world economy globalization. Therefore, starting from a common definition of inflation, the first objective was to identify causal relationships that singularize contemporary inflationary process. After that, attention was focused on the implications of inflation in the current stage, bearing in mind that monetary financial theory and practice are operating with perfectly anticipated inflation or imperfectly anticipated inflation. Inflation has great implications on the long-term contracts and wage contracts.

  11. Mind, Matter and the Implicate Order The Implicate Order Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Pylkkänen, Paavo T I

    2007-01-01

    Proposes that Bohm's alternative interpretation of quantum theory resolves the paradoxes such as Schrodinger's cat, and the EPR paradox. This work uses Bohm's concepts of "implicate order", "active information" and "soma-significance" as tools to tackle several well-known problems in the philosophy of mind.

  12. Sugar-based molecular computing by material implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstner, Martin; Axthelm, Jörg; Schiller, Alexander

    2014-07-07

    A method to integrate an (in principle) unlimited number of molecular logic gates to construct complex circuits is presented. Logic circuits, such as half- or full-adders, can be reinterpreted by using the functional completeness of the implication function (IMP) and the trivial FALSE operation. The molecular gate IMP is represented by a fluorescent boronic acid sugar probe. An external wiring algorithm translates the fluorescent output from one gate into a chemical input for the next gate on microtiter plates. This process is demonstrated on a four-bit full adder.

  13. Glycolic Acid 15% Plus Salicylic Acid 2%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Blanco, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial flat warts are a contagious viral disease that can cause disturbing cosmetic problems. Topical glycolic acid has been reported to be effective in dermatological treatment depending on the exfoliant capacity, but has not often been reported to be effective in the treatment of facial flat warts. Objective: The aim of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of glycolic acid 15% topical gel plus salicylic acid 2% in the treatment of recalcitrant facial flat warts. Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients 7 to 16 years of age with recalcitrant facial flat warts were enrolled in this study. Patients having warts by the eye and lip regions were excluded from the study. A fine layer of face gel was applied to the treatment area once daily. Most of the participants had tried different treatments with no success. Assessments for the response and the occurrence of side effects were performed every two weeks at Weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8. Results: All the patients were clinically cured within eight weeks. Seven patients cleared in four weeks, and 13 patients cleared in eight weeks. No noticeable adverse events were related to the skin. Conclusion: Topical gel of glycolic acid 15% plus salicylic acid 2% is safe and effective when applied to facial flat warts once daily until clearance and may be considered as first-line treatment. PMID:21938272

  14. Nitrogen Lewis Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoreltsev, Alla; Tulchinsky, Yuri; Fridman, Natalia; Gandelman, Mark

    2017-03-22

    Being a major conception of chemistry, Lewis acids have found countless applications throughout chemical enterprise. Although many chemical elements can serve as the central atom of Lewis acids, nitrogen is usually associated with Lewis bases. Here, we report on the first example of robust and modifiable Lewis acids centered on the nitrogen atom, which provide stable and well-characterized adducts with various Lewis bases. On the basis of the reactivity of nitrogen Lewis acids, we prepared, for the first time, cyclic triazanes, a class of cyclic organic compounds sequentially bearing three all-saturated nitrogen atoms (N-N-N motif). Reactivity abilities of these N-Lewis acids were explained by theoretical calculations. Properties and future applications of nitrogen Lewis acids are intriguing.

  15. Neural Tube Defects, Folic Acid and Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk J. Blom

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are common complex congenital malformations resulting from failure of the neural tube closure during embryogenesis. It is established that folic acid supplementation decreases the prevalence of NTDs, which has led to national public health policies regarding folic acid. To date, animal studies have not provided sufficient information to establish the metabolic and/or genomic mechanism(s underlying human folic acid responsiveness in NTDs. However, several lines of evidence suggest that not only folates but also choline, B12 and methylation metabolisms are involved in NTDs. Decreased B12 vitamin and increased total choline or homocysteine in maternal blood have been shown to be associated with increased NTDs risk. Several polymorphisms of genes involved in these pathways have also been implicated in risk of development of NTDs. This raises the question whether supplementation with B12 vitamin, betaine or other methylation donors in addition to folic acid periconceptional supplementation will further reduce NTD risk. The objective of this article is to review the role of methylation metabolism in the onset of neural tube defects.

  16. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  17. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  18. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness. PMID:28287411

  19. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  20. Educational Implications of the Bender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Examples of diagnostic formulations of the "Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt" are outlined and their instructional implications are delineated. The difficulties in paper and pencil copying of geometric designs focus primarily on: separation and overlapping of figures, repetition of design elements, pencil grip, visual perceptions, pattern reversals,…

  1. Military Implications of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    U.S. environmental issues also have important global implications. This paper analyzes current U.S. Policy as it pertains to global warming and climate...for military involvement to reduce global warming . Global warming and other environmental issues are important to the U.S. military. As the United

  2. Critical Thinking: Implications for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    1989-01-01

    Synthesizes critical thinking research in four areas--reading, writing, group interactions, and speaking--and discusses the implications of those studies for library information science research. The potential for employing critical thinking strategies in bibliographic instruction and the need for library science educators to initiate their own…

  3. Pharmacogenomics and migraine: possible implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P.; Brosen, K.

    2008-01-01

    cases pharmacodynamic variability we mention possible implications for the acute and preventive treatment of migraine. Pharmacogenomics will most likely in the future be one part of our therapeutic armamentarium and will provide a stronger scientific basis for optimizing drug therapy on the basis...

  4. The Educational Implications of NAFTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994

    The transcript provided in this document is from a symposium set up to explore the educational implications of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). NAFTA, which will remove trade barriers between the United States, Mexico, and Canada contains no educational provisions. The panelists discuss the new educational challenges that NAFTA may…

  5. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akifumi; Kushiyama; Kentaro; Tanaka; Shigeko; Hara; Shoji; Kawazu

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase(XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid(UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950 s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target forvascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted.

  6. Diterpenoid acids from Grindelia nana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, A A; Ahmed, A A; Tanaka, T; Iinuma, M

    2000-03-01

    Two new norditerpenoid acids of the labdane-type (norgrindelic acids), 4,5-dehydro-6-oxo-18-norgrindelic acid (1) and 4beta-hydroxy-6-oxo-19-norgrindelic acid (2), as well as a new grindelic acid derivative, 18-hydroxy-6-oxogrindelic acid (3), were isolated from the aerial parts of Grindelia nana. In addition, the known compounds, 6-oxogrindelic acid, grindelic acid, methyl grindeloate, 7alpha,8alpha-epoxygrindelic acid, and 4alpha-carboxygrindelic acid were also isolated. The structures of the new compounds were characterized on the basis of spectroscopic analysis.

  7. Acetic acid induces pH-independent cellular energy depletion in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sin Mei; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary A

    2015-03-01

    Weak organic acids are widely used as preservatives and disinfectants in the food industry. Despite their widespread use, the antimicrobial mode of action of organic acids is still not fully understood. This study investigated the effect of acetic acid on the cell membranes and cellular energy generation of four Salmonella strains. Using a nucleic acid/protein assay, it was established that acetic acid did not cause leakage of intracellular components from the strains. A scanning electron microscopy study further confirmed that membrane disruption was not the antimicrobial mode of action of acetic acid. Some elongated Salmonella cells observed in the micrographs indicated a possibility that acetic acid may inhibit DNA synthesis in the bacterial cells. Using an ATP assay, it was found that at a neutral pH, acetic acid caused cellular energy depletion with an ADP/ATP ratio in the range between 0.48 and 2.63 (pacid molecules. The antimicrobial effect of acetic acid was better under acidic conditions (ADP/ATP ratio of 5.56 ± 1.27; pacid molecules can act together. We concluded that the inhibitory effect of acetic acid is not solely attributable to acidic pH but also to undissociated acid molecules. This finding has implication for the use of acetic acid as an antimicrobial against Salmonella on food products, such as chicken meat, which can buffer its pH.

  8. Bioactive and nutritive compounds in Sorghum bicolor (Guinea corn) red leaves and their health implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abugri, D A; Tiimob, B J; Apalangya, V A; Pritchett, G; McElhenney, W H

    2013-05-01

    Sorghum bicolor L. Moench (Naga Red) red leaves is an ingredient used in rice and beans that is known as "waakye" in the Hausa language in some African countries. Little is known about its benefits aside from its colourant properties. We studied its bioactive, nutritive compounds and the effectiveness of four organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, acetone and diethyl ether) in isolation of these compounds to gain information regarding its health benefits to consumers. Of the compounds evaluated, the leaves consisted primarily of carotenoids, flavonoids and phenolic acids with small amounts of chlorophyll (a and b), lycopene and β-carotene. The fatty acid profiles of the leaves revealed palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acid as predominant with each having greater than 5% of the total fatty acid identified. The nutritional implication of these findings is that the consumption of diets prepared with the leaves provides natural antioxidant and essential fatty acids that could fight cardiovascular related diseases.

  9. Physical and mechanical properties and fire, decay, and termite resistance of treated oriented strandboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; S Nami Kartal; Theodore L. Laufenberg; Jerrold E. Winandy; Robert H. White

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a number of chemicals on the physical and mechanical properties and fire, decay, and termite resistance of oriented strandboard (OSB) panels. Disodium octaborate tetrahydrate (DOT), boric acid (BA), melamine phosphate (MP), and a BA/DOT mixture were sprayed onto the furnish at varying concentrations. The panels were tested for...

  10. n-3 fatty acids: role in neurogenesis and neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupi, R; Marino, A; Cuzzocrea, S

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are essential unsaturated fatty acids with a double bond (C=C) starting after the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. They are important nutrients but, unfortunately, mammals cannot synthesize them, whereby they must be obtained from food sources or from supplements. Amongst nutritionally important polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids, α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are highly concentrated in the brain and have anti-oxidative stress, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects. They are involved in many bodily processes and may reportedly lead to neuron protection in neurological diseases. aged or damaged neurons and in Alzheimer's disease. Their effect in cognitive and behavioral functions and in several neurological and psychiatric disorders has been also proven. The dentate gyrus (DG), a sub-region of hippocampus, is implicated in cognition and mood regulation. The hippocampus represents one of the two areas in the mammalian brain in which adult neurogenesis occurs. This process is associated with beneficial effects on cognition, mood and chronic pharmacological treatment. The exposure to n-3 fatty acids enhances adult hippocampal neurogenesis associated with cognitive and behavioral processes, promotes synaptic plasticity by increasing long-term potentiation and modulates synaptic protein expression to stimulate the dendritic arborization and new spines formation. On this basis we review the effect of n-3 fatty acids on adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuroplasticity. Moreover their possible use as a new therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases is pointed out.

  11. Nucleic Acid Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G

    2017-01-01

    Organisms throughout biology need to maintain the integrity of their genome. From bacteria to vertebrates, life has established sophisticated mechanisms to detect and eliminate foreign genetic material or to restrict its function and replication. Tremendous progress has been made in the understanding of these mechanisms which keep foreign or unwanted nucleic acids from viruses or phages in check. Mechanisms reach from restriction-modification systems and CRISPR/Cas in bacteria and archaea to RNA interference and immune sensing of nucleic acids, altogether integral parts of a system which is now appreciated as nucleic acid immunity. With inherited receptors and acquired sequence information, nucleic acid immunity comprises innate and adaptive components. Effector functions include diverse nuclease systems, intrinsic activities to directly restrict the function of foreign nucleic acids (e.g., PKR, ADAR1, IFIT1), and extrinsic pathways to alert the immune system and to elicit cytotoxic immune responses. These effects act in concert to restrict viral replication and to eliminate virus-infected cells. The principles of nucleic acid immunity are highly relevant for human disease. Besides its essential contribution to antiviral defense and restriction of endogenous retroelements, dysregulation of nucleic acid immunity can also lead to erroneous detection and response to self nucleic acids then causing sterile inflammation and autoimmunity. Even mechanisms of nucleic acid immunity which are not established in vertebrates are relevant for human disease when they are present in pathogens such as bacteria, parasites, or helminths or in pathogen-transmitting organisms such as insects. This review aims to provide an overview of the diverse mechanisms of nucleic acid immunity which mostly have been looked at separately in the past and to integrate them under the framework nucleic acid immunity as a basic principle of life, the understanding of which has great potential to

  12. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  13. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  16. Carbolic acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you to. If the person swallowed the carbolic acid, give them water or milk right away, if a provider tells ... well someone does depends on how much carbolic acid they swallowed and how quickly they receive treatment. The faster medical help is given, the better ...

  17. Uric acid - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High levels of uric acid can sometimes cause gout or kidney disease. You may have this test if you have had or are about to have certain types of chemotherapy. Rapid weight loss, which may occur with such treatments, can increase the amount of uric acid in ...

  18. Neurotoxicity of Folic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amsterdam van JGC; Jansen EHJM; A Opperhuizen; TOX

    2004-01-01

    The present review summarises the neurotoxicological effects of folic acid. Some studies in animals have shown that folic acid is neurotoxic and epileptogenic when applied directly to the brain. One poorly controlled and not further reproduced study from 1970 reported neurotoxic symptoms like

  19. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  20. Fats and fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The absolute fat requirement of the human species is the amount of essential fatty acids needed to maintain optimal fatty acid composition of all tissues and normal eicosanoid synthesis. At most, this requirement is no more than about 5% of an adequate energy intake. However, fat accounts for appro...