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Sample records for acid synthase depends

  1. Oncogene dependent requirement of fatty acid synthase in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Li; Pilo, Maria G; Cigliano, Antonio; Latte, Gavinella; Simile, Maria M; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Evert, Matthias; Chen, Xin; Calvisi, Diego F

    2017-03-19

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most frequent primary tumor of the liver, is an aggressive cancer type with limited treatment options. Cumulating evidence underlines a crucial role of aberrant lipid biosynthesis (a process known as de novo lipogenesis) along carcinogenesis. Previous studies showed that suppression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), the major enzyme responsible for de novo lipogenesis, is highly detrimental for the in vitro growth of HCC cell lines. To assess whether de novo lipogenesis is required for liver carcinogenesis, we have generated various mouse models of liver cancer by stably overexpressing candidate oncogenes in the mouse liver via hydrodynamic gene delivery. We found that overexpression of FASN in the mouse liver is unable to malignantly transform hepatocytes. However, genetic deletion of FASN totally suppresses hepatocarcinogenesis driven by AKT and AKT/c-Met protooncogenes in mice. On the other hand, liver tumor development is completely unaffected by FASN depletion in mice co-expressing β-catenin and c-Met. Our data indicate that tumors might be either addicted to or independent from de novo lipogenesis for their growth depending on the oncogenes involved. Additional investigation is required to unravel the molecular mechanisms whereby some oncogenes render cancer cells resistant to inhibition of de novo lipogenesis.

  2. Lipoic Acid Synthase (LASY)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Indira Padmalayam; Sumera Hasham; Uday Saxena; Sivaram Pillarisetti

    2009-01-01

    Lipoic Acid Synthase (LASY) A Novel Role in Inflammation, Mitochondrial Function, and Insulin Resistance Indira Padmalayam 1 , Sumera Hasham 2 , Uday Saxena 1 and Sivaram Pillarisetti 1 1 Discovery Research, ReddyUS...

  3. Quaternary structure of human fatty acid synthase by electron cryomicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jacob; Ludtke, Steven J.; Yang, Chao-Yuh; Gu, Zei-Wei; Wakil, Salih J.; Chiu, Wah

    2002-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional reconstruction of human fatty acid synthase obtained by electron cryomicroscopy and single-particle image processing. The structure shows that the synthase is composed of two monomers, arranged in an antiparallel orientation, which is consistent with biochemical data. The monomers are connected to each other at their middle by a bridge of density, a site proposed to be the combination of the interdomain regions of the two monomers. Each monomer subunit appears to be subdivided into three structural domains. With this reconstruction of the synthase, we propose a location for the enzyme's two fatty acid synthesis sites. PMID:11756679

  4. Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase as a New Antibiotic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In humans de novo synthesis of 2′-deoxythymidine-5′-monophosphate (dTMP, an essential building block of DNA, utilizes an enzymatic pathway requiring thymidylate synthase (TSase and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR. The enzyme flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS represents an alternative enzymatic pathway to synthesize dTMP, which is not present in human cells. A number of pathogenic bacteria, however, depend on this enzyme in lieu of or in conjunction with the analogous human pathway. Thus, inhibitors of this enzyme may serve as antibiotics. Here, we review the similarities and differences of FDTS vs. TSase including aspects of their structure and chemical mechanism. In addition, we review current progress in the search for inhibitors of flavin dependent thymidylate synthase as potential novel therapeutics.

  5. Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase as a New Antibiotic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael; Karunaratne, Kalani; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-05-20

    In humans de novo synthesis of 2'-deoxythymidine-5'-monophosphate (dTMP), an essential building block of DNA, utilizes an enzymatic pathway requiring thymidylate synthase (TSase) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The enzyme flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS) represents an alternative enzymatic pathway to synthesize dTMP, which is not present in human cells. A number of pathogenic bacteria, however, depend on this enzyme in lieu of or in conjunction with the analogous human pathway. Thus, inhibitors of this enzyme may serve as antibiotics. Here, we review the similarities and differences of FDTS vs. TSase including aspects of their structure and chemical mechanism. In addition, we review current progress in the search for inhibitors of flavin dependent thymidylate synthase as potential novel therapeutics.

  6. Deprotonations in the Reaction of Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Frederick W; Bernard, Steffen M; Sapra, Aparna; Smith, Janet L; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Palfey, Bruce A

    2016-06-14

    Many microorganisms use flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS) to synthesize the essential nucleotide 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP) from 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate (dUMP), 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH2THF), and NADPH. FDTSs have a structure that is unrelated to the thymidylate synthase used by humans and a very different mechanism. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance evidence that FDTS ionizes N3 of dUMP using an active-site arginine. The ionized form of dUMP is largely responsible for the changes in the flavin absorbance spectrum of FDTS upon dUMP binding. dUMP analogues also suggest that the phosphate of dUMP acts as the base that removes the proton from C5 of the dUMP-methylene intermediate in the FDTS-catalyzed reaction. These findings establish additional differences between the mechanisms of FDTS and human thymidylate synthase.

  7. Folate binding site of flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Eric M; Perissinotti, Laura L; Moghram, Salah; Prabhakar, Arjun; Lesley, Scott A; Mathews, Irimpan I; Kohen, Amnon

    2012-09-25

    The DNA nucleotide thymidylate is synthesized by the enzyme thymidylate synthase, which catalyzes the reductive methylation of deoxyuridylate using the cofactor methylene-tetrahydrofolate (CH(2)H(4)folate). Most organisms, including humans, rely on the thyA- or TYMS-encoded classic thymidylate synthase, whereas, certain microorganisms, including all Rickettsia and other pathogens, use an alternative thyX-encoded flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS). Although several crystal structures of FDTSs have been reported, the absence of a structure with folates limits understanding of the molecular mechanism and the scope of drug design for these enzymes. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of FDTS with several folate derivatives, which together with mutagenesis, kinetic analysis, and computer modeling shed light on the cofactor binding and function. The unique structural data will likely facilitate further elucidation of FDTSs' mechanism and the design of structure-based inhibitors as potential leads to new antimicrobial drugs.

  8. Heme A synthase in bacteria depends on one pair of cysteinyls for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Anna; Hederstedt, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Heme A is a prosthetic group unique for cytochrome a-type respiratory oxidases in mammals, plants and many microorganisms. The poorly understood integral membrane protein heme A synthase catalyzes the synthesis of heme A from heme O. In bacteria, but not in mitochondria, this enzyme contains one or two pairs of cysteine residues that are present in predicted hydrophilic polypeptide loops on the extracytoplasmic side of the membrane. We used heme A synthase from the eubacterium Bacillus subtilis and the hyperthermophilic archeon Aeropyrum pernix to investigate the functional role of these cysteine residues. Results with B. subtilis amino acid substituted proteins indicated the pair of cysteine residues in the loop connecting transmembrane segments I and II as being essential for catalysis but not required for binding of the enzyme substrate, heme O. Experiments with isolated A. pernix and B. subtilis heme A synthase demonstrated that a disulfide bond can form between the cysteine residues in the same loop and also between loops showing close proximity of the two loops in the folded enzyme protein. Based on the findings, we propose a classification scheme for the four discrete types of heme A synthase found so far in different organisms and propose that essential cysteinyls mediate transfer of reducing equivalents required for the oxygen-dependent catalysis of heme A synthesis from heme O. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Synthase for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-31

    ring of structure 3a; and coupling of various aldehydes and ,- unsaturated ethers to the 5 position of the quinine under acidic conditions to yield...share with orlistat a beta- lactone moiety as the distinguishing chemotype [70]. Beta-lactam derivatives of orlistat have also been described [71...Smith, J. W. Synthesis of novel beta‐ lactone  inhibitors of fatty acid synthase. J Med Chem, 2008,   51(17), 5285‐5296.  71.  Zhang, W., Richardson, R. D

  10. Conformational Flexibility of Metazoan Fatty Acid Synthase Enables Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignole, Edward J.; Smith, Stuart; Asturias, Francisco J.

    2008-01-01

    The metazoan cytosolic fatty acid synthase (FAS) contains all of the enzymes required for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis covalently linked around two reaction chambers. While the 3D architecture of FAS has been mostly defined, it is unclear how reaction intermediates can transfer between distant catalytic domains. Using single-particle electron microscopy we have identified a near continuum of conformations consistent with remarkable flexibility of FAS. The distribution of conformations was influenced by the presence of substrates and altered by different catalytic mutations suggesting a direct correlation between conformation and specific enzymatic activities. 3D reconstructions were interpreted by docking high-resolution structures of individual domains and illustrate that the substrate loading and condensation domains dramatically swing and swivel to access substrates within either reaction chamber. Concomitant rearrangement of the β-carbon processing domains synchronizes acyl-chain reduction in one chamber with acyl-chain elongation in the other. PMID:19151726

  11. Tomato linalool synthase is induced in trichomes by jasmonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Chris C. N.; Haring, Michel A.

    2007-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants emit a blend of volatile organic compounds, which mainly consists of terpenes. Upon herbivory or wounding, the emission of several terpenes increases. We have identified and characterized the first two tomato monoterpene synthases, LeMTS1 and LeMTS2. Although these proteins were highly homologous, recombinant LeMTS1 protein produced (R)-linalool from geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and (E)-nerolidol from farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), while recombinant LeMTS2 produced β-phellandrene, β-myrcene, and sabinene from GPP. In addition, these genes were expressed in different tissues: LeMTS1 was expressed in flowers, young leaves, stems, and petioles, while LeMTS2 was strongest expressed in stems and roots. LeMTS1 expression in leaves was induced by spider mite-infestation, wounding and jasmonic acid (JA)-treatment, while LeMTS2 did not respond to these stimuli. The expression of LeMTS1 in stems and petioles was predominantly detected in trichomes and could be induced by JA. Because JA treatment strongly induced emission of linalool and overexpression of LeMTS1 in tomato resulted in increased production of linalool, we propose that LeMTS1 is a genuine linalool synthase. Our results underline the importance of trichomes in JA-induced terpene emission in tomato. PMID:17440821

  12. Insights into the reactivation of cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutmos, Markos; Datta, Supratim; Pattridge, Katherine A.; Smith, Janet L.; Matthews, Rowena G.; (Michigan)

    2009-12-10

    Cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) is a modular protein that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine to produce methionine and tetrahydrofolate. The cobalamin cofactor, which serves as both acceptor and donor of the methyl group, is oxidized once every {approx}2,000 catalytic cycles and must be reactivated by the uptake of an electron from reduced flavodoxin and a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). Previous structures of a C-terminal fragment of MetH (MetH{sup CT}) revealed a reactivation conformation that juxtaposes the cobalamin- and AdoMet-binding domains. Here we describe 2 structures of a disulfide stabilized MetH{sup CT} ({sub s-s}MetH{sup CT}) that offer further insight into the reactivation of MetH. The structure of {sub s-s}MetH{sup CT} with cob(II)alamin and S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine represents the enzyme in the reactivation step preceding electron transfer from flavodoxin. The structure supports earlier suggestions that the enzyme acts to lower the reduction potential of the Co(II)/Co(I) couple by elongating the bond between the cobalt and its upper axial water ligand, effectively making the cobalt 4-coordinate, and illuminates the role of Tyr-1139 in the stabilization of this 4-coordinate state. The structure of {sub s-s}MetH{sub CT} with aquocobalamin may represent a transient state at the end of reactivation as the newly remethylated 5-coordinate methylcobalamin returns to the 6-coordinate state, triggering the rearrangement to a catalytic conformation.

  13. Flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase: N5 of flavin as a Methylene carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Kalani; Luedtke, Nicholas; Quinn, Daniel M; Kohen, Amnon

    2017-10-15

    Thymidylate is synthesized de novo in all living organisms for replication of genomes. The chemical transformation is reductive methylation of deoxyuridylate at C5 to form deoxythymidylate. All eukaryotes including humans complete this well-understood transformation with thymidylate synthase utilizing 6R-N 5 -N 10 -methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate as both a source of methylene and a reducing hydride. In 2002, flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase was discovered as a new pathway for de novo thymidylate synthesis. The flavin-dependent catalytic mechanism is different than thymidylate synthase because it requires flavin as a reducing agent and methylene transporter. This catalytic mechanism is not well-understood, but since it is known to be very different from thymidylate synthase, there is potential for mechanism-based inhibitors that can selectively inhibit the flavin-dependent enzyme to target many human pathogens with low host toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3474 (United States); Besra, Gurdyal S. [University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Sacchettini, James C., E-mail: sacchett@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3474 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein synthase plays an essential role in the synthesis of fatty acids, nonribosomal peptides and polyketides. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, AcpS or group I phosphopentatheine transferase exhibits two different structural conformations depending upon the pH. The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS–ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the α2 helix and in the conformation of the α3–α4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4–6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS–ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS–ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  15. Salt-induced expression of NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase and ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Olga V; Ismailov, Stanislav F; Popova, Tatyana N; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Golldack, Dortje

    2002-10-01

    NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase is a key cytosolic enzyme that links C and N metabolism by supplying C skeletons for primary N assimilation in plants. We report the characterization of the transcript Mc-ICDH1 encoding an NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH, EC 1.1.1.42) from the facultative halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L., focussing on salt-dependent regulation of the enzyme. The activity of NADP-ICDH in plants adapted to high salinity increased in leaves and decreased in roots. By transcript analyses and Western-type hybridizations, expression of Mc-ICDH1 was found to be stimulated in leaves in salt-adapted M. crystallinum. By immunocytological analyses, NADP-ICDH proteins were localized to most cell types with strongest expression in epidermal cells and in the vascular tissue. In leaves of salt-adapted plants, signal intensities increased in mesophyll cells. In contrast to Mc-ICDH1, the activity and transcript abundance of ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1), which is the key enzyme of N assimilation and biosynthesis of amino acids, decreased in leaves in response to salt stress. The physiological roles of NADP-ICDH and Fd-GOGAT in the adaptation of plants to high salinity are discussed.

  16. The effect of porphyrin and radiation on ferrochelatase and 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase in epidermal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, D.; Behar, S.; Nomura, N.; Lim, H.W. [New York Univ. School of Medicine, Dermatology Service, Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Ronald O. Perelman Dept. of Dermatology (United States); Sassa, S. [The Rockefeller University, New York (United States); Taketani, S. [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    The effects of ultraviolet A (UVA) and blue light on ferrochelatase protein, and its mRNA level, in 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-loaded A431 cells was evaluated. Western blot analysis of ferrochelatase protein showed a protein band of 43 kDA. There was a decrease in the protein concentration 24 h and 48 h after irradiation of these cells. In contrast, as judged by Northern blot analysis, there was no change in ferochelatase mRNA level. Measurement of ALA synthase activity showed an ALA dose-dependent but radiation-independent decrease of enzyme activity, suggesting an end-product feedback inhibition. Since reactive oxygen species generated by porphyrin-induced photochemical reaction may be involved in the decrease in ferrochelatase protein, the effect of scavengers of reactive oxygen species was evaluated by measuring porphyrin accumulation in irradiated, ALA-loaded A431 cells. Porphyrin accumulation was significantly decreased in the presence of singlet oxygen scavenger sodium azide (0.05 mM, 40.6% suppression) or hydroxyl radical scavenger mannitol (5.0 mM, 45% suppression). These data suggest that the photochemical reaction induced by porphyrin and irradiation resulted in a decrease in ferrochelatase protein content, but had no effect on ferrochelatase mRNA level nor on ALA synthase activity. The decrease in protein was partly mediated by the reactive oxygen species. (au).

  17. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid enhances chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil in hepatocellular carcinoma via inhibition of thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bo; Liang, Huifang; Chen, Jin; Liu, Qiumeng; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with a high rate of mortality worldwide. Here, we investigated the effect of combination treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on HCC cells. HepG2, SMMC7721, and BEL7402 cells were treated with SAHA and/or 5-FU and subjected to cell viability, colony formation, and soft agarose assays; cell cycle, apoptosis, and reverse transcription-PCR analyses; western blotting; immunohistochemistry; and xenograft tumorigenicity assay. SAHA and 5-FU inhibited the proliferation of the three cell lines, and combination treatment with SAHA and 5-FU resulted in a combination index 1, indicating a synergistic effect. Co-treatment with SAHA and 5-FU caused G0/G1 phase arrest and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, inhibiting tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. 5-FU upregulated thymidylate synthase, whereas SAHA downregulated its expression. Our results indicate that SAHA and 5-FU act synergistically to inhibit cell growth and tumorigenicity in HCC via the induction of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis through a mechanism involving the inhibition of thymidylate synthase, suggesting that combination treatment with 5-FU and SAHA may be beneficial for the treatment of inoperable HCC.

  18. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    OpenAIRE

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Lagoda, Gwen F.; Musicki, Biljana; Rameau, Gerald A.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) initiates penile erection, but has not been thought to participate in the sustained erection required for normal sexual performance. We now show that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of nNOS mediates erectile physiology, including sustained erection. nNOS is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at serine(S)1412. Electrical stimulation of the penile innervation increases S1412 phosphorylation that is blocked by PKA inhib...

  19. Prostaglandin H synthase-mediated bioactivation of the amino acid pyrolysate product Trp P-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petry, T.W.; Krauss, R.S.; Eling, T.E.

    1986-08-01

    We report evidence that the mutagen and carcinogen 3-amino-1-methyl-5H pyrido(4,3b)indole (Trp P-2) is a substrate for co-oxidation by prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) in ram seminal vesicle (RSV) microsomes. Trp P-2 serves as a reducing cofactor for the hydroperoxidase activity of PHS as shown by the concentration-dependent inhibition of the hydroperoxidase catalyzed incorporation of molecular oxygen into phenylbutazone. Spectral data suggest that this metabolism results in disruption of the double bond conjugation within the nucleus of the molecule. A single metabolite peak which was dependent upon arachidonic acid and substrate concentration was separated from the parent compound by h.p.l.c. following incubation with RSV microsomes. Co-oxidation of Trp P-2 produced reactive intermediates which bound covalently to microsomal protein (9 nmol/mg) and to calf thymus DNA (475 pmol/mg). Binding was inhibited by indomethacin, and supported by substitution of hydrogen peroxide for arachidonic acid. These data suggest a possible role for PHS in the in situ activation of Trp P-2 to its ultimate carcinogenic form in tissues which contain PHS.

  20. Expanding the product portfolio of fungal type I fatty acid synthases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yongjin J.; Krivoruchko, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    Fungal type I fatty acid synthases (FASs) are mega-enzymes with two separated, identical compartments, in which the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domains shuttle substrates to catalytically active sites embedded in the chamber wall. We devised synthetic FASs by integrating heterologous enzymes...... into the reaction chambers and demonstrated their capability to convert acyl-ACP or acyl-CoA from canonical fatty acid biosynthesis to short/ medium-chain fatty acids and methyl ketones....

  1. Methionine synthase activity and sulphur amino acid levels in the rat liver tumour cells HTC and Phi-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Susan H; Waterfield, Catherine J; Timbrell, John A; Nicolaou, Anna

    2002-02-01

    Methionine dependence has been reported in tumour cells and suggested as a possible target for chemotherapeutic drugs. The underlying defect has not been extensively researched, nor have levels of sulphur amino acids been examined in these cells. This study compared two rat liver tumour cell lines. One was found to be methionine dependent (HTC) and the other found to be methionine independent (Phi-1). The methionine-dependent cell line (HTC) was discovered to contain markedly less methionine synthase activity, the enzyme activity being less responsive to methionine concentration than in the methionine-independent cells (Phi-1). HTC cells had lower cysteine requirements and contained larger concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and taurine than the Phi-1 cells. Also, in contrast to Phi-1 cells, no glutathione was found in the media of the HTC cells, although large quantities of cysteinylglycine were detected. These results suggested that differences in methionine synthase activity might be partly responsible for methionine dependence and that methionine-dependent cells may have different metabolic requirements for other sulphur amino acids.

  2. Cloning and sequence analysis of putative type II fatty acid synthase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Peanut (A. hypogaea cultivar luhua-14) was grown in the farm and gynophores were labelled. The immature ..... Planta 191 102–111. Lai C Y and Cronan J E 2003 β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) is essential for bacterial fatty acid synthesis;. J. Biol. Chem. 278 51494–51503. Lamppa G and Jacks C 1991 ...

  3. Analysis of the role of the Aspergillus niger aminolevulinic acid synthase (hemA) gene illustrates the difference between regulation of yeast and fungal haem- and sirohaem-dependent pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, A.C.; Christien Lokman, B.; Ram, A.F.; Hondel, C.A. van den; Weert, S. de; Punt, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    To increase knowledge on haem biosynthesis in filamentous fungi like Aspergillus niger, pathway-specific gene expression in response to haem and haem intermediates was analysed. This analysis showed that iron, 5′-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and possibly haem control haem biosynthesis mostly via

  4. Analysis of the role of the A. niger aminolevulinic acid synthase (hemA) gene illustrates the difference between regulation of yeast and fungal heme and siroheme dependent pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Ram; C.A. van den Hondel; Christien Lokman; P.J. Punt; S. de Weert; A. Franken

    2012-01-01

    To increase knowledge on haem biosynthesis in filamentous fungi like Aspergillus niger, pathway-specific gene expression in response to haem and haem intermediates was analysed. This analysis showed that iron, 5'-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and possibly haem control haem biosynthesis mostly via

  5. Calcium Co-regulates Oxidative Metabolism and ATP Synthase-dependent Respiration in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio. PMID:24554722

  6. Increased fatty acid synthase expression and activity during progression of prostate cancer in the TRAMP model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, Beth R; Pecher, Stefana M; Brink, Alisa W; Nelson, Joel B; Foster, Barbara A

    2003-11-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is the major enzyme required to convert carbohydrates to fatty acids. Recent evidence suggests that FAS activity is essential for prostate cancer growth and survival, since blocking the enzyme activity results in cell death. In this study, the role of FAS up-regulation during prostate tumor progression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model was investigated. Sensitivity to FAS anti-metabolites was also analyzed in TRAMP prostate tumor cells and tissue to determine therapeutic potential of FAS inhibition in the treatment of prostate cancer. FAS expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry of TRAMP tissues, including primary and metastatic lesions in mice of varying ages. FAS pathway activity was studied in vitro using TRAMP-derived cell lines and in vivo in TRAMP tissues. The sensitivity of TRAMP cell lines and tissues to the antimetabolite drugs (2R,3S)-2,3-epoxy-4-oxo-7,10-trans, transdodecadienamide (cerulenin) and C-75, which target FAS, was determined by FAS antimetabolite inhibition of 14C-acetate conversion to fatty acids, cell growth inhibition, and apoptosis analyses. High FAS expression and activity in the TRAMP mouse prostate was evident at 12 weeks of age compared with nontransgenic littermates and further increased with age, tumor progression, and in metastatic lesions. FAS pathway inhibition resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in cell survival and decreased enzyme activity in these models. These data suggest that the up-regulation of FAS expression play a role in tumorigenesis of the prostate in the TRAMP model and hence can provide valuable insight into human prostate cancer. Given the response of tumor cells to FAS antimetabolites, FAS may serve as a novel target for prostate cancer therapy. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Crystallization of Δ{sup 1}-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase from Cannabis sativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoyama, Yoshinari; Takeuchi, Ayako; Taura, Futoshi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tamada, Taro; Adachi, Motoyasu; Kuroki, Ryota [Neutron Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shoyama, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Satoshi, E-mail: morimoto@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    Δ{sup 1}-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase from C. sativa was crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. Δ{sup 1}-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase is a novel oxidoreductase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of the psychoactive compound THCA in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). In order to investigate the structure–function relationship of THCA synthase, this enzyme was overproduced in insect cells, purified and finally crystallized in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 1.4 M sodium citrate. A single crystal suitable for X-ray diffraction measurement was obtained in 0.09 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 1.26 M sodium citrate. The crystal diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution at beamline BL41XU, SPring-8. The crystal belonged to the primitive cubic space group P432, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 178.2 Å. The calculated Matthews coefficient was approximately 4.1 or 2.0 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} assuming the presence of one or two molecules of THCA synthase in the asymmetric unit, respectively.

  8. Inhibitory effects of sea buckthorn procyanidins on fatty acid synthase and MDA-MB-231 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Nie, Fangyuan; Ouyang, Jian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2014-10-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is overexpressed in many human cancers including breast cancer and is considered to be a promising target for therapy. Sea buckthorn has long been used to treat a variety of maladies. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of sea buckthorn procyanidins (SBPs) isolated from the seeds of sea buckthorn on FAS and FAS overexpressed human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. The FAS activity and FAS inhibition were measured by a spectrophotometer at 340 nm of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) absorption. We found that SBP potently inhibited the activity of FAS with a half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.087 μg/ml. 3-4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,3-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to test the cell viability. SBP reduced MDA-MB-231 cell viability with an IC50 value of 37.5 μg/ml. Hoechst 33258/propidium iodide dual staining and flow cytometric analysis showed that SBP induced MDA-MB-231 cell apoptosis. SBP inhibited intracellular FAS activity with a dose-dependent manner. In addition, sodium palmitate could rescue the cell apoptosis induced by SBP. These results showed that SBP was a promising FAS inhibitor which could induce the apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells via inhibiting FAS. These findings suggested that SBP might be useful for preventing or treating breast cancer.

  9. Inhibition of Coix seed extract on fatty acid synthase, a novel target for anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Gao, Jing; Zeng, Yong; Liu, Chang-Xiao

    2008-09-26

    Coix seed has been traditionally used to treat cancers in folk medicine. Study the anticancer action mechanism of Coix seed extract. After the treatment with Coix seed extract (10 microl/ml), the residual activity of fatty acid synthase (FAS) as overall reaction, beta-ketoacyl reduction, enoyl reduction, and acetyl acetyl coenzyme A (AcAcCoA) reduction was separately detected at 340 nm in the UV-190 spectrophotometer. After rats were administrated Coix seed extract (2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 ml/kg) intragastrically for 10 days consecutively, activities of FAS, malate dehydrogenase (MDH), lipid protein lipase (LPL), hepatic lipase (HL), triglyceride (TG), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) in the plasma, liver and fatty tissues were determined. Experiments in vitro showed that the inhibition of Coix seed extract on FAS activity was significant and dose dependent, and two active sites inhibited were beta-ketoacyl reductases (KR) and enoyl reductase (ER). Experiments in vivo showed that Coix seed extract inhibited FAS activity in the liver, and elevated LPL and HL activity in the plasma, and effected G-6-PD activity. The study supports that FAS is a novel target for anticancer activity, and provides a theoretical foundation for the wide application of Coix seed extract in traditional medicine.

  10. Fatty Acid Synthase Modulates Intestinal Barrier Function through Palmitoylation of Mucin 2

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xiaochao; Yang, Zhen; Rey, Federico E.; Ridaura, Vanessa K.; Davidson, Nicholas O.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal mucus barrier prevents pathogen invasion and maintains host-microbiota homeostasis. We show that fatty acid synthase (FAS), an insulin-responsive enzyme essential for de novo lipogenesis, helps maintain the mucus barrier by regulating Mucin 2, the dominant mucin in the colon and a central component of mucus. Inducible Cre recombinase-directed inactivation of the FAS gene in the colonic epithelium of mice is associated with disruptions in the intestinal mucus barrier as well as ...

  11. Enrichment and identification of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase from Pichia pastoris culture supernatants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Lange

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This data article refers to the report Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS production in Pichia pastoris enables chemical synthesis of cannabinoids (Lange et. al. 2015 [2]. THCAS was produced on a 2 L lab scale using recombinant P. pastoris KM71 KE1. Enrichment of THCAS as a technically pure enzyme was realized using dialysis and cationic exchange chromatography. nLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis identified THCAS in different fractions obtained by cationic exchange chromatography.

  12. Fatty Acid Synthase Activity as a Target for c-Met Driven Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    cancer potentially due to increased fecal fat excretion. In addition, several families of plant-derived flavonoid compounds including...Apoptosis by Flavonoids Is Associated with Their Ability to Inhibit Fatty Acid Synthase Activity. J. Biol. Chem., 2005. 280(7): p. 5636-5645. 156... flavonoids , represent a source of relatively nontoxic, orally available and affordable compounds that are known to affect a number of different

  13. Fatty acid synthase - Modern tumor cell biology insights into a classical oncology target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Douglas; Duke, Gregory; Heuer, Timothy S; O'Farrell, Marie; Wagman, Allan S; McCulloch, William; Kemble, George

    2017-09-01

    Decades of preclinical and natural history studies have highlighted the potential of fatty acid synthase (FASN) as a bona fide drug target for oncology. This review will highlight the foundational concepts upon which this perspective is built. Published studies have shown that high levels of FASN in patient tumor tissues are present at later stages of disease and this overexpression predicts poor prognosis. Preclinical studies have shown that experimental overexpression of FASN in previously normal cells leads to changes that are critical for establishing a tumor phenotype. Once the tumor phenotype is established, FASN elicits several changes to the tumor cell and becomes intertwined with its survival. The product of FASN, palmitate, changes the biophysical nature of the tumor cell membrane; membrane microdomains enable the efficient assembly of signaling complexes required for continued tumor cell proliferation and survival. Membranes densely packed with phospholipids containing saturated fatty acids become resistant to the action of other chemotherapeutic agents. Inhibiting FASN leads to tumor cell death while sparing normal cells, which do not have the dependence of this enzyme for normal functions, and restores membrane architecture to more normal properties thereby resensitizing tumors to killing by chemotherapies. One compound has recently reached clinical studies in solid tumor patients and highlights the need for continued evaluation of the role of FASN in tumor cell biology. Significant advances have been made and much remains to be done to optimally apply this class of pharmacological agents for the treatment of specific cancers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibitory effect of emodin on fatty acid synthase, colon cancer proliferation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Ha; Lee, Myung Sun; Cha, Eun Young; Sul, Ji Young; Lee, Jin Sun; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Jun Beom; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2017-04-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a key anabolic enzyme for de novo fatty acid synthesis, which is important in the development of colon carcinoma. The high expression of FASN is considered a promising molecular target for colon cancer therapy. Emodin, a naturally occurring anthraquinone, exhibits an anticancer effect in various types of human cancer, including colon cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Cell viability was evaluated using a Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay. The apoptosis rate of cells was quantified via flow cytometry following Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. FASN activity was measured by monitoring oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate at a wavelength of 340 nm, and intracellular free fatty acid levels were detected using a Free Fatty Acid Quantification kit. Western blot analysis and reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction were used to detect target gene and protein expression. The present study was performed to investigate whether the gene expression of FASN and its enzymatic activity are regulated by emodin in a human colon cancer cell line. Emodin markedly inhibited the proliferation of HCT116 cells and a higher protein level of FASN was expressed, compared with that in SW480, SNU-C2A or SNU‑C5 cells. Emodin significantly downregulated the protein expression of FASN in HCT116 cells, which was caused by protein degradation due to elevated protein ubiquitination. Emodin also inhibited intracellular FASN enzymatic activity and reduced the levels of intracellular free fatty acids. Emodin enhanced antiproliferation and apoptosis in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. The combined treatment of emodin and cerulenin, a commercial FASN inhibitor, had an additive effect on these activities. Palmitate, the final product of the FASN reaction, rescued emodin‑induced viability and apoptosis. In addition, emodin altered FASN‑involved signaling pathways, including phosphatidylinositol 3

  15. Production of Medium Chain Fatty Acids by Yarrowia lipolytica: Combining Molecular Design and TALEN to Engineer the Fatty Acid Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigouin, Coraline; Gueroult, Marc; Croux, Christian; Dubois, Gwendoline; Borsenberger, Vinciane; Barbe, Sophie; Marty, Alain; Daboussi, Fayza; André, Isabelle; Bordes, Florence

    2017-10-20

    Yarrowia lipolytica is a promising organism for the production of lipids of biotechnological interest and particularly for biofuel. In this study, we engineered the key enzyme involved in lipid biosynthesis, the giant multifunctional fatty acid synthase (FAS), to shorten chain length of the synthesized fatty acids. Taking as starting point that the ketoacyl synthase (KS) domain of Yarrowia lipolytica FAS is directly involved in chain length specificity, we used molecular modeling to investigate molecular recognition of palmitic acid (C16 fatty acid) by the KS. This enabled to point out the key role of an isoleucine residue, I1220, from the fatty acid binding site, which could be targeted by mutagenesis. To address this challenge, TALEN (transcription activator-like effector nucleases)-based genome editing technology was applied for the first time to Yarrowia lipolytica and proved to be very efficient for inducing targeted genome modifications. Among the generated FAS mutants, those having a bulky aromatic amino acid residue in place of the native isoleucine at position 1220 led to a significant increase of myristic acid (C14) production compared to parental wild-type KS. Particularly, the best performing mutant, I1220W, accumulates C14 at a level of 11.6% total fatty acids. Overall, this work illustrates how a combination of molecular modeling and genome-editing technology can offer novel opportunities to rationally engineer complex systems for synthetic biology.

  16. Deletion of a Chitin Synthase Gene in a Citric Acid Producing Strain of Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinker, Torri E.; Baker, Scott E.

    2007-01-29

    Citric acid production by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is carried out in a process that causes the organism to drastically alter its morphology. This altered morphology includes hyphal swelling and highly limited polar growth resulting in clumps of swollen cells that eventually aggregate into pellets of approximately 100 microns in diameter. In this pelleted form, A. niger has increased citric acid production as compared to growth in filamentous form. Chitin is a crucial component of the cell wall of filamentous fungi. Alterations in the deposition or production of chitin may have profound effects on the morphology of the organism. In order to study the role of chitin synthesis in pellet formation we have deleted a chitin synthase gene (csmA) in Aspergillus niger strain ATCC 11414 using a PCR based deletion construct. This class of chitin synthases is only found in filamentous fungi and is not present in yeasts. The csmA genes contain a myosin motor domain at the N-terminus and a chitin synthesis domain at the C-terminus. They are believed to contribute to the specialized polar growth observed in filamentous fungi that is lacking in yeasts. The csmA deletion strain (csmAΔ) was subjected to minimal media with and without osmotic stabilizers as well as tested in citric acid production media. Without osmotic stabilizers, the mutant germlings were abnormally swollen, primarily in the subapical regions, and contained large vacuoles. However, this swelling is ultimately not inhibitory to growth as the germlings are able to recover and undergo polar growth. Colony formation was largely unaffected in the absence of osmotic stabilizers. In citric acid production media csmAΔ was observed to have a 2.5 fold increase in citric acid production. The controlled expression of this class of chitin synthases may be useful for improving production of organic acids in filamentous fungi.

  17. Manifold decrease of sialic acid synthase in fetal Down syndrome brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulesserian, T; Engidawork, E; Fountoulakis, M; Lubec, G

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21) is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation. A large series of biochemical defects have been observed in fetal and adult DS brain that help in unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying mental retardation. As sialylation of glycoconjugates plays an important role in brain development, this study aimed to look at the sialic acid metabolism by measuring sialic acid synthase (SAS; N-acetylneuraminate synthase) in early second trimester fetal control and DS brain. In this regard, protein profiling was performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass-spectrometry followed by database search and subsequent quantification of spot using specific software. SAS, the enzyme catalyzing synthesis of N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (syn: sialic acid) was represented as a single spot and found to be significantly and manifold reduced (P sialic acid metabolism, required for brain development and, more specifically, for sialylation of key brain proteins, including neuronal cell adhesion molecule and myelin associated glycoprotein.

  18. Phosphorylation of yeast phosphatidylserine synthase in vivo and in vitro by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinney, A J; Carman, G M

    1988-01-01

    Evidence is presented that demonstrates that phosphatidylserine synthase (CDPdiacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is phosphorylated in vivo and in vitro by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Phosphatidylserine synthase activity in cell extracts was reduced in the bcy1 mutant (which has high cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity) and elevated in the cyr1 mutant (which has low cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity) when compared with wild-ty...

  19. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Lagoda, Gwen F.; Musicki, Biljana; Rameau, Gerald A.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) initiates penile erection, but has not been thought to participate in the sustained erection required for normal sexual performance. We now show that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of nNOS mediates erectile physiology, including sustained erection. nNOS is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at serine(S)1412. Electrical stimulation of the penile innervation increases S1412 phosphorylation that is blocked by PKA inhibitors but not by PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitors. Stimulation of cAMP formation by forskolin also activates nNOS phosphorylation. Sustained penile erection elicited by either intracavernous forskolin injection, or augmented by forskolin during cavernous nerve electrical stimulation, is prevented by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME or in nNOS-deleted mice. Thus, nNOS mediates both initiation and maintenance of penile erection, implying unique approaches for treating erectile dysfunction. PMID:23012472

  20. Fatty acid synthase cooperates with glyoxalase 1 to protect against sugar toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Garrido

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid (FA metabolism is deregulated in several human diseases including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Therefore, FA-metabolic enzymes are potential targets for drug therapy, although the consequence of these treatments must be precisely evaluated at the organismal and cellular levels. In healthy organism, synthesis of triacylglycerols (TAGs-composed of three FA units esterified to a glycerol backbone-is increased in response to dietary sugar. Saturation in the storage and synthesis capacity of TAGs is associated with type 2 diabetes progression. Sugar toxicity likely depends on advanced-glycation-end-products (AGEs that form through covalent bounding between amine groups and carbonyl groups of sugar or their derivatives α-oxoaldehydes. Methylglyoxal (MG is a highly reactive α-oxoaldehyde that is derived from glycolysis through a non-enzymatic reaction. Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1 works to neutralize MG, reducing its deleterious effects. Here, we have used the power of Drosophila genetics to generate Fatty acid synthase (FASN mutants, allowing us to investigate the consequence of this deficiency upon sugar-supplemented diets. We found that FASN mutants are lethal but can be rescued by an appropriate lipid diet. Rescued animals do not exhibit insulin resistance, are dramatically sensitive to dietary sugar and accumulate AGEs. We show that FASN and Glo1 cooperate at systemic and cell-autonomous levels to protect against sugar toxicity. We observed that the size of FASN mutant cells decreases as dietary sucrose increases. Genetic interactions at the cell-autonomous level, where glycolytic enzymes or Glo1 were manipulated in FASN mutant cells, revealed that this sugar-dependent size reduction is a direct consequence of MG-derived-AGE accumulation. In summary, our findings indicate that FASN is dispensable for cell growth if extracellular lipids are available. In contrast, FA-synthesis appears to be required to limit a cell

  1. Carnosol and carnosic acids from Salvia officinalis inhibit microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Julia; Kuehnl, Susanne; Rollinger, Judith M; Scherer, Olga; Northoff, Hinnak; Stuppner, Hermann; Werz, Oliver; Koeberle, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), the most relevant eicosanoid promoting inflammation and tumorigenesis, is formed by cyclooxygenases (COXs) and PGE(2) synthases from free arachidonic acid. Preparations of the leaves of Salvia officinalis are commonly used in folk medicine as an effective antiseptic and anti-inflammatory remedy and possess anticancer activity. Here, we demonstrate that a standard ethyl acetate extract of S. officinalis efficiently suppresses the formation of PGE(2) in a cell-free assay by direct interference with microsomal PGE(2) synthase (mPGES)-1. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the extract yielded closely related fractions that potently suppressed mPGES-1 with IC(50) values between 1.9 and 3.5 μg/ml. Component analysis of these fractions revealed the diterpenes carnosol and carnosic acid as potential bioactive principles inhibiting mPGES-1 activity with IC(50) values of 5.0 μM. Using a human whole-blood assay as a robust cell-based model, carnosic acid, but not carnosol, blocked PGE(2) generation upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (IC(50) = 9.3 μM). Carnosic acid neither inhibited the concomitant biosynthesis of other prostanoids [6-keto PGF(1α), 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid, and thromboxane B(2)] in human whole blood nor affected the activities of COX-1/2 in a cell-free assay. Together, S. officinalis extracts and its ingredients carnosol and carnosic acid inhibit PGE(2) formation by selectively targeting mPGES-1. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of carnosic acid on PGE(2) formation, observed in the physiologically relevant whole-blood model, may critically contribute to the anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties of S. officinalis.

  2. Structure of the human beta-ketoacyl [ACP] synthase from the mitochondrial type II fatty acid synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Caspar Elo; Kragelund, Birthe B; von Wettstein-Knowles, Penny

    2007-01-01

    activities encoded by discrete genes. The beta-ketoacyl [ACP] synthase (KAS) moiety of the mitochondrial FAS (mtKAS) is targeted by the antibiotic cerulenin and possibly by the other antibiotics inhibiting prokaryotic KASes: thiolactomycin, platensimycin, and the alpha-methylene butyrolactone, C75. The high...

  3. Functional loss of two ceramide synthases elicits autophagy-dependent lifespan extension in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Mai-Britt; Kruse, Rikke; Harvald, Eva Bang

    2013-01-01

    Ceramide and its metabolites constitute a diverse group of lipids, which play important roles as structural entities of biological membranes as well as regulators of cellular growth, differentiation, and development. The C. elegans genome comprises three ceramide synthase genes; hyl-1, hyl-2...... of HYL-1 or LAGR-1 does not affect lifespan. We show that loss of HYL-1 and LAGR-1 functions extend lifespan in an autophagy-dependent manner, as knock down of the autophagy-associated gene ATG-12 abolishes hyl-1;lagr-1 longevity. The transcription factors PHA-4/FOXA, DAF-16/FOXO, and SKN-1 are also......-1 result in dietary restriction-induced autophagy and consequently prolonged longevity....

  4. Type III polyketide synthase is involved in the biosynthesis of protocatechuic acid in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yangyong; Xiao, Jing; Pan, Li

    2014-11-01

    Genomic studies have shown that not only plants but also filamentous fungi contain type III polyketide synthases. To study the function of type III polyketide synthase (AnPKSIII) in Aspergillus niger, a deletion strain (delAnPKSIII) and an overexpression strain (oeAnPKSIII) were constructed in A. niger MA169.4, a derivative of the wild-type (WT) A. niger ATCC 9029 that produces large quantities of gluconic acid. Alterations in the metabolites were analyzed by HPLC when the extract of the overexpression strain was compared with extracts of the WT and deletion strains. Protocatechuic acid (PCA; 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3.2 mg/l) was isolated and identified as the main product of AnPKSIII when inductively expressed in A. niger MA169.4. The molecular weight of PCA was 154.1 (m/z 153.1 [M-H](-)), was detected by ESI-MS in the negative ionization mode, and (1)H and (13)C NMR data confirmed its structure.

  5. Chlorine gas exposure causes systemic endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting endothelial nitric oxide synthase-dependent signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Jaideep; Samal, Andrey A; Bradley, Kelley M; Brandon, Angela; Balanay, Joann; Squadrito, Giuseppe L; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Maheshwari, Akhil; Postlethwait, Edward M; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2011-08-01

    Chlorine gas (Cl(2)) exposure during accidents or in the military setting results primarily in injury to the lungs. However, the potential for Cl(2) exposure to promote injury to the systemic vasculature leading to compromised vascular function has not been studied. We hypothesized that Cl(2) promotes extrapulmonary endothelial dysfunction characterized by a loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived signaling. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to Cl(2) for 30 minutes, and eNOS-dependent vasodilation of aorta as a function of Cl(2) dose (0-400 ppm) and time after exposure (0-48 h) were determined. Exposure to Cl(2) (250-400 ppm) significantly inhibited eNOS-dependent vasodilation (stimulated by acetycholine) at 24 to 48 hours after exposure without affecting constriction responses to phenylephrine or vasodilation responses to an NO donor, suggesting decreased NO formation. Consistent with this hypothesis, eNOS protein expression was significantly decreased (∼ 60%) in aorta isolated from Cl(2)-exposed versus air-exposed rats. Moreover, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA was up-regulated in circulating leukocytes and aorta isolated 24 hours after Cl(2) exposure, suggesting stimulation of inflammation in the systemic vasculature. Despite decreased eNOS expression and activity, no changes in mean arterial blood pressure were observed. However, injection of 1400W, a selective inhibitor of iNOS, increased mean arterial blood pressure only in Cl(2)-exposed animals, suggesting that iNOS-derived NO compensates for decreased eNOS-derived NO. These results highlight the potential for Cl(2) exposure to promote postexposure systemic endothelial dysfunction via disruption of vascular NO homeostasis mechanisms.

  6. Quantum-mechanical analysis of amino acid residues function in the proton transport during F0F1-ATP synthase catalytic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivontsin, L. A.; Mashkovtseva, E. V.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-11-01

    Implications of quantum-mechanical approach to the description of proton transport in biological systems are a tempting subject for an overlapping of fundamental physics and biology. The model of proton transport through the integrated membrane enzyme FoF1-ATP synthase responsible for ATP synthesis was developed. The estimation of the mathematical expectation of the proton transfer time through the half-channel was performed. Observed set of proton pathways through the inlet half-channel showed the nanosecond timescale highly dependable of some amino acid residues. There were proposed two types of crucial amino acids: critically localized (His245) and being a part of energy conserving system (Asp119).

  7. 7-deoxyloganetic acid synthase catalyzes a key 3 step oxidation to form 7-deoxyloganetic acid in Catharanthus roseus iridoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Vonny; Wiens, Brent; Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    Iridoids are key intermediates required for the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), as well as quinoline alkaloids. Although most iridoid biosynthetic genes have been identified, one remaining three step oxidation required to form the carboxyl group of 7-deoxyloganetic acid has yet to be characterized. Here, it is reported that virus-induced gene silencing of 7-deoxyloganetic acid synthase (7DLS, CYP76A26) in Catharanthus roseus greatly decreased levels of secologanin and the major MIAs, catharanthine and vindoline in silenced leaves. Functional expression of this gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed its function as an authentic 7DLS that catalyzes the 3 step oxidation of iridodial-nepetalactol to form 7-deoxyloganetic acid. The identification of CYP76A26 removes a key bottleneck for expression of iridoid and related MIA pathways in various biological backgrounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cerulenin blockade of fatty acid synthase reverses hepatic steatosis in ob/ob mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Cheng

    Full Text Available Fatty liver or hepatic steatosis is a common health problem associated with abnormal liver function and increased susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion injury. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the fatty acid synthase inhibitor cerulenin on hepatic function in steatotic ob/ob mice. Different dosages of cerulenin were administered intraperitoneally to ob/ob mice for 2 to 7 days. Body weight, serum AST/ALT, hepatic energy state, and gene expression patterns in ob/ob mice were examined. We found that cerulenin treatment markedly improved hepatic function in ob/ob mice. Serum AST/ALT levels were significantly decreased and hepatic ATP levels increased in treated obese mice compared to obese controls, accompanied by fat depletion in the hepatocyte. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ and uncoupling protein 2 were suppressed with cerulenin treatment and paralleled changes in AST/ALT levels. Hepatic glutathione content were increased in some cases and apoptotic activity in the steatotic livers was minimally changed with cerulenin treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that fatty acid synthase blockade constitutes a novel therapeutic strategy for altering hepatic steatosis at non-stressed states in obese livers.

  9. Functional loss of two ceramide synthases elicits autophagy-dependent lifespan extension in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai-Britt Mosbech

    Full Text Available Ceramide and its metabolites constitute a diverse group of lipids, which play important roles as structural entities of biological membranes as well as regulators of cellular growth, differentiation, and development. The C. elegans genome comprises three ceramide synthase genes; hyl-1, hyl-2, and lagr-1. HYL-1 function is required for synthesis of ceramides and sphingolipids containing very long acyl-chains (≥C24, while HYL-2 is required for synthesis of ceramides and sphingolipids containing shorter acyl-chains (≤C22. Here we show that functional loss of HYL-2 decreases lifespan, while loss of HYL-1 or LAGR-1 does not affect lifespan. We show that loss of HYL-1 and LAGR-1 functions extend lifespan in an autophagy-dependent manner, as knock down of the autophagy-associated gene ATG-12 abolishes hyl-1;lagr-1 longevity. The transcription factors PHA-4/FOXA, DAF-16/FOXO, and SKN-1 are also required for the observed lifespan extension, as well as the increased number of autophagosomes in hyl-1;lagr-1 animals. Both autophagic events and the transcription factors PHA-4/FOXA, DAF-16, and SKN-1 have previously been associated with dietary restriction-induced longevity. Accordingly, we find that hyl-1;lagr-1 animals display reduced feeding, increased resistance to heat, and reduced reproduction. Collectively, our data suggest that specific sphingolipids produced by different ceramide synthases have opposing roles in determination of C. elegans lifespan. We propose that loss of HYL-1 and LAGR-1 result in dietary restriction-induced autophagy and consequently prolonged longevity.

  10. Role of hyaluronan synthase 2 to promote CD44-dependent oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Steven J; Earle, Christine; Wong, Gabriel; Bourguignon, Lilly Y W

    2013-04-01

    CD44 is a transmembrane receptor found on many different benign and malignant cells. Hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the extracellular matrix, is the primary ligand for CD44 receptors. In cancer cells, HA interaction with CD44 promotes multiple signaling pathways that influence tumor cell progression behaviors in a variety of solid tumors. Increasing evidence indicates that HA and CD44 signaling play an important role in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma progression. HA is primarily synthesized by hyaluronan synthases, and the current study investigated the role of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS 2) in oral cavity carcinoma progression behaviors. Analysis of HAS 2 mRNA and protein expression, HA production, and HAS 2-mediated tumor cell proliferation and migration behaviors with and without HAS 2 suppression were carried out on 2 established oral cavity cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis of HAS 2 and CD44 expression in oral cavity carcinoma tumor specimens was performed. HAS 2 was expressed in the 2 oral cancer cell lines, HSC-3 and SCC-4. Suppression of HAS 2 expression resulted in CD44-dependent decreased tumor cell migration, decreased tumor cell growth, and increased cisplatin sensitivity, suggesting the importance of tumor cell HA production to promote in vitro tumor progression behaviors in oral cancer cells. Increased HAS 2 expression in oral cavity carcinoma clinical specimens was associated with poor clinicopathologic characteristics and worse disease-free survival. HAS 2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of oral cavity cancer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  12. Para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA synthase enhances thermotolerance of mushroom Agaricus bisporus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglei Lu

    Full Text Available Most mushrooms are thermo-sensitive to temperatures over 23°C, which greatly restricts their agricultural cultivation. Understanding mushroom's innate heat-tolerance mechanisms may facilitate genetic improvements of their thermotolerance. Agaricus bisporus strain 02 is a relatively thermotolerant mushroom strain, while strain 8213 is quite thermo-sensitive. Here, we compared their responses at proteomic level to heat treatment at 33°C. We identified 73 proteins that are differentially expressed between 02 and 8213 or induced upon heat stress in strain 02 itself, 48 of which with a known identity. Among them, 4 proteins are constitutively more highly expressed in 02 than 8213; and they can be further upregulated in response to heat stress in 02, but not in 8213. One protein is encoded by the para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA synthase gene Pabs, which has been shown to scavenge the reactive oxygen species in vitro. Pabs mRNA and its chemical product PABA show similar heat stress induction pattern as PABA synthase protein and are more abundant in 02, indicating transcriptional level upregulation of Pabs upon heat stress. A specific inhibitor of PABA synthesis impaired thermotolerance of 02, while exogenous PABA or transgenic overexpression of 02 derived PABA synthase enhanced thermotolerance of 8213. Furthermore, compared to 8213, 02 accumulated less H2O2 but more defense-related proteins (e.g., HSPs and Chitinase under heat stress. Together, these results demonstrate a role of PABA in enhancing mushroom thermotolerance by removing H2O2 and elevating defense-related proteins.

  13. Low concentrations of salicylic acid delay methyl jasmonate-induced leaf senescence by up-regulating nitric oxide synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yingbin; Liu, Jian; Xing, Da

    2016-09-01

    In plants, extensive efforts have been devoted to understanding the crosstalk between salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling in pathogen defenses, but this crosstalk has scarcely been addressed during senescence. In this study, the effect of SA application on methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced leaf senescence was assessed. We found that low concentrations of SA (1-50 μM) played a delayed role against the senescence promoted by MeJA. Furthermore, low concentrations of SA enhanced plant antioxidant defenses and restricted reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in MeJA-treated leaves. When applied simultaneously with MeJA, low concentrations of SA triggered a nitric oxide (NO) burst, and the elevated NO levels were linked to the nitric oxide associated 1 (NOA1)-dependent pathway via nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. The ability of SA to up-regulate plant antioxidant defenses, reduce ROS accumulation, and suppress leaf senescence was lost in NO-deficient Atnoa1 plants. In a converse manner, exogenous addition of NO donors increased the plant antioxidant capacity and lowered the ROS levels in MeJA-treated leaves. Taken together, the results indicate that SA at low concentrations counteracts MeJA-induced leaf senescence through NOA1-dependent NO signaling and strengthening of the antioxidant defense. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Activation of Secretagogue Independent Gastric Acid Secretion via Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Stimulation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Miriam Kitay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: L-arginine is an important mediator of cell division, wound healing, and immune function. It can be transformed by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS to nitric oxide (NO, an important cell signaling molecule. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrate specific effects of L-arginine (10mM exposure on gastric acid secretion in rat parietal cells. Methods: Studies were performed with isolated gastric glands and the pH sensitive dye BCECF-AM +/- L-arginine to examine its effects on acid secretion. The direct NO-donor diethylamine NONOate sodium salt hydrate, was also used while monitoring intracellular pH. The specific inhibitor of the intracellular NO signal cascade ODQ was also used. Results: We found that gastric proton extrusion was activated with application of L-arginine (10mM, in a separate series when L-arginine (10mM + L-NAME (30µM were added there was no acid secretion. Addition of the NO-donor diethylamine NONOate sodium salt hydrate (10µM also induced acid secretion. When the selective sGC-inhibitor ODQ was added with NONOate we did not observe acid secretion. Conclusion: We conclude that L-arginine is a novel secretagogue, which can mediate gastric acid secretion. Furthermore, the intake of L-arginine causes direct activation of the H+, K+ ATPase and increased proton extrusion from parietal cells resulting in the increased risk for acid-related diseases. The NO/sGC/cGMP pathway has never been described as a possible intracellular mechanism for H+, K+ ATPase activation before and presents a completely new scientific finding. Moreover, our studies demonstrate a novel role for L-NAME to effectively eliminate NOS induced acid secretion and thereby reducing the risk for L-arginine inducible ulcer disease.

  15. Akt-dependent phosphorylation of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A.; Crone, Julie K.; Becker, Robyn E.; Moriarity, John L.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2002-01-01

    In the penis, nitric oxide (NO) can be formed by both neuronal NO synthase and endothelial NOS (eNOS). eNOS is activated by viscous drag/shear stress in blood vessels to produce NO continuously, a process mediated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3kinase)/Akt pathway. Here we show that PI3-kinase/Akt physiologically mediates erection. Both electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve and direct intracavernosal injection of the vasorelaxant drug papaverine cause rapid increases in phosphorylated (activated) Akt and eNOS. Phosphorylation is diminished by wortmannin and LY294002, inhibitors of PI3-kinase, the upstream activator of Akt. The two drugs also reduce erection. Penile erection elicited by papaverine is reduced profoundly in mice with targeted deletion of eNOS. Our findings support a model in which rapid, brief activation of neuronal NOS initiates the erectile process, whereas PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent phosphorylation and activation of eNOS leads to sustained NO production and maximal erection. PMID:11904450

  16. Resveratrol inhibits neointimal formation after arterial injury through an endothelial nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Danna M; Dolinsky, Vernon W; Zhang, Hangjun; Ghanim, Husam; Guo, June; Mroziewicz, Margaret; Tsiani, Evangelia L; Bendeck, Michelle P; Dandona, Paresh; Dyck, Jason R B; Heximer, Scott P; Giacca, Adria

    2012-06-01

    Revascularization procedures used for treatment of atherosclerosis often result in restenosis. Resveratrol (RSV), an antioxidant with cardiovascular benefits, decreases neointimal formation after arterial injury by a mechanism that is still not fully clarified. Our main objective was to address the role of nitric oxide synthases (NOSes) and more specifically the endothelial-NOS (eNOS) isoform as a mediator of this effect. RSV (4 mg/kg/day, s.c.) alone or in combination with the NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (2 mg/kg/day, s.c.) was given to Sprague-Dawley rats beginning at 3 days before arterial (carotid or aortic) injury. RSV reduced neointimal formation by 50% (P<0.01), decreased intimal cell proliferation by 37% (P<0.01) and reduced inflammatory markers such as PECAM and MMP-9 mRNA. These effects of RSV were all abolished by coadministration of l-NAME. Oral RSV (beginning at 5 days before arterial injury) reduced neointimal thickness after femoral wire injury in mice, however this effect was not observed in eNOS knockout mice. This is the first report of RSV decreasing neointimal cell proliferation and neointimal growth through an eNOS-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Destabilization of Fatty Acid Synthase by Acetylation Inhibits De Novo Lipogenesis and Tumor Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huai-Peng; Cheng, Zhou-Li; He, Ruo-Yu; Song, Lei; Tian, Meng-Xin; Zhou, Li-Sha; Groh, Beezly S; Liu, Wei-Ren; Ji, Min-Biao; Ding, Chen; Shi, Ying-Hong; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Dan; Xiong, Yue

    2016-12-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is the terminal enzyme in de novo lipogenesis and plays a key role in cell proliferation. Pharmacologic inhibitors of FASN are being evaluated in clinical trials for treatment of cancer, obesity, and other diseases. Here, we report a previously unknown mechanism of FASN regulation involving its acetylation by KAT8 and its deacetylation by HDAC3. FASN acetylation promoted its degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. FASN acetylation enhanced its association with the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM21. Acetylation destabilized FASN and resulted in decreased de novo lipogenesis and tumor cell growth. FASN acetylation was frequently reduced in human hepatocellular carcinoma samples, which correlated with increased HDAC3 expression and FASN protein levels. Our results suggest opportunities to target FASN acetylation as an anticancer strategy. Cancer Res; 76(23); 6924-36. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Serum concentrations of extracellular fatty acid synthase in patients with steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsillach, Judit; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Beltrán, Raúl; Rull, Anna; Aragonès, Gerard; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Vázquez-Martín, Alejandro; Joven, Jorge; Menéndez, Javier A; Camps, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is an enzyme synthesized by the liver and plays an important role in lipogenesis. The present study aimed to assess whether serum FASN concentrations are altered in patients with chronic liver disease, and to investigate whether its measurement may be a useful tool in the clinical evaluation of this derangement. We investigated 93 patients with chronic liver disease (14 minimal change disease, 79 steatohepatitis) and 100 control subjects. Serum FASN concentrations were measured using ELISA. Patients had a significant increase in serum FASN concentration (pconcentrations were significantly correlated with the circulating levels of the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (Spearman rho=0.375; pconcentrations are increased in patients with chronic liver impairment, and are associated with specific histological alterations and biochemical markers of portal inflammation. These data suggest that FASN measurement may contribute significantly to the evaluation of these patients.

  19. Overexpression of the homologous lanosterol synthase gene in ganoderic acid biosynthesis in Ganoderma lingzhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Huai; Li, Na; Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2017-02-01

    Ganoderic acids (GAs) in Ganoderma lingzhi exhibit anticancer and antimetastatic activities. GA yields can be potentially improved by manipulating G. lingzhi through genetic engineering. In this study, a putative lanosterol synthase (LS) gene was cloned and overexpressed in G. lingzhi. Results showed that its overexpression (OE) increased the ganoderic acid (GA) content and the accumulation of lanosterol and ergosterol in a submerged G. lingzhi culture. The maximum contents of GA-O, GA-Mk, GA-T, GA-S, GA-Mf, and GA-Me in transgenic strains were 46.6 ± 4.8, 24.3 ± 3.5, 69.8 ± 8.2, 28.9 ± 1.4, 15.4 ± 1.2, and 26.7 ± 3.1 μg/100 mg dry weight, respectively, these values being 6.1-, 2.2-, 3.2-, 4.8-, 2.0-, and 1.9-times higher than those in wild-type strains. In addition, accumulated amounts of lanosterol and ergosterol in transgenic strains were 2.3 and 1.4-fold higher than those in the control strains, respectively. The transcription level of LS was also increased by more than five times in the presence of the G. lingzhi glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter, whereas transcription levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A enzyme and squalene synthase did not change significantly in transgenic strains. This study demonstrated that OE of the homologous LS gene can enhance lanosterol accumulation. A large precursor supply promotes GA biosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhanced citric acid biosynthesis in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 by overexpression of the Escherichia coli citrate synthase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Aditi D; Archana, G; Kumar, G Naresh

    2009-08-01

    Citric acid secretion by fluorescent pseudomonads has a distinct significance in microbial phosphate solubilization. The role of citrate synthase in citric acid biosynthesis and glucose catabolism in pseudomonads was investigated by overexpressing the Escherichia coli citrate synthase (gltA) gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525. The resultant approximately 2-fold increase in citrate synthase activity in the gltA-overexpressing strain Pf(pAB7) enhanced the intracellular and extracellular citric acid yields during the stationary phase, by about 2- and 26-fold, respectively, as compared to the control, without affecting the growth rate, glucose depletion rate or biomass yield. Decreased glucose consumption was paralleled by increased gluconic acid production due to an increase in glucose dehydrogenase activity. While the extracellular acetic acid yield increased in Pf(pAB7), pyruvic acid secretion decreased, correlating with an increase in pyruvate carboxylase activity and suggesting an increased demand for the anabolic precursor oxaloacetate. Activities of two other key enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase, remained unaltered, and the contribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and isocitrate lyase to glucose catabolism was negligible. Strain Pf(pAB7) demonstrated an enhanced phosphate-solubilizing ability compared to the control. Co-expression of the Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and E. coli gltA genes in P. fluorescens ATCC 13525, so as to supplement oxaloacetate for citrate biosynthesis, neither significantly affected citrate biosynthesis nor caused any change in the other physiological and biochemical parameters measured, despite approximately 1.3- and 5-fold increases in citrate synthase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities, respectively. Thus, our results demonstrate that citrate synthase is rate-limiting in enhancing citrate biosynthesis in P. fluorescens ATCC 13525

  1. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol: An abundant galactosyllipid of Cirsium brevicaule A. GRAY leaves inhibits the expression of gene encoding fatty acid synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inafuku, Masashi; Takara, Kensaku; Taira, Naoyuki; Nugara, Ruwani N; Kamiyama, Yasuo; Oku, Hirosuke

    2016-05-15

    The leaves of Cirsium brevicaule A. GRAY (CL) significantly decreased hepatic lipid accumulation and the expression of fatty acid synthase gene (FASN) in mice. We aimed to purify and identify the active compound(s) from CL and determine the inhibitory mechanism of expression of FASN. We purified monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) from extracts of CL (CL-MGDG) and showed that it was the active CL component through analyses of its effects on the expression of genes of human breast cancer cell line, SKBR-3. The content and fatty acid composition of CL-MGDG are distinctly different from those of other vegetable-derived MGDGs. Treatment of SKBR-3 cells with MGDG decreased the level of FASN mRNA as well as the levels of mRNA encoding other protein involved in lipogenesis. Further, MGDG treatments significantly inhibited luciferase activities of constructs containing liver X receptor response element in FASN promoter region without altering the levels of mRNA encoding transcription factors. MGDG and the FASN inhibitor C75 decreased the viabilities of SKBR-3 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. CL-MGDG more potently inhibited cell viability than a commercial MGDG preparation. CL represents a good source of glycoglycerolipids with potential as functional ingredients of food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic interplay between O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation and glycogen synthase kinase-3-dependent phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zihao; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hart, Gerald W

    2007-08-01

    O-GlcNAcylation on serine and threonine side chains of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins is dynamically regulated in response to various environmental and biological stimuli. O-GlcNAcylation is remarkably similar to O-phosphorylation and appears to have a dynamic interplay with O-phosphate in cellular regulation. A systematic glycoproteomics analysis of the affects of inhibiting specific kinases on O-GlcNAcylation should help reveal both the global and specific dynamic relationships between these two abundant post-translational modifications. Here we report the O-GlcNAc perturbations in response to inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), a pivotal kinase involved in many signaling pathways. By combining immunoaffinity chromatography and SILAC (stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture)-based quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified 45 potentially O-GlcNAcylated proteins. Quantitative measurements indicated that at least 10 proteins had an apparent increase of O-GlcNAcylation upon GSK-3 inhibition by lithium, whereas surprisingly 19 other proteins showed decreases. O-GlcNAcylation changes on a subset of the proteins were confirmed by follow-up experiments. By combining a new O-GlcNAc peptide enrichment method and beta-elimination followed by Michael addition with DTT, we also mapped the O-GlcNAc site (Ser-55) of vimentin, which showed an apparent increase of O-GlcNAcylation upon GSK-3 inhibition. Based on the MS data, we further investigated potential roles of O-GlcNAc on host cell factor-1, a transcription co-activator, and showed that dynamic regulation of O-GlcNAcylation on host cell factor-1 influenced its subcellular distribution. Taken together, these data indicated the complex interplay between phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation that occurs within signaling networks.

  3. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) fatty acid synthase complex: enoyl-[acyl carrier protein]-reductase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Thuillier, Irene; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Garcés, Rafael; von Wettstein-Knowles, Penny; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Enoyl-[acyl carrier protein]-reductases from sunflower. A major factor contributing to the amount of fatty acids in plant oils are the first steps of their synthesis. The intraplastidic fatty acid biosynthetic pathway in plants is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS). The last step in each elongation cycle is carried out by the enoyl-[ACP]-reductase, which reduces the dehydrated product of β-hydroxyacyl-[ACP] dehydrase using NADPH or NADH. To determine the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds, two enoyl-[ACP]-reductase genes have been identified and cloned from developing seeds with 75 % identity: HaENR1 (GenBank HM021137) and HaENR2 (HM021138). The two genes belong to the ENRA and ENRB families in dicotyledons, respectively. The genetic duplication most likely originated after the separation of di- and monocotyledons. RT-qPCR revealed distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. Highest expression of HaENR1 was in roots, stems and developing cotyledons whereas that of H a ENR2 was in leaves and early stages of seed development. Genomic DNA gel blot analyses suggest that both are single-copy genes. In vivo activity of the ENR enzymes was tested by complementation experiments with the JP1111 fabI(ts) E. coli strain. Both enzymes were functional demonstrating that they interacted with the bacterial FAS components. That different fatty acid profiles resulted infers that the two Helianthus proteins have different structures, substrate specificities and/or reaction rates. The latter possibility was confirmed by in vitro analysis with affinity-purified heterologous-expressed enzymes that reduced the crotonyl-CoA substrate using NADH with different V max.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C. (Birmingham UK); (TAM)

    2011-09-20

    The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS-ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the {alpha}2 helix and in the conformation of the {alpha}3-{alpha}4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4-6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS-ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS-ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  5. Desflurane inhibits endothelium-dependent vasodilation more than sevoflurane with inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuma, Satoshi; Tokinaga, Yasuyuki; Takada, Yukimasa; Azumaguchi, Ryu; Kimizuka, Motonobu; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2018-01-01

    The effects of desflurane on endothelium-dependent vasodilation remain uncertain, whereas sevoflurane is known to inhibit it. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation is mainly mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase. The effects of desflurane on endothelium-dependent vasodilation were compared with those of sevoflurane, and inhibition mechanisms, including phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the calcium pathway, were evaluated for the two anesthetics. We hypothesized that desflurane would inhibit endothelium-dependent vasodilation in a concentration-dependent manner more than sevoflurane, with inhibition of a calcium pathway. Isolated rat aortic rings were randomly assigned to treatment with desflurane or sevoflurane for measurements of the vasodilation ratio. To determine NO production with desflurane and sevoflurane, an in vitro assay was performed with cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. These cells were also used for measurement of intracellular calcium or Western blotting. For endothelium-dependent vasodilation, the ratio of vasodilation was more significantly inhibited by 11.4% desflurane than by 4.8% sevoflurane. Inhibition did not between 5.7% desflurane and 2.4% sevoflurane. No inhibitory effect of desflurane or sevoflurane was observed in endothelium-denuded aorta. Desflurane inhibited nitric oxide production caused by stimulation of bradykinin significantly more than sevoflurane. Desflurane had a greater suppressive effect on the bradykinin-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration than did sevoflurane. Sevoflurane, but not desflurane, inhibited phosphorylation of the serine 1177 residue by bradykinin stimulation. Desflurane inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation more than sevoflurane through inhibition of a calcium pathway. Sevoflurane inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation by inhibition of phosphorylation of the serine 1177 residue of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  6. Fatty acid synthase inhibitors from plants: isolation, structure elucidation, and SAR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Cong; Joshi, Alpana S; ElSohly, Hala N; Khan, Shabana I; Jacob, Melissa R; Zhang, Zhizheng; Khan, Ikhlas A; Ferreira, Daneel; Walker, Larry A; Broedel, Sheldon E; Raulli, Robert E; Cihlar, Ronald L

    2002-12-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) has been identified as a potential antifungal target. FAS prepared from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was employed for bioactivity-guided fractionation of Chlorophora tinctoria,Paspalum conjugatum, Symphonia globulifera, Buchenavia parviflora, and Miconia pilgeriana. Thirteen compounds (1-13), including three new natural products (1, 4, 12), were isolated and their structures identified by spectroscopic interpretation. They represented five chemotypes, namely, isoflavones, flavones, biflavonoids, hydrolyzable tannin-related derivatives, and triterpenoids. 3'-Formylgenistein (1) and ellagic acid 4-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranoside (9) were the most potent compounds against FAS, with IC(50) values of 2.3 and 7.5 microg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, 43 (14-56) analogues of the five chemotypes from our natural product repository and commercial sources were tested for their FAS inhibitory activity. Structure-activity relationships for some chemotypes were investigated. All these compounds were further evaluated for antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Although there were several antifungal compounds in the set, correlation between the FAS inhibitory activity and antifungal activity could not be defined.

  7. The effect of dietary modulation of sulfur amino acids on cystathionine β synthase-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Warren D; Gupta, Sapna

    2016-01-01

    Cystathionine β synthase (CBS) is a key enzyme in the methionine and cysteine metabolic pathway, acting as a metabolic gatekeeper to regulate the flow of fixed sulfur from methionine to cysteine. Mutations in the CBS gene cause clinical CBS deficiency, a disease characterized by elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and methionine and decreased plasma cysteine. The treatment goal for CBS-deficient patients is to normalize the metabolic values of these three metabolites using a combination of vitamin therapy and dietary manipulation. To better understand the effectiveness of nutritional treatment strategies, we have performed a series of long-term dietary manipulation studies using our previously developed Tg-I278T Cbs(-/-) mouse model of CBS deficiency and sibling Tg-I278T Cbs(+/-) controls. Tg-I278T Cbs(-/-) mice have undetectable levels of CBS activity, extremely elevated plasma tHcy, modestly elevated plasma methionine, and low plasma cysteine. They exhibit several easily assayable phenotypes, including osteoporosis, loss of fat mass, reduced life span, and facial alopecia. The diets used in these studies differed in the amounts of sulfur amino acids or sulfur amino acid precursors. In this review, we will discuss our findings and their relevance to CBS deficiency and the concept of gene-diet interaction. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Homology modeling of Homo sapiens lipoic acid synthase: Substrate docking and insights on its binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Ezhilarasi; Hassan, Sameer; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Padmalayam, Indira; Rajaram, Rama; Viswanathan, Vijay

    2017-05-07

    Lipoic acid synthase (LIAS) is an iron-sulfur cluster mitochondrial enzyme which catalyzes the final step in the de novo pathway for the biosynthesis of lipoic acid, a potent antioxidant. Recently there has been significant interest in its role in metabolic diseases and its deficiency in LIAS expression has been linked to conditions such as diabetes, atherosclerosis and neonatal-onset epilepsy, suggesting a strong inverse correlation between LIAS reduction and disease status. In this study we use a bioinformatics approach to predict its structure, which would be helpful to understanding its role. A homology model for LIAS protein was generated using X-ray crystallographic structure of Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 (PDB ID: 4U0P). The predicted structure has 93% of the residues in the most favour region of Ramachandran plot. The active site of LIAS protein was mapped and docked with S-Adenosyl Methionine (SAM) using GOLD software. The LIAS-SAM complex was further refined using molecular dynamics simulation within the subsite 1 and subsite 3 of the active site. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report a reliable homology model of LIAS protein. This study will facilitate a better understanding mode of action of the enzyme-substrate complex for future studies in designing drugs that can target LIAS protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Engineering a Polyketide Synthase for In Vitro Production of Adipic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, A; Poust, S; De Rond, T; Fortman, JL; Katz, L; Petzold, CJ; Keasling, JD

    2015-10-26

    Polyketides have enormous structural diversity, yet polyketide synthases (PKSs) have thus far been engineered to produce only drug candidates or derivatives thereof. Thousands of other molecules, including commodity and specialty chemicals, could be synthesized using PKSs if composing hybrid PKSs from well-characterized parts derived from natural PKSs was more efficient. Here, using modern mass spectrometry techniques as an essential part of the design–build–test cycle, we engineered a chimeric PKS to enable production one of the most widely used commodity chemicals, adipic acid. To accomplish this, we introduced heterologous reductive domains from various PKS clusters into the borrelidin PKS’ first extension module, which we previously showed produces a 3-hydroxy-adipoyl intermediate when coincubated with the loading module and a succinyl-CoA starter unit. Acyl-ACP intermediate analysis revealed an unexpected bottleneck at the dehydration step, which was overcome by introduction of a carboxyacyl-processing dehydratase domain. Appending a thioesterase to the hybrid PKS enabled the production of free adipic acid. Using acyl-intermediate based techniques to “debug” PKSs as described here, it should one day be possible to engineer chimeric PKSs to produce a variety of existing commodity and specialty chemicals, as well as thousands of chemicals that are difficult to produce from petroleum feedstocks using traditional synthetic chemistry.

  10. Expression of dehydratase domains from a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase increases the production of fatty acids in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola-Robles, Delise; Rullán-Lind, Carlos; Carballeira, Néstor M.; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2014-01-01

    Increasing the production of fatty acids by microbial fermentation remains an important step towards the generation of biodiesel and other portable liquid fuels. In this work, we report an Escherichia coli strain engineered to overexpress a fragment consisting of four dehydratase domains from the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthase enzyme complex from the deep-sea bacterium, Photobacterium profundum. The DH1-DH2-UMA enzyme fragment was excised from its natural context within a multi-enzyme PKS and expressed as a stand-alone protein. Fatty acids were extracted from the cell pellet, esterified with methanol and quantified by GC-MS analysis. Results show that the E. coli strain expressing the DH tetradomain fragment was capable of producing up to a 5-fold increase (80.31 mg total FA/L culture) in total fatty acids over the negative control strain lacking the recombinant enzyme. The enhancement in production was observed across the board for all the fatty acids that are typically made by E. coli. The overexpression of the DH tetradomain did not affect E. coli cell growth, thus showing that the observed enhancement in fatty acid production was not a result of effects associated with cell density. The observed enhancement was more pronounced at lower temperatures (3.8-fold at 16 °C, 3.5-fold at 22 °C and 1.5-fold at 30 °C) and supplementation of the media with 0.4% glycerol did not result in an increase in fatty acid production. All these results taken together suggest that either the dehydration of fatty acid intermediates are a limiting step in the E. coli fatty acid biosynthesis machinery, or that the recombinant dehydratase domains used in this study are also capable of catalyzing thioester hydrolysis of the final products. The enzyme in this report is a new tool which could be incorporated into other existing strategies aimed at improving fatty acid production in bacterial fermentations towards accessible biodiesel precursors. PMID:24411456

  11. A dodecylamine derivative of cyanocobalamin potently inhibits the activities of cobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bito, Tomohiro; Yabuta, Yukinori; Ichiyanagi, Tsuyoshi; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we showed that cyanocobalamin dodecylamine, a ribose 5'-carbamate derivative of cyanocobalamin, was absorbed and accumulated to significant levels by Caenorhabditis elegans and was not further metabolized. The levels of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine, which serve as indicators of cobalamin deficiency, were significantly increased in C. elegans treated with the dodecylamine derivative, indicating severe cobalamin deficiency. Kinetic studies show that the affinity of the cyanocobalamin dodecylamine derivative was greater for two cobalamin-dependent enzymes, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase, compared with their respective coenzymes, suggesting that the dodecylamine derivative inactivated these enzymes. The dodecylamine derivative did not affect the levels of mRNAs encoding these enzymes or those of other proteins involved in intercellular cobalamin metabolism, including methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mmcm-1), methylmalonic acidemia cobalamin A complementation group (mmaa-1), methylmalonic aciduria cblC type (cblc-1), and methionine synthase reductase (mtrr-1). In contrast, the level of the mRNAs encoding cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (mmab-1) was increased significantly and identical to that of cobalamin-deficient C. elegans. These results indicate that the cyanocobalamin-dodecylamine derivative acts as a potent inhibitor of cobalamin-dependent enzymes and induces severe cobalamin deficiency in C. elegans.

  12. A dodecylamine derivative of cyanocobalamin potently inhibits the activities of cobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Bito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we showed that cyanocobalamin dodecylamine, a ribose 5′-carbamate derivative of cyanocobalamin, was absorbed and accumulated to significant levels by Caenorhabditis elegans and was not further metabolized. The levels of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine, which serve as indicators of cobalamin deficiency, were significantly increased in C. elegans treated with the dodecylamine derivative, indicating severe cobalamin deficiency. Kinetic studies show that the affinity of the cyanocobalamin dodecylamine derivative was greater for two cobalamin-dependent enzymes, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase, compared with their respective coenzymes, suggesting that the dodecylamine derivative inactivated these enzymes. The dodecylamine derivative did not affect the levels of mRNAs encoding these enzymes or those of other proteins involved in intercellular cobalamin metabolism, including methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mmcm-1, methylmalonic acidemia cobalamin A complementation group (mmaa-1, methylmalonic aciduria cblC type (cblc-1, and methionine synthase reductase (mtrr-1. In contrast, the level of the mRNAs encoding cob(Ialamin adenosyltransferase (mmab-1 was increased significantly and identical to that of cobalamin-deficient C. elegans. These results indicate that the cyanocobalamin-dodecylamine derivative acts as a potent inhibitor of cobalamin-dependent enzymes and induces severe cobalamin deficiency in C. elegans.

  13. Shear stress induction of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene is calcium-dependent but not calcium-activated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z; Zhang, Z; Ranjan, V; Diamond, S L

    1997-05-01

    Arterial levels of shear stress (25 dynes/cm2) can elevate constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene expression in cultured endothelial cells (Ranjan et al., 1995). By PhosphorImaging of Northern blots, we report that the eNOS/glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) messenger RNA (mRNA) ratio in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) increased by 4.8- and 7.95-fold after 6-hr shear stress exposure of 4 and 25 dynes/cm2, respectively. Incubation of BAEC with dexamethasone (1 microM) had no effect on shear stress induction of eNOS mRNA. Buffering of intracellular calcium in BAEC with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetra(acetoxymethyl)-ester (BAPTA/AM) reduced shear stress induction of eNOS mRNA by 70%. Yet, stimulation of BAEC with ionomycin (0.1-1.0 microM) for 6-24 hr to elevate intracellular calcium had no effect on eNOS mRNA. These studies indicated that the shear stress induction of eNOS mRNA was a calcium-dependent, but not calcium-activated, process. Shear stress was a very potent and rapid inducer of the eNOS mRNA, which could not be mimicked with phorbol myristrate acetate or endotoxin. Inhibition of tyrosine kinases with genistein (10 microM) or tyrphostin B46 (10 microM) or inhibition of G-protein signaling with guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP-betaS) (600 microM, 6-hr preincubation) did not block the shear stress elevation of eNOS mRNA.

  14. Characterization and analysis of the cotton cyclopropane fatty acid synthase family and their contribution to cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawat Richa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclopropane fatty acids (CPA have been found in certain gymnosperms, Malvales, Litchi and other Sapindales. The presence of their unique strained ring structures confers physical and chemical properties characteristic of unsaturated fatty acids with the oxidative stability displayed by saturated fatty acids making them of considerable industrial interest. While cyclopropenoid fatty acids (CPE are well-known inhibitors of fatty acid desaturation in animals, CPE can also inhibit the stearoyl-CoA desaturase and interfere with the maturation and reproduction of some insect species suggesting that in addition to their traditional role as storage lipids, CPE can contribute to the protection of plants from herbivory. Results Three genes encoding cyclopropane synthase homologues GhCPS1, GhCPS2 and GhCPS3 were identified in cotton. Determination of gene transcript abundance revealed differences among the expression of GhCPS1, 2 and 3 showing high, intermediate and low levels, respectively, of transcripts in roots and stems; whereas GhCPS1 and 2 are both expressed at low levels in seeds. Analyses of fatty acid composition in different tissues indicate that the expression patterns of GhCPS1 and 2 correlate with cyclic fatty acid (CFA distribution. Deletion of the N-terminal oxidase domain lowered GhCPS's ability to produce cyclopropane fatty acid by approximately 70%. GhCPS1 and 2, but not 3 resulted in the production of cyclopropane fatty acids upon heterologous expression in yeast, tobacco BY2 cell and Arabidopsis seed. Conclusions In cotton GhCPS1 and 2 gene expression correlates with the total CFA content in roots, stems and seeds. That GhCPS1 and 2 are expressed at a similar level in seed suggests both of them can be considered potential targets for gene silencing to reduce undesirable seed CPE accumulation. Because GhCPS1 is more active in yeast than the published Sterculia CPS and shows similar activity when expressed in model

  15. Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase ThyX Activity: Implications for the Folate Cycle in Bacteria▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Damien; Escartin, Frédéric; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Reed, Michael C.; Liebl, Ursula; Skouloubris, Stéphane; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2007-01-01

    Although flavin-dependent ThyX proteins show thymidylate synthase activity in vitro and functionally complement thyA defects in heterologous systems, direct proof of their cellular functions is missing. Using insertional mutagenesis of Rhodobacter capsulatus thyX, we constructed the first defined thyX inactivation mutant. Phenotypic analyses of the obtained mutant strain confirmed that R. capsulatus ThyX is required for de novo thymidylate synthesis. Full complementation of the R. capsulatus thyX::spec strain to thymidine prototrophy required not only the canonical thymidylate synthase ThyA but also the dihydrofolate reductase FolA. Strikingly, we also found that addition of exogenous methylenetetrahydrofolate transiently inhibited the growth of the different Rhodobacter strains used in this work. To rationalize these experimental results, we used a mathematical model of bacterial folate metabolism. This model suggests that a very low dihydrofolate reductase activity is enough to rescue significant thymidylate synthesis in the presence of ThyX proteins and is in agreement with the notion that intracellular accumulation of folates results in growth inhibition. In addition, our observations suggest that the presence of flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase X provides growth benefits under conditions in which the level of reduced folate derivatives is compromised. PMID:17890305

  16. Phosphorylation-dependent translocation of glycogen synthase to a novel structure during glycogen resynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, Clara; Cadefau, Joan A; Cussó, Roser

    2005-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism has been the subject of extensive research, but the mechanisms by which it is regulated are still not fully understood. It is well accepted that the rate-limiting enzymes in glycogenesis and glycogenolysis are glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GPh), respective...

  17. Yeast beta-alanine synthase shares a structural scaffold and origin with dizinc-dependent exopeptidases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, S.; Gojkovic, Zoran; Piskur, Jure

    2003-01-01

    beta-Alanine synthase (betaAS) is the final enzyme of the reductive pyrimidine catabolic pathway, which is responsible for the breakdown of pyrimidine bases, including several anticancer drugs. In eukaryotes, betaASs belong to two subfamilies, which exhibit a low degree of sequence similarity. We...

  18. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase-Dependent Amelioration of Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats with Chronic Renocardiac Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongartz, Lennart G.; Soni, Siddarth; Cramer, Maarten-Jan; Steendijk, Paul; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; van Veen, Toon A.; Joles, Jaap A.; Braam, Branko

    We have recently described the chronic renocardiac syndrome (CRCS) in rats with renal failure, cardiac dysfunction and low nitric oxide (NO) availability by combining subtotal nephrectomy and transient low-dose NO synthase (NOS) inhibition. Cardiac gene expression of the neuronal isoform of NOS

  19. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase-Dependent Amelioration of Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats with Chronic Renocardiac Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongartz, Lennart G.; Soni, Siddarth; Cramer, MJ; Steendijk, Paul; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; van Veen, AAB; Joles, Jaap A.; Braam, Branko

    2015-01-01

    We have recently described the chronic renocardiac syndrome (CRCS) in rats with renal failure, cardiac dysfunction and low nitric oxide (NO) availability by combining subtotal nephrectomy and transient low-dose NO synthase (NOS) inhibition. Cardiac gene expression of the neuronal isoform of NOS

  20. Cellulose production and cellulose synthase gene detection in acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Maria José; Torija, Maria Jesús; Mas, Albert; Mateo, Estibaliz

    2015-02-01

    The ability of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) to produce cellulose has gained much industrial interest due to the physical and chemical characteristics of bacterial cellulose. The production of cellulose occurs in the presence of oxygen and in a glucose-containing medium, but it can also occur during vinegar elaboration by the traditional method. The vinegar biofilm produced by AAB on the air-liquid interface is primarily composed of cellulose and maintains the cells in close contact with oxygen. In this study, we screened for the ability of AAB to produce cellulose using different carbon sources in the presence or absence of ethanol. The presence of cellulose in biofilms was confirmed using the fluorochrome Calcofluor by microscopy. Moreover, the process of biofilm formation was monitored under epifluorescence microscopy using the Live/Dead BacLight Kit. A total of 77 AAB strains belonging to 35 species of Acetobacter, Komagataeibacter, Gluconacetobacter, and Gluconobacter were analysed, and 30 strains were able to produce a cellulose biofilm in at least one condition. This cellulose production was correlated with the PCR amplification of the bcsA gene that encodes cellulose synthase. A total of eight degenerated primers were designed, resulting in one primer pair that was able to detect the presence of this gene in 27 AAB strains, 26 of which formed cellulose.

  1. Fatty acid synthase (FASN) as a therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Lupu, Ruth

    2017-11-01

    Ten years ago, we put forward the metabolo-oncogenic nature of fatty acid synthase (FASN) in breast cancer. Since the conception of this hypothesis, which provided a model to explain how FASN is intertwined with various signaling networks to cell-autonomously regulate breast cancer initiation and progression, FASN has received considerable attention as a therapeutic target. However, despite the ever-growing evidence demonstrating the involvement of FASN as part of the cancer-associated metabolic reprogramming, translation of the basic science-discovery aspects of FASN blockade to the clinical arena remains a challenge. Areas covered: Ten years later, we herein review the preclinical lessons learned from the pharmaceutical liabilities of the first generation of FASN inhibitors. We provide an updated view of the current development and clinical testing of next generation FASN-targeted drugs. We also discuss new clinico-molecular approaches that should help us to convert roadblocks into roadways that will propel forward our therapeutic understanding of FASN. Expert opinion: With the recent demonstration of target engagement and early signs of clinical activity with the first orally available, selective, potent and reversible FASN inhibitor, we can expect Big pharma to revitalize their interest in lipogenic enzymes as well-credentialed targets for oncology drug development in breast cancer.

  2. Sustained activation of sphingomyelin synthase by 2-hydroxyoleic acid induces sphingolipidosis in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria Laura; Liebisch, Gerhard; Lehneis, Stefan; Schmitz, Gerd; Alonso-Sande, María; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; Lopez, Daniel H; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn

    2013-05-01

    The mechanism of action of 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2OHOA), a potent antitumor drug, involves the rapid and specific activation of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS), leading to a 4-fold increase in SM mass in tumor cells. In the present study, we investigated the source of the ceramides required to sustain this dramatic increase in SM. Through radioactive and fluorescent labeling, we demonstrated that sphingolipid metabolism was altered by a 24 h exposure to 2OHOA, and we observed a consistent increase in the number of lysosomes and the presence of unidentified storage materials in treated cells. Mass spectroscopy revealed that different sphingolipid classes accumulated in human glioma U118 cells after exposure to 2OHOA, demonstrating a specific effect on C16-, C20-, and C22-containing sphingolipids. Based on these findings, we propose that the demand for ceramides required to sustain the SMS activation (ca. 200-fold higher than the basal level) profoundly modifies both sphingolipid and phospholipid metabolism. As the treatment is prolonged, tumor cells fail to adequately metabolize sphingolipids, leading to a situation resembling sphingolipidosis, whereby cell viability is compromised.

  3. Sustained activation of sphingomyelin synthase by 2-hydroxyoleic acid induces sphingolipidosis in tumor cells1[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria Laura; Liebisch, Gerhard; Lehneis, Stefan; Schmitz, Gerd; Alonso-Sande, María; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; Lopez, Daniel H.; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of action of 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2OHOA), a potent antitumor drug, involves the rapid and specific activation of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS), leading to a 4-fold increase in SM mass in tumor cells. In the present study, we investigated the source of the ceramides required to sustain this dramatic increase in SM. Through radioactive and fluorescent labeling, we demonstrated that sphingolipid metabolism was altered by a 24 h exposure to 2OHOA, and we observed a consistent increase in the number of lysosomes and the presence of unidentified storage materials in treated cells. Mass spectroscopy revealed that different sphingolipid classes accumulated in human glioma U118 cells after exposure to 2OHOA, demonstrating a specific effect on C16-, C20-, and C22-containing sphingolipids. Based on these findings, we propose that the demand for ceramides required to sustain the SMS activation (ca. 200-fold higher than the basal level) profoundly modifies both sphingolipid and phospholipid metabolism. As the treatment is prolonged, tumor cells fail to adequately metabolize sphingolipids, leading to a situation resembling sphingolipidosis, whereby cell viability is compromised. PMID:23471028

  4. Mitochonic Acid 5 (MA-5 Facilitates ATP Synthase Oligomerization and Cell Survival in Various Mitochondrial Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Matsuhashi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction increases oxidative stress and depletes ATP in a variety of disorders. Several antioxidant therapies and drugs affecting mitochondrial biogenesis are undergoing investigation, although not all of them have demonstrated favorable effects in the clinic. We recently reported a therapeutic mitochondrial drug mitochonic acid MA-5 (Tohoku J. Exp. Med., 2015. MA-5 increased ATP, rescued mitochondrial disease fibroblasts and prolonged the life span of the disease model “Mitomouse” (JASN, 2016. To investigate the potential of MA-5 on various mitochondrial diseases, we collected 25 cases of fibroblasts from various genetic mutations and cell protective effect of MA-5 and the ATP producing mechanism was examined. 24 out of the 25 patient fibroblasts (96% were responded to MA-5. Under oxidative stress condition, the GDF-15 was increased and this increase was significantly abrogated by MA-5. The serum GDF-15 elevated in Mitomouse was likewise reduced by MA-5. MA-5 facilitates mitochondrial ATP production and reduces ROS independent of ETC by facilitating ATP synthase oligomerization and supercomplex formation with mitofilin/Mic60. MA-5 reduced mitochondria fragmentation, restores crista shape and dynamics. MA-5 has potential as a drug for the treatment of various mitochondrial diseases. The diagnostic use of GDF-15 will be also useful in a forthcoming MA-5 clinical trial.

  5. Fatty acid synthase inhibitors from the hulls of Nephelium lappaceum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, You-Xing; Liang, Wen-Juan; Fan, Hui-Jin; Ma, Qing-Yun; Tian, Wei-Xi; Dai, Hao-Fu; Jiang, He-Zhong; Li, Ning; Ma, Xiao-Feng

    2011-08-16

    Natural products inhibiting fatty acid synthase (FAS) are appearing as potential therapeutic agents to treat cancer and obesity. The bioassay-guided chemical investigation of the hulls of Nephelium lappaceum L. resulted in the isolation of ten compounds (1-10) mainly including flavonoids and oleane-type triterpene oligoglycosides, in which all of the compounds were isolated from this plant for the first time. Additionally, compounds 8 and 9 were new hederagenin derivatives and were elucidated as hederagenin 3-O-(2,3-di-O-acetyl-α-l-arabinofuranosyl)-(1→3)-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl(1→2)]-β-l-arabinopyranoside and hederagenin 3-O-(3-O-acetyl-α-l-arabinofuranosyl)-(1→3)-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-l-arabinopyranoside, respectively. All these isolates were evaluated for inhibitory activities of FAS, which showed these isolates had inhibitory activity against FAS with IC(50) values ranging from 6.69 to 204.40 μM, comparable to the known FAS inhibitor EGCG (IC(50)=51.97 μM). The study indicates that the hulls of Nephelium lappaceum L. could be considered as potential sources of promising FAS inhibitors and the oleane-type triterpene oligoglycosides could be considered as another type of natural FAS inhibitors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fatty acid synthase modulates intestinal barrier function through palmitoylation of mucin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaochao; Yang, Zhen; Rey, Federico E; Ridaura, Vanessa K; Davidson, Nicholas O; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Semenkovich, Clay F

    2012-02-16

    The intestinal mucus barrier prevents pathogen invasion and maintains host-microbiota homeostasis. We show that fatty acid synthase (FAS), an insulin-responsive enzyme essential for de novo lipogenesis, helps maintain the mucus barrier by regulating Mucin 2, the dominant mucin in the colon and a central component of mucus. Inducible Cre recombinase-directed inactivation of the FAS gene in the colonic epithelium of mice is associated with disruptions in the intestinal mucus barrier as well as increased intestinal permeability, colitis, systemic inflammation, and changes in gut microbial ecology. FAS deficiency blocked the generation of palmitoylated Mucin 2, which must be S-palmitoylated at its N terminus for proper secretion and function. Furthermore, a diabetic mouse model exhibited lower FAS levels and a decreased mucus layer, which could be restored with insulin treatment. Thus, the role of FAS in maintaining intestinal barrier function may explain the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation in diabetes and other disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Extracellular Fatty Acid Synthase: A Possible Surrogate Biomarker of Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Real, Jose Manuel; Menendez, Javier A.; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose Maria; Blüher, Matthias; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Vázquez, María Jesús; Ortega, Francisco; Diéguez, Carlos; Frühbeck, Gema; Ricart, Wifredo; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT Circulating fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a biomarker of metabolically demanding human diseases. The aim of this study was to determine whether circulating FASN could be a biomarker of overnutrition-induced metabolic stress and insulin resistance in common metabolic disorders. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Circulating FASN was evaluated in two cross-sectional studies in association with insulin sensitivity and in four longitudinal studies investigating the effect of diet- and surgery-induced weight loss, physical training, and adipose tissue expansion using peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor agonist rosiglitazone on circulating FASN. RESULTS Age- and BMI-adjusted FASN concentrations were significantly increased in association with obesity-induced insulin resistance in two independent cohorts. Both visceral and subcutaneous FASN expression and protein levels correlated inversely with extracellular circulating FASN (P = −0.63; P < 0.0001), suggesting that circulating FASN is linked to depletion of intracellular FASN. Improved insulin sensitivity induced by therapeutic strategies that decreased fat mass (diet induced, surgery induced, or physical training) all led to decreased FASN levels in blood (P values between 0.02 and 0.04). To discriminate whether this was an effect related to insulin sensitization, we also investigated the effects of rosiglitazone. Rosiglitazone did not lead to significant changes in circulating FASN concentration. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that circulating FASN is a biomarker of overnutrition-induced insulin resistance that could provide diagnostic and prognostic advantages by providing insights on the individualized metabolic stress. PMID:20299470

  8. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) fatty acid synthase complex: β-hydroxyacyl-[acyl carrier protein] dehydratase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Thuillier, Irene; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Sánchez, Rosario; Garcés, Rafael; von Wettstein-Knowles, Penny; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2016-02-01

    Two sunflower hydroxyacyl-[acyl carrier protein] dehydratases evolved into two different isoenzymes showing distinctive expression levels and kinetics' efficiencies. β-Hydroxyacyl-[acyl carrier protein (ACP)]-dehydratase (HAD) is a component of the type II fatty acid synthase complex involved in 'de novo' fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. This complex, formed by four intraplastidial proteins, is responsible for the sequential condensation of two-carbon units, leading to 16- and 18-C acyl-ACP. HAD dehydrates 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP generating trans-2-enoyl-ACP. With the aim of a further understanding of fatty acid biosynthesis in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds, two β-hydroxyacyl-[ACP] dehydratase genes have been cloned from developing seeds, HaHAD1 (GenBank HM044767) and HaHAD2 (GenBank GU595454). Genomic DNA gel blot analyses suggest that both are single copy genes. Differences in their expression patterns across plant tissues were detected. Higher levels of HaHAD2 in the initial stages of seed development inferred its key role in seed storage fatty acid synthesis. That HaHAD1 expression levels remained constant across most tissues suggest a housekeeping function. Heterologous expression of these genes in E. coli confirmed both proteins were functional and able to interact with the bacterial complex 'in vivo'. The large increase of saturated fatty acids in cells expressing HaHAD1 and HaHAD2 supports the idea that these HAD genes are closely related to the E. coli FabZ gene. The proposed three-dimensional models of HaHAD1 and HaHAD2 revealed differences at the entrance to the catalytic tunnel attributable to Phe166/Val1159, respectively. HaHAD1 F166V was generated to study the function of this residue. The 'in vitro' enzymatic characterization of the three HAD proteins demonstrated all were active, with the mutant having intermediate K m and V max values to the wild-type proteins.

  9. Fatty acid synthase 2 contributes to diapause preparation in a beetle by regulating lipid accumulation and stress tolerance genes expression

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Qian-Qian; Liu, Wen; Zhu, Fen; Lei, Chao-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Diapause, also known as dormancy, is a state of arrested development that allows insects to survive unfavorable environmental conditions. Diapause-destined insects store large amounts of fat when preparing for diapause. However, the extent to which these accumulated fat reserves influence diapause remains unclear. To address this question, we investigated the function of fatty acid synthase (FAS), which plays a central role in lipid synthesis, in stress tolerance, the duration of diapause pre...

  10. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Geun [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chin-Ju [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Eun; Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Ae-Ree; Choi, Seo-Ree; Lee, Shim Sung; Lee, Joon-Hwa, E-mail: joonhwa@gnu.ac.kr [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 3{sub 10}-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins.

  11. Ferulic acid and its water-soluble derivatives inhibit nitric oxide production and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in rat primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikugawa, Masaki; Ida, Tomoaki; Ihara, Hideshi; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    2017-08-01

    We recently reported that two water-soluble derivatives of ferulic acid (1-feruloyl glycerol, 1-feruloyl diglycerol) previously developed by our group exhibited protective effects against amyloid-β-induced neurodegeneration in vitro and in vivo. In the current study, we aimed to further understand this process by examining the derivatives' ability to suppress abnormal activation of astrocytes, the key event of neurodegeneration. We investigated the effects of ferulic acid (FA) derivatives on nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in rat primary astrocytes. The results showed that these compounds inhibited NO production and iNOS expression in a concentration-dependent manner and that the mechanism underlying these effects was the suppression of the nuclear factor-κB pathway. This evidence suggests that FA and its derivatives may be effective neuroprotective agents and could be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  12. Evolution of Conifer Diterpene Synthases: Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis in Lodgepole Pine and Jack Pine Involves Monofunctional and Bifunctional Diterpene Synthases1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dawn E.; Zerbe, Philipp; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet; Madilao, Lina L.; Yuen, Macaire; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are major components of pine (Pinus spp.) oleoresin. They play critical roles in conifer defense against insects and pathogens and as a renewable resource for industrial bioproducts. The core structures of DRAs are formed in secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism via cycloisomerization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) by diterpene synthases (diTPSs). Previously described gymnosperm diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze the initial bicyclization of GGPP followed by rearrangement of a (+)-copalyl diphosphate intermediate at two discrete class II and class I active sites. In contrast, similar diterpenes of gibberellin primary (i.e. general) metabolism are produced by the consecutive activity of two monofunctional class II and class I diTPSs. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we discovered 11 diTPS from jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Three of these were orthologous to known conifer bifunctional levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthases. Surprisingly, two sets of orthologous PbdiTPSs and PcdiTPSs were monofunctional class I enzymes that lacked functional class II active sites and converted (+)-copalyl diphosphate, but not GGPP, into isopimaradiene and pimaradiene as major products. Diterpene profiles and transcriptome sequences of lodgepole pine and jack pine are consistent with roles for these diTPSs in DRA biosynthesis. The monofunctional class I diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis form a new clade within the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d3 subfamily that evolved from bifunctional diTPS rather than monofunctional enzymes (TPS-c and TPS-e) of gibberellin metabolism. Homology modeling suggested alterations in the class I active site that may have contributed to their functional specialization relative to other conifer diTPSs. PMID:23370714

  13. Gene identification and functional analysis of methylcitrate synthase in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2013-01-01

    Methylcitrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.5; MCS) is a key enzyme of the methylcitric acid cycle localized in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells and related to propionic acid metabolism. In this study, cloning of the gene mcsA encoding MCS and heterologous expression of it in Escherichia coli were performed for functional analysis of the MCS of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. Only one copy of mcsA (1,495 bp) exists in the A. niger WU-2223L chromosome. It encodes a 51-kDa polypeptide consisting of 465 amino acids containing mitochondrial targeting signal peptides. Purified recombinant MCS showed not only MCS activity (27.6 U/mg) but also citrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.1; CS) activity (26.8 U/mg). For functional analysis of MCS, mcsA disruptant strain DMCS-1, derived from A. niger WU-2223L, was constructed. Although A. niger WU-2223L showed growth on propionate as sole carbon source, DMCS-1 showed no growth. These results suggest that MCS is an essential enzyme in propionic acid metabolism, and that the methylcitric acid cycle operates functionally in A. niger WU-2223L. To determine whether MCS makes a contribution to citric acid production, citric acid production tests on DMCS-1 were performed. The amount of citric acid produced from glucose consumed by DMCS-1 in citric acid production medium over 12 d of cultivation was on the same level to that by WU-2223L. Thus it was found that MCS made no contribution to citric acid production from glucose in A. niger WU-2223L, although MCS showed CS activity.

  14. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat aorta to a histamine H3 agonist is reduced by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase and Na+,K+-ATPase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Djuric

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible involvement of different effector systems (nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase, β-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase, and Na+,K+-ATPase was evaluated in a histamine H3 receptor agonist-induced ((Rα-methylhistamine, (Rα-MeHA endothelium-dependent rat aorta relaxation assay. (Rα-MeHA (0.1 nM – 0.01 mM relaxed endothelium-dependent rat aorta, with a pD2 value of 8.22 ± 0.06, compared with a pD2 value of 7.98 ± 0.02 caused by histamine (50% and 70% relaxation, respectively. The effect of (Rα-MeHA (0.1 nM – 0.01 mM was competitively antagonized by thioperamide (1, 10 and 30 nM (pA2 = 9.21 ± 0.40; slope = 1.03 ± 0.35 but it was unaffected by pyrilamine (100 nM, cimetidine (1 μM, atropine (10 μM, propranolol (1 μM, indomethacin (10 μM or nordthydroguaiaretic acid (0.1 mM. Inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, L-NG-monomethylarginine (L-NMMA, 10 μM and NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NOARG, 10 μM inhibited the relaxation effect of (Rα-MeHA, by approximately 52% and 70%, respectively. This inhibitory effect of L-NMMA was partially reversed by L-arginine (10 μM. Methylene blue (10 μM and ouabain (10 μM inhibited relaxation (Rα-MeHA-induced by approximately 50% and 90%, respectively. The products of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase are not involved in (Rα-MeHA-induced endothelium-dependent rat aorta relaxation nor are the muscarinic cholinergic and β-adrenergic receptors. The results also suggest the involvement of NO synthase, guanylate cyclase and Na+,K+-ATPase in (Rα-MeHA-induced endothelium-dependent rat aorta relaxation.

  15. Wounding stimulates ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE gene and increases the level of jasmonic acid in Ipomoea nil cotyledons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Wilmowicz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Allene oxide synthase (AOS encodes the first enzyme in the lipoxygenase pathway, which is responsible for jasmonic acid (JA formation. In this study we report the molecular cloning and characterization of InAOS from Ipomoea nil. The full-length gene is composed of 1662 bp and encodes for 519 amino acids. The predicted InAOS contains PLN02648 motif, which is evolutionarily conserved and characteristic for functional enzymatic proteins. We have shown that wounding led to a strong stimulation of the examined gene activity in cotyledons and an increase in JA level, which suggest that this compound may be a modulator of stress responses in I. nil.

  16. Akt-dependent phosphorylation of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    OpenAIRE

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A.; Crone, Julie K.; Becker, Robyn E.; Moriarity, John L.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2002-01-01

    In the penis, nitric oxide (NO) can be formed by both neuronal NO synthase and endothelial NOS (eNOS). eNOS is activated by viscous drag/shear stress in blood vessels to produce NO continuously, a process mediated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3kinase)/Akt pathway. Here we show that PI3-kinase/Akt physiologically mediates erection. Both electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve and direct intracavernosal injection of the vasorelaxant drug papaverine cause rapid increases in phos...

  17. The effect of anandamide on uterine nitric oxide synthase activity depends on the presence of the blastocyst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micaela S Sordelli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide production, catalyzed by nitric oxide synthase (NOS, should be strictly regulated to allow embryo implantation. Thus, our first aim was to study NOS activity during peri-implantation in the rat uterus. Day 6 inter-implantation sites showed lower NOS activity (0.19±0.01 pmoles L-citrulline mg prot(-1 h(-1 compared to days 4 (0.34±0.03 and 5 (0.35±0.02 of pregnancy and to day 6 implantation sites (0.33±0.01. This regulation was not observed in pseudopregnancy. Both dormant and active blastocysts maintained NOS activity at similar levels. Anandamide (AEA, an endocannabinoid, binds to cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1 and type 2 (CB2, and high concentrations are toxic for implantation and embryo development. Previously, we observed that AEA synthesis presents an inverted pattern compared to NOS activity described here. We adopted a pharmacological approach using AEA, URB-597 (a selective inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase, the enzyme that degrades AEA and receptor selective antagonists to investigate the effect of AEA on uterine NOS activity in vitro in rat models of implantation. While AEA (0.70±0.02 vs 0.40±0.04 and URB-597 (1.08±0.09 vs 0.83±0.06 inhibited NOS activity in the absence of a blastocyst (pseudopregnancy through CB2 receptors, AEA did not modulate NOS on day 5 pregnant uterus. Once implantation begins, URB-597 decreased NOS activity on day 6 implantation sites via CB1 receptors (0.25±0.04 vs 0.40±0.05. While a CB1 antagonist augmented NOS activity on day 6 inter-implantation sites (0.17±0.02 vs 0.27±0.02, a CB2 antagonist decreased it (0.17±0.02 vs 0.12±0.01. Finally, we described the expression and localization of cannabinoid receptors during implantation. In conclusion, AEA levels close to and at implantation sites seems to modulate NOS activity and thus nitric oxide production, fundamental for implantation, via cannabinoid receptors. This modulation depends on the presence of the blastocyst. These

  18. Probing eudesmane cation-π interactions in catalysis by aristolochene synthase with non-canonical amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraldos, Juan A; Antonczak, Alicja K; González, Verónica; Fullerton, Rebecca; Tippmann, Eric M; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2011-09-07

    Stabilization of the reaction intermediate eudesmane cation (3) through interaction with Trp 334 during catalysis by aristolochene synthase from Penicillium roqueforti was investigated by site-directed incorporation of proteinogenic and non-canonical aromatic amino acids. The amount of germacrene A (2) generated by the mutant enzymes served as a measure of the stabilization of 3. 2 is a neutral intermediate, from which 3 is formed during PR-AS catalysis by protonation of the C6,C7 double bond. The replacement of Trp 334 with para-substituted phenylalanines of increasing electron-withdrawing properties led to a progressive accumulation of 2 that showed a good correlation with the interaction energies of simple cations such as Na(+) with substituted benzenes. These results provide compelling evidence for the stabilizing role played by Trp 334 in aristolochene synthase catalysis for the energetically demanding transformation of 2 to 3.

  19. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Flavin Dependent Thymidylate Synthase (MtbThyX) at 2.0 Å Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Turley, Stewart; Ulmer, Jonathan E.; Rhie, Ho Gun; Hopkins Sibley, Carol; Hol, Wim G.J. (Kyunghee); (UWASH)

    2010-07-20

    A novel flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase was identified recently as an essential gene in many archaebacteria and some pathogenic eubacteria. This enzyme, ThyX, is a potential antibacterial drug target, since humans and most eukaryotes lack the thyX gene and depend upon the conventional thymidylate synthase (TS) for their dTMP requirements. We have cloned and overexpressed the thyX gene (Rv2754c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Escherichia coli. The M. tuberculosis ThyX (MtbThyX) enzyme complements the E. coli {chi}2913 strain that lacks its conventional TS activity. The crystal structure of the homotetrameric MtbThyX was determined in the presence of the cofactor FAD and the substrate analog, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate (BrdUMP). In the active site, which is formed by three monomers, FAD is bound in an extended conformation with the adenosine ring in a deep pocket and BrdUMP in a closed conformation near the isoalloxazine ring. Structure-based mutational studies have revealed a critical role played by residues Lys165 and Arg168 in ThyX activity, possibly by governing access to the carbon atom to be methylated of a totally buried substrate dUMP.

  20. An Arabidopsis callose synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole

    2002-01-01

    in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while...... expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant....

  1. Apoptosis in rat gastric antrum: Evidence that regulation by food intake depends on nitric oxide synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Bao-Hong; Mortensen, Kirsten; Tornehave, Ditte

    2000-01-01

    combined with immunocytochemical staining for gastrin and somatostatin. Apoptotic cell morphology was determined by bisbenzimide staining for DNA. Both gastrin and somatostatin cells showed a significantly lower apoptotic index than the general epithelium. This agrees with the longer turnover kinetics...... of gastric endocrine cells. On starvation, the apoptotic index of the general epithelium and of the gastrin but not of the somatostatin, cells increased significantly. This was prevented by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME but not by its inactive stereoisomer D-NAME. Immunoreactive neuronal...... epithelial apoptosis during starvation. The close paracrine relation between somatostatin cells and gastrin cells suggests that the former regulates apoptosis of the latter through release of NO....

  2. ES7, encoding a ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase, functions in nitrogen metabolism and impacts leaf senescence in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Yingxin; Wu, Weixun; Zhan, Xiaodeng; Yu, Ning; Xu, Tingting; Liu, Qunen; Li, Zhi; Shen, Xihong; Chen, Daibo; Cheng, Shihua; Cao, Liyong

    2017-06-01

    Glutamate synthase (GOGAT) is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism and ammonium assimilation in plants. In this study, an early senescence 7 (es7) mutant was identified and characterized. The leaves of the es7 mutant begin to senesce at the tillering stage about 60day after sowing, and become increasingly senescent as the plants develop at the heading stage. When es7 plants are grown under photorespiration-suppressed conditions (high CO2), the senescence phenotype and chlorophyll content are rescued. qRT-PCR analysis showed that senescence- associated genes were up-regulated significantly in es7. A map-based cloning strategy was used to identify ES7, which encodes a ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT). ES7 was expressed constitutively, and the ES7 protein was localized in chloroplast. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that several genes related to nitrogen metabolism were differentially expressed in es7. Further, we also demonstrated that chlorophyll synthesis-associated genes were significantly down-regulated in es7. In addition, when seedlings are grown under increasing nitrogen concentrations (NH4NO3) for 15days, the contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll were significantly lower in es7. Our results demonstrated that ES7 is involved in nitrogen metabolism, effects chlorophyll synthesis, and may also associated with photorespiration, impacting leaf senescence in rice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cloning and manipulation of the Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase gene: physiological aspects of enzyme overproduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Grogan, D W; Cronan, J E

    1984-01-01

    Like many other eubacteria, cultures of Escherichia coli accumulate cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) at a well-defined stage of growth, due to the action of the cytoplasmic enzyme CFA synthase. We report the isolation of the putative structural gene, cfa, for this enzyme on an E. coli-ColE1 chimeric plasmid by the use of an autoradiographic colony screening technique. When introduced into a variety of E. coli strains, this plasmid, pLC18-11, induced corresponding increases in CFA content and C...

  4. Embryopathic effects of thalidomide and its hydrolysis products in rabbit embryo culture: evidence for a prostaglandin H synthase (PHS)-dependent, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Crystal J J; Gonçalves, Luisa L; Wells, Peter G

    2011-07-01

    Thalidomide (TD) causes birth defects in humans and rabbits via several potential mechanisms, including bioactivation by embryonic prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) enzymes to a reactive intermediate that enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We show herein that TD in rabbit embryo culture produces relevant embryopathies, including decreases in head/brain development by 28% and limb bud growth by 71% (Pacid (PGMA) and 2-phthalimidoglutaric acid (PGA), were similarly embryopathic, attenuating otic vesicle (ear) and limb bud formation by up to 36 and 77%, respectively (Pacid (ETYA) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), or the free-radical spin trap phenylbutylnitrone (PBN), completely blocked embryonic 8-oxoG formation and/or embryopathies initiated by TD, PGMA, and PGA. This is the first demonstration of limb bud embryopathies initiated by TD, as well as its hydrolysis products, in a mammalian embryo culture model of a species susceptible to TD in vivo, indicating that all likely contribute to TD teratogenicity in vivo, in part through PHS-dependent, ROS-mediated mechanisms.

  5. Modulation of Medium-Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 by Replacing FabH with a Chaetoceros ketoacyl-ACP synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiya eGu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The isolation or engineering of algal cells synthesizing high levels of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs is attractive to mitigate the high clouding point of longer chain fatty acids in algal based biodiesel. To develop a more informed understanding of MCFA synthesis is photosynthetic microorganisms, we isolated several algae from Great Salt Lake and screened this collection for MCFA accumulation to identify strains naturally accumulating high levels of MCFA. A diatom, Chaetoceros sp. GSL56, accumulated particularly high levels of C14 (up to 40%, with the majority of C14 fatty acids (~2/3 allocated in triacylglycerols. Using whole cell transcriptome sequencing and de novo assembly, putative genes encoding fatty acid synthesis enzymes were identified. Enzymes from this Chaetoceros sp. were expressed in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 to validate gene function and to determine whether eukaryotic enzymes lacking bacteria evolutionary control mechanisms could be used to improve MCFA production in this promising production strains. Replacement of the Synechococcus 7002 native FabH with a Chaetoceros ketoacyl-ACP synthase III increased MCFA synthesis up to five fold. The level of increase is dependent on promoter strength and culturing conditions.

  6. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a complete bacterial fatty-acid synthase type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enderle, Mathias [Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 15, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); McCarthy, Andrew [EMBL Grenoble, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Paithankar, Karthik Shivaji, E-mail: paithankar@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 15, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Grininger, Martin, E-mail: paithankar@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 15, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2015-10-23

    Bacterial and fungal type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) are evolutionarily connected, as bacterial FAS I is considered to be the ancestor of fungal FAS I. In this work, the production, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data analysis of a bacterial FAS I are reported. While a deep understanding of the fungal and mammalian multi-enzyme type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) has been achieved in recent years, the bacterial FAS I family, which is narrowly distributed within the Actinomycetales genera Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium and Nocardia, is still poorly understood. This is of particular relevance for two reasons: (i) although homologous to fungal FAS I, cryo-electron microscopic studies have shown that bacterial FAS I has unique structural and functional properties, and (ii) M. tuberculosis FAS I is a drug target for the therapeutic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and therefore is of extraordinary importance as a drug target. Crystals of FAS I from C. efficiens, a homologue of M. tuberculosis FAS I, were produced and diffracted X-rays to about 4.5 Å resolution.

  7. Campylobacter jejuni fatty acid synthase II: Structural and functional analysis of [beta]-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew S.; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; (Houston)

    2009-08-14

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for all living cells. In contrast to higher organisms, bacteria use a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) composed of a series of individual proteins, making FAS II enzymes excellent targets for antibiotics discovery. The {beta}-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ) catalyzes an essential step in the FAS II pathway. Here, we report the structure of Campylobacter jejuni FabZ (CjFabZ), showing a hexamer both in crystals and solution, with each protomer adopting the characteristic hot dog fold. Together with biochemical analysis of CjFabZ, we define the first functional FAS II enzyme from this pathogen, and provide a framework for investigation on roles of FAS II in C. jejuni virulence

  8. Individualized supplementation of folic acid according to polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) reduced pregnant complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiujuan; Jiang, Jing; Xu, Min; Xu, Mei; Yang, Yan; Lu, Wei; Yu, Xuemei; Ma, Jianlin; Pan, Jiakui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, A1298C and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G polymorphisms of pregnant women in Jiaodong region in China, and to investigate whether folic acid supplementation affect the pregnancy complications. A total of 7,812 pregnant women from the Jiaodong region in Shandong province in China. By using Taqman-MGB, 2,928 pregnant women (case group) were tested for the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of MTHFR C677T, A1298C and MTRR A66G polymorphisms. Folic acid metabolism ability was ranked at four levels and then pregnant women in different rank group were supplemented with different doses of folic acid. Their pregnancy complications were followed up and compared with 4,884 pregnant women without folic acid supplementation (control group) in the same hospital. The allele frequencies of MTHFR C677T were 49.1 and 50.9%; those of MTHFR A1298C were 80.2 and 19.8%, and those of MTRR A66G were 74.1 and 25.9%. After supplemented with folic acid, the complication rates in different age groups were significantly reduced, especially for gestational diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Periconceptional folic acid supplementation and healthcare following gene polymorphism testing may be a powerful measure to decrease congenital malformations. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Examining the relationship between Cu-ATSM hypoxia selectivity and fatty acid synthase expression in human prostate cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavere, Amy L. [Division of Radiological Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Lewis, Jason S. [Division of Radiological Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)], E-mail: j.s.lewis@wustl.edu

    2008-04-15

    Introduction: Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with copper (II)-diacetyl-bis(N{sup 4}-Methylthiosemicarbazone)(Cu-ATSM) for delineating hypoxia has provided valuable clinical information, but investigations in animal models of prostate cancer have shown some inconsistencies. As a defense mechanism in prostate cancer cells, the fatty acid synthesis pathway harnesses its oxidizing power for improving the redox balance despite conditions of extreme hypoxia, potentially altering Cu-ATSM hypoxia selectivity. Methods: Human prostate tumor-cultured cell lines (PC-3, 22Rv1, LNCaP and LAPC-4), were treated with a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor (C75, 100 {mu}M) under anoxia. The {sup 64}Cu-ATSM uptake in these treated cells and nontreated anoxic cells was then examined. Fatty acid synthase expression level in each cell line was subsequently quantified by ELISA. An additional study was performed in PC-3 cells to examine the relationship between the restoration of {sup 64}Cu-ATSM hypoxia selectivity and the concentration of C75 (100, 20, 4 or 0.8 {mu}M) administered to the cells. Results: Inhibition of fatty acid synthesis with C75 resulted in a significant increase in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM retention in prostate tumor cells in vitro under anoxia over 60 min. Inhibition studies demonstrated higher uptake values of 20.9{+-}3.27%, 103.0{+-}32.6%, 144.2{+-}32.3% and 200.1{+-}79.3% at 15 min over control values for LAPC-4, PC-3, LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells, respectively. A correlation was seen (R{sup 2}=.911) with FAS expression plotted against percentage change in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM uptake with C75 treatment. Conclusions: Although Cu-ATSM has clinical relevance in the PET imaging of hypoxia in many tumor types, its translation to the imaging of prostate cancer may be limited by the overexpression of FAS associated with prostatic malignancies.

  10. DNA sequence and expression variation of hop (Humulus lupulus) valerophenone synthase (VPS), a key gene in bitter acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Consuelo B; Whittock, Lucy D; Whittock, Simon P; Leggett, Grey; Koutoulis, Anthony

    2008-08-01

    The hop plant (Humulus lupulus) is a source of many secondary metabolites, with bitter acids essential in the beer brewing industry and others having potential applications for human health. This study investigated variation in DNA sequence and gene expression of valerophenone synthase (VPS), a key gene in the bitter acid biosynthesis pathway of hop. Sequence variation was studied in 12 varieties, and expression was analysed in four of the 12 varieties in a series across the development of the hop cone. Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in VPS, seven of which were synonymous. The two non-synonymous polymorphisms did not appear to be related to typical bitter acid profiles of the varieties studied. However, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of VPS expression during hop cone development showed a clear link with the bitter acid content. The highest levels of VPS expression were observed in two triploid varieties, 'Symphony' and 'Ember', which typically have high bitter acid levels. In all hop varieties studied, VPS expression was lowest in the leaves and an increase in expression was consistently observed during the early stages of cone development.

  11. Fatty acid synthase plays a role in cancer metabolism beyond providing fatty acids for phospholipid synthesis or sustaining elevations in glycolytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopperton, Kathryn E., E-mail: kathryn.hopperton@mail.utoronto.ca [Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3E2 (Canada); Duncan, Robin E., E-mail: robin.duncan@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3E2 (Canada); Bazinet, Richard P., E-mail: richard.bazinet@utoronto.ca [Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3E2 (Canada); Archer, Michael C., E-mail: m.archer@utoronto.ca [Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3E2 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3E2 (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    Fatty acid synthase is over-expressed in many cancers and its activity is required for cancer cell survival, but the role of endogenously synthesized fatty acids in cancer is unknown. It has been suggested that endogenous fatty acid synthesis is either needed to support the growth of rapidly dividing cells, or to maintain elevated glycolysis (the Warburg effect) that is characteristic of cancer cells. Here, we investigate both hypotheses. First, we compared utilization of fatty acids synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-labeled acetate to those supplied exogenously as {sup 14}C-labeled palmitate in the culture medium in human breast cancer (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). We found that cancer cells do not produce fatty acids that are different from those derived from exogenous palmitate, that these fatty acids are esterified to the same lipid and phospholipid classes in the same proportions, and that their distribution within neutral lipids is not different from untransformed cells. These results suggest that endogenously synthesized fatty acids do not fulfill a specific function in cancer cells. Furthermore, we observed that cancer cells excrete endogenously synthesized fatty acids, suggesting that they are produced in excess of requirements. We next investigated whether lipogenic activity is involved in the maintenance of high glycolytic activity by culturing both cancer and non-transformed cells under anoxic conditions. Although anoxia increased glycolysis 2–3 fold, we observed no concomitant increase in lipogenesis. Our results indicate that breast cancer cells do not have a specific qualitative or quantitative requirement for endogenously synthesized fatty acids and that increased de novo lipogenesis is not required to sustain elevations in glycolytic activity induced by anoxia in these cells. - Highlights: • Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is over-expressed in cancer but its function is unknown. • We compare

  12. Role of cysteine amino acid residues on the RNA binding activity of human thymidylate synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xiukun; Liu, Jun; Maley, Frank; Chu, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The role of cysteine sulfhydryl residues on the RNA binding activity of human thymidylate synthase (TS) was investigated by mutating each cysteine residue on human TS to a corresponding alanine residue. Enzymatic activities of TS:C43A and TS:C210A mutant proteins were nearly identical to wild-type TS, while TS:C180A and TS:C199A mutants expressed >80% of wild-type enzyme activity. In contrast, TS:C195A was completely inactive. Mutant proteins, TS:C195A, TS:C199A and TS:C210A, retained RNA bin...

  13. Constitutive arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity in different organs of pea seedlings during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Carreras, Alfonso; Valderrama, Raquel; Palma, José M; León, Ana M; Sandalio, Luisa M; del Río, Luis A

    2006-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signalling molecule in different animal and plant physiological processes. Little is known about its biological function in plants and on the enzymatic source or site of NO production during plant development. The endogenous NO production from L-arginine (NO synthase activity) was analyzed in leaves, stems and roots during plant development, using pea seedlings as a model. NOS activity was analyzed using a novel chemiluminescence-based assay which is more sensitive and specific than previous methods used in plant tissues. In parallel, NO accumulation was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy using as fluorescent probes either DAF-2 DA or DAF-FM DA. A strong increase in NOS activity was detected in stems after 11 days growth, coinciding with the maximum stem elongation. The arginine-dependent NOS activity was constitutive and sensitive to aminoguanidine, a well-known irreversible inhibitor of animal NOS, and this NOS activity was differentially modulated depending on the plant organ and seedling developmental stage. In all tissues studied, NO was localized mainly in the vascular tissue (xylem) and epidermal cells and in root hairs. These loci of NO generation and accumulation suggest novel functions for NO in these cell types.

  14. Functional replacement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fatty acid synthase with a bacterial type II system allows flexible product profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moya, Ruben; Leber, Christopher; Cardenas, Javier; Da Silva, Nancy A

    2015-12-01

    The native yeast type I fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a complex, rigid enzyme, and challenging to engineer for the production of medium- or short-chain fatty acids. Introduction of a type II FAS is a promising alternative as it allows expression control for each discrete enzyme and the addition of heterologous thioesterases. In this study, the native Saccharomyces cerevisiae FAS was functionally replaced by the Escherichia coli type II FAS (eFAS) system. The E. coli acpS + acpP (together), fabB, fabD, fabG, fabH, fabI, fabZ, and tesA were expressed in individual S. cerevisiae strains, and enzyme activity was confirmed by in vitro activity assays. Eight genes were then integrated into the yeast genome, while tesA or an alternate thioesterase gene, fatB from Ricinus communis or TEII from Rattus novergicus, was expressed from a multi-copy plasmid. Native FAS activity was eliminated by knocking out the yeast FAS2 gene. The strains expressing only the eFAS as de novo fatty acid source grew without fatty acid supplementation demonstrating that this type II FAS is able to functionally replace the native yeast FAS. The engineered strain expressing the R. communis fatB thioesterase increased total fatty acid titer 1.7-fold and shifted the fatty acid profile towards C14 production, increasing it from <1% in the native strain to more than 30% of total fatty acids, and reducing C18 production from 39% to 8%. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Gene expression profiles of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cytokines in Leishmania major-infected macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells treated with gallic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radtke, O.A.; Kiderlen, A.F.; Kayser, Oliver; Kolodziej, H

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gallic acid on the gene expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-10, IL-12, IL-18, TNF-alpha, and interferon (IFN)-gamma were investigated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The experiments were performed

  16. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wise, Mitchell Lynn; Katahira, Eva Joy; Savage, Thomas Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  17. Direct structural insight into the substrate-shuttling mechanism of yeast fatty acid synthase by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Preeti; Mills, Deryck J; Wouts, Remco; Grininger, Martin; Vonck, Janet; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2010-05-18

    Yeast fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a 2.6-MDa barrel-shaped multienzyme complex, which carries out cyclic synthesis of fatty acids. By electron cryomicroscopy of single particles we obtained a three-dimensional map of yeast FAS at 5.9-A resolution. Compared to the crystal structures of fungal FAS, the EM map reveals major differences and new features that indicate a considerably different arrangement of the complex in solution compared to the crystal structures, as well as a high degree of variance inside the barrel. Distinct density regions in the reaction chambers next to each of the catalytic domains fitted the substrate-binding acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In each case, this resulted in the expected distance of approximately 18 A from the ACP substrate-binding site to the active site of the catalytic domains. The multiple, partially occupied positions of the ACP within the reaction chamber provide direct structural insight into the substrate-shuttling mechanism of fatty acid synthesis in this large cellular machine.

  18. Fatty acid synthase as a factor required for exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and dentate gyrus cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorna, Nataliya E; Santos-Soto, Iván J; Carballeira, Nestor M; Morales, Joan L; de la Nuez, Janneliz; Cátala-Valentin, Alma; Chornyy, Anatoliy P; Vázquez-Montes, Adrinel; De Ortiz, Sandra Peña

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis.

  19. Fatty acid synthase as a factor required for exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and dentate gyrus cellular proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya E Chorna

    Full Text Available Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN, the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis.

  20. Increased expression of fatty acid synthase provides a survival advantage to colorectal cancer cells via upregulation of cellular respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y; Harris, Jennifer W; Mitov, Mihail I; Kim, Ji Tae; Butterfield, D Allan; Lee, Eun Y; Weiss, Heidi L; Gao, Tianyan; Evers, B Mark

    2015-08-07

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a lipogenic enzyme, is upregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC). Increased de novo lipid synthesis is thought to be a metabolic adaptation of cancer cells that promotes survival and metastasis; however, the mechanisms for this phenomenon are not fully understood. We show that FASN plays a role in regulation of energy homeostasis by enhancing cellular respiration in CRC. We demonstrate that endogenously synthesized lipids fuel fatty acid oxidation, particularly during metabolic stress, and maintain energy homeostasis. Increased FASN expression is associated with a decrease in activation of energy-sensing pathways and accumulation of lipid droplets in CRC cells and orthotopic CRCs. Immunohistochemical evaluation demonstrated increased expression of FASN and p62, a marker of autophagy inhibition, in primary CRCs and liver metastases compared to matched normal colonic mucosa. Our findings indicate that overexpression of FASN plays a crucial role in maintaining energy homeostasis in CRC via increased oxidation of endogenously synthesized lipids. Importantly, activation of fatty acid oxidation and consequent downregulation of stress-response signaling pathways may be key adaptation mechanisms that mediate the effects of FASN on cancer cell survival and metastasis, providing a strong rationale for targeting this pathway in advanced CRC.

  1. Ethanol lowers glutathione in rat liver and brain and inhibits methionine synthase in a cobalamin-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waly, Mostafa I; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Deth, Richard C

    2011-02-01

    Methionine synthase (MS) is a ubiquitous enzyme that requires vitamin B12 (cobalamin) and 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate for the methylation of homocysteine to methionine. Previous studies have shown that acute or chronic ethanol (ETOH) administration results in the inhibition of MS and depletion of glutathione (GSH), and it has been proposed that GSH is required for the synthesis of methylcobalamin (MeCbl). We measured GSH levels and investigated the ability of different cobalamin cofactors [cyano- (CNCbl), glutathionyl- (GSCbl), hydroxo- (OHCbl), and MeCbl] to support MS activity in liver and brain cortex from control and ETOH-treated rats. In control animals, MS activity was higher in liver than in cortex for all cobalamins and MeCbl-based activity was higher than for other cofactors. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) was required for OHCbl, CNCbl, and GSCbl-based activity, but not for MeCbl. Feeding an ETOH-containing diet for four weeks caused a significant decrease in liver MS activity, in a cobalamin-dependent manner (OHCbl ≥ CNCbl > GSCbl > MeCbl). In brain cortex, OHCbl, CNCbl, and GSCbl-based activity was reduced by ETOH treatment, but MeCbl-based activity was unaffected. GSH levels were reduced by ETOH treatment in both liver and cortex homogenates, and addition of GSH restored OHCbl-based MS activity to control levels. Betaine administration had no significant effect on GSH levels or MS activity in either control or ETOH-fed groups. The ETOH-induced decrease in OHCbl-based MS activity is secondary to decreased GSH levels and a decreased ability to synthesize MeCbl. The ability of MeCbl to completely offset ETOH inhibition in brain cortex, but not liver, suggests tissue-specific differences in the GSH-dependent regulation of MS activity. Copyright © 2010 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  2. Arginase Inhibition Restores Peroxynitrite-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction via L-Arginine-Dependent Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Cong; Park, Jong Taek; Jeon, Yeong Gwan; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Hoe, Kwang Lae; Kim, Young Myeong; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Ryoo, Sungwoo

    2016-11-01

    Peroxynitrite plays a critical role in vascular pathophysiology by increasing arginase activity and decreasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate whether arginase inhibition and L-arginine supplement could restore peroxynitrite-induced endothelial dysfunction and determine the involved mechanism. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with SIN-1, a peroxynitrite generator, and arginase activity, nitrite/nitrate production, and expression levels of proteins were measured. eNOS activation was evaluated via Western blot and dimer blot analysis. We also tested nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and performed a vascular tension assay. SIN-1 treatment increased arginase activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner and reciprocally decreased nitrite/nitrate production that was prevented by peroxynitrite scavenger in HUVECs. Furthermore, SIN-1 induced an increase in the expression level of arginase I and II, though not in eNOS protein. The decreased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 and the increased at Thr495 by SIN-1 were restored with arginase inhibitor and L-arginine. The changed eNOS phosphorylation was consistent in the stability of eNOS dimers. SIN-1 decreased NO production and increased ROS generation in the aortic endothelium, all of which was reversed by arginase inhibitor or L-arginine. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) prevented SIN-1-induced ROS generation. In the vascular tension assay, SIN-1 enhanced vasoconstrictor responses to U46619 and attenuated vasorelaxant responses to acetylcholine that were reversed by arginase inhibition. These findings may explain the beneficial effect of arginase inhibition and L-arginine supplement on endothelial dysfunction under redox imbalance-dependent pathophysiological conditions.

  3. Catalysis by nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marletta, M A; Hurshman, A R; Rusche, K M

    1998-10-01

    The enzyme nitric oxide synthase catalyzes the oxidation of the amino acid L-arginine to L-citrulline and nitric oxide in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Nitric oxide plays a critical role in signal transduction pathways in the cardiovascular and nervous systems and is a key component of the cytostatic/cytotoxic function of the immune system. Characterization of nitric oxide synthase substrates and cofactors has outlined the broad details of the overall reaction and suggested possibilities for chemical steps in the reaction; however, the molecular details of the reaction mechanism are still poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests a role for the reduced bound pterin in the first step of the reaction--the hydroxylation of L-arginine.

  4. Citric acid production and citrate synthase genes in distinct strains of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citric acid is an important organic acid, multifunctional with a wide array of uses. The objectives of this study were the isolation and selection strains of the genus Aspergillus, investigating the solubilization of phosphate of these isolates, verifying the expression rate of genes involved in the identification of isolates, and ...

  5. Folic Acid Promotes Recycling of Tetrahydrobiopterin and Protects Against Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension by Recoupling Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupsky, Karel; Kračun, Damir; Kanchev, Ivan; Bertram, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nitric oxide (NO) derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) has been implicated in the adaptive response to hypoxia. An imbalance between 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH2) can result in eNOS uncoupling and the generation of superoxide instead of NO. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) can recycle BH2 to BH4, leading to eNOS recoupling. However, the role of DHFR and eNOS recoupling in the response to hypoxia is not well understood. We hypothesized that increasing the capacity to recycle BH4 from BH2 would improve NO bioavailability as well as pulmonary vascular remodeling (PVR) and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) as indicators of pulmonary hypertension (PH) under hypoxic conditions. Results: In human pulmonary artery endothelial cells and murine pulmonary arteries exposed to hypoxia, eNOS was uncoupled as indicated by reduced superoxide production in the presence of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Concomitantly, NO levels, BH4 availability, and expression of DHFR were diminished under hypoxia. Application of folic acid (FA) restored DHFR levels, NO bioavailability, and BH4 levels under hypoxia. Importantly, FA prevented the development of hypoxia-induced PVR, right ventricular pressure increase, and RVH. Innovation: FA-induced upregulation of DHFR recouples eNOS under hypoxia by improving BH4 recycling, thus preventing hypoxia-induced PH. Conclusion: FA might serve as a novel therapeutic option combating PH. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1076–1091. PMID:26414244

  6. Expression and regulation of pear 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase gene (PpACS1a) during fruit ripening, under salicylic acid and indole-3-acetic acid treatment, and in diseased fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Xing

    2014-06-01

    In plants, the level of ethylene is determined by the activity of the key enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase (ACS). A gene encoding an ACC synthase protein was isolated from pear (Pyrus pyrifolia). This gene designated PpACS1a (GenBank accession no. KC632526) was 1488 bp in length with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 495 amino acids that shared high similarity with other pear ACC synthase proteins. The PpACS1a was grouped into type-1 subfamily of plant ACS based on its conserved domain and phylogenetic status. Real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PpACS1a was differentially expressed in pear tissues and predominantly expressed in anthers. The expression signal of PpACS1a was also detected in fruit and leaves, but no signal was detected in shoots and petals. Furthermore, the PpACS1a expression was regulated during fruit ripening. In addition, the PpACS1a gene expression was regulated by salicylic acid (SA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in fruit. Moreover, the expression of the PpACS1a was up-regulated in diseased pear fruit. These results indicated that PpACS1a might be involved in fruit ripening and response to SA, IAA and disease.

  7. Crosstalk between osteoprotegerin (OPG), fatty acid synthase (FASN) and, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) in breast cancer: implications in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sudeshna; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2016-09-13

    The crosstalk between malignant and nonmalignant cells in the tumor microenvironment, as maneuvered by cytokines/chemokines, drives breast cancer progression. In our previous study, we discovered Osteoprotegerin (OPG) as one of the cytokines heavily secreted by breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that OPG is expressed and secreted at very high levels from the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines SUM149PT and SUM1315MO2 as compared to normal human mammary epithelial HMEC cells. OPG was involved in modulating aneuploidy, cell proliferation, and angiogenesis in breast cancer. Mass spectrometry analysis performed in this study revealed OPG interacts with fatty acid synthase (FASN), which is a key enzyme of the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway in breast cancer cells. Further, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and fluorescence quantitation assays highlighted the presence of a large number of lipid bodies (lipid droplets) in SUM149PT and SUM1315MO2 cells in comparison to HMEC. We recently showed upregulation of the COX-2 inflammatory pathway and its metabolite PGE2 secretion in SUM149PT and SUM1315MO2 breast cancer cells. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue samples displayed high expression of OPG, PGE2 and fatty acid synthase (FASN). FASN is a multifunctional enzyme involved in lipid biosynthesis. Immunofluorescence staining revealed the co-existence of COX-2 and FASN in the lipid bodies of breast cancer cells. We reasoned that there might be crosstalk between OPG, FASN, and COX-2 that sustains the inflammatory pathways in breast cancer. Interestingly, knocking down OPG by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing in breast cancer cells decreased FASN expression at the protein level. Here, we identified cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation of COX-2 and FASN by recombinant human OPG (rhOPG). Treatment with FASN inhibitor C75 and COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib individually decreased the number of lipid bodies/cell, downregulated phosphorylation of ERK

  8. Crosstalk between osteoprotegerin (OPG), fatty acid synthase (FASN) and, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) in breast cancer: implications in carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sudeshna; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    The crosstalk between malignant and nonmalignant cells in the tumor microenvironment, as maneuvered by cytokines/chemokines, drives breast cancer progression. In our previous study, we discovered Osteoprotegerin (OPG) as one of the cytokines heavily secreted by breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that OPG is expressed and secreted at very high levels from the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines SUM149PT and SUM1315MO2 as compared to normal human mammary epithelial HMEC cells. OPG was involved in modulating aneuploidy, cell proliferation, and angiogenesis in breast cancer. Mass spectrometry analysis performed in this study revealed OPG interacts with fatty acid synthase (FASN), which is a key enzyme of the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway in breast cancer cells. Further, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and fluorescence quantitation assays highlighted the presence of a large number of lipid bodies (lipid droplets) in SUM149PT and SUM1315MO2 cells in comparison to HMEC. We recently showed upregulation of the COX-2 inflammatory pathway and its metabolite PGE2 secretion in SUM149PT and SUM1315MO2 breast cancer cells. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue samples displayed high expression of OPG, PGE2 and fatty acid synthase (FASN). FASN is a multifunctional enzyme involved in lipid biosynthesis. Immunofluorescence staining revealed the co-existence of COX-2 and FASN in the lipid bodies of breast cancer cells. We reasoned that there might be crosstalk between OPG, FASN, and COX-2 that sustains the inflammatory pathways in breast cancer. Interestingly, knocking down OPG by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing in breast cancer cells decreased FASN expression at the protein level. Here, we identified cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation of COX-2 and FASN by recombinant human OPG (rhOPG). Treatment with FASN inhibitor C75 and COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib individually decreased the number of lipid bodies/cell, downregulated phosphorylation of ERK

  9. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.B.; Wildung, M.R.; Burke, C.C.; Gershenzon, J.

    1999-03-02

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate. 5 figs.

  10. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce (Pullman, WA); Wildung, Mark Raymond (Colfax, WA); Burke, Charles Cullen (Moscow, ID); Gershenzon, Jonathan (Jena, DE)

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate.

  11. Regulation of expression of citrate synthase by the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Crumbley

    Full Text Available The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors that plays an important role in regulation of the circadian rhythm and metabolism. Mice lacking a functional RORα display a range of metabolic abnormalities including decreased serum cholesterol and plasma triglycerides. Citrate synthase (CS is a key enzyme of the citric acid cycle that provides energy for cellular function. Additionally, CS plays a critical role in providing citrate derived acetyl-CoA for lipogenesis and cholesterologenesis. Here, we identified a functional RORα response element (RORE in the promoter of the CS gene. ChIP analysis demonstrates RORα occupancy of the CS promoter and a putative RORE binds to RORα effectively in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and confers RORα responsiveness to a reporter gene in a cotransfection assay. We also observed a decrease in CS gene expression and CS enzymatic activity in the staggerer mouse, which has a mutation of in the Rora gene resulting in nonfunctional RORα protein. Furthermore, we found that SR1001 a RORα inverse agonist eliminated the circadian pattern of expression of CS mRNA in mice. These data suggest that CS is a direct RORα target gene and one mechanism by which RORα regulates lipid metabolism is via regulation of CS expression.

  12. Improvement of Glyphosate Resistance through Concurrent Mutations in Three Amino Acids of the Ochrobactrum 5-Enopyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Zhao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2011-01-01

    A mutant of 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Ochrobactrum anthropi was identified after four rounds of DNA shuffling and screening. Its ability to restore the growth of the mutant ER2799 cell on an M9 minimal medium containing 300 mM glyphosate led to its identification. The mutant had mutations in seven amino acids: E145G, N163H, N267S, P318R, M377V, M425T, and P438L. Among these mutations, N267S, P318R, and M425T have never been previously reported as important residues for glyphosate resistance. However, in the present study they were found by site-directed mutagenesis to collectively contribute to the improvement of glyphosate tolerance. Kinetic analyses of these three mutants demonstrated that the effectiveness of these three individual amino acid alterations on glyphosate tolerance was in the order P318R > M425T > N267S. The results of the kinetic analyses combined with a three-dimensional structure modeling of the location of P318R and M425T demonstrate that the lower hemisphere's upper surface is possibly another important region for glyphosate resistance. Furthermore, the transgenic Arabidopsis was obtained to confirm the potential of the mutant in developing glyphosate-resistant crops. PMID:21948846

  13. Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase deficiency: urinary organic acid profiles and expanded spectrum of mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, James J; Peters, Heidi; Boneh, Avihu; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Wieser, Stefanie; Hinderhofer, Katrin; Johnson, David; Zschocke, Johannes

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (HMCS2) deficiency results in episodes of hypoglycemia and increases in fatty acid metabolites. Metabolite abnormalities described to date in HMCS2 deficiency are nonspecific and overlap with other inborn errors of metabolism, making the biochemical diagnosis of HMCS2 deficiency difficult. Urinary organic acid profiles from periods of metabolic decompensation were studied in detail in HMCS2-deficient patients from four families. An additional six unrelated patients were identified from clinical presentation and/or qualitative identification of abnormal organic acids. The diagnosis was confirmed by sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis of the HMGCS2 gene. Seven related novel organic acids were identified in urine profiles. Five of them (3,5-dihydroxyhexanoic 1,5 lactone; trans-5-hydroxyhex-2-enoate; 4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-pyrone; 5-hydroxy-3-ketohexanoate; 3,5-dihydroxyhexanoate) were identified by comparison with synthesized or commercial authentic compounds. We provisionally identified trans-3-hydroxyhex-4-enoate and 3-hydroxy-5-ketohexanoate by their mass spectral characteristics. These metabolites were found in samples taken during periods of decompensation and normalized when patients recovered. When cutoffs of adipic >200 and 4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-pyrone >20 μmol/mmol creatinine were applied, all eight samples taken from five HMCS2-deficient patients during episodes of decompensation were flagged with a positive predictive value of 80% (95% confidence interval 35-100%). Some ketotic patients had increased 4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-pyrone. Molecular studies identified a total of 12 novel mutations, including a large deletion of HMGCS2 exon 1 in two families, highlighting the need to perform quantitative gene analyses. There are now 26 known HMGCS2 mutations, which are reviewed in the text. 4-Hydroxy-6-methyl-2-pyrone and related metabolites are markers for HMCS2 deficiency. Detection of these metabolites

  14. Cloning, characterization and expression of Peking duck fatty acid synthase during adipocyte differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Ding

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: We have successfully cloned and characterized Peking duck FAS. FAS was induced during adipocyte differentiation and by oleic acid treatment. These findings suggest that Peking duck FAS plays a similar role to mammalian FAS during adipocyte differentiation.

  15. A stilbene synthase allele from a Chinese wild grapevine confers resistance to powdery mildew by recruiting salicylic acid signalling for efficient defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yuntong; Xu, Weirong; Duan, Dong; Wang, Yuejin; Nick, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Stilbenes are central phytoalexins in Vitis, and induction of the key enzyme stilbene synthase (STS) is pivotal for disease resistance. Here, we address the potential for breeding resistance using an STS allele isolated from Chinese wild grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata (VpSTS) by comparison with its homologue from Vitis vinifera cv. 'Carigane' (VvSTS). Although the coding regions of both alleles are very similar (>99% identity on the amino acid level), the promoter regions are significantly different. By expression in Arabidopsis as a heterologous system, we show that the allele from the wild Chinese grapevine can confer accumulation of stilbenes and resistance against the powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum, whereas the allele from the vinifera cultivar cannot. To dissect the upstream signalling driving the activation of this promoter, we used a dual-luciferase reporter system in a grapevine cell culture. We show elevated responsiveness of the promoter from the wild grape to salicylic acid (SA) and to the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22, equal induction of both alleles by jasmonic acid (JA), and a lack of response to the cell death-inducing elicitor Harpin. This elevated SA response of the VpSTS promoter depends on calcium influx, oxidative burst by RboH, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling, and JA synthesis. We integrate the data in the context of a model where the resistance of V. pseudoreticulata is linked to a more efficient recruitment of SA signalling for phytoalexin synthesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. The effect of insulin to decrease neointimal growth after arterial injury is endothelial nitric oxide synthase-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, June; Breen, Danna M; Pereira, Troy J; Dalvi, Prasad S; Zhang, Hangjun; Mori, Yusaku; Ghanim, Husam; Tumiati, Laura; Fantus, I George; Bendeck, Michelle P; Dandona, Paresh; Rao, Vivek; Dolinsky, Vernon W; Heximer, Scott P; Giacca, Adria

    2015-07-01

    In vitro, insulin has mitogenic effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) but also has protective effects on endothelial cells by stimulating nitric oxide (NO) production and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression. Furthermore, NOS inhibition attenuates the effect of insulin to inhibit VSMC migration in vitro. Using an in vivo model, we have previously shown that insulin decreases neointimal growth and cell migration and increases re-endothelialization after arterial injury in normal rats. Since insulin can stimulate NOS, and NO can decrease neointimal growth, we hypothesized that NOS, and more specifically eNOS was required for the effects of insulin in vivo. Rats were given subcutaneous insulin implants (3 U/day) alone or with the NOS inhibitor l-NAME (2 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) 3 days before arterial (carotid or aortic) balloon catheter injury. Insulin decreased both neointimal area (P < 0.01) and cell migration (P < 0.01), and increased re-endothelialization (P < 0.05). All of these effects were prevented by the co-administration of l-NAME. Insulin was found to decrease inducible NOS expression (P < 0.05) but increase eNOS phosphorylation (P < 0.05). These changes were also translated at the functional level where insulin improved endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation. To further study the NOS isoform involved in insulin action, s.c. insulin (0.1 U/day) was given to wild-type and eNOS knockout mice. We found that insulin was effective at decreasing neointimal formation in wild-type mice after wire injury of the femoral artery, whereas this effect of insulin was absent in eNOS knockout mice. These results show that the vasculoprotective effect of insulin after arterial injury is mediated by an eNOS-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Direct Inhibition of Cellular Fatty Acid Synthase Impairs Replication of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Respiratory Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohol, Yamini M; Wang, Zhaoti; Kemble, George; Duke, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the de novo synthesis of palmitate, a fatty acid utilized for synthesis of more complex fatty acids, plasma membrane structure, and post-translational palmitoylation of host and viral proteins. We have developed a potent inhibitor of FASN (TVB-3166) that reduces the production of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) progeny in vitro from infected human lung epithelial cells (A549) and in vivo from mice challenged intranasally with RSV. Addition of TVB-3166 to the culture medium of RSV-infected A549 cells reduces viral spread without inducing cytopathic effects. The antiviral effect of the FASN inhibitor is a direct consequence of reducing de novo palmitate synthesis; similar doses are required for both antiviral activity and inhibition of palmitate production, and the addition of exogenous palmitate to TVB-3166-treated cells restores RSV production. TVB-3166 has minimal effect on RSV entry but significantly reduces viral RNA replication, protein levels, viral particle formation and infectivity of released viral particles. TVB-3166 substantially impacts viral replication, reducing production of infectious progeny 250-fold. In vivo, oral administration of TVB-3166 to RSV-A (Long)-infected BALB/c mice on normal chow, starting either on the day of infection or one day post-infection, reduces RSV lung titers 21-fold and 9-fold respectively. Further, TVB-3166 also inhibits the production of RSV B, human parainfluenza 3 (PIV3), and human rhinovirus 16 (HRV16) progeny from A549, HEp2 and HeLa cells respectively. Thus, inhibition of FASN and palmitate synthesis by TVB-3166 significantly reduces RSV progeny both in vitro and in vivo and has broad-spectrum activity against other respiratory viruses. FASN inhibition may alter the composition of regions of the host cell membrane where RSV assembly or replication occurs, or change the membrane composition of RSV progeny particles, decreasing their infectivity.

  18. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Synthase in Prostate Cancer by Orlistat, a Novel Therapeutic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    of Biomolecular Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY), HeLa cervical cancer cells, and FS-4 human foreskin fibroblasts were...essential in maintaining cholesterol homeostasis. An earlier class of cholesterol lowering drugs are bile acid sequestrants, which prevent reabsorption

  19. Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitors Engage the Cell Death Program Through the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    their antitumor effects and the strategies underway to develop novel inhibitors. Keywords: C75 , cerulenin , fatty acid synthesis , flavonoids ...potential FASN inhibitors. Specifically, independent groups have identified plant-derived flavonoids as potential FASN inhibitors [77,78] . One study...identified five flavonoids , luteolin, quercetin, kaempferol, apigenin and taxifolin, with the ability to inhibit FASN activity ( Figure 4 ) [77

  20. Chemical inhibition of fatty acid synthase: molecular docking analysis and biochemical validation in ocular cancer cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deepa, P R; Vandhana, S; Muthukumaran, S; Umashankar, V; Jayanthi, U; Krishnakumar, S

    2010-01-01

    ...: cerulenin, triclosan and orlistat. The IC50 and dose-dependent sensitivity of cancer cells to FASN inhibitors decrease in biologic enzyme activity, and cell morphology alterations were analysed...

  1. Transient hypoxia stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in brain subcortex by a neuronal nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adaptive mechanisms that protect brain metabolism during and after hypoxia, for instance, during hypoxic preconditioning, are coordinated in part by nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that acute transient hypoxia stimulates NO synthase (NOS)-activated mechanisms of m...

  2. Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot14 enhances catalysis of fatty acid synthase in lactating mammary epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Michael C; Wellberg, Elizabeth A; Lewis, Andrew S; Terrell, Kristina L; Merz, Andrea L; Maluf, N Karl; Serkova, Natalie J; Anderson, Steven M

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot 14 has been consistently associated with de novo fatty acid synthesis activity in multiple tissues, including the lactating mammary gland, which synthesizes large quantities of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) exclusively via FASN. However, the molecular function of Spot14 remains undefined during lactation. Spot14-null mice produce milk deficient in total triglyceride and de novo MCFA that does not sustain optimal neonatal growth. The lactation defect was rescued by provision of a high fat diet to the lactating dam. Transgenic mice overexpressing Spot14 in mammary epithelium produced total milk fat equivalent to controls, but with significantly greater MCFA. Spot14-null dams have no diminution of metabolic gene expression, enzyme protein levels, or intermediate metabolites that accounts for impaired de novo MCFA. When [(13)C] fatty acid products were quantified in vitro using crude cytosolic lysates, native FASN activity was 1.6-fold greater in control relative to Spot14-null lysates, and add back of Spot14 partially restored activity. Recombinant FASN catalysis increased 1.4-fold and C = 14:0 yield was enhanced 4-fold in vitro following addition of Spot14. These findings implicate Spot14 as a direct protein enhancer of FASN catalysis in the mammary gland during lactation when maximal MCFA production is needed. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Fatty acid synthase 2 contributes to diapause preparation in a beetle by regulating lipid accumulation and stress tolerance genes expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qian-Qian; Liu, Wen; Zhu, Fen; Lei, Chao-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Diapause, also known as dormancy, is a state of arrested development that allows insects to survive unfavorable environmental conditions. Diapause-destined insects store large amounts of fat when preparing for diapause. However, the extent to which these accumulated fat reserves influence diapause remains unclear. To address this question, we investigated the function of fatty acid synthase (FAS), which plays a central role in lipid synthesis, in stress tolerance, the duration of diapause preparation, and whether insects enter diapause or not. In diapause-destined adult female cabbage beetles, Colaphellus bowringi, FAS2 was more highly expressed than FAS1 at the peak stage of diapause preparation. FAS2 knockdown suppressed lipid accumulation and subsequently affected stress tolerance genes expression and water content. However, silencing FAS2 had no significant effects on the duration of diapause preparation or the incidence of diapause. FAS2 transcription was suppressed by juvenile hormone (JH) and the JH receptor methoprene-tolerant (Met). These results suggest that the absence of JH-Met induces FAS2 expression, thereby promoting lipid storage in diapause-destined female beetles. These results demonstrate that fat reserves regulate stress tolerance genes expression and water content, but have no significant effect on the duration of diapause preparation or the incidence of diapause. PMID:28071706

  4. Triterpenoic Acids from Apple Pomace Enhance the Activity of the Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbauer, Katharina; Seiringer, Günter; Nguyen, Dieu Linh; Winkler, Johannes; Blaschke, Michael; McKinnon, Ruxandra; Urban, Ernst; Ladurner, Angela; Dirsch, Verena M; Zehl, Martin; Kopp, Brigitte

    2016-01-13

    Pomace is an easy-accessible raw material for the isolation of fruit-derived compounds. Fruit consumption is associated with health-promoting effects, such as the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Increased vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, for example, due to an enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, could be one molecular mechanism mediating this effect. To identify compounds from apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) pomace that have the potential to amplify NO bioavailability via eNOS activation, a bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol/water (70:30) extract has been performed using the (14)C-L-arginine to (14)C-L-citrulline conversion assay (ACCA) in the human endothelium-derived cell line EA.hy926. Phytochemical characterization of the active fractions was performed using the spectrophotometric assessment of the total phenolic content, as well as TLC, HPLC-DAD-ELSD, and HPLC-MS analyses. Eleven triterpenoic acids, of which one is a newly discovered compound, were identified as the main constituents in the most active fraction, accompanied by only minor contents of phenolic compounds. When tested individually, none of the tested compounds exhibited significant eNOS activation. Nevertheless, cell stimulation with the reconstituted compound mixture restored eNOS activation, validating the potential of apple pomace as a source of bioactive components.

  5. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase induced by EGFR/ERK activation promotes tumor growth in pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Yong, E-mail: drbiany@126.com [Department of Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, 210023 (China); Yu, Yun [College of Pharmacy, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, 210023 (China); Wang, Shanshan; Li, Lin [Department of Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, 210023 (China)

    2015-08-07

    Lipid metabolism is dysregulated in many human diseases including atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key lipogenic enzyme involved in de novo lipid biosynthesis, is significantly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and associates with tumor progression. However, limited data is available to understand underlying biological functions and clinical significance of overexpressed FASN in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here, upregulated FASN was more frequently observed in PDAC tissues compared with normal pancreas in a tissue microarray. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis revealed that high expression level of FASN resulted in a significantly poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Knockdown or inhibition of endogenous FASN decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in HPAC and AsPC-1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that EGFR/ERK signaling accounts for elevated FASN expression in PDAC as ascertained by performing siRNA assays and using specific pharmacological inhibitors. Collectively, our results indicate that FASN exhibits important roles in tumor growth and EGFR/ERK pathway is responsible for upregulated expression of FASN in PDAC. - Highlights: • Increased expression of FASN indicates a poor prognosis in PDAC. • Elevated FASN favors tumor growth in PDAC in vitro. • Activation of EGFR signaling contributes to elevated FASN expression.

  6. cAMP-dependent post-translational modification of neuronal nitric oxide synthase neuroprotects penile erection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Serkan; Musicki, Biljana; La Favor, Justin D; Burnett, Arthur L

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation, nNOS uncoupling, and oxidative stress in the penis and major pelvic ganglia (MPG), before and after the administration of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) agonist colforsin in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve injury (BCNI),which mimics nerve injury after prostatectomy. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into BCNI and sham-operated groups. Each group included two subgroups: vehicle and colforsin (0.1 mg/kg/day i.p.). After 3 days, erectile function (intracavernosal pressure) was measured and penis and MPG were collected for molecular analyses of phospho (P)-nNOS (Ser-1412 and Ser-847), total nNOS, nNOS uncoupling, binding of protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN) to nNOS, gp91phox subunit of NADPH oxidase, active caspase 3, PKA catalytic subunit α (PKA-Cα; by Western blot) and oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide [H2 O2 ] and superoxide by Western blot and microdialysis method). Erectile function was decreased 3 days after BCNI and normalized by colforsin. nNOS phosphorylation on both positive (Ser-1412) and negative (Ser-847) regulatory sites, and nNOS uncoupling, were increased after BCNI in the penis and MPG, and normalized by colforsin. H2 O2 and total reactive oxygen species production were increased in the penis after BCNI and normalized by colforsin. Protein expression of gp91phox was increased in the MPG after BCNI and was normalized by colforsin treatment. Binding of PIN to nNOS was increased in the penis after BCNI and was normalized by colforsin treatment. Protein expression of active Caspase 3 was increased in the MPG after BCNI and was normalized by colforsin treatment. Protein expression of PKA-Cα was decreased in the penis after BCNI and normalized by colforsin. Collectively, BCNI impairs nNOS function in the penis and MPG by mechanisms involving its phosphorylation and uncoupling in association with increased oxidative stress, resulting in erectile

  7. Sterol regulation of human fatty acid synthase promoter I requires nuclear factor-Y- and Sp-1-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S; Chirala, S S; Wakil, S J

    2000-04-11

    To understand cholesterol-mediated regulation of human fatty acid synthase promoter I, we tested various 5'-deletion constructs of promoter I-luciferase reporter gene constructs in HepG2 cells. The reporter gene constructs that contained only the Sp-1-binding site (nucleotides -82 to -74) and the two tandem sterol regulatory elements (SREs; nucleotides -63 to -46) did not respond to cholesterol. Only the reporter gene constructs containing a nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) sequence, the CCAAT sequence (nucleotides -90 to -86), an Sp-1 sequence, and the two tandem SREs responded to cholesterol. The NF-Y-binding site, therefore, is essential for cholesterol response. Mutating the SREs or the NF-Y site and inserting 4 bp between the Sp-1- and NF-Y-binding sites both resulted in a minimal cholesterol response of the reporter genes. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays using anti-SRE-binding protein (SREBP) and anti-NF-Ya antibodies confirmed that these SREs and the NF-Y site bind the respective factors. We also identified a second Sp-1 site located between nucleotides -40 and -30 that can substitute for the mutated Sp-1 site located between nucleotides -82 and -74. The reporter gene expression of the wild-type promoter and the Sp-1 site (nucleotides -82 to -74) mutant promoter was similar when SREBP1a [the N-terminal domain of SREBP (amino acids 1-520)] was constitutively overexpressed, suggesting that Sp-1 recruits SREBP to the SREs. Under the same conditions, an NF-Y site mutation resulted in significant loss of reporter gene expression, suggesting that NF-Y is required to activate the cholesterol response.

  8. Characterization of the Peroxidase Mechanism upon Reaction of Prostacyclin Synthase with Peracetic Acid. Identification of a Tyrosyl Radical Intermediate†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hui-Chun; Gerfen, Gary J.; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Wang, Lee-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) is a membrane-bound class III cytochrome P450 that catalyzes an isomerization of prostaglandin H2, an endoperoxide, to prostacyclin. We report here the characterization of the PGIS intermediates in reactions with other peroxides, peracetic acid (PA), and iodosylbenzene. Rapid-scan stopped-flow experiments revealed an intermediate with an absorption spectrum similar to that of compound ES (Cpd ES), which is an oxo–ferryl (Fe(IV)=O) plus a protein-derived radical. Cpd ES, formed upon reaction with PA, has an X-band (9 GHz) EPR signal of g = 2.0047 and a half-saturation power, P1/2, of 0.73 mW. High-field (130 GHz) EPR reveals the presence of two species of tyrosyl radicals in Cpd ES with their g-tensor components (gx, gy, gz) of 2.00970, 2.00433, 2.00211 and 2.00700, 2.00433, 2.00211 at a 1:2 ratio, indicating that one is involved in hydrogen bonding and the other is not. The line width of the g = 2 signal becomes narrower, while its P1/2 value becomes smaller as the reaction proceeds, indicating migration of the unpaired electron to an alternative site. The rate of electron migration (~0.2 s−1) is similar to that of heme bleaching, suggesting the migration is associated with the enzymatic inactivation. Moreover, a g = 6 signal that is presumably a high-spin ferric species emerges after the appearance of the amino acid radical and subsequently decays at a rate comparable to that of enzymatic inactivation. This loss of the g = 6 species thus likely indicates another pathway leading to enzymatic inactivation. The inactivation, however, was prevented by the exogenous reductant guaiacol. The studies of PGIS with PA described herein provide a mechanistic model of a peroxidase reaction catalyzed by the class III cytochromes P450. PMID:19187034

  9. Crystal Structures of the Iron–Sulfur Cluster-Dependent Quinolinate Synthase in Complex with Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate, Iminoaspartate Analogues, and Quinolinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenwick, Michael K. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Ealick, Steven E. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-07-12

    The quinolinate synthase of prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes, NadA, contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster with unknown function. We report crystal structures of Pyrococcus horikoshii NadA in complex with dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), iminoaspartate analogues, and quinolinate. DHAP adopts a nearly planar conformation and chelates the [4Fe-4S] cluster via its keto and hydroxyl groups. The active site architecture suggests that the cluster acts as a Lewis acid in enediolate formation, like zinc in class II aldolases. The DHAP and putative iminoaspartate structures suggest a model for a condensed intermediate. The ensemble of structures suggests a two-state system, which may be exploited in early steps.

  10. Tetra- and pentacyclic triterpene acids from the ancient anti-inflammatory remedy frankincense as inhibitors of microsomal prostaglandin E(2) synthase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoff, Moritz; Seitz, Stefanie; Paul, Michael; Noha, Stefan M; Jauch, Johann; Schuster, Daniela; Werz, Oliver

    2014-06-27

    The microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES)-1 is the terminal enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)E2 from cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived PGH2. We previously found that mPGES-1 is inhibited by boswellic acids (IC50 = 3-30 μM), which are bioactive triterpene acids present in the anti-inflammatory remedy frankincense. Here we show that besides boswellic acids, additional known triterpene acids (i.e., tircuallic, lupeolic, and roburic acids) isolated from frankincense suppress mPGES-1 with increased potencies. In particular, 3α-acetoxy-8,24-dienetirucallic acid (6) and 3α-acetoxy-7,24-dienetirucallic acid (10) inhibited mPGES-1 activity in a cell-free assay with IC50 = 0.4 μM, each. Structure-activity relationship studies and docking simulations revealed concrete structure-related interactions with mPGES-1 and its cosubstrate glutathione. COX-1 and -2 were hardly affected by the triterpene acids (IC50 > 10 μM). Given the crucial role of mPGES-1 in inflammation and the abundance of highly active triterpene acids in frankincence extracts, our findings provide further evidence of the anti-inflammatory potential of frankincense preparations and reveal novel, potent bioactivities of tirucallic acids, roburic acids, and lupeolic acids.

  11. Tetra- and Pentacyclic Triterpene Acids from the Ancient Anti-inflammatory Remedy Frankincense as Inhibitors of Microsomal Prostaglandin E2 Synthase-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES)-1 is the terminal enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)E2 from cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived PGH2. We previously found that mPGES-1 is inhibited by boswellic acids (IC50 = 3–30 μM), which are bioactive triterpene acids present in the anti-inflammatory remedy frankincense. Here we show that besides boswellic acids, additional known triterpene acids (i.e., tircuallic, lupeolic, and roburic acids) isolated from frankincense suppress mPGES-1 with increased potencies. In particular, 3α-acetoxy-8,24-dienetirucallic acid (6) and 3α-acetoxy-7,24-dienetirucallic acid (10) inhibited mPGES-1 activity in a cell-free assay with IC50 = 0.4 μM, each. Structure–activity relationship studies and docking simulations revealed concrete structure-related interactions with mPGES-1 and its cosubstrate glutathione. COX-1 and -2 were hardly affected by the triterpene acids (IC50 > 10 μM). Given the crucial role of mPGES-1 in inflammation and the abundance of highly active triterpene acids in frankincence extracts, our findings provide further evidence of the anti-inflammatory potential of frankincense preparations and reveal novel, potent bioactivities of tirucallic acids, roburic acids, and lupeolic acids. PMID:24844534

  12. Indole-3-butyric acid promotes adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana thin cell layers by conversion into indole-3-acetic acid and stimulation of anthranilate synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, L; Veloccia, A; Della Rovere, F; D'Angeli, S; Falasca, G; Altamura, M M

    2017-07-11

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and its precursor indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), control adventitious root (AR) formation in planta. Adventitious roots are also crucial for propagation via cuttings. However, IBA role(s) is/are still far to be elucidated. In Arabidopsis thaliana stem cuttings, 10 μM IBA is more AR-inductive than 10 μM IAA, and, in thin cell layers (TCLs), IBA induces ARs when combined with 0.1 μM kinetin (Kin). It is unknown whether arabidopsis TCLs produce ARs under IBA alone (10 μM) or IAA alone (10 μM), and whether they contain endogenous IAA/IBA at culture onset, possibly interfering with the exogenous IBA/IAA input. Moreover, it is unknown whether an IBA-to-IAA conversion is active in TCLs, and positively affects AR formation, possibly through the activity of the nitric oxide (NO) deriving from the conversion process. Revealed undetectable levels of both auxins at culture onset, showing that arabidopsis TCLs were optimal for investigating AR-formation under the total control of exogenous auxins. The AR-response of TCLs from various ecotypes, transgenic lines and knockout mutants was analyzed under different treatments. It was shown that ARs are better induced by IBA than IAA and IBA + Kin. IBA induced IAA-efflux (PIN1) and IAA-influx (AUX1/LAX3) genes, IAA-influx carriers activities, and expression of ANTHRANILATE SYNTHASE -alpha1 (ASA1), a gene involved in IAA-biosynthesis. ASA1 and ANTHRANILATE SYNTHASE -beta1 (ASB1), the other subunit of the same enzyme, positively affected AR-formation in the presence of exogenous IBA, because the AR-response in the TCLs of their mutant wei2wei7 was highly reduced. The AR-response of IBA-treated TCLs from ech2ibr10 mutant, blocked into IBA-to-IAA-conversion, was also strongly reduced. Nitric oxide, an IAA downstream signal and a by-product of IBA-to-IAA conversion, was early detected in IAA- and IBA-treated TCLs, but at higher levels in the latter explants. Altogether, results showed that IBA induced

  13. In silico investigation of lavandulyl flavonoids for the development of potent fatty acid synthase-inhibitory prototypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joonseok; Liu, Haining; Park, Hyun Bong; Ferreira, Daneel; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Hamann, Mark T; Doerksen, Robert J; Na, MinKyun

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FAS) is regarded as a sensible therapeutic strategy for the development of optimal anti-cancer agents. Flavonoids exhibit potent anti-neoplastic properties. The MeOH extract of Sophora flavescens was subjected to chromatographic analyses such as VLC and HPLC for the purification of active flavonoids. The DP4 chemical-shift analysis protocol was employed to investigate the elusive chirality of the lavandulyl moiety of the purified polyphenols. Induced Fit docking protocols and per-residue analyses were utilized to scrutinize structural prerequisites for hampering FAS activity. The FAS-inhibitory activity of the purified flavonoids was assessed via the incorporation of [3H] acetyl-CoA into palmitate. Six flavonoids, including lavandulyl flavanones, were purified and evaluated for FAS inhibition. The lavandulyl flavanone sophoraflavanone G (2) exhibited the highest potency (IC50 of 6.7±0.2μM), which was more potent than the positive controls. Extensive molecular docking studies revealed the structural requirements for blocking FAS. Per-residue interaction analysis demonstrated that the lavandulyl functional group in the active flavonoids (1-3 and 5) significantly contributed to increasing their binding affinity towards the target enzyme. This research suggests a basis for the in silico design of a lavandulyl flavonoid-based architecture showing anti-cancer effects via enhancement of the binding potential to FAS. FAS inhibition by flavonoids and their derivatives may offer significant potential as an approach to lower the risk of various cancer diseases and related fatalities. In silico technologies with available FAS crystal structures may be of significant use in optimizing preliminary leads. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Early growth response 1 and fatty acid synthase expression is altered in tumor adjacent prostate tissue and indicates field cancerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anna C; Trujillo, Kristina A; Phillips, Genevieve K; Fleet, Trisha M; Murton, Jaclyn K; Severns, Virginia; Shah, Satyan K; Davis, Michael S; Smith, Anthony Y; Griffith, Jeffrey K; Fischer, Edgar G; Bisoffi, Marco

    2012-08-01

    Field cancerization denotes the occurrence of molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. In prostate cancer, identification of field cancerization has several potential clinical applications. However, prostate field cancerization remains ill defined. Our previous work has shown up-regulated mRNA of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) in tissues adjacent to prostate cancer. Immunofluorescence data were analyzed quantitatively by spectral imaging and linear unmixing to determine the protein expression levels of EGR-1 and FAS in human cancerous, histologically normal adjacent, and disease-free prostate tissues. EGR-1 expression was elevated in both structurally intact tumor adjacent (1.6× on average) and in tumor (3.0× on average) tissues compared to disease-free tissues. In addition, the ratio of cytoplasmic versus nuclear EGR-1 expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent and tumor tissues. Similarly, FAS expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent (2.7× on average) and in tumor (2.5× on average) compared to disease-free tissues. EGR-1 and FAS expression is similarly deregulated in tumor and structurally intact adjacent prostate tissues and defines field cancerization. In cases with high suspicion of prostate cancer but negative biopsy, identification of field cancerization could help clinicians target areas for repeat biopsy. Field cancerization at surgical margins on prostatectomy specimen should also be looked at as a predictor of cancer recurrence. EGR-1 and FAS could also serve as molecular targets for chemoprevention. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Rice Ferredoxin-Dependent Glutamate Synthase Regulates Nitrogen-Carbon Metabolomes and Is Genetically Differentiated between japonica and indica Subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolu; Nian, Jinqiang; Xie, Qingjun; Feng, Jian; Zhang, Fengxia; Jing, Hongwei; Zhang, Jian; Dong, Guojun; Liang, Yan; Peng, Juli; Wang, Guodong; Qian, Qian; Zuo, Jianru

    2016-11-07

    Plants assimilate inorganic nitrogen absorbed from soil into organic forms as Gln and Glu through the glutamine synthetase/glutamine:2-oxoglutarate amidotransferase (GS/GOGAT) cycle. Whereas GS catalyzes the formation of Gln from Glu and ammonia, GOGAT catalyzes the transfer of an amide group from Gln to 2-oxoglutarate to produce two molecules of Glu. However, the regulatory role of the GS/GOGAT cycle in the carbon-nitrogen balance is not well understood. Here, we report the functional characterization of rice ABNORMAL CYTOKININ RESPONSE 1 (ABC1) gene that encodes a ferredoxin-dependent (Fd)-GOGAT. The weak mutant allele abc1-1 mutant shows a typical nitrogen-deficient syndrome, whereas the T-DNA insertional mutant abc1-2 is seedling lethal. Metabolomics analysis revealed the accumulation of an excessive amount of amino acids with high N/C ratio (Gln and Asn) and several intermediates in the tricarboxylic acid cycle in abc1-1, suggesting that ABC1 plays a critical role in nitrogen assimilation and carbon-nitrogen balance. Five non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in the ABC1 coding region and characterized as three distinct haplotypes, which have been highly and specifically differentiated between japonica and indica subspecies. Collectively, these results suggest that ABC1/OsFd-GOGAT is essential for plant growth and development by modulating nitrogen assimilation and the carbon-nitrogen balance. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-term Treatment with Hesperidin Improves Endothelium-dependent Vasodilation in Femoral Artery of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: The Involvement of NO-synthase and KvChannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobiaš, Lukáš; Petrová, Miriam; Vojtko, Róbert; Kristová, Viera

    2016-10-01

    Hesperidin is the most common flavonoid found in citrus fruits and is expected to exert vasodilation action relevant to its health benefits. The present study aimed to explore the effect of hesperidin on the vascular responses in normotensive and hypertensive rats and the involvement of NO-synthase and K v channels. The 15-week-old Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were randomized to orally receive either hesperidin (50 mg/kg/day) or a corresponding volume of the water for 4 weeks. Vascular responses of isolated femoral arteries were studied with myograph in control conditions and during inhibition of NO-synthase with l-NNA and K v channels with 4-AP. Hesperidin had no effect on blood pressure. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in Wistar and SHR was significantly improved by the treatment with hesperidin. The contraction responses after l-NNA were increased in all groups of rats to similar extent, but relaxatory responses were significantly attenuated only in SHR. The inhibition of K v channels significantly reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatory responses in only in SHR administered with hesperidin. The results of our experiment indicate that hesperidin might improve the endothelium-dependent vasodilation during hypertension, possibly through the enhancement of K v channels function. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effects of fatty acid synthase inhibitors on lymphatic vessels: an in vitro and in vivo study in a melanoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Débora C; Paupert, Jenny; Maillard, Catherine; Seguin, Fabiana; Carvalho, Marco A; Agostini, Michelle; Coletta, Ricardo D; Noël, Agnès; Graner, Edgard

    2017-02-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is responsible for the endogenous production of fatty acids from acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. Its overexpression is associated with poor prognosis in human cancers including melanomas. Our group has previously shown that the inhibition of FASN with orlistat reduces spontaneous lymphatic metastasis in experimental B16-F10 melanomas, which is a consequence, at least in part, of the reduction of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of pharmacological FASN inhibition on lymphatic vessels by using cell culture and mouse models. The effects of FASN inhibitors cerulenin and orlistat on the proliferation, apoptosis, and migration of human lymphatic endothelial cells (HDLEC) were evaluated with in vitro models. The lymphatic outgrowth was evaluated by using a murine ex vivo assay. B16-F10 melanomas and surgical wounds were produced in the ears of C57Bl/6 and Balb-C mice, respectively, and their peripheral lymphatic vessels evaluated by fluorescent microlymphangiography. The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor C and D (VEGF-C and -D) by melanoma cells was evaluated by ELISA and conditioned media used to study in vitro lymphangiogenesis. Here, we show that cerulenin and orlistat decrease the viability, proliferation, and migration of HDLEC cells. The volume of lymph node metastases from B16-F10 experimental melanomas was reduced by 39% in orlistat-treated animals as well as the expression of VEGF-C in these tissues. In addition, lymphatic vessels from orlistat-treated mice drained more efficiently the injected FITC-dextran. Orlistat and cerulenin reduced VEGF-C secretion and, increase production of VEGF-D by B16-F10 and SK-Mel-25 melanoma cells. Finally, reduced lymphatic cell extensions, were observed following the treatment with conditioned medium from cerulenin- and orlistat-treated B16-F10 cells. Altogether, our results show that FASN inhibitors have anti-metastatic effects by acting on

  18. Virtual Screening and X-ray Crystallography Identify Non-Substrate Analog Inhibitors of Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Rosaria; Saxena, Puneet; Surade, Sachin; Santucci, Matteo; Venturelli, Alberto; Borsari, Chiara; Marverti, Gaetano; Ponterini, Glauco; Ferrari, Stefania; Blundell, Tom L; Costi, Maria Paola

    2016-10-13

    Thymidylate synthase X (ThyX) represents an attractive target for tuberculosis drug discovery. Herein, we selected 16 compounds through a virtual screening approach. We solved the first X-ray crystal structure of Thermatoga maritima (Tm) ThyX in complex with a nonsubstrate analog inhibitor. Given the active site similarities between Mycobacterium tuberculosis ThyX (Mtb-ThyX) and Tm-ThyX, our crystal structure paves the way for a structure-based design of novel antimycobacterial compounds. The 1H-imidazo[4,5-d]pyridazine was identified as scaffold for the development of Mtb-ThyX inhibitors.

  19. Safflor yellow B reduces hypoxia-mediated vasoconstriction by regulating endothelial micro ribonucleic acid/nitric oxide synthase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoyun; Yang, Ying; Li, Miao; Liu, Xin; Wang, Qiaoyun; Xin, Wenyu; Sun, Hongliu; Zheng, Qingyin

    2017-11-07

    Hypoxia-induced generation of vasoconstrictors reduces cerebral blood flow (CBF) while nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) and microRNAs (miRNA) in endothelial cells (ECs) suppress vasoconstriction. Safflor yellow B (SYB), a natural plant compound, previously attenuated angiotensin II-mediated injury of ECs and maintained endothelial function. This study investigated the putative involvement of NOS and miRNAs in SYB-mediated resistance to hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction. In vivo , chronic hypoxia was induced in rats, and SYB was administered intravenously. In vitro , rat primary aortic ECs were cultured under oxygen and glucose deprivation. After treatment with anti-microR-199a, as well as the NOS inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, SYB, or both, cell viability, NO and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) levels, NOS expression, and miRNA levels were evaluated. SYB significantly alleviated hypoxia-mediated vasoconstriction and increased CBF endothelium-dependently. SYB upregulated miR-199a, increased EC viability, decreased endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels, inhibited protein kinase C (PKC) activity, and suppressed hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression. Furthermore, the SYB-mediated reduction of inducible NOS reduced ONOO- levels. In addition, SYB downregulated miR-138 and, thereby, enhanced S100A1 and endothelial NOS activity. Hypoxia-mediated regulation of miR-138 and miR-199a inhibited endothelial NOS expression and activation, which triggered ET-1 release and vasoconstriction. Therefore, SYB treatment reduced hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction through miR-199a/endothelial NOS signaling.

  20. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jennifer S; von Lersner, Ariana K; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  1. Solution structure of the tandem acyl carrier protein domains from a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase reveals beads-on-a-string configuration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uldaeliz Trujillo

    Full Text Available The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA synthases from deep-sea bacteria invariably contain multiple acyl carrier protein (ACP domains in tandem. This conserved tandem arrangement has been implicated in both amplification of fatty acid production (additive effect and in structural stabilization of the multidomain protein (synergistic effect. While the more accepted model is one in which domains act independently, recent reports suggest that ACP domains may form higher oligomers. Elucidating the three-dimensional structure of tandem arrangements may therefore give important insights into the functional relevance of these structures, and hence guide bioengineering strategies. In an effort to elucidate the three-dimensional structure of tandem repeats from deep-sea anaerobic bacteria, we have expressed and purified a fragment consisting of five tandem ACP domains from the PUFA synthase from Photobacterium profundum. Analysis of the tandem ACP fragment by analytical gel filtration chromatography showed a retention time suggestive of a multimeric protein. However, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS revealed that the multi-ACP fragment is an elongated monomer which does not form a globular unit. Stokes radii calculated from atomic monomeric SAXS models were comparable to those measured by analytical gel filtration chromatography, showing that in the gel filtration experiment, the molecular weight was overestimated due to the elongated protein shape. Thermal denaturation monitored by circular dichroism showed that unfolding of the tandem construct was not cooperative, and that the tandem arrangement did not stabilize the protein. Taken together, these data are consistent with an elongated beads-on-a-string arrangement of the tandem ACP domains in PUFA synthases, and speak against synergistic biocatalytic effects promoted by quaternary structuring. Thus, it is possible to envision bioengineering strategies which simply involve the artificial linking of

  2. Solution Structure of the Tandem Acyl Carrier Protein Domains from a Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Synthase Reveals Beads-on-a-String Configuration

    KAUST Repository

    Trujillo, Uldaeliz

    2013-02-28

    The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthases from deep-sea bacteria invariably contain multiple acyl carrier protein (ACP) domains in tandem. This conserved tandem arrangement has been implicated in both amplification of fatty acid production (additive effect) and in structural stabilization of the multidomain protein (synergistic effect). While the more accepted model is one in which domains act independently, recent reports suggest that ACP domains may form higher oligomers. Elucidating the three-dimensional structure of tandem arrangements may therefore give important insights into the functional relevance of these structures, and hence guide bioengineering strategies. In an effort to elucidate the three-dimensional structure of tandem repeats from deep-sea anaerobic bacteria, we have expressed and purified a fragment consisting of five tandem ACP domains from the PUFA synthase from Photobacterium profundum. Analysis of the tandem ACP fragment by analytical gel filtration chromatography showed a retention time suggestive of a multimeric protein. However, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed that the multi-ACP fragment is an elongated monomer which does not form a globular unit. Stokes radii calculated from atomic monomeric SAXS models were comparable to those measured by analytical gel filtration chromatography, showing that in the gel filtration experiment, the molecular weight was overestimated due to the elongated protein shape. Thermal denaturation monitored by circular dichroism showed that unfolding of the tandem construct was not cooperative, and that the tandem arrangement did not stabilize the protein. Taken together, these data are consistent with an elongated beads-on-a-string arrangement of the tandem ACP domains in PUFA synthases, and speak against synergistic biocatalytic effects promoted by quaternary structuring. Thus, it is possible to envision bioengineering strategies which simply involve the artificial linking of multiple ACP

  3. A jojoba beta-Ketoacyl-CoA synthase cDNA complements the canola fatty acid elongation mutation in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassner, M W; Lardizabal, K; Metz, J G

    1996-02-01

    beta-Ketoacyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthase (KCS) catalyzes the condensation of malonyl-CoA with long-chain acyl-CoA. This reaction is the initial step of the microsomal fatty acyl-CoA elongation pathway responsible for formation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs, or fatty acids with chain lengths > 18 carbons). Manipulation of this pathway is significant for agriculture, because it is the basis of conversion of high erucic acid rapeseed into canola. High erucic acid rapeseed oil, used as an industrial feedstock, is rich in VLCFAs, whereas the edible oil extracted from canola is essentially devoid of VLCFAs. Here, we report the cloning of a cDNA from developing jojoba embryos involved in microsomal fatty acid elongation. The jojoba cDNA is homologous to the recently cloned Arabidopsis FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1) gene that has been suggested to encode KCS. We characterize the jojoba enzyme and present biochemical data indicating that the jojoba cDNA does indeed encode KCS. Transformation of low erucic acid rapeseed with the jojoba cDNA restored KCS activity to developing embryos and altered the transgenic seed oil composition to contain high levels of VLCFAs. The data reveal the key role KCS plays in determining the chain lengths of fatty acids found in seed oils.

  4. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Deoxyhypusine Synthase in Leishmania donovani*

    OpenAIRE

    Chawla, Bhavna; Jhingran, Anupam; Singh, Sushma; Tyagi, Nidhi; Park, Myung Hee; Srinivasan, N.; Roberts, Sigrid C.; Madhubala, Rentala

    2009-01-01

    Deoxyhypusine synthase, an NAD+-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the first step in the post-translational synthesis of an unusual amino acid, hypusine (Nϵ-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl)lysine), in the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A precursor protein. Two putative deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) sequences have been identified in the Leishmania donovani genome, which are present on chromosomes 20: DHSL20 (DHS-like gene from chromosome 20) and DHS34 (DHS from chromosome 34). Although both sequences exhibit a...

  5. Nitric oxide synthase-dependent NADPH-diaphorase activity in the optic lobes of male and female Ceratitis capitata mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Roda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is acknowledged as a messenger molecule in the nervous system with a pivotal role in the modulation of the chemosensory information. It has been shown to be present in the optic lobes of several insect species. In the present study, we used males and females from four different strains of the medfly Ceratitis capitata (Diptera, Tephritidae: or; or,wp (both orange eyed; w,M360 and w,Heraklion (both white eyed, as models to further clarify the involvement of NO in the mutants’ visual system and differences in its activity and localization in the sexes. Comparison of the localization pattern of NO synthase (NOS, through NADPH-diaphorase (NADPHd staining, in the optic lobes of the four strains, revealed a stronger reaction intensity in the retina and in the neuropile region lamina than in medulla and lobula. Interestingly, the intensity of NADPHd staining differs, at least in some strains, in the optic lobes of the two sexes; all the areas are generally strongly labelled in the males of the or and w,M360 strains, whereas the w,Heraklion and or,wp mutants do not show evident sexdependent NADPHd staining. Taken as a whole, our data point to NO as a likely transmitter candidate in the visual information processes in insects, with a possible correlation among NOS distribution, eye pigmentation and visual function in C. capitata males. Moreover, NO could influence behavioural differences linked to vision in the two sexes.

  6. First discovery of two polyketide synthase genes for mitorubrinic acid and mitorubrinol yellow pigment biosynthesis and implications in virulence of Penicillium marneffei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C Y Woo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome of P. marneffei, the most important thermal dimorphic fungus causing respiratory, skin and systemic mycosis in China and Southeast Asia, possesses 23 polyketide synthase (PKS genes and 2 polyketide synthase nonribosomal peptide synthase hybrid (PKS-NRPS genes, which is of high diversity compared to other thermal dimorphic pathogenic fungi. We hypothesized that the yellow pigment in the mold form of P. marneffei could also be synthesized by one or more PKS genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All 23 PKS and 2 PKS-NRPS genes of P. marneffei were systematically knocked down. A loss of the yellow pigment was observed in the mold form of the pks11 knockdown, pks12 knockdown and pks11pks12 double knockdown mutants. Sequence analysis showed that PKS11 and PKS12 are fungal non-reducing PKSs. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector/electrospray ionization-quadruple time of flight-mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS analysis of the culture filtrates of wild type P. marneffei and the pks11 knockdown, pks12 knockdown and pks11pks12 double knockdown mutants showed that the yellow pigment is composed of mitorubrinic acid and mitorubrinol. The survival of mice challenged with the pks11 knockdown, pks12 knockdown and pks11pks12 double knockdown mutants was significantly better than those challenged with wild type P. marneffei (P<0.05. There was also statistically significant decrease in survival of pks11 knockdown, pks12 knockdown and pks11pks12 double knockdown mutants compared to wild type P. marneffei in both J774 and THP1 macrophages (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The yellow pigment of the mold form of P. marneffei is composed of mitorubrinol and mitorubrinic acid. This represents the first discovery of PKS genes responsible for mitorubrinol and mitorubrinic acid biosynthesis. pks12 and pks11 are probably responsible for sequential use in the biosynthesis of mitorubrinol and mitorubrinic acid

  7. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition causes acute increases in glomerular permeability in vivo, dependent upon reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinina, Julia; Sverrisson, Kristinn; Rippe, Anna; Öberg, Carl M; Rippe, Bengt

    2016-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that the permeability of the glomerular filtration barrier (GFB) is partly regulated by a balance between the bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) and that of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been postulated that normal or moderately elevated NO levels protect the GFB from permeability increases, whereas ROS, through reducing the bioavailability of NO, have the opposite effect. We tested the tentative antagonism between NO and ROS on glomerular permeability in anaesthetized Wistar rats, in which the left ureter was cannulated for urine collection while simultaneously blood access was achieved. Rats were systemically infused with either l-NAME or l-NAME together with the superoxide scavenger Tempol, or together with l-arginine or the NO-donor DEA-NONOate, or the cGMP agonist 8-bromo-cGMP. To measure glomerular sieving coefficients (theta, θ) to Ficoll, rats were infused with FITC-Ficoll 70/400 (mol/radius 10-80 Å). Plasma and urine samples were analyzed by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) for determination of θ for Ficoll repeatedly during up to 2 h. l-NAME increased θ for Ficoll70Å from 2.27 ± 1.30 × 10(-5) to 8.46 ± 2.06 × 10(-5) (n = 6, P permeability and an inhibition was also observed with l-arginine and with 8-bromo-cGMP. In conclusion, acute NO synthase inhibition in vivo by l-NAME caused rapid increases in glomerular permeability, which could be reversed by either an ROS antagonist or by activating the guanylyl cyclase-cGMP pathway. The data strongly suggest a protective effect of NO in maintaining normal glomerular permeability in vivo. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Hybrid polyketide synthases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Hagen, Andrew; Katz, Leonard; Keasling, Jay D.; Poust, Sean; Zhang, Jingwei; Zotchev, Sergey

    2016-05-10

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing an even-chain or odd-chain diacid or lactam or diamine. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the even-chain diacid, odd-chain diacid, or KAPA. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS capable of synthesizing a pimelic acid or KAPA, and when cultured produces biotin.

  9. Isolation of streptococcal hyaluronate synthase.

    OpenAIRE

    Prehm, P; Mausolf, A

    1986-01-01

    Hyaluronate synthase was isolated from protoblast membranes of streptococci by Triton X-114 extraction and cetylpyridinium chloride precipitation. It was identified as a 52,000-Mr protein, which bound to nascent hyaluronate and was affinity-labelled by periodate-oxidized UDP-glucuronic acid and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. Antibodies directed against the 52,000-Mr protein inhibited hyaluronate synthesis. Mutants defective in hyaluronate synthase activity lacked the 52,000-Mr protein in membrane e...

  10. Alternatively Spliced Methionine Synthase in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells: Cobalamin and GSH Dependence and Inhibitory Effects of Neurotoxic Metals and Thimerosal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Waly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The folate and cobalamin (Cbl- dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS is highly sensitive to oxidation and its activity affects all methylation reactions. Recent studies have revealed alternative splicing of MS mRNA in human brain and patient-derived fibroblasts. Here we show that MS mRNA in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells is alternatively spliced, resulting in three primary protein species, thus providing a useful model to examine cofactor dependence of these variant enzymes. MS activity was dependent upon methylcobalamin (MeCbl or the combination of hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM. OHCbl-based activity was eliminated by depletion of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH but could be rescued by provision of either glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl or MeCbl. Pretreatment of cells with lead, arsenic, aluminum, mercury, or the ethylmercury-containing preservative thimerosal lowered GSH levels and inhibited MS activity in association with decreased uptake of cysteine, which is rate-limiting for GSH synthesis. Thimerosal treatment decreased cellular levels of GSCbl and MeCbl. These findings indicate that the alternatively spliced form of MS expressed in SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells is sensitive to inhibition by thimerosal and neurotoxic metals, and lower GSH levels contribute to their inhibitory action.

  11. The red-vine-leaf extract AS195 increases nitric oxide synthase-dependent nitric oxide generation and decreases oxidative stress in endothelial and red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Marijke; Bölck, Birgit; Bizjak, Daniel Alexander; Stabenow, Christina Julia Annika; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-02-01

    The red-vine-leaf extract AS195 improves cutaneous oxygen supply and the microcirculation in patients suffering from chronic venous insufficiency. Regulation of blood flow was associated to nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent NO (nitric oxide) production, and endothelial and red blood cells (RBC) have been shown to possess respective NOS isoforms. It was hypothesized that AS195 positively affects NOS activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RBC. Because patients with microvascular disorders show increased oxidative stress which limits NO bioavailability, it was further hypothesized that AS195 increases NO bioavailability by decreasing the content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increasing antioxidant capacity. Cultured HUVECs and RBCs from healthy volunteers were incubated with AS195 (100 μmol/L), tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP, 1 mmol/L) to induce oxidative stress and with both AS195 and TBHP. Endothelial and red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS) activation significantly increased after AS195 incubation. Nitrite concentration, a marker for NO production, increased in HUVEC but decreased in RBC after AS195 application possibly due to nitrite scavenging potential of flavonoids. S-nitrosylation of RBC cytoskeletal spectrins and RBC deformability were increased after AS195 incubation. TBHP-induced ROS were decreased by AS195, and antioxidative capacity was significantly increased in AS195-treated cells. TBHP also reduced RBC deformability, but reduction was attenuated by parallel incubation with AS195. Adhesion of HUVEC was also reduced after AS195 treatment. Red-vine-leaf extract AS195 increases NOS activation and decreases oxidative stress. Both mechanisms increase NO bioavailability, improve cell function, and may thus account for enhanced microcirculation in both health and disease.

  12. Benzalacetone Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuro eAbe

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Benzalacetone synthase, from the medicinal plant Rheum palmatum (Polygonaceae (RpBAS, is a plant-specific chalcone synthase (CHS superfamily of type III polyketide synthase (PKS. RpBAS catalyzes the one-step, decarboxylative condensation of 4-coumaroyl-CoA with malonyl-CoA to produce the C6-C4 benzalacetone scaffold. The X-ray crystal structures of RpBAS confirmed that the diketide-forming activity is attributable to the characteristic substitution of the conserved active-site "gatekeeper" Phe with Leu. Furthermore, the crystal structures suggested that RpBAS employs novel catalytic machinery for the thioester bond cleavage of the enzyme-bound diketide intermediate and the final decarboxylation reaction to produce benzalacetone. Finally, by exploiting the remarkable substrate tolerance and catalytic versatility of RpBAS, precursor-directed biosynthesis efficiently generated chemically and structurally divergent, unnatural novel polyketide scaffolds. These findings provided a structural basis for the functional diversity of the type III PKS enzymes.

  13. Arginase inhibition reduces interleukin-1β-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by increasing nitric oxide synthase-dependent nitric oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeongyeon; Ryoo, Sungwoo, E-mail: ryoosw08@kangwon.ac.kr

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Arginase inhibition suppressed proliferation of IL-1β-stimulated VSMCs in dose-dependent manner. •NO production from IL-1β-induced iNOS expression was augmented by arginase inhibition, reducing VSMC proliferation. •Incubation with cGMP analogues abolished IL-1β-dependent proliferation of VSMCs. -- Abstract: We investigated whether arginase inhibition suppressed interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the possible mechanisms involved. IL-1β stimulation increased VSMC proliferation, while the arginase inhibitor BEC and transfection of the antisense (AS) oligonucleotide against arginase I decreased VSMC proliferation and was associated with increased protein content of the cell cycle regulator p21Waf1/Cip1. IL-1β incubation induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner, but did not affect arginase I and II expression. Consistent with this data, IL-1β stimulation resulted in increase in NO production that was significantly augmented by arginase inhibition. The specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W abolished IL-1β-mediated NO production and further accentuated IL-1β-stimulated cell proliferation. Incubation with NO donors GSNO and DETA/NO in the presence of IL-1β abolished VSMCs proliferation and increased p21Waf1/Cip1 protein content. Furthermore, incubation with the cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP prevented IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation. In conclusion, arginase inhibition augmented iNOS-dependent NO production that resulted in suppression of IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation in a cGMP-dependent manner.

  14. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response

    KAUST Repository

    Almadanim, M. Cecília

    2017-01-19

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that OsCPK17 plays a role in rice cold stress response by analyzing OsCPK17 knockout, silencing, and overexpressing rice lines under low temperature. Altered OsCPK17 gene expression compromises cold tolerance performance, without affecting the expression of key cold stress-inducible genes. A comparative phosphoproteomic approach led to the identification of six potential in vivo OsCPK17 targets, which are associated with sugar and nitrogen metabolism, and with osmotic regulation. To test direct interaction, in vitro kinase assays were performed, showing that the sucrose phosphate synthase OsSPS4, and the aquaporin OsPIP2;1/OsPIP2;6 are phosphorylated by OsCPK17 in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether, our data indicates that OsCPK17 is required for a proper cold stress response in rice, likely affecting the activity of membrane channels and sugar metabolism.

  15. Distinct substrate specificities and unusual substrate flexibilities of two hydroxycinnamoyltransferases, rosmarinic acid synthase and hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl-transferase, from Coleus blumei Benth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Marion; Petersen, Maike

    2011-06-01

    cDNAs and genes encoding a hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:hydroxyphenyllactate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (CbRAS; rosmarinic acid synthase) and a hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (CbHST) were isolated from Coleus blumei Benth. (syn. Solenostemon scutellarioides (L.) Codd; Lamiaceae). The proteins were expressed in E. coli and the substrate specificity of both enzymes was tested. CbRAS accepted several CoA-activated phenylpropenoic acids as donor substrates and D-(hydroxy)phenyllactates as acceptors resulting in ester formation while shikimate and quinate were not accepted. Unexpectedly, amino acids (D-phenylalanine, D-tyrosine, D-DOPA) also yielded products, showing that RAS can putatively catalyze amide formation. CbHST was able to transfer cinnamic, 4-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic as well as sinapic acid from CoA to shikimate but not to quinate or acceptor substrates utilized by CbRAS. In addition, 3-hydroxyanthranilate, 3-hydroxybenzoate and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate were used as acceptor substrates. The reaction product with 3-aminobenzoate putatively is an amide. For both enzymes, structural requirements for donor and acceptor substrates were deduced. The acceptance of unusual acceptor substrates by CbRAS and CbHST resulted in the formation of novel compounds. The rather relaxed substrate as well as reaction specificity of both hydroxycinnamoyltransferases opens up possibilities for the evolution of novel enzymes forming novel secondary metabolites in plants and for the in vitro formation of new compounds with putatively interesting biological activities.

  16. The role of ß-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III in the condensation steps of fatty acid biosynthesis in sunflower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Mellado, Damián; von Wettstein, Penny; Garcés, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    . Heterologous expression of HaKAS III in Escherichia coli altered their fatty acid content and composition implying an interaction of HaKAS III with the bacterial FAS complex. Testing purified HaKAS III recombinant protein by adding to a reconstituted E. coli FAS system lacking condensation activity revealed......The ß-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (KAS III; EC 2.3.1.180) is a condensing enzyme catalyzing the initial step of fatty acid biosynthesis using acetyl-CoA as primer. To determine the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) developing...... a novel substrate specificity. In contrast to all hitherto characterized plant KAS IIIs, the activities of which are limited to the first cycles of intraplastidial fatty acid biosynthesis yielding C6 chains, HaKAS III participates in at least four cycles resulting in C10 chains....

  17. Expression of glycogen synthase and phosphofructokinase in muscle from type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients before and after intensive insulin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Andersen, P H; Lund, S

    1994-01-01

    glycogen storage and glycolysis: glycogen synthase and phosphofructokinase, respectively. In nine diabetic patients biopsies of quadriceps muscle were taken before and 24-h after intensified insulin therapy and compared to findings in eight control subjects. Subcutaneous injections of rapid acting insulin...... diabetic patients showed a normal total glycogen synthase activity but a 48% decrease (p = 0.006) in glycogen synthase fractional velocity (0.1 mmol/l glucose 6-phosphate) (FV0.1) and a 45% increase (p = 0.01) in the half-maximal activation constant of glycogen synthase (A0.5). The activity...... of phosphofructokinase and the specific mRNA and immunoreactive protein levels of both glycogen synthase and phosphofructokinase were similar in the two groups. The 2.8-fold increase in serum insulin levels and the halving of the plasma glucose level for at least 15 h were associated with a normalization of glycogen...

  18. Patterning and lifetime of plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase is dependent on actin organization in Arabidopsis interphase cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampathkumar, A.; Gutierrez, R.; McFarlane, H.E.; Bringmann, M.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.; Samuels, L.; Ketelaar, T.; Ehrhardt, D.W.; Persson, S.

    2013-01-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In

  19. Biosynthesis of Akaeolide and Lorneic Acids and Annotation of Type I Polyketide Synthase Gene Clusters in the Genome of Streptomyces sp. NPS554

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation pattern of biosynthetic precursors into two structurally unique polyketides, akaeolide and lorneic acid A, was elucidated by feeding experiments with 13C-labeled precursors. In addition, the draft genome sequence of the producer, Streptomyces sp. NPS554, was performed and the biosynthetic gene clusters for these polyketides were identified. The putative gene clusters contain all the polyketide synthase (PKS domains necessary for assembly of the carbon skeletons. Combined with the 13C-labeling results, gene function prediction enabled us to propose biosynthetic pathways involving unusual carbon-carbon bond formation reactions. Genome analysis also indicated the presence of at least ten orphan type I PKS gene clusters that might be responsible for the production of new polyketides.

  20. Disruption of neuronal nitric oxide synthase dimerization contributes to the development of Alzheimer's disease: Involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5-mediated phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase at Ser(293).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Park, Jung-Hyun; Jo, Inho; Song, Kee-Ho; Han, Jung-Soo; Park, Seung Hwa; Han, Seol-Heui; Cho, Du-Hyong

    2016-10-01

    Although previous studies have suggested that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-derived NO has neuroprotective effects on the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether and how disruption of nNOS dimerization contributes to the development of AD. No differences in synaptic number or expression of synaptic markers, including synaptophysin and postsynaptic density 95, were found in the cortex of 5 × FAD mice, which possess 5 familial AD mutations, at 6 months of age compared with control littermates. nNOS dimerization was disrupted in the 5 × FAD cortex, accompanied by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The subcellular distribution of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) shifted more diffusely toward a cytosolic compartment, but there was no change in total expression. Furthermore, the levels of p25, a CDK5 activator, increased significantly and it colocalized with nNOS in the 5 × FAD cortex. In silico analysis revealed that a new nNOS-specific GSP (glycine-serine-proline) motif was well-conserved across species at nNOS-Ser(293), which is located ahead of the N-terminal hook. This motif was not present in the closely related isoform, endothelial NOS. Motif scan analysis also predicted that CDK5 can phosphorylate nNOS-Ser(293) with a high likelihood. An in vitro phosphorylation assay clearly showed that CDK5/p25 does indeed phosphorylate nNOS-Ser(293). Finally, nNOS-S293D mutant, a phosphomimetic form of nNOS-Ser(293), and nNOS-S293A mutant, a neutral form of nNOS-Ser(293), significantly decreased nNOS dimerization and NO production. Taken together, our results demonstrate that nNOS dimers are disrupted in the 5 × FAD cortex, and nNOS-Ser(293), a potential site of CDK5 phosphorylation, may be involved in the decrease in nNOS dimerization and NO production, and the development of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neighbor Preferences of Amino Acids and Context-Dependent Effects of Amino Acid Substitutions in Human, Mouse, and Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchuan Fu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids show apparent propensities toward their neighbors. In addition to preferences of amino acids for their neighborhood context, amino acid substitutions are also considered to be context-dependent. However, context-dependence patterns of amino acid substitutions still remain poorly understood. Using relative entropy, we investigated the neighbor preferences of 20 amino acids and the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions with protein sequences in human, mouse, and dog. For 20 amino acids, the highest relative entropy was mostly observed at the nearest adjacent site of either N- or C-terminus except C and G. C showed the highest relative entropy at the third flanking site and periodic pattern was detected at G flanking sites. Furthermore, neighbor preference patterns of amino acids varied greatly in different secondary structures. We then comprehensively investigated the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions. Our results showed that nearly half of 380 substitution types were evidently context dependent, and the context-dependent patterns relied on protein secondary structures. Among 20 amino acids, P elicited the greatest effect on amino acid substitutions. The underlying mechanisms of context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions were possibly mutation bias at a DNA level and natural selection. Our findings may improve secondary structure prediction algorithms and protein design; moreover, this study provided useful information to develop empirical models of protein evolution that consider dependence between residues.

  2. Neighbor Preferences of Amino Acids and Context-Dependent Effects of Amino Acid Substitutions in Human, Mouse, and Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mingchuan; Huang, Zhuoran; Mao, Yuanhui; Tao, Shiheng

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids show apparent propensities toward their neighbors. In addition to preferences of amino acids for their neighborhood context, amino acid substitutions are also considered to be context-dependent. However, context-dependence patterns of amino acid substitutions still remain poorly understood. Using relative entropy, we investigated the neighbor preferences of 20 amino acids and the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions with protein sequences in human, mouse, and dog. For 20 amino acids, the highest relative entropy was mostly observed at the nearest adjacent site of either N- or C-terminus except C and G. C showed the highest relative entropy at the third flanking site and periodic pattern was detected at G flanking sites. Furthermore, neighbor preference patterns of amino acids varied greatly in different secondary structures. We then comprehensively investigated the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions. Our results showed that nearly half of 380 substitution types were evidently context dependent, and the context-dependent patterns relied on protein secondary structures. Among 20 amino acids, P elicited the greatest effect on amino acid substitutions. The underlying mechanisms of context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions were possibly mutation bias at a DNA level and natural selection. Our findings may improve secondary structure prediction algorithms and protein design; moreover, this study provided useful information to develop empirical models of protein evolution that consider dependence between residues. PMID:25210846

  3. Thymidylate synthase inhibition induces p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptotic responses in human urinary bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Karkoulis, Panagiotis K; Konstantakou, Eumorphia G; Melachroinou, Sophia; Thanasopoulou, Angeliki; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Margaritis, Lukas H; Anastasiadou, Ema; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E

    2011-02-01

    In search for more effective clinical protocols, the antimetabolite drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been successfully included in new regimens of bladder cancer combination chemotherapy. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of 5-FU treatment on apoptosis induction in wild-type and mutant p53 urinary bladder cancer cells. We have used MTT-based assays, FACS analysis, Western blotting and semi-quantitative RT-PCR in RT4 and RT112 (grade I, wild-type p53), as well as in T24 (grade III, mutant p53) and TCCSUP (grade IV, mutant p53) human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. In the urothelial bladder cancer cell lines RT4 and T24, 5-FU-induced TS inhibition proved to be associated with cell type-dependent (a) sensitivity to the drug, (b) Caspase-mediated apoptosis, (c) p53 stabilization and activation, as well as Rb phosphorylation and E2F1 expression and (d) transcriptional regulation of p53 target genes and their cognate proteins, while an E2F-dependent transcriptional network did not seem to be critically engaged in such type of responses. We have shown that in the wild-type p53 context of RT4 cells, 5-FU-triggered apoptosis was prominently efficient and mainly regulated by p53-dependent mechanisms, whereas the mutant p53 environment of T24 cells was able to provide notable levels of resistance to apoptosis, basically ascribed to E2F-independent, and still unidentified, pathways. Nevertheless, the differential vulnerability of RT4 and T24 cells to 5-FU administration could also be associated with cell-type-specific transcriptional expression patterns of certain genes critically involved in 5-FU metabolism.

  4. Caenorhabditis elegans F09E10.3 Encodes a Putative 3-Oxoacyl-Thioester Reductase of Mitochondrial Type 2 Fatty Acid Synthase FASII that Is Functional in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aner Gurvitz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans F09E10.3 (dhs-25 was identified as encoding a 3-oxoacyl-thioester reductase, potentially of the mitochondrial type 2 fatty acid synthase (FASII system. Mitochondrial FASII is a relatively recent discovery in metazoans, and the relevance of this process to animal physiology has not been elucidated. A good animal model to study the role of FASII is the nematode C. elegans. However, the components of nematode mitochondrial FASII have hitherto evaded positive identification. The nematode F09E10.3 protein was ectopically expressed without an additional mitochondrial targeting sequence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant cells lacking the homologous mitochondrial FASII enzyme 3-oxoacyl-ACP reductase Oar1p. These yeast oar1Δ mutants are unable to respire, grow on nonfermentable carbon sources, or synthesize sufficient levels of lipoic acid. Mutant yeast cells producing a full-length mitochondrial F09E10.3 protein contained NAD+-dependent 3-oxoacyl-thioester reductase activity and resembled the corresponding mutant overexpressing native Oar1p for the above-mentioned phenotype characteristics. This is the first identification of a metazoan 3-oxoacyl-thioester reductase (see Note Added in Proof.

  5. Development of a Medium-Throughput Targeted LCMS Assay to Detect Endogenous Cellular Levels of Malonyl-CoA to Screen Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcroft, Philip J; Fisher, David I

    2016-02-01

    The fatty acid synthase (FAS) enzyme in mammalian cells is a large multidomain protein responsible for de novo synthesis of fatty acids. The steps catalyzed by FAS involve the condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA moieties in the presence of NADPH until palmitate is formed. Inhibition of FAS causes an accumulation of intracellular malonyl-CoA, as this metabolite is essentially committed to fatty acid synthesis once formed. Detection of intracellular metabolites for screening can be problematic due to a lack of appropriate tools, but here we describe a targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LCMS) method to directly measure endogenous levels of malonyl-CoA to drive a drug development structure-activity relationship (SAR) screening cascade. Our process involves preparation of samples at 96-well scale, normalization postpermeabilization via use of a whole-well imaging platform, and the LCMS detection methodology. The assay is amenable to multiplexing cellular endpoints, has a typical Z' of >0.6, and has high reproducibility of EC50 values. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  6. Low Temperature Induces the Accumulation of Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase and Chalcone Synthase mRNAs of Arabidopsis thaliana in a Light-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, A.; Jarillo, J. A.; Salinas, J.; Martinez-Zapater, J. M.

    1995-05-01

    Anthocyanins, which accumulate in leaves and stems in response to low temperature and changes in light intensity, are synthesized through the phenylpropanoid pathway that is controlled by key enzymes that include phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS). In this work we demonstrate that PAL and CHS mRNAs accumulate in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. upon exposure to low temperature in a light-dependent manner. The regulation of the PAL1 gene expression by low temperature and light was examined by analyzing the expression of the [beta]-glucuronidase (uidA) reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis plants containing the uidA gene of Escherichia coli under the control of the PAL1 promoter. The results indicate that the accumulation of PAL1 mRNA is transcriptionally regulated. Histochemical staining for [beta]-glucuronidase activity showed that the PAL1 promoter is preferentially activated in photosynthetically active cells, paralleling anthocyanin accumulation. Moreover, we show that light may also be implicated in the regulation of the CHS gene in response to bacterial infiltration. Finally, using two transparent testa Arabidopsis mutants that are unable to accumulate anthocyanins, we demonstrate that these pigments are not required for successful development of freezing tolerance in this species.

  7. Structure of the Alpha-2 Epsilon-2 Ni-dependent CO Dehydrogenase Component of the Methanosarcina Barkeri Acetyl-CoA Decarbonylase/Synthase Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, W.; Hao, B; Wei, Z; Ferguson, Jr., D; Tallant, T; Krzycki, J; Chan, M

    2008-01-01

    Ni-dependent carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (Ni-CODHs) are a diverse family of enzymes that catalyze reversible CO:CO2 oxidoreductase activity in acetogens, methanogens, and some CO-using bacteria. Crystallography of Ni-CODHs from CO-using bacteria and acetogens has revealed the overall fold of the Ni-CODH core and has suggested structures for the C cluster that mediates CO:CO2 interconversion. Despite these advances, the mechanism of CO oxidation has remained elusive. Herein, we report the structure of a distinct class of Ni-CODH from methanogenic archaea: the ?2?2 component from the ?8?8?8?8?8 CODH/acetyl-CoA decarbonylase/synthase complex, an enzyme responsible for the majority of biogenic methane production on Earth. The structure of this Ni-CODH component provides support for a hitherto unobserved state in which both CO and H2O/OH- bind to the Ni and the exogenous FCII iron of the C cluster, respectively, and offers insight into the structures and functional roles of the ?-subunit and FeS domain not present in nonmethanogenic Ni-CODHs.

  8. Integrin-linked kinase is a functional Mn2+-dependent protein kinase that regulates glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3beta phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Maydan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrin-linked kinase (ILK is a highly evolutionarily conserved, multi-domain signaling protein that localizes to focal adhesions, myofilaments and centrosomes where it forms distinct multi-protein complexes to regulate cell adhesion, cell contraction, actin cytoskeletal organization and mitotic spindle assembly. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ILK can regulate the phosphorylation of various protein and peptide substrates in vitro, as well as the phosphorylation of potential substrates and various signaling pathways in cultured cell systems. Nevertheless, the ability of ILK to function as a protein kinase has been questioned because of its atypical kinase domain.Here, we have expressed full-length recombinant ILK, purified it to >94% homogeneity, and characterized its kinase activity. Recombinant ILK readily phosphorylates glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 peptide and the 20-kDa regulatory light chains of myosin (LC(20. Phosphorylation kinetics are similar to those of other active kinases, and mutation of the ATP-binding lysine (K220 within subdomain 2 causes marked reduction in enzymatic activity. We show that ILK is a Mn-dependent kinase (the K(m for MnATP is approximately 150-fold less than that for MgATP.Taken together, our data demonstrate that ILK is a bona fide protein kinase with enzyme kinetic properties similar to other active protein kinases.

  9. Hyaluronate synthase-2 overexpression alters estrogen dependence and induces histone deacetylase inhibitor-like effects on ER-driven genes in MCF7 breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, Marion; Hanoux, Vincent; Bouakka, Mohammed; Bonnamy, Pierre-Jacques

    2017-03-15

    In breast carcinoma cells, high levels of hyaluronan (HA) and its CD44 receptor are frequently associated with alteration in estrogen signaling. We demonstrate that stable hyaluronate synthase 2 (HAS2) overexpression in estrogen receptor α (ERα) -positive MCF7 cells oppositely altered estrogen dependence of cell growth and its sensitivity towards antiestrogens. Albeit without effect on ERα expression and estradiol binding properties, HAS2 overexpression increased ERα Ser118 phosphorylation as well as transcriptional activity of estrogen in an ERE-luciferase reporter gene assay. However, HAS2 overexpression induced partial silencing of E2 driven-genes without affecting the magnitude of regulation by estradiol. This effect was associated with half-reduction in the activity of nuclear histone deacetylases (HDACs) through a post-translational mechanism likely consecutive to the enhanced expression of the histone acetyl-transferase EP300. In conclusion, increase in HA/CD44 interactions may contribute, through an HDAC inhibitor-like and ER-independent mechanism, to the silencing of estrogen-driven genes in breast carcinoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutational analysis of Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase reveals critical residues for tRNA-dependent cysteine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadóttir, Sunna; Sinapah, Sylvie; Söll, Dieter; Ling, Jiqiang

    2012-01-02

    In methanogenic archaea, Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS) converts Sep-tRNA(Cys) to Cys-tRNA(Cys). The mechanism of tRNA-dependent cysteine formation remains unclear due to the lack of functional studies. In this work, we mutated 19 conserved residues in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii SepCysS, and employed an in vivo system to determine the activity of the resulting variants. Our results show that three active-site cysteines (Cys39, Cys42 and Cys247) are essential for SepCysS activity. In addition, combined with structural modeling, our mutational and functional analyses also reveal multiple residues that are important for the binding of PLP, Sep and tRNA. Our work thus represents the first systematic functional analysis of conserved residues in archaeal SepCysSs, providing insights into the catalytic and substrate binding mechanisms of this poorly characterized enzyme. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Recoded organisms engineered to depend on synthetic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Alexis J; Haimovich, Adrian D; Katz, Spencer R; Li, Zhe; Grome, Michael W; Gassaway, Brandon M; Amiram, Miriam; Patel, Jaymin R; Gallagher, Ryan R; Rinehart, Jesse; Isaacs, Farren J

    2015-02-05

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly used in research and industrial systems to produce high-value pharmaceuticals, fuels and chemicals. Genetic isolation and intrinsic biocontainment would provide essential biosafety measures to secure these closed systems and enable safe applications of GMOs in open systems, which include bioremediation and probiotics. Although safeguards have been designed to control cell growth by essential gene regulation, inducible toxin switches and engineered auxotrophies, these approaches are compromised by cross-feeding of essential metabolites, leaked expression of essential genes, or genetic mutations. Here we describe the construction of a series of genomically recoded organisms (GROs) whose growth is restricted by the expression of multiple essential genes that depend on exogenously supplied synthetic amino acids (sAAs). We introduced a Methanocaldococcus jannaschii tRNA:aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair into the chromosome of a GRO derived from Escherichia coli that lacks all TAG codons and release factor 1, endowing this organism with the orthogonal translational components to convert TAG into a dedicated sense codon for sAAs. Using multiplex automated genome engineering, we introduced in-frame TAG codons into 22 essential genes, linking their expression to the incorporation of synthetic phenylalanine-derived amino acids. Of the 60 sAA-dependent variants isolated, a notable strain harbouring three TAG codons in conserved functional residues of MurG, DnaA and SerS and containing targeted tRNA deletions maintained robust growth and exhibited undetectable escape frequencies upon culturing ∼10(11) cells on solid media for 7 days or in liquid media for 20 days. This is a significant improvement over existing biocontainment approaches. We constructed synthetic auxotrophs dependent on sAAs that were not rescued by cross-feeding in environmental growth assays. These auxotrophic GROs possess alternative genetic codes that

  12. Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-04-16

    The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

  13. Glycogen synthase and phosphofructokinase protein and mRNA levels in skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Lund, S; Larsen, F S

    1993-01-01

    -limiting enzymes in glycogen synthesis and glycolysis, glycogen synthase (GS) and phosphofructokinase (PFK), respectively. Analysis of biopsies of quadriceps muscle from 19 NIDDM patients and 19 control subjects showed in the basal state a 30% decrease (P

  14. Age-dependent decrease and alternative splicing of methionine synthase mRNA in human cerebral cortex and an accelerated decrease in autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina R Muratore

    Full Text Available The folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS is highly sensitive to cellular oxidative status, and lower MS activity increases production of the antioxidant glutathione, while simultaneously decreasing more than 200 methylation reactions, broadly affecting metabolic activity. MS mRNA levels in postmortem human cortex from subjects across the lifespan were measured and a dramatic progressive biphasic decrease of more than 400-fold from 28 weeks of gestation to 84 years was observed. Further analysis revealed alternative splicing of MS mRNA, including deletion of folate-binding domain exons and age-dependent deletion of exons from the cap domain, which protects vitamin B12 (cobalamin from oxidation. Although three species of MS were evident at the protein level, corresponding to full-length and alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts, decreasing mRNA levels across the lifespan were not associated with significant changes in MS protein or methionine levels. MS mRNA levels were significantly lower in autistic subjects, especially at younger ages, and this decrease was replicated in cultured human neuronal cells by treatment with TNF-α, whose CSF levels are elevated in autism. These novel findings suggest that rather than serving as a housekeeping enzyme, MS has a broad and dynamic role in coordinating metabolism in the brain during development and aging. Factors adversely affecting MS activity, such as oxidative stress, can be a source of risk for neurological disorders across the lifespan via their impact on methylation reactions, including epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  15. Cloning and characterization of a flavonol synthase gene from Scutellaria baicalensis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Kim, KwangSoo; Kim, Yeji; Tuan, Pham Anh; Kim, Haeng Hoon; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    .... We isolated a cDNA clone encoding flavonol synthase from Scutellaria baicalensis (SbFLS). The SbFLS cDNA is 1011 bp long, encodes 336 amino acid residues, and belongs to a family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases...

  16. Analyzing effects of extra-virgin olive oil polyphenols on breast cancer-associated fatty acid synthase protein expression using reverse-phase protein microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Garcia-Villalba, Rocio; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegria; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2008-10-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key enzyme involved in the anabolic conversion of dietary carbohydrates to fat in mammals, are receiving increasingly more attention as they may provide therapeutic moieties for the treatment of human malignancies. Natural compounds, such as the green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate, have been shown to induce anti-cancer effects by suppressing FASN, which may account for the epidemiologically observed inverse correlation between green-tea drinking and cancer risk in Oriental populations. Since extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO)-derived phenolics have been suggested to possess biological activities that may explain the health-promoting effects of the 'Mediterranean diet', we evaluated their effects on the expression of FASN protein in human breast epithelial cell lines. First, we developed a reverse phase protein microspot array (RPPA) capable of rapidly assessing the relative amount of FASN protein in whole lysates from cultured human cells. Then we tested the effects of phenolic fractions from EVOO and its main constituents including single phenols (i.e. tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, vanillin), phenolic acids (i.e. caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, elenolic acid), lignans (i.e. 1-[+]-pinoresinol, 1-[+]-acetoxy-pinoresinol), flavonoids (i.e. apigenin, luteolin), or secoiridoids (i.e. deacetoxyoleuropein aglycone, ligstroside aglycone, oleuropein glycoside, oleuropein aglycone) on FASN protein expression. EVOO polyphenols lignans, flavonoids and secoiridoids were found to drastically suppress FASN protein expression in HER2 gene-amplified SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Equivalent results were observed in MCF-7 cells engineered to overexpress the HER2 tyrosine kinase receptor, a well-characterized up-regulator of FASN expression in aggressive sub-types of cancer cells. EVOO-derived lignans, flavonoids and secoiridoids were significantly more effective than the mono-HER2 inhibitor trastuzumab

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Dependent on Vesicular Traffic between the Golgi Apparatus and the Vacuole When Inositolphosphorylceramide Synthase Aur1 Is Inactivated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voynova, Natalia S; Roubaty, Carole; Vazquez, Hector M; Mallela, Shamroop K; Ejsing, Christer S; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Inositolphosphorylceramide (IPC) and its mannosylated derivatives are the only complex sphingolipids of yeast. Their synthesis can be reduced by aureobasidin A (AbA), which specifically inhibits the IPC synthase Aur1. AbA reportedly, by diminishing IPC levels, causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, an increase in cytosolic calcium, reactive oxygen production, and mitochondrial damage leading to apoptosis. We found that when Aur1 is gradually depleted by transcriptional downregulation, the accumulation of ceramides becomes a major hindrance to cell survival. Overexpression of the alkaline ceramidase YPC1 rescues cells under this condition. We established hydroxylated C26 fatty acids as a reliable hallmark of ceramide hydrolysis. Such hydrolysis occurs only when YPC1 is overexpressed. In contrast, overexpression of YPC1 has no beneficial effect when Aur1 is acutely repressed by AbA. A high-throughput genetic screen revealed that vesicle-mediated transport between Golgi apparatus, endosomes, and vacuole becomes crucial for survival when Aur1 is repressed, irrespective of the mode of repression. In addition, vacuolar acidification becomes essential when cells are acutely stressed by AbA, and quinacrine uptake into vacuoles shows that AbA activates vacuolar acidification. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine does not improve cell growth on AbA, indicating that reactive oxygen radicals induced by AbA play a minor role in its toxicity. AbA strongly induces the cell wall integrity pathway, but osmotic support does not improve the viability of wild-type cells on AbA. Altogether, the data support and refine current models of AbA-mediated cell death and add vacuolar protein transport and acidification as novel critical elements of stress resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Expression of the tetrahydrofolate-dependent nitric oxide synthase from the green alga Ostreococcus tauri increases tolerance to abiotic stresses and influences stomatal development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresi, Noelia; Mayta, Martín L; Lodeyro, Anabella F; Scuffi, Denise; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; García-Mata, Carlos; Casalongué, Claudia; Carrillo, Néstor; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule with diverse biological functions in plants. NO plays a crucial role in growth and development, from germination to senescence, and is also involved in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In animals, NO is synthesized by well-described nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes. NOS activity has also been detected in higher plants, but no gene encoding an NOS protein, or the enzymes required for synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, an essential cofactor of mammalian NOS activity, have been identified so far. Recently, an NOS gene from the unicellular marine alga Ostreococcus tauri (OtNOS) has been discovered and characterized. Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with OtNOS under the control of the inducible short promoter fragment (SPF) of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Hahb-4 gene, which responds to abiotic stresses and abscisic acid. Transgenic plants expressing OtNOS accumulated higher NO concentrations compared with siblings transformed with the empty vector, and displayed enhanced salt, drought and oxidative stress tolerance. Moreover, transgenic OtNOS lines exhibited increased stomatal development compared with plants transformed with the empty vector. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that OtNOS, unlike mammalian NOS, efficiently uses tetrahydrofolate as a cofactor in Arabidopsis plants. The modulation of NO production to alleviate abiotic stress disturbances in higher plants highlights the potential of genetic manipulation to influence NO metabolism as a tool to improve plant fitness under adverse growth conditions. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) gene of oomycetes: structure, phylogeny and influence on sensitivity to carboxylic acid amide (CAA) fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Mathias; Gamper, Hannes A; Waldner, Maya; Sierotzki, Helge; Gisi, Ulrich

    2012-04-01

    Proper disease control is very important to minimize yield losses caused by oomycetes in many crops. Today, oomycete control is partially achieved by breeding for resistance, but mainly by application of single-site mode of action fungicides including the carboxylic acid amides (CAAs). Despite having mostly specific targets, fungicidal activity can differ even in species belonging to the same phylum but the underlying mechanisms are often poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate the phylogenetic basis and underlying molecular mechanism of sensitivity and tolerance to CAAs, the cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) gene was isolated and characterized, encoding the target site of this fungicide class. The CesA3 gene was present in all 25 species included in this study representing the orders Albuginales, Leptomitales, Peronosporales, Pythiales, Rhipidiales and Saprolegniales, and based on phylogenetic analyses, enabled good resolution of all the different taxonomic orders. Sensitivity assays using the CAA fungicide mandipropamid (MPD) demonstrated that only species belonging to the Peronosporales were inhibited by the fungicide. Molecular data provided evidence, that the observed difference in sensitivity to CAAs between Peronosporales and CAA tolerant species is most likely caused by an inherent amino acid configuration at position 1109 in CesA3 possibly affecting fungicide binding. The present study not only succeeded in linking CAA sensitivity of various oomycetes to the inherent CesA3 target site configuration, but could also relate it to the broader phylogenetic context. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Replacement of two amino acids of 9R-dioxygenase-allene oxide synthase of Aspergillus niger inverts the chirality of the hydroperoxide and the allene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooman, Linda; Wennman, Anneli; Hamberg, Mats; Hoffmann, Inga; Oliw, Ernst H

    2016-02-01

    The genome of Aspergillus niger codes for a fusion protein (EHA25900), which can be aligned with ~50% sequence identity to 9S-dioxygenase (DOX)-allene oxide synthase (AOS) of Fusarium oxysporum, homologues of the Fusarium and Colletotrichum complexes and with over 62% sequence identity to homologues of Aspergilli, including (DOX)-9R-AOS of Aspergillus terreus. The aims were to characterize the enzymatic activities of EHA25900 and to identify crucial amino acids for the stereospecificity. Recombinant EHA25900 oxidized 18:2n-6 sequentially to 9R-hydroperoxy-10(E),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid (9R-HPODE) and to a 9R(10)-allene oxide. 9S- and 9R-DOX-AOS catalyze abstraction of the pro-R hydrogen at C-11, but the direction of oxygen insertion differs. A comparison between twelve 9-DOX domains of 9S- and 9R-DOX-AOS revealed conserved amino acid differences, which could contribute to the chirality of products. The Gly616Ile replacement of 9R-DOX-AOS (A. niger) increased the biosynthesis of 9S-HPODE and the 9S(10)-allene oxide, whereas the Phe627Leu replacement led to biosynthesis of 9S-HPODE and the 9S(10)-allene oxide as main products. The double mutant (Gly616Ile, Phe627Leu) formed over 90% of the 9S stereoisomer of HPODE. 9S-HPODE was formed by antarafacial hydrogen abstraction and oxygen insertion, i.e., the original H-abstraction was retained but the product chirality was altered. We conclude that 9R-DOX-AOS can be altered to 9S-DOX-AOS by replacement of two amino acids (Gly616Ile, Phe627Leu) in the DOX domain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase kinase and sucrose-phosphate synthase kinase activities in cauliflower florets: Ca2+ dependence and substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toroser, D; Huber, S C

    1998-07-15

    Plant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase(HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34) and sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14) and synthetic peptides designed from the known phosphorylation sites of plant HMGR (SAMS*: KSHMKYNRSTKDVK), rat acetyl-CoA carboxylase (SAMS: HMRSAMSGLHLVKRR), spinach SPS (SP2: GRRJRRISSVEJJDKK), and spinach NADH:nitrate reductase (NR6: GPTLKRTASTPFJNTTSK) were used to characterize kinase activities from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. ) inflorescences. The three major peaks of protein kinase activity resolved by anion-exchange FPLC are homologs of those observed previously in spinach leaves and thus are designated PKI, PKIV, and PKIII, listed in order of elution. PKIV was the most active in terms of phosphorylation and inactivation of recombinant Nicotiana HMGR and was also strictly Ca2+ dependent. The novel aspects are that PKIII has not been detected in previous cauliflower studies, that SAMS* is a more specific peptide substrate to identify potential HMGR kinases, and that the major HMGR kinase in cauliflower is Ca2+ dependent. Of the three major kinases that phosphorylated the SP2 peptide only PKI (partially Ca2+ sensitive) and PKIII (Ca2+ insensitive) inactivated native spinach leaf SPS. Cauliflower extracts contained endogenous SPS that was inactivated by endogenous kinase(s) in an ATP-dependent manner and this may be one of the substrate target proteins for PKI and/or PKIII. The substrate specificity of the three kinase peaks was studied using synthetic peptide variants of the SP2 sequence. All three kinases had a strong preference for peptides with a basic residue at P-6 (as in SP2 and SAMS*; SAMS has a free amino terminus at this position) or a Pro at P-7 (as in NR6). This requirement for certain residues at P-6 or P-7 was not recognized in earlier studies but appears to be a general requirement. In plant HMGR, a conserved His residue at P-6 is involved directly in catalysis and this may explain why substrates reduced HMGR phosphorylation

  2. The Formation of Pyrroline and Tetrahydropyridine Rings in Amino Acids Catalyzed by Pyrrolysine Synthase (PylD)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2014-06-10

    The dehydrogenase PylD catalyzes the ultimate step of the pyrrolysine pathway by converting the isopeptide L-lysine-Nε-3R-methyl-D-ornithine to the 22nd proteinogenic amino acid. In this study, we demonstrate how PylD can be harnessed to oxidize various isopeptides to novel amino acids by combining chemical synthesis with enzyme kinetics and X-ray crystallography. The data enable a detailed description of the PylD reaction trajectory for the biosynthesis of pyrroline and tetrahydropyridine rings as constituents of pyrrolysine analogues. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Pycnogenol® effects on skin elasticity and hydration coincide with increased gene expressions of collagen type I and hyaluronic acid synthase in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, A; Grether-Beck, S; Jaenicke, T; Weber, M; Burki, C; Formann, P; Brenden, H; Schönlau, F; Krutmann, J

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the use of nutritional supplements to benefit human skin. Molecular evidence substantiating such effects, however, is scarce. In the present study we investigated whether nutritional supplementation of women with the standardized pine bark extract Pycnogenol® will improve their cosmetic appearance and relate these effects to expression of corresponding molecular markers of their skin. For this purpose 20 healthy postmenopausal women were supplemented with Pycnogenol for 12 weeks. Before, during and after supplementation, their skin condition was assessed (i) by employing non-invasive, biophysical methods including corneometry, cutometry, visioscan and ultrasound analyses and (ii) by taking biopsies and subsequent PCR for gene expression analyses related to extracellular matrix homeostasis. Pycnogenol supplementation was well tolerated in all volunteers. Pycnogenol significantly improved hydration and elasticity of skin. These effects were most pronounced in women presenting with dry skin conditions prior to the start of supplementation. The skin-physiological improvement was accompanied by a significant increase in the mRNA expression of hyaluronic acid synthase-1 (HAS-1), an enzyme critically involved in the synthesis of hyaluronic acid, and a noticeable increase in gene expression involved in collagen de novo synthesis. This study provides skin-physiological and for the first time molecular evidence that Pycnogenol supplementation benefits human skin by increasing skin hydration and skin elasticity. These effects are most likely due to an increased synthesis of extracellular matrix molecules such as hyaluronic acid and possibly collagen. Pycnogenol supplementation may thus be useful to counteract the clinical signs of skin aging. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Oleic acid increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in cultured endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gremmels, Hendrik; Bevers, Lonneke M.; Fledderus, Joost O.; Braam, Branko; Jan Van Zonneveld, Anton; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Joles, Jaap A.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. This may be related to FFA-induced elevation of oxidative stress in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that, in addition to mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial nitric

  5. Regulation of C. elegans fat uptake and storage by acyl-CoA synthase-3 is dependent on NR5A family nuclear hormone receptor nhr-25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullaney, Brendan C; Blind, Raymond D; Lemieux, George A

    2010-01-01

    Acyl-CoA synthases are important for lipid synthesis and breakdown, generation of signaling molecules, and lipid modification of proteins, highlighting the challenge of understanding metabolic pathways within intact organisms. From a C. elegans mutagenesis screen, we found that loss of ACS-3......, a long-chain acyl-CoA synthase, causes enhanced intestinal lipid uptake, de novo fat synthesis, and accumulation of enlarged, neutral lipid-rich intestinal depots. Here, we show that ACS-3 functions in seam cells, epidermal cells anatomically distinct from sites of fat uptake and storage, and that acs-3...

  6. Protein kinase A-dependent Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation Mediates the Enhancement of Baroreflex Response by Adrenomedullin in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho I-Chun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenomedullin (ADM exerts its biological functions through the receptor-mediated enzymatic mechanisms that involve protein kinase A (PKA, or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. We previously demonstrated that the receptor-mediated cAMP/PKA pathway involves in ADM-enhanced baroreceptor reflex (BRR response. It remains unclear whether ADM may enhance BRR response via activation of nNOS-dependent mechanism in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS. Methods Intravenous injection of phenylephrine was administered to evoke the BRR before and at 10, 30, and 60 min after microinjection of the test agents into NTS of Sprague-Dawley rats. Western blotting analysis was used to measure the level and phosphorylation of proteins that involved in BRR-enhancing effects of ADM (0.2 pmol in NTS. The colocalization of PKA and nNOS was examined by immunohistochemical staining and observed with a laser confocal microscope. Results We found that ADM-induced enhancement of BRR response was blunted by microinjection of NPLA or Rp-8-Br-cGMP, a selective inhibitor of nNOS or protein kinase G (PKG respectively, into NTS. Western blot analysis further revealed that ADM induced an increase in the protein level of PKG-I which could be attenuated by co-microinjection with the ADM receptor antagonist ADM22-52 or NPLA. Moreover, we observed an increase in phosphorylation at Ser1416 of nNOS at 10, 30, and 60 min after intra-NTS administration of ADM. As such, nNOS/PKG signaling may also account for the enhancing effect of ADM on BRR response. Interestingly, biochemical evidence further showed that ADM-induced increase of nNOS phosphorylation was prevented by co-microinjection with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, a PKA inhibitor. The possibility of PKA-dependent nNOS activation was substantiated by immunohistochemical demonstration of co-localization of PKA and nNOS in putative NTS neurons. Conclusions The novel finding of this study is that the signal transduction cascade that

  7. Inhibition of thalidomide teratogenicity by acetylsalicylic acid: evidence for prostaglandin H synthase-catalyzed bioactivation of thalidomide to a teratogenic reactive intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, R R; Wells, P G

    1996-06-01

    Thalidomide is a teratogenic sedative-hypnotic drug that is structurally similar to phenytoin, which is thought to be bioactivated by prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) and other peroxidases to a teratogenic reactive intermediate. The relevance of this mechanism to thalidomide teratogenicity was evaluated in pregnant New Zealand White rabbits treated with thalidomide at 11:00 A.M. on gestational days 8 to 11, with day 0 indicating the time when sperm were observed in the vaginal fluid. Thalidomide (7.5 mg/kg i.v.) produced mainly fetal limb anomalies analogous to those observed in humans. Thalidomide (25-200 mg/kg i.p.), produced a dose-related increase in a spectrum of fetal anomalies, and in postpartum lethality, but did not produce a reliable incidence of limb anomalies. In subsequent studies, pregnant does received the irreversible PHS inhibitor acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 75 mg/kg i.p., or its vehicle, followed 2 hr later by thalidomide, 7.5 mg/kg i.v., or its vehicle. ASA pretreatment was remarkably embryoprotective, resulting in respective 61.2 and 61.4% decreases in thalidomide-initiated fetal limb anomalies (P = .002) and postpartum fetal lethality (P teratogenicity, suggesting that thalidomide may be bioactivated by PHS to a teratogenic reactive intermediate.

  8. Serum fatty acid synthase concentration is increased in patients with hepatitis viral infection and may assist in the prediction of liver steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joven, Jorge; Espinel, Eugenia; Rull, Anna; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Aragonès, Gerard; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Camps, Jordi; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Sans, Teresa; Menéndez, Javier A; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos

    2011-07-01

    Liver steatosis is frequent in patients with chronic hepatitis viral infections. Intracellular fatty acid synthase (FASN) seems to play a substantial role in its pathogenesis. FASN can also be found in circulation and is significantly increased in HIV-infected individuals, especially if they are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). To assess whether serum FASN concentration is also increased in patients with chronic hepatitis viral infections and its relationship with liver steatosis. Samples and associated data were obtained from stored collections in our institutions from patients with chronic infections with either hepatitis B virus (HBV, cHB, n=60), HCV (cHC, n=81) or co-infection (n=29). The incidence of liver steatosis was significantly (pconcentration was related to the degree of liver steatosis, and was correlated with serum ALT values when the whole group was considered (ρ=0.207; p=0.007). Serum FASN concentration is significantly increased in patients with chronic hepatitis viral infections and correlated with the degree of liver steatosis. These findings may represent a basis for further studies searching non-invasive biomarkers with either diagnostic or prognostic value. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 4-Methylumbelliferone inhibits hyaluronan synthesis by depletion of cellular UDP-glucuronic acid and downregulation of hyaluronan synthase 2 and 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kultti, Anne, E-mail: anne.kultti@uku.fi [Institute of Biomedicine, Anatomy, University of Kuopio, P.O.B. 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Pasonen-Seppaenen, Sanna [Institute of Biomedicine, Anatomy, University of Kuopio, P.O.B. 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Jauhiainen, Marjo [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Kuopio, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Rilla, Kirsi J.; Kaernae, Riikka; Pyoeriae, Emma; Tammi, Raija H.; Tammi, Markku I. [Institute of Biomedicine, Anatomy, University of Kuopio, P.O.B. 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-07-01

    Hyaluronan accumulation on cancer cells and their surrounding stroma predicts an unfavourable disease outcome, suggesting that hyaluronan enhances tumor growth and spreading. 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) inhibits hyaluronan synthesis and retards cancer spreading in experimental animals through mechanisms not fully understood. These mechanisms were studied in A2058 melanoma cells, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 breast, SKOV-3 ovarian and UT-SCC118 squamous carcinoma cells by analysing hyaluronan synthesis, UDP-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcUA) content, and hyaluronan synthase (HAS) mRNA levels. The maximal inhibition in hyaluronan synthesis ranged 22-80% in the cell lines tested. Active glucuronidation of 4-MU produced large quantities of 4-MU-glucuronide, depleting the cellular UDP-GlcUA pool. The maximal reduction varied between 38 and 95%. 4-MU also downregulated HAS mRNA levels: HAS3 was 84-60% lower in MDA-MB-361, A2058 and SKOV-3 cells. HAS2 was the major isoenzyme in MCF-7 cells and lowered by 81%, similar to 88% in A2058 cells. These data indicate that both HAS substrate and HAS2 and/or HAS3 mRNA are targeted by 4-MU. Despite different target point sensitivities, the reduction of hyaluronan caused by 4-MU was associated with a significant inhibition of cell migration, proliferation and invasion, supporting the importance of hyaluronan synthesis in cancer, and the therapeutic potential of hyaluronan synthesis inhibition.

  10. Ursolic acid mediates photosensitization by initiating mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuan-Hao; Wang, Exing; Kumar, Neeru; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2013-02-01

    The signaling pathways PI3K/Akt and MAPK play key roles in transcription, translation and carcinogenesis, and may be activated by light exposure. These pathways may be modulated or inhibited by naturally-occurring compounds, such as the triterpenoid, ursolic acid (UA). Previously, the transcription factors p53 and NF-kB, which transactivate mitochondrial apoptosis-related genes, were shown to be differentially modulated by UA. Our current work indicates that UA causes these effects via the mTOR and insulin-mediated pathways. UA-modulated apoptosis, following exposure to UV radiation, is observed to correspond to differential levels of oxidative stress in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and skin melanoma (SM) cells. Flow cytometry analysis, DHE (dihydroethidium) staining and membrane permeability assay showed that UA pretreatment potentiated cell cycle arrest and radiation-induced apoptosis selectively on SM cells while DNA photo-oxidative damage (i.e. strand breakage) was reduced, presumably by some antioxidant activity of UA in RPE cells. The UA-mediated NF-κB activation in SM cells was reduced by rapamycin pretreatment, which indicates that these agents exert inter-antagonistic effects in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. In contrast, the antagonistic effect of UA on the PI3K/Akt pathway was reversed by insulin leading to greater NF-κB and p53 activation in RPE cells. MitoTracker, a mitochondrial functional assay, indicated that mitochondria in RPE cells experienced reduced oxidative stress while those in SM cells exhibited increased oxidative stress upon UA pretreatment. When rapamycin administration was followed by UA, mitochondrial oxidative stress was increased in RPE cells but decreased in SM cells. These results indicate that UA modulates p53 and NF-κB, initiating a mitogenic response to radiation that triggers mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  11. Involvement of Salicylic Acid on Antioxidant and Anticancer Properties, Anthocyanin Production and Chalcone Synthase Activity in Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Karimi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of foliar application of salicylic acid (SA at different concentrations (10−3 M and 10−5 M was investigated on the production of secondary metabolites (flavonoids, chalcone synthase (CHS activity, antioxidant activity and anticancer activity (against breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 in two varieties of Malaysian ginger, namely Halia Bentong and Halia Bara. The results of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis showed that application of SA induced the synthesis of anthocyanin and fisetin in both varieties. Anthocyanin and fisetin were not detected in the control plants. Accordingly, the concentrations of some flavonoids (rutin and apigenin decreased significantly in plants treated with different concentrations of SA. The present study showed that SA enhanced the chalcone synthase (CHS enzyme activity (involving flavonoid synthesis and recorded the highest activity value of 5.77 nkat /mg protein in Halia Bara with the 10−5 M SA treatment. As the SA concentration was decreased from 10−3 M to 10−5 M, the free radical scavenging power (FRAP increased about 23% in Halia Bentong and 10.6% in Halia Bara. At a concentration of 350 μg mL−1, the DPPH antioxidant activity recorded the highest value of 58.30%–72.90% with the 10−5 M SA treatment followed by the 10−3 M SA (52.14%–63.66% treatment. The lowest value was recorded in the untreated control plants (42.5%–46.7%. These results indicate that SA can act not only as an inducer but also as an inhibitor of secondary metabolites. Meanwhile, the highest anticancer activity against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines was observed for H. Bara extracts treated with 10−5 M SA with values of 61.53 and 59.88%, respectively. The results suggest that the high anticancer activity in these varieties may be related to the high concentration of potent anticancer components including fisetin and anthocyanin. The results thus indicate that the synthesis of

  12. Up-Regulation of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters EAAT3 and EAAT4 by Lithium Sensitive Glycogen Synthase Kinase GSK3ß

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Abousaab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cellular uptake of glutamate by the excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs decreases excitation and thus participates in the regulation of neuroexcitability. Kinases impacting on neuronal function include Lithium-sensitive glycogen synthase kinase GSK3ß. The present study thus explored whether the activities of EAAT3 and/or EAAT4 isoforms are sensitive to GSK3ß. Methods: cRNA encoding wild type EAAT3 (SLC1A1 or EAAT4 (SLC1A6 was injected into Xenopus oocytes without or with additional injection of cRNA encoding wild type GSK3ß or the inactive mutant K85AGSK3ß. Dual electrode voltage clamp was performed in order to determine glutamate-induced current (IEAAT. Results: Appreciable IEAAT was observed in EAAT3 or EAAT4 expressing but not in water injected oocytes. IEAAT was significantly increased by coexpression of GSK3ß but not by coexpression of K85AGSK3ß. Coexpression of GSK3ß increased significantly the maximal IEAAT in EAAT3 or EAAT4 expressing oocytes, without significantly modifying apparent affinity of the carriers. Lithium (1 mM exposure for 24 hours decreased IEAAT in EAAT3 and GSK3ß expressing oocytes to values similar to IEAAT in oocytes expressing EAAT3 alone. Lithium did not significantly modify IEAAT in oocytes expressing EAAT3 without GSK3ß. Conclusions: Lithium-sensitive GSK3ß is a powerful regulator of excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT3 and EAAT4.

  13. A Mutant of Hepatitis B Virus X Protein (HBxΔ127 Promotes Cell Growth through A Positive Feedback Loop Involving 5-Lipoxygenase and Fatty Acid Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx contributes to the development of HCC, whereas HBx with COOH-terminal deletion is a frequent event in the HCC tissues. Previously, we identified a natural mutant of HBx-truncated 27 amino acids at the COOH-terminal (termed HBxΔ127, which strongly enhanced cell growth. In the present study, we focused on investigating the mechanism. Accordingly, fatty acid synthase (FAS plays a crucial role in cancer cell survival and proliferation; thus, we examined the signaling pathways involving FAS. Our data showed that HBxΔ127 strongly increased the transcriptional activities of FAS in human hepatoma HepG2 and H7402 cells. Moreover, we found that 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX was responsible for the up-regulation of FAS by using MK886 (an inhibitor of 5-LOX and 5-LOX small interfering RNA. We observed that HBxΔ127 could upregulate 5-LOX through phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 and thus resulted in the increase of released leukotriene B4 (LTB4, a metabolite of 5-LOX by ELISA. The additional LTB4 could upregulate the expression of FAS in the cells as well. Interestingly, we found that FAS was able to upregulate the expression of 5-LOX in a feedback manner by using cerulenin (an inhibitor of FAS. Collectively, HBxΔ127 promotes cell growth through a positive feedback loop involving 5-LOX and FAS, in which released LTB4 is involved in the up-regulation of FAS. Thus, our finding provides a new insight into the mechanism involving the promotion of cell growth mediated by HBxΔ127.

  14. pH-dependent and carrier-mediated transport of salicylic acid across Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanaga, H; Tamai, I; Tsuji, A

    1994-07-01

    The transport of monocarboxylic acid drugs such as salicylic acid was examined in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, Caco-2 cells that possess intestinal epithelia-like properties. [14C]Salicylic acid transport was pH-dependent and appeared to follow the pH-partition hypothesis. However, 10 mM unlabelled salicylic acid significantly reduced the permeability coefficient of [14C]salicylic acid. Kinetic analysis of the concentration dependence of the permeation rate of salicylic acid across Caco-2 cells showed both saturable (Kt = 5.28 +/- 0.72 mM Jmax = 36.6 +/- 3.54 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1) and nonsaturable (kd = 0.37 +/- 0.08 microL min-1 (mg protein)-1) processes. The permeation rate of [14C]salicylic acid was competitively inhibited by both acetic acid and benzoic acid, which were demonstrated in our previous studies to be transported in the carrier-mediated-transport mechanism which is responsible for monocarboxylic acids. Furthermore, certain monocarboxylic acids significantly inhibited [14C]salicylic acid transport, whereas salicylamide and dicarboxylic acids such as succinic acid did not. From these results, it was concluded that the transcellular transport of [14C]salicylic acid across Caco-2 cells is by the pH-dependent and carrier-mediated transport mechanism specific for monocarboxylic acids.

  15. Insulin-dependent signaling: regulation by amino acids and energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that amino acids stimulate a signal-transduction pathway that is also used by insulin. Moreover, for insulin to exert its anabolic and anticatabolic effects on protein, there is an absolute requirement for amino acids. This signaling pathway becomes inhibited by

  16. Implications of secondary structure prediction and amino acid sequence comparison of class I and class II phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthases on catalysis, regulation, and quaternary structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, B N; Hove-Jensen, B

    2001-01-01

    is consistent with a homotrimer. Secondary structure prediction shows that spinach PRPP synthase isozyme 4 has a general folding similar to that of Bacillus subtilis class I PRPP synthase, for which the three-dimensional structure has been solved, as the position and extent of helices and beta-sheets of the two......Spinach 5-phospho-D-ribosyl alpha-1-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase isozyme 4 was synthesized in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. The activity of the enzyme is independent of P(i); it is inhibited by ADP in a competitive manner, indicating a lack of an allosteric site; and it accepts...

  17. Effect of fish oils containing different amounts of EPA, DHA, and antioxidants on plasma and brain fatty acids and brain nitric oxide synthase activity in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Karin; Saldeen, Ann-Sofie; Yang, Baichun; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The interest in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has expanded significantly in the last few years, due to their many positive effects described. Consequently, the interest in fish oil supplementation has also increased, and many different types of fish oil supplements can be found on the market. Also, it is well known that these types of fatty acids are very easily oxidized, and that stability among supplements varies greatly. Aims of the study In this pilot study we investigated the effects of two different types of natural fish oils containing different amounts of the n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and antioxidants on plasma and brain fatty acids, blood lipids, vitamin E, and in vivo lipid peroxidation, as well as brain nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, an enzyme which has been shown to be important for memory and learning ability. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups and fed regular rat chow pellets enriched with 5% (w/w) of butter (control group), a natural fish oil (17.4% EPA and 11.7% DHA, referred to as EPA-rich), and a natural fish oil rich in DHA (7.7% EPA and 28.0% DHA, referred to as DHA-rich). Both of the fish oils were stabilized by a commercial antioxidant protection system (Pufanox®) at production. The fourth group received the same DHA-rich oil, but without Pufanox® stabilization (referred to as unstable). As an index of stability of the oils, their peroxide values were repeatedly measured during 9 weeks. The dietary treatments continued until sacrifice, after 10 days. Results Stability of the oils varied greatly. It took the two stabilized oils 9 weeks to reach the same peroxide value as the unstable oil reached after only a few days. Both the stabilized EPA- and DHA-rich diets lowered the triacylglycerols and total cholesterol compared to control (-45%, P < 0.05 and -54%, P < 0.001; -31%, P < 0.05 and -25%, P < 0.01) and so did the unstable oil, but less efficiently

  18. Saw palmetto extract enhances erectile responses by inhibition of phosphodiesterase 5 activity and increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid expression in rat and rabbit corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Surong; Chen, Changrui; Li, Yiying; Ren, Zhenghua; Zhang, Yungang; Wu, Gantong; Wang, Hao; Hu, Zhenzhen; Yao, Minghui

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate whether saw palmetto extract (SPE) relaxes corpus cavernosum and explore the underlying mechanisms. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats and 30 New Zealand rabbits were randomly allocated into 3 SPE-treated groups (low-, middle-, and high-dose) and 1 saline-treated control group. SPE was administered intragastrically for 7 consecutive days. Another 23 rats treated with sildenafil were used to appraise the erectile response to electrical stimulation of nerves in the corpus cavernosum. The erectile functions of rats and rabbits were evaluated 24 hours after the last SPE administration or 15 minutes after intragastric sildenafil. Outcome measures included corpus cavernosum electrical activity recording, phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) activity detected by the colorimetric quantitative method, and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression level for PDE5 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the SPE-treated animals, the relaxant response to electrical stimulation of nerves in the corpus cavernosum, reflected by the amplitude of the electrical activity within the cavernosum, was significantly and dose-dependently augmented. Similar effects were observed in the sildenafil-treated rats. PDE5 activity in rat and rabbit corpus cavernosum tissues was significantly and dose-dependently inhibited in SPE-treated animals, whereas the iNOS mRNA level increased compared with the saline group. PDE5 mRNA, however, was only significantly enhanced in the rats treated with the middle dose of SPE. The results suggest that SPE may have potential application value for the prevention or treatment of erectile dysfunction through an increase in iNOS mRNA expression and inhibition of PDE5 activity in corpus cavernosum smooth muscles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Proton re-uptake partitioning between uncoupling protein and ATP synthase during benzohydroxamic acid-resistant state 3 respiration in tomato fruit mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmuszkiewicz, W; Almeida, A M; Vercesi, A E; Sluse, F E; Sluse-Goffart, C M

    2000-05-05

    The yield of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated tomato fruit mitochondria depleted of free fatty acids remains constant when respiratory rates are decreased by a factor of 3 by the addition of n-butyl malonate. This constancy makes the determination of the contribution of the linoleic acid-induced energy-dissipating pathway by the ADP/O method possible. No decrease in membrane potential is observed in state 3 respiration with increasing concentration of n-butyl malonate, indicating that the rate of ATP synthesis is steeply dependent on membrane potential. Linoleic acid decreases the yield of oxidative phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner by a pure protonophoric process like that in the presence of FCCP. ADP/O measurements allow calculation of the part of respiration leading to ATP synthesis and the part of respiration sustained by the dissipative H(+) re-uptake induced by linoleic acid. Respiration sustained by this energy-dissipating process remains constant at a given LA concentration until more than 50% inhibition of state 3 respiration by n-butyl malonate is achieved. The energy dissipative contribution to oxygen consumption is proposed to be equal to the protonophoric activity of plant uncoupling protein divided by the intrinsic H(+)/O of the cytochrome pathway. It increases with linoleic acid concentration, taking place at the expense of ADP phosphorylation without an increase in the respiration.

  20. Conjugation Dependent Interaction of Folic Acid with Folate Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzel, Rachel L; Frey, Carolina; Chen, Junjie; Garn, Rachel; van Dongen, Mallory; Dougherty, Casey A; Kandaluru, Ananda Kumar; Low, Philip S; Marsh, E Neil G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2017-09-20

    Serum proteins play a critical role in the transport, uptake, and efficacy of targeted drug therapies, and here we investigate the interactions between folic acid-polymer conjugates and serum folate binding protein (FBP), the soluble form of the cellular membrane-bound folate receptor. We demonstrate that both choice of polymer and method of ligand conjugation affect the interactions between folic acid-polymer conjugates and serum FBP, resulting in changes in the folic acid-induced protein aggregation process. We have previously demonstrated that individual FBP molecules self-aggregate into nanoparticles at physiological concentrations. When poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-folic acid conjugates bound to FBP, the distribution of nanoparticles was preserved. However, the dendritic conjugates produced larger nanoparticles than those formed in the presence of physiologically normal human levels of folic acid, and the conjugation method affected particle size distribution. In contrast, poly(ethylene glycol)-folic acid conjugates demonstrated substantially reduced binding to FBP, did not cause folic acid-induced aggregation, and fully disrupted FBP self-aggregation. On the basis of these results, we discuss the potential implications for biodistribution, trafficking, and therapeutic efficacy of targeted nanoscale therapeutics, especially considering the widespread clinical use of poly(ethylene glycol) conjugates. We highlight the importance of considering specific serum protein interactions in the rational design of similar nanocarrier systems. Our results suggest that prebinding therapeutic nanocarriers to serum FBP may allow folate-specific metabolic pathways to be exploited for delivery while also affording benefits of utilizing an endogenous protein as a vector.

  1. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Klaus Peter; Petersen, Morten; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective...

  2. Regulation of C. elegans fat uptake and storage by acyl-CoA synthase-3 is dependent on NR5A family nuclear hormone receptor nhr-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Brendan C; Blind, Raymond D; Lemieux, George A; Perez, Carissa L; Elle, Ida C; Faergeman, Nils J; Van Gilst, Marc R; Ingraham, Holly A; Ashrafi, Kaveh

    2010-10-06

    Acyl-CoA synthases are important for lipid synthesis and breakdown, generation of signaling molecules, and lipid modification of proteins, highlighting the challenge of understanding metabolic pathways within intact organisms. From a C. elegans mutagenesis screen, we found that loss of ACS-3, a long-chain acyl-CoA synthase, causes enhanced intestinal lipid uptake, de novo fat synthesis, and accumulation of enlarged, neutral lipid-rich intestinal depots. Here, we show that ACS-3 functions in seam cells, epidermal cells anatomically distinct from sites of fat uptake and storage, and that acs-3 mutant phenotypes require the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-25, a key regulator of C. elegans molting. Our findings suggest that ACS-3-derived long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs, perhaps incorporated into complex ligands such as phosphoinositides, modulate NHR-25 function, which in turn regulates an endocrine program of lipid uptake and synthesis. These results reveal a link between acyl-CoA synthase function and an NR5A family nuclear receptor in C. elegans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An amino acid substitution in the Babesia bovis dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase gene is correlated to cross-resistance against pyrimethamine and WR99210.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, Fasila R; Wilschut, Karlijn; Franssen, Frits F J; de Vries, Erik

    2004-02-01

    The genomic locus and cDNA encoding Babesia bovis dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) were cloned and sequenced. A single dhfr-ts gene, composed of four exons, encodes a 511 aa protein that is most closely related to Plasmodium falciparum DHFR-TS. The genomic locus is characterized by the presence of four other genes of which at least three are expressed during the erythrocytic cycle. Three of the genes were highly conserved in closely related Theileria species and for two of the genes and dhfr-ts, gene synteny was observed between B. bovis and Theileria parva, B. bovis in vitro cultures displaying approximately 10-20-fold decreased sensitivity towards the antimalarial drugs WR99210 and pyrimethamine were selected repeatedly after prolonged growth in presence of drugs. Five cultures examined in detail were shown to encode a DHFR-TS carrying amino acid substitution S125F. Three-dimensional-modelling, using the P. falciparum DHFR structure as a template, suggests that substitution S125F protrudes into the binding site of NADPH. The S125F mutant could be isolated by growth under pyrimethamine or WR99210 pressure conferring cross-resistance to both drugs. Although opposing selection for pyrimethamine or WR99210 resistance was reported recently using P. falciparum or P. vivax strains carrying wildtype dhfr, the results obtained here are reminiscent of a quadruple mutant of P. falciparum dhfr displaying strong resistance to pyrimethamine and 10-fold enhanced resistance against WR99210. Wildtype B. bovis DHFR carries three mutations present in this mutant possibly explaining the low sensitivity to pyrimethamine and the ease by which moderately WR99210 resistant mutants could be isolated.

  4. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon) and SREBP-1 Synergistically Activate Transcription of Fatty-acid Synthase Gene (FASN)*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Park, Hyejin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Choong-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Osborne, Timothy F.; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a proto-oncogenic transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and pox virus zinc finger) domain family. Recent evidence suggested that FBI-1 might be involved in adipogenic gene expression. Coincidentally, expression of FBI-1 and fatty-acid synthase (FASN) genes are often increased in cancer and immortalized cells. Both FBI-1 and FASN are important in cancer cell proliferation. SREBP-1 is a major regulator of many adipogenic genes, and FBI-1 and SREBP-1 (sterol-responsive element (SRE)-binding protein 1) interact with each other directly via their DNA binding domains. FBI-1 enhanced the transcriptional activation of SREBP-1 on responsive promoters, pGL2-6x(SRE)-Luc and FASN gene. FBI-1 and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of the FASN gene by acting on the proximal GC-box and SRE/E-box. FBI-1, Sp1, and SREBP-1 can bind to all three SRE, GC-box, and SRE/E-box. Binding competition among the three transcription factors on the GC-box and SRE/E-box appears important in the transcription regulation. FBI-1 is apparently changing the binding pattern of Sp1 and SREBP-1 on the two elements in the presence of induced SREBP-1 and drives more Sp1 binding to the proximal promoter with less of an effect on SREBP-1 binding. The changes induced by FBI-1 appear critical in the synergistic transcription activation. The molecular mechanism revealed provides insight into how proto-oncogene FBI-1 may attack the cellular regulatory mechanism of FASN gene expression to provide more phospholipid membrane components needed for rapid cancer cell proliferation. PMID:18682402

  5. Relationship between Expression of Chalcone Synthase Genes and Chromones in Artificial Agarwood induced by Formic Acid Stimulation Combined with Fusarium sp. A2 Inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xiaoling; Feng, Meirou; Zhong, Zhaojian; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Xiaoying; Ye, Wei; Zhang, Weimin; Gao, Xiaoxia

    2017-04-25

    Agarwood (gaharu) is a fragrant resin produced in the heartwood of resinous Gyrinops and Aquilaria species. Artificial agarwood samples were obtained from Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg using formic acid (FA) stimulation combined with Fusarium sp. A2 inoculation. The relationship between the expression of chalcone synthase genes (CHS) and dynamic changes in chromone content was explored in resin-deposited parts of the trunks of A. sinensis. CHS gene expression levels were detected by qRT-PCR analysis. The chemical composition of agarwood obtained from the heartwood of A. sinensis before and within 1 year after induction was determined by GC-MS. After induction with FA stimulation combined with F. sp. A2 inoculation, the CHS1 gene showed relatively high expression, whereas the CHS2 gene showed low expression. The relative gene expression level of CHS1 peaked at 12 months, with a 153.1-fold increase, and the dominant period of the CHS2 gene expression was 10 months with a 14.13-fold increase. Moreover, chromones were not detected until after 2 months, and a large proportion of chromone compounds were detected after 4 months. Chromone content increased with time and peaked at 12 months. CHS1 gene expression was significantly correlated with 6-hydroxy-2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone accumulation, and CHS2 gene expression was significantly correlated with 5-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone accumulation. CHS gene expression was extremely sensitive to FA stimulation combined with F. sp. A2 inoculation and responded to late-onset injury. CHS genes expression also preceded the chromone accumulation. This work laid the foundation for studies on the mechanism by which genes regulate chromone biosynthesis pathways during the formation of agarwood resin in A. sinensis.

  6. Infection with HIV and HCV enhances the release of fatty acid synthase into circulation: evidence for a novel indicator of viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aragonès Gerard

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid synthase (FASN is an enzyme synthesized by the liver and plays an important role in lipogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate whether serum FASN concentration may provide a direct link between HIV and/or HCV viral infections and lipid metabolic disorders commonly observed in HIV/HCV-infected patients. Methods We evaluated serum FASN concentration in 191 consecutive HIV-infected patients in the absence or presence of HCV co-infection. For comparison, 102 uninfected controls were included. Metabolic and inflammatory phenotype was also compared with respect to the presence of HCV co-infection. Results Serum FASN concentration was significantly higher in HIV-infected patients than in healthy participants and HCV co-infected patients showed higher levels than those without co-infection. Levels were also affected by treatment regimen, but marginally influenced by virological variables. Insulin concentration was the sole variable among metabolic parameters that demonstrated a significant correlation with serum FASN concentrations. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT values correlated significantly with serum FASN concentration and provided the best discrimination with respect to the presence or absence of HCV co-infection. In multivariate analysis, only ALT, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and the presence of antiretroviral treatment regimen significantly contributed to explain serum FASN concentration in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Conclusion Serum FASN concentration is significantly increased in HIV-infected individuals. The release of FASN into the circulation is further enhanced in patients who are co-infected with HCV. Subsequent studies should explore the usefulness of this indicator to monitor the effect of viral infections on disease progression and survival.

  7. A Ser/Thr protein kinase phosphorylates MA-ACS1 (Musa acuminata 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase 1) during banana fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Roy, Sujit; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2012-08-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis during ripening. ACS isozymes are regulated both transcriptionally and post-translationally. However, in banana, an important climacteric fruit, little is known about post-translational regulation of ACS. Here, we report the post-translational modification of MA-ACS1 (Musa acuminata ACS1), a ripening inducible isozyme in the ACS family, which plays a key role in ethylene biosynthesis during banana fruit ripening. Immunoprecipitation analyses of phospholabeled protein extracts from banana fruit using affinity-purified anti-MA-ACS1 antibody have revealed phosphorylation of MA-ACS1, particularly in ripe fruit tissue. We have identified the induction of a 41-kDa protein kinase activity in pulp at the onset of ripening. The 41-kDa protein kinase has been identified as a putative protein kinase by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Biochemical analyses using partially purified protein kinase fraction from banana fruit have identified the protein kinase as a Ser/Thr family of protein kinase and its possible involvement in MA-ACS1 phosphorylation during ripening. In vitro phosphorylation analyses using synthetic peptides and site-directed mutagenized recombinant MA-ACS1 have revealed that serine 476 and 479 residues at the C-terminal region of MA-ACS1 are phosphorylated. Overall, this study provides important novel evidence for in vivo phosphorylation of MA-ACS1 at the molecular level as a possible mechanism of post-translational regulation of this key regulatory protein in ethylene signaling pathway in banana fruit during ripening.

  8. Evolution of a Double Amino Acid Substitution in the 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase in Eleusine indica Conferring High-Level Glyphosate Resistance1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Jalaludin, Adam; Han, Heping; Chen, Ming; Sammons, R. Douglas; Powles, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Glyphosate is the most important and widely used herbicide in world agriculture. Intensive glyphosate selection has resulted in the widespread evolution of glyphosate-resistant weed populations, threatening the sustainability of this valuable once-in-a-century agrochemical. Field-evolved glyphosate resistance due to known resistance mechanisms is generally low to modest. Here, working with a highly glyphosate-resistant Eleusine indica population, we identified a double amino acid substitution (T102I + P106S [TIPS]) in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene in glyphosate-resistant individuals. This TIPS mutation recreates the biotechnology-engineered commercial first generation glyphosate-tolerant EPSPS in corn (Zea mays) and now in other crops. In E. indica, the naturally evolved TIPS mutants are highly (more than 180-fold) resistant to glyphosate compared with the wild type and more resistant (more than 32-fold) than the previously known P106S mutants. The E. indica TIPS EPSPS showed very high-level (2,647-fold) in vitro resistance to glyphosate relative to the wild type and is more resistant (600-fold) than the P106S variant. The evolution of the TIPS mutation in crop fields under glyphosate selection is likely a sequential event, with the P106S mutation being selected first and fixed, followed by the T102I mutation to create the highly resistant TIPS EPSPS. The sequential evolution of the TIPS mutation endowing high-level glyphosate resistance is an important mechanism by which plants adapt to intense herbicide selection and a dramatic example of evolution in action. PMID:25717039

  9. Fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine leads to augmented hepatic and circulating triglycerides in adult male offspring due to increased expression of fatty acid synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Noelle; Nicholson, Catherine J; Wong, Michael; Holloway, Alison C; Hardy, Daniel B

    2014-02-15

    While nicotine replacement therapy is assumed to be a safer alternative to smoking during pregnancy, the long-term consequences for the offspring remain elusive. Animal studies now suggest that maternal nicotine exposure during perinatal life leads to a wide range of adverse outcomes for the offspring including increased adiposity. The focus of this study was to investigate if nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation leads to alterations in hepatic triglyceride synthesis. Female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive daily subcutaneous injections of saline (vehicle) or nicotine bitartrate (1mg/kg/day) for two weeks prior to mating until weaning. At postnatal day 180 (PND 180), nicotine exposed offspring exhibited significantly elevated levels of circulating and hepatic triglycerides in the male offspring. This was concomitant with increased expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), the critical hepatic enzyme in de novo triglyceride synthesis. Given that FAS is regulated by the nuclear receptor Liver X receptor (LXRα), we measured LXRα expression in both control and nicotine-exposed offspring. Nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation led to an increase in hepatic LXRα protein expression and enriched binding to the putative LXRE element on the FAS promoter in PND 180 male offspring. This was also associated with significantly enhanced acetylation of histone H3 [K9,14] surrounding the FAS promoter, a hallmark of chromatin activation. Collectively, these findings suggest that nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation leads to an increase in circulating and hepatic triglycerides long-term via changes in the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of the hepatic lipogenic pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine leads to augmented hepatic and circulating triglycerides in adult male offspring due to increased expression of fatty acid synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Noelle [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); The Lawson Health Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); Nicholson, Catherine J. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University (Canada); Wong, Michael [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); The Lawson Health Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); Holloway, Alison C. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University (Canada); Hardy, Daniel B., E-mail: Daniel.Hardy@schulich.uwo.ca [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); The Children' s Health Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); The Lawson Health Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    While nicotine replacement therapy is assumed to be a safer alternative to smoking during pregnancy, the long-term consequences for the offspring remain elusive. Animal studies now suggest that maternal nicotine exposure during perinatal life leads to a wide range of adverse outcomes for the offspring including increased adiposity. The focus of this study was to investigate if nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation leads to alterations in hepatic triglyceride synthesis. Female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive daily subcutaneous injections of saline (vehicle) or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/day) for two weeks prior to mating until weaning. At postnatal day 180 (PND 180), nicotine exposed offspring exhibited significantly elevated levels of circulating and hepatic triglycerides in the male offspring. This was concomitant with increased expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), the critical hepatic enzyme in de novo triglyceride synthesis. Given that FAS is regulated by the nuclear receptor Liver X receptor (LXRα), we measured LXRα expression in both control and nicotine-exposed offspring. Nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation led to an increase in hepatic LXRα protein expression and enriched binding to the putative LXRE element on the FAS promoter in PND 180 male offspring. This was also associated with significantly enhanced acetylation of histone H3 [K9,14] surrounding the FAS promoter, a hallmark of chromatin activation. Collectively, these findings suggest that nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation leads to an increase in circulating and hepatic triglycerides long-term via changes in the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of the hepatic lipogenic pathway. - Highlights: • Our data reveals the links nicotine exposure in utero and long-term hypertriglyceridemia. • It is due to nicotine-induced augmented expression of hepatic FAS and LXRα activity. • Moreover, this involves nicotine-induced enhanced

  11. Fatty acid synthase and hormone-sensitive lipase expression in liver are involved in zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein-induced body fat loss in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Feng-Ying; Deng, Jie-Ying; Zhu, Hui-Juan; Pan, Hui; Wang, Lin-Jie; Yang, Hong-Bo

    2010-09-01

    To explore the effects of zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein (ZAG) on body weight and body fat in high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice and the possible mechanism. Thirty-six male mice were fed with standard food (SF) (n = 9) and HFD (n = 27), respectively. Five weeks later, 9 mice fed with HFD were subjected to ZAG expression plasmid DNA transfection by liposome transfection method, and another 9 mice to negative control plasmid transfection. Two weeks later, serum ZAG level in the mice was assayed by Western blot, and the effects of ZAG over-expression on body weight, body fat, serum biochemical indexes, and adipose tissue of obese mice were evaluated. The mRNA expressions of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in liver tissue were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Serum ZAG level significantly lowered in simple HFD-fed mice in comparison to SF-fed mice (0.51 +/- 0.10 AU vs. 0.75 +/- 0.07 AU, P ZAG level was negatively correlated with body weight (r = -0.56, P ZAG over-expression in obese mice reduced body weight and the percentage of epididymal fat. Furthermore, FAS mRNA expression decreased (P ZAG over-expressing mice. ZAG is closely related to obesity. Serum ZAG level is inversely correlated with body weight and percentage of body fat. The action of ZAG is associated with reduced FAS expression and increased HSL expression in the liver of obese mice.

  12. Infection with HIV and HCV enhances the release of fatty acid synthase into circulation: evidence for a novel indicator of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Gerard; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Rull, Anna; Rodríguez-Sanabria, Fernando; Camps, Jordi; Martín, Alejandro Vázquez; Menéndez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2010-08-13

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is an enzyme synthesized by the liver and plays an important role in lipogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate whether serum FASN concentration may provide a direct link between HIV and/or HCV viral infections and lipid metabolic disorders commonly observed in HIV/HCV-infected patients. We evaluated serum FASN concentration in 191 consecutive HIV-infected patients in the absence or presence of HCV co-infection. For comparison, 102 uninfected controls were included. Metabolic and inflammatory phenotype was also compared with respect to the presence of HCV co-infection. Serum FASN concentration was significantly higher in HIV-infected patients than in healthy participants and HCV co-infected patients showed higher levels than those without co-infection. Levels were also affected by treatment regimen, but marginally influenced by virological variables. Insulin concentration was the sole variable among metabolic parameters that demonstrated a significant correlation with serum FASN concentrations. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) values correlated significantly with serum FASN concentration and provided the best discrimination with respect to the presence or absence of HCV co-infection. In multivariate analysis, only ALT, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the presence of antiretroviral treatment regimen significantly contributed to explain serum FASN concentration in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Serum FASN concentration is significantly increased in HIV-infected individuals. The release of FASN into the circulation is further enhanced in patients who are co-infected with HCV. Subsequent studies should explore the usefulness of this indicator to monitor the effect of viral infections on disease progression and survival.

  13. Inhibition of microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 as a molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory actions of boswellic acids from frankincense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemoneit, U; Koeberle, A; Rossi, A; Dehm, F; Verhoff, M; Reckel, S; Maier, T J; Jauch, J; Northoff, H; Bernhard, F; Doetsch, V; Sautebin, L; Werz, O

    2011-01-01

    Frankincense, the gum resin derived from Boswellia species, showed anti-inflammatory efficacy in animal models and in pilot clinical studies. Boswellic acids (BAs) are assumed to be responsible for these effects but their anti-inflammatory efficacy in vivo and their molecular modes of action are incompletely understood. A protein fishing approach using immobilized BA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy were used to reveal microsomal prostaglandin E(2) synthase-1 (mPGES1) as a BA-interacting protein. Cell-free and cell-based assays were applied to confirm the functional interference of BAs with mPGES1. Carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema and rat pleurisy models were utilized to demonstrate the efficacy of defined BAs in vivo. Human mPGES1 from A549 cells or in vitro-translated human enzyme selectively bound to BA affinity matrices and SPR spectroscopy confirmed these interactions. BAs reversibly suppressed the transformation of prostaglandin (PG)H(2) to PGE(2) mediated by mPGES1 (IC(50) = 3-10 µM). Also, in intact A549 cells, BAs selectively inhibited PGE(2) generation and, in human whole blood, β-BA reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced PGE(2) biosynthesis without affecting formation of the COX-derived metabolites 6-keto PGF(1α) and thromboxane B(2) . Intraperitoneal or oral administration of β-BA (1 mg·kg(-1) ) suppressed rat pleurisy, accompanied by impaired levels of PGE(2) and β-BA (1 mg·kg(-1) , given i.p.) also reduced mouse paw oedema, both induced by carrageenan. Suppression of PGE(2) formation by BAs via interference with mPGES1 contribute to the anti-inflammatory effectiveness of BAs and of frankincense, and may constitute a biochemical basis for their anti-inflammatory properties. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase type 2 (mPGES2) is a glutathione-dependent heme protein, and dithiothreitol dissociates the bound heme to produce active prostaglandin E2 synthase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takusagawa, Fusao

    2013-04-05

    An x-ray study indicated that microsomal prostaglandin E synthase type 2 (mPGES2) is a heme-bound protein and catalyzes prostaglandin (PG) H2 degradation, but not PGE2 formation (Yamada, T., and Takusagawa, F. (2007) Biochemistry 46, 8414-8424). In response to the x-ray study, Watanabe et al. claimed that mPGES2 is a heme-free protein and that both the heme-free and heme-bound proteins have PGE2 synthesis activity in the presence of dithiothreitol (Watanabe, K., Ito, S., and Yamamoto, S. (2008) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 367, 782-786). To resolve the contradictory results, the heme-binding scheme of mPGES2 was further characterized in vivo and in vitro by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. A substantial amount of heme-bound mPGES2 was detected in cell extracts. The heme content in mPGES2 was increased along with an increase in Fe(3+) in the culture medium. Heme-free mPGES2 was converted to the heme-bound form by mixing it with pig liver extract, indicating that mPGES2 is capable of forming a complex with heme in mammalian cells. Heme binds to mPGES2 only in the presence of glutathione. The newly determined heme dissociation constant (2.9 nM) supports strongly that mPGES2 is a heme-bound protein in vivo. The bound heme was not dissociated by oxidation by H2O2 or reduction by glutathione or 2-mercaptoethanol. However, reduction by dithiothreitol (an artificial reducing compound) induced the bound heme to dissociate from mPGES2 and released heme-free mPGES2, which exhibited PGE2 synthesis activity in vitro. Imidazole bound to mPGES2 by stacking on the bound heme and inhibited heme oxidation by H2O2 and reduction by dithiothreitol.

  15. Temperature dependence of poly(lactic acid) mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Guo, Huilong; Li, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymers are not only determined by their structures, but also related to the temperature field in which they are located. The yield behaviors, Young's modulus and structures of injection-molded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) samples after annealing at different temperatures...

  16. A nucleic acid dependent chemical photocatalysis in live human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arian, Dumitru; Cló, Emiliano; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2010-01-01

    Only two nucleic acid directed chemical reactions that are compatible with live cells have been reported to date. Neither of these processes generate toxic species from nontoxic starting materials. Reactions of the latter type could be applied as gene-specific drugs, for example, in the treatment...

  17. Active site modification of the β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase FabF3 of Streptomyces coelicolor affects the fatty acid chain length of the CDA lipopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard A; Nunns, Laura; Thirlway, Jenny; Carroll, Kathleen; Smith, Colin P; Micklefield, Jason

    2011-02-14

    Using site directed mutagenesis we altered an active site residue (Phe107) of the enzyme encoded by fabF3 (SCO3248) in the Streptomyces coelicolor gene cluster required for biosynthesis of the calcium dependent antibiotics (CDAs), successfully generating two novel CDA derivatives comprising truncated (C4) lipid side chains and confirming that fabF3 encodes a KAS-II homologue that is involved in determining CDA fatty acid chain length.

  18. Trans-chalcone and quercetin down-regulate fatty acid synthase gene expression and reduce ergosterol content in the human pathogenic dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourt, Tamires Aparecida; Komoto, Tatiana Takahasi; Massaroto, Bruna Gabriele; Miranda, Carlos Eduardo Saraiva; Beleboni, Rene Oliveira; Marins, Mozart; Fachin, Ana Lúcia

    2013-09-17

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a promising antifungal target due to its marked structural differences between fungal and mammalian cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of flavonoids described in the scientific literature as FAS inhibitors (quercetin, trans-chalcone, ellagic acid, luteolin, galangin, and genistein) against the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum and their effects on fatty acid and ergosterol synthesis. The antifungal activity of the natural products was tested by the microdilution assay for determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The effect of the compounds on the cell membrane was evaluated using a protoplast regeneration assay. Ergosterol content was quantified by spectrophotometry. Inhibition of FAS by flavonoids was evaluated by an enzymatic assay to determine IC50 values. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure transcription levels of the FAS1 and ERG6 genes involved in fatty acid and ergosterol biosynthesis, respectively, during exposure of T. rubrum to the flavonoids tested. The flavonoids quercetin and trans-chalcone were effective against T. rubrum, with MICs of 125 and 7.5 μg/mL for the wild-type strain (MYA3108) and of 63 and 1.9 μg/mL for the ABC transporter mutant strain (ΔTruMDR2), respectively. The MICs of the fluconazole and cerulenin controls were 63 and 125 μg/mL for the wild-type strain and 30 and 15 μg/mL for the mutant strain, respectively. Quercetin and trans-chalcone also reduced ergosterol content in the two strains, indicating that interference with fatty acid and ergosterol synthesis caused cell membrane disruption. The MIC of quercetin reduced the number of regenerated protoplasts by 30.26% (wild-type strain) and by 91.66% (mutant strain). Half the MIC (0.5 MIC) of quercetin did not reduce the number of regenerated wild-type fungal colonies, but caused a 36.19% reduction in the number of mutant strain protoplasts. In contrast, the MIC and 0.5 MIC of trans-chalcone and

  19. Gallic Acid Enriched Fraction of Phyllanthus emblica Potentiates Indomethacin-Induced Gastric Ulcer Healing via e-NOS-Dependent Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Chatterjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The healing activity of gallic acid enriched ethanolic extract (GAE of Phyllanthus emblica fruits (amla against the indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in mice was investigated. The activity was correlated with the ability of GAE to alter the cyclooxygenase- (COX- dependent healing pathways. Histology of the stomach tissues revealed maximum ulceration on the 3rd day after indomethacin (18 mg/kg, single dose administration that was associated with significant increase in inflammatory factors, namely, mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS expression. Proangiogenic parameters such as the levels of prostaglandin (PG E2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, von Willebrand Factor VIII, and endothelial NOS (e-NOS were downregulated by indomethacin. Treatment with GAE (5 mg/kg/day and omeprazole (3 mg/kg/day for 3 days led to effective healing of the acute ulceration, while GAE could reverse the indomethacin-induced proinflammatory changes of the designated biochemical parameters. The ulcer healing activity of GAE was, however, compromised by coadministration of the nonspecific NOS inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, but not the i-NOS-specific inhibitor, L-N6-(1-iminoethyl lysine hydrochloride (L-NIL. Taken together, these results suggested that the GAE treatment accelerates ulcer healing by inducing PGE2 synthesis and augmenting e-NOS/i-NOS ratio.

  20. Gallic Acid Enriched Fraction of Phyllanthus emblica Potentiates Indomethacin-Induced Gastric Ulcer Healing via e-NOS-Dependent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Ananya; Chatterjee, Sirshendu; Biswas, Angshuman; Bhattacharya, Sayanti; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Bandyopadhyay, Sandip K.

    2012-01-01

    The healing activity of gallic acid enriched ethanolic extract (GAE) of Phyllanthus emblica fruits (amla) against the indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in mice was investigated. The activity was correlated with the ability of GAE to alter the cyclooxygenase- (COX-) dependent healing pathways. Histology of the stomach tissues revealed maximum ulceration on the 3rd day after indomethacin (18 mg/kg, single dose) administration that was associated with significant increase in inflammatory factors, namely, mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS) expression. Proangiogenic parameters such as the levels of prostaglandin (PG) E2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), von Willebrand Factor VIII, and endothelial NOS (e-NOS) were downregulated by indomethacin. Treatment with GAE (5 mg/kg/day) and omeprazole (3 mg/kg/day) for 3 days led to effective healing of the acute ulceration, while GAE could reverse the indomethacin-induced proinflammatory changes of the designated biochemical parameters. The ulcer healing activity of GAE was, however, compromised by coadministration of the nonspecific NOS inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), but not the i-NOS-specific inhibitor, L-N6-(1-iminoethyl) lysine hydrochloride (L-NIL). Taken together, these results suggested that the GAE treatment accelerates ulcer healing by inducing PGE2 synthesis and augmenting e-NOS/i-NOS ratio. PMID:22966242

  1. Diet-dependent net acid load and risk of incident hypertension in United States women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luxia; Curhan, Gary C; Forman, John P

    2009-10-01

    Animal and human studies suggest a potential link between acid-base status and blood pressure. Contemporary Western diets yield a daily systemic acid load of varying amounts, yet the association with hypertension has never been explored. We prospectively examined the association between the diet-dependent net acid load (also known as the estimated net endogenous acid production) and the risk of incident hypertension among 87 293 women without a history of hypertension in the Nurses' Health Study II. We also used the ratio of animal protein intake to potassium intake as an alternative evaluation of diet-dependent net acid load. We identified 15 385 incident cases of hypertension during 995 239 person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for potential confounders, women in the top decile of estimated diet-dependent net acid load had an increased risk of hypertension (relative risk: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.24; P for trend=0.01) compared with women in the bottom decile. To test whether the association between estimated diet-dependent net acid load and hypertension is independent of its individual components, an additional adjustment for intakes of protein and potassium was made and resulted in a relative risk of 1.23 (95% CI: 1.08 to 1.41; P for trend=0.003) for the top decile of estimated diet-dependent net acid load. Results of the ratio of animal protein intake to potassium intake were similar with those of estimated diet-depend net acid load. In conclusion, a high diet-dependent net acid load is independently associated with a higher risk of incident hypertension.

  2. Fatty Acid Synthase and Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Are Expressed in Nodal Metastatic Melanoma But Not in Benign Intracapsular Nodal Nevi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Jad; Santos-Zabala, Maria Laureana; Loda, Massimo; Stack, Edward C; Hollmann, Travis J

    2017-06-13

    Melanoma is a potentially lethal form of skin cancer for which the current standard therapy is complete surgical removal of the primary tumor followed by sentinel lymph node biopsy when indicated. Histologic identification of metastatic melanoma in a sentinel node has significant prognostic and therapeutic implications, routinely guiding further surgical management with regional lymphadenectomy. While melanocytes in a lymph node can be identified by routine histopathologic and immunohistochemical examination, the distinction between nodal nevus cells and melanoma can be morphologically problematic. Previous studies have shown that malignant melanoma can over-express metabolic genes such as fatty acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). This immunohistochemical study aims to compare the utility of FASN and ACC in differentiating sentinel lymph nodes with metastatic melanomas from those with benign nodal nevi in patients with cutaneous melanoma. Using antibodies against FASN and ACC, 13 sentinel lymph nodes from 13 patients with metastatic melanoma and 14 lymph nodes harboring benign intracapsular nevi from 14 patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma were examined. A diagnosis of nodal melanoma was based on cytologic atypia and histologic comparison with the primary melanoma. All nodal nevi were intracapsular and not trabecular. Immunohistochemistry for Melan-A, S100, human melanoma black 45 (HMB45), FASN, and ACC were performed. The percentage of melanocytes staining with HMB45, FASN, and ACC was determined and graded in 25% increments; staining intensity was graded as weak, moderate, or strong. All metastatic melanomas tested had at least 25% tumor cell staining for both FASN and ACC. Greater than 75% of the tumor cells stained with FAS in 7/13 cases and for ACC in 5/12 cases. Intensity of staining was variable; strong staining for FASN and ACC was observed in 69% and 50% of metastatic melanoma, respectively. HMB45 was negative in 40% of nodal

  3. Trinuclear Metal Clusters in Catalysis by Terpenoid Synthases

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron, Julie A.; Christianson, David. W.

    2010-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the formation of structurally and stereochemically diverse isoprenoid natural products. Many isoprenoid coupling enzymes and terpenoid cyclases from bacteria, fungi, protists, plants, and animals share the class I terpenoid synthase fold. Despite generally low amino acid sequence identity among these examples, class I terpenoid synthases contain conserved metal binding motifs that coordinate to a trinuclear metal cluster. This cluster n...

  4. Variation of herbivore-induced volatile terpenes among Arabidopsis ecotypes depends on allelic differences and subcellular targeting of two terpene synthases, TPS02 and TPS03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mengsu; Abel, Christian; Sohrabi, Reza; Petri, Jana; Haupt, Ina; Cosimano, John; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Tholl, Dorothea

    2010-07-01

    When attacked by insects, plants release mixtures of volatile compounds that are beneficial for direct or indirect defense. Natural variation of volatile emissions frequently occurs between and within plant species, but knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms is limited. We investigated intraspecific differences of volatile emissions induced from rosette leaves of 27 accessions of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) upon treatment with coronalon, a jasmonate mimic eliciting responses similar to those caused by insect feeding. Quantitative variation was found for the emission of the monoterpene (E)-beta-ocimene, the sesquiterpene (E,E)-alpha-farnesene, the irregular homoterpene 4,8,12-trimethyltridecatetra-1,3,7,11-ene, and the benzenoid compound methyl salicylate. Differences in the relative emissions of (E)-beta-ocimene and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene from accession Wassilewskija (Ws), a high-(E)-beta-ocimene emitter, and accession Columbia (Col-0), a trace-(E)-beta-ocimene emitter, were attributed to allelic variation of two closely related, tandem-duplicated terpene synthase genes, TPS02 and TPS03. The Ws genome contains a functional allele of TPS02 but not of TPS03, while the opposite is the case for Col-0. Recombinant proteins of the functional Ws TPS02 and Col-0 TPS03 genes both showed (E)-beta-ocimene and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene synthase activities. However, differential subcellular compartmentalization of the two enzymes in plastids and the cytosol was found to be responsible for the ecotype-specific differences in (E)-beta-ocimene/(E,E)-alpha-farnesene emission. Expression of the functional TPS02 and TPS03 alleles is induced in leaves by elicitor and insect treatment and occurs constitutively in floral tissues. Our studies show that both pseudogenization in the TPS family and subcellular segregation of functional TPS enzymes control the variation and plasticity of induced volatile emissions in wild plant species.

  5. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic study and DFT calculations of the sorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, G. D.; Nogueira, C. E. S.; Freire, P. T. C.; de Sousa, F. F.; da Silva, J. H.; Teixeira, A. M. R.; Mendes Filho, J.

    2015-02-01

    This work reports a temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic study of the sorbic acid (C6H8O2), as well as the mode assignment at ambient conditions, based on the density functional theory. Temperature-dependent vibrational properties have been performed in polycrystalline sorbic acid through both Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the 20-300 K and 80-300 K temperature ranges, respectively. These studies present the occurrence of some modifications in the Raman spectra that could be interpreted as a low temperature phase transition undergone by sorbic acid from the monoclinic phase to an unknown phase with conformational change of the molecules in the unit cell.

  6. Plasma Ascorbic Acid in Insulin and Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood glucose, plasma ascorbic acid and haemoglobin levels were estimated in insulin dependent diabetics, non-insulin dependent diabetics and controls matched for number, sex and age. Significantly higher levels of these parameters were found in control group than in the other two groups. Statistically differences were ...

  7. Structural and functional characterization of the Helicobacter pylori cytidine 5'-monophosphate-pseudaminic acid synthase PseF: molecular insight into substrate recognition and catalysis mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahid SUH

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Syeda Umme Habiba Wahid Department of Microbiology, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Bangladesh Abstract: The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen that can cause a wide range of diseases, including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma. It is classified as a definitive (class I human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Flagella-mediated motility is essential for H. pylori to initiate colonization and for the development of infection in human beings. Glycosylation of the H. pylori flagellum with pseudaminic acid (Pse; 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-l-glycero-l-manno-nonulosonic acid is essential for flagella assembly and function. The sixth step in the Pse biosynthesis pathway, activation of Pse by addition of a cytidine 5′-monophosphate (CMP to generate CMP-Pse, is catalyzed by a metal-dependent enzyme pseudaminic acid biosynthesis protein F (PseF using cytidine 5′-triphosphate (CTP as a cofactor. No crystal–structural information for PseF is available. This study describes the first three-dimensional model of H. pylori PseF obtained using biocomputational tools. PseF harbors an α/β-type hydrolase fold with a β-hairpin (HP dimerization domain. Comparison of PseF with other structural homologs allowed identification of crucial residues for substrate recognition and the catalytic mechanism. This structural information would pave the way to design novel therapeutics to combat bacterial infection. Keywords: H. pylori, motility, glycosylation, homology modeling, pseudaminic acid

  8. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3 Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Min Woo

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3 and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3. Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3 expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1 into n-heptanoic acid (5 and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4. This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.

  9. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.

  10. Inhibitory effect of desoxyrhaponticin and rhaponticin, two natural stilbene glycosides from the Tibetan nutritional food Rheum tanguticum Maxim. ex Balf., on fatty acid synthase and human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Tian, Weixi; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2014-02-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) has attracted more and more attention as a potential target for cancer treatment. Natural FAS inhibitors are emerging as potential therapeutic agents to treat cancer. Rheum tanguticum Maxim. ex Balf. (rhubarb) is a traditional Chinese nutritional food and has been reported to possess a variety of biological activities, including the ability to induce the apoptosis of cancer cells. This study indicates that desoxyrhaponticin (DC) and rhaponticin (RC), two stilbene glycosides from rhubarb, could be considered as promising FAS inhibitors. We found that both DC and RC could inhibit intracellular FAS activity and downregulate FAS expression in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In addition, the apoptotic effect of DC on human cancer cells was announced for the first time. Since FAS plays a key role in the biosynthesis pathway of fatty acids in cancer cells, these findings suggest that DC has potential applications in the prevention and treatment of cancer.

  11. Salinomycin enhances cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells via down-regulation of AKT-dependent thymidylate synthase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Peng, Yi-Shuan; Wu, Chia-Hung; Wei, Chia-Li; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-12-15

    Salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, acts as a highly selective potassium ionophore and has anticancer activity on various cancer cell lines. Cisplatin has been proved as chemotherapy drug for advanced human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, and increased expression of TS is thought to be associated with resistance to cisplatin. In this study, we showed that salinomycin (0.5-2μg/mL) treatment down-regulating of TS expression in an AKT inactivation manner in two NSCLC cell lines, human lung adenocarcinoma A549 and squamous cell carcinoma H1703 cells. Knockdown of TS using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or inhibiting AKT activity with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of salinomycin. A combination of cisplatin and salinomycin resulted in synergistic enhancement of cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced activation of phospho-AKT, and TS expression. Overexpression of a constitutive active AKT (AKT-CA) expression vector reversed the salinomycin and cisplatin-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, pretreatment with LY294002 further decreased the cell viability in salinomycin and cisplatin cotreated cells. Our findings suggested that the down-regulation of AKT-mediated TS expression by salinomycin enhanced the cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in NSCLC cells. These results may provide a rationale to combine salinomycin with cisplatin for lung cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Salinomycin acts through reducing AKT-dependent thymidylate synthase expression to enhance erlotinib-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Hung; Peng, Yi-Shuan; Chen, Wen-Ching; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Jian, Yi-Jun; Wei, Chia-Li; Cheng, Ya-Ting; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2017-08-01

    Erlotinib (Tarceva R ) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor in the treatment of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, has been promising a novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer, and down-regulated the expression of thymidylate synthase (TS) in NSCLC cell lines. Previous study showed that against EGFR and TS was strongly synergistic cytotoxicity in NSCLC cells. In this study, we showed that erlotinib (1.25-10μM) treatment down-regulating of TS expression in an AKT inactivation manner in two NSCLC cell lines, human lung squamous cell carcinoma H1703 and adenocarcinoma H1975 cells. Knockdown of TS using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or inhibiting AKT activity with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of erlotinib. A combination of erlotinib and salinomycin resulted in synergistic enhancement of cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced protein levels of phospho-AKT(Ser473), phospho-AKT(Thr308), and TS. Overexpression of a constitutive active AKT (AKT-CA) or Flag-TS expression vector reversed the salinomycin and erlotinib-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. Our findings suggested that the down-regulation of AKT-mediated TS expression by salinomycin enhanced the erlotinib-induced cytotoxicity in NSCLC cells. These results may provide a rationale to combine salinomycin with erlotinib for lung cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High metastaticgastric and breast cancer cells consume oleic acid in an AMPK dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer and breast cancer have a clear tendency toward metastasis and invasion to the microenvironment predominantly composed of adipocytes. Oleic acid is an abundant monounsaturated fatty acid that releases from adipocytes and impinges on different energy metabolism responses. The effect and underlying mechanisms of oleic acid on highly metastatic cancer cells are not completely understood. We reported that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK was obviously activated in highly aggressive carcinoma cell lines treated by oleic acid, including gastric carcinoma HGC-27 and breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cell lines. AMPK enhanced the rates of fatty acid oxidation and ATP production and thus significantly promoted cancer growth and migration under serum deprivation. Inactivation of AMPK attenuated these activities of oleic acid. Oleic acid inhibited cancer cell growth and survival in low metastatic carcinoma cells, such as gastric carcinoma SGC7901 and breast carcinoma MCF-7 cell lines. Pharmacological activation of AMPK rescued the cell viability by maintained ATP levels by increasing fatty acid β-oxidation. These results indicate that highly metastatic carcinoma cells could consume oleic acid to maintain malignancy in an AMPK-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate the important contribution of fatty acid oxidation to cancer cell function.

  14. Pretreatment with light-emitting diode therapy reduces ischemic brain injury in mice through endothelial nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae In; Lee, Sae-Won; Kim, So Young; Kim, Nam Gyun; Park, Kyoung-Jun; Choi, Byung Tae; Shin, Yong-Il; Shin, Hwa Kyoung

    2017-05-13

    Photostimulation with low-level light emitting diode therapy (LED-T) modulates neurological and psychological functions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of LED-T pretreatment on the mouse brain after ischemia/reperfusion and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Ischemia/reperfusion brain injury was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. The mice received LED-T twice a day for 2 days prior to cerebral ischemia. After reperfusion, the LED-T group showed significantly smaller infarct and edema volumes, fewer behavioral deficits compared to injured mice that did not receive LED-T and significantly higher cerebral blood flow compared to the vehicle group. We observed lower levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in the injured mouse brains, but significantly higher eNOS phosphorylation in LED-T-pretreated mice. The enhanced phospho-eNOS was inhibited by LY294002, indicating that the effects of LED-T on the ischemic brain could be attributed to the upregulation of eNOS phosphorylation through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Moreover, no reductions in infarct or edema volume were observed in LED-T-pretreated eNOS-deficient (eNOS-/-) mice. Collectively, we found that pretreatment with LED-T reduced the amount of ischemia-induced brain damage. Importantly, we revealed that these effects were mediated by the stimulation of eNOS phosphorylation via the PI3K/Akt pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression of Deinococcus geothermalis trehalose synthase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel trehalose synthase gene from Deinococcus geothermalis (DSMZ 11300) containing 1692 bp reading-frame encoding 564 amino acids was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The gene was ligated into pET30Ek/LIC vector and expressed after isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside induction in ...

  16. Novel lineage- and stage-selective effects of retinoic acid on mouse granulopoiesis: Blockade by dexamethasone or inducible NO synthase inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier-Elsas, Pedro; Vieira, Bruno Marques; Masid-de-Brito, Daniela; Santos, Juliana; Barradas, Monica Gomes; de Luca, Bianca; Gaspar-Elsas, Maria Ignez

    2017-04-01

    Despite the close relationship of eosinophils and neutrophils, these granulocyte lineages respond to distinct cytokines and play unique roles in immune responses. They nevertheless respond to shared physiological/pharmacological regulators, including glucocorticoids and retinoids, and to ubiquitous mediators, including NO. Others showed that, in humans, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) suppresses eosinophil differentiation, but promotes neutrophil differentiation. Mechanisms of dual co-regulation of physiological granulopoiesis were here examined in murine bone-marrow, a model system suitable for exploration of immunopharmacological mechanisms, given the availability of experimental resources, including mutant/knockout mouse strains. We examined the effects of ATRA on mouse eosinophil and neutrophil production, using wild-type (BALB/c, C57BL/6) and mutant (iNOS-, CD95L-, or CD95-KO) bone-marrow cultures, further assessing the modification of ATRA activity by dexamethasone and iNOS blockade. ATRA (10(-6)-10(-8)M) significantly decreased eosinophil production relative to IL-5 controls. This effect was iNOS-independent, but CD95L- and caspase-dependent, and prevented by dexamethasone (10(-7)M in vitro; 1-20mg·kg(-1) in vivo). In myeloid colony formation assays, ATRA markedly suppressed GM-CSF-responsive progenitors, through an iNOS-dependent, CD95-independent, dexamethasone-sensitive mechanism. By contrast, ATRA potently enhanced GM-CSF-dependent neutropoiesis in liquid culture from BALB/c or C57BL/6 bone-marrow. This novel stimulatory effect was resistant to dexamethasone and abolished in iNOS-KO bone-marrow. ATRA injections also induced lineage- and stage-selective effects on granulopoiesis in vivo. ATRA therefore co-regulates eosinophil and neutrophil production in murine bone-marrow through multiple lineage- and stage-selective mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A dual, concentration-dependent absorption mechanism of linoleic acid by rat jejunum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, S L; Hollander, D

    1979-03-01

    Linoleic acid absorption was studied using everted rat jejunal sacs. At low concentrations (42-1260 microM), the relationship between linoleic acid concentration and its absorption rate fitted best to a rectangular hyperbola. At high concentrations (2.5-4.2 mM) the relationship between the two parameters was linear. The separate additions of 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyanide, or azide, or decrease in the incubation temperature from 37 to 20 degrees C did not change the absorption rate of linoleic acid. Absorption rate of linoleic acid at low concentrations increased as the hydrogen ion and taurocholate concentrations were increased or as the unstirred water layer thickness was decreased. Linoleic acid absorption rate was decreased after the additions of lecithin, oleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids or the substitution of taurocholate with the nonionic surfactant Pluronic F 68. These observations indicate that a concentration-dependent, dual mechanism of transport is operative in linoleic acid absorption. Facilitated diffusion is the predominant mechanism of absorption at low concentrations, while at high concentrations, simple diffusion is predominant. At low concentrations, the absorption rate of linoleic acid is influenced by the pH, surfactant type and concentration, the simultaneous presence of other polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the thickness of the unstirred water layer.

  19. Developmentally dependent and different roles of fatty acids OMEGA-6 and OMEGA-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourek, J; Mourek, J

    2011-01-01

    The developmentally-dependent differences in the biological significances and effects of PUFA-OMEGA-6 (namely of arachidonic acid) and PUFA-OMEGA-3 (namely of docosahexaenoic acid) are discussed. The clinical results as well as developmental experiences are indicating a hypothesis of the evolution...... that created mutual relationship between those two substances (with immunological basis and following recuperation). The anti-inflammatory actions of PUFA-OMEGA-3 are the most visible (and significant) contrasts as compared with the large affects of namely arachidonic acid and its metabolites....

  20. The ent-15α-Acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic Acid Relaxes Rat Artery Mesenteric Superior via Endothelium-Dependent and Endothelium-Independent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Êurica Adélia Nogueira Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism of the relaxant activity of the ent-15α-acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (KA-acetoxy. In rat mesenteric artery rings, KA-acetoxy induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in vessels precontracted with phenylephrine. In the absence of endothelium, the vasorelaxation was significantly shifted to the right without reduction of the maximum effect. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, an inhibitor of the NO-synthase (NOS, indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase, L-NAME + indomethacin, atropine, a nonselective antagonist of the muscarinic receptors, ODQ, selective inhibitor of the guanylyl cyclase enzyme, or hydroxocobalamin, a nitric oxide scavenger. The relaxation was completely reversed in the presence of L-NAME + 1 mM L-arginine or L-arginine, an NO precursor. Diterpene-induced relaxation was not affected by TEA, a nonselective inhibitor of K+ channels. The KA-acetoxy antagonized CaCl2-induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner and also inhibited an 80 mM KCl-induced contraction. The KA-acetoxy did not interfere with Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The vasorelaxant induced by KA-acetoxy seems to involve the inhibition of the Ca2+ influx and also, at least in part, by endothelial muscarinic receptors activation, NO and PGI2 release.

  1. GSK3-mediated raptor phosphorylation supports amino-acid-dependent mTORC1-directed signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretton, Clare; Hoffmann, Thorsten M.; Munson, Michael J.; Prescott, Alan; Taylor, Peter M.; Ganley, Ian G.; Hundal, Harinder S.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) is a ubiquitously expressed multimeric protein kinase complex that integrates nutrient and growth factor signals for the co-ordinated regulation of cellular metabolism and cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that suppressing the cellular activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3), by use of pharmacological inhibitors or shRNA-mediated gene silencing, results in substantial reduction in amino acid (AA)-regulated mTORC1-directed signalling, as assessed by phosphorylation of multiple downstream mTORC1 targets. We show that GSK3 regulates mTORC1 activity through its ability to phosphorylate the mTOR-associated scaffold protein raptor (regulatory-associated protein of mTOR) on Ser859. We further demonstrate that either GSK3 inhibition or expression of a S859A mutated raptor leads to reduced interaction between mTOR and raptor and under these circumstances, irrespective of AA availability, there is a consequential loss in phosphorylation of mTOR substrates, such as p70S6K1 (ribosomal S6 kinase 1) and uncoordinated-51-like kinase (ULK1), which results in increased autophagic flux and reduced cellular proliferation. PMID:26348909

  2. Chalcone synthase genes from milk thistle (Silybum marianum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leyva et al. 1995), UV treatments and blue light (Hartmann et al. 1998; Wade et al. 2001; Zhou et al. 2007), elicitor treatments such as salicylic acid and. Keywords. chalcone synthase; real-time PCR; silymarin; anthocyanin; Silybum marianum.

  3. Gbetagamma-mediated prostacyclin production and cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation by endothelin-1 promotes vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy through inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Hogarth, Kyle; Sandbo, Nathan; Yau, Douglas M; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2007-07-06

    Endothelin-1 (ET1) is a vasoactive peptide that stimulates hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through diverse signaling pathways mediated by G(q)/G(i)/G(13) heterotrimeric G proteins. We have found that ET1 stimulates the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in VSMC as profoundly as the G(s)-linked beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (ISO), but in a transient manner. PKA activation by ET1 was mediated by type-A ET1 receptors (ETA) and recruited an autocrine signaling mechanism distinct from that of ISO, involving G(i)-coupled betagamma subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, cyclooxygenase COX-1 (but not COX-2) and prostacyclin receptors. In the functional studies, inhibition of PKA or COX-1 attenuated ET1-induced VSMC hypertrophy, suggesting the positive role of PKA in this response to ET1. Furthermore, we found that ET1 stimulates a Gbetagamma-mediated, PKA-dependent phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3), an enzyme that regulates cell growth. Together, this study describes that (i) PKA can be transiently activated by G(i)-coupled agonists such as ET1 by an autocrine mechanism involving Gbetagamma/calcium/ERK/COX-1/prostacyclin signaling, and (ii) this PKA activation promotes VSMC hypertrophy, at least in part, through PKA-dependent phosphorylation and inhibition of GSK3.

  4. The Cellulase KORRIGAN Is Part of the Cellulose Synthase Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vain, T.; Crowell, E.F.; Timpano, H.; Biot, E.; Desprez, T.; Mansoori Zangir, N.; Trindade, L.M.; Pagant, S.; Robert, S.; Hofte, H.; Gonneau, M.; Vernhettes, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth and organ formation depend on the oriented deposition of load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. Cellulose is synthesized by a large relative molecular weight cellulose synthase complex (CSC), which comprises at least three distinct cellulose synthases. Cellulose synthesis

  5. Expression and characterization of PhzE from P. aeruginosa PAO1: aminodeoxyisochorismate synthase involved in pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Justin E; Toney, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    PhzE from Pseudomonas aeruginosa catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, pyocyanin, and other phenazines, which are virulence factors for Pseudomonas species. The reaction catalyzed converts chorismate into aminodeoxyisochorismate using ammonia supplied by a glutamine amidotransferase domain. It has structural and sequence homology to other chorismate-utilizing enzymes such as anthranilate synthase, isochorismate synthase, aminodeoxychorismate synthase, and salicylate synthase. Like these enzymes, it is Mg(2+) dependent and catalyzes a similar S(N)2" nucleophilic substitution reaction. PhzE catalyzes the addition of ammonia to C2 of chorismate, as does anthranilate synthase, yet unlike anthranilate synthase it does not catalyze elimination of pyruvate from enzyme-bound aminodeoxyisochorismate. Herein, the cloning of the phzE gene, high level expression of active enzyme in E. coli, purification, and kinetic characterization of the enzyme is presented, including temperature and pH dependence. Steady-state kinetics give K(chorismate)=20±4μM, K(Mg)(2+)=294±22μM, K(L-gln)=11±1mM, and k(cat)=2.2±0.2s(-1) for a random kinetic mechanism. PhzE can use NH(4)(+) as an alternative nucleophile, while Co(2+) and Mn(2+) are alternative divalent metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 5-Aminosalicylic acid dependency in Crohn's disease: A Danish Crohn Colitis Database study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duricova, D.; Pedersen, N.; Elkjaer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The role of 5 aminosalicylic acid (5 ASA) in Crohns disease is unclear The outcome of the first course of 5 ASA monotherapy with emphasis on 5 ASA dependency was retrospectively assessed in consecutive cohort of 537 Crohn s disease patients diagnosed 1953-2007 Methods Following...

  7. Oxidation of intramyocellular lipids is dependent on mitochondrial function and the availability of extracellular fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corpeleijn, Eva; Hessvik, Nina P.; Bakke, Siril S.; Levin, Klaus; Blaak, Ellen E.; Thoresen, G. Hege; Gaster, Michael; Rustan, Arild C.

    Corpeleijn E, Hessvik NP, Bakke SS, Levin K, Blaak EE, Thoresen GH, Gaster M, Rustan AC. Oxidation of intramyocellular lipids is dependent on mitochondrial function and the availability of extracellular fatty acids. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 299: E14-E22, 2010. First published May 4, 2010;

  8. Chitin synthase homologs in three ectomycorrhizal truffles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranco, L; Garnero, L; Delpero, M; Bonfante, P

    1995-12-01

    Degenerate PCR primers were used to amplify a conserved gene portion coding chitin synthase from genomic DNA of six species of ectomycorrhizal truffles. DNA was extracted from both hypogeous fruitbodies and in vitro growing mycelium of Tuber borchii. A single fragment of about 600 bp was amplified for each species. The amplification products from Tuber magnatum, T. borchii and T. ferrugineum were cloned and sequenced, revealing a high degree of identity (91.5%) at the nucleotide level. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequences these clones were assigned to class II chitin synthase. Southern blot experiments performed on genomic DNA showed that the amplification products derive from a single copy gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of class II chitin synthase genes confirmed the current taxonomic position of the genus Tuber, and suggested a close relationship between T. magnatum and T. uncinatum.

  9. Mitochondrial-driven ubiquinone enhances extracellular calcium-dependent nitric oxide production and reduces glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rubio, Sandra; Hidalgo, Ana B; Ferrín, Gustavo; Bello, Rosario I; González, Raul; Gahete, Manuel D; Ranchal, Isidora; Rodríguez, Blanca A; Barrera, Pilar; Aguilar-Melero, Patricia; Linares, Clara I; Castaño, Justo P; Victor, Victor M; De la Mata, Manuel; Muntané, Jordi

    2009-12-01

    Ca(2+) mobilization, nitric oxide (NO), and oxidative stress have been involved in cell death induced by hydrophobic bile acid in hepatocytes. The aim of the study was the elucidation of the effect of the antioxidant mitochondrial-driven ubiquinone (Mito Q) on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, NO production, and cell death in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated HepG2 cells. The role of the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by Ca(2+) chelators (EGTA or BAPTA-AM), agonist of Ca(2+) entrance (A23187) or NO (L-NAME or NO donor), was assessed during Mito Q cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. Cell death, NO synthase (NOS)-1, -2, and -3 expression, Ca(2+) mobilization, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and NOS-3 expression and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented and L-NAME enhanced GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca(2+) entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, reduced the expression of NOS-3 and enhanced cell death in control and GCDCA-treated cells. Mito Q prevented the reduction of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, NOS-3 expression, NO production, and cell death in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The conclusion is that the recovery of Ca(2+)-dependent NOS-3 expression by Mito Q may be considered an additional cytoprotective property of an antioxidant.

  10. Mycophenolic Acid Pharmacokinetics and Relapse in Children with Steroid–Dependent Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Stéphanie; Dallocchio, Aymeric; Guigonis, Vincent; Saint-Marcoux, Frank; Llanas, Brigitte; Ichay, Lydia; Bandin, Flavio; Godron, Astrid; Morin, Denis; Brochard, Karine; Gandia, Peggy; Bouchet, Stéphane; Marquet, Pierre; Decramer, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Therapeutic drug monitoring of mycophenolic acid can improve clinical outcome in organ transplantation and lupus, but data are scarce in idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. The aim of our study was to investigate whether mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics are associated with disease control in children receiving mycophenolate mofetil for the treatment of steroid–dependent nephrotic syndrome. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a retrospective multicenter study including 95 children with steroid–dependent nephrotic syndrome treated with mycophenolate mofetil with or without steroids. Area under the concentration-time curve of mycophenolic acid was determined in all children on the basis of sampling times at 20, 60, and 180 minutes postdose, using Bayesian estimation. The association between a threshold value of the area under the concentration-time curve of mycophenolic acid and the relapse rate was assessed using a negative binomial model. Results In total, 140 areas under the concentration-time curve of mycophenolic acid were analyzed. The findings indicate individual dose adaptation in 53 patients (38%) to achieve an area under the concentration-time curve target of 30–60 mg·h/L. In a multivariable negative binomial model including sex, age at disease onset, time to start of mycophenolate mofetil, previous immunomodulatory treatment, and concomitant prednisone dose, a level of area under the concentration-time curve of mycophenolic acid >45 mg·h/L was significantly associated with a lower relapse rate (rate ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.46 to 0.89; P=0.01). Conclusions Therapeutic drug monitoring leading to individualized dosing may improve the efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil in steroid–dependent nephrotic syndrome. Additional prospective studies are warranted to determine the optimal target for area under the concentration-time curve of mycophenolic acid in this population. PMID:27445161

  11. Temperature dependence of the dielectric permittivity of acetic acid, propionic acid and their methyl esters: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Sereina; Horta, Bruno A C; Thijssen, Bram; Gupta, Saumya; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2012-04-10

    For most liquids, the static relative dielectric permittivity is a decreasing function of temperature, because enhanced thermal motion reduces the ability of the molecular dipoles to orient under the effect of an external electric field. Monocarboxylic fatty acids ranging from acetic to octanoic acid represent an exception to this general rule. Close to room temperature, their dielectric permittivity increases slightly with increasing temperature. Herein, the causes for this anomaly are investigated based on molecular dynamics simulations of acetic and propionic acids at different temperatures in the interval 283-363 K, using the GROMOS 53A6(OXY) force field. The corresponding methyl esters are also considered for comparison. The dielectric permittivity is calculated using either the box-dipole fluctuation (BDF) or the external electric field (EEF) methods. The normal and anomalous temperature dependences of the permittivity for the esters and acids, respectively, are reproduced. Furthermore, in the EEF approach, the response of the acids to an applied field of increasing strength is found to present two successive linear regimes before reaching saturation. The low-field permittivity ε, comparable to that obtained using the BDF approach, increases with increasing temperature. The higher-field permittivity ε' is slightly larger, and decreases with increasing temperature. Further analyses of the simulations in terms of radial distribution functions, hydrogen-bonded structures, and diffusion properties suggest that increasing the temperature or the applied field strength both promote a relative population shift from cyclic (mainly dimeric) to extended (chain-like) hydrogen-bonded structures. The lower effective dipole moment associated with the former structures compared to the latter ones provides an explanation for the peculiar dielectric properties of the two acids compared to their methyl esters. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose-phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadanim, M Cecília; Alexandre, Bruno M; Rosa, Margarida T G; Sapeta, Helena; Leitão, António E; Ramalho, José C; Lam, TuKiet T; Negrão, Sónia; Abreu, Isabel A; Oliveira, M Margarida

    2017-07-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that OsCPK17 plays a role in rice cold stress response by analysing OsCPK17 knockout, silencing and overexpressing rice lines under low temperature. Altered OsCPK17 gene expression compromises cold tolerance performance, without affecting the expression of key cold stress-inducible genes. A comparative phosphoproteomic approach led to the identification of six potential in vivo OsCPK17 targets, which are associated with sugar and nitrogen metabolism, and with osmotic regulation. To test direct interaction, in vitro kinase assays were performed, showing that the sucrose-phosphate synthase OsSPS4 and the aquaporin OsPIP2;1/OsPIP2;6 are phosphorylated by OsCPK17 in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether, our data indicates that OsCPK17 is required for a proper cold stress response in rice, likely affecting the activity of membrane channels and sugar metabolism. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Pipecolic Acid Orchestrates Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance and Defense Priming via Salicylic Acid-Dependent and -Independent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernsdorff, Friederike; Döring, Anne-Christin; Gruner, Katrin; Schuck, Stefan; Bräutigam, Andrea; Zeier, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationships of the two immune-regulatory plant metabolites, salicylic acid (SA) and pipecolic acid (Pip), in the establishment of plant systemic acquired resistance (SAR), SAR-associated defense priming, and basal immunity. Using SA-deficient sid2, Pip-deficient ald1, and sid2 ald1 plants deficient in both SA and Pip, we show that SA and Pip act both independently from each other and synergistically in Arabidopsis thaliana basal immunity to Pseudomonas syringae. Transcriptome analyses reveal that SAR establishment in Arabidopsis is characterized by a strong transcriptional response systemically induced in the foliage that prepares plants for future pathogen attack by preactivating multiple stages of defense signaling and that SA accumulation upon SAR activation leads to the downregulation of photosynthesis and attenuated jasmonate responses systemically within the plant. Whereas systemic Pip elevations are indispensable for SAR and necessary for virtually the whole transcriptional SAR response, a moderate but significant SA-independent component of SAR activation and SAR gene expression is revealed. During SAR, Pip orchestrates SA-dependent and SA-independent priming of pathogen responses in a FLAVIN-DEPENDENT-MONOOXYGENASE1 (FMO1)-dependent manner. We conclude that a Pip/FMO1 signaling module acts as an indispensable switch for the activation of SAR and associated defense priming events and that SA amplifies Pip-triggered responses to different degrees in the distal tissue of SAR-activated plants. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  14. Pyocyanin and its precursor phenazine-1-carboxylic acid increase IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in human airway epithelial cells by oxidant-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, Dwight C; Stoll, Lynn L; Romig, Sara A; Humlicek, Alicia; Britigan, Bradley E; Denning, Gerene M

    2005-09-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes numerous factors that alter host cell function and may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Among recognized virulence factors is the redox-active phenazine pyocyanin. We have recently demonstrated that the precursor for pyocyanin, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), increases oxidant formation and alters gene expression in human airway epithelial cells. We report in this work that PCA and pyocyanin increase expression of ICAM-1 both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, phenazines enhanced cytokine-dependent increases in IL-8 and ICAM-1. Antioxidant intervention studies indicated both similarities and differences between PCA and pyocyanin. The thiol antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine, extracellular catalase, and inducible NO synthase inhibitors inhibited ICAM-1 and IL-8 increases in response to both phenazines. However, pyocyanin was significantly more sensitive to N-acetylcysteine inhibition. Interestingly, hydroxyl radical scavengers inhibited the response to pyocyanin, but not to PCA. These studies suggest that P. aeruginosa phenazines coordinately up-regulate chemokines (IL-8) and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) by mechanisms that are, at least in part, oxidant dependent. However, results indicate that the mechanisms by which PCA and pyocyanin exert their effects are not identical, and not all antioxidant interventions are equally effective in inhibiting phenazine-mediated proinflammatory effects.

  15. Trichinella pseudospiralis vs. T. spiralis thymidylate synthase gene structure and T. pseudospiralis thymidylate synthase retrogene sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Thymidylate synthase is a housekeeping gene, designated ancient due to its role in DNA synthesis and ubiquitous phyletic distribution. The genomic sequences were characterized coding for thymidylate synthase in two species of the genus Trichinella, an encapsulating T. spiralis and a non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis. Methods Based on the sequence of parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis thymidylate synthase cDNA, PCR techniques were employed. Results Each of the respective gene structures encompassed 6 exons and 5 introns located in conserved sites. Comparison with the corresponding gene structures of other eukaryotic species revealed lack of common introns that would be shared among selected fungi, nematodes, mammals and plants. The two deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. In addition to the thymidylate synthase gene, the intron-less retrocopy, i.e. a processed pseudogene, with sequence identical to the T. spiralis gene coding region, was found to be present within the T. pseudospiralis genome. This pseudogene, instead of the gene, was confirmed by RT-PCR to be expressed in the parasite muscle larvae. Conclusions Intron load, as well as distribution of exon and intron phases in thymidylate synthase genes from various sources, point against the theory of gene assembly by the primordial exon shuffling and support the theory of evolutionary late intron insertion into spliceosomal genes. Thymidylate synthase pseudogene expressed in T. pseudospiralis muscle larvae is designated a retrogene. PMID:24716800

  16. Trichinella pseudospiralis vs. T. spiralis thymidylate synthase gene structure and T. pseudospiralis thymidylate synthase retrogene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielska, Elżbieta; Płucienniczak, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Magdalena; Dowierciał, Anna; Rode, Wojciech

    2014-04-09

    Thymidylate synthase is a housekeeping gene, designated ancient due to its role in DNA synthesis and ubiquitous phyletic distribution. The genomic sequences were characterized coding for thymidylate synthase in two species of the genus Trichinella, an encapsulating T. spiralis and a non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis. Based on the sequence of parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis thymidylate synthase cDNA, PCR techniques were employed. Each of the respective gene structures encompassed 6 exons and 5 introns located in conserved sites. Comparison with the corresponding gene structures of other eukaryotic species revealed lack of common introns that would be shared among selected fungi, nematodes, mammals and plants. The two deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. In addition to the thymidylate synthase gene, the intron-less retrocopy, i.e. a processed pseudogene, with sequence identical to the T. spiralis gene coding region, was found to be present within the T. pseudospiralis genome. This pseudogene, instead of the gene, was confirmed by RT-PCR to be expressed in the parasite muscle larvae. Intron load, as well as distribution of exon and intron phases in thymidylate synthase genes from various sources, point against the theory of gene assembly by the primordial exon shuffling and support the theory of evolutionary late intron insertion into spliceosomal genes. Thymidylate synthase pseudogene expressed in T. pseudospiralis muscle larvae is designated a retrogene.

  17. YALI0E32769g (DGA1) and YALI0E16797g (LRO1) encode major triacylglycerol synthases of the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athenstaedt, Karin

    2011-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has an outstanding capacity to produce and store triacylglycerols resembling adipocytes of higher eukaryotes. Here, the identification of two genes YALI0E32769g (DGA1) and YALI0E16797g (LRO1) encoding major triacylglycerol synthases of Yarrowia lipolytica is reported. Heterologous expression of either DGA1 or LRO1 in a mutant of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in triacylglycerol synthesis restores the formation of this neutral lipid. Whereas Dga1p requires acyl-CoA as a substrate for acylation of diacylglycerol, Lro1p is an acyl-CoA independent triacylglycerol synthase using phospholipids as acyl-donor. Growth of Yarrowia lipolytica strains deleted of DGA1 and/or LRO1 on glucose containing medium significantly decreases triacylglycerol accumulation. Most interestingly, when oleic acid serves as the carbon source the ratio of triacylglycerol accumulation in mutants to wild-type is significantly increased in strains defective in DGA1 but not in lro1Δ. In vitro experiments revealed that under these conditions an additional acyl-CoA dependent triacylglycerol synthase contributes to triacylglycerol synthesis in the respective mutants. Taken together, evidence is provided that Yarrowia lipolytica contains at least four triacylglycerol synthases, namely Lro1p, Dga1p and two additional triacylglycerol synthases whereof one is acyl-CoA dependent and specifically induced upon growth on oleic acid. PMID:21782973

  18. Temperature dependence of the heterogeneous uptake of acrylic acid on Arizona test dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qifan; Wang, Yidan; Wu, Lingyan; Jing, Bo; Tong, Shengrui; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the temperature dependence of the heterogeneous uptake of acrylic acid on Arizona test dust (ATD) has been investigated within a temperature range of 255-315K using a Knudsen cell reactor. Combined with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiment, it was found that acrylic acid could adsorb on ATD via surface OH groups and convert to carboxylate on the particle surface. The kinetics study suggests that the initial true uptake coefficient (γt) of acrylic acid on ATD decreases from (4.02±0.12)×10(-5) to (1.73±0.05)×10(-5) with a temperature increase from 255 to 315K. According to the temperature dependence of uptake coefficients, the enthalpy (ΔHobs) and entropy (ΔSobs) of uptake processes were determined to be -(9.60±0.38) KJ/mol and -(121.55±1.33) J·K/mol, respectively. The activation energy for desorption (Edes) was calculated to be (14.57±0.60) KJ/mol. These results indicated that the heterogeneous uptake of acrylic acid on ATD surface was sensitive to temperature. The heterogeneous uptake on ATD could affect the concentration of acrylic acid in the atmosphere, especially at low temperature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Jasmonic acid-dependent regulation of seed dormancy following maternal herbivory in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Dave, Anuja; Vaistij, Fabian E; Worrall, Dawn; Holroyd, Geoff H; Wells, Jonathan G; Kaminski, Filip; Graham, Ian A; Roberts, Michael R

    2017-06-01

    Maternal experience of abiotic environmental factors such as temperature and light are well known to control seed dormancy in many plant species. Maternal biotic stress alters offspring defence phenotypes, but whether it also affects seed dormancy remains unexplored. We exposed Arabidopsis thaliana plants to herbivory and investigated plasticity in germination and defence phenotypes in their offspring, along with the roles of phytohormone signalling in regulating maternal effects. Maternal herbivory resulted in the accumulation of jasmonic acid-isoleucine and loss of dormancy in seeds of stressed plants. Dormancy was also reduced by engineering seed-specific accumulation of jasmonic acid in transgenic plants. Loss of dormancy was dependent on an intact jasmonate signalling pathway and was associated with increased gibberellin content and reduced abscisic acid sensitivity during germination. Altered dormancy was only observed in the first generation following herbivory, whereas defence priming was maintained for at least two generations. Herbivory generates a jasmonic acid-dependent reduction in seed dormancy, mediated by alteration of gibberellin and abscisic acid signalling. This is a direct maternal effect, operating independently from transgenerational herbivore resistance priming. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Oxygen-dependent catabolism of indole-3-acetic acid in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebo, L A; Nielsen, S V; Jochimsen, B U

    1991-01-01

    Some strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum have the ability to catabolize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Examination of this catabolism in strain 110 by in vivo experiments has revealed an enzymatic activity catalyzing the degradation of IAA and 5-hydroxy-indole-3-acetic acid. The activity requires...... addition of the substrates for induction and is oxygen dependent. The highest activity is obtained when the concentration of inducer is 0.2 mM. Spectrophotometric data are consistent with the suggestion that the indole ring is broken during degradation of IAA. We hypothesize that the enzyme catalyzes...

  1. Extracellular Protein Kinase A Modulates Intracellular Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II, Nitric Oxide Synthase, and the Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway in Cerebellum. Differential Effects in Hyperammonemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-12-21

    Extracellular protein kinases, including cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), modulate neuronal functions including N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent long-term potentiation. NMDA receptor activation increases calcium, which binds to calmodulin and activates nitric oxide synthase (NOS), increasing nitric oxide (NO), which activates guanylate cyclase, increasing cGMP, which is released to the extracellular fluid, allowing analysis of this glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in vivo by microdialysis. The function of this pathway is impaired in hyperammonemic rats. The aims of this work were to assess (1) whether the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway is modulated in cerebellum in vivo by an extracellular PKA, (2) the role of phosphorylation and activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and NOS in the pathway modulation by extracellular PKA, and (3) whether the effects are different in hyperammonemic and control rats. The pathway was analyzed by in vivo microdialysis. The role of extracellular PKA was analyzed by inhibiting it with a membrane-impermeable inhibitor. The mechanisms involved were analyzed in freshly isolated cerebellar slices from control and hyperammonemic rats. In control rats, inhibiting extracellular PKA reduces the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway function in vivo. This is due to reduction of CaMKII phosphorylation and activity, which reduces NOS phosphorylation at Ser1417 and NOS activity, resulting in reduced guanylate cyclase activation and cGMP formation. In hyperammonemic rats, under basal conditions, CaMKII phosphorylation and activity are increased, increasing NOS phosphorylation at Ser847, which reduces NOS activity, guanylate cyclase activation, and cGMP. Inhibiting extracellular PKA in hyperammonemic rats normalizes CaMKII phosphorylation and activity, NOS phosphorylation, NOS activity, and cGMP, restoring normal function of the pathway.

  2. Bilirubin inhibits the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase by scavenging reactive oxygen species generated by the toll-like receptor 4-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gila Idelman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been previously shown that bilirubin prevents the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in response to LPS. The present study examines whether this effect is exerted through modulation of Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR4 signaling. LPS-stimulated iNOS and NADPH oxidase (Nox activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages was assessed by measuring cellular nitrate and superoxide (O2− production, respectively. The generation of both nitrate and O2− in response to LPS was suppressed by TLR4 inhibitors, indicating that activation of iNOS and Nox is TLR4-dependent. While treatment with superoxide dismutase (SOD and bilirubin effectively abolished LPS-mediated O2− production, hydrogen peroxide and nitrate release were inhibited by bilirubin and PEG-catalase, but not SOD, supporting that iNOS activation is primarily dependent upon intracellular H2O2. LPS treatment increased nuclear translocation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α, an effect that was abolished by bilirubin. Cells transfected with murine iNOS reporter constructs in which the HIF-1α-specific hypoxia response element was disrupted exhibited a blunted response to LPS, supporting that HIF-1α mediates Nox-dependent iNOS expression. Bilirubin, but not SOD, blocked the cellular production of interferon-β, while interleukin-6 production remained unaffected. These data support that bilirubin inhibits the TLR4-mediated up-regulation of iNOS by preventing activation of HIF-1α through scavenging of Nox-derived reactive oxygen species. Bilirubin also suppresses interferon-β release via a ROS-independent mechanism. These findings characterize potential mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of bilirubin.

  3. Bilirubin inhibits the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase by scavenging reactive oxygen species generated by the toll-like receptor 4-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelman, Gila; Smith, Darcey L H; Zucker, Stephen D

    2015-08-01

    It has been previously shown that bilirubin prevents the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in response to LPS. The present study examines whether this effect is exerted through modulation of Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR4) signaling. LPS-stimulated iNOS and NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages was assessed by measuring cellular nitrate and superoxide ( [Formula: see text] ) production, respectively. The generation of both nitrate and [Formula: see text] in response to LPS was suppressed by TLR4 inhibitors, indicating that activation of iNOS and Nox is TLR4-dependent. While treatment with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and bilirubin effectively abolished LPS-mediated [Formula: see text] production, hydrogen peroxide and nitrate release were inhibited by bilirubin and PEG-catalase, but not SOD, supporting that iNOS activation is primarily dependent upon intracellular H2O2. LPS treatment increased nuclear translocation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α), an effect that was abolished by bilirubin. Cells transfected with murine iNOS reporter constructs in which the HIF-1α-specific hypoxia response element was disrupted exhibited a blunted response to LPS, supporting that HIF-1α mediates Nox-dependent iNOS expression. Bilirubin, but not SOD, blocked the cellular production of interferon-β, while interleukin-6 production remained unaffected. These data support that bilirubin inhibits the TLR4-mediated up-regulation of iNOS by preventing activation of HIF-1α through scavenging of Nox-derived reactive oxygen species. Bilirubin also suppresses interferon-β release via a ROS-independent mechanism. These findings characterize potential mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of bilirubin. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Structural organization of films based on polyaniline/polysulfonic acid complexes depending on the synthesis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simagina, L. V., E-mail: lsimagina@gmail.com; Gaynutdinov, R. V.; Stepina, N. D.; Sorokina, K. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Morozova, O. V.; Shumakovich, G. P.; Yaropolov, A. I., E-mail: yaropolov@inbi.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Tolstikhina, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15

    The optical properties and morphology of complexes based on polyaniline (PANI) and poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPS), depending on their synthesis conditions, have been characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The dependence of the electron absorption spectra of PANI/PAMPS complexes and the surface topography of their films on the initiation way of PANI formation (chemical and enzymatic) and the use of promoters of aniline polymerization has been investigated. The aniline polymerization kinetics with and without polymerization promoters has been studied. All PANI/PAMPS complexes are found to have a nanocomposite time-stable structure.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Stimulates Ischemic Vascular Remodeling Through Nitric Oxide Synthase and Nitrite Reduction Activity Regulating Hypoxia‐Inducible Factor‐1α and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Dependent Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bir, Shyamal C.; Kolluru, Gopi K.; McCarthy, Paul; Shen, Xinggui; Pardue, Sibile; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) therapy is recognized as a modulator of vascular function during tissue ischemia with the notion of potential interactions of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. However, little is known about specific biochemical mechanisms or the importance of H2S activation of NO metabolism during ischemic tissue vascular remodeling. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of H2S on NO metabolism during chronic tissue ischemia and subsequent effects on ischemic vascular remodeling responses. Methods and Results The unilateral, permanent femoral artery ligation model of hind‐limb ischemia was performed in C57BL/6J wild‐type and endothelial NO synthase–knockout mice to evaluate exogenous H2S effects on NO bioavailability and ischemic revascularization. We found that H2S selectively restored chronic ischemic tissue function and viability by enhancing NO production involving both endothelial NO synthase and nitrite reduction mechanisms. Importantly, H2S increased ischemic tissue xanthine oxidase activity, hind‐limb blood flow, and angiogenesis, which were blunted by the xanthine oxidase inhibitor febuxostat. H2S treatment increased ischemic tissue and endothelial cell hypoxia‐inducible factor‐1α expression and activity and vascular endothelial growth factor protein expression and function in a NO‐dependent manner that was required for ischemic vascular remodeling. Conclusions These data demonstrate that H2S differentially regulates NO metabolism during chronic tissue ischemia, highlighting novel biochemical pathways to increase NO bioavailability for ischemic vascular remodeling. PMID:23316304

  6. Recombinant cells and organisms having persistent nonstandard amino acid dependence and methods of making them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.

    2017-12-05

    Recombinant cells and recombinant organisms persistently expressing nonstandard amino acids (NSAAs) are provided. Methods of making recombinant cells and recombinant organisms dependent on persistently expressing NSAAs for survival are also provided. These methods may be used to make safe recombinant cells and recombinant organisms and/or to provide a selective pressure to maintain one or more reassigned codon functions in recombinant cells and recombinant organisms.

  7. Translation-dependent bioassay for amino acid quantification using auxotrophic microbes as biocatalysts of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameya, Masafumi; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-03-01

    Bioassay for amino acid quantification is an important technology for a variety of fields, which allows for easy, inexpensive, and high-throughput analyses. Here, we describe a novel translation-dependent bioassay for the quantification of amino acids. For this, the gene encoding firefly luciferase was introduced into Lactococcus lactis auxotrophic to Glu, His, Ile, Leu, Pro, Val, and Arg. After a preculture where luciferase expression was repressed, the cells were mixed with analytes, synthetic medium, and an inducer for luciferase expression. Luminescence response to the target amino acid appeared just after mixing, and linear standard curves for these amino acids were obtained during 15-60-min incubation periods. The rapid quantification of amino acids has neither been reported in previous works on bioassays nor is it theoretically feasible with conventional methods, which require incubation times of more than 4 h to allow for the growth of the microbe used. In contrast, our assay was shown to depend on protein translation, rather than on cell growth. Furthermore, replacement of the luciferase gene with that of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-galactosidase allowed for fluorescent and colorimetric detection of the amino acids, respectively. Significantly, when a Gln-auxotrophic Escherichia coli mutant was created and transformed by a luciferase expression plasmid, a linear standard curve for Gln was observed in 15 min. These results demonstrate that this methodology can provide versatile bioassays by adopting various combinations of marker genes and host strains according to the analytes and experimental circumstances.

  8. A novel amino acid substitution Trp574Arg in acetolactate synthase (ALS) confers broad resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides in crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Li, Mei; Gao, Xingxiang; Fang, Feng

    2017-06-23

    Crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis) is an annual monocotyledonous weed. In recent years, field applications of nicosulfuron have been ineffective in controlling crabgrass populations in Shandong Province, China. To investigate the mechanisms of resistance to nicosulfuron in crabgrass populations, the acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene fragment covering known resistance-confering mutation sites was amplified and sequenced. Dose-response experiments suggested that the resistant population SD13 (R) was highly resistant to nicosulfuron (resistance index R/S = 43.7) compared with the sensitive population SD22 (S). ALS gene sequencing revealed a Trp574Arg substitution in the SD13 population, and no other known resistance-conferring mutations were found. In vitro ALS enzyme assays further confirmed that the SD13 population was resistant to all tested ALS-inhibiting herbicides. The resistance pattern experiments revealed that, compared with SD22, the SD13 population exhibited broad-spectrum resistance to nicosulfuron (43.7-fold), imazethapyr (11.4-fold) and flumetsulam (16.1-fold); however, it did not develop resistance to atrazine, mesotrione and topramezone. This study demonstrated that Trp574Arg substitution was the main reason for crabgrass resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Trp574Arg substitution in a weed species, and is the first report of target-site mechanisms of herbicide resistance for crabgrass. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Engineering an ATP-dependent D-Ala:D-Ala ligase for synthesizing amino acid amides from amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Yuta; Okazaki, Seiji; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-05-01

    We successfully engineered a new enzyme that catalyzes the formation of D-Ala amide (D-AlaNH2) from D-Ala by modifying ATP-dependent D-Ala:D-Ala ligase (EC 6.3.2.4) from Thermus thermophilus, which catalyzes the formation of D-Ala-D-Ala from two molecules of D-Ala. The new enzyme was created by the replacement of the Ser293 residue with acidic amino acids, as it was speculated to bind to the second D-Ala of D-Ala-D-Ala. In addition, a replacement of the position with Glu performed better than that with Asp with regards to specificity for D-AlaNH2 production. The S293E variant, which was selected as the best enzyme for D-AlaNH2 production, exhibited an optimal activity at pH 9.0 and 40 °C for D-AlaNH2 production. The apparent K m values of this variant for D-Ala and NH3 were 7.35 mM and 1.58 M, respectively. The S293E variant could catalyze the synthesis of 9.3 and 35.7 mM of D-AlaNH2 from 10 and 50 mM D-Ala and 3 M NH4Cl with conversion yields of 93 and 71.4 %, respectively. This is the first report showing the enzymatic formation of amino acid amides from amino acids.

  10. GESTATIONAL-AGE DEPENDENCY OF ESSENTIAL FATTY-ACIDS IN CORD PLASMA-CHOLESTEROL ESTERS AND TRIGLYCERIDES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOVING, EB; VANBEUSEKOM, CM; NIJEBOER, HJ; MUSKIET, FAJ

    Plasma cholesterol ester and triglyceride fatty acid compositions of 38 singleton deliveries (23-42 wk), three twins (32, 39, and 40 wk), and their mothers were investigated. No gestational age-dependent changes occurred in maternal fatty acid compositions. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in

  11. Mutations in the beta-subunit Thr(159) and Glu(184) of the Rhodospirillum rubrum F(0)F(1) ATP synthase reveal differences in ligands for the coupled Mg(2+)- and decoupled Ca(2+)-dependent F(0)F(1) activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nathanson, L; Gromet-Elhanan, Z

    2000-01-01

    ...) ATP synthase of Rhodospirillum rubrum with Ser, Ala, or Val and the Glu(184) with Gln or Lys. The mutant beta subunits were isolated and tested for their capacity to assemble into a beta-less chromatophore F...

  12. Dietary oleic acid regulates hepatic lipogenesis through a liver X receptor-dependent signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Ducheix

    Full Text Available Olive oil consumption is beneficial for health as it is associated with a decreased prevalence of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Oleic acid is, by far, the most abundant component of olive oil. Since it can be made through de novo synthesis in animals, it is not an essential fatty acid. While it has become clear that dietary oleic acid regulates many biological processes, the signaling pathway involved in these regulations remains poorly defined. In this work we tested the impact of an oleic acid-rich diet on hepatic gene expression. We were particularly interested in addressing the contribution of Liver X Receptors (LXR in the control of genes involved in hepatic lipogenesis, an essential process in whole body energy homeostasis. We used wild-type mice and transgenic mice deficient for both α and β Liver X Receptor isoforms (LXR-/- fed a control or an oleate enriched diet. We observed that hepatic-lipid accumulation was enhanced as well as the expression of lipogenic genes in the liver of wild-type mice fed the oleate enriched diet. In contrast, none of these changes occurred in the liver of LXR-/- mice. Strikingly, oleate-rich diet reduced cholesterolemia in wild-type mice and induced signs of liver inflammation and damage in LXR-/- mice but not in wild-type mice. This work suggests that dietary oleic acid reduces cholesterolemia while promoting LXR-dependent hepatic lipogenesis without detrimental effects to the liver.

  13. Increased carnitine-dependent fatty acid uptake into mitochondria of human colon cancer cells induces apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Uwe; Nickel, Alexander; Daniel, Hannelore

    2005-06-01

    Carnitine-dependent fatty acid import into mitochondria and beta-oxidation seem to be impaired in tumor cells. In the present study we show that a supply of palmitoylcarnitine together with L-carnitine potently induces apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cells as a consequence of accelerated fatty acid oxidation. Caspase-3-like activities, measured by the cleavage rate of a fluorogenic tetrapeptide substrate and nuclear fragmentation determined after DNA labeling in fixed cells by fluorescence microscopy, served as indicators of apoptosis. Neither L-carnitine nor palmitoylcarnitine alone were able to increase caspase-3-like activities and DNA fragmentation, but when provided together, apoptosis occurred. That exogenous carnitine was indeed able to enhance fatty acid uptake into mitochondria was demonstrated by an increased influx of a fluorescent palmitic acid analog. Enhanced fatty acid availability in mitochondria led to an increased generation of O*2-, as detected by a O*2- -sensitive fluorogenic dye, indicating oxidation of delivered substrates. Benzoquinone, an O*2- scavenger, blocked O*2- generation and prevented apoptosis as initiated by the combination of palmitoylcarnitine and carnitine. The lack of effect of the ceramide synthesis inhibitor fumonisin on palmitoylcarnitine/carnitine-induced apoptosis further supports the notion that apoptotic cell death is specifically due to fatty acid oxidation. In contrast to HT-29 cells, nontransformed human colonocytes did not respond to exogenous palmitoylcarnitine/carnitine and no apoptosis was observed. In conclusion, our studies provide evidence that a limited mitochondrial fatty acid import in human colon cancer cells prevents high rates of mitochondrial O*2- production and protects colon cancer cells from apoptosis that can be overcome by an exogenous carnitine supply.

  14. Proton re-uptake partitioning between uncoupling protein and ATP synthase during benzohydroxamic acid-resistant state 3 respiration in tomato fruit mitochondria.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarmuszkiewicz, W.; Almeida, A.; Vercesi, A.; Sluse, Francis; Sluse-goffart, C.

    2000-01-01

    The yield of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated tomato fruit mitochondria depleted of free fatty acids remains constant when respiratory rates are decreased by a factor of 3 by the addition of n-butyl malonate. This constancy makes the determination of the contribution of the linoleic acid-induced energy-dissipating pathway by the ADP/O method possible. No decrease in membrane potential is observed in state 3 respiration with increasing concentration of n-butyl malonate, indicating that th...

  15. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca(2+) mobilization and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser(1179)) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. This study suggests that FIR radiation increases NO production via increasing CaMKII-mediated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation but TRPV channels may not be involved in this pathway. Our results may provide the molecular mechanism by which FIR radiation improves endothelial function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Poly(aspartic acid) with adjustable pH-dependent solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Csaba; Gyarmati, Benjámin; Abdullin, Timur; László, Krisztina; Szilágyi, András

    2017-02-01

    Poly(aspartic acid) (PASP) derivatives with adjustable pH-dependent solubility were synthesized and characterized to establish the relationship between their structure and solubility in order to predict their applicability as a basic material for enteric coatings. Polysuccinimide, the precursor of PASP, was modified with short chain alkylamines, and the residual succinimide rings were subsequently opened to prepare the corresponding PASP derivatives. Study of the effect of the type and concentration of the side groups on the pH-dependent solubility of PASP showed that solubility can be adjusted by proper selection of the chemical structure. The Henderson-Hasselbalch (HH) and the extended HH equations were used to describe the pH-dependent solubility of the polymers quantitatively. The estimate provided by the HH equation is poor, but an accurate description of the pH-dependent solubility can be found with the extended HH equation. The dissolution rate of a polymer film prepared from a selected PASP derivative was determined by fluorescence marking. The film dissolved rapidly when the pH was increased above its pK a . Cellular viability tests show that PASP derivatives are non-toxic to a human cell line. These polymers are thus of great interest as starting materials for enteric coatings. Poly(amino acid) type biocompatible polymers were synthesized for future use as pharmaceutical film coatings. To this end, we tailored the pH-dependent solubility of poly(aspartic acid) (PASP). It was found that both the solubility and the pK a values of the modified PASP depended strongly on composition. Fluorescent marking was used to characterize the dissolution of a chosen PASP derivative. In acidic media only a negligible amount of the polymer dissolved, but dissolution was very fast and complete at the pH values that prevail in the small intestine. As a consequence, enteric coatings based on such PASP derivatives may be used for drug delivery in the gastrointestinal tract

  17. Phytochelatin synthase genes from Arabidopsis and the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, S B; Smith, A P; Howden, R; Dietrich, W M; Bugg, S; O'Connell, M J; Goldsbrough, P B; Cobbett, C S

    1999-06-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs), a family of heavy metal-inducible peptides important in the detoxification of heavy metals, have been identified in plants and some microorganisms, including Schizosaccharomyces pombe, but not in animals. PCs are synthesized enzymatically from glutathione (GSH) by PC synthase in the presence of heavy metal ions. In Arabidopsis, the CAD1 gene, identified by using Cd-sensitive, PC-deficient cad1 mutants, has been proposed to encode PC synthase. Using a positional cloning strategy, we have isolated the CAD1 gene. Database searches identified a homologous gene in S. pombe, and a mutant with a targeted deletion of this gene was also Cd sensitive and PC deficient. Extracts of Escherichia coli cells expressing a CAD1 cDNA or the S. pombe gene catalyzing GSH-dependent, heavy metal-activated synthesis of PCs in vitro demonstrated that both genes encode PC synthase activity. Both enzymes were activated by a range of metal ions. In contrast, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction experiments showed that expression of the CAD1 mRNA is not influenced by the presence of Cd. A comparison of the two predicted amino acid sequences revealed a highly conserved N-terminal region, which is presumed to be the catalytic domain, and a variable C-terminal region containing multiple Cys residues, which is proposed to be involved in activation of the enzyme by metal ions. Interestingly, a similar gene was identified in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting that PCs may also be expressed in some animal species.

  18. Temperature dependence of amino acid side chain IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Amide I' IR spectra are widely used for studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins as a function of temperature. Temperature dependent absorptions of amino acid side-chains that overlap the amide I' may significantly complicate the structural analyses. While the side-chain IR spectra have been investigated previously, thus far their dependence on temperature has not been reported. Here we present the study of the changes in the IR spectra with temperature for side-chain groups of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, and tyrosine in the amide I' region (in D2O). Band fitting analysis was employed to extract the temperature dependence of the individual spectral parameters, such as peak frequency, integrated intensity, band width, and shape. As expected, the side-chain IR bands exhibit significant changes with temperature. The majority of the spectral parameters, particularly the frequency and intensity, show linear dependence on temperature, but the direction and magnitude vary depending on the particular side-chain group. The exception is arginine, which exhibits a distinctly nonlinear frequency shift with temperature for its asymmetric CN3H5(+) bending signal, although a linear fit can account for this change to within ~1/3 cm(-1). The applicability of the determined spectral parameters for estimations of temperature-dependent side-chain absorptions in peptides and proteins are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Molecular cloning and functional expression of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase from Coleus forskohlii Briq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engprasert, Surang; Taura, Futoshi; Kawamukai, Makoto; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2004-11-18

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP), a common biosynthetic precursor to the labdane diterpene forskolin, has been biosynthesised via a non-mevalonate pathway. Geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthase is an important branch point enzyme in terpenoid biosynthesis. Therefore, GGPP synthase is thought to be a key enzyme in biosynthesis of forskolin. Herein we report the first confirmation of the GGPP synthase gene in Coleus forskohlii Briq. The open reading frame for full-length GGPP synthase encodes a protein of 359 amino acids, in which 1,077 nucleotides long with calculated molecular mass of 39.3 kDa. Alignments of C. forskohlii GGPP synthase amino acid sequences revealed high homologies with other plant GGPP synthases. Several highly conserved regions, including two aspartate-rich motifs were identified. Transient expression of the N-terminal region of C. forskohlii GGPP synthase-GFP fusion protein in tobacco cells demonstrated subcellular localization in the chloroplast. Carotenoid production was observed in Escherichia coli harboring pACCAR25DeltacrtE from Erwinia uredovora and plasmid carrying C. forskohlii GGPP synthase. These results suggested that cDNA encoded functional GGPP synthase. Furthermore, C. forskohlii GGPP synthase expression was strong in leaves, decreased in stems and very little expression was observed in roots. This investigation proposed that forskolin was synthesised via a non-mevalonate pathway. GGPP synthase is thought to be involved in the biosynthesis of forskolin, which is primarily synthesised in the leaves and subsequently accumulates in the stems and roots.

  20. Cross-talk between abscisic acid-dependent and abscisic acid-independent pathways during abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhury, Aryadeep; Paul, Saikat; Basu, Supratim

    2013-07-01

    Salinity, drought and low temperature are the common forms of abiotic stress encountered by land plants. To cope with these adverse environmental factors, plants execute several physiological and metabolic responses. Both osmotic stress (elicited by water deficit or high salt) and cold stress increase the endogenous level of the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA-dependent stomatal closure to reduce water loss is associated with small signaling molecules like nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species and cytosolic free calcium, and mediated by rapidly altering ion fluxes in guard cells. ABA also triggers the expression of osmotic stress-responsive (OR) genes, which usually contain single/multiple copies of cis-acting sequence called abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE) in their upstream regions, mostly recognized by the basic leucine zipper-transcription factors (TFs), namely, ABA-responsive element-binding protein/ABA-binding factor. Another conserved sequence called the dehydration-responsive element (DRE)/C-repeat, responding to cold or osmotic stress, but not to ABA, occurs in some OR promoters, to which the DRE-binding protein/C-repeat-binding factor binds. In contrast, there are genes or TFs containing both DRE/CRT and ABRE, which can integrate input stimuli from salinity, drought, cold and ABA signaling pathways, thereby enabling cross-tolerance to multiple stresses. A strong candidate that mediates such cross-talk is calcium, which serves as a common second messenger for abiotic stress conditions and ABA. The present review highlights the involvement of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent signaling components and their interaction or convergence in activating the stress genes. We restrict our discussion to salinity, drought and cold stress.

  1. Altering the expression of two chitin synthase genes differentially affects the growth and morphology of Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Christian; Hjort, C.M.; Hansen, K.

    2002-01-01

    In Aspergillus oryzae, one full-length chitin synthase (chsB) and fragments of two other chitin synthases (csmA and chsC) were identified. The deduced amino acid sequence of chsB was similar (87% identity) to chsB from Aspergillus nidulans, which encodes a class III chitin synthase. The sequence...

  2. Glutamate decarboxylase-dependent acid resistance in Brucella spp.: distribution and contribution to fitness under extremely acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Maria Alessandra; Bastianelli, Daniela; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Köhler, Stephan; Cloeckaert, Axel; De Biase, Daniela; Occhialini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an expanding genus of major zoonotic pathogens, including at least 10 genetically very close species occupying a wide range of niches from soil to wildlife, livestock, and humans. Recently, we have shown that in the new species Brucella microti, the glutamate decarboxylase (Gad)-dependent system (GAD system) contributes to survival at a pH of 2.5 and also to infection in mice by the oral route. In order to study the functionality of the GAD system in the genus Brucella, 47 isolates, representative of all known species and strains of this genus, and 16 strains of the closest neighbor genus, Ochrobactrum, were studied using microbiological, biochemical, and genetic approaches. In agreement with the genome sequences, the GAD system of classical species was not functional, unlike that of most strains of Brucella ceti, Brucella pinnipedialis, and newly described species (B. microti, Brucella inopinata BO1, B. inopinata-like BO2, and Brucella sp. isolated from bullfrogs). In the presence of glutamate, these species were more acid resistant in vitro than classical terrestrial brucellae. Expression in trans of the gad locus from representative Brucella species in the Escherichia coli MG1655 mutant strain lacking the GAD system restored the acid-resistant phenotype. The highly conserved GAD system of the newly described or atypical Brucella species may play an important role in their adaptation to acidic external and host environments. Furthermore, the GAD phenotype was shown to be a useful diagnostic tool to distinguish these latter Brucella strains from Ochrobactrum and from classical terrestrial pathogenic Brucella species, which are GAD negative. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Spectroscopic investigation on structure and pH dependent Cocrystal formation between gamma-aminobutyric acid and benzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Xue, Jiadan; Cai, Qiang; Zhang, Qi

    2018-02-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic methods, including terahertz absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopy, were utilized for the characterization and analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), benzoic acid (BA), and the corresponding GABA-BA cocrystal formation under various pH values of aqueous solution. Vibrational spectroscopic results demonstrated that the solvent GABA-BA cocrystal, similar as grinding counterpart, possessed unique characteristic features compared with that of starting parent compounds. The change of vibrational modes for GABA-BA cocrystal comparing with starting components indicates there is strong inter-molecular interaction between GABA and BA molecules during its cocrystallization process. Formation of GABA-BA cocrystal under slow solvent evaporation is impacted by the pH value of aqueous solution. Vibrational spectra indicate that the GABA-BA cocrystal could be stably formed with the solvent condition of 2.00 ≤ pH ≤ 7.00. In contrast, such cocrystallization did not occur and the cocrystal would dissociate into its parent components when the pH value of solvent is lower than 2.00. This study provides experimental benchmark to discriminate and identify the structure of cocrystal and also pH-dependent cocrystallization effect with vibrational spectroscopic techniques in solid-state pharmaceutical fields.

  4. Variability of humic acid properties depending on their precursor material: a study of peat profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of variation of peat composition, presence of trace elements in the peat and HSs within peat profiles can give information on the character of transformation of organic matter, important for C biogeochemical cycling, but also about impacts of climate change and human activities. In peat the transformation and decay process of living organic matter (humification) is retarded by the acidic and anaerobic environment, but at the same time the peat can provide information on environmental and paleo-environmental conditions of the past. The aim of the present study is to analyze the elemental and functional composition, spectral characteristics of humic acids isolated from a well characterized raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the impact of the character of humification processes on the peat HA properties. A comparative and complex characterization of humic acids (HAs) isolated from peat profiles of different origin in Latvia was carried out. Elemental and functional analysis of the isolated HAs was done, their acidity and molecular weights estimated. Spectral characterization included UV-Vis, IR, and electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectra. Structural characterization of HAs was by both 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Comparison of position of studied humic acids in the Van Krevelen graph was done, thus locating them in the biogeochemical transformation processes of organic matter. Properties of HAs isolated from the Latvian peat were compared with HA from other sources (soil, water, coal and synthetic humic substances). Major properties of peat HAs depended on their origin, indicating the importance of humification processes. HAs isolated from peat of more recent origin were more similar to soil HAs, but from older sources there was a greater degree of humification. Changes of surface tension of solutions of humic acids stress the differences in aggregation character - ability to form supramacromolecular complexes of humic substances

  5. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Selim Gokay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg, or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg. After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P=0.044 positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  6. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Komur, Baran; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidative Stress Triggers Tgf-Beta-Dependent Muscle Dysfunction by Accelerating Ascorbic Acid Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzer, Diego; Favellato, Mariagrazia; Bolis, Marco; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Solagna, Francesca; Blaauw, Bert; Zito, Ester

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress are two related phenomena that have important metabolic consequences. As many skeletal muscle diseases are triggered by oxidative stress, we explored the chain of events linking a hyperoxidized ER (which causes ER and oxidative stress) with skeletal muscle dysfunction. An unbiased exon expression array showed that the combined genetic modulation of the two master ER redox proteins, selenoprotein N (SEPN1) and endoplasmic oxidoreductin 1 (ERO1), led to an SEPN1-related myopathic phenotype due to excessive signalling of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. The increased TGF-beta activity in the genetic mutants was caused by accelerated turnover of the ER localized (anti-oxidant) ascorbic acid that affected collagen deposition in the extracellular matrix. In a mouse mutant of SEPN1, which is dependent on exogenous ascorbic acid, a limited intake of ascorbic acid revealed a myopathic phenotype as a consequence of an altered TGF-beta signalling. Indeed, systemic antagonism of TGF-beta re-established skeletal muscle function in SEPN1 mutant mice. In conclusion, this study sheds new light on the molecular mechanism of SEPN1-related myopathies and indicates that the TGF-beta/ERO1/ascorbic acid axis offers potential for their treatment. PMID:28106121

  8. Plastidial fatty acid levels regulate resistance gene-dependent defense signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra-Shekara, A C; Venugopal, Srivathsa C; Barman, Subhankar Roy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2007-04-24

    In Arabidopsis, resistance to Turnip Crinkle Virus (TCV) depends on the resistance (R) gene, HRT, and the recessive locus rrt. Resistance also depends on salicylic acid (SA), EDS1, and PAD4. Exogenous application of SA confers resistance in RRT-containing plants by increasing HRT transcript levels in a PAD4-dependent manner. Here we report that reduction of oleic acid (18:1) can also induce HRT gene expression and confer resistance to TCV. However, the 18:1-regulated pathway is independent of SA, rrt, EDS1, and PAD4. Reducing the levels of 18:1, via a mutation in the SSI2-encoded stearoyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturase, or by exogenous application of glycerol, increased transcript levels of HRT as well as several other R genes. Second-site mutations in the ACT1-encoded glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase or GLY1-encoded glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase restored 18:1 levels in HRT ssi2 plants and reestablished a dependence on rrt. Resistance to TCV and HRT gene expression in HRT act1 plants was inducible by SA but not by glycerol, whereas that in HRT pad4 plants was inducible by glycerol but not by SA. The low 18:1-mediated induction of R gene expression was also dependent on ACT1 but independent of EDS1, PAD4, and RAR1. Intriguingly, TCV inoculation did not activate this 18:1-regulated pathway in HRT plants, but instead resulted in the induction of several genes that encode 18:1-synthesizing isozymes. These results suggest that the 18:1-regulated pathway may be specifically targeted during pathogen infection and that altering 18:1 levels may serve as a unique strategy for promoting disease resistance.

  9. Evolution reveals a glutathione-dependent mechanism of 3-hydroxypropionic acid tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Hallström, Björn M.; Blicher, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    propose that 3HP toxicity is mediated by3-hydroxypropionic aldehyde (reuterin) and that glutathione-dependent reactions are used for reuterin detoxification. The identified molecular response to 3HP and reuterin may well be a general mechanism for handling resistance to organic acid and aldehydes......Biologically produced 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) is a potential source for sustainable acrylates and can also find direct use as monomer in the production of biodegradable polymers. For industrial-scale production there is a need for robust cell factories tolerant to highconcentration of 3HP......, preferably at low pH. Through adaptive laboratory evolution we selected S. cerevisiae strains with improved tolerance to 3HP at pH 3.5.Genome sequencing followed by functional analysis identified the causal mutation in SFA1 gene encoding S-(hydroxymethyl)glutathione dehydrogenase. Based on our findings, we...

  10. Enterobacteria modulate intestinal bile acid transport and homeostasis through apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (SLC10A2) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hamatsu, Mayumi; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    In our study, ampicillin (AMP)-mediated decrease of enterobacteria caused increases in hepatic bile acid concentration through (at least in part) elevation of bile acid synthesis in C57BL/6N mice. We investigated the involvement of enterobacteria on intestinal bile acid absorption in AMP-treated mice in the present study. Fecal enterobacterial levels and fecal bile acid excretion rates were markedly decreased in mice treated with AMP (100 mg/kg) for 3 days, whereas bile acid concentrations in portal blood were significantly increased compared with those in mice treated with a vehicle. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (SLC10A2) mRNA levels and ileal SLC10A2 protein levels in brush-border membranes were significantly increased compared with those in mice treated with the vehicle. In AMP-treated mice, total bile acid levels were increased, whereas levels of enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and cholic acid were decreased in intestinal lumen. These phenomena were also observed in farnesoid X receptor-null mice treated with AMP for 3 days. Discontinuation of AMP administration after 3 days (vehicle administration for 4 days) increased levels of fecal enterobacteria, fecal bile acid excretion, and taurodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid in the intestinal lumen, whereas the discontinuation decreased ileal SLC10A2 expression and bile acid concentrations in the portal blood. Coadministration of taurodeoxycholic acid or cholic acid decreased ileal SLC10A2 expression in mice treated with AMP. These results suggest that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid biotransformation modulates intestinal bile acid transport and homeostasis through down-regulation of ileal SLC10A2 expression.

  11. Regulation of phenylacetic acid uptake is sigma54 dependent in Pseudomonas putida CA-3.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Leary, Niall D

    2011-10-13

    primer extension analysis. Comparative analyses of genomes encoding phenylacetyl CoA, (PACoA), catabolic operons identified a common association among styrene degradation linked PACoA catabolons in Pseudomonas species studied to date. Conclusions In summary, this is the first study to report RpoN dependent transcriptional activation of the PACoA catabolon paaL gene, encoding a transport protein essential for phenylacetic acid utilisation in P. putida CA-3. Bioinformatic analysis is provided to suggest this regulatory link may be common among styrene degrading Pseudomonads.

  12. Age-dependent loss of the C-terminal amino acid from alpha crystallin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, T.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum made against the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin was used to monitor the purification of a tryptic peptide containing the C-terminus of the molecule from fetal versus adult bovine lenses. Mass spectral analysis of the peptide preparations obtained from these lenses demonstrated the presence of a peptide (T20) containing an intact C-terminus from fetal lenses and the presence of an additional peptide (T20') from older lenses that contained a cleaved C-terminal serine. These results demonstrate an age-dependent processing of alpha-A crystallin in the bovine lens, resulting in removal of the C-terminal amino acid residue.

  13. Isolation and expression of the Pneumocystis carinii thymidylate synthase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edman, U; Edman, J C; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    The thymidylate synthase (TS) gene from Pneumocystis carinii has been isolated from complementary and genomic DNA libraries and expressed in Escherichia coli. The coding sequence of TS is 891 nucleotides, encoding a 297-amino acid protein of Mr 34,269. The deduced amino acid sequence is similar...

  14. The role of aristolochene synthase in diphosphate activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraldos, Juan A; Gonzalez, Veronica; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2012-03-28

    Analysis of the role of amino acids involved in diphosphate binding in the Michaelis complex of aristolochene synthase from P. roqueforti (PR-AS) reveals mechanistic details about leaving group (PPi) activation and the nature of the active site acid. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  15. Substrate specificity of thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Luttik, Marijke A H; Kötter, Peter; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2012-11-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share sequence similarity with genes encoding thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases (2ODCs). PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6 encode differentially regulated pyruvate decarboxylase isoenzymes; ARO10 encodes a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase with broad substrate specificity, and THI3 has not yet been shown to encode an active decarboxylase. Despite the importance of fusel alcohol production in S. cerevisiae, the substrate specificities of these five 2ODCs have not been systematically compared. When the five 2ODCs were individually overexpressed in a pdc1Δ pdc5Δ pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ strain, only Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the linear-chain 2-oxo acids pyruvate, 2-oxo-butanoate, and 2-oxo-pentanoate in cell extracts. The presence of a Pdc isoenzyme was also required for the production of n-propanol and n-butanol in cultures grown on threonine and norvaline, respectively, as nitrogen sources. These results demonstrate the importance of pyruvate decarboxylases in the natural production of n-propanol and n-butanol by S. cerevisiae. No decarboxylation activity was found for Thi3 with any of the substrates tested. Only Aro10 and Pdc5 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the aromatic substrate phenylpyruvate, with Aro10 showing superior kinetic properties. Aro10, Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 exhibited activity with all branched-chain and sulfur-containing 2-oxo acids tested but with markedly different decarboxylation kinetics. The high affinity of Aro10 identified it as a key contributor to the production of branched-chain and sulfur-containing fusel alcohols.

  16. Resolving the dependence of Δ47 thermometers on acid digestion temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, A. S.; Olack, G.

    2015-12-01

    Clumped isotope paleothermometry on carbonate minerals has emerged as a leading tool in paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry studies. The utility of Δ47 measurements is especially pronounced when estimating formation temperature of carbonates that precipitated from solutions with unknown water oxygen isotope composition. However, the interpretation of Δ47 values has been hindered by discrepancies among the many published thermometric calibrations. As the number of calibrations grows, it now appears that the slope of the Δ47 vs. inverse temperature relationship clusters into two distinct groupings based on whether the carbonate minerals were digested at low temperature (25°C) vs. high temperature (generally 70 - 90°C). We model the effect that small amounts of oxygen exchange between CO2 liberated to the phosphoric acid solution and trace water in that solution can have on measured Δ47. This can occur with very little shift in δ47 and δ18O of the CO2. The extent and effect of oxygen exchange following CaCO3 dissolution is a complex function of the phosphoric acid's temperature, water content, and viscosity. Conventional approaches to preparation of phosphoric acid (targeting a defined density range at room temperature) are likely inadequate for resolving the details of these dependencies. This stems in part from changes that can occur to the water content and density of phosphoric acid during heating of the acid under vacuum. Secondary effects may also arise that relate to the grain and crystallite size of the carbonate minerals, intercalation of carbonate minerals with siliciclastic matrix in sediments or paleosols, and possibly the reactivity of hydrous components of a siliciclastic rich sample.

  17. Fatty acid compositions of triglycerides and free fatty acids in sebum depend on amount of triglycerides, and do not differ in presence or absence of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Numata, Shigeki; Matsusue, Miyuki; Mashima, Yasuo; Miyawaki, Masaaki; Yamada, Shunji; Yagami, Akiko; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2014-12-01

    To clarify the influence of the fatty acid composition of sebum in acne vulgaris, we investigated the amounts and fatty acid compositions of triglycerides (TG) and free fatty acids (FFA), and the amounts of cutaneous superficial Propionibacterium acnes in acne patients and healthy subjects. The foreheads of 18 female patients, 10 male patients, 10 healthy females and 10 healthy males were studied in a Japanese population. There were significant differences in the amounts of sebum, TG and cutaneous superficial P. acnes, as well as the fatty acid compositions of TG and FFA between acne patients and healthy subjects in females. Their fatty acid compositions were correlated with the amount of TG with or without acne. It was clarified that the fatty acid compositions of TG and FFA depended on the amount of TG, and there were no differences in the fatty acid composition in the presence and absence of acne. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  18. Discovery of New 2-[(4,6-Dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)oxy]-6-(substituted phenoxy)benzoic Acids as Flexible Inhibitors of Arabidopsis thaliana Acetohydroxyacid Synthase and Its P197L Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ren-Yu; Yang, Jing-Fang; Devendar, Ponnam; Kang, Wei-Ming; Liu, Yu-Chao; Chen, Qiong; Niu, Cong-Wei; Xi, Zhen; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2017-12-27

    In the search for new antiresistance acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS, EC 2.2.1.6) inhibitors to combat weed resistance associated with AHAS mutations, a series of 2-[(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)oxy]-6-(substituted phenoxy)benzoic acids 11-38 were designed and synthesized via the strategy of conformational flexibility analysis. Compounds 21, 22, 26, 33, 36, and 38 with high potency against both wild-type AtAHAS and its P197L mutant were identified as promising candidates with low resistance factors (RF, defined as the ratio between the ki values toward P197L mutant and wild-type AHAS) ranging from 0.73 to 6.32. Especially, compound 22 (RF = 0.73) was further identified as the most potent antiresistance AHAS inhibitor because of its significantly reduced resistance level compared with that of tribenuron-methyl (RF = 2650) and bispyribac (RF = 4.57). Furthermore, compounds 26, 33, 36, and 38 also displayed promising herbicidal activities against sensitive and resistant (P197L) Descurainia sophia at the dosage of 75-150 g of active ingredient (ai)/ha. Notably, compounds 33 and 38 still maintained over 60% herbicidal activity toward the resistant weed even at much lower dosages (37.5 g ai/ha). Therefore, the designed scaffold has the great potential to discover new candidate compounds for the control of weed resistance associated with AHAS mutation.

  19. Conductivity-Dependent Flow Field-Flow Fractionation of Fulvic and Humic Acid Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha J. M. Wells

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fulvic (FAs and humic acids (HAs are chemically fascinating. In water, they have a strong propensity to aggregate, but this research reveals that tendency is regulated by ionic strength. In the environment, conductivity extremes occur naturally—freshwater to seawater—warranting consideration at low and high values. The flow field flow fractionation (flow FFF of FAs and HAs is observed to be concentration dependent in low ionic strength solutions whereas the corresponding flow FFF fractograms in high ionic strength solutions are concentration independent. Dynamic light scattering (DLS also reveals insight into the conductivity-dependent behavior of humic substances (HSs. Four particle size ranges for FAs and humic acid aggregates are examined: (1 <10 nm; (2 10 nm–6 µm; (3 6–100 µm; and (4 >100 µm. Representative components of the different size ranges are observed to dynamically coexist in solution. The character of the various aggregates observed—such as random-extended-coiled macromolecules, hydrogels, supramolecular, and micellar—as influenced by electrolytic conductivity, is discussed. The disaggregation/aggregation of HSs is proposed to be a dynamic equilibrium process for which the rate of aggregate formation is controlled by the electrolytic conductivity of the solution.

  20. The Humidity Dependence of N2O5 Uptake to Citric Acid Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzinic, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Tuerler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The heterogeneous loss of N2O5 to aerosol particles has remained uncertain, and reconciling lab and field data has demonstrated some gaps in our understanding of the detailed mechanism. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles in an aerosol flow reactor at ambient pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Citric acid, representing strongly oxidized polyfunctional organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols, has been chosen as a proxy due to its well established physical properties. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 15-75 % RH, within which the uptake coefficient varies between about 0.001 and about 0.02. Taking into account the well established hygroscopic properties of citric acid, we interpret uptake in terms of disproportionation of N2O5 into nitrate ion and nitronium ion and reaction of the latter with liquid water.

  1. Taurolithocholic acid exerts cholestatic effects via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanisms in perfused rat livers and rat hepatocyte couplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Denk, Gerald U.; Soroka, Carol J.; Wimmer, Ralf; Rust, Christian; Paumgartner, Gustav; Boyer, James L.

    2003-01-01

    Taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) is a potent cholestatic agent. Our recent work suggested that TLCA impairs hepatobiliary exocytosis, insertion of transport proteins into apical hepatocyte membranes, and bile flow by protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon)-dependent mechanisms. Products of

  2. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Du-Hyong [Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Mi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Duk-Hee [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Inho, E-mail: inhojo@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  3. Ursolic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside improves rat plasma lipid profile and increases liver glycogen content through glycogen synthase kinase-3

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, Marisa; Camsari, Çagri; Sá, Carla M.; Lima, Cristóvão F.; Ferreira, Manuel Fernandes; Wilson, Cristina Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Documento submetido para revisão pelos pares. A publicar em Phytotherapy Research. ISSN 0951-418X In the present study, two phytochemicals – ursolic acid (UA) and luteolin-7-glucoside (L7G) – were assessed in vivo in healthy rats regarding effects on plasma glucose and lipid profi le (total cholesterol, HDL and LDL), as well as liver glycogen content, in view of their importance in the aetiology of diabetes and associated complications. Both UA and L7G significantly decreased plasma glucos...

  4. Opioid Tolerance and Physical Dependence: Role of Spinal Neuropeptides, Excitatory Amino Acids and Their Messengers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khem Jhamandas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic opioid treatment results in the development of tolerance and physical dependence. The mechanisms underlying opioid tolerance and/or physical dependence are unclear. Recent studies suggest that opioid receptor or nociceptive, neural network-based adaptations contribute to this phenomenon. At the spinal level, the genesis of tolerance and physical dependence is associated with increased excitatory amino acid activity expressed through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the dorsal horn. However, recent evidence also implicates spinal neuropeptide transmitters such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and  substance P in the development of opioid tolerance. Long term spinal morphine treatment increases CGRP-like immunostaining in the dorsal horn, and coadministration of morphine with CGRP8-37, a competitive CGRP1 receptor antagonist, prevents this response as well as loss of the analgesic potency. CGRP8-37, like N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, has the potential to restore morphine potency in experimental animals who are already tolerant to the opioid agonist. Recent evidence suggests that the effects of excitatory amino acid and neuropeptide receptor activity may be expressed through the generation of messengers such as nitric oxide and prostanoids. Agents that inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids have the potential to inhibit and reverse spinal opioid tolerance, suggesting that this phenomenon may be expressed through the activity of these mediators. Nociceptive transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord also involves activity of a number of other mediators including morphine modulatory neuropeptides, neuropeptide FF  and neuropeptide SF. The role of these mediators and their relationship with other factors implicated in tolerance remain to be determined.

  5. Purification, Structure and Properties of Escherichia coli tRNA Pseudouridine Synthase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    enzymes which are reactive at C5 of uracil ( thymidylate synthase and aminoacyl synthetases). The deduced amino acid sequence of PSUI was also compared with...localize the sites of tRNA interaction with PSUI. The mechanism elucidated by Santi and others for thymidylate synthase (34-38) provides a conceptual...aminoacyl tRNA synthetases with residue U8 of their cognate tRNA substrates (39,40). In the case of thymidylate synthase , I the catalytic nucleophile is

  6. The modulating effect of Persea americana fruit extract on the level of expression of fatty acid synthase complex, lipoprotein lipase, fibroblast growth factor-21 and leptin--A biochemical study in rats subjected to experimental hyperlipidemia and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monika, Padmanabhan; Geetha, Arumugam

    2015-09-15

    Obesity is a multifactorial disorder which is closely associated with hyperlipidemia. Avocados are edible fruits traditionally consumed for various health benefits including body weight reduction. To determine the hypolipidemic and anti-obesity effect of hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of avocado (HFEA) in rats fed with high fat diet (HFD). Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Groups 1 and 2 rats were fed with normal diet. Groups 3 and 4 rats were fed with HFD for 14 weeks. In addition, Groups 2 and 4 rats were co-administered with 100 mg/kg body weight of HFEA from 3rd week onwards. The HFEA was subjected to HPLC to quantify the major phytonutrients. Body mass index (BMI), adiposity index (ADI), total fat pad mass (TFP), blood lipid levels were determined in all the groups of rats. The mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and leptin was also assessed. HFEA was found to contain flavonoids: rutin-141.79, quercetin-5.25, luteolin-165, phenolic compounds: gallic acid-198.57, ellagic acid-238.22, vanillic acid-4.79 and phytosterols: betasitosterol-70, stigmasterol-12.5 (mg/100 g). HFEA reduced BMI, ADI, TFP, blood cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL in rats fed with HFD. Serum leptin was found reduced in HFEA co-administered rats. The mRNA expression of FASN, LPL, and leptin in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue was found to be significantly reduced in HFEA co-administered rats. The gene expression of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) was found to be significantly increased in HFEA treated rats when compared to HFD control rats. The hypolipidemic effect of HFEA may be partly due to its modulating effect on endogenous fat synthesis and adiponectin formation through the transcription factor FGF21. The results also show that avocado fruit extract has profound influence on leptin activity, which controls satiety and hunger to regulate the food intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  7. Regulation of resin acid synthesis in Pinus densiflora by differential transcription of genes encoding multiple 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase and 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Bok; Kim, Sang-Min; Kang, Min-Kyoung; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Lee, Jong Kyu; Park, Seung-Chan; Shin, Sang-Chul; Kim, Soo-Un

    2009-05-01

    Pinus densiflora Siebold et Zucc. is the major green canopy species in the mountainous area of Korea. To assess the response of resin acid biosynthetic genes to mechanical and chemical stimuli, we cloned cDNAs of genes encoding enzymes involved in the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway (1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (PdDXS), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (PdDXR) and 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase (PdHDR)) by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. In addition, we cloned the gene encoding abietadiene synthase (PdABS) as a marker for the site of pine resin biosynthesis. PdHDR and PdDXS occurred as two gene families. In the phylogenetic trees, PdDXSs, PdDXR and PdHDRs each formed a separate clade from their respective angiosperm homologs. PdDXS2, PdHDR2 and PdDXR were most actively transcribed in stem wood, whereas PdABS was specifically transcribed. The abundance of PdDXS2 transcripts in wood in the resting state was generally 50-fold higher than the abundance of PdDXS1 transcripts, and PdHDR2 transcripts were more abundant by an order of magnitude in wood than in other tissues, with the ratio of PdHDR2 to PdHDR1 transcripts in wood being about 1. Application of 1 mM methyl jasmonate (MeJA) selectively enhanced the transcript levels of PdDXS2 and PdHDR2 in wood. The ratios of PdDXS2 to PdDXS1 and PdHDR2 to PdHDR1 reached 900 and 20, respectively, on the second day after MeJA treatment, whereas the transcript level of PdABS increased twofold by 3 days after MeJA treatment. Wounding of the stem differentially enhanced the transcript ratios of PdDXS2 to PdDXS1 and PdHDR2 to PdHDR1 to 300 and 70, respectively. The increase in the transcript levels of the MEP pathway genes in response to wounding was accompanied by two orders of magnitude increase in PdABS transcripts. These observations indicated that resin acid biosynthesis activity, represented by PdABS transcription, was correlated

  8. Molecular determinants of acidic pH-dependent transport of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Fazlur; Askwith, Candice; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2017-09-08

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) translocate hydrophilic nucleosides across cellular membranes and are essential for salvage nucleotide synthesis and purinergic signaling. Unlike the prototypic human ENT members hENT1 and hENT2, which mediate plasma membrane nucleoside transport at pH 7.4, hENT3 is an acidic pH-activated lysosomal transporter partially localized to mitochondria. Recent studies demonstrate that hENT3 is indispensable for lysosomal homeostasis, and that mutations in hENT3 can result in a spectrum of lysosomal storage-like disorders. However, despite hENT3's prominent role in lysosome pathophysiology, the molecular basis of hENT3-mediated transport is unknown. Therefore, we sought to examine the mechanistic basis of acidic pH-driven hENT3 nucleoside transport with site-directed mutagenesis, homology modeling, and [(3)H]adenosine flux measurements in mutant RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes. Scanning mutagenesis of putative residues responsible for pH-dependent transport via hENT3 revealed that the ionization states of Asp-219 and Glu-447, and not His, strongly determined the pH-dependent transport permissible-impermissible states of the transporter. Except for substitution with certain isosteric and polar residues, substitution of either Asp-219 or Glu-447 with any other residues resulted in robust activity that was pH-independent. Dual substitution of Asp-219 and Glu-447 to Ala sustained pH-independent activity over a broad range of physiological pH (pH 5.5-7.4), which also maintained stringent substrate selectivity toward endogenous nucleosides and clinically used nucleoside drugs. Our results suggest a putative pH-sensing role for Asp-219 and Glu-447 in hENT3 and that the size, ionization state, or electronegative polarity at these positions is crucial for obligate acidic pH-dependent activity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase-enhancing G-protein coupled receptor antagonist inhibits pulmonary artery hypertension by endothelin-1-dependent and endothelin-1-independent pathways in a monocrotaline model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Pin Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether endothelin-1 (ET-1 mediates monocrotaline (MCT-induced pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH, and if so, whether the G-protein coupled receptor antagonist KMUP-1 (7-{2-[4-(2-chlorobenzenepiperazinyl]ethyl}-1,3-dimethylxanthine inhibits ET-1-mediated PA constriction and the aforementioned pathological changes. In a chronic rat model, intraperitoneal MCT (60 mg/kg induced PAH and increased PA medial wall thickening and RV/left ventricle + septum weight ratio on Day 21 after MCT injection. Treatment with sublingual KMUP-1 (2.5 mg/kg/day for 21 days prevented these changes and restored vascular endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that KMUP-1 enhanced eNOS, soluble guanylate cyclase, and protein kinase G levels, and reduced ET-1 expression and inactivated Rho kinase II (ROCKII in MCT-treated lung tissue over long-term administration. In MCT-treated rats, KMUP-1 decreased plasma ET-1 on Day 21. KMUP-1 (3.6 mg/kg maximally appeared at 0.25 hours in the plasma and declined to basal levels within 24 hours after sublingual administration. In isolated PA of MCT-treated rats, compared with control and pretreatment with l-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (100 μM, KMUP-1 (0.1–100 μM inhibited ET-1 (0.01 μM-induced vasoconstriction. Endothelium-denuded PA sustained higher contractility in the presence of KMUP-1. In a 24-hour culture of smooth muscle cells (i.e., PA smooth muscle cells or PASMCs, KMUP-1 (0.1–10 μM inhibited RhoA- and ET-1-induced RhoA activation. KMUP-1 prevented MCT-induced PAH, PA wall thickening, and RVH by enhancing eNOS and suppressing ET-1/ROCKII expression. In vitro, KMUP-1 inhibited ET-1-induced PA constriction and ET-1-dependent/independent RhoA activation of PASMCs. In summary, KMUP-1 attenuates ET-1-induced/ET-1-mediated PA constriction, and could thus aid in

  10. Shape-dependent electrocatalysis: methanol and formic acid electrooxidation on preferentially oriented Pt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solla-Gullón, J; Vidal-Iglesias, F J; López-Cudero, A; Garnier, E; Feliu, J M; Aldaz, A

    2008-07-07

    Reactivity towards methanol and formic acid electrooxidation on Pt nanoparticles with well characterised surfaces were studied and compared with the behaviour of single crystal electrodes with basal orientations. Polyoriented and preferential (100), (111) and (100)-(111) Pt nanoparticles were synthesised, cleaned preserving its surface structure, characterised and employed to evaluate the influence of the surface structure/shape of the Pt nanoparticles on these two relevant electrochemical reactions. The results pointed out that, in agreement with fundamental studies with Pt single crystal electrodes, the surface structure of the electrodes plays an important role on the reactivity of both oxidation processes, and thus the electrocatalytic properties strongly depend on the surface structure/shape of the nanoparticles, in particular on the presence of sites with (111) symmetry. These findings open the possibility of designing new and better electrocatalytic materials using decorated shape-controlled Pt nanoparticles as previously described with Pt single crystal electrodes.

  11. Prenyldiphosphate synthases and gibberellin biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, C.C.N.; Haring, M.A.; Schuurink, R.C.; Bach, T.J.; Rohmer, M.

    2013-01-01

    Gibberellins are derived from the diterpene precursor geranylgeranyl diphophosphate (GGPP). GGPP is converted to ent-kaurene, which contains the basic structure of gibberellins, in the plastids by the combined actions of copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) and ent-kaurene synthase (KS). Generally,

  12. Suppression of jasmonic acid-dependent defense in cotton plant by the mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengjun Zhang

    Full Text Available The solenopsis mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis, has been recently recognized as an aggressively invasive pest in China, and is now becoming a serious threat to the cotton industry in the country. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the molecular mechanisms employed by cotton for defending against P. solenopsis before the pest populations reach epidemic levels. Here, we examined the effects of exogenous jasmonic acid (JA, salicylic acid (SA, and herbivory treatments on feeding behavior and on development of female P. solenopsis. Further, we compared the volatile emissions of cotton plants upon JA, SA, and herbivory treatments, as well as the time-related changes in gossypol production and defense-related genes. Female adult P. solenopsis were repelled by leaves from JA-treated plant, but were not repelled by leaves from SA-treated plants. In contrast, females were attracted by leaves from plants pre-infested by P. solenopsis. The diverse feeding responses by P. solenopsis were due to the difference in volatile emission of plants from different treatments. Furthermore, we show that JA-treated plants slowed P. solenopsis development, but plants pre-infested by P. solenopsis accelerated its development. We also show that P. solenopsis feeding inhibited the JA-regulated gossypol production, and prevented the induction of JA-related genes. We conclude that P. solenopsis is able to prevent the activation of JA-dependent defenses associated with basal resistance to mealybugs.

  13. Suppression of Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Defense in Cotton Plant by the Mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengjun; Zhu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Fang; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Jinming; Lu, Yaobin; Ruan, Yongming

    2011-01-01

    The solenopsis mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis, has been recently recognized as an aggressively invasive pest in China, and is now becoming a serious threat to the cotton industry in the country. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the molecular mechanisms employed by cotton for defending against P. solenopsis before the pest populations reach epidemic levels. Here, we examined the effects of exogenous jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), and herbivory treatments on feeding behavior and on development of female P. solenopsis. Further, we compared the volatile emissions of cotton plants upon JA, SA, and herbivory treatments, as well as the time-related changes in gossypol production and defense-related genes. Female adult P. solenopsis were repelled by leaves from JA-treated plant, but were not repelled by leaves from SA-treated plants. In contrast, females were attracted by leaves from plants pre-infested by P. solenopsis. The diverse feeding responses by P. solenopsis were due to the difference in volatile emission of plants from different treatments. Furthermore, we show that JA-treated plants slowed P. solenopsis development, but plants pre-infested by P. solenopsis accelerated its development. We also show that P. solenopsis feeding inhibited the JA-regulated gossypol production, and prevented the induction of JA-related genes. We conclude that P. solenopsis is able to prevent the activation of JA-dependent defenses associated with basal resistance to mealybugs. PMID:21818315

  14. Prostaglandin H synthase immunoreactivity in human gut. An immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Rumessen, J J; Qvortrup, K

    1991-01-01

    Prostaglandins exhibit a variety of actions on intestinal smooth muscle depending upon the type, dose and muscle layer studied. As the cellular origin of prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase has not been established with certainty in the human gut wall, we studied the localization of PGH synthase...... in the human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon by immunohistochemistry. PGH synthase immunoreactivity appeared to be similar in all segments of the intestine. Most smooth muscle cells seemed to contain PGH synthase; however, the reaction in the lamina muscularis mucosae was much stronger than...... in the longitudinal and circular muscle layers. Endothelial cells in capillaries and larger vessels showed a positive reaction. In addition, unidentified cells in subserosa, at the level of Auerbach's plexus and in the submucosa were stained. We concluded that the smooth muscle cells of the human gut has a rather...

  15. Use of linalool synthase in genetic engineering of scent production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichersky, Eran

    1998-01-01

    A purified S-linalool synthase polypeptide from Clarkia breweri is disclosed as is the recombinant polypeptide and nucleic acid sequences encoding the polypeptide. Also disclosed are antibodies immunoreactive with the purified peptide and with recombinant versions of the polypeptide. Methods of using the nucleic acid sequences, as well as methods of enhancing the smell and the flavor of plants expressing the nucleic acid sequences are also disclosed.

  16. Prostaglandin H synthase immunoreactivity in human gut. An immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Rumessen, J J; Qvortrup, Klaus

    1991-01-01

    Prostaglandins exhibit a variety of actions on intestinal smooth muscle depending upon the type, dose and muscle layer studied. As the cellular origin of prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase has not been established with certainty in the human gut wall, we studied the localization of PGH synthase in th...... large capacity for PGH synthesis and the present results may provide a basis for a better understanding of both normal physiological functions as well as intestinal disease states involving disorders of prostaglandin synthesis.......Prostaglandins exhibit a variety of actions on intestinal smooth muscle depending upon the type, dose and muscle layer studied. As the cellular origin of prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase has not been established with certainty in the human gut wall, we studied the localization of PGH synthase...... in the human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon by immunohistochemistry. PGH synthase immunoreactivity appeared to be similar in all segments of the intestine. Most smooth muscle cells seemed to contain PGH synthase; however, the reaction in the lamina muscularis mucosae was much stronger than...

  17. Ascorbic acid synthesis and metabolism in maize are subject to complex and genotype-dependent feedback regulation during endosperm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanahuja, Georgina; Farré, Gemma; Bassie, Ludovic; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul; Capell, Teresa

    2013-10-01

    L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an antioxidant and electron donor whose metabolism in plants is under strict feedback control. The factors that influence L-ascorbic acid accumulation in staple crops are only partially understood. One way to gain insight into the regulation of L-ascorbic acid metabolism is to investigate the endogenous pathways in various genetic backgrounds and characterize their interactions with transgenes encoding relevant enzymes. In an initial step, we investigated the developmental profile of L-ascorbic acid accumulation in the endosperm of three diverse maize genotypes and a transgenic line expressing rice dehydroascorbate reductase, which enhances L-ascorbic acid recycling. We determined the transcript levels of all the key genes in the L-ascorbic acid metabolic pathways as well as the specific levels of ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbate. L-ascorbic acid levels were high 20 days after pollination and declined thereafter. We found significant genotype-dependent variations in the transcript levels of some genes, with particular complexity in the ascorbic acid recycling pathway. Our data will help to elucidate the complex mechanisms underlying the regulation of L-ascorbic acid metabolism in plants, particularly the impact of genetic background on the strict regulation of ascorbic acid metabolism in endosperm cells. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Biochemical characterization of the water-soluble squalene synthase from Methylococcus capsulatus and the functional analyses of its two DXXD(E)D motifs and the highly conserved aromatic amino acid residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Kana; Saito, Naoki; Shibuya, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Wakako; Amano, Ryosuke; Hirai, Takumi; Sasaki, Shinji; Nakano, Chiaki; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2014-12-01

    Information regarding squalene synthases (SQSs) from prokaryotes is scarce. We aimed to characterize the SQS from Methylococcus capsulatus. We studied its reaction mechanism by kinetic analysis and evaluated the structure of the substrate/inhibitor-binding sites via homology modeling. The cloned M. capsulatus SQS was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid column chromatography. Interestingly, M. capsulatus SQS was water-soluble and did not require any detergent for its higher activity, unlike other SQSs studied previously; supplementation of any type of detergent inhibited enzyme activity. The specific activity and the kinetic values (Km and kcat ) for the substrate farnesyl diphosphate and NADPH are reported. The substrate analog farnesyl methylenediphosphonate showed potent inhibition toward the enzyme. We prepared the site-specific mutants directed at potential active-site residues (58) DXX(61) E(62) D (S1 site) and (213) DXX(216) D(217) D (S2 site), which were assumed to be involved in the binding of the substrate farnesyl diphosphate through the Mg(2+) ion. We first demonstrated that the S1 site and the two basic residues (R55 and K212) were responsible for the binding of farnesyl diphosphate. Furthermore, we examined the catalytic roles of the highly conserved aromatic residues and demonstrated that the Y164 residue abstracts the proton of cation 5, which is produced during the first half-reaction (Scheme 1), to afford presqualene diphosphate, and that the W224 residue stabilizes the intermediary cation 5 via the cation-π interaction. Furthermore, we confirm for the first time that the F32 and the Y51 residues also stabilize the carbocation intermediate(s) generated during the second half-reaction. © 2014 FEBS.

  19. Humic acid induces the endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation at Ser1177 and Thr495 Via Hsp90α and Hsp90β upregulation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masato; Miyajima, Miki; Hishioka, Naoko; Nishimura, Ryo; Kihara, Yusuke; Hosokawa, Toshiyuki; Kurasaki, Masaaki; Tanaka, Shunitz; Saito, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as a contributory factor for blackfoot disease, which is an endemic peripheral vascular disease. We investigated the effect of HA on the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to evaluate the involvement of eNOS and related factors in peripheral vascular impairment with HA exposure. Treatment of HUVECs with HA induced upregulation of eNOS. This result coincides with those of previous studies. Furthermore this is the first study to report that HA induces upregulation of heat shock protein (Hsp)90α, Hsp90β, eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177, and eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495, as compared to that in the control. In contrast, treatment with BAPTA, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, inhibited upregulation of these proteins induced by HA. This study demonstrates that HA treatment leads to increases in both Hsp90α and Hsp90β proteins and indicates that Hsp90α leads to eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 and that Hsp90β leads to eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495, respectively. Upregulation of eNOS, Hsp90α, and Hsp90β in HUVECs is regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation induced by HA. These results suggest that upregulation of eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 and eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495 produce NO and superoxide anions, respectively, resulting in generation of peroxynitrite, which causes impairment of vascular endothelial cells. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Bacillus caldolyticus prs gene encoding phosphoribosyldiphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, Britta N.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    -transcribed. Comparison of amino acid sequences revealed a high similarity among PRPP synthases across a wide phylogenetic range. An E. coli strain harbouring the B. caldolyticus prs gene in a multicopy plasmid produced PRPP synthase activity 33-fold over the activity of a haploid B. caldolyticus strain. B. caldolyticus...

  1. Cyclin-dependent kinase activity enhances phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by repressing phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Christian P; Adams, Nicolette; Kroon, Johan T M; Bryant, Fiona M; Hussey, Patrick J; Kurup, Smita; Eastmond, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Coordination of endomembrane biogenesis with cell cycle progression is considered to be important in maintaining cell function during growth and development. We previously showed that the disruption of PHOSPHATIDIC ACID PHOSPHOHYDROLASE (PAH) activity in Arabidopsis thaliana stimulates biosynthesis of the major phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and causes expansion of the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we show that PC biosynthesis is repressed by disruption of the core cell cycle regulator CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE A;1 (CDKA;1) and that this repression is reliant on PAH. Furthermore, we show that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) phosphorylate PAH1 at serine 162, which reduces both its activity and membrane association. Expression of a CDK-insensitive version of PAH1 with a serine 162 to alanine substitution represses PC biosynthesis and also reduces the rate of cell division in early leaf development. Together our findings reveal a physiologically important mechanism that couples the rate of phospholipid biosynthesis and endomembrane biogenesis to cell cycle progression in Arabidopsis. © 2016 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Gibberellic acid and cGMP-dependent transcriptional regulation in arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Bastian, René

    2010-03-01

    An ever increasing amount of transcriptomic data and analysis tools provide novel insight into complex responses of biological systems. Given these resources we have undertaken to review aspects of transcriptional regulation in response to the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) and its second messenger guanosine 3\\',5\\'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in Arabidopsis thaliana, both wild type and selected mutants. Evidence suggests enrichment of GA-responsive (GARE) elements in promoters of genes that are transcriptionally upregulated in response to cGMP but downregulated in a GA insensitive mutant (ga1-3). In contrast, in the genes upregulated in the mutant, no enrichment in the GARE is observed suggesting that GARE motifs are diagnostic for GA-induced and cGMP-dependent transcriptional upregulation. Further, we review how expression studies of GA-dependent transcription factors and transcriptional networks based on common promoter signatures derived from ab initio analyses can contribute to our understanding of plant responses at the systems level. © 2010 Landes Bioscience.

  3. ABCA1-dependent but apoA-I-independent cholesterol efflux mediated by fatty acid-bile acid conjugates (FABACs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldiner, Ilana; van der Velde, Astrid E.; Vandenberghe, Kristin E.; van Wijland, Michel A.; Halpern, Zamir; Gilat, Tuvia; Konikoff, Fred M.; Veldman, Robert Jan; Groen, Albert K.

    2006-01-01

    FABACs (fatty acid-bile acid conjugates) are synthetic molecules that are designed to treat a range of lipid disorders. The compounds prevent cholesterol gallstone formation and diet-induced fatty liver, and increase reverse cholesterol transport in rodents. The aim of the present study was to

  4. Time-dependent uptake and toxicity of nickel to Enchytraeus crypticus in the presence of humic acid and fulvic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Erkai; Qiu, Hao; Qiu, Rongliang; Rentenaar, Charlotte; Devresse, Quentin; Van Gestel, Cornelis A.M.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the influence of different fractions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the uptake and toxicity of nickel (Ni) in the soil invertebrate Enchytraeus crypticus after different exposure times. The addition of DOC as humic acid or fulvic acid significantly

  5. Identification of avian wax synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biester, Eva-Maria; Hellenbrand, Janine; Gruber, Jens; Hamberg, Mats; Frentzen, Margrit

    2012-02-04

    Bird species show a high degree of variation in the composition of their preen gland waxes. For instance, galliform birds like chicken contain fatty acid esters of 2,3-alkanediols, while Anseriformes like goose or Strigiformes like barn owl contain wax monoesters in their preen gland secretions. The final biosynthetic step is catalyzed by wax synthases (WS) which have been identified in pro- and eukaryotic organisms. Sequence similarities enabled us to identify six cDNAs encoding putative wax synthesizing proteins in chicken and two from barn owl and goose. Expression studies in yeast under in vivo and in vitro conditions showed that three proteins from chicken performed WS activity while a sequence from chicken, goose and barn owl encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing both wax ester and triacylglycerol synthesis. Mono- and bifunctional WS were found to differ in their substrate specificities especially with regard to branched-chain alcohols and acyl-CoA thioesters. According to the expression patterns of their transcripts and the properties of the enzymes, avian WS proteins might not be confined to preen glands. We provide direct evidence that avian preen glands possess both monofunctional and bifunctional WS proteins which have different expression patterns and WS activities with different substrate specificities.

  6. Identification of avian wax synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biester Eva-Maria

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bird species show a high degree of variation in the composition of their preen gland waxes. For instance, galliform birds like chicken contain fatty acid esters of 2,3-alkanediols, while Anseriformes like goose or Strigiformes like barn owl contain wax monoesters in their preen gland secretions. The final biosynthetic step is catalyzed by wax synthases (WS which have been identified in pro- and eukaryotic organisms. Results Sequence similarities enabled us to identify six cDNAs encoding putative wax synthesizing proteins in chicken and two from barn owl and goose. Expression studies in yeast under in vivo and in vitro conditions showed that three proteins from chicken performed WS activity while a sequence from chicken, goose and barn owl encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing both wax ester and triacylglycerol synthesis. Mono- and bifunctional WS were found to differ in their substrate specificities especially with regard to branched-chain alcohols and acyl-CoA thioesters. According to the expression patterns of their transcripts and the properties of the enzymes, avian WS proteins might not be confined to preen glands. Conclusions We provide direct evidence that avian preen glands possess both monofunctional and bifunctional WS proteins which have different expression patterns and WS activities with different substrate specificities.

  7. Glucagon Couples Hepatic Amino Acid Catabolism to mTOR-Dependent Regulation of α-Cell Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Solloway

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation of islet cell mass has important implications for the discovery of regenerative therapies for diabetes. The liver plays a central role in metabolism and the regulation of endocrine cell number, but liver-derived factors that regulate α-cell and β-cell mass remain unidentified. We propose a nutrient-sensing circuit between liver and pancreas in which glucagon-dependent control of hepatic amino acid metabolism regulates α-cell mass. We found that glucagon receptor inhibition reduced hepatic amino acid catabolism, increased serum amino acids, and induced α-cell proliferation in an mTOR-dependent manner. In addition, mTOR inhibition blocked amino-acid-dependent α-cell replication ex vivo and enabled conversion of α-cells into β-like cells in vivo. Serum amino acids and α-cell proliferation were increased in neonatal mice but fell throughout postnatal development in a glucagon-dependent manner. These data reveal that amino acids act as sensors of glucagon signaling and can function as growth factors that increase α-cell proliferation.

  8. Taurolithocholic acid exerts cholestatic effects via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanisms in perfused rat livers and rat hepatocyte couplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Denk, Gerald U; Soroka, Carol J; Wimmer, Ralf; Rust, Christian; Paumgartner, Gustav; Boyer, James L

    2003-05-16

    Taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) is a potent cholestatic agent. Our recent work suggested that TLCA impairs hepatobiliary exocytosis, insertion of transport proteins into apical hepatocyte membranes, and bile flow by protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon)-dependent mechanisms. Products of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) stimulate PKCepsilon. We studied the role of PI3K for TLCA-induced cholestasis in isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL) and isolated rat hepatocyte couplets (IRHC). In IPRL, TLCA (10 micromol/liter) impaired bile flow by 51%, biliary secretion of horseradish peroxidase, a marker of vesicular exocytosis, by 46%, and the Mrp2 substrate, 2,4-dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione, by 95% and stimulated PI3K-dependent protein kinase B, a marker of PI3K activity, by 154% and PKCepsilon membrane binding by 23%. In IRHC, TLCA (2.5 micromol/liter) impaired canalicular secretion of the fluorescent bile acid, cholylglycylamido fluorescein, by 50%. The selective PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin (100 nmol/liter), and the anticholestatic bile acid tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA, 25 micromol/liter) independently and additively reversed the effects of TLCA on bile flow, exocytosis, organic anion secretion, PI3K-dependent protein kinase B activity, and PKCepsilon membrane binding in IPRL. Wortmannin also reversed impaired bile acid secretion in IRHC. These data strongly suggest that TLCA exerts cholestatic effects by PI3K- and PKCepsilon-dependent mechanisms that are reversed by tauroursodeoxycholic acid in a PI3K-independent way.

  9. Microbiological study of lactic acid fermentation of Caper berries by molecular and culture-dependent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Ben Omar, Nabil; Abriouel, Hikmate; Lucas López, Rosario; Martínez Cañamero, Magdalena; Gálvez, Antonio

    2005-12-01

    Fermentation of capers (the fruits of Capparis sp.) was studied by molecular and culture-independent methods. A lactic acid fermentation occurred following immersion of caper berries in water, resulting in fast acidification and development of the organoleptic properties typical of this fermented food. A collection of 133 isolates obtained at different times of fermentation was reduced to 75 after randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis. Isolates were identified by PCR or 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Lactobacillus plantarum (37 isolates), Lactobacillus paraplantarum (1 isolate), Lactobacillus pentosus (5 isolates), Lactobacillus brevis (9 isolates), Lactobacillus fermentum (6 isolates), Pediococcus pentosaceus (14 isolates), Pediococcus acidilactici (1 isolate), and Enterococcus faecium (2 isolates). Cluster analysis of RAPD-PCR patterns revealed a high degree of diversity among lactobacilli (with four major groups and five subgroups), while pediococci clustered in two closely related groups. A culture-independent analysis of fermentation samples by temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE) also indicated that L. plantarum is the predominant species in this fermentation, in agreement with culture-dependent results. The distribution of L. brevis and L. fermentum in samples was also determined by TTGE, but identification of Pediococcus at the species level was not possible. TTGE also allowed a more precise estimation of the distribution of E. faecium, and the detection of Enterococcus casseliflavus (which was not revealed by the culture-dependent analysis). Results from this study indicate that complementary data from molecular and culture-dependent analysis provide a more accurate determination of the microbial community dynamics during caper fermentation.

  10. Biosynthesis of Germacrene A Carboxylic Acid in Chicory Roots. Demonstration of a Cytochrome P450 (+)-Germacrene A Hydroxylase and NADP+-Dependent Sesquiterpenoid Dehydrogenase(s) Involved in Sesquiterpene Lactone Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kraker, Jan-Willem; Franssen, Maurice C. R.; Dalm, Marcella C. F.; de Groot, Aede; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    2001-01-01

    Sprouts of chicory (Cichorium intybus), a vegetable grown in the dark, have a slightly bitter taste associated with the presence of guaianolides, eudesmanolides, and germacranolides. The committed step in the biosynthesis of these compounds is catalyzed by a (+)-germacrene A synthase. Formation of the lactone ring is the postulated next step in biosynthesis of the germacrene-derived sesquiterpene lactones. The present study confirms this hypothesis by isolation of enzyme activities from chicory roots that introduce a carboxylic acid function in the germacrene A isopropenyl side chain, which is necessary for lactone ring formation. (+)-Germacrene A is hydroxylated to germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-ol by a cytochrome P450 enzyme, and is subsequently oxidized to germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid by NADP+-dependent dehydrogenase(s). Both oxidized germacrenes were detected as their Cope-rearrangement products elema-1,3,11(13)-trien-12-ol and elema-1,3,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid, respectively. The cyclization products of germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-ol, i.e. costol, were also observed. The (+)-germacrene A hydroxylase is inhibited by carbon monoxide (blue-light reversible), has an optimum pH at 8.0, and hydroxylates β-elemene with a modest degree of enantioselectivity. PMID:11299372

  11. A Therapeutic Connection between Dietary Phytochemicals and ATP Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Hassan, Sherif S; Azim, Sofiya

    2017-11-20

    For centuries, phytochemicals have been used to prevent and cure multiple health ailments. Phytochemicals have been reported to have antioxidant, antidiabetic, antitussive, antiparasitic, anticancer, and antimicrobial properties. Generally, the therapeutic use of phytochemicals is based on tradition or word of mouth with few evidence-based studies. Moreover, molecular level interactions or molecular targets for the majority of phytochemicals are unknown. In recent years, antibiotic resistance by microbes has become a major healthcare concern. As such, the use of phytochemicals with antimicrobial properties has become pertinent. Natural compounds from plants, vegetables, herbs, and spices with strong antimicrobial properties present an excellent opportunity for preventing and combating antibiotic resistant microbial infections. ATP synthase is the fundamental means of cellular energy. Inhibition of ATP synthase may deprive cells of required energy leading to cell death, and a variety of dietary phytochemicals are known to inhibit ATP synthase. Structural modifications of phytochemicals have been shown to increase the inhibitory potency and extent of inhibition. Sitedirected mutagenic analysis has elucidated the binding site(s) for some phytochemicals on ATP synthase. Amino acid variations in and around the phytochemical binding sites can result in selective binding and inhibition of microbial ATP synthase. In this review, the therapeutic connection between dietary phytochemicals and ATP synthase is summarized based on the inhibition of ATP synthase by dietary phytochemicals. Research suggests selective targeting of ATP synthase is a valuable alternative molecular level approach to combat antibiotic resistant microbial infections. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. CYP4 enzymes as potential drug targets: focus on enzyme multiplicity, inducers and inhibitors, and therapeutic modulation of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthase and fatty acid ω-hydroxylase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Katheryne Z; Rettie, Allan E

    2013-01-01

    The Cytochrome P450 4 (CYP4) family of enzymes in humans is comprised of thirteen isozymes that typically catalyze the ω-oxidation of endogenous fatty acids and eicosanoids. Several CYP4 enzymes can biosynthesize 20- hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, or 20-HETE, an important signaling eicosanoid involved in regulation of vascular tone and kidney reabsorption. Additionally, accumulation of certain fatty acids is a hallmark of the rare genetic disorders, Refsum disease and X-ALD. Therefore, modulation of CYP4 enzyme activity, either by inhibition or induction, is a potential strategy for drug discovery. Here we review the substrate specificities, sites of expression, genetic regulation, and inhibition by exogenous chemicals of the human CYP4 enzymes, and discuss the targeting of CYP4 enzymes in the development of new treatments for hypertension, stroke, certain cancers and the fatty acid-linked orphan diseases.

  13. Germacrene C synthase from Lycopersicon esculentum cv. VFNT cherry tomato: cDNA isolation, characterization, and bacterial expression of the multiple product sesquiterpene cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, S M; Crock, J; Dowdle-Rizzo, B; Lemaux, P G; Croteau, R

    1998-03-03

    Germacrene C was found by GC-MS and NMR analysis to be the most abundant sesquiterpene in the leaf oil of Lycopersicon esculentum cv. VFNT Cherry, with lesser amounts of germacrene A, guaia-6,9-diene, germacrene B, beta-caryophyllene, alpha-humulene, and germacrene D. Soluble enzyme preparations from leaves catalyzed the divalent metal ion-dependent cyclization of [1-3H]farnesyl diphosphate to these same sesquiterpene olefins, as determined by radio-GC. To obtain a germacrene synthase cDNA, a set of degenerate primers was constructed based on conserved amino acid sequences of related terpenoid cyclases. With cDNA prepared from leaf epidermis-enriched mRNA, these primers amplified a 767-bp fragment that was used as a hybridization probe to screen the cDNA library. Thirty-one clones were evaluated for functional expression of terpenoid cyclase activity in Escherichia coli by using labeled geranyl, farnesyl, and geranylgeranyl diphosphates as substrates. Nine cDNA isolates expressed sesquiterpene synthase activity, and GC-MS analysis of the products identified germacrene C with smaller amounts of germacrene A, B, and D. None of the expressed proteins was active with geranylgeranyl diphosphate; however, one truncated protein converted geranyl diphosphate to the monoterpene limonene. The cDNA inserts specify a deduced polypeptide of 548 amino acids (Mr = 64,114), and sequence comparison with other plant sesquiterpene cyclases indicates that germacrene C synthase most closely resembles cotton delta-cadinene synthase (50% identity).

  14. Pipecolic Acid Orchestrates Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance and Defense Priming via Salicylic Acid-Dependent and -Independent Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Bernsdorff, Friederike; Döring, Anne-Christin; Gruner, Katrin; Schuck, Stefan; Bräutigam, Andrea; Zeier, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationships of the two immune-regulatory plant metabolites, salicylic acid (SA) and pipecolic acid (Pip), in the establishment of plant systemic acquired resistance (SAR), SAR-associated defense priming, and basal immunity. Using SA-deficient sid2, Pip-deficient ald1, and sid2 ald1 plants deficient in both SA and Pip, we show that SA and Pip act both independently from each other and synergistically in Arabidopsis thaliana basal immunity to Pseudomonas syringae. Transcri...

  15. Dietary Protein and Potassium, Diet–Dependent Net Acid Load, and Risk of Incident Kidney Stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Ernest I.; Curhan, Gary C.; Gambaro, Giovanni; Taylor, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Protein and potassium intake and the resulting diet–dependent net acid load may affect kidney stone formation. It is not known whether protein type or net acid load is associated with risk of kidney stones. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We prospectively examined intakes of protein (dairy, nondairy animal, and vegetable), potassium, and animal protein-to-potassium ratio (an estimate of net acid load) and risk of incident kidney stones in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (n=42,919), the Nurses’ Health Study I (n=60,128), and the Nurses’ Health Study II (n=90,629). Multivariable models were adjusted for age, body mass index, diet, and other factors. We also analyzed cross-sectional associations with 24-hour urine (n=6129). Results During 3,108,264 person-years of follow-up, there were 6308 incident kidney stones. Dairy protein was associated with lower risk in the Nurses’ Health Study II (hazard ratio for highest versus lowest quintile, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.73 to 0.96; P value for trend <0.01). The hazard ratios for nondairy animal protein were 1.15 (95% confidence interval, 0.97 to 1.36; P value for trend =0.04) in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.46; P value for trend =0.06) in the Nurses’ Health Study I. Potassium intake was associated with lower risk in all three cohorts (hazard ratios from 0.44 [95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 0.53] to 0.67 [95% confidence interval, 0.57 to 0.78]; P values for trend <0.001). Animal protein-to-potassium ratio was associated with higher risk (P value for trend =0.004), even after adjustment for animal protein and potassium. Higher dietary potassium was associated with higher urine citrate, pH, and volume (P values for trend <0.002). Conclusions Kidney stone risk may vary by protein type. Diets high in potassium or with a relative abundance of potassium compared with animal protein could represent a means of

  16. Dietary Protein and Potassium, Diet-Dependent Net Acid Load, and Risk of Incident Kidney Stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Pietro Manuel; Mandel, Ernest I; Curhan, Gary C; Gambaro, Giovanni; Taylor, Eric N

    2016-10-07

    Protein and potassium intake and the resulting diet-dependent net acid load may affect kidney stone formation. It is not known whether protein type or net acid load is associated with risk of kidney stones. We prospectively examined intakes of protein (dairy, nondairy animal, and vegetable), potassium, and animal protein-to-potassium ratio (an estimate of net acid load) and risk of incident kidney stones in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (n=42,919), the Nurses' Health Study I (n=60,128), and the Nurses' Health Study II (n=90,629). Multivariable models were adjusted for age, body mass index, diet, and other factors. We also analyzed cross-sectional associations with 24-hour urine (n=6129). During 3,108,264 person-years of follow-up, there were 6308 incident kidney stones. Dairy protein was associated with lower risk in the Nurses' Health Study II (hazard ratio for highest versus lowest quintile, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.73 to 0.96; P value for trend <0.01). The hazard ratios for nondairy animal protein were 1.15 (95% confidence interval, 0.97 to 1.36; P value for trend =0.04) in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.46; P value for trend =0.06) in the Nurses' Health Study I. Potassium intake was associated with lower risk in all three cohorts (hazard ratios from 0.44 [95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 0.53] to 0.67 [95% confidence interval, 0.57 to 0.78]; P values for trend <0.001). Animal protein-to-potassium ratio was associated with higher risk (P value for trend =0.004), even after adjustment for animal protein and potassium. Higher dietary potassium was associated with higher urine citrate, pH, and volume (P values for trend <0.002). Kidney stone risk may vary by protein type. Diets high in potassium or with a relative abundance of potassium compared with animal protein could represent a means of stone prevention. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions of amino acids developed from a hierarchical Dirichlet process model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ting

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Distributions of the backbone dihedral angles of proteins have been studied for over 40 years. While many statistical analyses have been presented, only a handful of probability densities are publicly available for use in structure validation and structure prediction methods. The available distributions differ in a number of important ways, which determine their usefulness for various purposes. These include: 1 input data size and criteria for structure inclusion (resolution, R-factor, etc.; 2 filtering of suspect conformations and outliers using B-factors or other features; 3 secondary structure of input data (e.g., whether helix and sheet are included; whether beta turns are included; 4 the method used for determining probability densities ranging from simple histograms to modern nonparametric density estimation; and 5 whether they include nearest neighbor effects on the distribution of conformations in different regions of the Ramachandran map. In this work, Ramachandran probability distributions are presented for residues in protein loops from a high-resolution data set with filtering based on calculated electron densities. Distributions for all 20 amino acids (with cis and trans proline treated separately have been determined, as well as 420 left-neighbor and 420 right-neighbor dependent distributions. The neighbor-independent and neighbor-dependent probability densities have been accurately estimated using Bayesian nonparametric statistical analysis based on the Dirichlet process. In particular, we used hierarchical Dirichlet process priors, which allow sharing of information between densities for a particular residue type and different neighbor residue types. The resulting distributions are tested in a loop modeling benchmark with the program Rosetta, and are shown to improve protein loop conformation prediction significantly. The distributions are available at http://dunbrack.fccc.edu/hdp.

  18. Retinoic acid specifically activates an oleate-dependent phospholipase D in the nuclei of LA-N-1 neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Pierre; Kanfer, Julian N; Freysz, Louis

    2003-04-24

    Earlier studies showed that treatment of LA-N-1 cells with TPA, a tumoral promoter, leads to the stimulation of a G protein-regulated phospholipase D (PLD) in the nuclei. Now we demonstrate that retinoic acid, a cellular differentiation inducing agent, activates a nuclear oleate-dependent PLD in LA-N-1 cells. Treatment of the nuclei with retinoic acid induces the breakdown of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho). Our results indicate that PLD is regulated differentially depending on the nature of the stimulatory agent. These results strongly suggest the existence of two nuclear PLD isoforms in LA-N-1 nuclei that hydrolyze PtdCho.

  19. Uric Acid Inhibition of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV In Vitro is Dependent on the Intracellular Formation of Triuret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohandas, Rajesh; Sautina, Laura; Beem, Elaine; Schuler, Anna; Chan, Wai-Yan; Domsic, John; McKenna, Robert; Johnson, Richard J.; Segal, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid affects endothelial and adipose cell function and has been linked to diseases such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Interestingly uric acid has been shown to increase endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) mobilization, a potential mechanism to repair endothelial injury. Since EPC mobilization is dependent on activity of the enzyme CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)IV, we examined the effect uric acid has on CD26/DPPIV activity. Uric acid inhibited the CD26/DPPIV associated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells but not human recombinant (hr)CD26/DPPIV. However, triuret, a product of uric acid and peroxynitrite, could inhibit cell associated and hrCD26/DPPIV. Increasing or decreasing intracellular peroxynitrite levels enhanced or decreased the ability of uric acid to inhibit cell associated CD26/DPPIV respectively. Last, protein modeling demonstrates how triuret can act as a small molecule inhibitor of CD26/DPPIV activity. This is the first time that uric acid or a uric acid reaction product has been shown to affect enzymatic activity and suggests a novel avenue of research in the role of uric acid in the development of clinically important diseases. PMID:24925478

  20. Uric acid inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV in vitro is dependent on the intracellular formation of triuret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohandas, Rajesh; Sautina, Laura; Beem, Elaine; Schuler, Anna; Chan, Wai-Yan; Domsic, John; McKenna, Robert; Johnson, Richard J; Segal, Mark S

    2014-08-01

    Uric acid affects endothelial and adipose cell function and has been linked to diseases such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Interestingly uric acid has been shown to increase endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) mobilization, a potential mechanism to repair endothelial injury. Since EPC mobilization is dependent on activity of the enzyme CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)IV, we examined the effect uric acid will have on CD26/DPPIV activity. Uric acid inhibited the CD26/DPPIV associated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells but not human recombinant (hr) CD26/DPPIV. However, triuret, a product of uric acid and peroxynitrite, could inhibit cell associated and hrCD26/DPPIV. Increasing or decreasing intracellular peroxynitrite levels enhanced or decreased the ability of uric acid to inhibit cell associated CD26/DPPIV, respectively. Finally, protein modeling demonstrates how triuret can act as a small molecule inhibitor of CD26/DPPIV activity. This is the first time that uric acid or a uric acid reaction product has been shown to affect enzymatic activity and suggests a novel avenue of research in the role of uric acid in the development of clinically important diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Linoleic acid and stearic acid elicit opposite effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent signaling pathways in immortalized hypothalamic N38 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songbo; Xiang, Nana; Yang, Liusong; Zhu, Canjun; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Lina; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-03-18

    The regulation of food intake is a promising way to combat obesity. It has been implicated that various fatty acids exert different effects on food intake and body weight. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) on agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression and secretion in immortalized mouse hypothalamic N38 cells and to explore the likely underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that LA inhibited, while SA stimulated AgRP expression and secretion of N38 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LA suppressed the protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), phosphorylation levels of JNK and IKKα/β, suggesting the inhibition of TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway. However, the above mentioned inhibitory effects of LA were eliminated by TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, SA promoted TLR4 protein expression and activated TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway, with elevated ratio of p-JNK/JNK. While TLR4 siRNA reversed the stimulatory effects of SA on AgRP expression and TLR4-dependent inflammation. Moreover, we found that TLR4 was also involved in LA-enhanced and SA-impaired leptin/insulin signal pathways in N38 cells. In conclusion, our findings indicated that LA elicited inhibitory while SA exerted stimulatory effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent inflammation and leptin/insulin pathways in N38 cells. These data provided a better understanding of the mechanism underlying fatty acids-regulated food intake and suggested the potential role of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids such as LA in reducing food intake and treating obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Temperature dependent emission of formic and acetic acid from paper, and its consequences for the air quality in archives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild Smedemark, Signe; Ryhl-Svendsen, Morten; Vinther Hansen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    ) the reaction rate is therefore, among other things, depending on temperature. Some of the emission products from paper, e.g., acetic and formic acid, are problematic from a conservation point of view, because they will re-react with the paper and other archival materials and cause further deterioration......Paper records affect the indoor environment in archives, because the paper may give off acid compounds to the air. These emission products origins from the decay of cellulose and lignin in the paper. As the off-gassing origins from chemical processes within the material (e.g., acid hydrolysis...

  3. Morphology dependent field emission of acid-spun carbon nanotube fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, S. B.; Boeckl, J.; Back, T. C.; Ferguson, J. B.; Koerner, H.; Murray, P. T.; Maruyama, B.; Lange, M. A.; Cahay, M. M.; Behabtu, N.; Young, C. C.; Pasquali, M.; Lockwood, N. P.; Averett, K. L.; Gruen, G.; Tsentalovich, D. E.

    2015-03-01

    Acid spun carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers were investigated for their field emission properties and performance was determined to be dependent on fiber morphology. The fibers were fabricated by wet-spinning of pre-made CNTs. Fiber morphology was controlled by a fabrication method and processing conditions, as well as purity, size, and type of the CNT starting material. The internal fiber structure consisted of CNT fibrils held together by van der Waals forces. Alignment and packing density of the CNTs affects the fiber’s electrical and thermal conductivity. Fibers with similar diameters and differing morphology were compared, and those composed of the most densely packed and well aligned CNTs were the best field emitters as exhibited by a lower turn-on voltage and a larger field enhancement factor. Fibers with higher electrical and thermal conductivity demonstrated higher maximum current before failure and longer lifetimes. A stable emission current at 3 mA was obtained for 10 h at a field strength of fibers excellent candidates for use as low voltage electron sources for vacuum electronic devices.

  4. Chlorogenic acid differentially affects postprandial glucose and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide response in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Jasmine M; Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2011-10-01

    Regular coffee consumption significantly lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Coffee contains thousands of compounds; however, the specific component(s) responsible for this reduced risk is unknown. Chlorogenic acids (CGA) found in brewed coffee inhibit intestinal glucose uptake in vitro. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which CGA acts to mediate blood glucose response in vivo. Conscious, unrestrained, male Sprague-Dawley rats were chronically catheterized and gavage-fed a standardized meal (59% carbohydrate, 25% fat, 12% protein), administered with or without CGA (120 mg·kg(-1)), in a randomized crossover design separated by a 3-day washout period. Acetaminophen was co-administered to assess the effects of CGA on gastric emptying. The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) were measured. GLP-1 response in the presence of glucose and CGA was further examined, using the human colon cell line NCI-H716. Total area under the curve (AUC) for blood glucose was significantly attenuated in rats fed CGA (p rats fed CGA, with a lower peak concentration and AUC up to 180 min postprandially (p blood glucose response, with alterations seen in GIP concentrations. Given the widespread consumption and availability of coffee, CGA may be a viable prevention tool for T2D.

  5. Histone-dependent IgG conservation in octanoic acid precipitation and its mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Toh, Phyllicia; Sun, Yue; Latiff, Sarah Maria Abdul; Hoi, Aina; Xian, Mo; Zhang, Haibo; Nian, Rui; Zhang, Wei; Gagnon, Pete

    2016-12-01

    Octanoic acid (OA) precipitation has long been used in protein purification. Recently, we reported a new cell culture clarification method for immunoglobulin G (IgG) purification, employing an advance elimination of chromatin heteroaggregates with a hybrid OA-solid phase system. This treatment reduced DNA more than 3 logs, histone below the detection limit (LOD), and non-histone host cell proteins (nh-HCP) by 90 % while conserving more than 90 % of the IgG monomer. In this study, we further investigated the conservation of IgG monomer and antibody light chain (LC) to the addition of OA/OA-solid phase complex, with or without histone and DNA in different combinations. The results showed that highly basic histone protein was the prime target in OA/OA-solid phase precipitation system for IgG purification, and the selective conservation of IgG monomer in this system was histone dependent. Our findings partially support the idea that OA works by sticking to electropositive hydrophobic domains on proteins, reducing their solubility, and causing them to agglomerate into large particles that precipitate from solution. Our findings also provide a new perspective for IgG purification and emphasize the necessity to re-examine the roles of various host contaminants in IgG purification.

  6. The vasorelaxant effect of gallic acid involves endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Lais Moraes; de Oliveira, Thiago Sardinha; da Costa, Rafael Menezes; de Souza Gil, Eric; Costa, Elson Alves; Passaglia, Rita de Cassia Aleixo Tostes; Filgueira, Fernando Paranaíba; Ghedini, Paulo César

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms of action involved in the vasorelaxant effect of gallic acid (GA) were examined in the isolated rat thoracic aorta. GA exerted a relaxant effect in the highest concentrations (0.4-10mM) in both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings. Pre-incubation with L-NAME, ODQ, calmidazolium, TEA, 4-aminopyridine, and barium chloride significantly reduced the pEC50 values. Moreover, this effect was not modified by indomethacin, wortmannin, PP2, glibenclamide, or paxillin. Pre-incubation of GA (1, 3, and 10mM) in a Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution attenuated CaCl2-induced contractions and blocked BAY K8644-induced vascular contractions, but it did not inhibit a contraction induced by the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmatic reticulum stores. In addition, a Western blot analysis showed that GA induces phosphorylation of eNOS in rat thoracic aorta. These results suggest that GA induces relaxation in rat aortic rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, resulting in eNOS phosphorylation and opening potassium channels. Additionally, the relaxant effect by an endothelium-independent pathway involves the blockade of the Ca(2+) influx via L-type Ca(2+) channels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gender-dependent levels of hyaluronic acid in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurodegenerative dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrietta M; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Minthon, Lennart; Londos, Elisabet; Wennström, Malin

    2012-03-01

    Numerous reports over the years have described neuroinflammatory events and vascular changes in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers disease (AD) and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Interestingly, recent reports from other research areas suggest that inflammatory and vascular processes are influenced by gender. These findings are intriguing from the perspective that women show a higher incidence of AD and warrant investigations on how gender influences various processes in neurodegenerative dementia. In the current study we measured the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma concentrations of hyaluroinic acid (HA), an adhesionmolecule known to regulate both vascular and inflammatory processes, in AD and DLB patients as well as in healthy elders. Our analysis showed that male AD and DLB patients had almost double the amount of HA compared to female patients whereas no gender differences were observed in the controls. Furthermore, we found that CSF levels of HA in foremost female AD patients correlated with various AD related biomarkers. Correlations between HA levels and markers of inflammation and vascular changes were only detected in female AD patients but in both male and female DLB patients. We conclude that HA may be linked to several pathological events present in AD, as reflected in CSF protein concentrations. The HA profile in CSF, but not in plasma, and associations to other markers appear to be gender-dependent which should be taken into account in clinical examinations and future biomarker studies.

  8. Caffeic acid ethanolamide prevents cardiac dysfunction through sirtuin dependent cardiac bioenergetics preservation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Shih-Yi; Ku, Hui-Chun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yang, Kai-Chien; Tu, Ping-Chen; Chiu, His-Lin; Su, Ming-Jai

    2015-01-01

    .... Caffeic acid ethanolamide (CAEA), a synthesized derivative from caffeic acid that exerted antioxidative properties, was thus applied in this study to explore its effects on the pathogenesis of heart failure...

  9. Identification of cystathionine γ-synthase and threonine synthase from Cicer arietinum and Lens culinaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morneau, Dominique J K; Jaworski, Allison F; Aitken, Susan M

    2013-04-01

    In plants, cystathionine γ-synthase (CGS) and threonine synthase (TS) compete for the branch-point metabolite O-phospho-L-homoserine. These enzymes are potential targets for metabolic engineering studies, aiming to alter the flux through the competing methionine and threonine biosynthetic pathways, with the goal of increasing methionine production. Although CGS and TS have been characterized in the model organisms Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana, little information is available on these enzymes in other, particularly plant, species. The functional CGS and TS coding sequences from the grain legumes Cicer arietinum (chickpea) and Lens culinaris (lentil) identified in this study share approximately 80% amino acid sequence identity with the corresponding sequences from Glycine max. At least 7 active-site residues of grain legume CGS and TS are conserved in the model bacterial enzymes, including the catalytic base. Putative processing sites that remove the targeting sequence and result in functional TS were identified in the target species.

  10. 3-Nitropropionic acid neurotoxicity in organotypic striatal and corticostriatal slice cultures is dependent on glucose and glutamate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, J; Kornblit, B T; Zimmer, J

    2000-01-01

    of lactate dehydrogenase in the medium and glutamic acid decarboxylase in tissue homogenates. 3-NPA toxicity (25-100 microM in 5 mM glucose, 24-48 h) appeared to be highly dependent on culture medium glucose levels. 3-NPA treatment caused also a dose-dependent lactate increase, reaching a maximum...... that in vivo characteristics of 3-NPA toxicity can be reproduced in organotypic corticostriatal slice cultures....

  11. Impact of Sorbic Acid on Germinant Receptor-Dependent and -Independent Germination Pathways in Bacillus cereus▿

    OpenAIRE

    van Melis, C. C. J.; Nierop Groot, M. N.; Abee, T.

    2011-01-01

    Amino acid- and inosine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores was reversibly inhibited in the presence of 3 mM undissociated sorbic acid. Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure, Ca-dipicolinic acid (DPA), and bryostatin, an activator of PrkC kinase, negated this inhibition, pointing to specific blockage of signal transduction in germinant receptor-mediated germination.

  12. Impact of sorbic acid on germinant receptor-dependent and -independent germination pathways in Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis, van C.C.J.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2011-01-01

    Amino acid- and inosine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores was reversibly inhibited in the presence of 3 mM undissociated sorbic acid. Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure, Ca-dipicolinic acid (DPA), and bryostatin, an activator of PrkC kinase, negated this inhibition,

  13. Impact of sorbic acid on germinant receptor-dependent and -independent germination pathways in Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Melis, C C J; Nierop Groot, M N; Abee, T

    2011-04-01

    Amino acid- and inosine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores was reversibly inhibited in the presence of 3 mM undissociated sorbic acid. Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure, Ca-dipicolinic acid (DPA), and bryostatin, an activator of PrkC kinase, negated this inhibition, pointing to specific blockage of signal transduction in germinant receptor-mediated germination.

  14. Impact of Sorbic Acid on Germinant Receptor-Dependent and -Independent Germination Pathways in Bacillus cereus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Melis, C. C. J.; Nierop Groot, M. N.; Abee, T.

    2011-01-01

    Amino acid- and inosine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores was reversibly inhibited in the presence of 3 mM undissociated sorbic acid. Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure, Ca-dipicolinic acid (DPA), and bryostatin, an activator of PrkC kinase, negated this inhibition, pointing to specific blockage of signal transduction in germinant receptor-mediated germination. PMID:21278268

  15. L-Ascorbic acid can abrogate SVCT-2-dependent cetuximab resistance mediated by mutant KRAS in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soo-A; Lee, Dae-Hee; Moon, Jai-Hee; Hong, Seung-Woo; Shin, Jae-Sik; Hwang, Ih Yeon; Shin, Yu Jin; Kim, Jeong Hee; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Kim, Seung-Mi; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Seul; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jung Shin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, TaeWon; Lee, Wang Jae

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer patients with mutant KRAS are resistant to cetuximab, an antibody directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor, which is an effective clinical therapy for patients with wild-type KRAS. Numerous combinatorial therapies have been tested to overcome the resistance to cetuximab. However, no combinations have been found that can be used as effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we demonstrate that L-ascorbic acid partners with cetuximab to induce killing effects, which are influenced by sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT-2) in human colon cancer cells with a mutant KRAS. L-Ascorbic acid treatment of human colon cancer cells that express a mutant KRAS differentially and synergistically induced cell death with cetuximab in a SVCT-2-dependent manner. The ectopic expression of SVCT-2 induced sensitivity to L-ascorbic acid treatment in human colon cancer cells that do not express SVCT-2, whereas the knockdown of endogenous SVCT-2 induced resistance to L-ascorbic acid treatment in SVCT-2-positive cells. Moreover, tumor regression via the administration of L-ascorbic acid and cetuximab in mice bearing tumor cell xenografts corresponded to SVCT-2 protein levels. Interestingly, cell death induced by the combination of L-ascorbic acid and cetuximab resulted in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. These cell death mechanisms were related to a disruption of the ERK pathway and were represented by the impaired activation of RAFs and the activation of the ASK-1-p38 pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that resistance to cetuximab in human colon cancer patients with a mutant KRAS can be bypassed by L-ascorbic acid in an SVCT-2-dependent manner. Furthermore, SVCT-2 in mutant KRAS colon cancer may act as a potent marker for potentiating L-ascorbic acid co-treatment with cetuximab. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Membrane sialic acid influences basophil histamine release by interfering with calcium dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C; Norn, S; Skov, P S

    1987-01-01

    The influence of the cell membrane content of sialic acid on basophil histamine release was examined in vitro in allergic patients and normal controls. Enzymatical removal of sialic acid enhanced histamine release induced by allergen and anti-IgE, whereas an increase in membrane sialic acid content....... This difference, together with the previous finding that alterations in membrane sialic acid content is reflected in the cell sensitivity to extracellular calcium, suggest an interaction between membrane sialic acid and the calcium channels involved in basophil histamine release....

  17. Ascorbic acid and sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters in the peripheral nervous system: from basic science to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gess, Burkhard; Röhr, Dominik; Young, Peter

    2013-12-10

    Ascorbic acid and sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters (SVCT) have been shown to have important functions in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Ascorbic acid is known to promote myelination in vitro in Schwann cell/dorsal root ganglion co-cultures by the formation of a collagen- and laminin-containing extracellular matrix. Recently, the function of ascorbic acid and SVCT2 in the PNS has been shown in vivo as well. Several studies on ascorbic acid treatment of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy 1A (CMT1A) have been completed and showed no clinical benefit. Possible reasons for the failure of ascorbic acid in CMT1A treatment are discussed in this review. More preclinical trials, ideally using different animal models, should be considered before the initiation of clinical trials in humans. More knowledge about ascorbic acid transport kinetics and inter-individual differences in humans is necessary for future studies. Further research into ascorbic acid transport mechanisms in the PNS is warranted. Especially the effects of transgenic or pharmacologic SVCT2 up-regulation on PNS myelination and remyelination will be an interesting area of research in the future. Furthermore, the potential use of ascorbic acid for peripheral neuropathies other than CMT1A would be a possible future research direction.

  18. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Widderich

    Full Text Available Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa, we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (SaEctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of

  19. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widderich, Nils; Kobus, Stefanie; Höppner, Astrid; Riclea, Ramona; Seubert, Andreas; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Heider, Johann; Smits, Sander H J; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC) catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa), we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (Sa)EctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of enzyme activity

  20. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höppner, Astrid; Riclea, Ramona; Seubert, Andreas; Dickschat, Jeroen S.; Heider, Johann; Smits, Sander H. J.; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC) catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa), we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (Sa)EctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of enzyme activity

  1. Engineering and systems-level analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid via malonyl-CoA reductase-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kildegaard, Kanchana R; Jensen, Niels B; Schneider, Konstantin; Czarnotta, Eik; Özdemir, Emre; Klein, Tobias; Maury, Jérôme; Ebert, Birgitta E; Christensen, Hanne B; Chen, Yun; Kim, Il-Kwon; Herrgård, Markus J; Blank, Lars M; Forster, Jochen; Nielsen, Jens; Borodina, Irina

    2016-03-15

    In the future, oil- and gas-derived polymers may be replaced with bio-based polymers, produced from renewable feedstocks using engineered cell factories. Acrylic acid and acrylic esters with an estimated world annual production of approximately 6 million tons by 2017 can be derived from 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), which can be produced by microbial fermentation. For an economically viable process 3HP must be produced at high titer, rate and yield and preferably at low pH to minimize downstream processing costs. Here we describe the metabolic engineering of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for biosynthesis of 3HP via a malonyl-CoA reductase (MCR)-dependent pathway. Integration of multiple copies of MCR from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and of phosphorylation-deficient acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC1 genes into the genome of yeast increased 3HP titer fivefold in comparison with single integration. Furthermore we optimized the supply of acetyl-CoA by overexpressing native pyruvate decarboxylase PDC1, aldehyde dehydrogenase ALD6, and acetyl-CoA synthase from Salmonella enterica SEacs (L641P). Finally we engineered the cofactor specificity of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase to increase the intracellular production of NADPH at the expense of NADH and thus improve 3HP production and reduce formation of glycerol as by-product. The final strain produced 9.8 ± 0.4 g L(-1) 3HP with a yield of 13% C-mol C-mol(-1) glucose after 100 h in carbon-limited fed-batch cultivation at pH 5. The 3HP-producing strain was characterized by (13)C metabolic flux analysis and by transcriptome analysis, which revealed some unexpected consequences of the undertaken metabolic engineering strategy, and based on this data, future metabolic engineering directions are proposed. In this study, S. cerevisiae was engineered for high-level production of 3HP by increasing the copy numbers of biosynthetic genes and improving flux towards precursors and redox cofactors. This strain represents

  2. Time-dependent uptake and toxicity of nickel to Enchytraeus crypticus in the presence of humic acid and fulvic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Erkai; Qiu, Hao; Qiu, Rongliang; Rentenaar, Charlotte; Devresse, Quentin; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the influence of different fractions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the uptake and toxicity of nickel (Ni) in the soil invertebrate Enchytraeus crypticus after different exposure times. The addition of DOC as humic acid or fulvic acid significantly reduced Ni uptake by E. crypticus in the soil-solution test system. Median lethal effect concentrations were calculated based on total dissolved Ni concentrations (LC50[Ni]), free Ni ion activity (LC50{Ni2+ }), and Ni body concentrations (LC50Body-Ni ). The LC50[Ni] values increased with increasing DOC levels and decreased with exposure time (4, 7, and 10 d). Humic acid exerted a greater protective effect on Ni toxicity than fulvic acid, but the protective effects decreased with prolonged exposure time. The LC50{Ni2+ } values also decreased with exposure time but were almost constant with variation in DOC levels, indicating that the protective effect of DOC is mainly through complexation with free Ni ions to reduce Ni bioavailability. The LC50Body-Ni value was independent of DOC concentration and exposure time, with an estimated overall value of 22.1 µg/g dry weight. The present study shows that body concentration could serve as an effective indicator for predicting Ni toxicity with variations in the exposure environment (e.g., DOC) and exposure time. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3019-3027. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  3. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid exerts anticholestatic effects by a cooperative cPKC alpha-/PKA-dependent mechanism in rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimmer, R.; Hohenester, S.; Pusl, T.; Denk, G. U.; Rust, C.; Beuers, U.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) exerts anticholestatic effects in part by protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent mechanisms. Its taurine conjugate, TUDCA, is a cPKC alpha agonist. We tested whether protein kinase A (PKA) might contribute to the anticholestatic action of TUDCA via cooperative cPKC

  4. [6]-Gingerol inhibits de novo fatty acid synthesis and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 activity which triggers apoptosis in HepG2

    OpenAIRE

    Impheng, Hathaichanok; Richert, Lysiane; Pekthong, Dumrongsak; Scholfield, C. Norman; Pongcharoen, Sutatip; Pungpetchara, Ittipon; Srisawang, Piyarat

    2015-01-01

    The de novo fatty acid synthesis catalyzed by key lipogenic enzymes, including fatty acid synthase (FASN) has emerged as one of the novel targets of anti-cancer approaches. The present study explored the possible inhibitory efficacy of [6]-gingerol on de novo fatty acid synthesis associated with mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic induction in HepG2 cells. We observed a dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential accompanied by a reduction of fatty acid levels. [6]-gingerol administration m...

  5. Growth medium-dependent regulation of Myxococcus xanthus fatty acid content is controlled by the esg locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeusz, G; Zhu, Y; Downard, J

    1998-10-01

    We compared the cellular fatty acid profiles of Myxococcus xanthus cells grown in either a Casitone-based complex medium or a chemically defined medium. The cells grown in the complex medium had a much higher content of the abundant branched-chain fatty acid iso-15:0 and several other branched-chain species. The higher branched-chain fatty acid content of the cells grown in the complex medium was dependent on the esg locus, which encodes the E1alpha and E1beta components of a branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD) multienzyme complex involved in branched-chain fatty acid biosynthesis. Cells grown in the complex medium were also found to have a higher level of esg transcription and more BCKAD enzyme activity than cells from the chemically defined medium. The level of esg transcription appears to be an important factor in the growth medium-dependent regulation of the M. xanthus branched-chain fatty acid content.

  6. Induction of time-dependent oxidative stress and related transcriptional effects of perfluorododecanoic acid in zebrafish liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yang [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Wang Jianshe; Wei Yanhong; Zhang Hongxia; Xu Muqi [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai Jiayin [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China)], E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn

    2008-09-29

    The effects of acute perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) exposure on the induction of oxidative stress and alteration of mitochondrial gene expression were studied in the livers of female zebrafish (Danio rerio). Female zebrafish were exposed to PFDoA via a single intraperitoneal injection (0, 20, 40, or 80 {mu}g PFDoA/g body weight) and were then sacrificed 48 h, 96 h, or seven days post-PFDoA administration. PFDoA-treated fish exhibited histopathological liver damage, including swollen hepatocytes, vacuolar degeneration, and nuclei pycnosis. Glutathione (GSH) content and catalase (CAT) activity decreased significantly at 48 h post-injection while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was initially decreased at 48 h post-injection but was then elevated by seven days post-injection. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) increased at 48 h and seven days compared to control fish, although the increased level at seven days post-injection was decreased compared to the level at 48 h post-injection. Lipid peroxidation levels were increased at seven days post-injection, while no apparent induction was observed at 48 h or 96 h post-injection. The mRNA expression of medium-chain fatty acid dehydrogenase (MCAD) was induced, while the transcriptional expression of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), peroxisome proliferating activating receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), carnitine palmitoyl-transferase I (CPT-I), uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2), and Bcl-2 were significantly inhibited. Furthermore, the transcriptional expression of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX), very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) did not exhibit significant changes following PFDoA treatment. No significant changes were noted in the transcriptional expression of genes involved in mitochondrial respiratory chain and ATP synthesis, including cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COXI), NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (NDI), and ATP synthase F0 subunit 6

  7. Extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent enhancement of cytocidal potency of zoledronic acid in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Sayaka; Arai, Naoya; Tomihara, Kei; Takashina, Michinori; Hattori, Yuichi; Noguchi, Makoto

    2015-08-15

    Direct antitumor effects of bisphosphonates (BPs) have been demonstrated in various cancer cells in vitro. However, the effective concentrations of BPs are typically much higher than their clinically relevant concentrations. Oral cancers frequently invade jawbone and may lead to the release of Ca(2+) in primary lesions. We investigated the effects of the combined application of zoledronic acid (ZA) and Ca(2+) on proliferation and apoptosis of oral cancer cells. Human oral cancer cells, breast cancer cells, and colon cancer cells were treated with ZA at a wide range of concentrations in different Ca(2+) concentration environments. Under a standard Ca(2+) concentration (0.6mM), micromolar concentrations of ZA were required to inhibit oral cancer cell proliferation. Increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations greatly enhanced the potency of the ZA cytocidal effect. The ability of Ca(2+) to enhance the cytocidal effects of ZA was negated by the Ca(2+)-selective chelator EGTA. In contrast, the cytocidal effect of ZA was less pronounced in breast and colon cancer cells regardless of whether extracellular Ca(2+) was elevated. In oral cancer cells incubated with 1.6mM Ca(2+), ZA up-regulated mitochondrial Bax expression and increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. This was associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased release of cytochrome c. We suggest that ZA can specifically produce potent cytocidal activity in oral cancer cells in an extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent manner, implying that BPs may be useful for treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma with jawbone invasion leading to the hypercalcemic state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fenretinide-induced apoptosis of Huh-7 hepatocellular carcinoma is retinoic acid receptor β dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Yu-Jui

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinoids are used to treat several types of cancer; however, their effects on liver cancer have not been fully characterized. To investigate the therapeutic potential of retinoids on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the present study evaluates the apoptotic effect of a panel of natural and synthetic retinoids in three human HCC cell lines as well as explores the underlying mechanisms. Methods Apoptosis was determined by caspase-3 cleavage using western blot, DNA double-strand breaks using TUNEL assay, and phosphatidylserine translocation using flow cytometry analysis. Gene expression of nuclear receptors was assessed by real-time PCR. Transactivation assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP were conducted to evaluate the activation of RXRα/RARβ pathway by fenretinide. Knockdown of RARβ mRNA expression was achieved by siRNA transfection. Results Our data revealed that fenretinide effectively induces apoptosis in Huh-7 and Hep3B cells. Gene expression analysis of nuclear receptors revealed that the basal and inducibility of retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ expression positively correlate with the susceptibility of HCC cells to fenretinide treatment. Furthermore, fenretinide transactivates the RXRα/RARβ-mediated pathway and directly increases the transcriptional activity of RARβ. Knockdown of RARβ mRNA expression significantly impairs fenretinide-induced apoptosis in Huh-7 cells. Conclusion Our findings reveal that endogenous expression of retinoids receptor RARβ gene determines the susceptibility of HCC cells to fenretinide-induced apoptosis. Our results also demonstrate fenretinide directly activates RARβ and induces apoptosis in Huh-7 cells in a RARβ-dependent manner. These findings suggest a novel role of RARβ as a tumor suppressor by mediating the signals of certain chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. Folic acid-capped PEGylated magnetic nanoparticles enter cancer cells mostly via clathrin-dependent endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard-Vannier, Emilie; Hervé-Aubert, Katel; Kaaki, Karine; Blondy, Thibaut; Shebanova, Anastasia; Shaitan, Konstantin V; Ignatova, Anastasia A; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Feofanov, Alexey V; Chourpa, Igor

    2017-06-01

    This work is focused on mechanisms of uptake in cancer cells of rationally designed, covalently assembled nanoparticles, made of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), fluorophores (doxorubicin or Nile Blue), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and folic acid (FA), referred hereinafter as SFP-FA. SFP-FA were characterized by DLS, zetametry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The SFP-FA uptake in cancer cells was monitored using fluorescence-based methods like fluorescence-assisted cell sorting, CLSM with single-photon and two-photon excitation. The SFP-FA endocytosis was also analyzed with electron microscopy approaches: TEM, HAADF-STEM and EELS. The SFP-FA have zeta potential below -6mW and stable hydrodynamic diameter close to 100nm in aqueous suspensions of pH range from 5 to 8. They contain ca. 109 PEG-FA, 480 PEG-OCH 3 and 22-27 fluorophore molecules per SPION. The fluorophores protected under the PEG shell allows a reliable detection of intracellular NPs. SFP-FA readily enter into all the cancer cell lines studied and accumulate in lysosomes, mostly via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, whatever the FR status on the cells. The present study highlights the advantages of rational design of nanosystems as well as the possible involvement of direct molecular interactions of PEG and FA with cellular membranes, not limited to FA-FR recognition, in the mechanisms of their endocytosis. Composition, magnetic and optical properties of the SFP-FA as well their ability to enter cancer cells are promising for their applications in cancer theranosis. Combination of complementary analytical approaches is relevant to understand the nanoparticles behavior in suspension and in contact with cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Voltage-Dependent Inhibition of Glycine Receptor Channels by Niflumic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleeva, Galyna; Peiretti, Franck; Zhorov, Boris S.; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Niflumic acid (NFA) is a member of the fenamate class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This compound and its derivatives are used worldwide clinically for the relief of chronic and acute pain. NFA is also a commonly used blocker of voltage-gated chloride channels. Here we present evidence that NFA is an efficient blocker of chloride-permeable glycine receptors (GlyRs) with subunit heterogeneity of action. Using the whole-cell configuration of patch-clamp recordings and molecular modeling, we analyzed the action of NFA on homomeric α1ΔIns, α2B, α3L, and heteromeric α1β and α2β GlyRs expressed in CHO cells. NFA inhibited glycine-induced currents in a voltage-dependent manner and its blocking potency in α2 and α3 GlyRs was higher than that in α1 GlyR. The Woodhull analysis suggests that NFA blocks α1 and α2 GlyRs at the fractional electrical distances of 0.16 and 0.65 from the external membrane surface, respectively. Thus, NFA binding site in α1 GlyR is closer to the external part of the membrane, while in α2 GlyR it is significantly deeper in the pore. Mutation G254A at the cytoplasmic part of the α1 GlyR pore-lining TM2 helix (level 2′) increased the NFA blocking potency, while incorporation of the β subunit did not have a significant effect. The Hill plot analysis suggests that α1 and α2 GlyRs are preferably blocked by two and one NFA molecules, respectively. Molecular modeling using Monte Carlo energy minimizations provides the structural rationale for the experimental data and proposes more than one interaction site along the pore where NFA can suppress the ion permeation. PMID:28559795

  11. The pH-dependence of organofluorine binding domain preference in dissolved humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaffe, James G; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Simpson, André J

    2013-01-01

    In this study we explore the relationship between solution pH and the distribution of the binding interactions at different domains of a dissolved humic acid (HA) for three xenobiotics: pentafluoroaniline (PFA), pentafluorophenol (PFP), and hexafluorobenzene (HFB). The components of HA where xenobiotic interactions occur are identified using the (1)H{(19)F} Reverse Heteronuclear Saturation Transfer Difference (RHSTD) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment. At low pH, PFA and PFP interact preferentially with aromatic components of HA. Increasing pH reduces this preference. Conversely, HFB interacts with all components of HA equally, across the entire pH range. The possible roles of both aromatic-specific interactions and conformational changes of HA behind these observations are explored. It is shown that T-oriented π-π interactions at π-electron accepting HA structures are slightly stronger for PFA and PFP than for HFB. Using DOSY NMR it is shown that the pH-dependence of the interactions is correlated with changes in the conformation of the carbohydrate components of HA rather than with the aromatic components. It is argued that the observed preference for aromatic HA is caused by restricted access to the non-aromatic components of HA at low pH. These HA components form tightly bound hydrophobic domains due to strong inter- and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds. At high pH, these structures open up, making them more available for interactions with polar compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Temperature-Dependence of the Rates of Reaction of Trifluoroacetic Acid with Criegee Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; McGillen, Max R; Beames, Joseph M; Khan, M Anwar H; Percival, Carl J; Shallcross, Dudley E; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2017-07-24

    The rate coefficients for gas-phase reaction of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) with two Criegee intermediates, formaldehyde oxide and acetone oxide, decrease with increasing temperature in the range 240-340 K. The rate coefficients k(CH 2 OO + CF 3 COOH)=(3.4±0.3)×10 -10  cm 3  s -1 and k((CH 3 ) 2 COO + CF 3 COOH)=(6.1±0.2)×10 -10  cm 3  s -1 at 294 K exceed estimates for collision-limited values, suggesting rate enhancement by capture mechanisms because of the large permanent dipole moments of the two reactants. The observed temperature dependence is attributed to competitive stabilization of a pre-reactive complex. Fits to a model incorporating this complex formation give k [cm 3  s -1 ]=(3.8±2.6)×10 -18  T 2 exp((1620±180)/T) + 2.5×10 -10 and k [cm 3  s -1 ]=(4.9±4.1)×10 -18  T 2 exp((1620±230)/T) + 5.2×10 -10 for the CH 2 OO + CF 3 COOH and (CH 3 ) 2 COO + CF 3 COOH reactions, respectively. The consequences are explored for removal of TFA from the atmosphere by reaction with biogenic Criegee intermediates. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  13. Voltage-Dependent Inhibition of Glycine Receptor Channels by Niflumic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galyna Maleeva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Niflumic acid (NFA is a member of the fenamate class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This compound and its derivatives are used worldwide clinically for the relief of chronic and acute pain. NFA is also a commonly used blocker of voltage-gated chloride channels. Here we present evidence that NFA is an efficient blocker of chloride-permeable glycine receptors (GlyRs with subunit heterogeneity of action. Using the whole-cell configuration of patch-clamp recordings and molecular modeling, we analyzed the action of NFA on homomeric α1ΔIns, α2B, α3L, and heteromeric α1β and α2β GlyRs expressed in CHO cells. NFA inhibited glycine-induced currents in a voltage-dependent manner and its blocking potency in α2 and α3 GlyRs was higher than that in α1 GlyR. The Woodhull analysis suggests that NFA blocks α1 and α2 GlyRs at the fractional electrical distances of 0.16 and 0.65 from the external membrane surface, respectively. Thus, NFA binding site in α1 GlyR is closer to the external part of the membrane, while in α2 GlyR it is significantly deeper in the pore. Mutation G254A at the cytoplasmic part of the α1 GlyR pore-lining TM2 helix (level 2′ increased the NFA blocking potency, while incorporation of the β subunit did not have a significant effect. The Hill plot analysis suggests that α1 and α2 GlyRs are preferably blocked by two and one NFA molecules, respectively. Molecular modeling using Monte Carlo energy minimizations provides the structural rationale for the experimental data and proposes more than one interaction site along the pore where NFA can suppress the ion permeation.

  14. Voltage-Dependent Inhibition of Glycine Receptor Channels by Niflumic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleeva, Galyna; Peiretti, Franck; Zhorov, Boris S; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Niflumic acid (NFA) is a member of the fenamate class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This compound and its derivatives are used worldwide clinically for the relief of chronic and acute pain. NFA is also a commonly used blocker of voltage-gated chloride channels. Here we present evidence that NFA is an efficient blocker of chloride-permeable glycine receptors (GlyRs) with subunit heterogeneity of action. Using the whole-cell configuration of patch-clamp recordings and molecular modeling, we analyzed the action of NFA on homomeric α1ΔIns, α2B, α3L, and heteromeric α1β and α2β GlyRs expressed in CHO cells. NFA inhibited glycine-induced currents in a voltage-dependent manner and its blocking potency in α2 and α3 GlyRs was higher than that in α1 GlyR. The Woodhull analysis suggests that NFA blocks α1 and α2 GlyRs at the fractional electrical distances of 0.16 and 0.65 from the external membrane surface, respectively. Thus, NFA binding site in α1 GlyR is closer to the external part of the membrane, while in α2 GlyR it is significantly deeper in the pore. Mutation G254A at the cytoplasmic part of the α1 GlyR pore-lining TM2 helix (level 2') increased the NFA blocking potency, while incorporation of the β subunit did not have a significant effect. The Hill plot analysis suggests that α1 and α2 GlyRs are preferably blocked by two and one NFA molecules, respectively. Molecular modeling using Monte Carlo energy minimizations provides the structural rationale for the experimental data and proposes more than one interaction site along the pore where NFA can suppress the ion permeation.

  15. Molecular cloning and functional expression of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase from Coleus forskohlii Briq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamukai Makoto

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP, a common biosynthetic precursor to the labdane diterpene forskolin, has been biosynthesised via a non-mevalonate pathway. Geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP synthase is an important branch point enzyme in terpenoid biosynthesis. Therefore, GGPP synthase is thought to be a key enzyme in biosynthesis of forskolin. Herein we report the first confirmation of the GGPP synthase gene in Coleus forskohlii Briq. Results The open reading frame for full-length GGPP synthase encodes a protein of 359 amino acids, in which 1,077 nucleotides long with calculated molecular mass of 39.3 kDa. Alignments of C. forskohlii GGPP synthase amino acid sequences revealed high homologies with other plant GGPP synthases. Several highly conserved regions, including two aspartate-rich motifs were identified. Transient expression of the N-terminal region of C. forskohlii GGPP synthase-GFP fusion protein in tobacco cells demonstrated subcellular localization in the chloroplast. Carotenoid production was observed in Escherichia coli harboring pACCAR25ΔcrtE from Erwinia uredovora and plasmid carrying C. forskohlii GGPP synthase. These results suggested that cDNA encoded functional GGPP synthase. Furthermore, C. forskohlii GGPP synthase expression was strong in leaves, decreased in stems and very little expression was observed in roots. Conclusion This investigation proposed that forskolin was synthesised via a non-mevalonate pathway. GGPP synthase is thought to be involved in the biosynthesis of forskolin, which is primarily synthesised in the leaves and subsequently accumulates in the stems and roots.

  16. Acetolactate synthase inhibiting herbicides bind to the regulatory site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, M V; Loney-Gallant, V; Dias, J M; Mireles, L C

    1991-05-01

    Acetolactate synthase from spontaneous mutants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum; KS-43 and SK-53) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum; PS-3, PSH-91, and DO-2) selected in tissue culture for resistance to a triazolopyrimidine sulfonanilide showed varying degrees of insensitivity to feedback inhibitor(s) valine and/or leucine. A similar feature was evident in the enzyme isolated from chlorsulfuron-resistant weed biotypes, Kochia scoparia and Stellaria media. Dual inhibition analyses of triazolopyrimidine sulfonanilide, thifensulfuron, and imazethapyr versus feedback inhibitor leucine revealed that the three herbicides were competitive with the amino acid for binding to acetolactate synthase from wild-type cotton cultures. Acetolactate synthase inhibiting herbicides may bind to the regulatory site on the enzyme.

  17. Gut microbiota inhibit Asbt-dependent intestinal bile acid reabsorption via Gata4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Out, Carolien; Patankar, Jay V; Doktorova, Marcela; Boesjes, Marije; Bos, Trijnie; de Boer, Sanna; Havinga, Rick; Wolters, Henk; Boverhof, Renze; van Dijk, Theo H; Smoczek, Anna; Bleich, André; Sachdev, Vinay; Kratky, Dagmar; Kuipers, Folkert; Verkade, Henkjan J; Groen, Albert K

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of bile acid homeostasis in mammals is a complex process regulated via extensive cross-talk between liver, intestine and intestinal microbiota. Here we studied the effects of gut microbiota on bile acid homeostasis in mice. Bile acid homeostasis was assessed in four mouse models. Germfree mice, conventionally-raised mice, Asbt-KO mice and intestinal-specific Gata4-iKO mice were treated with antibiotics (bacitracin, neomycin and vancomycin; 100 mg/kg) for five days and subsequently compared with untreated mice. Attenuation of the bacterial flora by antibiotics strongly reduced fecal excretion and synthesis of bile acids, but increased the expression of the bile acid synthesis enzyme CYP7A1. Similar effects were seen in germfree mice. Intestinal bile acid absorption was increased and accompanied by increases in plasma bile acid levels, biliary bile acid secretion and enterohepatic cycling of bile acids. In the absence of microbiota, the expression of the intestinal bile salt transporter Asbt was strongly increased in the ileum and was also expressed in more proximal parts of the small intestine. Most of the effects of antibiotic treatment on bile acid homeostasis could be prevented by genetic inactivation of either Asbt or the transcription factor Gata4. Attenuation of gut microbiota alters Gata4-controlled expression of Asbt, increasing absorption and decreasing synthesis of bile acids. Our data support the concept that under physiological conditions microbiota stimulate Gata4, which suppresses Asbt expression, limiting the expression of this transporter to the terminal ileum. Our studies expand current knowledge on the bacterial control of bile acid homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-01-01

    .... We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells...

  19. Ammonium-Dependent Shortening of CLS in Yeast Cells Starved for Essential Amino Acids Is Determined by the Specific Amino Acid Deprived, through Different Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium (NH4+ leads to chronological life span (CLS shortening in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4742 cells, particularly evident in cells starved for auxotrophy-complementing amino acids (leucine, lysine, and histidine simultaneously. Here, we report that the effect of NH4+ on aging yeast depends on the specific amino acid they are deprived of. Compared with no amino acid starvation, starvation for leucine alone or in combination with histidine resulted in the most pronounced NH4+-induced CLS shortening, whereas starvation for lysine, alone or in combination with histidine resulted in the least sensitivity to NH4+. We also show that NH4+-induced CLS shortening is mainly mediated by Tor1p in cells starved for leucine or histidine but by Ras2p in cells starved for lysine, and in nonstarved cells. Sch9p protected cells from the effect of NH4+ under all conditions tested (starved or nonstarved cells, which was associated with Sch9p-dependent Hog1p phosphorylation. Our data show that NH4+ toxicity can be modulated through manipulation of the specific essential amino acid supplied to cells and of the conserved Ras2p, Tor1p, and Sch9p regulators, thus providing new clues to the development of environmental interventions for CLS extension and to the identification of new therapeutic targets for diseases associated with hyperammonemia.

  20. Rosmarinic Acid Methyl Ester Inhibits LPS-Induced NO Production via Suppression of MyD88- Dependent and -Independent Pathways and Induction of HO-1 in RAW 264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Yangkang; Lee, Seung Young; Han, Ah-Reum; Kim, Jin-Baek; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jin, Chang Hyun

    2016-08-18

    In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of rosmarinic acid methyl ester (RAME) isolated from a mutant cultivar of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton. We found that RAME inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, with an IC50 of 14.25 µM, in RAW 264.7 cells. RAME inhibited the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interferon-β, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Moreover, RAME suppressed the activation of nuclear factor kappa B. These results suggest that the downregulation of iNOS expression by RAME was due to myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent and -independent pathways. Furthermore, RAME induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) through activation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2. Treatment with tin protoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO-1, reversed the RAME-induced suppression of NO production. Taken together, RAME isolated from P. frutescens inhibited NO production in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells through simultaneous induction of HO-1 and inhibition of MyD88-dependent and -independent pathways.

  1. Rosmarinic Acid Methyl Ester Inhibits LPS-Induced NO Production via Suppression of MyD88- Dependent and -Independent Pathways and Induction of HO-1 in RAW 264.7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangkang So

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of rosmarinic acid methyl ester (RAME isolated from a mutant cultivar of Perilla frutescens (L. Britton. We found that RAME inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO production, with an IC50 of 14.25 µM, in RAW 264.7 cells. RAME inhibited the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interferon-β, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. Moreover, RAME suppressed the activation of nuclear factor kappa B. These results suggest that the downregulation of iNOS expression by RAME was due to myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88-dependent and -independent pathways. Furthermore, RAME induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 through activation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2. Treatment with tin protoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO-1, reversed the RAME-induced suppression of NO production. Taken together, RAME isolated from P. frutescens inhibited NO production in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells through simultaneous induction of HO-1 and inhibition of MyD88-dependent and -independent pathways.

  2. Identification of a Transcription Factor Controlling pH-Dependent Organic Acid Response in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lantz, Anna Eliasson

    2012-01-01

    Acid formation in Aspergillus niger is known to be subjected to tight regulation, and the acid production profiles are fine-tuned to respond to the ambient pH. Based on transcriptome data, putative trans-acting pH responding transcription factors were listed and through knock out studies, mutants...

  3. Bile Acid-induced Apoptosis in Hepatocytes Is Caspase-6-dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rust, Christian; Wild, Nadine; Bernt, Carina; Vennegeerts, Timo; Wimmer, Ralf; Beuers, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis induced by hydrophobic bile acids is thought to contribute to liver injury during cholestasis. Caspase-6 is an executioner caspase that also appears to have regulatory functions in hematopoetic cell lines. We aimed to elucidate the role of caspase-6 in bile acid-induced apoptosis. The

  4. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Predicting the catalytic sites of isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predicting the catalytic sites of isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS) related non-haem iron-dependent oxygenases and oxidases (NHIDOX) through a structural superimposition ... With the advancement of protein structural analysis software, it is possible to predict the catalytic sites of protein that shared a structural resemblance.

  6. Physiological characterization of the ARO10-dependent, broad-substrate-specificity 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuralhan, Zeynep; Luttik, Marijke A H; Tai, Siew Leng; Boer, Viktor M; Morais, Marcos A; Schipper, Dick; Almering, Marinka J H; Kötter, Peter; Dickinson, J Richard; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T

    2005-06-01

    Aerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D were grown with different nitrogen sources. Cultures grown with phenylalanine, leucine, or methionine as a nitrogen source contained high levels of the corresponding fusel alcohols and organic acids, indicating activity of the Ehrlich pathway. Also, fusel alcohols derived from the other two amino acids were detected in the supernatant, suggesting the involvement of a common enzyme activity. Transcript level analysis revealed that among the five thiamine-pyrophospate-dependent decarboxylases (PDC1, PDC5, PDC6, ARO10, and THI3), only ARO10 was transcriptionally up-regulated when phenylalanine, leucine, or methionine was used as a nitrogen source compared to growth on ammonia, proline, and asparagine. Moreover, 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity measured in cell extract from CEN.PK113-7D grown with phenylalanine, methionine, or leucine displayed similar broad-substrate 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity. Constitutive expression of ARO10 in ethanol-limited chemostat cultures in a strain lacking the five thiamine-pyrophosphate-dependent decarboxylases, grown with ammonia as a nitrogen source, led to a measurable decarboxylase activity with phenylalanine-, leucine-, and methionine-derived 2-oxo acids. Moreover, even with ammonia as the nitrogen source, these cultures produced significant amounts of the corresponding fusel alcohols. Nonetheless, the constitutive expression of ARO10 in an isogenic wild-type strain grown in a glucose-limited chemostat with ammonia did not lead to any 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity. Furthermore, even when ARO10 was constitutively expressed, growth with phenylalanine as the nitrogen source led to increased decarboxylase activities in cell extracts. The results reported here indicate the involvement of posttranscriptional regulation and/or a second protein in the ARO10-dependent, broad-substrate-specificity decarboxylase activity.

  7. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid exerts anticholestatic effects by a cooperative cPKC alpha-/PKA-dependent mechanism in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, R; Hohenester, S; Pusl, T; Denk, G U; Rust, C; Beuers, U

    2008-10-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) exerts anticholestatic effects in part by protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent mechanisms. Its taurine conjugate, TUDCA, is a cPKC alpha agonist. We tested whether protein kinase A (PKA) might contribute to the anticholestatic action of TUDCA via cooperative cPKC alpha-/PKA-dependent mechanisms in taurolithocholic acid (TLCA)-induced cholestasis. In perfused rat liver, bile flow was determined gravimetrically, organic anion secretion spectrophotometrically, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release enzymatically, cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation by immunoblotting, and cAMP by immunoassay. PKC/PKA inhibitors were tested radiochemically. In vitro phosphorylation of the conjugate export pump, Mrp2/Abcc2, was studied in rat hepatocytes and human Hep-G2 hepatoma cells. In livers treated with TLCA (10 micromol/l)+TUDCA (25 micromol/l), combined inhibition of cPKC by the cPKC-selective inhibitor Gö6976 (100 nmol/l) or the non-selective PKC inhibitor staurosporine (10 nmol/l) and of PKA by H89 (100 nmol/l) reduced bile flow by 36% (pTLCA+taurocholic acid. Inhibition of cPKC or PKA alone did not affect the anticholestatic action of TUDCA. Hepatic cAMP levels and CREB phosphorylation as readout of PKA activity were unaffected by the bile acids tested, suggesting a permissive effect of PKA for the anticholestatic action of TUDCA. Rat and human hepatocellular Mrp2 were phosphorylated by phorbol ester pretreatment and recombinant cPKC alpha, nPKC epsilon, and PKA, respectively, in a staurosporine-sensitive manner. UDCA conjugates exert their anticholestatic action in bile acid-induced cholestasis in part via cooperative post-translational cPKC alpha-/PKA-dependent mechanisms. Hepatocellular Mrp2 may be one target of bile acid-induced kinase activation.

  8. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-02-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA.

  9. Probe-Dependent Negative Allosteric Modulators of the Long-Chain Free Fatty Acid Receptor FFA4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watterson, Kenneth R; Hansen, Steffen V F; Hudson, Brian D

    2017-01-01

    High-affinity and selective antagonists that are able to block the actions of both endogenous and synthetic agonists of G protein-coupled receptors are integral to analysis of receptor function and to support suggestions of therapeutic potential. Although there is great interest in the potential...... of endogenous and synthetic agonists, clear agonist probe dependence in the nature of allosteric modulation was apparent. Although AH-7614 did not antagonize the second long-chain free fatty acid receptor, free fatty acid receptor 1, the simple chemical structure of AH-7614 containing features found in many...

  10. De novo lipogenesis maintains vascular homeostasis through endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) palmitoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaochao; Schneider, Jochen G; Shenouda, Sherene M; Lee, Ada; Towler, Dwight A; Chakravarthy, Manu V; Vita, Joseph A; Semenkovich, Clay F

    2011-01-28

    Endothelial dysfunction leads to lethal vascular complications in diabetes and related metabolic disorders. Here, we demonstrate that de novo lipogenesis, an insulin-dependent process driven by the multifunctional enzyme fatty-acid synthase (FAS), maintains endothelial function by targeting endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) to the plasma membrane. In mice with endothelial inactivation of FAS (FASTie mice), eNOS membrane content and activity were decreased. eNOS and FAS were physically associated; eNOS palmitoylation was decreased in FAS-deficient cells, and incorporation of labeled carbon into eNOS-associated palmitate was FAS-dependent. FASTie mice manifested a proinflammatory state reflected as increases in vascular permeability, endothelial inflammatory markers, leukocyte migration, and susceptibility to LPS-induced death that was reversed with an NO donor. FAS-deficient endothelial cells showed deficient migratory capacity, and angiogenesis was decreased in FASTie mice subjected to hindlimb ischemia. Insulin induced FAS in endothelial cells freshly isolated from humans, and eNOS palmitoylation was decreased in mice with insulin-deficient or insulin-resistant diabetes. Thus, disrupting eNOS bioavailability through impaired lipogenesis identifies a novel mechanism coordinating nutritional status and tissue repair that may contribute to diabetic vascular disease.

  11. Comprehensive Profiling of Amino Acid Response Uncovers Unique Methionine-Deprived Response Dependent on Intact Creatine Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaohu; Keenan, Melissa M.; Wu, Jianli; Lin, Chih-An; Dubois, Laura; Thompson, J. Will; Freedland, Stephen J.; Murphy, Susan K.; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    Besides being building blocks for protein synthesis, amino acids serve a wide variety of cellular functions, including acting as metabolic intermediates for ATP generation and for redox homeostasis. Upon amino acid deprivation, free uncharged tRNAs trigger GCN2-ATF4 to mediate the well-characterized transcriptional amino acid response (AAR). However, it is not clear whether the deprivation of different individual amino acids triggers identical or distinct AARs. Here, we characterized the global transcriptional response upon deprivation of one amino acid at a time. With the exception of glycine, which was not required for the proliferation of MCF7 cells, we found that the deprivation of most amino acids triggered a shared transcriptional response that included the activation of ATF4, p53 and TXNIP. However, there was also significant heterogeneity among different individual AARs. The most dramatic transcriptional response was triggered by methionine deprivation, which activated an extensive and unique response in different cell types. We uncovered that the specific methionine-deprived transcriptional response required creatine biosynthesis. This dependency on creatine biosynthesis was caused by the consumption of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) during creatine biosynthesis that helps to deplete SAM under methionine deprivation and reduces histone methylations. As such, the simultaneous deprivation of methionine and sources of creatine biosynthesis (either arginine or glycine) abolished the reduction of histone methylation and the methionine-specific transcriptional response. Arginine-derived ornithine was also required for the complete induction of the methionine-deprived specific gene response. Collectively, our data identify a previously unknown set of heterogeneous amino acid responses and reveal a distinct methionine-deprived transcriptional response that results from the crosstalk of arginine, glycine and methionine metabolism via arginine/glycine-dependent

  12. Age-dependent changes from allylphenol to prenylated benzoic acid production in Piper gaudichaudianum Kunth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaia, Anderson M; Yamaguchi, Lydia F; Jeffrey, Christopher S; Kato, Massuo J

    2014-10-01

    HPLC-DAD and principal component analysis (PCA) of the (1)H NMR spectrum of crude plant extracts showed high chemical variability among seedlings and adult organs of Piper gaudichaudianum. While gaudichaudianic acid was the major compound in the adult leaves, apiole and dillapiole were the major compounds in their seedling leaves. By the 15th month of seedling growth, the levels of apiole and dillapiole decreased and gaudichaudianic acid appeared along with two compounds, biosynthetically related to gaudichaudianic acid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Variation of Herbivore-Induced Volatile Terpenes among Arabidopsis Ecotypes Depends on Allelic Differences and Subcellular Targeting of Two Terpene Synthases, TPS02 and TPS031[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mengsu; Abel, Christian; Sohrabi, Reza; Petri, Jana; Haupt, Ina; Cosimano, John; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Tholl, Dorothea

    2010-01-01

    When attacked by insects, plants release mixtures of volatile compounds that are beneficial for direct or indirect defense. Natural variation of volatile emissions frequently occurs between and within plant species, but knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms is limited. We investigated intraspecific differences of volatile emissions induced from rosette leaves of 27 accessions of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) upon treatment with coronalon, a jasmonate mimic eliciting responses similar to those caused by insect feeding. Quantitative variation was found for the emission of the monoterpene (E)-β-ocimene, the sesquiterpene (E,E)-α-farnesene, the irregular homoterpene 4,8,12-trimethyltridecatetra-1,3,7,11-ene, and the benzenoid compound methyl salicylate. Differences in the relative emissions of (E)-β-ocimene and (E,E)-α-farnesene from accession Wassilewskija (Ws), a high-(E)-β-ocimene emitter, and accession Columbia (Col-0), a trace-(E)-β-ocimene emitter, were attributed to allelic variation of two closely related, tandem-duplicated terpene synthase genes, TPS02 and TPS03. The Ws genome contains a functional allele of TPS02 but not of TPS03, while the opposite is the case for Col-0. Recombinant proteins of the functional Ws TPS02 and Col-0 TPS03 genes both showed (E)-β-ocimene and (E,E)-α-farnesene synthase activities. However, differential subcellular compartmentalization of the two enzymes in plastids and the cytosol was found to be responsible for the ecotype-specific differences in (E)-β-ocimene/(E,E)-α-farnesene emission. Expression of the functional TPS02 and TPS03 alleles is induced in leaves by elicitor and insect treatment and occurs constitutively in floral tissues. Our studies show that both pseudogenization in the TPS family and subcellular segregation of functional TPS enzymes control the variation and plasticity of induced volatile emissions in wild plant species. PMID:20463089

  14. Analysis of hydroxycinnamic acid degradation in Agrobacterium fabrum reveals a coenzyme A-dependent, beta-oxidative deacetylation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, Tony; Renoud, Sébastien; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Vial, Ludovic; Baude, Jessica; Gaillard, Vincent; Bellvert, Floriant; Chamignon, Cécile; Comte, Gilles; Nesme, Xavier; Lavire, Céline; Hommais, Florence

    2014-06-01

    The soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum (genomospecies G8 of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex) is known to have species-specific genes involved in ferulic acid degradation. Here, we characterized, by genetic and analytical means, intermediates of degradation as feruloyl coenzyme A (feruloyl-CoA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-hydroxypropionyl-CoA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionyl-CoA, vanillic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The genes atu1416, atu1417, and atu1420 have been experimentally shown to be necessary for the degradation of ferulic acid. Moreover, the genes atu1415 and atu1421 have been experimentally demonstrated to be essential for this degradation and are proposed to encode a phenylhydroxypropionyl-CoA dehydrogenase and a 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionic acid (HMPKP)-CoA β-keto-thiolase, respectively. We thus demonstrated that the A. fabrum hydroxycinnamic degradation pathway is an original coenzyme A-dependent β-oxidative deacetylation that could also transform p-coumaric and caffeic acids. Finally, we showed that this pathway enables the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants and their use for growth, likely providing the species an ecological advantage in hydroxycinnamic-rich environments, such as plant roots or decaying plant materials.

  15. Riboflavin synthase of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Protein dynamics revealed by 19F NMR protein perturbation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cushman Mark

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the transformation of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine into riboflavin in the last step of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway. Gram-negative bacteria and certain yeasts are unable to incorporate riboflavin from the environment and are therefore absolutely dependent on endogenous synthesis of the vitamin. Riboflavin synthase is therefore a potential target for the development of antiinfective drugs. Results A cDNA sequence from Schizosaccharomyces pombe comprising a hypothetical open reading frame with similarity to riboflavin synthase of Escherichia coli was expressed in a recombinant E. coli strain. The recombinant protein is a homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits as shown by sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation. The protein sediments at an apparent velocity of 4.1 S at 20°C. The amino acid sequence is characterized by internal sequence similarity indicating two similar folding domains per subunit. The enzyme catalyzes the formation of riboflavin from 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine at a rate of 158 nmol mg-1 min-1 with an apparent KM of 5.7 microM. 19F NMR protein perturbation experiments using fluorine-substituted intermediate analogs show multiple signals indicating that a given ligand can be bound in at least 4 different states. 19F NMR signals of enzyme-bound intermediate analogs were assigned to ligands bound by the N-terminal respectively C-terminal folding domain on basis of NMR studies with mutant proteins. Conclusion Riboflavin synthase of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a trimer of identical 23-kDa subunits. The primary structure is characterized by considerable similarity of the C-terminal and N-terminal parts. Riboflavin synthase catalyzes a mechanistically complex dismutation of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine affording riboflavin and 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H-pyrimidinedione. The 19F NMR data suggest large scale dynamic mobility in the trimeric protein which may play an important

  16. Arabidopsis ETO1 specifically interacts with and negatively regulates type 2 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Koji

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis, ETO1 (ETHYLENE-OVERPRODUCER1 is a negative regulator of ethylene evolution by interacting with AtACS5, an isoform of the rate-limiting enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases (ACC synthase or ACS, in ethylene biosynthetic pathway. ETO1 directly inhibits the enzymatic activity of AtACS5. In addition, a specific interaction between ETO1 and AtCUL3, a constituent of a new type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, suggests the molecular mechanism in promoting AtACS5 degradation by the proteasome-dependent pathway. Because orthologous sequences to ETO1 are found in many plant species including tomato, we transformed tomato with Arabidopsis ETO1 to evaluate its ability to suppress ethylene production in tomato fruits. Results Transgenic tomato lines that overexpress Arabidopsis ETO1 (ETO1-OE did not show a significant delay of fruit ripening. So, we performed yeast two-hybrid assays to investigate potential heterologous interaction between ETO1 and three isozymes of ACC synthases from tomato. In the yeast two-hybrid system, ETO1 interacts with LE-ACS3 as well as AtACS5 but not with LE-ACS2 or LE-ACS4, two major isozymes whose gene expression is induced markedly in ripening fruits. According to the classification of ACC synthases, which is based on the C-terminal amino acid sequences, both LE-ACS3 and AtACS5 are categorized as type 2 isozymes and possess a consensus C-terminal sequence. In contrast, LE-ACS2 and LE-ACS4 are type 1 and type 3 isozymes, respectively, both of which do not possess this specific C-terminal sequence. Yeast two-hybrid analysis using chimeric constructs between LE-ACS2 and LE-ACS3 revealed that the type-2-ACS-specific C-terminal tail is required for interaction with ETO1. When treated with auxin to induce LE-ACS3, seedlings of ETO1-OE produced less ethylene than the wild type, despite comparable expression of the LE-ACS3 gene in the wild type. Conclusion These results suggest that ETO1

  17. Development and binding mode assessment of N-[4-[2-propyn-1-yl[(6S)-4,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-oxo-3H-cyclopenta[g]quinazolin-6-yl]amino]benzoyl]-l-γ-glutamyl-D-glutamic acid (BGC 945), a novel thymidylate synthase inhibitor that targets tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochowicz, Anna; Dalziel, Sean; Eidam, Oliv; O'Connell, Joseph D; Griner, Sarah; Finer-Moore, Janet S; Stroud, Robert M

    2013-07-11

    N-[4-[2-Propyn-1-yl[(6S)-4,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-oxo-3H-cyclopenta[g]quinazolin-6-yl]amino]benzoyl]-l-γ-glutamyl-d-glutamic acid 1 (BGC 945, now known as ONX 0801), is a small molecule thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibitor discovered at the Institute of Cancer Research in London. It is licensed by Onyx Pharmaceuticals and is in phase 1 clinical studies. It is a novel antifolate drug resembling TS inhibitors plevitrexed and raltitrexed that combines enzymatic inhibition of thymidylate synthase with α-folate receptor-mediated targeting of tumor cells. Thus, it has potential for efficacy with lower toxicity due to selective intracellular accumulation through α-folate receptor (α-FR) transport. The α-FR, a cell-surface receptor glycoprotein, which is overexpressed mainly in ovarian and lung cancer tumors, has an affinity for 1 similar to that for its natural ligand, folic acid. This study describes a novel synthesis of 1, an X-ray crystal structure of its complex with Escherichia coli TS and 2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate, and a model for a similar complex with human TS.

  18. Substrates and oxygen dependent citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica: insights through transcriptome and fluxome analyses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wael Sabra; Rajesh Reddy Bommareddy; Garima Maheshwari; Seraphim Papanikolaou; An-Ping Zeng

    2017-01-01

    .... However, to develop a commercial process for the production of citric acid by Y. lipolytica, it is necessary to better understand the primary metabolism and its regulation, especially for growth on mixed substrate...

  19. [Evaluation of fatty acid levels and selected bioelements in femoral bones of chicks depending on age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dołegowska, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    The study was done in Starbro chicks aged 1 to 50 days. Two chicks were collected every day and the femoral bones were removed. Altogether, 200 bones were studied. The material was divided into 5 age groups (I to V). Compact and spongy bone, bone marrow and articular cartilage were sampled. Lipids were extracted according to Folch et al. Total lipids were measured spectrophotometrically. Gas chromatography was used to study the content of individual fatty acids. Calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), magnesium (Mg) and zinc (Zn) levels were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry (Philips PU 9100X), while fluorine content was studied with gas chromatography. As the distribution of the results deviated from normal, non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and median tests were used. Correlations were studied with Spearman's Rs coefficients. Computations were done with Statistica 5.0 (StatSoft) software and the level of significance was taken as p < 0.05. Statistically significant differences in the fatty acid profile (Tab. 1) and content of elements (Tab. 2) were found. The content of fatty acids, calcium and fluorine correlated with age. Fatty acids with the highest content in bone tissues were C18:1, C16:0, C18:2 and C18:0. The highest content of fatty acids was found in bone marrow and the lowest in articular cartilage. Several correlations were revealed between individual fatty acids and elements (Tab. 3, 4). The following conclusions were drawn: 1) The fatty acid profile in compact and spongy bone, bone marrow and articular cartilage changed according to age of chicks; 2) Content of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc and fluoride correlated with age; 3) Oleic (C18:1), palmitic (C16:0), linoleic (C18:2), stearic (C18:0) and arachidonic acid (C20:4) accounted for the majority of the fatty acid pool; 4) Correlations in the content of fatty acids and elements were noted between bone structures. Fatty acids appear to play an important role in the metabolism of bone tissues

  20. Folic acid supplementation during high-fat diet feeding restores AMPK activation via an AMP-LKB1-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sid, Victoria; Wu, Nan; Sarna, Lindsei K.; Siow, Yaw L.; House, James D.

    2015-01-01

    AMPK is an endogenous energy sensor that regulates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is regarded as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome with impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and increased oxidative stress. Our recent study showed that folic acid supplementation attenuated hepatic oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of folic acid on hepatic AMPK during high-fat diet feeding and the mechanisms involved. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet (10% kcal fat), a high-fat diet (60% kcal fat), or a high-fat diet supplemented with folic acid (26 mg/kg diet) for 5 wk. Mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited hyperglycemia, hepatic cholesterol accumulation, and reduced hepatic AMPK phosphorylation. Folic acid supplementation restored AMPK phosphorylation (activation) and reduced blood glucose and hepatic cholesterol levels. Activation of AMPK by folic acid was mediated through an elevation of its allosteric activator AMP and activation of its upstream kinase, namely, liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in the liver. Consistent with in vivo findings, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (bioactive form of folate) restored phosphorylation (activation) of both AMPK and LKB1 in palmitic acid-treated HepG2 cells. Activation of AMPK by folic acid might be responsible for AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of HMG-CoA reductase, leading to reduced hepatic cholesterol synthesis during high-fat diet feeding. These results suggest that folic acid supplementation may improve cholesterol and glucose metabolism by restoration of AMPK activation in the liver. PMID:26400185

  1. Dose-dependent improvement of myoclonic hyperkinesia due to Valproic acid in eight Huntington's Disease patients: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przuntek Horst

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chorea in Huntington's Disease (HD is usually treated with antidopaminergic neuroleptics like haloperidol, olanzapine and tiaprid or dopamine depleting drugs like tetrabenazine. Some patients with hyperkinesia, however, react to treatment with antidopaminergic drugs by developing extrapyramidal side effects. In earlier studies valproic acid showed no beneficial effect on involuntary choreatic movements. Myoclonus is rare in HD and is often overseen or misdiagnosed as chorea. Methods In this report, we present eight patients whose main symptom is myoclonic hyperkinesia. All patients were treated with valproic acid and scored by using the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS motor score before and after treatment. In addition to this, two patients agreed to be videotaped. Results In seven patients myoclonus and, therefore the UHDRS motor score improved in a dose dependent manner. In three of these patients antidopaminergic medication could be reduced. Conclusion In the rare subgroup of HD patients suffering from myoclonic hyperkinesia, valproic acid is a possible alternative treatment.

  2. Temperature-dependent deliquescence relative humidities and water activities using humidity controlled thermogravimetric analysis with application to malonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Keith D; Schroeder, Jason R; Kissinger, Jared A

    2014-04-03

    We utilize a new experimental technique, humidity-controlled thermogravimetric analysis (HTGA), to determine temperature-dependent deliquescence relative humidities (DRH) and to determine the equilibrium concentration of a solution at a given temperature and relative humidity. To that end, we have investigated the malonic acid/water system determining the DRH and concentration/RH relationship in the temperature range 303-278 K. Excellent agreement is found with literature values for the DRH of malonic acid as a function of temperature and for the concentration/RH relationship at several temperatures. Thus, we extend the DRH and concentration/RH relationship to a broader temperature range and are using the HTGA experiments to investigate other organic acids.

  3. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W. [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, The University of Kansas Medical Center, 4089 KLSIC, MS 1018, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: fjgonz@helix.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibition–induction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria β-oxidation. -- Highlights: ► Isoniazid metabolites were elevated only in wild-type mice. ► Isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. ► Isoniazid elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids. ► Bile acid transporters were significantly decreased in isoniazid-treated mice.

  4. Weak Organic Acids Decrease Borrelia burgdorferi Cytoplasmic pH, Eliciting an Acid Stress Response and Impacting RpoN- and RpoS-Dependent Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Dulebohn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi survives in its tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, or within various hosts. To transition between and survive in these distinct niches, B. burgdorferi changes its gene expression in response to environmental cues, both biochemical and physiological. Exposure of B. burgdorferi to weak monocarboxylic organic acids, including those detected in the blood meal of fed ticks, decreased the cytoplasmic pH of B. burgdorferi in vitro. A decrease in the cytoplasmic pH induced the expression of genes encoding enzymes that have been shown to restore pH homeostasis in other bacteria. These include putative coupled proton/cation exchangers, a putative Na+/H+ antiporter, a neutralizing buffer transporter, an amino acid deaminase and a proton exporting vacuolar-type VoV1 ATPase. Data presented in this report suggested that the acid stress response triggered the expression of RpoN- and RpoS-dependent genes including important virulence factors such as outer surface protein C (OspC, BBA66, and some BosR (Borreliaoxidative stress regulator-dependent genes. Because the expression of virulence factors, like OspC, are so tightly connected by RpoS to general cellular stress responses and cell physiology, it is difficult to separate transmission-promoting conditions in what is clearly a multifactorial and complex regulatory web.

  5. First insights into the mode of action of a "lachrymatory factor synthase"--implications for the mechanism of lachrymator formation in Petiveria alliacea, Allium cepa and Nectaroscordum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Quan; Kubec, Roman; Jadhav, Abhijit P; Musah, Rabi A

    2011-11-01

    A study of an enzyme that reacts with the sulfenic acid produced by the alliinase in Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae) to yield the P. alliacea lachrymator (phenylmethanethial S-oxide) showed the protein to be a dehydrogenase. It functions by abstracting hydride from sulfenic acids of appropriate structure to form their corresponding sulfines. Successful hydride abstraction is dependent upon the presence of a benzyl group on the sulfur to stabilize the intermediate formed on abstraction of hydride. This dehydrogenase activity contrasts with that of the lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) found in onion, which catalyzes the rearrangement of 1-propenesulfenic acid to (Z)-propanethial S-oxide, the onion lachrymator. Based on the type of reaction it catalyzes, the onion LFS should be classified as an isomerase and would be called a "sulfenic acid isomerase", whereas the P. alliacea LFS would be termed a "sulfenic acid dehydrogenase". Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The random co-polymer glatiramer acetate rapidly kills primary human leukocytes through sialic-acid-dependent cell membrane damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stig Hill; Zhang, Xianwei; Juul-Madsen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    in innate immunity. It shares the positive charge and amphipathic character of GA, and, as shown here, also the ability to kill human leukocyte. The cytotoxicity of both compounds depends on sialic acid in the cell membrane. The killing was associated with the generation of CD45 + debris, derived from cell...... of certain oligomeric and chemical properties to support cytotoxic effects of cationic polymers targeting human leukocytes....

  7. A Systems Chemical Biology Study of Malate Synthase and Isocitrate Lyase Inhibition in Mycobacterium tuberculosis During Active and NRP Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Elebeoba E.; Leitão, Andrei; Tropsha, Alexander; Oprea, Tudor I.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to survive in low oxygen environments enables the bacterium to persist in a latent state within host tissues. In vitro studies of Mtb growth have identified changes in isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS) that enable bacterial persistent under low oxygen and other environmentally limiting conditions. Systems chemical biology (SCB) enables us to evaluate the effects of small molecule inhibitors not only on the reaction catalyzed by malate synthase and isocitrate lyase, but the effect on the complete tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) by taking into account complex network relationships within that system. To study the kinetic consequences of inhibition on persistent bacilli, we implement a systems-chemical biology (SCB) platform and perform a chemistry-centric analysis of key metabolic pathways believed to impact Mtb latency. We explore consequences of disrupting the function of malate synthase (MS) and isocitrate lyase (ICL) during aerobic and hypoxic non-replicating persistence (NRP) growth by using the SCB method to identify small molecules that inhibit the function of MS and ICL, and simulating the metabolic consequence of the disruption. Results indicate variations in target and non-target reaction steps, clear differences in the normal and low oxygen models, as well as dosage dependent response. Simulation results from singular and combined enzyme inhibition strategies suggest ICL may be the more effective target for chemotherapeutic treatment against Mtb growing in a microenvironment where oxygen is slowly depleted, which may favor persistence. PMID:24121675

  8. Dynamics of lactic acid bacteria populations in Rioja wines by PCR-DGGE, comparison with culture-dependent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Arenzana, Lucía; López, Rosa; Santamaría, Pilar; López-Alfaro, Isabel

    2013-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria populations of red wine samples from industrial fermentations, including two different vinification methods were studied. For this investigation, polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis was employed to supplement previous results that were obtained by culture-dependent methods. PCR-DGGE was aimed to study two targeted genes, 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and rpoB, and the results were useful to evaluate the microbial populations in wine samples. Moreover, an improvement of a detection limit determined so far for DGGE analysis was obtained with the method described in this study, what made possible to identify lactic acid bacteria populations below 10(1) colony-forming unit/mL. The species Oenococcus oeni was the most frequently detected bacterium, but identifications close to species Oenococcus kitaharae and Lactococcus lactis that are not often found in wine were firstly identified in samples of this research. PCR-DGGE allowed to detect 9 out of 11 lactic acid bacteria species identified in this study (nine by PCR-16S rDNA/DGGE and four by PCR-rpoB/DGGE), while five species were detected using the modified de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe agar. Therefore, the two methods were demonstrated to be complementary. This finding suggests that analysis of the lactic acid bacteria population structure in wine should be carried out using both culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques with more than one primer pair.

  9. In Vitro Gender-Dependent Inhibition of Porcine Cytochrome P450 Activity by Selected Flavonoids and Phenolic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ekstrand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated gender-related differences in the ability of selected flavonoids and phenolic compounds to modify porcine hepatic CYP450-dependent activity. Using pools of microsomes from male and female pigs, the inhibition of the CYP families 1A, 2A, 2E1, and 3A was determined. The specific CYP activities were measured in the presence of the following selected compounds: rutin, myricetin, quercetin, isorhamnetin, p-coumaric acid, gallic acid, and caffeic acid. We determined that myricetin and isorhamnetin competitively inhibited porcine CYP1A activity in the microsomes from both male and female pigs but did not affect the CYP2A and CYP2E1. Additionally, isorhamnetin competitively inhibited CYP3A in both genders. Noncompetitive inhibition of CYP3A activity by myricetin was observed only in the microsomes from male pigs, whereas CYP3A in female pigs was not affected. Quercetin competitively inhibited CYP2E1 and CYP1A activity in the microsomes from male pigs and irreversibly CY3A in female pigs. No effect of quercetin on CYP2E1 was observed in the microsomes from female pigs. Neither phenolic acids nor rutin affected CYP450 activities. Taken together, our results suggest that the flavonoids myricetin, isorhamnetin, and quercetin may affect the activities of porcine CYP1A, CYP3A, and CYP2E1 in a gender-dependent manner.

  10. Eicosapentaenoic acid protects cardiomyoblasts from lipotoxicity in an autophagy-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Ching; Li, Sin-Jin; Chen, Ching-Yi; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2017-07-24

    The cardiovascular health benefits of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have been demonstrated previously; however, the exact mechanism underlying them remains unclear. Our previous study found that lipotoxicity induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis via the inhibition of autophagy. Accordingly, in this study, we investigated whether EPA attenuated lipotoxicity-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis through autophagy regulation. The role of EPA in mitochondrial dynamics was analyzed as well. To explore how EPA protected against lipotoxicity-induced myocardial injury, cardiomyoblast (H9C2) cells were left untreated or were treated with 400 μM palmitic acid (PAM) and/or 80 μM EPA for 24 h. Excessive PAM treatment induced apoptosis. EPA reduced this PAM-induced apoptosis; however, EPA was unable to ameliorate the effects of PAM when autophagy was blocked by 3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1. PAM blocked the autophagic flux, thus causing the accumulation of autophagosomes and acid vacuoles, whereas EPA restored the autophagic flux. PAM caused a decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content and an increase in saturated fatty acid content in the mitochondrial membrane, while EPA was incorporated in the mitochondrial membrane and caused a significant increase in the PUFA content. PAM also decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, whereas EPA enhanced it. Finally, PAM elevated the expressions of autophagy-related proteins (LC3I, LC3II, p62) and mitochondrial fission protein (Drp1), whereas EPA inhibited their elevation under PAM treatment. EPA reduces lipotoxicity-induced cardiomyoblast apoptosis through its effects on autophagy.

  11. Bile acid-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes is caspase-6-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Christian; Wild, Nadine; Bernt, Carina; Vennegeerts, Timo; Wimmer, Ralf; Beuers, Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Apoptosis induced by hydrophobic bile acids is thought to contribute to liver injury during cholestasis. Caspase-6 is an executioner caspase that also appears to have regulatory functions in hematopoetic cell lines. We aimed to elucidate the role of caspase-6 in bile acid-induced apoptosis. The major human hydrophobic bile acid, glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA, 75 micromol/liter), rapidly induced caspase-6 cleavage in HepG2-Ntcp human hepatoma cells. GCDCA-induced, but not tumor necrosis factor alpha- or etoposide-induced activation of effector caspases-3 and -7 was significantly reduced by 50% in caspase-6-deficient HepG2-Ntcp cells as well as in primary rat hepatocytes pretreated with a caspase-6 inhibitor. Inhibition of caspase-9 reduced GCDCA-induced activation of caspase-6, whereas inhibition of caspase-6 reduced activation of caspase-8 placing caspase-6 between caspase-9 and caspase-8. GCDCA also induced apoptosis in Fas-deficient Hep3B-Ntcp and HuH7-Ntcp hepatoma cells. In addition, GCDCA-induced apoptosis was reduced by 50% in FADD-deficient HepG2-Ntcp cells, whereas apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha was reduced by 90%. Collectively, these observations suggest that GCDCA can induce hepatocyte apoptosis in the absence of death receptor signaling, presumably by a compensatory mitochondrial pathway. In conclusion, caspase-6 appears to play an important regulatory role in the promotion of bile acid-induced apoptosis as part of a feedback loop.

  12. Temperature-Dependent Effect of Boric Acid Additive on Surface Roughness and Wear Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Şerafettin

    Wear and friction hold an important place in engineering. Currently, scientific societies are struggling to control wear by means of studies on lubricants. Boric acid constitutes an important alternative with its good tribological properties similar to MO2S and graphite alongside with low environmental impacts. Boric acid can be used as a solid lubricant itself whereas it can be added or blended into mineral oils in order to yield better mechanical and tribological properties such as low shear stress due to the lamellar structure and low friction, wear and surface roughness rates. In this study, distinguishing from the literature, boric acid addition effect considering the temperature was investigated for the conventional ranges of internal combustion engines. Surface roughness, wear and friction coefficient values were used in order to determine tribological properties of boric acid as an environmentally friendly additive and mineral oil mixture in the present study. Wear experiments were conducted with a ball on disc experimental setup immersed in an oil reservoir at room temperature, 50∘C and 80∘C. The evolution of both the friction coefficient and wear behavior was determined under 10N load, at 2m/s sliding velocity and a total sliding distance of 9000m. Surface roughness was determined using atomic-force microscopy (AFM). Wear rate was calculated utilizing scanning electron microscope (SEM) visuals and data. The test results showed that wear resistance increased as the temperature increased, and friction coefficient decreased due to the presence of boric acid additive.

  13. Diastereomeric mixture of calophyllic acid and isocalophyllic acid stimulates glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells: involvement of PI-3-kinase- and ERK1/2-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Janki; Maurya, Chandan Kumar; Pandey, Jyotsana; Jaiswal, Natasha; Madhur, Gaurav; Srivastava, Arvind Kumar; Narender, Tadigoppula; Tamrakar, Akhilesh Kumar

    2013-05-06

    The diastereomeric mixture of calophyllic acid and isocalophyllic acid (F015) isolated from the leaves of Calophyllum inophyllum was investigated for the metabolic effect on glucose transport in skeletal muscle cells. In L6 myotubes, F015 dose-dependently stimulated glucose uptake by increasing translocation of glucose transporter4 (GLUT4) to plasma membrane without affecting their gene expression. The effects on glucose uptake were additive to insulin. Inhibitors analyses revealed that F015-induced glucose uptake was dependent on the activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3-K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), while independent to the activation of 5'AMP-activated kinase (AMPK). F015 significantly increased the phosphorylation of AKT, AS160 and ERK1/2, account for the augmented glucose transport capacity in L6 myotubes. Furthermore, F015 improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle of dexamethasone-induced insulin resistant mice. Our findings demonstrate that F015 activates glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells through PI-3-K- and EKR1/2-dependent mechanisms and can be a potential lead for the management of diabetes and obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Alfred J; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins and of the elimination of damaged or functionally redundant organelles. Proper functioning of this process is essential for cell survival. Dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in the etiology of several pathologies. The history of the studies on the interrelationship between amino acids, MTOR signaling and autophagy is the subject of this review. The mechanisms responsible for the stimulation of MTOR-mediated signaling, and the inhibition of autophagy, by amino acids have been studied intensively in the past but are still not completely clarified. Recent developments in this field are discussed.

  15. Renal energy excretion of horses depends on renal hippuric acid and nitrogen excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, B; Südekum, K-H; Zeyner, A; Goren, G; Kienzle, E

    2018-02-01

    The prediction of renal energy excretion is crucial in a metabolizable energy system for horses. Phenolic acids from forage cell walls may affect renal energy losses by increasing hippuric acid excretion. Therefore, the relationships were investigated between renal energy, nitrogen (N) and hippuric acid excretion of four adult ponies (230-384 kg body weight (BW)) consuming diets based on fresh grass, grass silage, grass cobs (heat-dried, finely chopped, pressed grass), alfalfa hay, straw, extruded straw and soybean meal. Feed intake was measured; urine and faeces were quantitatively collected for three days. Feed was analysed for crude nutrients, gross energy, amino acids and neutral-detergent-insoluble crude protein (CP); faeces were analysed for crude nutrients and cross energy; urine was analysed for N, hippuric acid, creatinine and gross energy. Renal energy excretion (y; kJ/kg BW 0.75 ) correlated with renal N excretion (x 1 ; g/kg BW 0.75 ) and renal hippuric acid excretion (x 2 ; g/kg BW 0.75 ): y = 14.4 + 30.2x 1 +20.7x 2 (r = .95; n = 30; p energy losses per gram CP intake: (i) protein supplements (e.g., soybean meal): 4.2-4.9 kJ/g CP intake (ii) alfalfa hay, grains, dried sugar beet pulp: 6.4 kJ/g CP intake, (iii) hay, preserved grass products, straw: 5.2-12.3 kJ/g CP intake (mean 8) and (iv) fresh grass. For group (iii) a negative relationship was observed between renal energy losses per gram of CP and the content of CP or neutral-detergent-insoluble CP in dry matter. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Lysosomal metabolomics reveals V-ATPase- and mTOR-dependent regulation of amino acid efflux from lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Wyant, Gregory A; Kim, Choah; Laqtom, Nouf N; Abbasi, Maria; Chan, Sze Ham; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Sabatini, David M

    2017-11-10

    The lysosome degrades and recycles macromolecules, signals to the cytosol and nucleus, and is implicated in many diseases. Here, we describe a method for the rapid isolation of mammalian lysosomes and use it to quantitatively profile lysosomal metabolites under various cell states. Under nutrient-replete conditions, many lysosomal amino acids are in rapid exchange with those in the cytosol. Loss of lysosomal acidification through inhibition of the vacuolar H+-adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) increased the luminal concentrations of most metabolites but had no effect on those of the majority of essential amino acids. Instead, nutrient starvation regulates the lysosomal concentrations of these amino acids, an effect we traced to regulation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Inhibition of mTOR strongly reduced the lysosomal efflux of most essential amino acids, converting the lysosome into a cellular depot for them. These results reveal the dynamic nature of lysosomal metabolites and that V-ATPase- and mTOR-dependent mechanisms exist for controlling lysosomal amino acid efflux. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  17. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat...

  18. Oxidation of intramyocellular lipids is dependent on mitochondrial function and the availability of extracellular fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corpeleijn, Eva; Hessvik, Nina P; Bakke, Siril S

    2010-01-01

    were extended by comparing these processes in primary cultured myotubes established from healthy lean and obese type 2 diabetic (T2D) individuals, two extremes in a range of metabolic phenotypes. ICLs were prelabeled for 2 days with 100 microM [(14)C]oleic acid (OA). ICL(OX) was studied using a (14)CO...... mitochondrial function. Furthermore, the variation in ICL(OX) in vitro was significantly related to the in vivo fasting respiratory quotient of all subjects (P acids and mitochondrial function rather than...

  19. Characterizing time-dependent contact angles for sands hydrophobized with oleic and stearic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subedi, S; Kawamoto, K; Jayarathna, L

    2012-01-01

    -frequency precipitation. A potential solution is to alter soil grain surfaces to become water repellent by mixing or coating the soil cover material with hydrophobic agents (HAs). In this study, hydrophobic CBs comprised of sands mixed with environmentally friendly HAs (oleic acid [OA] and stearic acid [SA]) were studied....... Water repellency (WR) characteristics for hydrophobized sand samples with different HA contents and representing different coating methods (mixing in and solvent aided) were measured. Initial contact angles (αi) for OA-coated samples sharply increased with increasing HA content and reached peak values...

  20. Acidified bile acids enhance tumor progression and telomerase activity of gastric cancer in mice dependent on c-Myc expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Sun, Lei; Wang, Xijing; Kang, Huafeng; Ma, Xiaobin; Wang, Meng; Lin, Shuai; Liu, Meng; Dai, Cong; Dai, Zhijun

    2017-04-01

    c-Myc overexpression has been implicated in several malignancies including gastric cancer. Here, we report that acidified bile acids enhance tumor progression and telomerase activity in gastric cancer via c-Myc activation both in vivo and in vitro. c-Myc mRNA and protein levels were assessed in ten primary and five local recurrent gastric cancer samples by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analysis. The gastric cancer cell line MGC803 was exposed to bile salts (100 μmol/L glycochenodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid) in an acid medium (pH 5.5) for 10 min daily for 60 weeks to develop an MGC803-resistant cell line. Control MGC803 cells were grown without acids or bile salts for 60 weeks as a control. Cell morphology, proliferation, colony formation and apoptosis of MGC803-resistant cells were analyzed after 60 weeks. To determine the involvement of c-Myc in tumor progression and telomere aging in MGC803-resistant cells, we generated xenografts in nude mice and measured xenograft volume and in vivo telomerase activity. The c-Myc and hTERT protein and mRNA levels were significantly higher in local recurrent gastric cancer samples than in primary gastric cancer samples. MGC803-resistant cells showed a marked phenotypic change under normal growth conditions with more clusters and acini, and exhibited increased cell viability and colony formation and decreased apoptosis in vitro. These phenotypic changes were found to be dependent on c-Myc activation using the c-Myc inhibitor 10058-F4. MGC803-resistant cells also showed a c-Myc-dependent increase in xenograft growth and telomerase activity in vivo. In conclusion, these observations support the hypothesis that acidified bile acids enhance tumor progression and telomerase activity in gastric cancer and that these effects are dependent on c-Myc activity. These findings suggest that acidified bile acids play an important role in the malignant progression of local recurrent

  1. Dynamin-dependent amino acid endocytosis activates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibutani, Shusaku; Okazaki, Hana; Iwata, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-03

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of protein synthesis and potential target for modifying cellular metabolism in various conditions, including cancer and aging. mTORC1 activity is tightly regulated by the availability of extracellular amino acids, and previous studies have revealed that amino acids in the extracellular fluid are transported to the lysosomal lumen. There, amino acids induce recruitment of cytoplasmic mTORC1 to the lysosome by the Rag GTPases, followed by mTORC1 activation by the small GTPase Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb). However, how the extracellular amino acids reach the lysosomal lumen and activate mTORC1 remains unclear. Here, we show that amino acid uptake by dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a critical role in mTORC1 activation. We found that mTORC1 is inactivated when endocytosis is inhibited by overexpression of a dominant-negative form of dynamin 2 or by pharmacological inhibition of dynamin or clathrin. Consistently, the recruitment of mTORC1 to the lysosome was suppressed by the dynamin inhibition. The activity and lysosomal recruitment of mTORC1 were rescued by increasing intracellular amino acids via cycloheximide exposure or by Rag overexpression, indicating that amino acid deprivation is the main cause of mTORC1 inactivation via the dynamin inhibition. We further show that endocytosis inhibition does not induce autophagy even though mTORC1 inactivation is known to strongly induce autophagy. These findings open new perspectives for the use of endocytosis inhibitors as potential agents that can effectively inhibit nutrient utilization and shut down the upstream signals that activate mTORC1. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Shape-dependent electrocatalytic activity of monodispersed palladium nanocrystals toward formic acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuwei; Yin, Huajie; Wang, Jinfeng; Chang, Lin; Gao, Yan; Liu, Wei; Tang, Zhiyong

    2013-08-01

    The catalytic activity of different-shaped and monodispersed palladium nanocrystals, including cubes, octahedra and rhombic dodecahedra, toward the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid has been systematically evaluated in both HClO4 and H2SO4 solutions. Notably, the cubic palladium nanocrystals wholly exposed with {100} facets exhibit the highest activity, while the rhombic dodecahedra with {110} facets show the lowest electrocatalytic performance. Furthermore, compared with HClO4 electrolyte, the catalytic activity is found to be obviously lower in H2SO4 solution likely due to the competitive adsorption of SO42- ions and formic acid on the surface of Pd nanocrystals.The catalytic activity of different-shaped and monodispersed palladium nanocrystals, including cubes, octahedra and rhombic dodecahedra, toward the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid has been systematically evaluated in both HClO4 and H2SO4 solutions. Notably, the cubic palladium nanocrystals wholly exposed with {100} facets exhibit the highest activity, while the rhombic dodecahedra with {110} facets show the lowest electrocatalytic performance. Furthermore, compared with HClO4 electrolyte, the catalytic activity is found to be obviously lower in H2SO4 solution likely due to the competitive adsorption of SO42- ions and formic acid on the surface of Pd nanocrystals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03100d

  3. Substrate Specificity of Thiamine Pyrophosphate-Dependent 2-Oxo-Acid Decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romagnoli, G.; Luttik, M.A.H.; Kötter, P.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share

  4. Lidocaine time- and dose-dependently demethylates deoxyribonucleic acid in breast cancer cell lines in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.; Berger, R.; Hollmann, M. W.; Fiegl, H.

    2012-01-01

    Anaesthetic management of cancer surgery may influence tumour recurrence. The modulation of gene expression by methylation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (epigenetics) is increasingly recognized as a major hallmark of cancer. Next to direct effects of local anaesthetics upon tumour cells, the

  5. Betulinic acid-induced mitochondria-dependent cell death is counterbalanced by an autophagic salvage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potze, L.; Mullauer, F. B.; Colak, S.; Kessler, J. H.; Medema, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BetA) is a plant-derived pentacyclic triterpenoid that exerts potent anti-cancer effects in vitro and in vivo. It was shown to induce apoptosis via a direct effect on mitochondria. This is largely independent of proapoptotic BAK and BAX, but can be inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA),

  6. Coral cavity sponges depend on reef-derived food resources: stable isotope and fatty acid constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Duyl, F.C.; Moodley, L.; Nieuwland, G.; Van IJzerloo, L.P.; Van Soest, R.W.M.; Houtekamer, M.J.; Meesters, E.H.W.G.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The diet of cavity sponges on the narrow fringing reefs of Curac¸ao, Caribbean was studied. The origin and resources of the bulk food of these sponges, i.e., dissolved organic matter (DOM), were identified using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes and fatty acid biomarkers. We found that

  7. Coral cavity sponges depend on reef-derived food resources: stable isotope and fatty acid constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyl, van F.C.; Moodley, L.; Nieuwland, G.; Ijzerloo, van L.; Soest, R.W.M.; Houtekamer, M.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The diet of cavity sponges on the narrow fringing reefs of Cura double dagger ao, Caribbean was studied. The origin and resources of the bulk food of these sponges, i.e., dissolved organic matter (DOM), were identified using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes and fatty acid biomarkers. We found

  8. Coral cavity sponges depend on reef-derived food resources: stable isotope and fatty acid constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duyl, F.C.; Moodley, L.; Nieuwland, G.; van IJzerloo, L.; van Soest, R.W.M.; Houtekamer, M.; Meesters, E.H.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The diet of cavity sponges on the narrow fringing reefs of Curaçao, Caribbean was studied. The origin and resources of the bulk food of these sponges, i.e., dissolved organic matter (DOM), were identified using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes and fatty acid biomarkers. We found that

  9. Evolution Reveals A Glutathione-dependent Mechanism Of 3-hydroxypropionic Acid Detoxification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Hallström, Björn M.; Blicher, Thomas H.

    Biologically produced 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) is a potential source for sustainable acrylates and can also find direct use as monomer in the production of biodegradable polymers. For industrial-scale production, high titer, rate and yield are essential; thus there is a need for robust cell...

  10. SODIUM ION-DEPENDENT AMINO-ACID-TRANSPORT IN MEMBRANE-VESICLES OF BACILLUS-STEAROTHERMOPHILUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEYNE, RIR; DEVRIJ, W; CRIELAARD, W; KONINGS, WN

    Amino acid transport in membrane vesicles of Bacillus stearothermophilus was studied. A relatively high concentration of sodium ions is needed for uptake of L-alanine (K(t) = 1.0 mM) and L-leucine (K(t) = 0.4 mM). In contrast, the Na+-H+-L-glutamate transport system has a high affinity for sodium

  11. Polymorph-dependent titanium dioxide nanoparticle dissolution in acidic and alkali digestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple polymorphs (anatase, brookite and rutile) of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) with variable structures were quantified in environmental matrices via microwave-based hydrofluoric (HF) and nitric (HNO3) mixed acid digestion and muffle furnace (MF)-based potassium ...

  12. Stimulation of gluconeogenesis by intravenous lipids in preterm infants: response depends on fatty acid profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kempen, Anne A. M. W.; van der Crabben, Saskia N.; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Endert, Erik; Kok, Joke H.; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2006-01-01

    In preterm infants, both hypo- and hyperglycemia are a frequent problem. Intravenous lipids can affect glucose metabolism by stimulation of gluconeogenesis by providing glycerol, which is a gluconeogenic precursor, and/or free fatty acids (FFA), which are stimulants of the rate of gluconeogenesis.

  13. Dispersion state and humic acids concentration-dependent sorption of pyrene to carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Kah, M.; Jonker, M.T.O.; Hofmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    Sonication and humic acids (HA) are known to disperse carbon nanotube (CNT) suspensions, but potential effects on sorption of chemicals to CNTs remain poorly understood. We applied a passive sampling method to investigate the influence of dispersion/aggregation on sorption of pyrene to CNTs.

  14. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F.; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins

  15. Estrogen receptor-dependent genomic expression profiles in breast cancer cells in response to fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alquobaili Faizeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The estrogen receptor (ER status in breast cancer plays a major role in the progression and metastatic potential of breast cancer in women. Breast cancer cells lacking the ER are usually more advanced and more difficult to treat than ER+ breast cancer cells. ER- women have more advanced breast cancer at the time of diagnosis than ER+ women. ER- breast cancer cells in women, regardless of age, are more likely to have tumor Grade III or IV with fewer Grade I and II tumor stages combined for each individual stage group. Studies have suggested a strong correlation between fat intake and the elevated risk of ER+ breast cancer cells. Materials and Methods: We studied the role of ER status on the gene expression in breast cancer cells in response to omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids using microarrays. We have studied gene expression patterns in 8 breast cancer cell lines (4 ER- and 4 ER+ in response to Eicosapentanoic (EPA and Arachidonic (AA acids. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of Variance (ANOVA t-test analysis was carried out to identify genes differentially expressed between the two groups. Results: We identified genes which were significantly correlated with the ER status when breast cancer cells were treated with these fatty acids. Conclusion: We have determined ER-related gene expression patterns in breast cancer cells in response to fatty acids. Additional studies of these biomarkers may enlighten the importance of the ER status on the mechanistic and therapeutic roles of fatty acids in breast cancer.

  16. The increased level of COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Agnieszka; Miller, Elzbieta; Bijak, Michal; Saluk, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Platelet activation is increasingly postulated as a possible component of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially due to the increased risk of cardiovascular events in MS. Arachidonic acid cascade metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key pathway of platelet activation. The aim of our study was to investigate the COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolic pathway in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SP MS) patients. The blood samples were obtained from 50 patients (man n = 22; female n = 28), suffering from SP MS, diagnosed according to the revised McDonald criteria. Platelet aggregation was measured in platelet-rich plasma after arachidonic acid stimulation. The level of COX activity and thromboxane B2 concentration were determined by ELISA method. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring the level of malondialdehyde. The results were compared with a control group of healthy volunteers. We found that blood platelets obtained from SP MS patients were more sensitive to arachidonic acid and their response measured as platelet aggregation was stronger (about 14 %) relative to control. We also observed a significantly increased activity of COX (about 40 %) and synthesis of thromboxane B2 (about 113 %). The generation of malondialdehyde as a marker of lipid peroxidation was about 10 % higher in SP MS than in control. Cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism is significantly increased in blood platelets of patients with SP MS. Future clinical studies are required to recommend the use of low-dose aspirin, and possibly other COX inhibitors in the prevention of cardiovascular risk in MS.

  17. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase in opaque and floury maize mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varisi, V.A.; Medici, L.O.; Meer, van der I.M.; Lea, P.J.; Azevedo, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, EC 4.2.1.52) was isolated and studied in four high-lysine maize mutants (Oh43o1, Oh43o2, Oh43fl1 and Oh43fl2). The activity of DHDPS was analyzed at 16, 20, and 24 DAP and characterized in the presence of the amino acids, lysine, S-(2-aminoethyl)-l-cysteine

  18. Novel multifunctional acyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs of 5-aminolevulinic acid display improved anticancer activity dependent on photoactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitch, G.; Nudelman, A.; Ehenberg, B.; Rephaeli, A.; Malik, Z.

    2009-06-01

    New approaches to PDT using multifunctional 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based prodrugs activating mutual routes of toxicity are described. We investigated the mutual anti-cancer activity of ALA prodrugs which upon metabolic hydrolysis by unspecific esterases release ALA, formaldehyde or acetaldehye and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) butyric acid. The most potent prodrug in this study was butyryloxyethyl 5-amino-4-oxopentanoate (AN-233) that stimulated a rapid biosynthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in human glioblastoma U-251 cells and generated an efficient photodynamic destruction. AN-233 induced a considerable high level of intracellular ROS in the cells following light irradiation, reduction of mitochondrial activity, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential resulting in necrotic and apoptotic cell death. The main advantage of AN-233 over ALA stems from its ability to induce photodamage at a significantly lower dose than ALA.

  19. Microbiological Study of Lactic Acid Fermentation of Caper Berries by Molecular and Culture-Dependent Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Ben Omar, Nabil; Abriouel, Hikmate; Lucas López, Rosario; Martínez Cañamero, Magdalena; Gálvez, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Fermentation of capers (the fruits of Capparis sp.) was studied by molecular and culture-independent methods. A lactic acid fermentation occurred following immersion of caper berries in water, resulting in fast acidification and development of the organoleptic properties typical of this fermented food. A collection of 133 isolates obtained at different times of fermentation was reduced to 75 after randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis. Isolates were identified by PCR or 16S r...

  20. Autoinducer-2 detection among commensal oral streptococci is dependent on pH and boric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadra, Giancarlo A; Frantellizzi, Ashley J; Gaesser, Kimberly M; Tammariello, Steven P; Ahmed, Anika

    2016-07-01

    Autoinducer-2, considered a universal signaling molecule, is produced by many species of bacteria; including oral strains. Structurally, autoinducer-2 can exist bound to boron (borated autoinducer-2). Functionally, autoinducer-2 has been linked to important bacterial processes such as virulence and biofilm formation. In order to test production of autoinducer-2 by a given bacterial strain, a bioassay using marine bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio harveyi as a reporter for autoinducer-2 has been designed. We hypothesize that pH adjustment and addition of boron are required for optimal bioluminescence and accurate autoinducer-2 detection. Using this reporter strain we tested autoinducer-2 activity from two oral commensal species, Streptococcus gordonii DL1 and Streptococcus oralis 34. Spent broth was collected and adjusted to pH 7.5 and supplemented with boric acid prior to measuring autoinducer- 2 activity. Results show that low pH inhibits bioluminescence of the reporter strain, but pH 7.5 allows for bioluminescence induction and proper readings of autoinducer-2 activity. Addition of boric acid also has a positive effect on bioluminescence allowing for a more sensitive detection of autoinducer-2 activity. Our data suggests that although autoinducer-2 is present in spent broth, low pH and/or low levels of boric acid become an obstacle for proper autoinducer-2 detection. For proper autoinducer-2 detection, we propose a protocol using this bioassay to include pH adjustment and boric acid addition to spent broth. Studies on autoinducer-2 activity in several bacteria species represent an important area of study as this universal signaling molecule is involved in critical bacterial phenotypes such as virulence and biofilm formation.

  1. Study on the Ascorbic Acid Content of rose Hip fruit Depending on Stationary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina Ropciuc

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The dog rose area includes southern and central Europe, reaching southern Scandinavia; it is also found in Asia Minor, Central Asia and North Africa. In our country, Rosa canina is the most widespread of the many species of Rosa, common in all areas. The components of the station, known also as the „stationary factors” affect differently the plant life and their chemical composition. Cynosbati fructus is the false fruit of Rosa canina L. (Rosaceae, known in Romanian as rose hip. The rose hip contain as active ingredients 500-1000 % vitamin C, 600-10000 mg% carotenoids, pectin, dextrin, vitamins B2, E, PP, flavone, sugars, organic acids, tannins, volatile oil, vanillin, triterpenoid saponosides, beta-sitosterol, fat (lecithin, glycerides of fatty acids in seeds, minerals (potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid plays an important role in human body. The greatest amount is found in plants which reached maturity. It is concentrated in the rose hip flesh. Solutions easily destroyit in the presence of UV, of copper, silver, iron and oxidative enzymes traces. Vitamin C participates actively in all processes of oxidoreductions of the living cell. Its lack in food causes the disease called scurvy which manifests itself by inflammated and bleeding gums, tooth loss. Rose hip fruits are known as medicines since prehistoric times.

  2. Specificity of Ocimum basilicum geraniol synthase modified by its expression in different heterologous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marc J C; Meyer, Sophie; Claudel, Patricia; Perrin, Mireille; Ginglinger, Jean François; Gertz, Claude; Masson, Jean E; Werck-Reinhardt, Danièle; Hugueney, Philippe; Karst, Francis

    2013-01-10

    Numerous aromatic plant species produce high levels of monoterpenols, using geranyl diphosphate (GPP) as a precursor. Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) geraniol synthase (GES) was used to evaluate the monoterpenol profiles arising from heterologous expressions in various plant models. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) calli were transformed using Agrobacterium tumefasciens and the plants were regenerated. Thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) was transformed using the floral dip method. Tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves were agro-infiltrated for transient expression. Although, as expected, geraniol was the main product detected in the leaves, different minor products were observed in these plants (V. vinifera: citronellol and nerol; N. benthamiana: linalool and nerol; A. thaliana: none). O. basilicum GES expression was also carried out with microbial system yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Escherichia coli. These results suggest that the functional properties of a monoterpenol synthase depend not only on the enzyme's amino-acidic sequence, but also on the cellular background. They also suggest that some plant species or microbial expression systems could induce the simultaneous formation of several carbocations, and could thus have a natural tendency to produce a wider spectrum of monoterpenols. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular cloning and expression profile of ß-ketoacyl-acp synthase gene from tung tree (Vernicia fordii Hemsl.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung tree (Vernicia fordii) is an important woody oil tree. Tung tree seeds contain 50-60% oil with approximately 80 mole a-eleostearic acid (9cis, 11trans, 13trans octadecatrienoic acid). Fatty acid synthesis is catalyzed by the concerted action of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, a ...

  4. Catalytic mechanism of porphobilinogen synthase: the chemical step revisited by QM/MM calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bo-Xue; Erdtman, Edvin; Eriksson, Leif A

    2012-10-11

    Porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) catalyzes the asymmetric condensation and cyclization of two 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) substrate molecules to give porphobilinogen (PBG). The chemical step of PBGS is herein revisited using QM/MM (ONIOM) calculations. Two different protonation states and several different mechanisms are considered. Previous mechanisms based on DFT-only calculations are shown unlikely to occur. According to these new calculations, the deprotonation step rather than ring closure is rate-limiting. Both the C-C bond formation first mechanism and the C-N bond formation first mechanism are possible, depending on how the A-site ALA binds to the enzyme. We furthermore propose that future work should focus on the substrate binding step rather than the enzymatic mechanism.

  5. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of a Nitric Oxide Synthase-Like Protein from Bacillus cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather J. Montgomery

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitric oxide synthase-like protein from Bacillus cereus (bcNOS has been cloned, expressed, and characterized. This small hemeprotein (356 amino acids in length has a mass of 43 kDa and forms a dimer. The recombinant protein showed similar spectral shifts to the mammalian NOS proteins and could bind the substrates L-arginine and NG-hydroxy-L-arginine as well as the ligand imidazole. Low levels of activity were recorded for the hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of NG-hydroxy-L-arginine and L-arginine by bcNOS, while a reconstituted system with the rat neuronal NOS reductase domain showed no activity. The recombinant bcNOS protein adds to the complement of bacterial NOS-like proteins that are used for the investigation of the mechanism and function of NO in microorganisms.

  6. Control of malate synthase formation in Rhizopus nigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, W S; Schell, J; Romano, A H

    1967-12-01

    The control of malate synthase formation in a fumaric acid-producing strain of Rhizopus nigricans has been found to be similar in most respects to that of isocitrate lyase, the companion enzyme of the glyoxylate bypass. A basal level is formed in a casein hydrolysate medium, which is repressed by glucose. Utilization of glucose during growth results in relief of glucose repression. Any factor which stimulates growth promotes relief of glucose repression by enhancing the incorporation of repressor metabolites derived from glucose into cell material. Thus, malate synthase formation was enhanced in glucose-containing media by the addition of zinc, or by an increase of the concentration of available nitrogen source in a synthetic medium. Both acetate and glycolate acted as apparent inducers of malate synthase, with glycolate the more effective of the two when added alone. Acetate induction was enhanced by Zn(++), however, whereas induction by glycolate was unaffected. This supports the concept that acetate stimulates formation of glyoxylate bypass enzymes by a derepression mechanism, whereas glycolate or a product derived from it acts directly as an inducer. Moreover, it is indicated that the malate synthases induced by acetate and glycolate are separate and distinct, as has been shown in Escherichia coli.

  7. Functional Characterization of Sesquiterpene Synthase from Polygonum minus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Fang Ee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum minus is an aromatic plant, which contains high abundance of terpenoids, especially the sesquiterpenes C15H24. Sesquiterpenes were believed to contribute to the many useful biological properties in plants. This study aimed to functionally characterize a full length sesquiterpene synthase gene from P. minus. P. minus sesquiterpene synthase (PmSTS has a complete open reading frame (ORF of 1689 base pairs encoding a 562 amino acid protein. Similar to other sesquiterpene synthases, PmSTS has two large domains: the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal metal-binding domain. It also consists of three conserved motifs: the DDXXD, NSE/DTE, and RXR. A three-dimensional protein model for PmSTS built clearly distinguished the two main domains, where conserved motifs were highlighted. We also constructed a phylogenetic tree, which showed that PmSTS belongs to the angiosperm sesquiterpene synthase subfamily Tps-a. To examine the function of PmSTS, we expressed this gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Two transgenic lines, designated as OE3 and OE7, were further characterized, both molecularly and functionally. The transgenic plants demonstrated smaller basal rosette leaves, shorter and fewer flowering stems, and fewer seeds compared to wild type plants. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the transgenic plants showed that PmSTS was responsible for the production of β-sesquiphellandrene.

  8. How Imaging Glutamate, γ-Aminobutyric Acid, and Dopamine Can Inform the Clinical Treatment of Alcohol Dependence and Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmer, Ansel T; Mason, Graeme F; Fucito, Lisa M; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Cosgrove, Kelly P

    2015-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies have dramatically advanced our understanding of the neurochemical basis of alcohol dependence, a major public health issue. In this paper, we review the research generated from neurochemical specific imaging modalities including magnetic resonance spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, and s