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Sample records for acid sulfate soils

  1. Genesis and solution chemistry of acid sulfate soils in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.

    1976-01-01

    To study short-term and long-term chemical processes in periodically flooded acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain and in various smaller coastal plains along the Gulf of Thailand, 16 acid sulfate soils and one non-acid marine soil were examined for distribution of iron-sulfur compounds, elemental

  2. Characteristics of Phosphorus in Some Eastern Australian Acid Sulfate Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Forty-five acid sulfate topsoil samples (depth < 0.5 m) from 15 soil cores were collected from 11 locations along the New South Wales coast, Australia. There was an overall trend for the concentration of the HC1extractable P to increase along with increasing amounts of organic C and the HCl-extractable trivalent metals in the topsoils of some less-disturbed acid sulfate soils (pH <4.5). This suggests that inorganic P in these soils probably accumulated via biological cycling and was retained by complexation with trivalent metals or their oxides and hydroxides. While there was no clear correlation between pH and the water-extractable P, the concentration of the water-extractable P tended to increase with increasing amounts of the HCl-extractable P. This disagrees with some established models which suggest that the concentration of solution P in acid soils is independent of total P and decreases with increasing acidity. The high concentration of sulfate present in acid sulfate soils appeared to affect the chemical behavior of P in these soil systems. Comparison was made between a less disturbed wetland acid sulfate soil and a more intensively disturbed sugarcane acid sulfate soil.The results show that reclamation of wetland acid sulfate soils for sugarcane production caused a significant decrease in the HCl-extractable P in the topsoil layer as a result of the reduced bio-cycling of phosphorus following sugarcane farming. Simulation experiment shows that addition of hydrated lime had no effects on the immobilization of retained P in an acid sulfate soil sample within a pH range 3.5~4.6. When the pH was raised to above 4.6, soluble P in the soil extracts had a tendency to increase with increasing pH until the 15th extraction (pH 5.13). This, in combination with the poor pH-soluble P relationship observed from the less-disturbed acid sulfate soils, suggests that soluble P was not clearly pH-dependent in acid sulfate soils with pH < 4.5.

  3. Controls of Soluble Al in Experimental Acid Sulfate Conditions and Acid Sulfate Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINCHUXIA; M.D.MELVILLE

    1997-01-01

    The controls of soluble Al concentration were examined in three situations of acid sulfate conditions:1) experimental acid sulfate conditions by addition of varying amounts of Al(OH)3(gibbsite) into a sequence of H2SO4 solutions;2)experimental acid sulfate conditions by addition of the same sequence of H2SO4 solutions into two non-cid sulfacte soil samples with known amounts of acid oxalate extractable Al; and 3) actual acid sulfate soil conditions.The experiment using gibbsite as an Al-bearing mineral showed that increase in the concentration of H2SO4 solution increased the soluble Al concentration,accompanied by a decrease i the solution pH, Increasing amount of gibbsite added to the H2SO4 solutions also increased soluble Al concentration,but resulted in an increase in solution pH.Within the H2SO4 concentration range of 0.0005-0.5mol L-1 and the Al(OH)3 range of 0.01-0.5g(in 25 mL of H2SO4 solutions),the input of H2SO4 had the major control on soluble Al Concentration and pH .The availability of Al(OH)3,however,was responsible for the spread fo the various sample points,with a tendency that the samples containing more gibbsite had a higher soluble Al concentration than those containing less gibbsite at equivalent pH levels.The experimental results from treatment of soil samples with H2SO4 solutions and the analytical results of acid sulfate soils also showed the similar trend.

  4. Analytical Methods for Environmental Risk Assessment of Acid Sulfate Soils: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of acid sulfate soil risk is an important step for acid sulfate soil management and its reliability depends very much on the suitability and accuracy of various analytical methods for estimating sulfide-derived potential acidity, actual acidity and acid-neutralizing capacity in acid sulfate soils. This paper critically reviews various analytical methods that are currently used for determination of the above parameters, as well as their implications for environmental risk assessment of acid sulfate soils.

  5. Soil Quality Assessment of Acid Sulfate Paddy Soils with Different Productivities in Guangdong Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhan-jun; ZHOU Wei; SHEN Jian-bo; LI Shu-tian; LIANG Guo-qing; WANG Xiu-bin; SUN Jing-wen; AI Chao

    2014-01-01

    Land conversion is considered an effective measure to ensure national food security in China, but little information is available on the quality of low productivity soils, in particular those in acid sulfate soil regions. In our study, acid sulfate paddy soils were divided into soils with high, medium and low levels based on local rice productivity, and 60 soil samples were collected for analysis. Twenty soil variables including physical, chemical and biochemical properties were determined. Those variables that were signiifcantly different between the high, medium and low productivity soils were selected for principal component analysis, and microbial biomass carbon (MBC), total nitrogen (TN), available silicon (ASi), pH and available zinc (AZn) were retained in the minimum data set (MDS). After scoring the MDS variables, they were integrated to calculate a soil quality index (SQI), and the high, medium and low productivity paddy soils received mean SQI scores of 0.95, 0.83 and 0.60, respectively. Low productivity paddy soils showed worse soil quality, and a large discrepancy was observed between the low and high productivity paddy soils. Lower MBC, TN, ASi, pH and available K (AK) were considered as the primary limiting factors. Additionally, all the soil samples collected were rich in available P and AZn, but deifcient in AK and ASi. The results suggest that soil AK and ASi deifciencies were the main limiting factors for all the studied acid sulfate paddy soil regions. The application of K and Si on a national basis and other sustainable management approaches are suggested to improve rice productivity, especially for low productivity paddy soils. Our results indicated that there is a large potential for increasing productivity and producing more cereals in acid sulfate paddy soil regions.

  6. Acid sulfate soils are an environmental hazard in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) create significant threats to the environment on coastal regions of the Baltic Sea in Finland. The sediments were deposited during the ancient Litorina Sea phase of the Baltic Sea about 7500-4500 years ago. Finland has larger spatial extent of the ASS than any other European country. Mostly based on anthropogenic reasons (cultivation, trenching etc.) ASS deposits are currently being exposed to oxygen which leads to chemical reaction creating sulfuric acid. The acidic waters then dissolve metals form the soil. Acidic surface run off including the metals are then leached into the water bodies weakening the water quality and killing fish or vegetation. In constructed areas acidic waters may corrode building materials. Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is mapping ASS deposits in Finland. The goal is to map a total of 5 million hectares of the potentially ASS affected region. It has been estimated that the problematic Litorina Sea deposits, which are situated 0-100 m above the recent Baltic Sea shoreline, cover 500 000 hectares area. There are several phases in mapping. The work begins at the office with gathering the existing data, interpreting airborne geophysical data and compiling a field working plan. In the field, quality of the soil is studied and in uncertain cases samples are taken to laboratory analyses. Also electrical conductivity and pH of soil and water are measured in the field. Laboratory methods include multielemental determinations with ICP-OES, analyses of grain size and humus content (LOI), and incubation. So far, approximately 60 % of the potential ASS affected regions in Finland are mapped. Over 15 000 sites have been studied in the field and 4000 laboratory analyses are done. The spatial database presented in the scale of 1: 250 000 can be viewed at the GTK's web pages (http://gtkdata.gtk.fi/hasu/index.html).

  7. Reclamation of acid sulfate soils using lime-stabilized biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orndorff, Zenah W; Daniels, W Lee; Fanning, Delvin S

    2008-01-01

    Excavation of sulfidic materials during construction has resulted in acid rock drainage (ARD) problems throughout Virginia. The most extensive documented uncontrolled disturbance at a single location is Stafford Regional Airport (SRAP) in Stafford, Virginia. Beginning in 1998, over 150 ha of sulfidic Coastal Plain sediments were disturbed, including steeply sloping cut surfaces and spoils placed into fills. Acid sulfate soils developed, and ARD generated on-site degraded metal and concrete structures and heavily damaged water quality with effects noted over 1 km downstream. The site was not recognized as sulfidic until 2001 when surface soil sampling revealed pH values ranging from 1.9 to 5.3 and peroxide potential acidity (PPA) values ranging from 1 to 42 Mg CaCO(3) per 1000 Mg material. In February 2002 a water quality program was established in and around the site to monitor baseline pH, EC, NO(3)-N, NH(4)-N, PO(4)-P, Fe, Al, Mn, and SO(4)-S, and initial pH values as low as 2.9 were noted in on-site receiving streams. In the spring and fall of 2002, the site was treated with variable rates of lime-stabilized biosolids, straw-mulch, and acid- and salt-tolerant legumes and grasses. By October 2002, the site was fully revegetated (> or = 90% living cover) with the exception of a few highly acidic outcrops and seepage areas. Surface soil sampling in 2003, 2004, and 2006 revealed pH values typically > 6.0. Water quality responded quickly to treatment, although short-term NH(4)(+) release occurred. Despite heavy loadings, no significant surface water P losses were observed.

  8. Characteristics of Soluble and Exchangeable Acidity in an Extremely Acidified Acid Sulfate Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Lin; M.D.MELVILLE; 等

    1999-01-01

    An extremely acidified acid sulfate soil(ASS) was investigated to characterise its soluble and exchangeable acidity,The results showed that soluble acidity of a sample dtermined by titration with a KOH soulution was much significantly greater than that indicated by pH measured using a pH meter,paricularly for the extremely acidic soil samples,This is because the total soluble acidity of the extremely acidic soil samples was mainly composed of various soluble Al and Fe species,possibly in forms of Al sulfate complexes(e.g.,AlSO4+) and feerous Fe(Fe2+)_,It is therefore suggested not to use pH alone as an indicator of soluble acidity in ASS,particularly for extremely acidic ASS,It is also likely that AlSO4+ actively participated in cation exchange reactions.It appears that the possible involvement of this Al sulfate cation in the cation adsorption has significant effect on increasing the amount of acidity being adsorbed by the soils.

  9. Isotopically exchangeable Al in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A.M. [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Fink, D. [Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Rose, J. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Waite, T. David [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Collins, Richard N., E-mail: richard.collins@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Periodic discharges of high concentrations of aluminium (Al) causing fish kills and other adverse effects occur worldwide in waterways affected by coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS). The exchangeability — a metal's ability to readily transfer between the soil solid- and solution-phases — of Al in these soils is therefore of particular importance as it has implications for metal transport, plant availability and toxicity to living organisms. In the present study, the concentrations of isotopically exchangeable Al (E values) were measured in 27 CLASS and compared with common salt extractions (i.e. KCl and CuCl{sub 2}) used to estimate exchangeable soil pools of Al. E values of Al were high in the soils, ranging from 357 to 3040 mg·kg{sup −1}. Exchangeable concentrations estimated using 1 M KCl were consistently lower than measured E values, although a reasonable correlation was obtained between the two values (E = 1.68 × Al{sub KCl}, r{sup 2} = 0.66, n = 25). The addition of a 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extraction step improved the 1:1 agreement between extractable and isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations, but lead to significant mobilisation of non-isotopically exchangeable Al in surficial ‘organic-rich’ CLASS having E values < 1000 mg·kg{sup −1}. It was concluded that currently used (i.e. 1 M KCl) methodology severely underestimates exchangeable Al and total actual acidity values in CLASS and should be corrected by a factor similar to the one determined here. - Highlights: • Isotopically exchangeable Al was compared to 1 M KCl or 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extractable Al. • 1 M KCl always underestimated isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations. • 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} mobilised non-isotopically exchangeable Al • 1 M KCl values require correction of ~ 1.7 to reflect exchangeable Al concentrations.

  10. Effects of Multiple Soil Conditioners on a Mine Site Acid Sulfate Soil for Vetiver Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chu-Xia; LONG Xin-Xian; XU Song-Jun; CHU Cheng-Xing; MAI Shao-Zhi; JIANG Dian

    2004-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of various soil treatments on the growth of vetiver grass ( Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) with the objective of formulating appropriate soil media for use in sulfide-bearing mined areas. An acidic mine site acid sulfate soil (pH 2.8) was treated with different soil conditioner formula including hydrated lime, red mud (bauxite residues), zeolitic rock powder, biosolids and a compound fertilizer. Soils treated with red mud and hydrated lime corrected soil acidity and reduced or eliminated metal toxicity enabling the establishment of vetiver grass.Although over-liming affected growth, some seedlings of vetiver survived the initial strong alkaline conditions. Addition of appropriate amounts of zeolitic rock powder also enhanced growth, but over-application caused detrimental effects. In this experiment, soil medium with the best growth performance of vetiver was 50 g of red mud, 10 g of lime, 30 g of zeolitic rock powder and 30 g of biosolids with 2000 g of mine soils (100% survival rate with the greatest biomass and number of new shoots), but adding a chemical fertilizer to this media adversely impacted plant growth. In addition, a high application rate of biosolids resulted in poorer growth of vetiver, compared to a moderate application rate.

  11. Acid Release from an Acid Sulfate Soil Sample Under Successive Extractions with Different Extractants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An acid sulfate soil sample was successively extracted with deionized water, 1 mol L-1 KCI and 0.000 5 mol L-1 Ca(OH)2 solutions. The results showed that only very small amounts of acidity were extracted by deionized water, possibly through slow jarosite hydrolysis. Acid release through jarosite hydrolysis was greatly enhanced by Ca(OH)2 extraction at the expense of the added OH- being neutralized by the acid released. Successive extraction of the sample with KCI removed the largest amounts of acidity from the sample. However, it is likely that the major form of acidity released by KC1 extraction was exchangeable acidity. The results also show the occurrence of low or non charged A1 and Fe species in water and Ca(OH)2 extracts after first a few extractions. It appears that such a phenomenon was related to a decreasing EC value with increasing number of extractions.

  12. Speciation and transport of arsenic in an acid sulfate soil-dominated catchment, eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsela, Andrew S; Collins, Richard N; Waite, T David

    2011-02-01

    Factors controlling the transport of geogenically-derived arsenic from a coastal acid sulfate soil into downstream sediments are identified in this study with both solid-phase associations and aqueous speciation clearly critical to the mobility and toxicity of arsenic. The data from both sequential extractions and X-ray adsorption spectroscopy indicate that arsenic in the unoxidised Holocene acid sulfate soils is essentially non-labile in the absence of prolonged oxidation, existing primarily as arsenopyrite or as an arsenopyrite-like species, likely arsenian pyrite. Anthropogenically-accelerated pedogenic processes, which have oxidised this material over time, have greatly enhanced the potential bioavailability of arsenic, with solid-phase arsenic almost solely present as As(V) associated with secondary Fe(III) minerals present. Analyses of downstream sediments reveal that a portion of the arsenic is retained as a mixed As(III)/As(V) solid-phase, though not at levels considered to be environmentally deleterious. Determination of arsenic speciation in pore waters using high performance liquid chromatography/Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry shows a dominance of As(III) in upstream pore waters whilst an unidentified As species reaches comparative levels within the downstream, estuarine locations. Pore water As(V) was detected at trace concentrations only. The results demonstrate the importance of landscape processes to arsenic transport and availability within acid sulfate soil environments.

  13. Impeded Acidification of Acid Sulfate Soils in an Inten- sively Drained Sugarcane Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Recent research results suggest that acidification of acid sulfate soils may be inhibited in well-drained estuarine floodplains in eastern Australia by the absence of natural creek levees. The lack of natural levees has allowed the inundation of the land by regular tidal flooding prior to the construction of flood mitigation work. Such physiographical conditions prevent the development of pre-drainage pyrite-derived soil acidifica- tion that possibly occurred at many levee-protected sites in eastern Australian estuarine floodplains during extremely dry spells. Pre-drainage acidification is considered as an important condition for accumulation of soluble Fe and consequently, the creation of favourable environments for catalysed pyrite oxidation. Under current intensively drained conditions, the acid materials produced by ongoing pyrite oxidation can be rapidly removed from soil pore water by lateral leaching and acid buffering, resulting in low concentrations of soluble Fe in the pyritic layer, which could reduce the rate of pyrite oxidation.

  14. Groundwater or floodwater? Assessing the pathways of metal exports from a coastal acid sulfate soil catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Isaac R; de Weys, Jason; Eyre, Bradley D

    2011-11-15

    Daily observations of dissolved aluminum, iron, and manganese in an estuary downstream of a coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS) catchment provided insights into how floods and submarine groundwater discharge drive wetland metal exports. Extremely high Al, Fe, and Mn concentrations (up to 40, 374, and 8 mg L(-1), respectively) were found in shallow acidic groundwaters from the Tuckean Swamp, Australia. Significant correlations between radon (a natural groundwater tracer) and metals in surface waters revealed that metal loads were driven primarily by groundwater discharge. Dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al loads during a 16-day flood triggered by a 213 mm rain event were respectively 80, 35, and 14% of the total surface water exports during the four months of observations. Counter clockwise hysteresis was observed for Fe and Mn in surface waters during the flood due to delayed groundwater inputs. Groundwater-derived Fe fluxes into artificial drains were 1 order of magnitude higher than total surface water exports, which is consistent with the known accumulation of monosulfidic black ooze within the wetland drains. Upscaling the Tuckean catchment export estimates yielded dissolved Fe fluxes from global acid sulfate soil catchments on the same order of magnitude of global river inputs into estuaries.

  15. Monitoring and assessment of surface water acidification following rewetting of oxidised acid sulfate soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Luke M; Zammit, Benjamin; Jolley, Ann-Marie; Barnett, Liz; Fitzpatrick, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale exposure of acid sulfate soils during a hydrological drought in the Lower Lakes of South Australia resulted in acidification of surface water in several locations. Our aim was to describe the techniques used to monitor, assess and manage these acidification events using a field and laboratory dataset (n = 1,208) of acidic to circum-neutral pH water samples. The median pH of the acidified (pH  H(+) ≈ Mn(II) > Fe(II/III)) but was about 20 % higher on average. Geochemical speciation calculations and XRD measurements indicated that solid phase minerals (schwertmannite and jarosite for Fe and jurbanite for Al) were likely controlling dissolved metal concentrations and influencing measured acidity between pH 2 and 5.

  16. Exchangeable and secondary mineral reactive pools of aluminium in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A M; Waite, T David; Collins, Richard N

    2014-07-01

    The use of coastal floodplain sulfidic sediments for agricultural activities has resulted in the environmental degradation of many areas worldwide. The generation of acidity and transport of aluminium (Al) and other metals to adjacent aquatic systems are the main causes of adverse effects. Here, a five-step sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was applied to 30 coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS) from north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. This enabled quantification of the proportion of aluminium present in 'water-soluble', 'exchangeable', 'organically-complexed', 'reducible iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide/hydroxysulfate-incorporated' and 'amorphous Al mineral' fractions. The first three extractions represented an average of 5% of 'aqua regia' extractable Al and their cumulative concentrations were extremely high, reaching up to 4000 mg·kg(-1). Comparison of Al concentrations in the final two extractions indicated that 'amorphous Al minerals' are quantitatively a much more important sink for the removal of aqueous Al derived from the acidic weathering of these soils than reducible Fe(III) minerals. Correlations were observed between soil pH, dissolved and total organic carbon (DOC and TOC) and Al concentrations in organic carbon-rich CLASS soil horizons. These results suggest that complexation of Al by dissolved organic matter significantly increases soluble Al concentrations at pH values >5.0. As such, present land management practices would benefit with redefinition of an 'optimal' soil from pH ≥5.5 to ~4.8 for the preservation of aquatic environments adjacent to organic-rich CLASS where Al is the sole or principle inorganic contaminant of concern. Furthermore, it was observed that currently-accepted standard procedures (i.e. 1 M KCl extraction) to measure exchangeable Al concentrations in these types of soils severely underestimate exchangeable Al and a more accurate representation may be obtained through the use of 0.2 M CuCl2.

  17. Impeded Acidification of Acid Sulfate Soils in an Inter—sively Drained Sugarcane Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.LIN; R.T.BUSH; 等

    2001-01-01

    Recent research results suggest that acidification of acid sulfate soils may be inhibited in well-drained estuarine floodplains in eastern Australia by the absence of natural creek levees,The lack of natural levees has allowed the inuudation of the land by regular tidal flooding prior to the construction of flood mitigation work.Such physiographical conditions prevent the development of pre-draingae pyrite-derived soil acidifica-tion that possibly occurred at many levee-protected sites in eastern Australian estuarine floodplains during extremely dry spells.Pre-drainage acidification is considered as an important condition for accumulation of soluble Fe and consequently,the creation of favourable environments for catalysed pyrite oxidation.Under current intensively drained onditions,the acid materials produced by ongoing pyrite oxidation can be rapidly removed from soil pore water by lateral leaching and acid buffering,resulting in low concentrations of soluble Fe in the pyritic layer,which could reduce the rate of pyrite oxidation.

  18. Factors Controlling Deoxygenation of "Floodwater" Overlying an Acid Sulfate Soil: Experimental Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. LIN; P. G. HASKINS; J. LIN

    2003-01-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted to simulate the effect of flooding on water deoxygenation in acid sulfate soil floodplain systems. The originally oxygenated "floodwater" could be deoxygenated immediately following "flooding" and it is likely that this was caused mainly by decomposition of organic debris from the inundated plants. Deoxygenation eventually led to the depletion of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the "floodwater"and it is highly possible that this resulted in the transformations of ferric Fe to ferrous Fe, sulfate to hydrogen sulfide, and organic nitrogen to ammonia (ammonification). The accumulation of these reduced substances allows the "floodwater" to develop DO-consuming capacity (DOCC). When the "floodwater" is mixed with the introduced oxygenated water, apart from the dilution effects, the reduced substances contained in the "floodwater" oxidize to further consume DO carried by the introduced water. However, it appears that the DO drop in the mixed water can only last for a few hours if no additional DO-depleted "floodwater" is added.Entry of atmospheric oxygen into the water can raise the DO level of the mixed water and lower water pH through the oxidation of the reduced substances.

  19. Eliminating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil for rice cultivation using plant growth promoting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Naher, Umme Aminun; Radziah, Othman; Shamshuddin, Jusop; Razi, Ismail Mohd

    2015-02-20

    Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), ground magnesium limestone (GML) and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0) at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM). Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB), GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha-1 each). Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  20. Gaseous Nitrogen Losses from Coastal Acid Sulfate Soils:A Short-Term Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. C. T. MACDONALD; O. T. DENMEAD; I.WHITE; G. BYRANT

    2011-01-01

    NOx and N2O emissions from coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS) cultivated for sugarcane production were investigated on the coastal lowlands of northern New South Wales, Australia. Two series of short-term measurements were made using chambers and micrometeorological techniques. Series 1 occurred during the wet season, the water-filled pore space (WFPS) was between 60%-80% and the site flooded during the measurements. Measurements were made directly after the harvest of soybean crop, which fixed an estimated 100 kg N ha-1, and the emission amounted to 3.2 kg NOx-N ha-1 (12 d) and 1.8 kg N2O-N ha-1 (5 d). Series 2 was made towards the end of the dry season when the WFPS was less than 60%. In Series 2, after an application of 50 kg N ha-1, emissions were markedly less, amounting to 0.9 kg N ha-1 over 10 d. During both series when the soil was moist, emissions of NOx were larger than those of N2O. The emission of NOx appeared to be haphazard, with little time dependence, but there was a clear diurnal cycle for N2O, emphasising the need for continuous measurement procedures for both gases. Theseresults suggest that agricultural production on CASS could be important sources of greenhouse gases and nitrogen practices will need to be optimised to reduce the offsite effects of atmospheric warming, acidification or nitrification. Many questions still remain unanswered such as the emissions during the soybean bean filling stage and crop residue decomposition, the longer-term losses following the fertiliser application and emissions from CASS under different land uses.

  1. Significance of Ligand Exchange Relating to Sulfate in Retarding Acidification of Variable Charge Soils Caused by Acid Rain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJINGHUA; YUTIANREN

    1996-01-01

    For the purpose of evaluating the role of ligand exchange of sulfate ions in retarding the rate of acidification of variable charge soils,the changes in pH after the addition of different amounts of HNO3 or H2SO4 to representative soils of China were measured .A difference between pH changes caused by the two kinds of acids was observed only for variable charge soils and kaolinite,but not for constant charge soils and bentonite,The larger the proportion of H2SO4 in the HNO3-H2SO4 mixture,the lower the calculated H+ ion activities remained in the suspension.The difference in H+ ion activities between H2SO4 systems and HNO3 systems was larger for soils with a low base-saturation(BS) percentage than those with a high BS percentage.The removal of free iron oxides from the soil led to a decrease in the difference,while the coating of Fe2O3 on a bentonite resulted in a remarkable appearance of the difference.The effect of ligand exchange on the acidity status of the soil varied with the soil type.Surface soils with a high organic matter content showed a less pronounced effect of ligand exchange than subsoils did.It was estimated that when acid rain chiefly containing H2SO4 was deposited on variable charge soils the acidification rate might be slower by 20%-40% than that when the acid rain chiefly contained HNO3 for soils with a high organic matter content,and that the rate might be half of that caused by HNO3 for soils with a low organic matter content,especially for latosols.

  2. Distribution of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria across a coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS environment: implications for passive bioremediation by tidal inundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen eLing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS constitute a serious and global environmental problem. Oxidation of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air generates sulfuric acid with consequently negative impacts on coastal and estuarine ecosystems. Tidal inundation represents one current treatment strategy for CASS, with the aim of neutralizing acidity by triggering microbial iron- and sulfate-reduction and inducing the precipitation of iron-sulfides. Although well-known functional guilds of bacteria drive these processes, their distributions within CASS environments, as well as their relationships to tidal cycling and the availability of nutrients and electron acceptors, are poorly understood. These factors will determine the long-term efficacy of passive CASS remediation strategies. Here we studied microbial community structure and functional guild distribution in sediment cores obtained from ten depths ranging from 0-20 cm in three sites located in the supra-, inter- and sub-tidal segments, respectively, of a CASS-affected salt marsh (East Trinity, Cairns, Australia. Whole community 16S rRNA gene diversity within each site was assessed by 454 pyrotag sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in the context of local hydrological, geochemical and lithological factors. The results illustrate spatial overlap, or close association, of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in an environment rich in organic matter and controlled by parameters such as acidity, redox potential, degree of water saturation, and mineralization. The observed spatial distribution implies the need for empirical understanding of the timing, relative to tidal cycling, of various terminal electron-accepting processes that control acid generation and biogeochemical iron and sulfur cycling.

  3. Effectiveness of the bran media and bacteria inoculum treatments in increasing pH and reducing sulfur-total of acid sulfate soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufieq, Nur Anny Suryaningsih; Rahim, Sahibin Abdul; Jamil, Habibah

    2013-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effectiveness ofsulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in using bran as a source of food and energy, and to see the effectiveness of the bran media and bacteria inoculums treatments for pH and sulfur-total of acid sulfate reduction insoils. This study used two factors in group random designs with four treatments for bacteria inoculum of B1 (1%), B2 (5%), B3 (10%), B4 (15%) and two treatments for organic media (bran) of D1 (1:1) and D2 (1:19). Based on three replications, the combination resulted in a total of 24 treatments. Soil pH was measured using the Duddridge and Wainright method and determination of sulfate content in soil was conducted by the spectrophotometry method. The data obtained was analyzed for significance by Analysis of Variance and the Least Significant Difference Test. The pH of the initial acid sulfate soils ranged from 3 to 4 and the soil sulfur-total ranged from 1.4% to 10%. After mixing sulfate reducing bacteria with the bran mediaand incubated for four days, the pH of the acid sulfate soils increased from 3.67 to 4.20, while the soil sulfur-total contents had been reduced by 2.85% to 0.35%. This experiment has proven that an acid sulfate soil with low pH is a good growth medium for the sulfate reducing bacteria. The bestincubation period to achieve an effective bioremediation resultthrough sulfate percentage reduction by sulfate reducing bacteria was 10 days, while the optimum bran media dose was 1:19, and the bacteria inoculums dose was 10%.

  4. Germination and Seedling Growth of Perennial Ryegrass in Acid Sulfate Soil Treated by Pyrite Nano-Encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Yi, J.; Kim, T.

    2007-05-01

    The trial pot experiment was conducted to validate the effect of encapsulation in reduction of acid rock drainage. Six different treatments were performed: A = control, four times spraying of distilled water; B = four times of 0.01 M H2O2; C = once-encapsulated and three times spraying of distilled water; D = twice-encapsulated and twice spraying of distilled water; E = three times-encapsulated and once spraying of distilled water and F = four times-encapsulated for the acid sulfate soil with pyrite bearing andesite powder and sand. After the encapsulation treatment, the perennial ryegrass (Loium perenne) was sowed to evaluate germination rate and growth for three months. The leachate was examined for the chemical properties. The leachate from the A pot (control) is characterized as acidic (pH below 3) and high concentrations of SO4-2: 12,022 mg/L, Al: 85.8 mg/L and Mn: 34.1 mg/L which can be toxic effect to the plant growth. However, the leachate from encapsulated pots showed near neutral (pH 6 to 7) and low concentrations of SO4-2 (below 3,000 mg/L), Al (below 45mg/L) and Mn (24 gm/L). The frequency of encapsulation treatment is related to reduction of acidic drainage. It was hard to identify the significant difference of the seed germination rate of ryegrass between the treatments, although root and shoot growth showed three times difference between the control (1.90g/pot) and four times encapsulated treatment (6.33g/pot) after 2 month growth. It is suggested that encapsulation of pyrite in acid sulfate soil causes the reduction of acidic drainage resulting in the higher growth of herbaceous plants.

  5. Solid-solution partitioning and thionation of diphenylarsinic acid in a flooded soil under the impact of sulfate and iron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng; Tu, Chen; Hu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Haibo; Zhang, Lijuan; Wei, Jing; Li, Yuan; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a major organic arsenic (As) compound derived from abandoned chemical weapons. The solid-solution partitioning and transformation of DPAA in flooded soils are poorly understood but are of great concern. The identification of the mechanisms responsible for the mobilization and transformation of DPAA may help to develop effective remediation strategies. Here, soil and Fe mineral incubation experiments were carried out to elucidate the partitioning and transformation of DPAA in anoxic (without addition of sulfate or sodium lactate) and sulfide (with the addition of sulfate and sodium lactate) soil and to examine the impact of sulfate and Fe(III) reduction on these processes. Results show that DPAA was more effectively mobilized and thionated in sulfide soil than in anoxic soil. At the initial incubation stages (0-4weeks), 6.7-74.5% of the total DPAA in sulfide soil was mobilized likely by sorption competition with sodium lactate. At later incubation stage (4-8weeks), DPAA was almost completely released into the solution likely due to the near-complete Fe(III) reduction. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) results provide further direct evidence of elevated DPAA release coupled with Fe(III) reduction in sulfide environments. The total DPAA fraction decreased significantly to 24.5% after two weeks and reached 3.4% after eight weeks in sulfide soil, whereas no obvious elimination of DPAA occurred in anoxic soil at the initial two weeks and the total DPAA fraction decreased to 10.9% after eight weeks. This can be explained in part by the enhanced mobilization of DPAA and sulfate reduction in sulfide soil compared with anoxic soil. These results suggest that under flooded soil conditions, Fe(III) and sulfate reduction significantly promote DPAA mobilization and thionation, respectively, and we suggest that it is essential to consider both sulfate and Fe(III) reduction to further our understanding of the environmental fate of DPAA.

  6. Donnan membrane speciation of Al, Fe, trace metals and REEs in coastal lowland acid sulfate soil-impacted drainage waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Adele M.; Xue, Youjia [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Kinsela, Andrew S. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Institute for Environmental Research (IER), Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Wilcken, Klaus M. [Institute for Environmental Research (IER), Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Collins, Richard N., E-mail: richard.collins@unsw.edu.au [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Donnan dialysis has been applied to forty filtered drainage waters collected from five coastal lowland acid sulfate soil (CLASS) catchments across north-eastern NSW, Australia. Despite having average pH values < 3.9, 78 and 58% of Al and total Fe, respectively, were present as neutral or negatively-charged species. Complementary isotope dilution experiments with {sup 55}Fe and {sup 26}Al demonstrated that only soluble (i.e. no colloidal) species were present. Trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) were also mainly present (> 70%) as negatively-charged complexes. In contrast, the speciation of the divalent trace metals Co, Mn, Ni and Zn was dominated by positively-charged complexes and was strongly correlated with the alkaline earth metals Ca and Mg. Thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations indicated that natural organic matter (NOM) complexes dominated Fe(III) speciation in agreement with that obtained by Donnan dialysis. In the case of Fe(II), however, the free cation was predicted to dominate under thermodynamic equilibrium, whilst our results indicated that Fe(II) was mainly present as neutral or negatively-charged complexes (most likely with sulfate). For all other divalent metals thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations agreed well with the Donnan dialysis results. The proportion of Al and REEs predicted to be negatively-charged was also grossly underestimated, relative to the experimental results, highlighting possible inaccuracies in the stability constants developed for these trivalent Me(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup −} and/or Me–NOM complexes and difficulties in modeling complex environmental samples. These results will help improve metal mobility and toxicity models developed for CLASS-affected environments, and also demonstrate that Australian CLASS environments can discharge REEs at concentrations an order of magnitude greater than previously reported. - Highlights: • CLASS discharge large amounts of metals and their speciation is poorly

  7. Could Acid Sulfate Soils Be a Potential Environmental Threat to Estuarine Ecosystems on the South CHina Coast?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.LIN

    1999-01-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) contain considerable amounts of reduced sulfur compounds(mainly pyrite) which produce sulfuric acid upon their oxidation.ASS-derived environmental degradation widely occurs in the coastal lowlands around the world,especially in the tropical and subtropical areas.The presence of ASS iun the South China has been recognized but their distribution may be largely underestimated because the soil survey data concerning ASS are based on unreliable methods and techniques.ASS in the South China have been traditionally used for rice cultivation and this practice has been proved sustainable if appropriate improvement measures are adopted.Recently,the rapid economic growth in the region has resulted in intensified coastal development which frequently involves activities that may disturb ASS,Construction of roads,foundations and aquaculture ponds may cause the exposure of ASS to air and bring about severe environmental acidificvation.There is currently insufficient awareness of the problems among the researchers,policy-makers and land managers in the South China.More attention must be paid to the possible ASS-dervived environmental degradation in order to ensure a sustainable development of the coastal lowlands in the South China region.

  8. Donnan membrane speciation of Al, Fe, trace metals and REEs in coastal lowland acid sulfate soil-impacted drainage waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adele M; Xue, Youjia; Kinsela, Andrew S; Wilcken, Klaus M; Collins, Richard N

    2016-03-15

    Donnan dialysis has been applied to forty filtered drainage waters collected from five coastal lowland acid sulfate soil (CLASS) catchments across north-eastern NSW, Australia. Despite having average pH values70%) as negatively-charged complexes. In contrast, the speciation of the divalent trace metals Co, Mn, Ni and Zn was dominated by positively-charged complexes and was strongly correlated with the alkaline earth metals Ca and Mg. Thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations indicated that natural organic matter (NOM) complexes dominated Fe(III) speciation in agreement with that obtained by Donnan dialysis. In the case of Fe(II), however, the free cation was predicted to dominate under thermodynamic equilibrium, whilst our results indicated that Fe(II) was mainly present as neutral or negatively-charged complexes (most likely with sulfate). For all other divalent metals thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations agreed well with the Donnan dialysis results. The proportion of Al and REEs predicted to be negatively-charged was also grossly underestimated, relative to the experimental results, highlighting possible inaccuracies in the stability constants developed for these trivalent Me(SO4)2(-) and/or Me-NOM complexes and difficulties in modeling complex environmental samples. These results will help improve metal mobility and toxicity models developed for CLASS-affected environments, and also demonstrate that Australian CLASS environments can discharge REEs at concentrations an order of magnitude greater than previously reported.

  9. Applying Limestone or Basalt in Combination with Bio-Fertilizer to Sustain Rice Production on an Acid Sulfate Soil in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of applying ground magnesium limestone (GML or ground basalt in combination with bio-fertilizer to sustain rice production on an acid sulfate soil in Malaysia. Soils from Kelantan Plains, Malaysia, were treated with GML, ground basalt, bio-fertilizer, GML + bio-fertilizer, and ground basalt + bio-fertilizer (4 t·ha−1 each. Results showed that soil fertility was improved by applying the soil amendments. GML and basalt contain some Zn and Cu; thus, application of these amendments would increase their contents in the soil needed for the healthy growth of rice. Basalt applied in combination with bio-fertilizer appeared to be the best agronomic option to improve the fertility of acid sulfate soils for sustainable rice production in the long run. In addition to increasing Ca, Mg, Zn, and Cu reserves in the soil, water pH increased and precipitated Al3+ and/or Fe2+. Ground basalt is cheaper than GML, but basalt dissolution in the acidic soil was slow. As such, its ameliorative effects could only be seen significantly from the second season onwards. The specially-formulated bio-fertilizer for alleviating the infertility of acid sulfate soil could also enhance rice growth. The use of the bio-fertilizer fortified with N2-fixing bacteria is a green technology that would help reduce NO3− and/or NO2− pollution and reduce the cost of rice production. The phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB present in the bio-fertilizer not only increased the available P, but also helped release organic acids that would inactivate Al3+ and/or Fe2+ via the process of chelation.

  10. Trace metal biogeochemistry in mangrove ecosystems: a comparative assessment of acidified (by acid sulfate soils) and non-acidified sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Bibhash; Birch, Gavin; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu

    2013-10-01

    The generation of acidity and subsequent mobilization of toxic metals induced by acid sulfate soils (ASSs) are known to cause severe environmental damage to many coastal wetlands and estuaries of Australia and worldwide. Mangrove ecosystems serve to protect coastal environments, but are increasingly threatened from such ASS-induced acidification due to variable hydrological conditions (i.e., inundation-desiccation cycles). However, the impact of such behaviors on trace metal distribution, bio-availability and accumulation in mangrove tissues, i.e., leaves and pneumatophores, are largely unknown. In this study, we examined how ASS-induced acidifications controlled trace metal distribution and bio-availability in gray mangrove (Avicennia marina) soils and in tissues in the Kooragang wetland, New South Wales, Australia. We collected mangrove soils, leaves and pneumatophores from a part of the wetland acidified from ASS (i.e., an affected site) for detailed biogeochemical studies. The results were compared with samples collected from a natural intertidal mangrove forest (i.e., a control site) located within the same wetland. Soil pH (mean: 5.90) indicated acidic conditions in the affected site, whereas pH was near-neutral (mean: 7.17) in the control site. The results did not show statistically significant differences in near-total and bio-available metal concentrations, except for Fe and Mn, between affected and control sites. Iron concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the affected site, whereas Mn concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the control site. However, large proportions of near-total metals were potentially bio-available in control sites. Concentrations of Fe and Ni were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in leaves and pneumatophores of the affected sites, whereas Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn were greater in control sites. The degree of metal bio-accumulation in leaves and pneumatophores suggest contrasting

  11. DOMINANT FACTORS AFFECTING SEAWEED (Gracilaria verrucosa PRODUCTION IN ACID SULFATE SOILS-AFFECTED PONDS OF LUWU REGENCY, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Mustafa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of brackish water ponds used for seaweed (Gracilaria verrucosa culture in Luwu Regency, South Sulawesi, Indonesia are constructed on acid sulfate soil. Despite this inevitable condition, opportunities remain open to increase the seaweed production. The research was conducted to study the dominant factors that affect the seaweed production in ASS-affected ponds of Luwu Regency. As a dependent variable in this research is seaweed production. Independent variables were grouped into: (a farmer status factor, consisting of 9 variables; (b pond condition factor, consisting of 8 variables; (c pond management factor, consisting of 29 variables; (d soil quality factor, consisting of 17 variables and (e water quality factor, consisting of 11 variables. Multiple regression with dummy variable was used to analyze the data in prediction dependent variable. Results show that the average of seaweed production in ASS-affected pond of Luwu Regency is 11,000 kg dry/ha/year. Seaweed production can be increased through: (a decreasing dosage of urea and KCl and increasing dosage and frequency of fertilizer containing phosphate; (b increasing water depth in the pond and decreasing percentage of water exchange,(c conducting remediation to increase the soil pH and decreasing the concentration of Fe in the water, (d increasing stocking density of milkfish to decrease the epiphyte population and (e increasing the frequency of the farmer to attend trainings.

  12. Mapping potential acid sulfate soils in Denmark using legacy data and LiDAR-based derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beucher, Amélie; Adhikari, Kabindra; Breuning-Madsen, H.;

    2017-01-01

    of environmental variables. The overall prediction accuracy based on a 30% hold-back validation data reached 70%. Furthermore, the conventional map indicated 32% of the study area (c. 2100 km2) as having a high frequency for potential a.s. soils while the digital map displayed about 46% (c. 3000 km2) as high....... In this study, a probability map for potential a.s. soil occurrence was constructed for thewetlands located in Jutland, Denmark (c. 6500 km2), using the digital soilmapping (DSM) approach. Among the variety of available DSM techniques, artificial neural networks (ANNs) were selected. More than 8000 existing...... soil observations and 16 environmental variables, including geology, landscape type, land use and terrain parameters,were available as input datawithin themodeling. Predictionmodels based on various network topologieswere assessed for different selections of soil observations and combinations...

  13. Early Performance of Duong Mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco on Three Rootstock under Acid Sulfate Soil Fields at Mekong Delta of Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoe Thi Le

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract About 1.6 billion hectare area of acid sulfate soils is at Mekong Delta of Vietnam, and Duong mandarin fruits are valued for the fresh market due to the easy peeling, attractive flavor, and health and nutritional properties; thereby, the investigation on early performance of Duong mandarin on three rootstock under acid sulfate soil fields (pH below 4 at Mekong Delta of Vietnam was undertaken from 2009 to 2012 for determination of the most promising scion stock combination of Duong mandarin, which introduced to growers for expanding citrus production to increase in income of farmers, and helping to use the sustainable and efficient land resource at acid sulfate soil region of Mekong Delta. Primary results showed that Duong mandarin grafted on Mat orange, Tau lemon and Carrizo citrange were significant differenence in vegetative parameters, fruit yield and quality. It proved that Duong mandarin trees grafted on Tau lemon were better growth and development on acid sulfate soil fields with below 4 pH in soil and water suspension of 1:2.5 ratio as compared to those grafted on Mat orange and Carrizo citrange rootstocks; whereby, that induced trees with 171.48 cm height, 6.65 m3 canopy volume and 51.84 mm trunk diameter, 1.08 scion/ stock ratio in third year after growing. Moreover, Duong mandarin trees grafted on Tau lemon were with spreading growth performance. In regarding to fruit yield and quality, Duong mandarin trees grafted on Tau lemon produced highest fruit yield of 9.21 kg per tree per year in third year after planting, and fruit with 115.30g weight, 8.85 brix juice, thinner and somewhat easy peel rind. 

  14. Biochemical and molecular characterization of potential phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in acid sulfate soils and their beneficial effects on rice growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the total microbial population, the occurrence of growth promoting bacteria and their beneficial traits in acid sulfate soils. The mechanisms by which the bacteria enhance rice seedlings grown under high Al and low pH stress were investigated. Soils and rice root samples were randomly collected from four sites in the study area (Kelantan, Malaysia. The topsoil pH and exchangeable Al ranged from 3.3 to 4.7 and 1.24 to 4.25 cmol(c kg(-1, respectively, which are considered unsuitable for rice production. Total bacterial and actinomycetes population in the acidic soils were found to be higher than fungal populations. A total of 21 phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB including 19 N2-fixing strains were isolated from the acid sulfate soil. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, three potential PSB strains based on their beneficial characteristics were identified (Burkholderia thailandensis, Sphingomonas pituitosa and Burkholderia seminalis. The isolated strains were capable of producing indoleacetic acid (IAA and organic acids that were able to reduce Al availability via a chelation process. These PSB isolates solubilized P (43.65% existing in the growth media within 72 hours of incubation. Seedling of rice variety, MR 219, grown at pH 4, and with different concentrations of Al (0, 50 and 100 µM was inoculated with these PSB strains. Results showed that the bacteria increased the pH with a concomitant reduction in Al concentration, which translated into better rice growth. The improved root volume and seedling dry weight of the inoculated plants indicated the potential of these isolates to be used in a bio-fertilizer formulation for rice cultivation on acid sulfate soils.

  15. Biochemical and molecular characterization of potential phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in acid sulfate soils and their beneficial effects on rice growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Naher, Umme Aminun; Shamshuddin, Jusop; Jusop, Shamshuddin; Othman, Radziah; Latif, Md Abdul; Ismail, Mohd Razi

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the total microbial population, the occurrence of growth promoting bacteria and their beneficial traits in acid sulfate soils. The mechanisms by which the bacteria enhance rice seedlings grown under high Al and low pH stress were investigated. Soils and rice root samples were randomly collected from four sites in the study area (Kelantan, Malaysia). The topsoil pH and exchangeable Al ranged from 3.3 to 4.7 and 1.24 to 4.25 cmol(c) kg(-1), respectively, which are considered unsuitable for rice production. Total bacterial and actinomycetes population in the acidic soils were found to be higher than fungal populations. A total of 21 phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) including 19 N2-fixing strains were isolated from the acid sulfate soil. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, three potential PSB strains based on their beneficial characteristics were identified (Burkholderia thailandensis, Sphingomonas pituitosa and Burkholderia seminalis). The isolated strains were capable of producing indoleacetic acid (IAA) and organic acids that were able to reduce Al availability via a chelation process. These PSB isolates solubilized P (43.65%) existing in the growth media within 72 hours of incubation. Seedling of rice variety, MR 219, grown at pH 4, and with different concentrations of Al (0, 50 and 100 µM) was inoculated with these PSB strains. Results showed that the bacteria increased the pH with a concomitant reduction in Al concentration, which translated into better rice growth. The improved root volume and seedling dry weight of the inoculated plants indicated the potential of these isolates to be used in a bio-fertilizer formulation for rice cultivation on acid sulfate soils.

  16. Extreme environments in the critical zone: Linking acidification hazard of acid sulfate soils in mound spring discharge zones to groundwater evolution and mantle degassing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Paul; Gotch, Travis; Love, Andrew; Raven, Mark; Priestley, Stacey; Grocke, Sonia

    2016-10-15

    A decrease in flow from the iconic travertine mound springs of the Great Artesian Basin in South Australia has led to the oxidation of hypersulfidic soils and extreme soil acidification, impacting their unique groundwater dependent ecosystems. The build-up of pyrite in these systems occurred over millennia by the discharge of deep artesian sulfate-containing groundwaters through organic-rich subaqueous soils. Rare iron and aluminium hydroxysulfate minerals form thick efflorescences due to high evaporation rates in this arid zone environment, and the oxidised soils pose a significant risk to local aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The distribution of extreme acidification hazard is controlled by regional variations in the hydrochemistry of groundwater. Geochemical processes fractionate acidity and alkalinity into separate parts of the discharge zone allowing potentially extreme environments to form locally. Differences in groundwater chemistry in the aquifer along flow pathways towards the spring discharge zone are related to a range of processes including mineral dissolution and redox reactions, which in turn are strongly influenced by degassing of the mantle along deep crustal fractures. There is thus a connection between shallow critical zone ecosystems and deep crustal/mantle processes which ultimately control the formation of hypersulfidic soils and the potential for extreme geochemical environments.

  17. Acid Sulfate Alteration in Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Catalano, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit landed on the Gusev Crater plains west of the Columbia Hills in January, 2004, during the Martian summer (sol 0; sol = 1 Martian day = 24 hr 40 min). Spirit explored the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater in the vicinity of Home Plate at the onset on its second winter (sol approximately 900) until the onset of its fourth winter (sol approximately 2170). At that time, Spirit became mired in a deposit of fined-grained and sulfate-rich soil with dust-covered solar panels and unfavorable pointing of the solar arrays toward the sun. Spirit has not communicated with the Earth since sol 2210 (January, 2011). Like its twin rover Opportunity, which landed on the opposite side of Mars at Meridiani Planum, Spirit has an Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument for chemical analyses and a Moessbauer spectrometer (MB) for measurement of iron redox state, mineralogical speciation, and quantitative distribution among oxidation (Fe(3+)/sigma Fe) and coordination (octahedral versus tetrahedral) states and mineralogical speciation (e.g., olivine, pyroxene, ilmenite, carbonate, and sulfate). The concentration of SO3 in Gusev rocks and soils varies from approximately 1 to approximately 34 wt%. Because the APXS instrument does not detect low atomic number elements (e.g., H and C), major-element oxide concentrations are normalized to sum to 100 wt%, i.e., contributions of H2O, CO2, NO2, etc. to the bulk composition care not considered. The majority of Gusev samples have approximately 6 plus or minus 5 wt% SO3, but there is a group of samples with high SO3 concentrations (approximately 30 wt%) and high total iron concentrations (approximately 20 wt%). There is also a group with low total Fe and SO3 concentrations that is also characterized by high SiO2 concentrations (greater than 70 wt%). The trend labeled "Basaltic Soil" is interpreted as mixtures in variable proportions between unaltered igneous material and oxidized and SO3-rich basaltic

  18. [Effects of colistin sulfate residue on soil microbial community structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Peng, Jin-Ju; Chen, Jin-Jun; Fan, Ting-Li; Sun, Yong-Xue

    2014-06-01

    By using fumigation extraction and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) methods, the change of characteristics of soil microbial community structure caused by residue of colistin sulfate (CS) was studied. The results showed that the CS (w(cs) > or = 5 mg x kg(-1)) had a significant effect on the microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and it was dose-dependent where MBC decreased with the increase of CS concentration in soil. The MBC in soil decreased by 52. 1% when the CS concentration reached 50 mg x kg(-1). The total PLFA of soil in each CS treatment was significantly decreased during the sampling period compared with the control group and showed a dose-dependent relationship. The soil microbial community structure and diversity in the low CS group (w(cs) = 0.5 mg x kg(-1)) were not significantly different from the control group on 7th and 49th day. However, they were significantly different on 21st and 35th day especially in the high CS group (w(cs) = 50 mg x kg(-1)). It was concluded that CS could change the structure of soil microorganisms and varied with time which might be caused by the chemical conversion and degradation of CS in soil.

  19. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  20. A simplified method for estimation of jarosite and acid-forming sulfates in acid mine wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Smart, Roger St C; Schumann, Russell C; Gerson, Andrea R; Levay, George

    2007-02-01

    In acid base accounting (ABA) estimates of acid mine wastes, the acid potential (AP) estimate can be improved by using the net carbonate value (NCV) reactive sulfide S method rather than total S assay methods but this does not give recovery of potentially acid producing ferrous and ferric sulfates present in many wastes. For more accurate estimation of AP, an effective, site-specific method to quantify acid sulfate salts, such as jarosite and melanterite, in waste rocks has been developed and tested on synthetic and real wastes. The SPOCAS (acid sulfate soils) methods have been modified to an effective, rapid method to speciate sulfate forms in different synthetic waste samples. A three-step sequential extraction procedure has been established. These steps are: (1) argon-purged water extraction (3 min) to extract soluble Fe(II) salts (particularly melanterite), epsomite and gypsum (1 wt.% S) as copper sulfides, the second step of roasting needs to be excluded from the procedure with an increased time of 4 M HCl extraction to 16 h for jarosite determination.

  1. Biological functions of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, Martin A; Bartolini, Barbara; Axelsson, Jakob; Gustafsson, Renata; Tykesson, Emil; Pera, Edgar; Oldberg, Åke; Maccarana, Marco; Malmstrom, Anders

    2013-05-01

    The presence of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate changes the properties of the polysaccharides because it generates a more flexible chain with increased binding potentials. Iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate influences multiple cellular properties, such as migration, proliferation, differentiation, angiogenesis and the regulation of cytokine/growth factor activities. Under pathological conditions such as wound healing, inflammation and cancer, iduronic acid has diverse regulatory functions. Iduronic acid is formed by two epimerases (i.e. dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 and 2) that have different tissue distribution and properties. The role of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate is highlighted by the vast changes in connective tissue features in patients with a new type of Ehler-Danlos syndrome: adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome. Future research aims to understand the roles of the two epimerases and their interplay with the sulfotransferases involved in chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Furthermore, a better definition of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate functions using different knockout models is needed. In this review, we focus on the two enzymes responsible for iduronic acid formation, as well as the role of iduronic acid in health and disease.

  2. Bioremediation of coal contaminated soil under sulfate-reducing condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwano, Y.; Shimizu, Y. [Kyoto University, Shiga (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of coal-derived hydrocarbons, especially high molecular weight (HMW) components, under anaerobic conditions. For this purpose biodegradation experiments were performed, using specifically designed soil column bioreactors. For the experiment, coal-contaminated soil was prepared, which contains high molecular weight hydrocarbons at high concentration (approx. 55.5 mgC g-drysoil{sup -1}). The experiment was carried out in two different conditions: sulfate reducing (SR) condition (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}=10 mmol 1{sup -1} in the liquid medium) and control condition (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} {lt} 0.5 mmol 1{sup -1}). Although no degradation was observed under the control condition, the resin fraction decreased to half (from 6,541 to 3,386 mgC g-soil{sup -1}) under SR condition, with the concomitant increase of two PAHs (phenanthrene and fluoranthene 9 and 2.5 times, respectively). From these results, we could conclude that high molecular hydrocarbons were biodegradable and transformed to low molecular weight PAHs under the sulfate-reducing condition. Since these PAHs are known to be biologically degraded under aerobic condition, a serial combination of anaerobic (sulfate reducing) and then aerobic bioremediations could be effective and useful for the soil pollution by petroleum and/or coal derived hydrocarbons.

  3. Acid Sulfate Weathering on Mars: Results from the Mars Exploration Rover Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2006-01-01

    Sulfur has played a major role in the formation and alteration of outcrops, rocks, and soils at the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites on Meridiani Planum and in Gusev crater. Jarosite, hematite, and evaporite sulfates (e.g., Mg and Ca sulfates) occur along with siliciclastic sediments in outcrops at Meridiani Planum. The occurrence of jarosite is a strong indicator for an acid sulfate weathering environment at Meridiani Planum. Some outcrops and rocks in the Columbia Hills in Gusev crater appear to be extensively altered as suggested by their relative softness as compared to crater floor basalts, high Fe(3+)/FeT, iron mineralogy dominated by nanophase Fe(3+) oxides, hematite and/or goethite, corundum-normative mineralogies, and the presence of Mg- and Casulfates. One scenario for aqueous alteration of these rocks and outcrops is that vapors and/or fluids rich in SO2 (volcanic source) and water interacted with rocks that were basaltic in bulk composition. Ferric-, Mg-, and Ca-sulfates, phosphates, and amorphous Si occur in several high albedo soils disturbed by the rover's wheels in the Columbia Hills. The mineralogy of these materials suggests the movement of liquid water within the host material and the subsequent evaporation of solutions rich in Fe, Mg, Ca, S, P, and Si. The presence of ferric sulfates suggests that these phases precipitated from highly oxidized, low-pH solutions. Several hypotheses that invoke acid sulfate weathering environments have been suggested for the aqueous formation of sulfate-bearing phases on the surface of Mars including (1) the oxidative weathering of ultramafic igneous rocks containing sulfides; (2) sulfuric acid weathering of basaltic materials by solutions enriched by volcanic gases (e.g., SO2); and (3) acid fog (i.e., vapors rich in H2SO4) weathering of basaltic or basaltic-derived materials.

  4. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  5. Effects of Electrolyte Anions and pH on Adsortpion of Sulfate by Variable Charge Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGGANGYA; G.M.BRUEMMER; 等

    1996-01-01

    The effects of three electrolyte anions,ionic strength and pH on the adsorption of sulfate by two variable charge soils,with different surface charge properties were studied.Under the conditions of the same pH and ionic strength the effect of electrolyte anions on the adsorption of sulfate was in the order of Cl->NO3->ClO4-,indicating the difference of the nature among these three anions.For ferralsol in the same concentration of chloride and perchloride solutions,the two sulfate adsorption-pH curves could intersect at certain pH value.When pH was higher than the intersecting point.more sulfate was adsorbed in the perchloride solution,while when it was lower than the intersecting point,more sulfate was adsorbed in the chloride solution.In different concentratioins of electrolyte solution,the curves of the amount of oxy-acid anion adsorbed,which changed with pH,could intersect at a certain pH,which is termed point of zero salt effect(PZSE) on adsortpion.The nature of electrolyte anions influenced obviously the appearace of PZSE for sulfate adsorption.For ferralsol the curves of adsorption converged to about pH 7 in NaCl solution seemed to intersect in NaNO3 solution and to have a typical PZSE for sulfate adsorption in NaClO4 solution,For Acrisol the three curves of adsorption were nearly parallel in NaCl and NaNO3 solutions and converged to pH 6.5 in NaClO4 solution.

  6. ELECTRON DETACHMENT DISSOCIATION OF SYNTHETIC HEPARAN SULFATE GLYCOSAMINOGLYCAN TETRASACCHARIDES VARYING IN DEGREE OF SULFATION AND HEXURONIC ACID STEREOCHEMISTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Franklin E; Arungundram, Sailaja; Al-Mafraji, Kanar; Venot, Andre; Boons, Geert-Jan; Amster, I Jonathan

    2012-12-15

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) carbohydrates provide a challenging analytical target for structural determination due to their polydisperse nature, non-template biosynthesis, and labile sulfate modifications. The resultant structures, although heterogeneous, contain domains which indicate a sulfation pattern or code that correlates to specific function. Mass spectrometry, in particular electron detachment dissociation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (EDD FT-ICR MS), provides a highly sensitive platform for GAG structural analysis by providing cross-ring cleavages for sulfation location and product ions specific to hexuronic acid stereochemistry. To investigate the effect of sulfation pattern and variations in stereochemistry on EDD spectra, a series of synthetic heparan sulfate (HS) tetrasaccharides are examined. Whereas previous studies have focused on lowly sulfated compounds (0.5-1 sulfate groups per disaccharide), the current work extends the application of EDD to more highly sulfated tetrasaccharides (1-2 sulfate groups per disaccharide) and presents the first EDD of a tetrasaccharide containing a sulfated hexuronic acid. For these more highly sulfated HS oligomers, alternative strategies are shown to be effective for extracting full structural details. These strategies inlcude sodium cation replacement of protons, for determining the sites of sulfation, and desulfation of the oligosaccharides for the generation of product ions for assigning uronic acid stereochemistry.

  7. Sulfate Reduction at Low Ph To Remediate Acid Mine Drainage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Andrea, I.; Sanz, J.L.; Bijmans, M.F.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, b

  8. Arsenic immobilization in the contaminated soil using poorly crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxy sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhihui; Liu, Lin; Chai, Liyuan; Liao, Yingping; Yao, Wenbin; Xiao, Ruiyang

    2015-08-01

    A low crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxy sulfate (FeOS) was used to immobilize arsenic (As) in soils in this study. The effects of FeOS amount, treatment time and soil moisture on As immobilization were investigated. The results showed that water-soluble and NaHCO3-extractable As were immobilized by 53.4-99.8 and 13.8-73.3% respectively, with 1-10% of FeOS addition. The highest immobilization of water-soluble (98.5%) and NaHCO3-extractable arsenic (47.2%) was achieved under condition of 4% of FeOS and 80% of soil moisture. Further, more amounts of FeOS addition resulted in less time requirement for As immobilization. Sequential chemical extraction experiment revealed that easily mobile arsenic phase was transferred to less mobile phase. The FeOS-bonded As may play a significant role in arsenic immobilization. Under leaching with simulated acid rain at 60 times pore volumes, accumulation amount of As release from untreated soil and soil amended with FeOS were 98.4 and 1.2 mg, respectively, which correspond to 7.69 and 0.09% of total As amounts in soil. The result showed that the low crystalline FeOS can be used as a suitable additive for arsenic immobilization in soils.

  9. Prenyl sulfates as alkylating reagents for mercapto amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Sizova, Olga; Utkina, Natalia; Shibaev, Vladimir; Chojnacki, Tadeusz; Jankowski, Wieslaw; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2008-01-01

    A new methodology for prenylation of thiol compounds has been developed. The approach is based on the use of prenyl sulfates as new reagents for S-prenylation of benzenethiol and cysteamine in aqueous systems. The C(10)-prenols geraniol and nerol that differ in the configuration (E or Z, correspondingly) of the alpha-isoprene unit were efficiently O-sulfated in the presence of a pyridine-SO(3') complex. The obtained geranyl and neryl sulfates were tested as alkylating agents. These compounds were chosen to reveal the influence of the alpha-isoprene unit configuration on their alkylation (prenylation) ability. S-Geranyl cysteine was prepared to demonstrate the applicability of this method for prenylation of peptides containing mercapto amino acids.

  10. Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols

    KAUST Repository

    Kravitz, Ben

    2009-07-28

    We used a general circulation model of Earth\\'s climate to conduct geoengineering experiments involving stratospheric injection of sulfur dioxide and analyzed the resulting deposition of sulfate. When sulfur dioxide is injected into the tropical or Arctic stratosphere, the main additional surface deposition of sulfate occurs in midlatitude bands, because of strong cross-tropopause flux in the jet stream regions. We used critical load studies to determine the effects of this increase in sulfate deposition on terrestrial ecosystems by assuming the upper limit of hydration of all sulfate aerosols into sulfuric acid. For annual injection of 5 Tg of SO2 into the tropical stratosphere or 3 Tg of SO2 into the Arctic stratosphere, neither the maximum point value of sulfate deposition of approximately 1.5 mEq m−2 a−1 nor the largest additional deposition that would result from geoengineering of approximately 0.05 mEq m−2 a−1 is enough to negatively impact most ecosystems.

  11. Selenium inhibits sulfate-mediated methylmercury production in rice paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Jie; Dang, Fei; Zhao, Jia-Ting; Zhong, Huan

    2016-06-01

    There is increasing interest in understanding factors controlling methylmercury (MeHg) production in mercury-contaminated rice paddy soil. Sulfate has been reported to affect MeHg biogeochemistry under anoxic conditions, and recent studies revealed that selenium (Se) could evidently reduce MeHg production in paddy soil. However, the controls of sulfate and Se on net MeHg production in paddy soil under fluctuating redox conditions remain largely unknown. Microcosm experiments were conducted to explore the effects of sulfate and Se on net MeHg production in rice paddy soil. Soil was added with 0-960 mg/kg sulfate, in the presence or absence of 3.0 mg/kg selenium (selenite or selenate), and incubated under anoxic (40 days) or suboxic conditions (5 days), simulating fluctuating redox conditions in rice paddy field. Sulfate addition moderately affected soil MeHg concentrations under anoxic conditions, while reoxidation resulted in evidently higher (18-40%) MeHg levels in sulfate amended soils than the control. The observed changes in net MeHg production were related to dynamics of sulfate and iron. However, Se could inhibit sulfate-mediated MeHg production in the soils: Se addition largely reduced net MeHg production in the soils (23-86%, compared to the control), despite of sulfate addition. Similarly, results of the pot experiments (i.e., rice cultivation in amended soils) indicated that soil MeHg levels were rather comparable in Se-amended soils during rice growth period, irrespective of added sulfate doses. The more important role of Se than sulfate in controlling MeHg production was explained by the formation of HgSe nanoparticles irrespective of the presence of sulfate, confirmed by TEM-EDX and XANES analysis. Our findings regarding the effects of sulfate and Se on net MeHg production in rice paddy soil together with the mechanistic explanation of the processes advance our understanding of MeHg dynamics and risk in soil-rice systems.

  12. 75 FR 78243 - Propionic Acid and Salts, Urea Sulfate, Methidathion, and Methyl Parathion; Registration Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... AGENCY Propionic Acid and Salts, Urea Sulfate, Methidathion, and Methyl Parathion; Registration Review... pesticides propionic acid and salts, case no. 4078, urea sulfate, case no. 7213, methidathion, case no. 0034... pesticides in the table below--propionic acid and salts, case 4078, urea sulfate, case no. 7213,...

  13. Sulfur-accumulating plants convert sulfate salts from soils into environmentally resilient biominerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Thomas; Reid, Nathan; Stevens, Jason; Dixon, Kingsley

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur-accumulator plants (thiophores), which accumulate atypically high sulfur and calcium concentrations in their aerial biomass, may be suitable for revegetating and phytostabilising reactive sulfur-enriched substrates such as mine tailings, acid-sulfate soils and polluted soils. We present biogeochemical insights on thiophores from the Australian Great Sandy Desert, which accumulate up to 40 times as much sulfur (2-5 %S) versus comparator species. X-ray microanalyses revealed this accumulation relates to peculiar gypsum-like mineralisation throughout their foliage, illustrating a mechanism for sulfate removal from soils and sequestration as sparingly soluble biominerals. However, we did not know whether these species treat the excess Ca/S as a waste to be shed with senescent litter and, if so, how resilient these 'biominerals' are to photo-biodegradation once shed and so to what extent the accumulated elements are recycled back into the reactive/bioavailable sulfate reservoir. To address these questions, we sampled four foliage (phyllode) fractions from ten individuals of the thiophore, Acacia bivenosa: healthy mature phyllodes, senescent phyllodes on the branch, recently shed and older, more degraded ground litter. We selected two thiophores (A. bivenosa and A. robeorum) and a non-thiophore (A. ancistrocarpa) for detailed soil/regolith studies. Samples were collected from trenches bisected by each tree, taken from varying depth (20-500 mm) and distance from the stem (0.1-5 m). Dried foliage was cleaned, sectioned for SEM-EDXS examination and elemental compositions of foliage and soils were determined (microwave-assisted acid digestion + ICP-OES/MS). Each species generated a 'halo' of elevated S/Ca in the soil immediately beneath their crowns, although that of A. ancistrocarpa was of minor magnitude. These anomalies were confined to shallow soil (20-50 mm i.e. influenced by litter), suggesting limited S/Ca re-mobilisation from the litter. Foliar elemental

  14. Effect of Enhancing Urea-Humic Acid Mixture with Refined Acid Sulphate Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd T.M. Yusuff

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Acid Sulphate Soil (ASS is a problem soil partly because of its high acidity. This low pH could be exploited to reduce ammonia loss from urea by reducing soil microsite pH. The use Humic Acid (HA to control ammonia loss from urea has been reported but the cost of this material is high. This laboratory study compared the effect of enhancing urea-humic acid mixtures with acid sulphate soil on NH3 loss, pH, exchangeable ammonium and available nitrate contents. Approach: Humic acid, acid sulfate soil and soil used in the incubation study were analyzed for selected soil physical-chemical properties using standard procedures. Urea-HA-ASS mixtures were prepared and ammonia volatilization of the mixtures was evaluated by the closed-dynamic air flow system. The treatments were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with 3 replications. Standard procedures were used to determine ammonia loss, soil pH, exchangeable ammonium and available nitrate at 22 days of incubation. Data obtained were analyzed using analysis of variance and Duncan's test using Statistical Analysis System (SAS version 9.2. Results: Urea amended with 0.75 g ASS significantly reduced ammonia volatilization. Although the use of appropriate amount of acid sulphate soil to control ammonia loss is possible, excessive use of this material is not recommended because of Fe in it. Conclusion: Urea amended with 0.75 g ASS reduced ammonia.

  15. Estimation of interfacial acidity of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arghya Dey; G Naresh Patwari

    2011-11-01

    An enhancement in the excited state proton transfer (ESPT) processes of coumarin-102 (C-102) dye was observed upon addition of salicylic acid and hydrochloric acid in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar solution. The phenomenon was observed only in the micellar medium of anionic surfactant SDS and not in case of cationic (CTAB) or neutral (Trition X -100) surfactants. ESPT of C-102 was also observed in aqueous solutions but on addition of very high concentrations of hydrochloric acid. However, on comparing the ratio of the protonated species from the emission spectra in the presence and absence of SDS micelle, a conclusive estimation of the local proton concentration at the Stern layer of SDS micelles could be evaluated.

  16. Smectite Formation in Acid Sulfate Environments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretyazhko, T. S.; Niles, P. B.; Sutter, B.; Clark, J. V.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    Phyllosilicates of the smectite group detected in Noachian and early Hesperian terrains on Mars were hypothesized to form under aqueous conditions that were globally neutral to alkaline. These pH conditions and the presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere should have been favorable for the formation of large carbonate deposits. However, large-scale carbonate deposits have not been detected on Mars. We hypothesized that smectite deposits are consistent with perhaps widespread acidic aqueous conditions that prevented carbonate precipitation. The objective of our work was to investigate smectite formation under acid sulfate conditions in order to provide insight into the possible geochemical conditions required for smectite formation on Mars. Hydrothermal batch incubation experiments were performed with Mars-analogue, glass-rich, basalt simulant in the presence of sulfuric acid of variable concentration.

  17. Effect of Sulfate on Adsorption of Zinc and Cadmium by Variable Charge Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGGANGYA; G.W.BRUMMER; 等

    1998-01-01

    SO42- and Zn2+ or Cd2+ were added to three variable charge soils in different sequences.In one sequence sulfate was added first ,and in the other,Zn2+ or Cd2+ first.The addition of sulfate to the system invariably caused an increase in adsorption of the heavy metal added,with the effect more remarkable whn the soil reacted with the sulfate prior to the metal.the shift in pH50 for both Zn and Cd adsorption was aslo comparatively larger in the first sequence of reactions .It was suggested that the increase in negative charge density and the resultant negative potential of the soil were the primary cause of the pronounced effect of sulfate on adsorption of Zn or Cd,and the formaiton of the ternary surface complex-S-SO4-M might also play a role in the effect.

  18. 75 FR 51055 - Propionic Acid and Salts, and Urea Sulfate; Registration Review Proposed Decisions; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... AGENCY Propionic Acid and Salts, and Urea Sulfate; Registration Review Proposed Decisions; Notice of... urea sulfate and opens a public comment period on the proposed decisions. Registration review is EPA's.... Urea sulfate is used as a desiccant on ] cotton. No food crop uses remain and all tolerances for...

  19. The Pacific Marine aerosol: Evidence for natural acid sulfates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Ahlquist, Norman C.; Covert, David S.

    1987-04-01

    Optical, chemical, and physical measurements of marine boundary layer aerosol were made during two oceanographic cruises in the central Pacific in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Both cruises revealed a ubiquitous accumulation mode atmospheric aerosol that showed marked increases in the region of equatorial upwelling, 4°N to 15°S, between Hawaii and Tahiti. Changes in the aerosol size distribution in response to thermal conditioning revealed properties consistent with those of sulfuric acid and/or ammonium sulfate/bisulfate depending upon the sampling location. Changes in the apparent acidity of the accumulation mode varied in conjunction with physical and chemical properties of the region sampled, while the number concentration suggests that it is the dominant and possibly limiting aerosol for cloud condensation nuclei in the remote central Pacific.

  20. Dermatan Sulfate Epimerase 1-Deficient Mice Have Reduced Content and Changed Distribution of Iduronic Acids in Dermatan Sulfate and an Altered Collagen Structure in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarana, M.; Kalamajski, S.; Kongsgaard, M.;

    2009-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 (DS-epi1) and DS-epi2 convert glucuronic acid to iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Here we report on the generation of DS-epi1-null mice and the resulting alterations in the chondroitin/dermatan polysaccharide chains. The numbers of long blocks...... of adjacent iduronic acids are greatly decreased in skin decorin and biglycan chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, along with a parallel decrease in iduronic-2-O-sulfated-galactosamine-4-O-sulfated structures. Both iduronic acid blocks and iduronic acids surrounded by glucuronic acids are also decreased in versican......-derived chains. DS-epi1-deficient mice are smaller than their wild-type littermates but otherwise have no gross macroscopic alterations. The lack of DS-epi1 affects the chondroitin/dermatan sulfate in many proteoglycans, and the consequences for skin collagen structure were initially analyzed. We found...

  1. Effects of sulfate and selenite on mercury methylation in a mercury-contaminated rice paddy soil under anoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjie; Dang, Fei; Zhong, Huan; Wei, Zhongbo; Li, Ping

    2016-03-01

    Biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and selenium (Se) could play an important role in methylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in soil, while their potential effects on MeHg production in rice paddy soil are less understood. The main objective of this study was to explore the effects of sulfate and selenite on net MeHg production in contaminated rice paddy soil, characterized with massive MeHg production and thus MeHg accumulation in rice. A series of microcosm incubation experiments were conducted using a contaminated paddy soil amended with sulfate and/or selenite, in which sulfate-reducing bacteria were mainly responsible for MeHg production. Our results demonstrated that sulfate addition reduced solid and dissolved MeHg levels in soils by ≤18 and ≤25 %, respectively. Compared to sulfate, selenite was more effective in inhibiting net MeHg production, and the inhibitory effect depended largely on amended selenite doses. Moreover, sulfate input played a dual role in affecting Hg-Se interactions in soil, which could be explained by the dynamics of sulfate under anoxic conditions. Therefore, the effects of sulfate and selenium input should be carefully considered when assessing risk of Hg in anoxic environments (e.g., rice paddy field and wetland).

  2. SULFATION OF PACHYMAN WITH CHLOROSULFONIC ACID USING THE IMPROVED WOLFROM METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Chen; Ai-yun Wang; Tian-tong Li; Cheng-fu Li; Qing-cai Jiao

    2006-01-01

    High purity polysaccharide of pachyman was isolated from the powder of Poria cocos sclerotium with an yield of 77.8%. The intrinsic viscosity of polysaccharide was found to be 78.95 mL/g in DMSO solution at 25℃. The isolated polysaccharide was reacted with chlorosulfonic acid to obtain pachyman sulfate using the improved Wolfrom method. The results of the orthogonality experiment on the sulfation reaction identified that the effectiveness of the reaction conditions on the degree of sulfation and the value of intrinsic viscosity is in the following order: molar ratio of chlorosulfonic acid to glucoside (3-5) > reaction temperature (60-80℃) > reaction time (1-2 h). The kinetic studies of the pachyman sulfationindicated that the hydrolysis is accompanied with the sulfation process. The decrease in intrinsic viscosity of the sulfated pachyman is proportional to the increase in the degree of sulfation under the mild reaction conditions of < 80℃,chlorosulfonic acid/glucoside mole ratio < 5, and reaction time < 2 h. Beyond the above reaction conditions, excessive loss of -OH group occurs during hydrolysis. The NMR results indicated a complete sulfation on C-6 and a partial sulfation on the C-2 and C-4 of glucoside.

  3. The fate of sulfate in acidified pig slurry during storage and following application to cropped soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Peter; Elsgaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    to 11 mo at 2, 10, or 20°C. Furthermore, the fertilizer efficiency of sulfuric acid in acidified slurry was investigated in a pot experiment with spring barley. The sulfate content from acidification with sulfuric acid was relatively stable and even after 11 mo of storage the majority was in the plant...... not exceed those of the untreated slurry for several months after addition. The S fertilizer value of the acidified slurry was considerable as a result of the stable sulfate pool during storage. The high content of inorganic S in the acidified slurry may potentially lead to development of odorous volatile...

  4. Depositional ice nucleation on solid ammonium sulfate and glutaric acid particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Baustian

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous ice nucleation on solid ammonium sulfate and glutaric acid particles was studied using optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Optical microscopy was used to detect selective nucleation events as water vapor was slowly introduced into an environmental sample cell. Particles that nucleated ice were dried via sublimation and examined in detail using Raman spectroscopy. Depositional ice nucleation is highly selective and occurred preferentially on just a few ammonium sulfate and glutaric acid particles in each sample. For freezing temperatures between 214 K and 235 K an average ice saturation ratio of S = 1.10±0.07 for solid ammonium sulfate was observed. Over the same temperature range, S values observed for ice nucleation on glutaric acid particles increased from 1.2 at 235 K to 1.6 at 218 K. Experiments with externally mixed particles further show that ammonium sulfate is a more potent ice nucleus than glutaric acid. Our results suggest that heterogeneous nucleation on ammonium sulfate may be an important pathway for atmospheric ice nucleation and cirrus cloud formation when solid ammonium sulfate aerosol particles are available for ice formation. This pathway for ice formation may be particularly significant near the tropical tropopause region where sulfates are abundant and other species known to be good ice nuclei are depleted.

  5. Reactive Crystallization of Calcium Sulfate Dihydrate from Acidic Wastewater and Lime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓立聪; 张亦飞; 陈芳芳; 曹绍涛; 游韶玮; 刘艳; 张懿

    2013-01-01

    The present work focused on the recycle of the sulfate and the metal ions from acidic wastewater dis-charged by nonferrous metallurgical industry. The effects of the temperature, the reactant concentration, the stirring speed and the metal ions on the reactive crystallization process of calcium sulfate between sulfuric acid and lime were systematically investigated. The morphology of the precipitated crystals evolved from platelet-like and nee-dle-like shape to rod-like shape when the temperature was increased from 25 to 70 °C. An increase in the agglom-eration of calcium sulfate was found with increasing lime concentration. Metal ions markedly retard the rate of crystallization of calcium sulfate dihydrate. The crystallization of gypsum was slowed with the existence of Mg2+in the solution, and the morphology of gypsum was transformed from platelet-like shape to rod-like shape when Mg2+concentration reached 0.08 mol·L-1. The amorphous ferric hydroxide was coated on the calcium sulfate after the co-precipitation process while Zn2+and Al3+ions in the solution enhanced the agglomeration of the calcium sulfate by absorbing on the surface of the crystals. Comprehensive acidic wastewater containing heavy metals was effi-ciently purified by the two stage lime neutralization technology, and highly agglomerated gypsum precipitates with needle-like shape were obtained. The precipitates could be purified by sulfuric acid washing, and the metal ions were effectively separated from the calcium sulfate by-products.

  6. Relationship between binding activity of sup 67 Ga and low sulfated acid glycosaminoglycans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, Yasuhito; Tsukada, Fumitake; Kohno, Hiroyuki (Tohoku Coll. of Pharmacy, Sendai (Japan)); Kubodera, Akiko (Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). School of Pharmaceutical Sciences)

    1989-01-01

    Sulfate content of acid glycosaminoglycan (AGAG) extracted from granuloma which had been produced by turpentine oil was inversely proportional to the amount of {sub 67}Ga accumulation in the granuloma. Additionally, the lowest sulfation occurred in granuloma at a peak of inflammation when the uptake of {sub 67}Ga had reached a maximum. On the basis of electrophoretic pattern, sulfate content, and specific optical rotation, it was concluded that acid glycosaminoglycans obtained from granuloma are mainly composed of chondroitin sulfate-A, -B, and desulfated heparin, while haparan sulfate was a minor component. From in vitro assays, desulfated acid glycosaminoglycans, especially desulfated-heparin and desulfated-heparan sulfate, were found to have a high affinity to {sub 67}Ga. These results suggest that low- or de-sulfation of AGAG is related to the accumulation of {sub 67}Ga in inflammatory lesions such as granuloma. Moreover, these results suggest that {sub 67}Ga does not bind to glycosaminoglycans via sulfuric acid residues. (author).

  7. Homoserine as an Aspartic Acid Precursor for Synthesis of Proteoglycan Glycopeptide Containing Aspartic Acid and a Sulfated Glycan Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weizhun; Ramadan, Sherif; Yang, Bo; Yoshida, Keisuke; Huang, Xuefei

    2016-12-02

    Among many hurdles in synthesizing proteoglycan glycopeptides, one challenge is the incorporation of aspartic acid in the peptide backbone and acid sensitive O-sulfated glycan chains. To overcome this, a new strategy was developed utilizing homoserine as an aspartic acid precursor. The conversion of homoserine to aspartic acid in the glycopeptide was successfully accomplished by late stage oxidation using (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) and bis(acetoxy)iodobenzene (BAIB). This is the first time that a glycopeptide containing aspartic acid and an O-sulfated glycan was synthesized.

  8. Toward understanding the influence of soil metals and sulfate content on plant thiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunaiti, Abdelrahim A; Al-Oqlah, Ahmed; Shannag, Noor M; Abukhalaf, Imad K; Silvestrov, Natalia A; von Deutsch, Daniel A; Bayorh, Mohamed A

    2007-03-15

    Plants respond to increased concentrations of metals by a number of mechanisms, including chelation with phytochelatins (PCs). Soil specimens and plants (Veronica anagalis-aquatica, Typha domingensis, Cynodon dactylon, Chenopodium album, Rumex dentatus, Amaranthus gracilis, Chenopodium murale, Inula viscosa) leaves were collected from two sites in northern Jordan and subsequently metals (cadmium, copper, and lead), sulfate, and PC (from leaves) levels were determined. One of these sites was contaminated with metals and the other served as a control site. The contaminated site had elevated cadmium, copper, lead, and sulfate levels. This increase of metal and sulfate levels in the soil at the contaminated site correlated with a rise in plant total glutathione (GSH(T)) and cysteine (CYS(T)). These increases were not attributed to an elevation in total phytochelatin levels. However, a significant increase in the ratio of short-chain phytochelatins to the total phytochelatin stores was observed. The individual effects of metals and sulfate on glutathione, short-chain PCs and long-chain PCs levels were dissimilar.

  9. Sulfate Mineral Formation from Acid-Weathered Phyllosilicates: Implications for the Aqueous History of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, P. I.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars are thought to have formed under neutral to alkaline conditions during Mars' earliest Noachian geologic era (approx. 4.1-3.7 Gya). Sulfate formation, on the other hand, requires more acidic conditions which are thought to have occurred later during Mars' Hesperian era (approx. 3.7-3.0 Gya). Therefore, regions on Mars where phyllosilicates and sulfates are found in close proximity to each other provide evidence for the geologic and aqueous conditions during this global transition. Both phyllosilicates and sulfates form in the presence of water and thus give clues to the aqueous history of Mars and its potential for habitability. Phyllosilicates that formed during the Noachian era may have been weathered by the prevailing acidic conditions that characterize the Hesperian. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to characterize the alteration products resulting from acid-sulfate weathered phyllosilicates in laboratory experiments. This study focuses on two phyllosilicates commonly identified with sulfates on Mars: nontronite and saponite. We also compare our results to observations of phyllosilicates and sulfates on Mars to better understand the formation process of sulfates in close proximity to phyllosilicates on Mars and constrain the aqueous conditions of these regions on Mars.

  10. Endosulfan sulfate mobility in soil columns and pesticide pollution of groundwater in Northwest Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakouri, Hicham; Ouassini, Abdelhamid; Morillo Aguado, José; Usero García, José

    2007-12-01

    Groundwater pollution from agricultural practices is a serious environmental and health problem. In this work, stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (MS) detection were used to determine phytosanitary products in groundwater samples from the Loukkos perimeter in Northwest Morocco. Some pesticides--in particular, endosulfan and its metabolites--were found in water destined for human consumption. Analyses of soil samples were also carried out, and the results showed endosulfan sulfate and endosulfan ether in abundance. Endosulfan sulfate leaching was also performed in undisturbed soil columns to obtain more information on the vertical migration of pesticides used in the perimeter. The kinetic study showed a high recovery rate (73%) after 10 days of experimental work.

  11. Replenishing Humic Acids in Agricultural Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Susic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For many decades, it was commonly believed that humic acids were formed in soils by the microbial conversion of plant lignins. However, an experiment to test whether these humic acids were formed prior to plant matter reaching the soil was never reported until the late 1980s (and then only as a side issue, even though humic acids were first isolated and reported in 1786. This was a serious omission, and led to a poor understanding of how the humic acid content of soils could be maintained or increased for optimum fertility. In this study, commercial sugar cane mulch and kelp extracts were extracted with alkali and analyzed for humic acid content. Humic acids in the extracts were positively identified by fluorescence spectrophotometry, and this demonstrated that humic acids are formed in senescent plant and algal matter before they reach the soil, where they are then strongly bound to the soil and are also resistant to microbial metabolism. Humic acids are removed from soils by wind and water erosion, and by water leaching, which means that they must be regularly replenished. This study shows that soils can be replenished or fortified with humic acids simply by recycling plant and algal matter, or by adding outside sources of decomposed plant or algal matter such as composts, mulch, peat, and lignite coals.

  12. Sulfate reduction in sulfuric material after re-flooding: Effectiveness of organic carbon addition and pH increase depends on soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chaolei; Fitzpatrick, Rob; Mosley, Luke M; Marschner, Petra

    2015-11-15

    Sulfuric material is formed upon oxidation of sulfidic material; it is extremely acidic, and therefore, an environmental hazard. One option for increasing pH of sulfuric material may be stimulation of bacterial sulfate reduction. We investigated the effects of organic carbon addition and pH increase on sulfate reduction after re-flooding in ten sulfuric materials with four treatments: control, pH increase to 5.5 (+pH), organic carbon addition with 2% w/w finely ground wheat straw (+C), and organic carbon addition and pH increase (+C+pH). After 36 weeks, in five of the ten soils, only treatment +C+pH significantly increased the concentration of reduced inorganic sulfur (RIS) compared to the control and increased the soil pore water pH compared to treatment+pH. In four other soils, pH increase or/and organic carbon addition had no significant effect on RIS concentration compared to the control. The RIS concentration in treatment +C+pH as percentage of the control was negatively correlated with soil clay content and initial nitrate concentration. The results suggest that organic carbon addition and pH increase can stimulate sulfate reduction after re-flooding, but the effectiveness of this treatment depends on soil properties.

  13. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  14. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  15. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M.; Kaufmann, Christian;

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils...... from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the 35SO42– radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of 142 ± 20 nmol cm–3 day–1. Concentrations...... of heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone...

  16. Production of fired construction brick from high sulfate-containing fly ash with boric acid addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başpinar, M Serhat; Kahraman, Erhan; Görhan, Gökhan; Demir, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    The increase of power plant capacity has led to the production of an increasing amount of fly ash that causes high environmental impact in Turkey. Some of the fly ash is utilized within the fired brick industry but high sulfate-containing fly ash creates severe problems during sintering of the fired brick. This study attempted to investigate the potential for converting high sulfate-containing fly ash into useful material for the construction industry by the addition of boric acid. The chemical and mineralogical composition of fly ash and clay were investigated. Boric acid (H(3)BO(3)) was added to fly ash-clay mixtures with up to 5 wt.%. Six different series of test samples were produced by uniaxial pressing. The samples were fired at the industrial clay-brick firing temperatures of 800, 900 and 1000 degrees C. The microstructures of the fired samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and some physical and mechanical properties were measured. It was concluded that the firing at conventional brick firing temperature of high sulfate fly ash without any addition of boric acid resulted in very weak strength bricks. The addition of boric acid and clay simultaneously to the high sulfate- containing fly ash brick dramatically increased the compressive strength of the samples at a firing temperature of 1000 degrees C by modifying the sintering behaviour of high sulfate fly ash.

  17. Stabilization of human prostatic acid phosphatase by coupling with chondroitin sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchter-Wasylewska, E; Dulińska, J; Ostrowski, W S; Torchilin, V P; Trubetskoy, V S

    1991-02-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) (EC 3.1.3.2) was covalently linked to chondroitin sulfate A from whale cartilage. In order to bind the protein amino groups with the preactivated carboxyl groups of chondroitin sulfate, 1-ethyl-3-(3'-dimethylaminepropyl)carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide were used as coupling agents. The product was soluble and enzymatically active. The activity was on average 25% higher than that of the free enzyme. The product was heterogeneous in respect to charge and Mr (50-1500) kDa, as determined by chromatography on Sephacryl S 300 and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The resulting polymers contained covalently bound chondroitin sulfate, as shown by the biotin-avidin test. The modified enzyme is more resistant against various denaturing agents, e.g., urea, ethanol, and heat. Thus covalent modification of PAP by cross-linking to chondroitin sulfate could be the preferred method for stabilization of its biological activity.

  18. Efflorescent sulfates from Baia Sprie mining area (Romania) — Acid mine drainage and climatological approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzatu, Andrei, E-mail: andrei.buzatu@uaic.ro [“Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University of Iaşi, Department of Geology, 20A Carol I Blv., 700505 Iaşi (Romania); Dill, Harald G. [Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University, Welfengarten 1 D-30167, Hannover (Germany); Buzgar, Nicolae [“Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University of Iaşi, Department of Geology, 20A Carol I Blv., 700505 Iaşi (Romania); Damian, Gheorghe [Technical University Cluj Napoca, North University Center of Baia Mare, 62A Dr. Victor Babeş Street, 430083 Baia Mare (Romania); Maftei, Andreea Elena; Apopei, Andrei Ionuț [“Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University of Iaşi, Department of Geology, 20A Carol I Blv., 700505 Iaşi (Romania)

    2016-01-15

    The Baia Sprie epithermal system, a well-known deposit for its impressive mineralogical associations, shows the proper conditions for acid mine drainage and can be considered a general example for affected mining areas around the globe. Efflorescent samples from the abandoned open pit Minei Hill have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and near-infrared (NIR) spectrometry. The identified phases represent mostly iron sulfates with different hydration degrees (szomolnokite, rozenite, melanterite, coquimbite, ferricopiapite), Zn and Al sulfates (gunningite, alunogen, halotrichite). The samples were heated at different temperatures in order to establish the phase transformations among the studied sulfates. The dehydration temperatures and intermediate phases upon decomposition were successfully identified for each of mineral phases. Gunningite was the single sulfate that showed no transformations during the heating experiment. All the other sulfates started to dehydrate within the 30–90 °C temperature range. The acid mine drainage is the main cause for sulfates formation, triggered by pyrite oxidation as the major source for the abundant iron sulfates. Based on the dehydration temperatures, the climatological interpretation indicated that melanterite formation and long-term presence is related to continental and temperate climates. Coquimbite and rozenite are attributed also to the dry arid/semi-arid areas, in addition to the above mentioned ones. The more stable sulfates, alunogen, halotrichite, szomolnokite, ferricopiapite and gunningite, can form and persists in all climate regimes, from dry continental to even tropical humid. - Highlights: • Efflorescent salts from mining areas have a great impact on the environment. • Secondary minerals are influenced by geology, hydrology, biology and climate. • AMD-precipitates samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM, Raman and NIR spectrometry. • The dehydration temperatures

  19. Response of agricultural soils to acid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, M.F.; Wagner, C.K.

    1982-07-01

    Proceedings of the workshop, Response of Agricultural Soils to Acid Deposition, which was held May 12-13 1981, in Columbus, Ohio, and which evaluated the potential beneficial and harmful impacts of atmospheric acid deposition on agricultural soils are presented. Those issues requiring further research are also identified. Five working papers and a literature review prepared by soils specialists are included as is a summary of conclusions reached by the participants. Each of the five working papers has been abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)

  20. Microbial sulfate reduction under sequentially acidic conditions in an upflow anaerobic packed bed bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, T.; Parry, D.L. [Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT (Australia). Faculty for Educational Health & Science

    2006-07-15

    The aim of this study was to operate an upflow anaerobic packed bed reactor (UAPB) containing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) under acidic conditions similar to those found in acid mine drainage (AMD). The UAPB was filled with sand and operated under continuous flow at progressively lower pH and was shown to be capable of supporting sulfate reduction at pH values of 6.0, 5.0, 4.5, 4.0 and 3.5 in a synthetic medium containing 53.5 mmol l{sup -1} lactate. Sulfate reduction rates of 553-1052 mmol m{sup -3} d{sup -1} were obtained when the influent solution pH was progressively lowered from pH 6.0 to 4.0, under an optimal flow rate of 2.61 ml min{sup -1}. When the influent pH was further lowered to pH 3.5, sulfate reduction was substantially reduced with only about 1% sulfate removed at a rate of 3.35 mmol m{sup -3} d{sup -1} after 20 days of operation. However, viable SRB were recovered from the column, indicating that the SRB population was capable of surviving and metabolizing at low levels even at pH 3.5 conditions for at least 20 days. The changes in conductivity in the SRB column did not always occur with changes in pH and redox potential, suggesting that conductivity measurements may be more sensitive to SRB activity and could be used as an additional tool for monitoring SRB activity. The bioreactor containing SRB was able to reduce sulfate and generate alkalinity even when challenged with influent as low as pH 3.5, indicating that such treatment systems have potential for bioremediating highly acidic, sulfate contaminated waste waters.

  1. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meda Anderson R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.

  2. Sulfur utilization by rice and Crotalaria juncea from sulfate - 34S applied to the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivelin Paulo Cesar Ocheuze

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In tropical soils with intensive agriculture an increasing sulfur deficiency has been verified in several crops. The low available S in these soils is caused by the continuous use of concentrated NPK fertilizers. The objective of this work was to evaluate the utilization by rice (Oriza sativa L. and crotalaria juncea (Crotalaria juncea L. of sulfur applied to the soil, under greenhouse conditions. Pots with 3 kg of an Argisol (Paleudalf were used to test the isotopic technique with the stable isotope 34S, adding a solution of sodium sulfate labeled with 34S (14.30 ± 0.05 atom % of 34S to the soil (70 mg SO4-S per kg-1 of soil 18 days after sowing both species. The shoots of the crotalaria and rice were harvested, respectively on the 72nd and 122nd days after S fertilization. The concentration and the amount of sulfur in the crotalaria were higher than in rice, due to the higher legume requirement for this nutrient. The sulfur requirement and the short time interval between fertilization and harvest of the crotalaria resulted in a small amount of native SO4-S mineralized in the soil and a small quantity of 34SO4 immobilized by soil microorganisms. Thus, the percentage of sulfur in the crotalaria derived from the fertilizer (Sdff was higher than in the rice (%Sdff crotalaria = 91.3 ± 3.5%; %Sdff rice = 66.3 ± 0.8%. The expressive values of %Sdff indicate a low rate of mineralization of SO4-S probably as a consequence of the low available sulfur content in the soil.

  3. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-05

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  4. Modeling Sorption and Degradation of 17β-Estradiol-17-Sulfate in Agricultural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, X.; Casey, F. X.; Hakk, H.; Shrestha, S. L.; DeSutter, T.; Khan, E.; Oduor, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    The natural steroid hormone, 17β-estradiol (E2), can be an endocrine disruptor at part-per trillion levels. Laboratory studies indicate a low potential for E2 persistence and mobility in the environment; however, field studies consistently indicate the presence of E2 and its primary metabolite, estrone, at levels sufficiently high to impact water quality. To facilitate urine excretion, animals may release E2 as a sulfated conjugate, which would have a higher aqueous solubility than the parent compound. We hypothesize that E2 conjugates contribute to the detection of free estrogens in the environment. The objective of this study was to determine the sorption, degradation, and mobility of a model conjugate, 17β-estradiol-17-sulfate (E2-17S), in agricultural soils. Radiolabeled E2-17S ([14C]E2-17S) was chemically synthesized in a three-step process, and then batch experiments were conducted in natural and sterile soils. Additionally, soil organic carbon (OC) was varied (1.29 and 0.26%) to investigate its effect on the fate of [14C]E2-17S. Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was used in concert with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to detect and quantitate parent compound and metabolites of E2-17S in the aqueous and bound phases. Residual soil was combusted to determine non-extractable levels of 14C. The E2-17S was relatively stable in the aqueous phase for natural and sterile soils. Mono- and di- hydroxyl E2-17S were detected as metabolites of E2-17S in the aqueous phase above both sterile and natural soil. Deconjugation to form E2 was not observed in aqueous phase; however, E2 and estrone were extracted from both natural and sterile soils. A conceptual model was developed to simulate and identify the fate and transport processes of E2-17S. Organic carbon was found to be an important factor affecting the sorption and degradation of E2-17S in soils.

  5. Use of organic substrates as electron donors for biological sulfate reduction in gypsiferous mine soils from Nakhon Si Thammarat (Thailand).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-04-01

    Soils in some mining areas contain a high gypsum content, which can give adverse effects to the environment and may cause many cultivation problems, such as a low water retention capacity and low fertility. The quality of such mine soils can be improved by reducing the soil's gypsum content. This study aims to develop an appropriate in situ bioremediation technology for abbreviating the gypsum content of mine soils by using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The technology was applied to a mine soil from a gypsum mine in the southern part of Thailand which contains a high sulfate content (150 g kg(-1)). Cheap organic substrates with low or no cost, such as rice husk, pig farm wastewater treatment sludge and coconut husk chips were mixed (60:20:20 by volume) and supplied to the soil as electron donors for the SRB. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 59% was achieved in the soil mixed with 40% organic mixture, corresponding to a reduction of the soil gypsum content from 25% to 7.5%. For economic gains, this treated soil can be further used for agriculture and the produced sulfide can be recovered as the fertilizer elemental sulfur.

  6. Effect of liming on sulfate transformation and sulfur gas emissions in degraded vegetable soil treated by reductive soil disinfestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Tianzhu; Zhu, Tongbin; Zhang, Jinbo; Cai, Zucong

    2015-10-01

    Reductive soil disinfestation (RSD), namely amending organic materials and mulching or flooding to create strong reductive status, has been widely applied to improve degraded soils. However, there is little information available about sulfate (SO4(2-)) transformation and sulfur (S) gas emissions during RSD treatment to degraded vegetable soils, in which S is generally accumulated. To investigate the effects of liming on SO4(2-) transformation and S gas emissions, two SO4(2-)-accumulated vegetable soils (denoted as S1 and S2) were treated by RSD, and RSD plus lime, denoted as RSD0 and RSD1, respectively. The results showed that RSD0 treatment reduced soil SO4(2-) by 51% and 61% in S1 and S2, respectively. The disappeared SO4(2-) was mainly transformed into the undissolved form. During RSD treatment, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were detected, but the total S gas emission accounted for soils. Compared to RSD0, lime addition stimulated the conversion of SO4(2-) into undissolved form, reduced soil SO4(2-) by 81% in S1 and 84% in S2 and reduced total S gas emissions by 32% in S1 and 57% in S2, respectively. In addition to H2S, COS and DMS, the emissions of carbon disulfide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl disulfide were also detected in RSD1 treatment. The results indicated that RSD was an effective method to remove SO4(2-), liming stimulates the conversion of dissolved SO4(2-) into undissolved form, probably due to the precipitation with calcium.

  7. Promoting effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on accumulation of sugar and phenolics in berries of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on zinc deficient soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chang-Zheng; Liu, Mei-Ying; Meng, Jiang-Fei; Chi, Ming; Xi, Zhu-Mei; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2015-02-02

    The effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on berry development of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on arid zone Zn-deficient soils was investigated over two consecutive seasons, 2013 and 2014. Initial zinc concentration in soil and vines, photosynthesis at three berry developmental stages, berry weight, content of total soluble solids, titratable acidity, phenolics and expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout the stages were measured. Foliage sprayed zinc sulfate showed promoting effects on photosynthesis and berry development of vines and the promotion mainly occurred from veraison to maturation. Zn treatments enhanced the accumulation of total soluble solids, total phenols, flavonoids, flavanols, tannins and anthocyanins in berry skin, decreasing the concentration of titratable acidity. Furthermore, foliage sprayed zinc sulfate could significantly influence the expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout berry development, and the results of expression analysis supported the promotion of Zn treatments on phenolics accumulation. This research is the first comprehensive and detailed study about the effect of foliage sprayed Zn fertilizer on grape berry development, phenolics accumulation and gene expression in berry skin, providing a basis for improving the quality of grape and wine in Zn-deficient areas.

  8. Promoting Effect of Foliage Sprayed Zinc Sulfate on Accumulation of Sugar and Phenolics in Berries of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot Growing on Zinc Deficient Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Zheng Song

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on berry development of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on arid zone Zn-deficient soils was investigated over two consecutive seasons, 2013 and 2014. Initial zinc concentration in soil and vines, photosynthesis at three berry developmental stages, berry weight, content of total soluble solids, titratable acidity, phenolics and expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout the stages were measured. Foliage sprayed zinc sulfate showed promoting effects on photosynthesis and berry development of vines and the promotion mainly occurred from veraison to maturation. Zn treatments enhanced the accumulation of total soluble solids, total phenols, flavonoids, flavanols, tannins and anthocyanins in berry skin, decreasing the concentration of titratable acidity. Furthermore, foliage sprayed zinc sulfate could significantly influence the expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout berry development, and the results of expression analysis supported the promotion of Zn treatments on phenolics accumulation. This research is the first comprehensive and detailed study about the effect of foliage sprayed Zn fertilizer on grape berry development, phenolics accumulation and gene expression in berry skin, providing a basis for improving the quality of grape and wine in Zn-deficient areas.

  9. Sulfuric acid-ammonium sulfate aerosol: optical detection in the St. Louis region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlson, R J; Vanderpol, A H; Covert, D S; Waggnoner, A P; Ahlquist, N C

    1974-04-12

    Nephelometric sensing of the deliquescence of ammonium sulfate produced by the reaction of sulfuric acid or ammonium bisulfate aerosol with ammonia provides a means for detecting these substances in air. Field experiments show them to be the dominant substances in the submicrometer, light-scattering aerosol in the St. Louis region.

  10. BILE SECRETION OF SULFATED GLYCOLITHOCHOLIC ACID IS REQUIRED FOR ITS CHOLESTATIC ACTION IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KUIPERS, F; HARDONK, MJ; VONK, RJ; VANDERMEER, R

    1992-01-01

    To test our hypothesis that the cholestatic action of sulfated glycolithocholic acid (SGLC) in the rat is related to its interaction with calcium in the biliary tree [R. van der Meer, R. J. Vonk, and F. Kuipers. Am. J. Physiol. 254 (Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 17): G644-G649, 1988], we have now com

  11. Use of copper sulfate and peracetic acid as therapeutants on fish: can these replace formalin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper sulfate (CuSO4) and peracetic acid (PAA) are compounds that have been found to be useful in several areas of aquaculture around the world. In the United States, CuSO4 is used for treatment of an ectoparasite (Ichthyophthirius multifiliis) on fish (Straus 1993; Tieman and Goodwin 2001), and s...

  12. Airway responses to sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols in asthmatics. An exposure-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utell, M J; Morrow, P E; Speers, D M; Darling, J; Hyde, R W

    1983-09-01

    Epidemiologic studies support an association between elevated levels of sulfates and increased symptoms in asthmatics. To determine if these pollutants produce airway responses, 17 asthmatics inhaled the following sulfates: sodium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate (NH4HSO4), or sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosols with an aerodynamic diameter of 0.80 micron at concentrations of 100 micrograms/m3, 450 micrograms/m3, and 1,000 micrograms/m3. A sodium chloride (NaCl) aerosol of similar characteristics, administered by double-blind randomization, served as a control. Subjects breathed these aerosols for a 16-minute period via a mouthpiece. Deposition studies showed 54 to 65% retention of the inhaled aerosols. At the 1,000 micrograms/m3 concentration, the Threshold Limit Value for occupational exposure, H2SO4 and NH4HSO4 inhalation produced significant reductions in specific airway conductance (SGaw) (p less than 0.05) and forced expiratory volume in one second (p less than 0.01) compared with NaCl or pre-exposure values. At the 450 micrograms/m3 concentration, only H2SO4 inhalation produced a significant reduction in SGaw (p less than 0.01). At 100 micrograms/m3, a level 3 to 5 times greater than peak urban levels, no significant change in airway function occurred after any sulfate exposure. These data indicate that asthmatics demonstrate bronchoconstriction after brief exposure to common acidic sulfate pollutants.

  13. Solid/liquid phase diagram of the ammonium sulfate/succinic acid/water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2015-05-14

    We have studied the low-temperature phase diagram and water activities of the ammonium sulfate/succinic acid/water system using differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy of thin films. Using the results from our experiments, we have mapped the solid/liquid ternary phase diagram, determined the water activities based on the freezing point depression, and determined the ice/succinic acid phase boundary as well as the ternary eutectic composition and temperature. We also compared our results to the predictions of the extended AIM aerosol thermodynamics model (E-AIM) and found good agreement for the ice melting points in the ice primary phase field of this system; however, differences were found with respect to succinic acid solubility temperatures. We also compared the results of this study with those of previous studies that we have published on ammonium sulfate/dicarboxylic acid/water systems.

  14. Redox transformation, solid phase speciation and solution dynamics of copper during soil reduction and reoxidation as affected by sulfate availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Beate; Voegelin, Andreas; Ehlert, Katrin; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2013-12-01

    In periodically flooded soils, interactions of Cu with biogenic sulfide formed during soil reduction lead to the precipitation of sparingly soluble Cu-sulfides. In contaminated soils, however, the amounts of Cu can exceed the amount of sulfate available for microbial reduction to sulfide. In laboratory batch experiments, we incubated a paddy soil spiked to ∼4.4 mmol kg-1 (280 mg kg-1) Cu(II) to monitor temporal changes in the concentrations of dissolved Cu and the speciation of solid-phase Cu during 40 days of soil reduction and 28 days of reoxidation as a function of initially available reducible sulfate (0.06, 2.09 or 5.92 mmol kg-1). Using Cu K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy, we found that a large fraction of Cu(II) became rapidly reduced to Cu(I) (23-39%) and Cu(0) (7-17%) before the onset of sulfate reduction. Combination with results from sequential Cu extraction and chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) data suggested that complexation of Cu(I) by reduced organic S groups (Sorg) may be an important process during this early stage. In sulfate-depleted soil, Cu(0) and Cu(I)-Sorg remained the dominant species over the entire reduction period, whereas in soils with sufficient sulfate, initially formed Cu(0) and (remaining) Cu(II) became transformed into Cu-sulfide during continuing sulfate reduction. The formation of Cu(0), Cu(I)-Sorg, and Cu-sulfide led to an effective decrease in dissolved Cu concentrations. Differences in Cu speciation at the end of soil reduction however affected the dynamics of Cu during reoxidation. Whereas Cu(0) was rapidly oxidized to Cu(II), more than half of the S-coordinated Cu fraction persisted over 14 days of aeration. Our results show that precipitation of Cu(0) and complexation of Cu(I) by reduced organic S groups are important processes in periodically flooded soils if sulfide formation is limited by the amount of available sulfate or the duration of soil flooding. The speciation changes of Cu described in this study may also affect the

  15. Annual sulfate budgets for Dutch lowland peat polders: The soil is a major sulfate source through peat and pyrite oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaat, Jan E.; Harmsen, Joop; Hellmann, Fritz A.; van der Geest, Harm G.; de Klein, Jeroen J. M.; Kosten, Sarian; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.; Mes, Ron G.; Ouboter, Maarten

    2016-02-01

    Annual sulfate mass balances have been constructed for four low-lying peat polders in the Netherlands, to resolve the origin of high sulfate concentrations in surface water, which is considered a water quality problem, as indicated amongst others by the absence of sensitive water plant species. Potential limitation of these plants to areas with low sulfate was analyzed with a spatial match-up of two large databases. The peat polders are generally used for dairy farming or nature conservation, and have considerable areas of shallow surface water (mean 16%, range 6-43%). As a consequence of continuous drainage, the peat in these polders mineralizes causing subsidence rates generally ranging between 2 and 10 mm y-1. Together with pyrite oxidation, this peat mineralization the most important internal source of sulfate, providing an estimated 96 kg SO4 ha-1 mm-1 subsidence y-1. External sources are precipitation and water supplied during summer to compensate for water shortage, but these were found to be minor compared to internal release. The most important output flux is discharge of excess surface water during autumn and winter. If only external fluxes in and out of a polder are evaluated, inputs average 37 ± 9 and exports 169 ± 17 kg S ha-1 y-1. During summer, when evapotranspiration exceeds rainfall, sulfate accumulates in the unsaturated zone, to be flushed away and drained off during the wet autumn and winter. In some polders, upward seepage from early Holocene, brackish sediments can be a source of sulfate. Peat polders export sulfate to the regional water system and the sea during winter drainage. The available sulfate probably only plays a minor role in the oxidation of peat: we estimate that this is less than 10% whereas aerobic mineralization is the most important. Most surface waters in these polders have high sulfate concentrations, which generally decline during the growing season when aquatic sediments are a sink. In the sediment, this sulfur is

  16. Zinc-Nickel Codeposition in Sulfate Solution Combined Effect of Cadmium and Boric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Addi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of cadmium and boric acid on the electrodeposition of zinc-nickel from a sulfate has been investigated. The presence of cadmium ion decreases zinc in the deposit. In solution, cadmium inhibits the zinc ion deposition and suppresses it when deposition potential value is more negative than −1.2 V. Low concentration of CdSO4 reduces the anomalous nature of Zn-Ni deposit. Boric acid decreases current density and shifts potential discharge of nickel and hydrogen to more negative potential. The combination of boric acid and cadmium increases the percentage of nickel in the deposit. Boric acid and cadmium.

  17. Volatile fatty acids as substrates for iron and sulfate reduction in Arctic marine sediments, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, N.; Vandieken, V.; Jorgensen, B. B.

    2006-12-01

    Anaerobic degradation of complex organic material in aquatic systems is a multi-step process. The metabolic products of fermentative bacteria serve as electron donors for the terminal oxidizing bacteria. In marine sediments, iron reduction and sulfate reduction are generally the most important terminal oxidation processes in the upper anoxic zone [1]. Microorganisms that reduce iron and sulfate may use a broad range of electron donors, yet the list of potential substrates provides little information about the substrates used in situ by these organisms. Investigations on the electron donors for sulfate reducers in marine sediments have shown that volatile fatty acids (VFA), and in particular acetate, together with hydrogen are the major substrates (e.g. [2-4]). Similar investigations for iron reduction or simultaneous iron and sulfate reduction are lacking for marine sediments. Furthermore, most of these studies were made in temperate sediments and little is known about the substrates for sulfate reducers in permanently cold sediments, which account for >90% of the ocean floor [5]. We investigated the relative contributions of iron reduction and sulfate reduction to the terminal oxidation of organic carbon and the importance of acetate, lactate, propionate, and isobutyrate as electron donors for iron and sulfate reduction in permanently cold, Arctic sediments from Svalbard. In the surface layer (0-2 cm) sulfate reduction accounted for 2/3 of the organic carbon oxidation (determined as DIC production), the remaining 1/3 were attributed to iron reduction. In the 5-9 cm layer sulfate reduction was the sole important terminal oxidation step. The contribution of acetate to terminal oxidation was determined by radiotracer incubation as well as from the accumulation after the inhibition of sulfate reduction by selenate. The rates determined with the two methods varied by less than 20%. Acetate turnover, determined with the tracer incubations, accounted for 10 and 40% of

  18. Sulfation of metal-organic framework: Opportunities for acid catalysis and proton conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, E.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Ramos-Fernandez, E.V.; Sai Sankar Gupta, K.B.; van Bekkum, H.; Gascon, J. and Kapteijn, F.

    2011-05-24

    A new post-functionalization method for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed to introduce acidity for catalysis. Upon treatment with a mixture of triflic anhydride and sulfuric acid, chemically stable MOF structures MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-53(Al) can be sulfated, resulting in a Broensted sulfoxy acid group attached to up to 50% of the aromatic terephthalate linkers of the structure. The sulfated samples have been extensively characterized by solid-state NMR, XANES, and FTIR spectroscopy. The functionalized acidic frameworks show catalytic activity similar to that of acidic polymers like Nafion{reg_sign} display in the esterification of n-butanol with acetic acid (TOF {approx} 1 min{sup -1} {at} 343 K). Water adsorbs strongly up to 4 molecules per sulfoxy acid group, and an additional 2 molecules are taken up at lower temperatures in the 1-D pore channels of S-MIL-53(Al). The high water content and Broensted acidity provide the structure S-MIL-53(Al) a high proton conductivity up to moderate temperatures.

  19. Ice Formation by Sulfate and Sulfuric Acid Aerosol Particles under Upper-Tropospheric Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yalei; Demott, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Rogers, David C.; Eli Sherman, D.

    2000-11-01

    Ice formation in ammoniated sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under upper-tropospheric conditions was studied using a continuous flow thermal diffusion chamber. This technique allowed for particle exposure to controlled temperatures and relative humidities for known residence times. The phase states of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4HSO4 particles were found to have important impacts on their ice formation capabilities. Dry (NH4)2SO4 particles nucleated ice only at high relative humidity (RH 94%) with respect to water at temperatures between 40° and 60°C. This result suggested either an impedance or finite time dependence to deliquescence and subsequent homogeneous freezing nucleation. Ammonium sulfate particles that entered the diffusion chamber in a liquid state froze homogeneously at relative humidities that were 10% lower than where ice nucleated on initially dry particles. Likewise, crystalline or partially crystallized (as letovicite) NH4HSO4 particles required higher relative humidities for ice nucleation than did initially liquid bisulfate particles. Liquid particles of size 0.2 m composed of either ammonium sulfate or bisulfate froze at lower relative humidity at upper-tropospheric temperatures than did 0.05-m sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Comparison of calculated homogeneous freezing point depressions suggest that size effects on freezing may be more important than the degree of ammoniation of the sulfate compound.

  20. Determination of sulfate in the wet-process of phosphoric acid by reverse flow injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved method based on reverse flow injection is proposed for determining sulfate concentration in the wet-process of phosphoric acid (WPA. The effect of reagent composition, flow rate, temperature, acid concentration, length of the reaction coil, and linear response range on the flow system is discussed in detail. Optimal conditions are established for determining sulfate in the WPA samples. Baseline drift is avoided by a periodic washing step with EDTA in an alkaline medium. A linear response is observed within a range of 20 - 360 mg L-1, given by the equation A = 0.0020C (mg L-1 + 0.0300, R² = 0.9991. The detection limit of the proposed method for sulfate analysis is 3 mg L-1, and the relative standard deviation (n = 12 of sulfate absorbance peak is less than 1.60%. This method has a rate of up to 29 samples per hour, and the results compare well with those obtained with gravimetric method.

  1. Hexuronic acid stereochemistry determination in chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan oligosaccharides by electron detachment dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Franklin E; Ly, Mellisa; Laremore, Tatiana N; Wolff, Jeremy J; Perlow, Jacob; Linhardt, Robert J; Amster, I Jonathan

    2012-09-01

    Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) has previously provided stereo-specific product ions that allow for the assignment of the acidic C-5stereochemistry in heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), but application of the same methodology to an epimer pair in the chondroitin sulfate glycoform class does not provide the same result. A series of experiments have been conducted in which glycosaminoglycan precursor ions are independently activated by electron detachment dissociation (EDD), electron induced dissociation (EID), and negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) to assign the stereochemistry in chondroitin sulfate (CS) epimers and investigate the mechanisms for product ion formation during EDD in CS glycoforms. This approach allows for the assignment of electronic excitation products formed by EID and detachment products to radical pathways in NETD, both of which occur simultaneously during EDD. The uronic acid stereochemistry in electron detachment spectra produces intensity differences when assigned glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages are compared. The variations in the intensities of the doubly deprotonated (0,2)X(3) and Y(3) ions have been shown to be indicative of CS-A/DS composition during the CID of binary mixtures. These ions can provide insight into the uronic acid composition of binary mixtures in EDD, but the relative abundances, although reproducible, are low compared with those in a CID spectrum acquired on an ion trap. The application of principal component analysis (PCA) presents a multivariate approach to determining the uronic acid stereochemistry spectra of these GAGs by taking advantage of the reproducible peak distributions produced by electron detachment.

  2. Improved process for the production of cellulose sulfate using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Hongwen

    2013-06-05

    An improved process for production of cellulose sulfate (CS) was developed by using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution as sulfonating agent and Na2SO4 as water absorbent. The FTIR, SEM and TG analysis were used to characterize the CS prepared. The total degree of substitution and viscosity of the product solution (2%, w/v) were ranging from 0.28 to 0.77 and from 115 to 907 mPa s, respectively, by changing the process parameters such as the amount of Na2SO4, the reaction time, the temperature, the sulfuric acid/alcohol ratio and liquid/solid ratio. The results indicated that the product with DS (0.28-0.77) and η2% (115-907) mPa s could be produced by using this improved process and more cellulose sulfate could be produced when cellulose was sulfonated for 3-4 h at -2 °C in sulfuric acid/ethanol (1.4-1.6) solution with addition of 0.8 g Na2SO4. The (13)C NMR indicated that the sulfate group of CS produced using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution was at C6 position.

  3. Comparative potency of inhaled acidic sulfates: speciation and the role of hydrogen ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R B; Chen, L C; Finkelstein, I; Zelikoff, J T

    1990-08-01

    Inhaled acidic sulfate aerosols affect various aspects of lung function, presumably by delivery of hydrogen ion (H+) to target sites. Recent evidence suggests that the relationship between response and H+ content of the exposure atmosphere may depend upon the specific sulfate species with which the H+ is associated. This study examined comparatively the effects of exposure to the two main ambient acidic sulfates, sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and ammonium bisulfate (NH4HSO4), using the phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages as the endpoint. Rabbits were exposed to 250-2000 micrograms/m3 H2SO4 (as SO4(-2)) and 500-4000 micrograms/m3 NH4HSO4 (as SO4(-2)) for 1 hr/day for 5 days; bronchopulmonary lavage was then performed for recovery of free lung cells. Phagocytosis, measured by uptake of opsonized latex spheres in vitro, was altered by exposure to H2SO4 at concentrations greater than or equal to 500 micrograms/m3 and to NH4HSO4 at greater than or equal to 2000 micrograms/m3. Assessment of results in terms of the calculated hydrogen ion concentration in the exposure atmosphere showed that identical levels of H+ produced different degrees of response depending upon whether exposure was to H2SO4 or NH4HSO4. On the other hand, macrophages incubated in acidic environments in vitro responded similarly regardless of whether H2SO4 or NH4HSO4 was used to adjust the pH. Possible reasons for the difference in response observed in vivo and in vitro are discussed. Speciation of ambient acidic sulfate aerosols may be needed in atmospheric monitoring so as to assess the presence of H+ posing the greatest biologic hazard following inhalation exposure.

  4. Production of furans from pulp sheet over sulfated solid acid catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdan Zhang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Furans are high value-added biomass-derived chemicals that can be used to replace petrochemicals. In this study, sulfated solid acid catalysts were prepared by precipitation and impregnation and were used for the conversion of a cellulosic pulp sheet into furans. The physicochemical properties of the prepared sulfated solid acid with different calcination temperatures and different mol ratios of Ti-Al were characterized using XRD, elemental analysis, TG, and NH3-TPD. Furthermore, the effects of various processing parameters such as temperature, time, and catalyst dosage on the reaction performance were studied. The combined yield of 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural and furfural reached 8.9% and 4.5% of pulp sheet mass with a 5% dosage of SO42-/TiO2-Al2O3 catalyst at 220 oC for 30 min. The activity for recovered catalyst was also investigated in this study.

  5. Impact of Seasalt Deposition on Acid Soils in Maritime Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-Hua

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of seasalt deposition and its impact on acid soils in maritime regions are reviewed. It is pointed out that studies involving the impact of seasalt deposition on acid soils have been concentrated on short-term effects on soil and water acidification. A deep consideration of long-term effects on soil acidification in maritime regions is still needed.

  6. Obtaining of barium sulfate from solution formed after desulfation of the active mass of scrap lead-acid batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Kalko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of literature data about processes for solution utilization formed after desulfation of the active mass of scrap lead-acid batteries is performed. Optimal conditions for obtaining of barium sulfate sediment from ammonium sulfate solute and chemically pure Ba(OH2×8H2O и BaCl2×2H2O were found experimentally. In laboratory the commercial barium sulfate from sulfate solutions, that are waste of recycling process of battery scrap, with application of chloride and barium hydroxide was production. The possibility of using this product were discussed.

  7. Sulfate reduction at low pH to remediate acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene, E-mail: irene.sanchezandrea@wur.nl [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); Sanz, Jose Luis [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bijmans, Martijn F.M. [Wetsus, Centre of Sustainable Water Technology, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Stams, Alfons J.M. [Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); IBB – Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Acid mine drainage (AMD) is an important environmental concern. • Remediation through biological sulfate reduction and metal recovery can be applied for AMD. • Microbial community composition has a major impact on the performance of bioreactors to treat AMD. • Acidophilic SRB are strongly influenced by proton, sulfide and organic acids concentration. - Abstract: Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, biological treatment applying sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is an attractive option to treat AMD and to recover metals. The process produces alkalinity, neutralizing the AMD simultaneously. The sulfide that is produced reacts with the metal in solution and precipitates them as metal sulfides. Here, important factors for biotechnological application of SRB such as the inocula, the pH of the process, the substrates and the reactor design are discussed. Microbial communities of sulfidogenic reactors treating AMD which comprise fermentative-, acetogenic- and SRB as well as methanogenic archaea are reviewed.

  8. Experimental Study on the Feasibility of Using Water Glass and Aluminum Sulfate to Treat Complications in High Liquid Limit Soil Subgrade

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using water glass and aluminum sulfate to treat high liquid limit soil subgrade diseases is studied through laboratory experiments, and the following results were observed. After improving the high liquid limit clay with water glass and aluminum sulfate, the liquid limit decreases, the plastic limit increases, and the plasticity index decreases. Compared with untreated soil, the clay content of the improved soil decreases, while the silt and coarse contents increase. The ab...

  9. Sulfated Steroid–Amino Acid Conjugates from the Irish Marine Sponge Polymastia boletiformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vangelis Smyrniotopoulos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Antifungal bioactivity-guided fractionation of the organic extract of the sponge Polymastia boletiformis, collected from the west coast of Ireland, led to the isolation of two new sulfated steroid-amino acid conjugates (1 and 2. Extensive 1D and 2D NMR analyses in combination with quantum mechanical calculations of the electronic circular dichroism (ECD spectra, optical rotation, and 13C chemical shifts were used to establish the chemical structures of 1 and 2. Both compounds exhibited moderate antifungal activity against Cladosporium cucumerinum, while compound 2 was also active against Candida albicans. Marine natural products containing steroidal and amino acid constituents are extremely rare in nature.

  10. Alleviation of Soil Acidity and Aluminium Phytotoxicity in Acid Soils by Using Alkaline-Stabilised Biosolids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to study alleviation of soil acidity and Al toxicity by applying an alkaline-stabilised sewage sludge product (biosolids) to an acid clay sandy loam (pH 5.7) and a strongly acid sandy loam (pH 4.5). Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Forrester) was used as a test crop and was grown in the sewage sludge-amended (33.5 t sludge DM ha-1) and unamended soils. The results showed that the alkaline biosloids increased soil pH from 5.7 to 6.9 for the clay sandy loam and from 4.5 to 6.0 for the sandy loam. The sludge product decreased KCl-extractable Al from 0.1 to 0.0 cmol kg-1 for the former soil and from 4.0 to 0.1 cmol kg-1 for the latter soil. As a result, barley plants grew much better and grain yield increased greatly in the amended treatments compared with the unamended controls. These observations indicate that alkaline-stabilised biosolids can be used as a liming material for remedying Al phytotoxicity in strongly acid soils by increasing soil pH and lowering Al bioavailability.

  11. Nitrous Oxide and Methane Fluxes Following Ammonium Sulfate and Vinasse Application on Sugar Cane Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Debora da S; Alves, Bruno J R; dos Santos, Marco A; Bolonhezi, Denizart; Sant'Anna, Selenobaldo A C; Urquiaga, Segundo; Lima, Magda A; Boddey, Robert M

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to quantify nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emission/sink response from sugar cane soil treated with fertilizer nitrogen (N) and vinasse applied separately or in sequence, the latter being investigated with regard to the time interval between applications for a possible effect on emissions. The study was carried out in a traditional area of unburned sugar cane in São Paulo state, Brazil. Two levels of N fertilization (0 and 100 kg N ha(-1)) with no added vinasse and combined with vinasse additions at different times (100 m(-3) ha(-1) at 3 and 15 days after N fertilization) were evaluated. Methane and N2O fluxes were monitored for 211 days. On average, the soil was a sink for CH4, which was not affected by the treatments. Emissions of N2O were induced by N fertilizer and vinasse applications. For ammonium sulfate, 0.6% of the added N was emitted as N2O, while for vinasse, this ranged from 1.0 to 2.2%. Changes in N2O fluxes were detected the day after application of vinasse on the N fertilized areas, but although the emission factor (EF) was 34% greater, the EF was not significantly different from fertilizer N alone. Nevertheless, we recommend to not apply vinasse after N fertilization to avoid boosting N2O emissions.

  12. The partitioning of Nitric Acid between the gas phase and condensed phase of aqueous sulfate aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentel, T. F.; Folkers, M.; Sebald, H.; Wahner, A.

    2001-12-01

    The heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O_5 on aqueous aerosol surfaces is an important source of atmospheric HNO3. We generated HNO3 by heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O_5 on aqueous ammonium and sodium sulfate aerosols and studied its partitioning between the gas phase and the aerosol phase. The experiments were performed in the large aerosol chamber at the FZ-Jülich at several relative humidities. Gas phase processes and the composition of the aerosols were monitored on-line simultaneously by FTIR spectroscopy and by Steam Jet Aerosol Collection/Ion Chromatography. The aerosol size distributions in the range of 20 nm to 5 μ m were measured by differential electromobility classification and by aerodynamic particle sizing. In the presence of aqueous bisulfate and sulfate aerosols a fast heterogeneous formation HNO3 is observed. (The reaction probability of N2O_5 is about 0.02.) In the case of the acidic bisulfate aerosols the major fraction of heterogeneously formed HNO3 resides in the gas phase. For neutral sulfate aerosols a significant fraction of HNO3 is taken up by the condensed phase of the aerosols. This leads to a distinctive growth of the aerosol population during the heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O_5, which is observable in the number size distribution as well as in IR extinction measurements. The observed partitioning of HNO3 between gas phase and aqueous aerosol phase can be quantitatively understood by a Pitzer based thermodynamic model for salt solutions of high ionic strength. The model calculations and low resolution FTIR spectroscopy demonstrate that protonation of sulfate to bisulfate is the driving force for the uptake of HNO3 in neutral sulfate aerosols.

  13. Treatment of acid rock drainage using a sulfate-reducing bioreactor with zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2016-05-05

    This study assessed the bioremediation of acid rock drainage (ARD) in flow-through columns testing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for the first time as the sole exogenous electron donor to drive sulfate-reducing bacteria in permeable reactive barriers. Columns containing ZVI, limestone or a mixture of both materials were inoculated with an anaerobic mixed culture and fed a synthetic ARD containing sulfuric acid and heavy metals (initially copper, and later also cadmium and lead). ZVI significantly enhanced sulfate reduction and the heavy metals were extensively removed (>99.7%). Solid-phase analyses showed that heavy metals were precipitated with biogenic sulfide in the columns packed with ZVI. Excess sulfide was sequestered by iron, preventing the discharge of dissolved sulfide. In the absence of ZVI, heavy metals were also significantly removed (>99.8%) due to precipitation with hydroxide and carbonate ions released from the limestone. Vertical-profiles of heavy metals in the columns packing, at the end of the experiment, demonstrated that the ZVI columns still had excess capacity to remove heavy metals, while the capacity of the limestone control column was approaching saturation. The ZVI provided conditions that enhanced sulfate reduction and generated alkalinity. Collectively, the results demonstrate an innovative passive ARD remediation process using ZVI as sole electron-donor.

  14. Preparation of metal-resistant immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads for acid mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia; Han, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Novel immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) beads were prepared for the treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of Fe, Cu, Cd and Zn using up-flow anaerobic packed-bed bioreactor. The tolerance of immobilized SRB beads to heavy metals was significantly enhanced compared with that of suspended SRB. High removal efficiencies of sulfate (61-88%) and heavy metals (>99.9%) as well as slightly alkaline effluent pH (7.3-7.8) were achieved when the bioreactor was fed with acidic influent (pH 2.7) containing high concentrations of multiple metals (Fe 469 mg/L, Cu 88 mg/L, Cd 92 mg/L and Zn 128 mg/L), which showed that the bioreactor filled with immobilized SRB beads had tolerance to AMD containing high concentrations of heavy metals. Partially decomposed maize straw was a carbon source and stabilizing agent in the initial phase of bioreactor operation but later had to be supplemented by a soluble carbon source such as sodium lactate. The microbial community in the bioreactor was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of partial 16S rDNA genes. Synergistic interaction between SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and co-existing fermentative bacteria could be the key factor for the utilization of complex organic substrate (maize straw) as carbon and nutrients source for sulfate reduction.

  15. Mechanistic modeling of biocorrosion caused by biofilms of sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-08-01

    Biocorrosion is also known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Most anaerobic MIC cases can be classified into two major types. Type I MIC involves non-oxygen oxidants such as sulfate and nitrate that require biocatalysis for their reduction in the cytoplasm of microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This means that the extracellular electrons from the oxidation of metal such as iron must be transported across cell walls into the cytoplasm. Type II MIC involves oxidants such as protons that are secreted by microbes such as acid producing bacteria (APB). The biofilms in this case supply the locally high concentrations of oxidants that are corrosive without biocatalysis. This work describes a mechanistic model that is based on the biocatalytic cathodic sulfate reduction (BCSR) theory. The model utilizes charge transfer and mass transfer concepts to describe the SRB biocorrosion process. The model also includes a mechanism to describe APB attack based on the local acidic pH at a pit bottom. A pitting prediction software package has been created based on the mechanisms. It predicts long-term pitting rates and worst-case scenarios after calibration using SRB short-term pit depth data. Various parameters can be investigated through computer simulation.

  16. Characterization of Soil Humin by Acid Hydrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云峰; 徐建民; 等

    1999-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize soil humin by acid hydrolysis.Two humin samples collected from two different types of soil,namely chernozem and laterite,which are widespread over a vast area from the north to south of China,were hyrolyzed under reflux with 0.5M H2SO4or 3M H2SO4for 4h.The results showed that 25%-29% of organic carbon and 46%-54%of organic nitrogen could be hydrolyzed by 0.5M H2SO4;36%-40%of organic carbon and 93%-97% of organic nitrogen hydrolyzed by 3M H2SO4.The C/N ration in hydrolyzed organic matter is lower than that in soil humin and that in organic matter hydrolyzed by 3M H2SO4 is lower than that in organic matter hydrolyzed by 0.5M H2SO4.The proportion of nitrogen hydrolyzed from humin is markedly larger than that from the original soil and also markedly larger than that from humic acid fraction.Only 3%-7% of nitrogen in humin exists in a relatively stable from,which is not easy to hydrolyze.There in little nitrogen that occurs in the form of heterocyclic rings in humin.Incubation experiments showed that the newly formed organic matter can be hydrolyzed more easily.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Soil Fulvic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Munsif Ali Talpur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fulvic acid was isolated from the agriculture soil of District Naushahro Feroz, Sindh, Pakistan by International Humic Substances Society (IHSS method. The nutrient contents of the soil like N. P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn were determined by using the Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer (AAS. The Spectroscopic analysis was carried out by studying the UV-Vis, FT-IR and NIR spectra of isolated compounds. The data has been compared with the literature and correlated. Moisture as well as texture shows good water holding capacity and silt- loam type of soil. pH and EC are indicators of the fertility of soil to be beneficial for plantation. The spectral data (UV-Visible, FTIR and NIR supports the characteristic functional groups (-COOH, C=O, -OH, -NH2, C=C, CH2 and Polysaccharides present in Fulvic acid. E4/E6 values depict its hydrophilic nature, having less aromatic and more aliphatic groups. The presence of metal ions indicates its chelating ability.

  18. Effect of A Long Chain Carboxylate Acid on Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelle Structure: A SANS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriati, Arum; Giri Rachman Putra, Edy; Seok Seong, Baek

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a different hydrocarbon chain length of carboxylate acid, i.e. dodecanoic acid, CH3(CH)10COOH or lauric acid and hexadecanoic acid, CH3(CH2)14COOH or palmitic acid as a co-surfactant in the 0.3 M sodium dedecyl sulfate, SDS micellar solution has been studied using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The present of lauric acid has induced the SDS structural micelles. The ellipsoid micelles structures changed significantly in length (major axis) from 22.6 Å to 37.1 Å at a fixed minor axis of 16.7 Å in the present of 0.005 M to 0.1 M lauric acid. Nevertheless, this effect did not occur in the present of palmitic acid with the same concentration range. The present of palmitic acid molecules performed insignificant effect on the SDS micelles growth where the major axis of the micelle was elongated from 22.9 Å to 25.3 Å only. It showed that the appropriate hydrocarbon chain length between surfactant and co-surfactant molecules emerged as one of the determining factors in forming a mixed micelles structure.

  19. Selenium speciation in acidic environmental samples: application to acid rain-soil interaction at Mount Etna volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floor, Geerke H; Iglesías, Mònica; Román-Ross, Gabriela; Corvini, Philippe F X; Lenz, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Speciation plays a crucial role in elemental mobility. However, trace level selenium (Se) speciation analyses in aqueous samples from acidic environments are hampered due to adsorption of the analytes (i.e. selenate, selenite) on precipitates. Such solid phases can form during pH adaptation up till now necessary for chromatographic separation. Thermodynamic calculations in this study predicted that a pHacid rain-soil interaction samples from Etna volcano was developed. With a mobile phase containing 20mM ammonium citrate at pH 3, selenate and selenite could be separated in different acidic media (spiked water, rain, soil leachates) in acid rain-soil interaction using synthetic rain based on H(2)SO(4) and soil samples collected at the flanks of Etna volcano demonstrated the dominance of selenate over selenite in leachates from samples collected close to the volcanic craters. This suggests that competitive behavior with sulfate present in acid rain might be a key factor in Se mobilization. The developed speciation method can significantly contribute to understand Se cycling in acidic, Al/Fe rich environments.

  20. Sulfates on Mars: Indicators of Aqueous Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Lane, Melissa D.; Dyar, M. Darby; Brown, Adrian J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent analyses by MER instruments at Meridiani Planum and Gusev crater and the OMEGA instrument on Mars Express have provided detailed information about the presence of sulfates on Mars [1,2,3]. We are evaluating these recent data in an integrated multi-disciplinary study of visible-near-infrared, mid-IR and Mossbauer spectra of several sulfate minerals and sulfate-rich analog sites. Our analyses suggest that hydrated iron sulfates may account for features observed in Mossbauer and mid-IR spectra of Martian soils [4]. The sulfate minerals kieserite, gypsum and other hydrated sulfates have been identified in OMEGA spectra in the layered terrains in Valles Marineris and Terra Meridiani [2]. These recent discoveries emphasize the importance of studying sulfate minerals as tracers of aqueous processes. The sulfate-rich rock outcrops observed in Meridiani Planum may have formed in an acidic environment similar to acid rock drainage environments on Earth [5]. Because microorganisms typically are involved in the oxidation of sulfides to sulfates in terrestrial sites, sulfate-rich rock outcrops on Mars may be a good location to search for evidence of past life on that planet. Whether or not life evolved on Mars, following the trail of sulfate minerals will lead to a better understanding of aqueous processes and chemical weathering.

  1. Titanium Mass-balance Analysis of Paso Robles Soils: Elemental Gains and Losses as Affected by Acid Alteration Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    The Columbia Hills soils have been exposed to aqueous alteration in alkaline [1] as well as acid conditions [2,3]. The Paso Robles class soils are bright soils that possess the highest S concentration of any soil measured on Mars [2]. Ferric-sulfate detection by Moessbauer analysis indicated that acid solutions were involved in forming these soils [4]. These soils are proposed to have formed by alteration of nearby rock by volcanic hydrothermal or fumarolic activity. The Paso Robles soils consist of the original Paso Robles-disturbed-Pasadena (PR-dist), Paso Robles- PasoLight (PR-PL), Arad-Samra, Arad-Hula, Tyrone- Berker Island1 and Tyrone-MountDarwin [2 ,3. ]Chemical characteristics indicate that the PR-dist and PR-PL soils could be derived from acid weathering of local Wishstone rocks while the Samra and Hula soils are likely derived from local Algonquin-Iroquet rock [3]. The Paso Robles soils were exposed to acidic sulfur bearing fluids; however, little else is known about the chemistry of the alteration fluid and its effects on the alteration of the proposed parent materials. The objectives of this work are to conduct titanium normalized mass-balance analysis to1) assess elemental gains and losses from the parent materials in the formation of the Paso Robles soils and 2) utilize this information to indicate the chemical nature of the alteration fluids.

  2. The electrochemical corrosion of bulk nanocrystalline ingot iron in acidic sulfate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S G; Shen, C B; Long, K; Zhang, T; Wang, F H; Zhang, Z D

    2006-01-12

    The corrosion properties of bulk nanocrystalline ingot iron (BNII) fabricated from conventional polycrystalline ingot iron (CPII) by severe rolling were investigated by means of immersion test, potentiodynamic polarization (PDP), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. These experimental results indicate that BNII possesses excellent corrosion resistance in comparison with CPII in acidic sulfate solution at room temperature. It may mainly result from different surface microstructures between CPII and BNII. However, the corrosion resistance of nanocrystalline materials is usually degraded because of their metastable microstructure nature, and the residual stress in nanocrystalline materials also can result in degradation of corrosion resistance according to the traditional point of view.

  3. The Hydrothermal System at Home Plate in Gusev Crater, Mars: Formation of High Silica Material by Acid-Sulfate Alteration of Basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Yen, A.; Clark, B. C.; Gnaff, T. G.; Arvidson, R. E.; Squyres, S. W.

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit measured three targets on or adjacent to Home Plate in Gusev Crater that have unusually high SiO2 concentrations (68% to 91%), unusually low FeO concentrations (1% to 7%, with total Fe as FeO), and unusually high TiO2/FeO ratios (0.2 to 1.2 by weight) [1]. Two targets (Kenosha Comets and Lefty Ganote) are located on high albedo soil (Gertrude Weise) that was exposed by the rover wheels, and one target is a float rock called Fuzzy Smith. Kenosha Comets has the highest SiO2 concentration, lowest FeO concentration, and highest TiO2/FeO ratio. Mineralogical evidence from the MER Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) suggests that the SiO2 is present as amorphous (noncrystalline) SiO2 at Gertrude Weise and nearby targets [2,3]. Mini-TES data were not acquired for Fuzzy Smith. Home Plate is considered to have an explosive volcanic origin, resulting when basaltic magma came into contact with ground water or ice [4]. Within 50 m to 1 km of Home Plate are sulfate rich soil deposits (Paso Robles class soils with 22-35% SO3) which are considered to be probable fumarolic and/or hydrothermal deposits associated with the volcanism [5]. We develop the model here, suggested by [5], that the high-silica materials are another manifestation of acid-sulfate processes associated with fumarolic and hydrothermal activity at Home Plate. This is done by analogy with basaltic materials altered by acid sulfate processes on the Island of Hawaii.

  4. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: IV Acid-sulfate waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Nordstrom D.; Blaine, McCleskey R.; Ball, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Many waters sampled in Yellowstone National Park, both high-temperature (30-94 ??C) and low-temperature (0-30 ??C), are acid-sulfate type with pH values of 1-5. Sulfuric acid is the dominant component, especially as pH values decrease below 3, and it forms from the oxidation of elemental S whose origin is H2S in hot gases derived from boiling of hydrothermal waters at depth. Four determinations of pH were obtained: (1) field pH at field temperature, (2) laboratory pH at laboratory temperature, (3) pH based on acidity titration, and (4) pH based on charge imbalance (at both laboratory and field temperatures). Laboratory pH, charge imbalance pH (at laboratory temperature), and acidity pH were in close agreement for pH ??10%, a selection process was used to compare acidity, laboratory, and charge balance pH to arrive at the best estimate. Differences between laboratory and field pH can be explained based on Fe oxidation, H2S or S2O3 oxidation, CO2 degassing, and the temperature-dependence of pK2 for H2SO4. Charge imbalances are shown to be dependent on a speciation model for pH values 350 mg/L Cl) decrease as the Cl- concentration increases from boiling which appears inconsistent with the hypothesis of H2S oxidation as a source of hydrothermal SO4. This trend is consistent with the alternate hypothesis of anhydrite solubility equilibrium. Acid-sulfate water analyses are occasionally high in As, Hg, and NH3 concentrations but in contrast to acid mine waters they are low to below detection in Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations. Even concentrations of SO4, Fe, and Al are much lower in thermal waters than acid mine waters of the same pH. This difference in water chemistry may explain why certain species of fly larvae live comfortably in Yellowstone's acid waters but have not been observed in acid rock drainage of the same pH.

  5. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Maciero, Eugenia; Krasnoff, Gustavo; Cócaro, Nicolas; Gaitan, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers’ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old) participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001). The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers’ requirements of this micronutrient. PMID:26529007

  6. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pizarro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers´ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001. The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers´ requirements of this micronutrient.

  7. Factors Affecting Sensitivity of Variable Charge Soils to Acid Rain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJING-HUA

    1995-01-01

    The sensitivity of a large number of variable charge soils to acid rain was evaluated through examining pH-H2SO4 input curves.Two derivative parameters,the consumption of hydrogen ions by the soil and the acidtolerant limit as defined as the quantity of sulfuric acid required to bring the soil to pH 3.5 in a 0.001mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 solution,were used.The sensitivity of variable charge soils was higher than that of constant charge soils,due to the predominance of kaolinite in clay mineralogical composition.Among these soils the sensitivity was generally of the order lateritic red soil>red soil> latosol.For a given type of soil within the same region the sensitivity was affected by parent material,due to differences in clay minerals and texture.The sensitivity of surface soil may be lower or higher than that of subsiol,depending on whether organic matter or texture plays the dominant role in determining the buffering capacity.Paddy soils consumed more acid within lower range of acid input when compared with upland soils,due to the presence of more exchangeable bases,but consumed less acid within higher acid input range,caused by the decrease in clay content.

  8. Amendment of Acid Soils with Crop Residues and Biochars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Jin-Hua; XU Ren-Kou; WANG Ning; LI Jiu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The liming potential of some crop residues and their biochars on an acid Ultisol was investigated using incubation experiments. Rice hulls showed greater liming potential than rice hull biochar, while soybean and pea straws had less liming potential than their biochars. Due to their higher alkalinity, biochars from legume materials increased soil pH much compared to biochars from non-legume materials. The alkalinity of biochars was a key factor affecting their liming potential,and the greater alkalinity of biochars led to greater reductions in soil acidity. The incorporation of biochars decreased soil exchangeable acidity and increased soil exchangeable base cations and base saturation, thus improving soil fertility.

  9. Sulfate- and sialic acid-containing glycolipids inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbulan, C M; Taki, T; Tamiya-Koizumi, K; Suzuki, M; Savoysky, E; Shoji, M; Yoshida, S

    1994-03-16

    The effects of various glycolipids on the activity of immunoaffinity-purified calf thymus DNA polymerase alpha were studied in vitro. Preincubation with sialic acid-containing glycolipids, such as sialosylparagloboside (SPG), GM3, GM1, and GD1a, and sulfatide (cerebroside sulfate ester, CSE) dose-dependently inhibited the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, while other glycolipids, as well as free sphingosine and ceramide did not. About 50% inhibition was achieved by preincubating the enzyme with 2.5 microM of CSE, 50 microM of SPG or GM3, and 80 microM of GM1. Inhibition was noncompetitive with both the DNA template and the substrate dTTP, as well as with the other dNTPs. Since the inhibition was largely reversed by the addition of 0.05% Nonidet P40, these glycolipids may interact with the hydrophobic region of the enzyme protein. Apparently, the sulfate moiety in CSE and the sialic acid moiety in gangliosides were essential for the inhibition since neither neutral glycolipids (i.e., glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, lactosylceramide) nor asialo-gangliosides (GA1 and GA2) showed any inhibitory effect. Furthermore, the ceramide backbone was also found to be necessary for maximal inhibition since the inhibition was largely abolished by substituting the lipid backbone with cholesterol. Increasing the number of sialic acid moieties per molecule further enhanced the inhibition, while elongating the sugar chain diminished it. It was clearly shown that the N-acetyl residue of the sialic acid moiety is particularly essential for inhibition by both SPG and GM3 because the loss of this residue or substitution with a glycolyl residue completely negated their inhibitory effect on DNA polymerase alpha activity.

  10. Using Australian Acidic Playa Lakes as Analogs for Phyllosilicate and Sulfate Depositional Environments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, A. M.; Michalski, J.; Kargel, J.; Hook, S.; Marion, G.; Crowley, J.; Bridges, N.; Brown, A.; Ribeiro da Luz, B.; de Souza Filho, C. R.; Thomson, B.

    2008-12-01

    Recent work on the origin of martian sulfates and their relationship to phyllosilicate deposits suggest that these deposits formed in different eras of Mars' history, under distinct environmental conditions. In southwestern Meridiani Planum phyllosilicates exist in close proximity to sulfate deposits. One possible explanation for this relationship is that it is an unconformable stratigraphic sequence, representing a significant change in aqueous geochemical conditions over time. Specifically, it may be interpreted to record a change in environment from neutral pH aqueous alteration in the Noachian to an acidic evaporitic system in the late Noachian to the Hesperian. On Earth, two different geochemical systems need not be evoked to explain such chemical variation. Acidic playa lakes in Western Australia have large pH differences separated by only a few tens of meters and demonstrate how highly variable chemistries can coexist over short distances in natural environments. Playa lakes on Earth tend to be dominated by lateral flow of water and salts leading to lateral chemical variation. Heterogeneity of playa mineralogy in Australia is due to the varied source rocks of brines and the mixing of dilute oxidizing brines and freshwater with the saturated evaporitic brines. This is evidenced by the ferricretes in the near-shore environment and more soluble phases in basin interiors. Playa lakes on Mars would be much larger than their terrestrial counterparts, leading to the prevalence of large-scale surface and crustal advection of water and salt rather than short-distance lateral flow, except at lake boundaries. Little or no influx of freshwater would preclude the formation of playa rim (e.g., crater rim) ferricretes and silcretes. Instead, we expect to see mainly vertical facies changes, and any diachronous lateral facies changes are expected to occur on very large spatial scales. Comparison of high spatial resolution, hyperspectral airborne data for Australian playa

  11. Preparation of manganese sulfate from low-grade manganese carbonate ores by sulfuric acid leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-quan Lin; Guo-hua Gu; Hui Wang; Ren-feng Zhu; You-cai Liu; and Jian-gang Fu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a method for preparing pure manganese sulfate from low-grade ores with a granule mean size of 0.47 mm by direct acid leaching was developed. The effects of the types of leaching agents, sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, and agitation rate on the leaching efficiency of manganese were investigated. We observed that sulfuric acid used as a leaching agent provides a similar leach-ing efficiency of manganese and superior selectivity against calcium compared to hydrochloric acid. The optimal leaching conditions in sul-furic acid media were determined; under the optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of Mn and Ca were 92.42% and 9.61%, respec-tively. Moreover, the kinetics of manganese leaching indicated that the leaching follows the diffusion-controlled model with an apparent ac-tivation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol−1. The purification conditions of the leaching solution were also discussed. The results show that manganese dioxide is a suitable oxidant of ferrous ions and sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate is an effective precipitant of heavy metals. Finally, through chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the obtained product was determined to contain 98% of MnSO4·H2O.

  12. Phenolic Acids in Plant-Soil-Microbe System: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Phenolic acids are very common compounds in pedosphere. The objective of this review was to summarize the current knowledge of the behaviors of phenolic acids in plant-soil-microbe system. When phenolic acids originated from leaching, decomposition and exudation of living and dead plant tissues enter soils, they can react physicochemically with soil particle surfaces and/or incorporate into humic matter. Phenolic acids desorbed from soil particle surfaces and remained in solution phase can be utilized by microbe as carbon sources and absorbed by plants. The degradation products of phenolic acids by microbe include some organic and/or inorganic compounds such as new phenolic acids. In addition, phenolic acids in soils can stimulate population and activity of microbe. Phenolic acids can inhibit plants growth by affecting ion leakage, phytohormone activity, membrane permeability, hydraulic conductivity, net nutrient uptake, and enzyme activity. Behaviors of phenolic acids in soils are influenced by other organic compounds (phenolic acids, methionine, glucose, etc.) and/or inorganic ions. The role of phenolic acids as allelopathic agents should not be neglected only based on their low specific concentrations in natural soils, because numbers and interactions of phenolic acids will increase their allelopathic activities.

  13. Role of basic amino acids in the interaction of bindin with sulfated fucans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, P L; Glabe, C G

    1988-10-18

    Bindin, the acrosomal sperm adhesion protein of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, binds specifically and with high affinity (Kd = 10(-8) M) to egg sulfated fucans in the high ionic strength milieu of seawater (0.55 M salt). Previous studies indicated that the negatively charged sulfate groups of the polysaccharide are critical for binding which suggested a binding mechanism involving basic residues of bindin. We found that the binding of fucan to bindin or polyarginine is stable at the ionic strength of seawater, whereas the binding of fucan to polylysine or polyhistidine is inhibited by 50% or more at this ionic strength. Group-specific modification of either arginine, lysine, or histidine residues of bindin results in a substantial inactivation of fucan binding activity. Preincubation of bindin with fucan can almost completely protect bindin from inactivation by arginine-specific reagents, butanedione and phenylglyoxal, but only moderately slowed the inactivation by the histidine reagent diethyl pyrocarbonate. In contrast, prior fucan binding could not prevent loss of activity by the reaction of citraconic anhydride with lysine residues. Other sulfated polysaccharides which do not interact strongly with bindin did not protect binding from phenylglyoxal-mediated inactivation when 800-3000-fold more polysaccharide than fucan was used during the preincubation before modification. We found that the larger and more hydrophobic arginine-modifying reagents, camphorquinone-10-sulfonic acid and cyclohexanedione, fail to inactivate fucan binding, suggesting that essential arginine residues may reside in an environment with restricted accessibility to these reagents. Parallel kinetic studies monitoring [14C]phenylglyoxal incorporation and fucan binding inactivation indicate that several of the four total arginine residues may be critical for fucan binding.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Evidence for Acid-Sulfate Alteration in the Pahrump Hills Region, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D. F.; Chipera, S.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Cavanagh, P.; Achilles, C.; Bristow, T.; Fairen, A.; Morrison, S. M.; Treiman, A. H.; Crisp, J. A.; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, J. D.; Fendrich, K.; Morookian, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Pahrump Hills region of Gale crater is a ~12 m thick section of sedimentary rock in the Murray formation, interpreted as the basal geological unit of Mount Sharp. The Mars Science Laboratory, Curiosity, arrived at the Pahrump Hills in September 2014 and performed a detailed six-month investigation of the sedimentary structures, geochemistry, and mineralogy of the area. During the campaign, Curiosity drilled and delivered three mudstone samples (targets Confidence Hills, Mojave 2, and Telegraph Peak) to its internal instruments, including the CheMin XRD/XRF. Results from CheMin show that these samples have variable amounts of plagioclase, pyroxene, iron oxides, jarosite, phyllosilicates, cristobalite, and X-ray amorphous material. The presence of jarosite in all samples indicates these rocks were affected by acid-sulfate alteration, and the mineralogical and geochemical trends observed through the section may give more insight into this process. Geochemical data measured by APXS show enrichment in Si and depletion in Mg moving up section. CheMin data show that cristobalite is more abundant up section, whereas pyroxene and phyllosilicates are more abundant at the bottom of the section. Based on mineralogical and geochemical trends and diagenetic features observed in the Pahrump Hills, we hypothesize that the sediments were altered in-situ by acid-sulfate fluids moving down from the top of the section to leach mobile elements, dissolve the minerals most susceptible to acidic alteration, and precipitate secondary silica at the top of the section. Alternative interpretations of the observed mineralogical and geochemical data are possible, including the hypothesis that the redox conditions of the body of water in which the sediments were deposited changed over time.

  15. Comparative biological potency of acidic sulfate aerosols: implications for the interpretation of laboratory and field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R B; Chen, L C

    1994-04-01

    Biological responses to inhaled acid sulfates result from the deposition of hydrogen ion (H+) on airway surfaces. Thus, effects from sulfuric acid and ammonium bisulfate, the two major ambient species, have been assumed to be the same for a given H+ concentration within the exposure atmosphere, assuming similar respiratory tract deposition patterns. However, recent inhalation studies have indicated that sulfuric acid is disproportionately potent compared to ammonium bisulfate when the H+ content of the exposure atmosphere is considered, suggesting that some factors following inhalation affect the amount of H+ contacting airway surfaces. This study assessed a mechanism potentially underlying this phenomenon, namely, the extent of neutralization by respiratory tract ammonia. This was evaluated using a physical model system designed to mimic transit of these aerosols in the upper respiratory tract of the animal model used in this laboratory, the rabbit. The results suggest that for equal exposure quantities of H+, more acid would be deposited when sulfuric acid is inhaled than when ammonium bisulfate is inhaled. Furthermore, results from a series of in vitro exposures of tracheal epithelial cells to sulfuric acid and ammonium bisulfate aerosols indicated that the biological response is a function of the total mass (ionic) concentration of H+ deliverable to the cells or the total extractable H+ per particle. The results of this study have possible implications for ambient monitoring of particulate-associated strong acidity, suggesting that it may be necessary to specilate such measures into the relative amounts of H+ as sulfuric acid or ammonium bisulfate in order to most accurately relate atmospheric acid levels to observed health effects. In addition, since much of the ambient particulate-associated H+ exists as sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate mixtures rather than pure compounds, H(+)-associated health effects from controlled exposure studies of sulfuric acid may

  16. Reduced carbon sequestration potential of biochar in acidic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yaqi; Zhan, Yu; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-12-01

    Biochar application in soil has been proposed as a promising method for carbon sequestration. While factors affecting its carbon sequestration potential have been widely investigated, the number of studies on the effect of soil pH is limited. To investigate the carbon sequestration potential of biochar across a series of soil pH levels, the total carbon emission, CO2 release from inorganic carbon, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) of six soils with various pH levels were compared after the addition of straw biochar produced at different pyrolysis temperatures. The results show that the acidic soils released more CO2 (1.5-3.5 times higher than the control) after the application of biochar compared with neutral and alkaline soils. The degradation of both native soil organic carbon (SOC) and biochar were accelerated. More inorganic CO2 release in acidic soil contributed to the increased degradation of biochar. Higher proportion of gram-positive bacteria in acidic soil (25%-36%) was responsible for the enhanced biochar degradation and simultaneously co-metabolism of SOC. In addition, lower substrate limitation for bacteria, indicated by higher C-O stretching after the biochar application in the acidic soil, also caused more CO2 release. In addition to the soil pH, other factors such as clay contents and experimental duration also affected the phsico-chemical and biotic processes of SOC dynamics. Gram-negative/gram-positive bacteria ratio was found to be negatively related to priming effects, and suggested to serve as an indicator for priming effect. In general, the carbon sequestration potential of rice-straw biochar in soil reduced along with the decrease of soil pH especially in a short-term. Given wide spread of acidic soils in China, carbon sequestration potential of biochar may be overestimated without taking into account the impact of soil pH.

  17. Soil Acidification due to Acid Deposition in Southern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Bohan

    1998-12-31

    Anthropogenic emission of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} to the atmosphere has made acid deposition one of the most serious environmental problems. In China, acid deposition research started in the late 1970s. The present thesis is part of a joint Chinese-Norwegian research project. The main goal of the thesis was to investigate the mechanism of soil acidification, to estimate soil responses to acid deposition, and to compare relative soil sensitivity to acidification in southern China. Laboratory experiments and modelling simulations were included. Specifically, the thesis (1) studies the characteristics of anion adsorption and cation release of the soils from southern China, (2) examines the effects of increased ionic strength in the precipitation and the effects of anion adsorption on cation release from the soils, (3) compares the relative sensitivity of these soils to acidification and the potentially harmful effects of acid deposition, (4) estimates likely soil responses to different deposition scenarios, including changes in soil waters and soil properties, and (5) investigates long-term changes in soils and soil waters in the Guiyang catchment due to acid deposition. 218 refs., 31 figs., 23 tabs.

  18. A study of the phase transition behavior of internally mixed ammonium sulfate - malonic acid aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Braban

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a study into the phase transitions of aerosol composed of the ternary system ammonium sulfate (AS - malonic acid (MA - water using infrared extinction spectroscopy. Twelve compositions were studied in both deliquescence and efflorescence mode experiments. The presence of a MA fraction, by dry mass, (fMA of 0.1 in an AS aerosol altered the relative humidity at which the phase transitions occur in an atmospherically significant manner. For compositions with 0.25fMAfMA=0.9, the crystallization relative humidity of MA was lowered from RH=6% to less than 1%. Similarly, at fMA=0.4, the AS component did not crystallize. The atmospheric implications of the results are discussed.

  19. Liming of acid soils in Osijek-Baranja county

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolijanović Željko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The negative trend of soil degradation process increases with intensive agricultural production. Therefore, there is a need for soil conditioning like liming, humification, fertilization, etc. to improve soil quality. One of the major problems that occur on agricultural soils of Croatia is acidification. A downward trend of soil pH is mainly present in soils of poor structure with intensive agricultural production. In agricultural practice liming often needs to rely only on the pH value, without determining the hydrolytic acidity, CEC or soil texture. Due to the above mentioned facts, calculation of liming for Osijek-Baranja County was conducted with the help of ALRxp calculator, which takes CEC, soil pH in KCl, hydrolytic acidity, bulk density of soil, soil textural class and depth of the plow layer to 30 cm into account. Low soil pH values have a great influence on soil suitability for crops as well as on the deficit of calcium and magnesium. All of these lead to the degradation of soil structure, and can even lead to disturbances of plant nutrition in some production areas. On such soils, liming would be imperatively required, but with caution because an excessive intake of lime materials, especially without the necessary analysis, causes a decline in organic matter and reduces accessibility for plant uptake of microelements.

  20. Titratable Acidity and Alkalinity of Red Soil Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAOZONG-CHEN; HEQUN; 等

    1993-01-01

    The surfaces of red soils have an apparent amphoteric character,carrying titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity simultaneously.The titratable acidity arises from deprotonation of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces and dissociation of weak-acid functional groups of soil organic matter,while the titratable alkalinity is derived from release of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity mainly depended on the composition and content of iron and aluminum oxides in the soils.The results showed that the titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity were in significantly positive correlation not only with the content of amorphous aluminum oxide(Alo) and iron oxide(Feo) extracted with acid ammonium oxalate solution,free iron oxide(Fed) extracted with sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate(DCB) and clays,but also with the zero point of charge (ZPC) of the samples.Organic matter made an important contribution to the titratable acidity.the titratable alkalinity was closely correlated with the amount of fluoride ions adsorbed.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity of red soils were influenced by parent materials,being in the order of red soil derived from basalt> that from tuff> that from granite.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity ware closely related with origination of the variable charges of red soils,and to a certain extent were responsible for variable negative and positive charges of the soils.

  1. Genotypic Differences of Forage Crop Tolerance to Acid Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGYUAI; CHUXIANGYUN; 等

    1998-01-01

    Twenty eight species of forage crops were planted on acid soils derived from Quaternary red clay(pH4.16) and red sandstone(pH4.55) to study genotypic differences of the forage crops in tolerance to acid soils as affected by liming,phosporus and potassium fertilizer application.Eight forage species,Lolium nultiflorum L., Brachiaria decumbens,Digitaria sumtisii,Melinis minutiflora,Paspalum dilatatum,Paspalum wettsteinii,Sataria viridis Beanv and Shcep's Festuca,were highly toleran to acid soils,and grew relatively well in the tested soils without lime application,whereas most of the other 20 tested forage species such as Lolium perenne L., Meadow Festuca and Trifolium praense L. were intolerant to acid soil ,showing retarded growth when the soil pH was below 5.5 and significant increase in dry matter yields by phosphrus fertilizer application at soil pH 6.0 Results showed that large differences in tolerance to acid soils existed among the forage species,and tolerance of the froage species to acid soils might be closely associated with their tolerance to Al and P efficiency.

  2. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: IV Acid-sulfate waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk Nordstrom, D. [US Geological Survey, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)], E-mail: dkn@usgs.gov; Blaine McCleskey, R.; Ball, James W. [US Geological Survey, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Many waters sampled in Yellowstone National Park, both high-temperature (30-94 deg. C) and low-temperature (0-30 deg. C), are acid-sulfate type with pH values of 1-5. Sulfuric acid is the dominant component, especially as pH values decrease below 3, and it forms from the oxidation of elemental S whose origin is H{sub 2}S in hot gases derived from boiling of hydrothermal waters at depth. Four determinations of pH were obtained: (1) field pH at field temperature, (2) laboratory pH at laboratory temperature, (3) pH based on acidity titration, and (4) pH based on charge imbalance (at both laboratory and field temperatures). Laboratory pH, charge imbalance pH (at laboratory temperature), and acidity pH were in close agreement for pH < 2.7. Field pH measurements were predominantly used because the charge imbalance was <{+-}10%. When the charge imbalance was generally >{+-}10%, a selection process was used to compare acidity, laboratory, and charge balance pH to arrive at the best estimate. Differences between laboratory and field pH can be explained based on Fe oxidation, H{sub 2}S or S{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxidation, CO{sub 2} degassing, and the temperature-dependence of pK{sub 2} for H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Charge imbalances are shown to be dependent on a speciation model for pH values <3. The highest SO{sub 4} concentrations, in the thousands of mg/L, result from evaporative concentration at elevated temperatures as shown by the consistently high {delta}{sup 18}O values (-10 per mille to -3 per mille ) and a {delta}D vs. {delta}{sup 18}O slope of 3, reflecting kinetic fractionation. Low SO{sub 4} concentrations (<100 mg/L) for thermal waters (>350 mg/L Cl) decrease as the Cl{sup -} concentration increases from boiling which appears inconsistent with the hypothesis of H{sub 2}S oxidation as a source of hydrothermal SO{sub 4}. This trend is consistent with the alternate hypothesis of anhydrite solubility equilibrium. Acid-sulfate water analyses are occasionally high in As, Hg, and

  3. Characterization of specific membrane fatty acids as chemotaxonomic markers for sulfate-reducing bacteria involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvert, M.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.;

    2003-01-01

    Membrane fatty acids were extracted from a sediment core above marine gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific. Anaerobic sediments from this environment are characterized by high sulfate reduction rates driven by the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The assimilation of methane carbon into ...

  4. Effects of folic acid and zinc sulfate on male factor subfertility: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, W.Y.; Merkus, J.M.W.M.; Thomas, C.M.G.; Menkveld, R.; Zielhuis, G.A.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of folic acid and zinc sulfate treatment on semen variables in fertile and subfertile men. DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled interventional study. SETTING: Two outpatient fertility clinics and nine midwifery practices in The Netherlands. PARTICIPANT(S): One hun

  5. Succession of Soil Acidity Quality and its Influence on Soil Phosphorus Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUANWenbiao; CHENLixin

    2004-01-01

    Succession rules of soil acidity quality of larch plantations in first rotation at different development stages, succession rules of soil acidity quality of young stand of larch plantations in second rotation and the relationship between soil acidity and various forms of organic phosphorus and inorganic phosphorus were studied in mountainous area of eastern part of Northeastern China. The results showed that active acidity (pH value) inrhizosphere soil decreased continually with stand age increasing from young stand, half-mature stand, near mature stand to mature stand, but active acidity (pH value) in non-rhizosphere soil, exchange acidity, exchangeable aluminium, total hydrolytic acidity, and the ratio of exchange acidity and total hydrolytic acidity in rhizosphere soil and in non-rhizosphere soil increased apparently; total organic P, moderately resistant organic P, and highly resistant organic P in soil decreased at all age stages in larch plantations when soil acidity added. For rhizosphere soil of all stands of larch plantations at different development stages,there was positive correlation between Ca-P (except in young stand), Al-P(except in half-mature stand), Fe-P (except in near mature stand and mature stand), O-P (except in young stand), and soil active acidity,respectively; For rhizosphere soil, there was negative correlation between Ca-P (except in half-mature stand), Al-P(except in young stand), O-P, and exchange acidity, exchangeable aluminium, there was also negative correlation between Ca-P, Al-P(except in young stand and half-mature stand), Fe-P, O-P, and total hydrolytic acidity respectively. For rhizosphere soil, the correlation coefficient between Ca-P, O-P and total hydrolytic aciditydecreased, respectively, as stand ages up and that between Fe-P and exchange acidity,exchangeable aluminium increased, respectively, as stand ages grew. For non-rhizosphere soil, there was not significant correlation between soil acidity and various forms of

  6. Experimental Study on the Feasibility of Using Water Glass and Aluminum Sulfate to Treat Complications in High Liquid Limit Soil Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-hui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of using water glass and aluminum sulfate to treat high liquid limit soil subgrade diseases is studied through laboratory experiments, and the following results were observed. After improving the high liquid limit clay with water glass and aluminum sulfate, the liquid limit decreases, the plastic limit increases, and the plasticity index decreases. Compared with untreated soil, the clay content of the improved soil decreases, while the silt and coarse contents increase. The absolute and relative expansion rates of the improved soil are both lower than those of the untreated soil. With the same number of dry and wet cycles, the decreased degrees of cohesion and internal friction angle of the improved soil are, respectively, one-half and one-third of those of the untreated soil. After three dry and wet cycles, the California bearing ratio (CBR of the untreated soil does not meet the requirements of specifications. However, after being cured for seven days and being subjected to three dry and wet cycles, the CBR of the improved soil, with 4% water glass solution and 0.4% aluminum sulfate, meets the requirements of specifications.

  7. N-Sulfonic acid poly(4-vinylpyridinum) hydrogen sulfate as a novel, efficient, and reusable solid acid catalyst for acylation under solvent-free conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nader Ghaffari Khaligh; Parisa Ghods Ghasem-Abadi

    2014-01-01

    N-Sulfonic acid poly(4-vinylpyridinum) hydrogen sulfate has been developed as a recyclable solid acid catalyst for the acetylation of alcohols, phenols, thiols, and amines, as well as the 1,1- diacetyla-tion of aldehydes under solvent-free conditions at room temperature. The acetylated products were formed in good to excellent yields over short reaction times, and the catalyst could be readily re-covered by filtration and used several times without any discernible loss in activity. The hydrogen sulfate anion of the catalytic system was found to play a critical role in enhancing the reaction time and yield of the acetylation reaction.

  8. Preparation and application of zirconium sulfate supported on SAPO-34 molecular sieve as solid acid catalyst for esterification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan, E-mail: xdy0156@sina.com; Ma, Hong; Cheng, Fei

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SAPO-34 supported zirconium sulfate solid acid catalyst was prepared. • Esterification of acetic acid with ethanol can be catalyzed by ZS/SAPO-34. • The hydration of ZS is vital to the acidic property and catalytic performance. • The ZS/SAPO-34 catalyst treated at 200 °C shows good reusability. - Abstract: Zirconium sulfate (ZS) was supported on SAPO-34 molecular sieve by using an incipient wetness impregnation method with zirconium sulfate as the precursor. The as-prepared catalysts were used as solid acid catalyst for esterification reaction of acetic acid with ethanol. The influence of calcination temperature on the acidic property, catalytic activity, and reusability of ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts were mainly investigated. FT-IR, SEM, EDS and TG analysis have been carried out to demonstrate the characteristics of ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts. It was found that the 30 wt%ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts display the property of superacid irrespective of calcination temperature. The ZS/SAPO-34 catalyst treated at 200 °C can enhance the interaction between the supported ZS and SAPO-34 and keep the catalyst remaining substantially active after several reaction cycles. However, further increasing calcination temperature will cause the transfer of ZS from hydrate to anhydrous phase, and thus the decrease of activity.

  9. Preparation and Acid Catalytic Activity of TiO2 Grafted Silica MCM-41 with Sulfate Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai-shi Guo; Zi-feng Ma; Chun-sheng Yin; Qi-zhong Jiang

    2008-01-01

    TiO2 grafted silica MCM-41 catalyst with and without sulfate treatment were prepared.The structural and acid properties of these materials were investigated by XRD,N2 adsorption-desorption,element analysis,thermal analysis,Raman and FTIR measurements.Their acid-catalytic activities were evaluated using the cyclization reaction of pseudoionone.It was found that the obtained materials possess well-ordered mesostructure,and the grafted TiO2 components were in highly dispersed amorphous form.T/MCM41 without sulfation contained only Lewis acid sites,while Br(o)nsted and Lewis acidities were remarkably improved for the sulfated materials ST/MCM41 and d-ST/MCM41.T/MCM-41 was not active for the cyclization reaction of pseudoionone,but ST/MCM-41 and d-ST/MCM-41 possessed favorable catalytic activities.The catalytic performance of ST/MCM-41 was comparable with that of the commercial solid acid catalyst of Amberlyst-15,and better than that of d-ST/MCM-41,although the latter underwent a second TiO2 grafting process and accordingly had higher Ti and S content.The specific surface structure of Si-O-Ti-O-S=O in ST/MCM-41 and the bilateral induction effect of Si and S=O on Si-O-Ti bonds were speculated to account for its higher acid catalytic activity.

  10. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  11. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey; Harden, Jennifer; Maher, Kate

    2014-08-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.

  12. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.

  13. Selective cleavage and anticoagulant activity of a sulfated fucan: stereospecific removal of a 2-sulfate ester from the polysaccharide by mild acid hydrolysis, preparation of oligosaccharides, and heparin cofactor II-dependent anticoagulant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomin, Vitor H; Pereira, Mariana S; Valente, Ana-Paula; Tollefsen, Douglas M; Pavão, Mauro S G; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2005-04-01

    A linear sulfated fucan with a regular repeating sequence of [3)-alpha-L-Fucp-(2SO4)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Fucp-(4SO4)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Fucp-(2,4SO4)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Fucp-(2SO4)-(1-->]n is an anticoagulant polysaccharide mainly due to thrombin inhibition mediated by heparin cofactor II. No specific enzymatic or chemical method is available for the preparation of tailored oligosaccharides from sulfated fucans. We employ an apparently nonspecific approach to cleave this polysaccharide based on mild hydrolysis with acid. Surprisingly, the linear sulfated fucan was cleaved by mild acid hydrolysis on an ordered sequence. Initially a 2-sulfate ester of the first fucose unit is selectively removed. Thereafter the glycosidic linkage between the nonsulfated fucose residue and the subsequent 4-sulfated residue is preferentially cleaved by acid hydrolysis, forming oligosaccharides with well-defined size. The low-molecular-weight derivatives obtained from the sulfated fucan were employed to determine the requirement for interaction of this polysaccharide with heparin cofactor II and to achieve complete thrombin inhibition. The linear sulfated fucan requires significantly longer chains than mammalian glycosaminoglycans to achieve anticoagulant activity. A slight decrease in the molecular size of the sulfated fucan dramatically reduces its effect on thrombin inactivation mediated by heparin cofactor II. Sulfated fucan with approximately 45 tetrasaccharide repeating units binds to heparin cofactor II but is unable to link efficiently the plasma inhibitor and thrombin. This last effect requires chains with approximately 100 or more tetrasaccharide repeating units. We speculate that the template mechanism may predominate over the allosteric effect in the case of the linear sulfated fucan inactivation of thrombin in the presence of heparin cofactor II.

  14. Chemical evaluation of soil-solution in acid forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-solution chemistry is commonly studied in forests through the use of soil lysimeters.This approach is impractical for regional survey studies, however, because lysimeter installation and operation is expensive and time consuming. To address these problems, a new technique was developed to compare soil-solution chemistry among red spruce stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. Soil solutions were expelled by positive air pressure from soil that had been placed in a sealed cylinder. Before the air pressure was applied, a solution chemically similar to throughfall was added to the soil to bring it to approximate field capacity. After the solution sample was expelled, the soil was removed from the cylinder and chemically analyzed. The method was tested with homogenized Oa and Bs horizon soils collected from a red spruce stand in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, a red spruce stand in east-central Vermont, and a mixed hardwood stand in the Catskill Mountains of New York. Reproducibility, effects of varying the reaction time between adding throughfall and expelling soil solution (5-65 minutes) and effects of varying the chemical composition of added throughfall, were evaluated. In general, results showed that (i) the method was reproducible (coefficients of variation were generally reaction-time did not affect expelled solution concentrations, and (iii) adding and expelling solution did not cause detectable changes in soil exchange chemistry. Concentrations of expelled solutions varied with the concentrations of added throughfall; the lower the CEC, the more sensitive expelled solution concentrations were to the chemical concentrations of added throughfall. Addition of a tracer (NaBr) showed that the expelled solution was a mixture of added solution and solution that preexisted in the soil. Comparisons of expelled solution concentrations with concentrations of soil solutions collected by zero-tension and tension lysimetry indicated that expelled

  15. Evaluating enhanced sulfate reduction and optimized volatile fatty acids (VFA) composition in anaerobic reactor by Fe (III) addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-17

    Anaerobic reactors with ferric iron addition have been experimentally demonstrated to be able to simultaneously improve sulfate reduction and organic matter degradation during sulfate-containing wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the impact of ferric iron addition on sulfate reduction and organic carbon removal as well as the volatile fatty acids (VFA) composition in anaerobic reactor. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using independent long-term experimental data sets from the anaerobic reactor with Fe (III) addition under different operational conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the sulfate reduction, organic carbon removal and VFA production. Results show Fe (III) addition induces the microbial reduction of Fe (III) by iron reducing bacteria (IRB), which significantly enhances sulfate reduction by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and subsequently changes the VFA composition to acetate-dominating effluent. Simultaneously, the produced Fe (II) from IRB can alleviate the inhibition of undissociated H2S on microorganisms through iron sulfide precipitation, resulting in further improvement of the performance. In addition, the enhancement on reactor performance by Fe (III) is found to be more significantly favored at relatively low organic carbon/SO4(2-) ratio (e.g., 1.0) than at high organic carbon/SO4(2-) ratio (e.g., 4.5). The Fe (III)-based process of this work can be easily integrated with a commonly used strategy for phosphorus recovery, with the produced sulfide being recovered and then deposited into conventional chemical phosphorus removal sludge (FePO4) to achieve FeS precipitation for phosphorus recovery while the required Fe (III) being acquired from the waste ferric sludge of drinking water treatment process, to enable maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving high-rate sulfate removal.

  16. Glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid chronic risk assessment for soil biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mérey, Georg; Manson, Philip S; Mehrsheikh, Akbar; Sutton, Peter; Levine, Steven L

    2016-11-01

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide used widely in agriculture, horticulture, private gardens, and public infrastructure, where it is applied to areas such as roadsides, railway tracks, and parks to control the growth of weeds. The exposure risk from glyphosate and the primary soil metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) on representative species of earthworms, springtails, and predatory soil mites and the effects on nitrogen-transformation processes by soil microorganisms were assessed under laboratory conditions based on internationally recognized guidelines. For earthworms, the reproductive no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) was 472.8 mg glyphosate acid equivalent (a.e.)/kg dry soil, which was the highest concentration tested, and 198.1 mg/kg dry soil for AMPA. For predatory mites, the reproductive NOEC was 472.8 mg a.e./kg dry soil for glyphosate and 320 mg/kg dry soil for AMPA, the highest concentrations tested. For springtails, the reproductive NOEC was 472.8 mg a.e./kg dry soil for glyphosate and 315 mg/kg dry soil for AMPA, the highest concentrations tested. Soil nitrogen-transformation processes were unaffected by glyphosate and AMPA at 33.1 mg a.e./kg soil and 160 mg/kg soil, respectively. Comparison of these endpoints with worst-case soil concentrations expected for glyphosate (6.62 mg a.e./kg dry soil) and AMPA (6.18 mg/kg dry soil) for annual applications at the highest annual rate of 4.32 kg a.e./ha indicate very low likelihood of adverse effects on soil biota. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2742-2752. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  17. Methylsulfonylmethane and boswellic acids versus glucosamine sulfate in the treatment of knee arthritis: Randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, Angela; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Moretti, Lorenzo; Pesce, Vito; Tafuri, Silvio; Fiore, Alessandra; Moretti, Biagio

    2016-03-01

    Until now glucosamine sulfate (GS) has been the most widely used supplement and has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and boswellic acids (BA) are new effective supplements for the management of inflammation and joint degeneration, according to previous experimental studies. The aim of our study is to test the effectiveness of association of MSM and BA in comparison with GS in knee arthritis.In this prospective randomized clinical trial, MEBAGA (Methylsulfonylmethane and Boswellic Acids versus Glucosamine sulfate in the treatment of knee Arthritis), 120 participants affected by arthritis of the knee were randomly assigned to an experimental group (MB group) or a control group (GS group) treated for 60 days with 5 g of MSM and 7.2 mg of BA or with 1500 mg of GS daily, respectively. At the 2-month (T1) and 6-months (T2) follow-up , the efficacy of these two nutraceuticals was assessed using the visual analog pain scale (VAS) and the Lequesne Index (LI) for joint function, along with the use of anti-inflammatory drugs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-cyclooxygenase-2).The repeated measures ANOVA analysis shows that for VAS, LI, and the use of anti-inflammatory drugs scores there are improvements due to the time in the two groups (respectively, F=26.0; P<0.0001; F=4.15; P=0.02; F=3.38; P=0.04), with a tendency to better values for the MB group at T2.On the basis of these preliminary data, we could support the efficacy of the MSM in association with BA in the treatment of OA. These results are consistent with the anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective effects previously occurred in experimental studies. This new combination of integration (MSM and BS) has presented good results and satisfactory in comparison with GS, until now the cornerstone of the treatment of arthritis in according to guidelines.

  18. Isotopic constraints on the role of hypohalous acids in sulfate aerosol formation in the remote marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianjie; Geng, Lei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Xie, Zhouqing; Kang, Hui; Dachs, Jordi; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Schauer, Andrew J.; Camp, Madeline G.; Alexander, Becky

    2016-09-01

    Sulfate is an important component of global atmospheric aerosol, and has partially compensated for greenhouse gas-induced warming during the industrial period. The magnitude of direct and indirect radiative forcing of aerosols since preindustrial times is a large uncertainty in climate models, which has been attributed largely to uncertainties in the preindustrial environment. Here, we report observations of the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O) of sulfate aerosol collected in the remote marine boundary layer (MBL) in spring and summer in order to evaluate sulfate production mechanisms in pristine-like environments. Model-aided analysis of the observations suggests that 33-50 % of sulfate in the MBL is formed via oxidation by hypohalous acids (HOX = HOBr + HOCl), a production mechanism typically excluded in large-scale models due to uncertainties in the reaction rates, which are due mainly to uncertainties in reactive halogen concentrations. Based on the estimated fraction of sulfate formed via HOX oxidation, we further estimate that daily-averaged HOX mixing ratios on the order of 0.01-0.1 parts per trillion (ppt = pmol/mol) in the remote MBL during spring and summer are sufficient to explain the observations.

  19. Arsenic removal from contaminated soil using phosphoric acid and phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to study Arsenic (As) removal from a naturally contaminated soil using phosphoric acid (H3PO4) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4). Both H3PO4 and KH2PO4 proved to clearly reduce toxicity of the soil in terms of soil As content, attaining more than 20% As removal at a concentration of 200 mmol/L, although soil As tolerance limit of 30 mg/kg, according to Chinese Environmental quality standard for soil (EQSS), was not satisfied by using these two extractants. At the same time, acidification of soil and dissolution of soil components (Ca, Mg, and Si) resulted from using these two extractants, especially H3PO4. The effectiveness of these two extractants could be attributed to the replacement of As by phosphate ions (PO43-). The function of H3PO4 as an acid to dissolve soil components had little effects on As removal. KH2PO4 almost removed as much As as H3PO4, but it did not result in serious damage to soils, indicating that it was a more promising extractant. The results of a kinetic study showed that As removal reached equilibrium after incubation for 360 min, but dissolution of soil components, especially Mg and Ca, was very rapid. Therefore dissolution of soil components would be inevitable if As was further removed. Elovich's model best described the kinetic data of As removal among the four models used in the kinetic study.

  20. Acid soils of western Serbia and their further acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrvic, Vesna

    2010-05-01

    Acid soils cause many unfavorable soil characteristics from the plant nutrition point of view. Because of increased soil acidity the violation of buffering soil properties due to leaching of Ca and Mg ions is taking place that also can cause soil physical degradation via peptization of colloids. Together with increasing of soil acidity the content of mobile Al increases that can be toxic for plants. Easily available nutritive elements transforms into hardly avaialble froms. The process of deactivation is especially expressed for phosphorous that under such conditions forms non-soluble compounds with sesqui-oxides. From the other hand the higher solubility of some microelements (Zn and B) can cause their accelerated leaching from root zone and therefore, result in their deficiency for plant nutrition. Dangerous and toxic matters transforms into easly-available forms for plants, especially, Cd and Ni under the lower soil pH. The studied soil occupies 36675 hectare in the municipality of Krupan in Serbia, and are characterized with very unfavorable chemical properties: 26% of the territory belongs to the cathegory of very acidic, and 44 % belongs to the cathegory of acidic. The results showed that the soil of the territory of Krupan is limited for agricultural land use due to their high acidity. Beside the statement of negative soil properties determined by acidity, there is a necessity for determination of soil sensitivity for acidification processes toward soil protection from ecological aspect and its prevention from further acidification. Based on such data and categorization of soils it is possible to undertake proper measures for soil protection and melioration of the most endangered soil cover, where the economic aspect of these measures is very important. One of the methods of soil classification based on sensitivity for acidification classification the determination of soil categories is based on the values of soil CEC and pH in water. By combination of these

  1. Assignment of hexuronic acid stereochemistry in synthetic heparan sulfate tetrasaccharides with 2-O-sulfo uronic acids using electron detachment dissociation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyekum, Isaac; Patel, Anish B.; Zong, Chengli; Boons, Geert Jan; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The present work focuses on the assignment of uronic acid stereochemistry in heparan sulfate (HS) oligomers. The structural elucidation of HS glycosaminoglycans is the subject of considerable importance due to the biological and biomedical significance of this class of carbohydrates. They are highly

  2. Partial replacement of dietary linoleic acid with long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids protects against dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Anupama; Kumar, Uday; Santosh, Vadakattu Sai; Reddy, Suryam; Mohammed, Saazida Bhanu; Ibrahim, Ahamed

    2014-12-01

    Imbalances in the dietary n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been implicated in the increased prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigated the effects of substitution of linoleic acid with long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and hence decreasing n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratio on inflammatory response in dextran sulfate sodium induced colitis. Male weanling Sprague Dawley rats were fed diets with n-6:n-3 fatty acid in the ratios of 215,50,10 or 5 for 3 months and colitis was induced by administration of dextran sulfate sodium in drinking water during last 11 days. Decreasing the dietary n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratio to 10 and 5 significantly attenuated the severity of colitis as evidenced by improvements in clinical symptoms, reversal of shortening of colon length, reduced severity of anemia, preservation of colonic architecture as well as reduced colonic mucosal myeloperoxidase activity. This protection was associated with suppression of colonic mucosal proinflammatory mediators such as TNFα, IL-1β and nitric oxide. These findings suggest that long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids at a level of 3.0 g/kg diet (n-6:n-3 ratio of 10) prevents dextran sulfate sodium induced colitis by suppressing the proinflammatory mediators.

  3. Glycyrrhetic Acid Ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Deok Jeon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhizae Radix (GR is a Korean traditional herb medicine that is widely used in clinical health care. Glycyrrhetic acid (GA is an aglycone saponin extracted from GR that has anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and anti-viral effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effects of GA in colitis have not been reported. This study investigated the role of GA on ulcerative colitis in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced mouse colitis model. DSS-treated mice displayed weight loss and shortened colon length compared with control mice. Mice administered GA showed less weight loss and longer colon length than the DSS-treated group. Interleukin (IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were decreased by GA treatment. GA treatment also reduced DSS-induced microscopic damage to colon tissue. GA regulates the phosphorylation of transcription factors including nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and IκB alpha, and regulates the expression of cycloxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E2. GA thus showed beneficial effects in a mouse model of colitis, implicating GA might be a useful herb-derived medicine in the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

  4. A study of the phase transition behavior of mixed ammonium sulfate – malonic acid aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Braban

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a study into the phase transitions of aerosol composed of the ternary system ammonium sulfate (AS – malonic acid (MA – water using infrared extinction spectroscopy. Twelve compositions were studied in both deliquescence and efflorescence mode experiments. The presence of a MA fraction, by dry mass, (fMA of 0.1 in an AS aerosol altered the relative humidity at which the phase transitions occur in an atmospherically significant manner. For compositions with 0.25<fMA<0.90, no distinct "deliquescence" was observed, contrary to the observed behavior in the binary systems. The crystallization of both the MA and AS components is suppressed by the presence of the other component in the aerosol. At fMA=0.9, the crystallization relative humidity of MA was lowered from RH=6% to less than 1%. Similarly, at fMA=0.4, the AS component did not crystallize. The atmospheric implications of the results are discussed.

  5. Modified ferrous ammonium sulfate benzoic acid xyelenol orange (MFBX) and thermoluminescent dosimeters--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindha, S; Rose, J V R; Sathyan, S; Singh I, Rabi Raja; Ravindran, B Paul

    2002-06-07

    Radiation dosimetry deals with the determination of absorbed dose to the medium exposed to ionizing radiation. Chemical dosimetry depends on oxidation or reduction of chemicals by ionizing radiation. A ferrous ammonium sulfate benzoic acid xyelenol orange (FBX) dosimeter based on this principle is being used as a clinical dosimeter at present. Certain modifications were carried out in the preparation and storage of the FBX dosimeter to increase its shelf life. The resulting dosimeter was called a modified FBX (MFBX) dosimeter and has been used in our department for the past few years. An extensive study of the dose, dose rate and energy response of the dosimeter was carried out and compared with a thermoluminescent (LiF7) dosimeter. The results obtained were found to be comparable to the thermoluminescent (LiF7) dosimeter. Hence it was concluded that the MFBX dosimeter could be used for phantom dosimetry, data collection and in vivo measurements. Easier preparation and availability of the reagents are added advantages of using MFBX as a clinical dosimeter in small radiotherapy departments.

  6. Biochemical degradation of soil humic acids and fungal melanins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavgorodnyaya, Y.A.; Demin, V.V.; Kurakov, A.V. [Moscow MV Lomonosov State University, Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Soil Science

    2002-07-01

    Studies were conducted to compare properties and biodegradation of fungal melanins from Aspergillus niger and Cladosporium cladosporiodes with those of humic acids from soils and brown coal. Compared to the humic acids the fungal melanins contained more functional groups, were less hydrophilic and had relatively high molecular weights. Under the conditions of incubation the melanins were found to be more readily degradable than the humic acids studied. The changes in elemental composition, optical parameters and the decrease of molecular weight, observed for both fungal melanins during degradation, made them more similar to soil humic acids.

  7. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    KAUST Repository

    Oburger, E.

    2011-07-26

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal uptake. Little is known about the interaction dynamics of organic acid anions with the soil matrix and the potential impact of adsorption and desorption processes on the functional significance of these effects. The aim of this study was to characterize experimentally the adsorption and desorption dynamics of organic acid anions in five agricultural soils differing in iron and aluminium oxide contents and using citrate as a model carboxylate. Results showed that both adsorption and desorption processes were fast in all soils, reaching a steady state within approximately 1 hour. However, for a given total soil citrate concentration (ct) the steady state was critically dependent on the starting conditions of the experiment, whether most of the citrate was initially present in solution (cl) or held on the solid phase (cs). Specifically, desorption-led processes resulted in significantly smaller steady-state solution concentrations than adsorption-led processes, indicating that hysteresis occurred. As it is not possible to distinguish between different adsorption and desorption pools in soil experimentally, a new dynamic hysteresis model that relies only on measured soil solution concentrations was developed. The model satisfactorily explained experimental data and was able to predict dynamic adsorption and desorption behaviour. To demonstrate its use, we applied the model to two relevant situations involving exudation and microbial degradation. The study highlighted the complex nature of citrate adsorption and desorption dynamics in soil. We conclude that existing models need to incorporate both temporal and hysteresis components to describe realistically the role and fate of organic acids in soil processes. © 2011 The

  8. Identification of sulfate reducers and Syntrophobacter sp. in anaerobic granular sludge by fatty-acid biomarkers and 16S rRNA probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Stams, A.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterial sludge population in anaerobic bioreactors, treating different types of wastewater in the presence or absence of sulfate, was evaluated by polar-lipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses, and by 16S rRNA dot-blot hybridizations using specific 16S rRNA- targeted oligonucleotide

  9. Identification of sulfate reducers and Syntrophobacter sp. in anaerobic granular sludge by fatty-acid biomarkers and 16S rRNA probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Stams, A.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterial sludge population in anaerobic bioreactors, treating different types of wastewater in the presence or absence of sulfate, was evaluated by polar-lipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses, and by 16S rRNA dot-blot hybridizations using specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide p

  10. SOLUBILITIES AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SATURATED SOLUTIONS IN THE COPPER SULFATE + SULFURIC ACID + SEAWATER SYSTEM AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Justel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn Chile, the most important economic activity is mining, concentrated in the north of the country. This is a desert region with limited water resources; therefore, the mining sector requires research and identification of alternative sources of water. One alternative is seawater, which can be a substitute of the limited fresh water resources in the region. This work determines the influence of seawater on the solid-liquid equilibrium for acid solutions of copper sulfate at different temperatures (293.15 to 318.15 K, and its effect on physical properties (density, viscosity, and solubility. Knowledge of these properties and solubility data are useful in the leaching process and in the design of copper sulfate pentahydrate crystallization plants from the leaching process using seawater by means of the addition of sulfuric acid.

  11. SOLUBILITIES AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SATURATED SOLUTIONS IN THE COPPER SULFATE + SULFURIC ACID + SEAWATER SYSTEM AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES

    OpenAIRE

    F. J. Justel; M. Claros; M. E. Taboada

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In Chile, the most important economic activity is mining, concentrated in the north of the country. This is a desert region with limited water resources; therefore, the mining sector requires research and identification of alternative sources of water. One alternative is seawater, which can be a substitute of the limited fresh water resources in the region. This work determines the influence of seawater on the solid-liquid equilibrium for acid solutions of copper sulfate at different...

  12. Managing Actual Problems of Peatsoils Associated with Soil Acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Edi Armanto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to manage actual problems of peatsoils associated with soil acidity. The research has been conducted on peatsoils in river backswamps located in Subdistricts of East Pedamaran and Pedamaran, District of OKI South Sumatra. Soil sampling was taken in cultivated and uncultivated types of landuse; cultivated peatsoils consist of Site A (intercropping between oil palm and pineapple and Site B (oil palm, uncultivated peatsoils are divided into Site C (peat forest, Site D (swamp bush and Site E (swamp grass. The research resulted that actual problems of soil acidity is associated with base saturation, cations exchange capacity, soil organic matters and C/N ratio, balances of soil nutrients, and toxicity potency. The climatic condition and drought can accelerate the occurrence of actual problems of peatsoils associated with acidity peatsoils. Some ameliorant have been applied in order of importance in the fields, namely lime/dolomite, mineral soils, organic fertilizers, combustion ash, and volcanic ash. Application of ameliorant materials is capable to minimize the actual problems of peatsoils associated with soil acidity.

  13. Chemical Species of Aluminum Lons in Acid Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XURENKOU; JIGUOLIANG

    1998-01-01

    Soil samples collected from several acid soils in Guangdong,Fujian,Zhejiang and Anhui provinces of the southern China were employded to characterize the chemical species of aluminum ions in the soils.The proportion or monoeric inorganic Al to total Al in soil solution was in the range of 19% to 70%,that of monomeric organlic Al (Al-OM) to total Al ranged from 7.7% to 69%,and that of the acid-soluble Al to total Al was generally smaller and was lower than 20% in most of the acid soils studied ,The Al-OM concentration in soil solution was postively correlated with the content of dissolved organic carbon(DOC) and aslo affected by the concentration of Al3+,The complexes of aluminum with fluoride(Al-F) were the predominant forms of inorganic Al,and the proportion of Al-F compexes to total inorganic Al increased with pH.Under strongly acid ondition,Al3+ was also a mjaor form of inorganic Al,and the proportio of Al3+ to total inorganic Al decreased with increasing pH.The,proportions of Al-OH and Al-SO4 complexes to total inorganic Al were small and were not larger than 10% in the most acid soils.The concentration of inorganic Al in solution depended largely on pH and the concentration of total F in soil solution,The concentrations of Al-OM,Al3+,Al-F and Al-OH complexes in topsoil were higher than those in subsoil and decreased with the increase in soil depth,The chemical species of aluminum ions were influenced by pH,The concentrations of Al-OM, Al3+,Al-F complexes and Al-OH complexes decreased with the increase in pH.

  14. Gallic acid attenuates dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandurangan AK

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ashok Kumar Pandurangan,1,2 Nooshin Mohebali,2 Mohd Esa Norhaizan,1,3 Chung Yeng Looi2 1Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, MalaysiaAbstract: Gallic acid (GA is a polyhydroxy phenolic compound that has been detected in various natural products, such as green tea, strawberries, grapes, bananas, and many other fruits. In inflammatory bowel disease, inflammation is promoted by oxidative stress. GA is a strong antioxidant; thus, we evaluated the cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory role of GA in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced mouse colitis model. Experimental acute colitis was induced in male BALB/c mice by administering 2.5% DSS in the drinking water for 7 days. The disease activity index; colon weight/length ratio; histopathological analysis; mRNA expressions of IL-21 and IL-23; and protein expression of nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 were compared between the control and experimental mice. The colonic content of malondialdehyde and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activity were examined as parameters of the redox state. We determined that GA significantly attenuated the disease activity index and colon shortening, and reduced the histopathological evidence of injury. GA also significantly (P<0.05 reduced the expressions of IL-21 and IL-23. Furthermore, GA activates/upregulates the expression of Nrf2 and its downstream targets, including UDP-GT and NQO1, in DSS-induced mice. The findings of this study demonstrate the protective effect of GA on experimental colitis, which is probably due to an antioxidant nature of GA.Keywords: IL-21, NQO1, MDA, enzymic antioxidants

  15. Metal and acidity fluxes controlled by precipitation/dissolution cycles of sulfate salts in an anthropogenic mine aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, C. R.; Macías, F.; Pérez-López, R.

    2016-05-01

    Underground mine drainages are extremely difficult to study due to the lack of information about the flow path and source proximity in relation to the outflow adit. Geochemical processes controlling metals and acidity fluxes in a complex anthropogenic mine aquifer in SW Spain during the dry and rainy season were investigated by geochemical and statistical tools. High concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals and metalloids (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Ni, Co) were observed due to intense sulfide oxidation processes. The high residence time inside the anthropogenic aquifer, around 40 days, caused the release of significant quantities of metals linked to host rocks (e.g. Al, Ca, Ge, Li, Mg, REE). The most outstanding characteristic of the acid mine drainage (AMD) outflows is the existence of higher Fe/SO4 molar ratios than those theoretical of pyrite (0.50) during most of the monitored period, due to a fire which occurred in 1949 and remained active for decades. Permanent and temporal retention mechanisms of acidity and metals were observed in the galleries. Once released from sulfide oxidation, Pb and As are sorbed on Fe oxyhydroxysulfate or precipitated as low solubility minerals (i.e. anglesite) inside the galleries. The precipitation of evaporitic sulfate salts during the dry season and the subsequent re-dissolution after rainfall control the fluxes of acidity and main metals (i.e. Fe, Mg, Al) from this anthropogenic aquifer. Some elements, such as Cd, Cu, Ni, REE and Zn, are retained in highly soluble sulfate salts while other elements, such as Ge, Pb and Sc, have a lower response to washout processes due to its incorporation in less soluble sulfate salts. In this way, metal concentration during the washout processes would be controlled by the proportion and solubility of each type of evaporitic sulfate salt stored during the dry season. The recovery of metals of economic interest contained in the AMD could help to self-finance the remediation of these waters in

  16. Tolerance of VA Mycorrhizal Fungi to Soil Acidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A 45-day greenhouse experiment was carried out to determine effect of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizai fungi on colonization rate,plant height, plant growth,hyphae length,total Al in the plants,exchangeable A1 in the soil and soil pH by comparison at soil pH 3.5,4.5 and 6.0.Plant mung bean (Phaseolus radiatus L.) and crotalaria (Crotalaria mucronata Desv.) were grown with and without VA mycorrhizal fungi in pots with red soil.Ten VA mycorrhizal fungi strains were tested,including Glomus epigaeum (No.90001),Glomus caledonium (No.90036),Glomus mosseae (No.90107), Acaulospora spp.(No.34),Scutellospora heterogama (No.36),Scutellospora calospora (No. 37),Glomus manihotis (No.38),Gigaspora spp.(No.47),Glomus manihotis (No.49),and Acaulospora spp.(No.53).Being the most tolerant to acidity,strain 34 and strain 38 showed quicker and higher-rated colonization without lagging,three to four times more in number of nodules,two to four times more in plant dry weight,30% to 60% more in hyphae length,lower soil exchangeable Al,and higher soil pH than without VA mycorrhizal fungi (CK).Other strains also could improve plant growth and enhance plant tolerance to acidity,but their effects were not marked.This indicated that VA mycorrhizal fungi differed in the tolerance to soil acidity and so did their inoculation effects.In the experiment,acidic soil could be remedied by inoculation of promising VA mycorrhizal fungi tolerant of acidity.

  17. Amelioration of acidic soil using various renewable waste resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Young; Ok, Yong Sik; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, improvement of acidic soil with respect to soil pH and exchangeable cations was attempted for sample with an initial pH of approximately 5. Acidic soil was amended with various waste resources in the range of 1 to 5 wt.% including waste oyster shells (WOS), calcined oyster shells (COS), Class C fly ash (FA), and cement kiln dust (CKD) to improve soil pH and exchangeable cations. Upon treatment, the soil pH was monitored for periods up to 3 months. The exchangeable cations were measured after 1 month of curing. After a curing period of 1 month, a maize growth experiment was conducted with selected-treated samples to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. The treatment results indicate that in order to increase the soil pH to a value of 7, 1 wt.% of WOS, 3 wt.% of FA, and 1 wt.% of CKD are required. In the case of COS, 1 wt.% was more than enough to increase the soil pH value to 7 because of COS's strong alkalinity. Moreover, the soil pH increases after a curing period of 7 days and remains virtually unchanged thereafter up to 1 month of curing. Upon treatment, the summation of cations (Ca, Mg, K, and Na) significantly increased. The growth of maize is superior in the treated samples rather than the untreated one, indicating that the amelioration of acidic soil is beneficial to plant growth, since soil pH was improved and nutrients were replenished.

  18. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  19. Partition of Chiral pharmaceutical intermediate R(-)-Mandelic Acid in Aqueous Two-Phase System of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Ammonium Sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiaoping; Li Zhongqin; Chen Jiebo; Huang Xinghua

    2004-01-01

    An aqueous two-phase system of poly (ethylene glycol)-ammonium sulfate was employed to separate R (-)-mandelic acid.The result showed that R (-)-mandelic acid has priority to partition in PEG-rich top phase. This indicated that aqueous two-phase is a very suitable system for separation of R(-)-mandelic acid.

  20. Intrinsic degradation of volatile fatty acids in laboratory-compacted clayey soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrapovic, L.; Rowe, R. K.

    2002-10-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) represent the major organic constituent of landfill leachate and provide the greatest potential for leachate induced organic contamination of groundwater (e.g. as represented by an increase in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand). Long-term diffusion tests were performed for laboratory-compacted clayey soil plugs exposed to continuous supply of synthetic leachate containing VFAs. Significant microbial activity developed upon exposure of the soil's indigenous microorganisms to these degradable contaminants. The growth of heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (HAB, which include facultative anaerobes), sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria carrying out fermentation and mineralization of the VFAs became evident after 30-50 days of testing. The maximum microbial counts of (2-8)×10 8 and (0.1-1)×10 8 cfu/g for HAB and SRB were localized in the soil layer at the interface with the source of organic and inorganic nutrients. Regardless of this rapid growth in microbial population, the VFA consumption was small and measurable only after a lag of 140-180 days. It is considered that this lag of otherwise readily degradable organic compounds (such as VFAs) persisted due to a combination of the effects of a high initial concentration of these acids (2.4 g/l as dissolved organic carbon, DOC) applied to carbon starved soil microorganisms and the small pore size of the compacted clay. Once the significant amounts of gas were generated from fermentation, conditions developed for improved mass transport and exchange of the nutrients and bacteria and the outcome of the intrinsic degradation was more apparent. The breakdown of VFAs that followed after the lag was localized near the top of the soil and was characterized by a short half-life of 0.75-5 days for DOC (total VFAs as dissolved organic carbon).

  1. Combined Use of Alkaline Slag and Rapeseed Cake to Ameliorate Soil Acidity in an Acid Tea Garden Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; YANG Xing-Lun; K.RACHEL; WANG Yu; TONG De-Li; YE Mao; JIANG Xin

    2013-01-01

    Rapeseed cake (RC),the residue of rapeseed oil extraction,is effective for improving tea (Camellia sinensis) quality,especially taste and aroma,but it has limited ability to ameliorate strongly acidic soil.In order to improve the liming potential of RC,alkaline slag (AS),the by-product of recovery of sodium carbonate,was incorporated.Combined effects of different levels of RC and AS on ameliorating acidic soil from a tea garden were investigated.Laboratory incubations showed that combined use of AS and RC was an effective method to reduce soil exchangeable acidity and A1 saturation and increase base saturation,but not necessarily for soil pH adjustment.The release of alkalinity from the combined amendments and the mineralization of organic nitrogen increased soil pH initially,but then soil pH decreased due to nitrifications.Various degrees of nitrification were correlated with the interaction of different Ca levels,pH and N contents.When RC was applied at low levels,high Ca levels from AS repressed soil nitrification,resulting in smaller pH fluctuations.In contrast,high AS stimulated soil nitrification,when RC was applied at high levels,and resulted in a large pH decrease.Based on the optimum pH for tea production and quality,high ratios of AS to RC were indicated for soil acidity amelioration,and 8.0 g kg-1 and less than 2.5 g kg-1 were indicated for AS and RC,respectively.Further,field studies are needed to investigate the variables of combined amendments.

  2. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area.

  3. Interaction of Cd and citric acid, EDTA in red soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption process of cadmium in redsoil(Ferrisols) as well as the influence by media's pH were investigated in detail with and without citric acid and EDTA. Experimental results clearly showed that Cd adsorption in red soil was affected significantly by the coexisted organic chemicals. In the presence of citric acid and EDTA, Cd adsorption in red soil increased with pH in acid media but decreased in high pH one. Further studies placed stress on the adsorbed Cd in red soil which was found to be existed mainly as exchangeable one at pH<5.5, and desorption rate by 0.10 mol/L NaNO3 gave a peak-shaped curve due to the difference of specifically and nonspecifically adsorbed Cd with pH's change.

  4. Effects of poultry manure on soil biochemical properties in phthalic acid esters contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Qin, Xiaojian; Ren, Xuqin; Zhou, Haifeng

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of poultry manure (PM) on soil biological properties in DBP- and DEHP-contaminated soils. An indoor incubation experiment was conducted. Soil microbial biomass C (Cmic), soil enzymatic activities, and microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) concentrations were measured during incubation period. The results indicated that except alkaline phosphatase activity, DBP and DEHP had negative effects on Cmic, dehydrogenase, urease, protease activities, and contents of total PLFA. However, 5 % PM treatment alleviated the negative effects of PAEs on the above biochemical parameters. In DBP-contaminated soil, 5 % PM amendment even resulted in dehydroenase activity and Cmic content increasing by 17.8 and 11.8 % on the day 15 of incubation, respectively. During the incubation periods, the total PLFA contents decreased maximumly by 17.2 and 11.6 % in DBP- and DEHP-contaminated soils without PM amendments, respectively. Compared with those in uncontaminated soil, the total PLFA contents increased slightly and the value of bacPLFA/fugalPLFA increased significantly in PAE-contaminated soils with 5 % PM amendment. Nevertheless, in both contaminated soils, the effects of 5 % PM amendment on the biochemical parameters were not observed with 10 % PM amendment. In 10 % PM-amended soils, DBP and DEHP had little effect on Cmic, soil enzymatic activities, and microbial community composition. At the end of incubation, the effects of PAEs on these parameters disappeared, irrespective of PM amendment. The application of PM ameliorated the negative effect of PAEs on soil biological environment. However, further work is needed to study the effect of PM on soil microbial gene expression in order to explain the change mechanisms of soil biological properties.

  5. Preparation and Catalytic Application of Novel Water Tolerant Solid Acid Catalysts of Zirconium Sulfate/HZSM-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ya-jie; JUAN Joon Ching; MENG Xiu-juan; CAO Wei-liang; YARMO Mohd Ambar; ZHANG Jing-chang

    2007-01-01

    Esterification of acrylic acid(AA) to produce AA esters has widespread application in the chemical industry. A series of water tolerant solid acid catalysts was prepared, and characterized by XRD, nitrogen adsorption, TGA-DTA, XPS, and ammonia adsorption FTIR. The effects of Si/Al ratio, zirconium sulfate(ZS) loading on HZSM-5 and calcination temperature on the esterification were investigated. When 20%(mass fraction) ZS is loaded on HZSM-5, the conversion of AA reaches 100%. XRD analysis indicates that ZS is highly dispersed on HZSM-5 because no crystalline structure assigned to ZS is found. Catalytic activity and hydrophobicity of ZS supported on HZSM-5 are higher compared with those of parent ZS or HZSM-5. Results show that this kind of novel catalysts is an efficient water tolerant solid acid catalyst for esterification reactions.

  6. Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an Acid mine drainage-contaminated natural wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, John W; Fournelle, John H; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

  7. Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an acid mine drainage-contaminated wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Moreau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

  8. Release of Soil Nonexchangeable K by Organic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUYONG-GUAN; LUOJIA-XIAN

    1993-01-01

    The amounts of soil nonexchangeable K extracted with 0.01mL/L oxalic acid and citric acid solutions and that with boiling 1mL/L HNO3 for ten minutes were remarkably significantly correlated with each other,and the amount extracted with the oxalic acid solution was higher than that with the citric acid solution.The soil nonexchangeable K release was comprised of two first-order kinetic processes.The faster one was ascribed to the interlayer K in outer sphere,while the slower one to that in inner sphere.The rate constants of the soil nonexchageable K were significantly correlated with the amounts of nonexchangeable K ex tracted with boiling 1mL/L HNO3 for ten minutes.Study on the fitness of different kinetic equations indicated that the first-order,parabolic diffusion and zero-order equations could all describe the release of soil nonexchangeable K well,but Elovich equation was not suitable to describe it.

  9. Soil Studies: Applying Acid-Base Chemistry to Environmental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Donna M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory activities for chemistry students focus attention on the use of acid-base chemistry to examine environmental conditions. After using standard laboratory procedures to analyze soil and rainwater samples, students use web-based resources to interpret their findings. Uses CBL probes and graphing calculators to gather and analyze data and…

  10. Microbiological transformations of phosphorus and sulphur compounds in acid soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenov Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of phosphorus and sulphur in soil is closely related to the dynamics of the biological cycle in which microorganisms play a central role. There is not much microbiological activity in acid soils because aerobes are scarce, rhizosphere is restricted to the shallow surface layer, and the biomass of microorganisms decreases with higher acidity. The aim of the research was to investigate the number of microorganisms, which decompose organic and inorganic phosphorus compounds and organic sulphur compounds in calcocambisol, luvisol, and pseudogley. The following parameters were determined in the soil samples: pH in H2O and in 1MKCl; the content of CaCO3 (%; humus content (%, nitrogen content (%; the content of physiologically active phosphorus and potassium (mg P2O5/100g of soil; mg K2O/100g of soil. The number of microorganisms was determined by the method of agar plates on appropriate nutrient media: the number of microorganisms solubilizing phosphates on a medium by Muramcov; the number of microorganisms that decompose organic phosphorus compounds on a medium with lecithin; and the number of microorganisms that transform organic sulphur compounds on a medium by Baar. All three types of soil are acid non-carbonate soils with a low level of available phosphorus and a more favorable amount of potassium, nitrogen, and humus. The largest number of bacteria, which transform organic phosphorus compounds, was found in calcocambisol. The largest number of phosphate solubilizing bacteria was recorded in pseudogley, whereas the largest number of phosphate solubilizing fungi was recorded in calcocambisol. The largest number of bacteria, which transform organic sulphur compounds, was recorded in pseudogley.

  11. Impact of tree species on soil carbon stocks and soil acidity in southern Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostra, Swantje [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp (Sweden). Dept. of Landscape Planning; Majdi, Hooshang [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Sciences; Olsson, Mats [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Soils

    2006-10-15

    The impact of tree species on soil carbon stocks and acidity in southern Sweden was studied in a non-replicated plantation with monocultures of 67-year-old ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.), beech (Fagus silvatica L.), elm (Ulmus glabra Huds.), hornbeam (Carpinusbetulus L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.). The site was characterized by a cambisol on glacial till. Volume-determined soil samples were taken from the O-horizon and mineral soil layers to 20 cm. Soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), pH (H2O), cation-exchange capacity and base saturation at pH 7 and exchangeable calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium ions were analysed in the soil fraction < 2 mm. Root biomass <5 mm in diameter) and its proportion in the forest floor and mineral soil varied between tree species. There was a vertical gradient under all species, with the highest concentrations of SOC, TN and base cations in the O-horizon and the lowest in the 10-20 cm layer. The tree species differed with respect to SOC, TN and soil acidity in the O-horizon and mineral soil. For SOC and TN, the range in the O-horizon was spruce> hornbeam > oak > beech > ash > elm. The pH in the O-horizon ranged in the order elm > ash > hornbeam > beech > oak > spruce. In the mineral soil, SOC and TN ranged in the order elm > oak > ash = hornbeam > spruce > beech, i.e. partly reversed, and pH ranged in the same order as for the O-horizon. It is suggested that spruce is the best option for fertile sites in southern Sweden if the aim is a high carbon sequestration rate, whereas elm, ash and hornbeam are the best solutions if the aim is a low soil acidification rate.

  12. Enzyme Activities in Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA)-Polluted Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; LIN Kuang-Fei; YANG Sha-Sha; ZHANG Meng

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a popular additive of the chemical industry; its effect on activities of important soil enzymes is not well understood.A laboratory incubation experiment was carried out to analyze the PFOA-induced changes in soil urease,catalase,and phosphatase activities.During the entire incubation period,the activities of the three soil enzymes generally declined with increasing PFOA concentration,following certain dose-response relationships.The values of EC10,the contaminant concentration at which the biological activity is inhibited by 10%,of PFOA for the soil enzyme activity calculated from the modeling equation of the respective dose-response curve suggested a sensitivity order of phosphatase > catalase > urease.The effect of PFOA on soil enzyme activities provided a basic understanding of the eco-toxicological effect of PFOA in the environment.Results of this study supported using soil phosphatase as a convenient biomarker for ecological risk assessment of PFOA-polluted soils.

  13. Methylprednisolone Inhibits the Expression of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans in Reactivated Astrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-LIN LIU; YI-HSUAN LEE; SHIH-YING TSAI; CHUNG YI HSU; YU-YO SUN; LIANG-YO YANG; SHING-HAN TSAI; WEI-CHUNG VIVIAN YANG

    2008-01-01

    创伤后的神经胶质增生导致硫酸软骨素蛋白聚糖(CSPG)的显著表达,从而抑制轴突生长和再生.甲基强地松龙(MP),一种合成的糖皮质激素,在急性脊髓损伤(SCI)的治疗中有神经保护作用和抗炎效应.但是,MP对于CSPG在活性胶质细胞中的表达的作用尚不清楚.本文用a-氨基-3-羟基-5-甲基-4-异恶唑丙酸酯(AM-PA)诱导星形胶质细胞再活化,用环噻嗪模拟SCI的兴奋性中毒刺激.AMPA治疗后,星形胶质细胞再活化的标志物-胶质纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)、CSPG神经聚糖和磷酸盐的表达都显著上调.AMPA治疗星形胶质细胞的条件培养液强烈抑制大鼠背根神经节中神经元的轴突生长,但这种作用能被MP的预处理所逆转.此外,MP下调成年SCI大鼠中GFAP和CSPG的表达,对抗RU486的糖皮质激素受体(GR)和GR siRNA能逆转MP对GFAP和神经聚糖表达的抑制作用.这些结果提示,MP能在兴奋性中毒损伤后通过GR介导的星形胶质细胞再活化下调和GSPG表达抑制来改善神经修复,促进轴突生长.%Reactive gliosis caused by post-traumatic injury often results in marked expression of chondroitin sul-fate proteoglycan(CSPG), which inhibits neurite outgrowth and regeneration. Methylprednisolone (MP), a synthet-ic glucocorticoid, has been shown to have neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the effect of MP on CSPG expression in reactive glial cells remains unclear. In our study, we induced astrocyte reactivation using a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) and cyclothiazide to mimic the exciotoxic stimuli of SCI. The expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of astrocyte reactivation, and CSPG neurocan and phosphacan were significantly elevated by AMPA treat-ment. The conditioned media from AMPA-treated astrocytes strongly inhibited neurite outgrowth of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, and this

  14. Growth response of Avena sativa in amino-acids-rich soils converted from phenol-contaminated soils by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Youn; Kim, Bit-Na; Choi, Yong Woo; Yoo, Kye Sang; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2012-04-01

    The biodegradation of phenol in laboratory-contaminated soil was investigated using the Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum. This study showed that the phenol degradation caused by C. glutamicum was greatly enhanced by the addition of 1% yeast extract. From the toxicity test using Daphnia magna, the soil did not exhibit any hazardous effects after the phenol was removed using C. glutamicum. Additionally, the treatment of the phenolcontaminated soils with C. glutamicum increased various soil amino acid compositions, such as glycine, threonine, isoleucine, alanine, valine, leucine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. This phenomenon induced an increase in the seed germination rate and the root elongation of Avena sativa (oat). This probably reflects that increased soil amino acid composition due to C. glutamicum treatment strengthens the plant roots. Therefore, the phenol-contaminated soil was effectively converted through increased soil amino acid composition, and additionally, the phenol in the soil environment was biodegraded by C. glutamicum.

  15. Alteration of chemical behavior of L-ascorbic acid in combination with nickel sulfate at different pH solutions in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaheen A Maniyar; Jameel G Jargar; Swastika N Das; Salim A Dhundasi; Kusal K Das

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the alteration of chemical behavior of L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) with metal ion (nickel) at different pH solutions in vitro. Methods: Spectra of pure aqueous solution of L-ascorbic acid (E mark) compound and NiSO4 (H2O) (sigma USA) were evaluated by UV visible spectrophotometer. Spectral analysis of L-ascorbic acid and nickel at various pH (2.0, 7.0, 7.4 and 8.6) at room temperature of 29℃ was recorded. In this special analysis, combined solution of L-ascorbic acid and nickel sulfate at different pH was also recorded. Results: The result revealed that λmax (peak wavelength of spectra) of L-ascorbic acid at pH 2.0 was 289.0 nm whereas at neutral pH 7.0, λmax was 295.4 nm. In alkaline pH 8.6, λmax was 295.4 nm and at pH 7.4 the λmax of L-ascorbic acid remained the same as 295.4 nm. Nickel solution at acidic pH 2.0 was 394.5 nm, whereas at neutral pH 7.0 and pH 7.4 were the same as 394.5 nm. But at alkaline pH 8.6, λmax value of nickel sulfate became 392.0 nm. The combined solution of L-ascorbic acid and nickel sulfate (6 mg/mL each) at pH 2.0 showed 292.5 nm and 392.5 nm, respectively whereas at pH 7.0, L-ascorbic acid showed 296.5 nm and nickel sulfate showed 391.5 nm. At pH 7.4, L-ascorbic acid showed 297.0 nm and nickel sulfate showed 394.0 nm in the combined solution whereas at pH 8.6 (alkaline) L-ascorbic acid and nickel sulfate were showing 297.0 and 393.5 nm, respectively.Conclusions:alone or in combination with nickel sulfate in vitro at different pH. Perhaps oxidation of L-ascorbic acid to L-dehydro ascorbic acid via the free radical (HSc*) generation from the reaction of H2ASc+ Ni (II) is the cause of such alteration of λmax value of L-ascorbic acid in the presence of metal Results clearly indicate an altered chemical behavior of L-ascorbic acid either nickel.

  16. Raman Spectra and Nucleation Rates of Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate Aerosols Supercooled with Respect to Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, D. A.; Koop, T.; Weers, U. G.; Krieger, U. K.; Peter, T.

    2001-12-01

    Sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate aerosol particles can serve as ice condensation nuclei for the formation of upper tropospheric cirrus clouds. These clouds influence the global radiation budget by scattering of short wavelength (solar) radiation as well as by absorbing long wavelength (terrestrial) radiation. Knowledge of the thermodynamics and the nucleation rates of aerosols is fundamental for the understanding of formation processes of cirrus clouds. Here, we present a new investigation tool to observe phase transitions of aerosols supercooled with respect to ice. Confocal Raman microscopy is used to determine the phase changes and the morphology of the particles. Raman spectroscopy is employed to distinguish and to characterize the different phases inside the frozen particles. Single droplets with a diameter of typically 20-120 μ m are deposited on a hydrophobically coated Herasil-plate that is covered by a spacer and another plate. Since the gas phase volume of the cell is small compared to the liquid droplet volume the composition of the droplets remains fixed during temperature changes. The temperature of the droplets can be varied between 150-350~K. We present the first Raman spectra of aqueous H2SO4/H2O and (NH4)2SO4/H2O droplets for several concentrations and temperatures to the homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The analysis of the speciation of the components inside the droplets (e.g. sulfate vs. bisulfate ions) is compared to results from thermodynamic models. Evaluation of the freezing data gives upper limits for ice nucleation rates of droplets as a function of sulfuric acid or ammonium sulfate concentration.

  17. Thermal stability and surface acidity of mesoporous silica doubly doped by incorporation of sulfate and zirconium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, P. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: psalas@imp.mx; Chen, L.F. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-A, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa-Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Wang, J.A. [Laboratorio de Catalisis y Materiales, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Col. Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Armendariz, H. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Guzman, M.L. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Montoya, J.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Acosta, D.R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. P. 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-11-15

    A sulfated Si-Zr-MCM-41 solid with highly ordered mesostructure was synthesized through a templated synthesis route where the CTAB surfactant was used as template. During the synthesis procedure, various amounts of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} were added into the mixed solution of Zr and Si precursors to in situ sulfate the MCM-41 solids, aiming to enhance the acidity and thermal stability. The resultant materials showed a long-range ordered hexagonal arrangement with high surface area larger than 797 m{sup 2}/g and an average pore size distributed at approximate 2.5-2.8 nm. The high-resolution TEM observations confirmed that the order of the mesostructure gained when the molar ratio of SO{sub 4} {sup 2-}/(ZrO{sub 2} + SiO{sub 2}) increased from 0.1 to 0.3 but decreased as it reached 0.5, which is consistent with the results of {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR and XRD analysis. Compared to Si-MCM-41, the (Q{sup 2} + Q{sup 3})/Q{sup 4} ratio derived from the NMR spectra of the Zr-doped sample was higher, indicating that zirconium atoms were incorporated into the silica framework. Unexpectedly, in situ sulfation does not enhance the surface Broensted acidity, most likely due to the sulfur retained within the bulk of the materials; however, it indeed improved the thermal stability of the solid and long-range order of the structure.

  18. Effect of Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids on Cl- Adsorption by Variable Charge Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ren-Kou; ANG Ma-Li; WANG Qiang-Sheng; JI Guo-Liang1

    2004-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids exist widely in soils and have been implicated in many soil processes.The objective of the present paper was to evaluate effect of two LMW organic acids, citric acid and oxalic acid, on Cl- adsorption by three variable charge soils, a latosol, a lateritic red soil and a red soil, using a batch method. The results showed that the presence of citric acid and oxalic acid led to a decrease in Cl- adsorption with larger decreases for citric acid. Among the different soils Gl- adsorption in the lateritic red soil and the red soil was more affected by both the LMW organic acids than that in the latosol.

  19. Enrichment of sulfate-reducing bacteria and resulting mineral formation in media mimicking pore water metal ion concentrations and pH conditions of acidic pit lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Jutta; Piva, Angela; Fortin, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Acid mine drainage sites are extreme environments with high acidity and metal ion concentrations. Under anoxic conditions, microbial sulfate reduction may trigger the formation of secondary minerals as a result of H2S production and pH increase. This process was studied in batch experiments with enrichment cultures from acidic sediments of a pit lake using growth media set at different pH values and containing elevated concentrations of Fe²⁺ and Al³⁺. At initial pH values of 5 and 6, sulfate reduction occurred shortly after inoculation. Sulfate- reducing bacteria affiliated to the genus Desulfosporosinus predominated the microbial communities as shown by 16S rRNA gene analysis performed at the end of the incubation. At initial pH values of 3 and 4, sulfate reduction and cell growth occurred only after an extended lag phase, however, at a higher rate than in the less acidic assays. At the end of the growth phase, enrichments were dominated by Thermodesulfobium spp. suggesting that these sulfate reducers were better adapted to acidic conditions. Iron sulfides in the bulk phase were common in all assays, but specific aluminum precipitates formed in close association with cell surfaces and may function as a detoxification mechanism of dissolved Al species at low pH.

  20. Soil knowledge for farmers, farmer knowledge for soil scientists. The case of acid sulphate soils in the Mekong delta, Viet Nam.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensvoort, van M.E.F.

    1996-01-01

    Half the Mekong delta in Vietnam, i.e. around 2 million hectares, suffers soil related problems due to acid sulphate soils. These soils generate sulphuric acid due to the oxidation of pyrite after aeration. Pyrite is most easily formed in tidal swamps. Human interference through land drainage is the

  1. Metagenomic Analysis of the Rhizosphere Soil Microbiome with Respect to Phytic Acid Utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Unno, Yusuke; Shinano, Takuro

    2012-01-01

    While phytic acid is a major form of organic phosphate in many soils, plant utilization of phytic acid is normally limited; however, culture trials of Lotus japonicus using experimental field soil that had been managed without phosphate fertilizer for over 90 years showed significant usage of phytic acid applied to soil for growth and flowering and differences in the degree of growth, even in the same culture pot. To understand the key metabolic processes involved in soil phytic acid utilizat...

  2. Formation of a Phyllosilicate-, K-feldspar-, and Sulfate-Bearing Hematite Ridge on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii, Under Hydrothermal, Acid-Sulfate Conditions: Process and Mineralogical Analog for the Hematite Ridge on Mt. Sharp, Gale Crater, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Adams, M. E.; Catalano, J. G.; Graff, T. G.; Arvidson, R. E.; Guinness, E. A.; Hamilton, J. C.; Mertzman, S. A.; Fraeman, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity is currently moving upslope on Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater toward a hematite-bearing ridge. This hematite exposure was originally detected in CRISM spectra and subsequently mapped as part of a ~200 m wide, 6.5 km long ridge extending roughly parallel to the base of Mt. Sharp. CRISM spectra in the region suggest that hematite, smectite, and hydrated sulfates occur as secondary phases in lower layers of Mt. Sharp, separated by an unconformity from overlying anhydrous strata. A potential process and mineralogical analog is a hematite-bearing and weathering-resistant stratum (ridge) is exposed on the Puu Poliahu cinder cone on Mauna Kea (MK) volcano, Hawaii. The MK ridge is the product of hydrothermal alteration of basaltic precursors under acid-sulfate conditions. We are acquiring chemical and mineralogical (VNIR, Mid-IR, and backscatter Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission XRD) data on the MK ridge area that correspond to rover and orbiting spacecraft measurements at Gale Crater and elsewhere. The hematite-bearing stratum does not have detectable sulfate minerals by XRD, and hematite is variably present as up to mm-sized black crystals which, together with associated trioctahedral smectite and K-feldspar (from XRD), imply hydrothermal conditions. Adjacent to the MK hematite-bearing stratum are sulfates (jarosite and alunite) that are evidence for aqueous alteration under acid-sulfate conditions, and more soluble sulfates are absent but such phases would not persist if formed because of annual precipitation. Dioctahedral smectite is associated with red hematite and alunite-rich samples. The black and red hematite zones have the highest and lowest MgO/Al2O3 and K2O/Na2O ratios, respectively. Hematite, smectite, jarosite, and K-feldspar have been detected by Curiosity XRD downslope from the Mt. Sharp hematite ridge. MK field work and samples were obtained with PISCES partnership and OMKM, MKMB, BLNR, and KKMC permissions.

  3. Soil Components Affecting Phosphate Sorption Parameters of Acid Paddy Soils in Guangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Soil components affecting phosphate sorption parameters were studied using acid paddy soils derived from basalt, granite, sand-shale and the Pearl River Delta sediments, respectively, in Guangdong Province.For each soil, seven 2.50 g subsamples were equilibrated with 50 mL 0.02 mol L-1 (pH=7.0) of KCl containing 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50 and 100 ng P kg-1, respectively, in order to derive P sorption parameters (P sorption maximum, P sorption intensity factor and maximum buffer capacity) by Langmuir isotherm equation. It was shown that the main soil components influencing phosphate sorption maximum (Xm) included soil clay, pH,amorphous iron oxide (Feo) and amorphous aluminum oxide (Alo), with their effects in the order of Alo >Feo > pH > clay. Among these components, pH had a negative effect, and the others had a positive effect.Organic matter (OM) was the only soil component influencing P sorption intensity factor (K). The main components influencing maximum phosphate buffer capacity (MBC) consisted of soil clay, OM, pH, Feo and Alo, with their effects in the order of Alo > OM > pH > Feo > clay. Path analysis indicated that among the components with positive effects on maximum phosphate buffer capacity (MBC), the effect was in the order of Alo > Feo > Clay, while among the components with negative effects, OM > pH. OM played an important role in mobilizing phosphate in acid paddy soils mainly through decreasing the sorption intensity of phosphate by soil particles.

  4. Results of mineral, chemical, and sulfate isotopic analyses of water, soil, rocks, and soil extracts from the Pariette Draw Watershed, Uinta Basin, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jean M.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Fahy, Juli W.

    2015-08-06

    In 2010, Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Division of Water Quality (UDWQ, 2010) determined that water quality in Pariette Draw was in violation of Federal and State water quality criteria for total dissolved solids (TDS), selenium (Se), and boron (B). The measure of total dissolved solids is the sum of all the major ion concentrations in solution and in this case, the dominant ions are sodium (Na) and sulfate (SO4), which can form salts like thenardite (Na2SO4) and mirabilite (Na2SO4⋅H2O). The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (2010) classified the contamination as natural background and from nonpoint sources related to regional lithology and irrigation practices. Although the daily loads of the constituents of concern and water chemistry have been characterized for parts of the watershed, little is known about the controls that bedrock and soil mineralogy have on salt, Se, and B storage and the water-rock interactions that influence the mobility of these components in ground and surface waters. Studies in the Uncompahgre River watershed in Colorado by Tuttle and others (2014a, 2014b) show that salt derived from weathering of shale in a semiarid climate is stored in a variety of minerals that contribute solutes to runoff and surface waters based on a complex set of conditions such as water availability, geomorphic position (for example, topography controls the depth of salt accumulation in soils), water-table fluctuations, redox conditions, mineral dissolution kinetics, ion-exchange reactions, and secondary mineral formation. Elements like Se and B commonly reside in soluble salt phases, so knowledge of the behavior of salt minerals also sheds light on the behavior of associated contaminants.

  5. Cadmium Release in Contaminated Soils due to Organic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Min; XIE Xiao-Mei

    2004-01-01

    There is limited information on the release behavior of heavy metals from natural soils by organic acids. Thus,cadmium release,due to two organic acids (tartrate and citrate) that are common in the rhizosphere,from soils polluted by metal smelters or tailings and soils artificially contaminated by adding Cd were analyzed. The presence of tartrate or citrate at a low concentration (≤6mmol L-1 for tartrate and ≤0.5 mmol L-1 for citrate) inhibited Cd release,whereas the presence of organic acids in high concentrations (≥2 mmol L-1 for citrate and ≥15 mmol L-1 for tartrate)apparently promoted Cd release. Under the same conditions,the Cd release in naturally polluted soils was less than that of artificially contaminated soils. Additionally,as the initial pH rose from 2 to 8 in the presence of citrate,a sequential valley and then peak appeared in the Cd release curve,while in the presence of tartrate the Cd release steadily decreased.In addition,Cd release was clearly enhanced as the electrolyte concentration of KNO3 or KC1 increased in the presence of 2 mmol L-1 tartrate. Moreover,a higher desorption of Cd was shown with the KC1 electrolyte compared to KNO3 for the same concentration levels. This implied that the bioavailability of heavy metals could be promoted with the addition of suitable types and concentrations of organic acids as well as reasonable field conditions.

  6. Adsorption of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazzo, N.; Rampazzo Todorovic, G.; Mentler, A.; Blum, W. E. H.

    2013-03-01

    The results showed that glyphosate is initially adsorbed mostly in the upper 2 cm. It is than transported and adsorbed after few days in deeper soil horizons with concomitant increasing content of its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid. Moreover, Fe-oxides seem to be a key parameter for glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic adsorption in soils. This study confirmed previous studies: the analysis showed lower contents of dithionite-soluble and Fe-oxides for the Chernozem, with consequently lower adsorption of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic as compared with the Cambisol and the Stagnosol.

  7. Citramalic acid and salicylic acid in sugar beet root exudates solubilize soil phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlovsky Petr

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In soils with a low phosphorus (P supply, sugar beet is known to intake more P than other species such as maize, wheat, or groundnut. We hypothesized that organic compounds exuded by sugar beet roots solubilize soil P and that this exudation is stimulated by P starvation. Results Root exudates were collected from plants grown in hydroponics under low- and high-P availability. Exudate components were separated by HPLC, ionized by electrospray, and detected by mass spectrometry in the range of mass-to-charge ratio (m/z from 100 to 1000. Eight mass spectrometric signals were enhanced at least 5-fold by low P availability at all harvest times. Among these signals, negative ions with an m/z of 137 and 147 were shown to originate from salicylic acid and citramalic acid. The ability of both compounds to mobilize soil P was demonstrated by incubation of pure substances with Oxisol soil fertilized with calcium phosphate. Conclusions Root exudates of sugar beet contain salicylic acid and citramalic acid, the latter of which has rarely been detected in plants so far. Both metabolites solubilize soil P and their exudation by roots is stimulated by P deficiency. These results provide the first assignment of a biological function to citramalic acid of plant origin.

  8. A multi-faceted approach to characterize acid-sulfate alteration processes in volcanic hydrothermal systems on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Emma Cordts

    Acid-sulfate alteration is a dominant weathering process in high temperature, low pH, sulfur-rich volcanic environments. Additionally, hydrothermal environments have been proposed as locations where life could have originated on Earth. Based on the extensive evidence of flowing surface water and persistent volcanism, similar locations and processes could have existed on early Mars. Globally observed alteration mineral assemblages likely represent relic Martian hydrothermal settings. Yet the limited understanding of environmental controls, limits the confidence of interpreting the paleoconditions of these hydrothermal systems and assessing their habitability to support microbial life. This thesis presents a series of laboratory experiments, geochemical models, analog fieldwork, and Martian remote sensing to characterize distinguishing features and controls of acid-sulfate alteration. The experiments and models were designed to replicate alteration is a highly acidic, sulfurous, and hot field sites. The basaltic minerals were individually reacted in both experimental and model simulations with varying initial parameters to infer the geochemical pathways of acid-sulfate alteration on Earth and Mars. It was found that for a specific starting material, secondary mineralogies were consistent. Variations in pH, temperature and duration affected the abundance, shape, and size of mineral products. Additionally evaporation played a key role in secondary deposits; therefore, both alteration and evaporitic processes need to be taken into consideration. Analog volcanic sites in Nicaragua were used to supplement this work and highlight differences between natural and simulated alteration. In situ visible near-infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that primary lithology and gas chemistry were dominant controls of alteration, with secondary effects from environmental controls, such as temperature and pH. The spectroscopic research from the field was directly related to Mars

  9. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P acid and alkaline soils, respectively.

  10. Highly acidic glycans from sea cucumbers. Isolation and fractionation of fucose-rich sulfated polysaccharides from the body wall of Ludwigothurea grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, P A; Bastos, I G

    1987-08-03

    The body wall of the sea cucumber contains high amounts of sulfated glycans, which differ in structure from glycosaminoglycans of animal tissues and also from the fucose-rich sulfated polysaccharides isolated from marine algae and from the jelly coat of sea urchin eggs. In Ludwigothurea grisea, glycans can be separated into three fractions which differ in molecular mass and chemical composition. The fraction containing a high-molecular-mass component has a high proportion of fucose and small amounts of amino sugars, whereas another fraction contains primarily a sulfated fucan. The third fraction, which represents the major portion of the sea cucumber polysaccharides, contains besides fucose, approximately equimolar proportions of glucuronic acid and amino sugars, and has a sulfate content higher than that in the other two fractions. Both D and L-isomers of fucose are found in these polysaccharides, and the sulfate is linked to the O-3 position of the fucose residues. The attachment position of the sulfate groups to the glucuronic acid units and amino sugars is still undetermined. It is possible that these compounds are involved in maintaining the integrity of the sea cucumber's body wall, in analogy with the role of other macromolecules in the vertebrate connective tissue.

  11. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of Acid-Sulfate Alteration of Basaltic Material on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii: Jarosite and Hydrated Halloysite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Trevor G.; Morris, R. V.; Archilles C. N.; Agresti, D. G.; Ming, D. W.; Hamilton, J. C.; Mertzman, S. A.; Smith, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfates have been identified on the martian surface during robotic surface exploration and by orbital remote sensing. Measurements at Meridiani Planum (MP) by the Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and Mossbauer (MB) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity document the presence of a ubiquitous sulfate-rich outcrop (20-40% SO3) that has jarosite as an anhydrous Fe3+-sulfate [1- 3]. The presence of jarosite implies a highly acidic (pH volcano, Hawaii) resulted in jarosite and alunite as sulfate-bearing alteration products [11-14]. Other, more soluble, sulfates may have formed, but were leached away by rain and melting snow. Acidsulfate processes on Puu Poliahu also formed hematite spherules similar (except in size) to the hematite spherules observed at MP as an alteration product [14]. Phyllosilicates, usually smectite }minor kaolinite are also present as alteration products [13]. We discuss here an occurrence of acid-sulfate alteration on Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii). We report VNIR spectra (0.35-2.5 microns ASD spectrometer), Mossbauer spectra (MER-like ESPI backscatter spectrometer), powder XRD (PANalytical), and major element chemical compositions (XRF with LOI and Fe redox) for comparison to similar data acquired or to be acquired by MRO-CRISM and MEx OMEGA, MERMB, MSL-CheMin, and MER and MSL APXS, respectively.

  12. Influence of Biomass Burning on Temporal and Diurnal Variations of Acidic Gases, Particulate Nitrate, and Sulfate in a Tropical Urban Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Sailesh N. Behera; Rajasekhar Balasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the temporal and diurnal distributions of atmospheric acidic gases (sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrous acid (HONO), and nitric acid (HNO3)) and those of particulate nitrate (NO3-) and sulfate (SO42-) through a comprehensive field campaign during the largest smoke haze episode in Singapore, a representative country in Southeast Asia (SEA). To identify the atmospheric behavior of these pollutants during the smoke haze period, the data generated from the measurement ca...

  13. Simple method of isolating humic acids from organic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, O. H.; Susilawati, K.; Nik Muhamad, A. B.; Khanif, M. Y.

    2009-04-01

    Humic substances particularly humic acids (HA) play a major role in soil conditioning e.g. erosion control, soil cation exchange capacity, complexation of heavy metal ions and pesticides, carbon and nitrogen cycles, plant growth and reduction of ammonia volatilization from urea. Humified substances such as coal, composts, and peat soils have substantial amounts of HA but the isolation of these acids is expensive, laborious, and time consuming. Factors that affect the quality and yield of HA isolated from these materials include extraction, fractionation, and purification periods. This work developed a simple, rapid, and cost effective method of isolating HA from peat soils. There was a quadratic relationship between extraction period and HA yield. Optimum extraction period was estimated at 4 h instead of the usual range of 12 to 48 h. There was no relationship between fractionation period and HA yield. As such 2 h instead of the usual range of 12 to 24 h fractionation period could be considered optimum. Low ash content (5%), remarkable reduction in K, coupled with the fact that organic C, E4/E6, carboxylic COOH, phenolic OH, and total acidity values of the HA were consistent with those reported by other authors suggest that the HA dealt with were free from mineral matter. This was possible because the distilled water used to purify the HA served as Bronsted-Lowry acid during the purification process of the HA. Optimum purification period using distilled waster was 1 h instead of the usual range of 1 and 7 days (uses HF and HCl and dialysis). Humic acids could be isolated from tropical peat soils within 7 h (i.e. 4 h extraction, 2 h fractionation, and 1 h purification) instead of the existing period of 2 and 7 days. This could facilitate the idea of producing organic fertilizers such as ammonium-humate and potassium-humate from humified substances since techniques devised in this study did not alter the true nature of the HA. Besides, the technique is rapid, simple

  14. Chloride, gluconate, sulfate, and short-chain fatty acids affect calcium flux rates across the sheep forestomach epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhard-Marek, S; Becker, G; Breves, G; Schröder, B

    2007-03-01

    In ruminants, more than 50% of overall gastrointestinal Ca absorption can occur preintestinally, and the anions of orally applied Ca salts are thought to play an important role in stimulating ruminal Ca absorption. This assumption is based mainly on ion-exchange studies that have used gluconate as the control anion, which may bind Ca2+ ions and interfere with treatment effects. In the present study, we investigated the distinct effects of different anions on Ca absorption across the sheep rumen and on the concentration of free Ca2+ ions ([Ca2+]ion). We showed that gluconate, sulfate, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) remarkably reduced [Ca2+]ion in buffer solutions. Nevertheless, increasing the Cl or SCFA concentration by 60 mM stimulated net ruminal Ca absorption 5- to 7-fold, but these effects could be antagonized by gluconate. Therefore, ion-exchange experiments must be (re)evaluated very carefully, because changes in [Ca2+]ion in the presence of gluconate, sulfate, or SCFA not only might entail an underestimation of Ca flux rates, but also might have effects on other cellular pathways that are Ca2+ dependent. Concerning the optimal Ca supply for dairy cows, the present study suggests that CaCl2 formulations and Ca salts of the SCFA stimulate Ca absorption across the rumen wall and are beneficial in preventing or correcting a Ca deficiency.

  15. Selectively leaching Cu(Ⅱ) and Ni(Ⅱ) from acid mine drainage sludge by using ethylenediamine-ammonium sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A method based on controlling the complexation-precipitation equilibrium of metal ions was proposed to selectively recover nickel and copper from hydroxide sludge formed by lime neutralization of acid mine drainage(AMD). Ethylenediamine(EDA) and ammonium sulfate were chosen as complex reagent and precipitating reagent, respectively, to dissolve target metal hydroxides from sludge and limit useless metal ions in the pregnant solution. Results from both synthetic and natural samples show the excellent selectivity for the target metals(copper and nickel) against Fe(Ⅲ), Ca(Ⅱ) and Mg(Ⅱ), 99% recovery of Cu(Ⅱ) and Ni(Ⅱ) and shorter leaching time can be reached by this process, and the resultant solution can be used for direct electrowinning. The optimum operating conditions are: pH=9~11, ρ(EDA)=40g/L, ammonium sulfate 50g/L, leaching time 5h(for natural sample) and 2.5h(for synthetic sludge), liquid to solid ratio being 4 with mechanical stirring at room temperature.

  16. Persistence of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in loess soil under different combinations of temperature, soil moisture and light/darkness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins Bento, Celia; Yang, Xiaomei; Gort, Gerrit; Xue, Sha; Dam, van Ruud; Zomer, Paul; Mol, Hans G.J.; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2016-01-01

    The dissipation kinetics of glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were studied in loess soil, under biotic and abiotic conditions, as affected by temperature, soil moisture (SM) and light/darkness. Nonsterile and sterile soil samples were spiked with 16 mg kg− 1

  17. Effect of Oxalic Acid on Potassium Release from Typical Chinese Soils and Minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Shu-Xin; GUO Zhi-Fen; SUN Jin-He

    2007-01-01

    Oxalic acid plays an important role in improving the bioavailability of soil nutrients. Batch experiments were employed to examine the influences of oxalic acid on extraction and release kinetics of potassium (K) from soils and minerals along with the adsorption and desorption of soil K+. The soils and minerals used were three typical Chinese soils, black soil (Mollisol), red soil (Ultisol), and calcareous alluvial soil (Entisol), and four K-bearing minerals, biotite, phlogopite, muscovite, and microcline. The results showed that soil K extracted using 0.2 mol L-1 oxalic acid was similar to that using 1 mol L-1 boiling HNO3. The relation between K release (y) and concentrations of oxalic acid (c) could be best described logarithmically as y=a+blogc, while the best-fit kinetic equation of K release was y=a +b√t, where a and b are the constants and t is the elapsed time. The K release for minerals was ranked as biotite> phlogopite>> muscovite> microcline and for soils it was in the order: black soil> calcareous alluvial soil> red soil. An oxalic acid solution with low pH was able to release more K from weathered minerals and alkaline soils. Oxalic acid decreased the soil K+ adsorption and increased the soil K+ desorption, the effect of which tended to be greater at lower solution pH, especially in the red soil.

  18. Effects of Composted and Thermally Dried Sewage Sludges on Soil and Soil Humic Acid Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.M.FERN(A)NDEZ; N.SENESI; C.PLAZA; G.BRUNETTI; A.POLO

    2009-01-01

    The effect of annual additions of composted sewage sludge (CS) and thermally dried sewage sludge (TS) at 80 t ha-1 on soil chemical properties was investigated for three years in a field experiment under semiarid conditions.Humie acids (HAs) isolated by conventional procedures from CS,TS,and unamended (SO) and sludge amended soils were analysed for elemental (C,H,N,S and O) and acidic functional groups (carboxylic and phenolic) and by ultraviolet-visible,Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies.With respect to CS,TS had similar pH and total P and K contents,larger dry matter,total organic C,total N.and C/N ratio and smaller ash content and electrical conductivity.Amendment with both CS and TS induced a number of modifications in soil properties,including an increase of pH,electrical conductivity,total organic C,total N,and available P.The CS-HA had greater O,total acidity,carboxyl,and phenolic OH group contents and smaller C and H contents than TS-HA.The CS-HA and TS-HA had larger N and S contents,smaller C,O and acidic functional group contents,and lower aromatic polycondensation and humification degrees than SO-HA.Amended soil-HAs showed C,H,N and S contents larger than SO-HA,suggesting that sludge HAs were partially incorporated into soil HAs.These effects were more evident with increasing number of sludge applications.

  19. Effect of Selected Organic Acids on Cadmium Sorption by Variable-and Permanent-Charge Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hong-Qing; LIU Hua-Liang; HE Ji-Zheng; HUANG Qiao-Yun

    2007-01-01

    Batch equilibrium experiments were conducted to investigate cadmium (Cd) sorption by two permanent-charge soils, a yellow-cinnamon soil and a yellow-brown soil, and two variable-charge soils, a red soil and a latosol, with addition of selected organic acids (acetate, tartrate, and citrate). Results showed that with an increase in acetate concentrations from 0 to 3.0 mmol L-1, Cd sorption percentage by the yellow-cinnamon soil, the yellow-brown soil, and the latosol decreased. The sorption percentage of Cd by the yellow-cinnamon soil and generally the yellow-brown soil (permanent-charge soils)decreased with an increase in tartrate concentration, but increased at low tartrate concentrations for the red soil and the latosol. Curves of percentage of Cd sorption for citrate were similar to those for tartrate. For the variable-charge soils with tartrate and citrate, there were obvious peaks in Cd sorption percentage. These peaks, where organic acids had maximum influence, changed with soil type, and were at a higher organic acid concentration for the variable-charge soils than for the permanent charge soils. Addition of cadmium after tartrate adsorption resulted in higher sorption increase for the variable-charge soils than permanent-charge soils. When tartrate and Cd solution were added together, sorption of Cd decreased with tartrate concentration for the yellow-brown soil, but increased at low tartrate concentrations and then decreased with tartrate concentration for the red soil and the latosol.

  20. Enhancement of bacterial iron and sulfate respiration for in situ bioremediation of acid mine drainage sites: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgin, A.A.; Harrington, J.M.; Silverstein, J. [ARCADIS G& amp; M, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The prevention of acid mine drainage (AMD) in situ is more attractive than down-gradient treatment alternatives that do not involve source control. AMD source control can be achieved by shifting the microbial activity in the sulfidic rock from pyrite oxidation to anaerobic heterotrophic activity. This is achieved by adding biodegradable organic carbon amendments to the sulfidic rock. This technique was applied to an abandoned coal mine pool in Pennsylvania. The pool had a pH of 3.0 to 3.5. Following treatment, near-neutral pH and decreased effluent heavy metal concentrations were achieved. In situ bioremediation by the enhancement of bacterial iron and sulfate reduction is a promising technology for AMD prevention.

  1. Relationships between soil properties and community structure of soil macroinvertebrates in oak-history forests along an acidic deposition gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperman, R.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-02-01

    Soil macroinvertebrate communities were studied in ecologically analogous oak-hickory forests across a three-state atmospheric pollution gradient in Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. The goal was to investigate changes in the community structure of soil fauna in study sites receiving different amounts of acidic deposition for several decades and the possible relationships between these changes and physico-chemical properties of soil. The study revealed significant differences in the numbers of soil animals among the three study sites. The sharply differentiated pattern of soil macroinvertebrate fauna seems closely linked to soil chemistry. Significant correlations of the abundance of soil macroinvertebrates with soil parameters suggest that their populations could have been affected by acidic deposition in the region. Abundance of total soil macroinvertebrates decreased with the increased cumulative loading of acidic deposition. Among the groups most sensitive to deposition were: earthworms gastropods, dipteran larvae, termites, and predatory beetles. The results of the study support the hypothesis that chronic long-term acidic deposition could aversely affect the soil decomposer community which could cause lower organic matter turnover rates leading to an increase in soil organic matter content in high deposition sites.

  2. pH effects of the addition of three biochars to acidic Indonesian mineral soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, V; Alling, V; Nurida, N L

    2015-01-01

    Soil acidity may severely reduce crop production. Biochar (BC) may increase soil pH and cation exchange capacity (CEC) but reported effects differ substantially. In a systematic approach, using a standardized protocol on a uniquely large number set of 31 acidic soils, we quantified the effect of ...

  3. Utilisation of coal ash to improve acid soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Kato

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The study on utilization of coal ash to improve acid soil was carried out in a greenhouse at the Land Development Regional Office 1, Pathum Thani Province, Central Thailand, from January-May 2003. Fly ash mixture (fly ash plus gypsum and lime at the proportion 5:4:1 and clinker ash mixture (clinker ash plus gypsum and lime at the proportion 5:4:1 were used as soil amendments at varying rates i.e., 0, 6.25,12.5, 18.75 and 25 t/ha to improve the soil. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of application of coal ash on acid soil and the growth of a vegetable (Chinese kale. Chinese kale cultivars were planted in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Pak Chong soil series (Ultisols was used as the growth medium. Twenty-day-old seedlings were transplanted in 270 pots (two plants per pot containing acid soil with different treatments of coal ash mixture which were as follows: 1 control, 2 fly ash mixture 6.25 t/ha, 3 fly ash mixture 12.5 t/ha, 4 fly ash mixture 18.75 t/ha, 5 fly ash mixture 25 t/ha, 6 clinker ash mixture 6.25 t/ha, 7 clinker ash mixture 12.5 t/ha, 8 clinker ash mixture 18.75 t/ha and 9 clinker ash mixture 25 t/ha. Chemical fertilizers were applied at the rate of 250 kg/ha using a grade of 15-15-15 of N, P and K, respectively. Plants were harvested 40 days after transplanting. Among the treatments, application of fly ashmixture at a rate of 25t/ha (4t/rai substantially increased soil pH up to 5.7. Fly ash was found more effective than clinker ash in increasing soil pH. The highest yield of Chinese kale was also obtained when fly ash mixture was applied at a rate of 25 t/ha followed by fly ash mixture at 18.75 t/ha and clinker ash mixture at 18.75 t/ha with an average yield per plant of 4.980, 3.743 and 3.447 grams, respectively. It can be concluded that the application of coal ash mixture, either fly- or clinker ash, at 18.75-25 t/ha (3-4 t/rai was the most effective in terms of plant yield. The use of

  4. 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium Hydrogen Sulfate [bmim]HSO4: An Efficient Reusable Acidic Ionic Liquid for the Formylation of Alcohols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIKNAM Khodabakhsh; ZOLFIGOL Mohammad Ali; SABERI Dariush; KHONBAZI Mahdi

    2009-01-01

    1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate [bmim]HSO4 as an acidic ionic liquid was prepared and used as a catalyst for the formylation of alcohols with ethyl formate at room temperature with good to excellent yields.A good selectivity was observed for the formylation of primary alcohols in the presence of tertiary alcohols.

  5. Rice husk ash as corrective of soil acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Oliveira Islabão

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice husk ash (RHA is a by-product from the burning of rice husk that can have favorable effects on the soil in terms of acidity correction. The objectives of this study were to determine the effective calcium carbonate equivalent (ECC of RHA under field conditions, and establish technical criteria as a basis for estimating the overall ECC of RHA. The 12 treatments of the experiment consisted of 10 RHA dosages (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, and 140 Mg ha-1 and two references, one of which was an absolute control (AC and the other a plot limed and fertilized according to official recommendations (recommended fertilization - RF. The soil was sampled twice (15 and 210 days after incorporating RHA, in the layers 0.00-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m, to determine the pH(H2O and base saturation (V%. The ECC and neutralizing value (NV of RHA were also determined. The results showed that RHA neutralizes soil acidity, in a faster reaction than conventional limestone, despite a low ECC (around 3 %.

  6. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochuang Cao

    Full Text Available Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N, which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N. On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10. The compositional

  7. [Characteristics of soil pH and exchangeable acidity in red soil profile under different vegetation types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Gang; Xu, Ming-gang; Wen, Shi-lin; Wang, Bo-ren; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Li-sheng

    2015-09-01

    The characteristics of soil pH and exchangeable acidity in soil profile under different vegetation types were studied in hilly red soil regions of southern Hunan Province, China. The soil samples from red soil profiles within 0-100 cm depth at fertilized plots and unfertilized plots were collected and analyzed to understand the profile distribution of soil pH and exchangeable acidity. The results showed that, pH in 0-60 cm soil from the fertilized plots decreased as the following sequence: citrus orchard > Arachis hypogaea field > tea garden. As for exchangeable acidity content, the sequence was A. hypogaea field ≤ citrus orchard soil (0-40 cm), compared with the deep soil (60-100 cm), and soil pH decreased by 0.55 and 0.17 respectively, but such changes did not occur in citrus orchard. Soil pH in 0-40 cm soil from the natural recovery vegetation unfertilized plots decreased as the following sequence: Imperata cylindrica land > Castanea mollissima garden > Pinus elliottii forest ≥ Loropetalum chinensis forest. As for exchangeable acidity content, the sequence was L cylindrica land Soil pH in surface soil (0-20 cm) from natural forest plots, secondary forest and Camellia oleifera forest were significantly lower than that from P. massoniana forest, decreased by 0.34 and 0.20 respectively. For exchangeable acidity content in 0-20 cm soil from natural forest plot, P. massoniana forest and secondary forest were significantly lower than C. oleifera forest. Compared with bare land, surface soil acidification in unfertilized plots except I. cylindrica land had been accelerated, and the natural secondary forest was the most serious among them, with surface soil pH decreasing by 0.52. However, the pH increased in deep soils from unfertilized plots except natural secondary forest, and I. cylindrica land was the most obvious among them, with soil pH increasing by 0.43. The effects of fertilization and vegetation type on pH and exchangeable acidity decreased with the

  8. Influence of ameliorating soil acidity with dolomite on the priming of soil C content and CO2 emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Wu, Lei; Peng, Qi-An; van Zwieten, Lukas; Chhajro, Muhammad Afzal; Wu, Yupeng; Lin, Shan; Ahmed, Muhammad Mahmood; Khalid, Muhammad Salman; Abid, Muhammad; Hu, Ronggui

    2017-02-21

    Lime or dolomite is commonly implemented to ameliorate soil acidity. However, the impact of dolomite on CO2 emissions from acidic soils is largely unknown. A 53-day laboratory study was carried out to investigate CO2 emissions by applying dolomite to an acidic Acrisol (rice-rapeseed rotation [RR soil]) and a Ferralsol (rice-fallow/flooded rotation [RF soil]). Dolomite was dosed at 0, 0.5, and 1.5 g 100 g(-1) soil, herein referred to as CK, L, and H, respectively. The soil pH(H2O) increased from 5.25 to 7.03 and 7.62 in L and H treatments of the RR soil and from 5.52 to 7.27 and 7.77 in L and H treatments of the RF soil, respectively. Dolomite application significantly (p ≤ 0.001) increased CO2 emissions in both RR and RF soils, with higher emissions in H as compared to L dose of dolomite. The cumulative CO2 emissions with H dose of dolomite were greater 136% in the RR soil and 149% in the RF soil as compared to CK, respectively. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) increased and reached at 193 and 431 mg kg(-1) in the RR soil and 244 and 481 mg kg(-1) in the RF soil by H treatments. The NH4(-)-N and NO3(-)-N were also increased by dolomite application. The increase in C and N contents stimulated microbial activities and therefore higher respiration in dolomite-treated soil as compared to untreated. The results suggest that CO2 release in dolomite-treated soils was due to the priming of soil C content rather than chemical reactions.

  9. PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS OF FACTORS DETERMINING PHOSPHATE ROCK DISSOLUTION ON ACID SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusdar Hilman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the agricultural soils in Indonesia are acidic and low in both total and available phosphorus which severely limits their potential for crops production. These problems can be corrected by application of chemical fertilizers. However, these fertilizers are expensive, and cheaper alternatives such as phosphate rock (PR have been considered. Several soil factors may influence the dissolution of PR in soils, including both chemical and physical properties. The study aimed to identify PR dissolution factors and evaluate their relative magnitude. The experiment was conducted in Soil Chemical Laboratory, Universiti Putra Malaysia and Indonesian Center for Agricultural Land Resources Research and Development from January to April 2002. The principal component analysis (PCA was used to characterize acid soils in an incubation system into a number of factors that may affect PR dissolution. Three major factors selected were soil texture, soil acidity, and fertilization. Using the scores of individual factors as independent variables, stepwise regression analysis was performed to derive a PR dissolution function. The factors influencing PR dissolution in order of importance were soil texture, soil acidity, then fertilization. Soil texture factors including clay content and organic C, and soil acidity factor such as P retention capacity interacted positively with P dissolution and promoted PR dissolution effectively. Soil texture factors, such as sand and silt content, soil acidity factors such as pH, and exchangeable Ca decreased PR dissolution.

  10. Absorption, fluorescence, and acid-base equilibria of rhodamines in micellar media of sodium dodecyl sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obukhova, Elena N.; Mchedlov-Petrossyan, Nikolay O.; Vodolazkaya, Natalya A.; Patsenker, Leonid D.; Doroshenko, Andrey O.; Marynin, Andriy I.; Krasovitskii, Boris M.

    2017-01-01

    Rhodamine dyes are widely used as molecular probes in different fields of science. The aim of this paper was to ascertain to what extent the structural peculiarities of the compounds influence their absorption, emission, and acid-base properties under unified conditions. The acid-base dissociation (HR+ ⇄ R + H+) of a series of rhodamine dyes was studied in sodium n-dodecylsulfate micellar solutions. In this media, the form R exists as a zwitterion R±. The indices of apparent ionization constants of fifteen rhodamine cations HR+ with different substituents in the xanthene moiety vary within the range of pKaapp = 5.04 to 5.53. The distinct dependence of emission of rhodamines bound to micelles on pH of bulk water opens the possibility of using them as fluorescent interfacial acid-base indicators.

  11. Inactivation of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. by Palmitic, Stearic, and Oleic Acid Sophorolipids and Thiamine Dilauryl Sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuejie; Ashby, Richard; Solaiman, Daniel K Y; Uknalis, Joseph; Fan, Xuetong

    2016-01-01

    Food contaminated with human pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes, frequently causes outbreaks of foodborne illness. Consumer concern over the use of synthesized antimicrobials to enhance microbial food safety has led to a search of natural alternatives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of various types of sophorolipids (SLs) and thiamine dilauryl sulfate (TDS) against pathogenic Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Both free and lactonic forms of SLs were synthesized from Candida bombicola using palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids as co-feedstocks. TDS and purified SLs were used to treat cocktails of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Results showed that lactonic SLs had higher antimicrobial activity than the free-acid form, and Gram-positive Listeria spp. were more susceptible to SLs and TDS than Gram-negative Salmonella spp. Listeria populations were reduced from an initial concentration of 7.2 log CFU/mL to a non-detectible level within a 1 min treatment of 0.1% (w/v) lactonic SLs and TDS in the presence of 20% ethanol, which itself did not significantly reduce the populations. There were no significant differences in the antimicrobial efficacy among palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid-based SLs against Salmonella or Listeria spp. Ethanol was utilized to improve the antimicrobial activity of free-acid SLs against Gram-negative bacteria. In general, TDS was more effective than the SLs against Salmonella and Listeria spp. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that SLs and TDS damaged Listeria cell membranes and resulted in cell lysis. Overall, our results demonstrated that SLs and TDS in the presence of ethanol can be used to inactivate foodborne pathogens, especially Gram-positive bacteria.

  12. Inactivation of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. by Palmitic, Stearic, and Oleic Acid Sophorolipids and Thiamine Dilauryl Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuejie; Ashby, Richard; Solaiman, Daniel K. Y.; Uknalis, Joseph; Fan, Xuetong

    2016-01-01

    Food contaminated with human pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes, frequently causes outbreaks of foodborne illness. Consumer concern over the use of synthesized antimicrobials to enhance microbial food safety has led to a search of natural alternatives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of various types of sophorolipids (SLs) and thiamine dilauryl sulfate (TDS) against pathogenic Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Both free and lactonic forms of SLs were synthesized from Candida bombicola using palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids as co-feedstocks. TDS and purified SLs were used to treat cocktails of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Results showed that lactonic SLs had higher antimicrobial activity than the free-acid form, and Gram-positive Listeria spp. were more susceptible to SLs and TDS than Gram-negative Salmonella spp. Listeria populations were reduced from an initial concentration of 7.2 log CFU/mL to a non-detectible level within a 1 min treatment of 0.1% (w/v) lactonic SLs and TDS in the presence of 20% ethanol, which itself did not significantly reduce the populations. There were no significant differences in the antimicrobial efficacy among palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid-based SLs against Salmonella or Listeria spp. Ethanol was utilized to improve the antimicrobial activity of free-acid SLs against Gram-negative bacteria. In general, TDS was more effective than the SLs against Salmonella and Listeria spp. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that SLs and TDS damaged Listeria cell membranes and resulted in cell lysis. Overall, our results demonstrated that SLs and TDS in the presence of ethanol can be used to inactivate foodborne pathogens, especially Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:28066390

  13. Study on Extracting Rare Earth from Sulfate System by Long-Chain Fatty Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yanhui; Zhao Zengqi; Liu Quansheng

    2004-01-01

    The extraction of rare earths by long-chain fatty acid in kerosene from sulphate system was described.It was demonstrated from the experimental results that the ratio of kerosene: fatty acid: isooctanol = 55 : 30: 15 ( V/V),By the saturation capability method and the slope method, the extracted reaction mechanism of the extraction of rare earth was studied.It is shown that the extraction reaction conform to the cation exchange reaction mechanism.The extracted sequence of rare earth was determined in this system and it is shown that there is no tetrad effect and the position of yttrium is between lanthanum and cerium.

  14. Influences of humic acid and fulvic acid on horizontal leaching behavior of anthracene in soil barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheng; Li, Bang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Hu

    2015-12-01

    The influences of humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) on horizontal leaching behaviors of anthracene in barriers were investigated. Soil colloids (≤1 μm) were of concern because of their abilities of colloid-facilitated transport for hydrophobic organic compounds with soluble and insoluble organic matters. Through freely out of the barriers in the presence of soil colloids with FA added, the higher concentrations of anthracene were from 320 μg L(-1) (D1 and D3) to 390 μg L(-1) (D2 and D4) with 1 to 20 cm in length. The contents of anthracene were distributed evenly at 25 ng g(-1) dry weight (DW) (D1 and D3) and 11 ng g(-1) DW (D2 and D4) in barriers. Therefore, anthracene leaching behaviors were mainly induced by soil colloids with soluble organic matters. The insoluble organic matters would facilitate anthracene onto soil colloids and enhance the movement in and through porous media of soil matrix.

  15. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging of the morphology of submicrometer aerosol containing organic acids and ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veghte, Daniel P; Bittner, Danielle Rae; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2014-03-04

    The effects of aerosol particles on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry and climate are determined in part by the internal arrangement of compounds within the particles. To characterize the morphology of internally mixed aerosol particles in the accumulation mode size regime, we have used cryo-transmission electron microscopy to investigate the phase separation behavior of dry, submicrometer particles composed of ammonium sulfate mixed with carboxylic acids (adipic, azelaic, citric, glutaric, malonic, pimelic, suberic, and succinic acid). Determining the morphology of dry particles is important for understanding laboratory studies of aerosol optical properties, reactivity, and cloud condensation nucleus activity, results from field instruments where aerosol particles are dried prior to analysis, and atmospheric processes like deposition mode heterogeneous ice nucleation that occur on dried particles. We observe homogeneous morphologies for highly soluble organic compounds. For organic compounds with limited aqueous solubility, partially engulfed structures are observed. At intermediate aqueous solubilities, small particles are homogeneous and larger particles are partially engulfed. Results are compared to previous studies of liquid-liquid phase separation in supermicrometer particles and the impact of these dry particle morphologies on aerosol-climate interactions are discussed.

  16. Stannous sulfate as an electrolyte additive for lead acid battery made from a novel ultrafine leady oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Liu, Jianwen; Yang, Danni; Yuan, Xiqing; Li, Lei; Zhu, Xinfeng; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Yucheng; Sun, Xiaojuan; Liang, Sha; Hu, Jingping; Kumar, R. Vasant; Yang, Jiakuan

    2015-07-01

    The effects of SnSO4 as an electrolyte additive on the microstructure of positive plate and electrochemical performance of lead acid battery made from a novel leady oxide are investigated. The novel leady oxide is synthesized through leaching of spent lead paste in citric acid solution. The novel leady oxides are used to prepare working electrode (WE) subjected to electrochemical cyclic voltammetry (CV) tests. Moreover, the novel leady oxides are used as active materials of positive plate assembled as a testing battery of 1.85 A h capacity. In CV tests, SEM/EDX results show that the major crystalline phase of the paste in WE after CV cycles is PbSO4. The larger column-shaped PbSO4 crystals easily generate in the paste of WE without an electrolyte additive of SnSO4. However, PbSO4 crystals significantly become smaller with the addition of SnSO4 in the electrolyte. In batteries testing, SEM results show that an electrolyte additive of SnSO4 could effectively decrease PbO2 particle size in the positive active materials of the teardown battery at the end of charging procedure. It is indicated that an electrolyte additive of SnSO4 could have a positive influence on restraining larger particles of irreversible sulfation in charge/discharge cycles of battery testing.

  17. Effects of simulated acid rain on soil fauna community composition and their ecological niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Jiaen; Qin, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Acid rain is one of the severest environmental issues globally. Relative to other global changes (e.g., warming, elevated atmospheric [CO2], and nitrogen deposition), however, acid rain has received less attention than its due. Soil fauna play important roles in multiple ecological processes, but how soil fauna community responds to acid rain remains less studied. This microcosm experiment was conducted using latosol with simulated acid rain (SAR) manipulations to observe potential changes in soil fauna community under acid rain stress. Four pH levels, i.e., pH 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5, and a neutral control of pH 7.0 were set according to the current pH condition and acidification trend of precipitation in southern China. As expected, we observed that the SAR treatments induced changes in soil fauna community composition and their ecological niches in the tested soil; the treatment effects tended to increase as acidity increased. This could be attributable to the environmental stresses (such as acidity, porosity and oxygen supply) induced by the SAR treatments. In addition to direct acidity effect, we propose that potential changes in permeability and movability of water and oxygen in soils induced by acid rain could also give rise to the observed shifts in soil fauna community composition. These are most likely indirect pathways of acid rain to affect belowground community. Moreover, we found that nematodes, the dominating soil fauna group in this study, moved downwards to mitigate the stress of acid rain. This is probably detrimental to soil fauna in the long term, due to the relatively severer soil conditions in the deep than surface soil layer. Our results suggest that acid rain could change soil fauna community and the vertical distribution of soil fauna groups, consequently changing the underground ecosystem functions such as organic matter decomposition and greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. THE STABILIZATION SYSTEM OF SOIL ACIDITY WHEN GROWING TOMATOES IN A GREENHOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsokur D. S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents: the stabilization system of soil acidity, which allows subsoil irrigation tomato plants catholyte to compensate the negative effects of acidic fertilizer, and additionally to prevent plant diseases anolyte solution; transfer function of the stabilization system of soil acidity and the results of its tests

  19. Role of amino acid metabolites in the formation of soil organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1972-01-01

    Carbon-14 labelled cellulose or glucose were added to a medium loam and two sandy soils. The soils were incubated at 20°C for about 6 yr under laboratory conditions. Six to 12 per cent of the labelled carbon added to the soils was transformed into metabolites hydrolysable to amino acids during...... the first 10–30 days of the incubation period. The newly-formed metabolites decayed slowly as incubation continued. During the first 100–300 days of the incubation, losses of labelled amino acid carbon from soil were curvilinear when plotted on a semi-logarithmic scale. After this time the decay curves...... became linear, indicating half lives of 6–7 yr for the labelled carbon in amino acids. However, the labelled amino acid metabolites decayed at a faster rate than the native amino acid compounds of the soil, since they constituted a gradually decreasing percentage of total soil amino acid carbon...

  20. An Experimental Method to Quantify Extractable Amino Acids in Soils from Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xian-you; WU Liang-huan; CAO Xiao-chuang; Sarkar Animesh; ZHU Yuan-hong

    2013-01-01

    The extraction and comparison of soil amino acids using different extractants (deionized water, K2SO4, Na2SO4, NaCl, KCl) were reported. Results showed that 0.5 mol L-1 K2SO4 with a 5 times extraction was a better method to assess the concentration of extractable amino acids in soils. The total amino acids extracted from soil planted for tea were similar to the total inorganic nitrogen. While they extracted from vegetable soil and paddy soil were much lower than the total inorganic nitrogen.

  1. Multivariate analysis of electron detachment dissociation and infrared multiphoton dissociation mass spectra of heparan sulfate tetrasaccharides differing only in hexuronic acid stereochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Han Bin; Leach, Franklin E; Arungundram, Sailaja; Al-Mafraji, Kanar; Venot, Andre; Boons, Geert-Jan; Amster, I Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    The structural characterization of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) carbohydrates by mass spectrometry has been a long-standing analytical challenge due to the inherent heterogeneity of these biomolecules, specifically polydispersity, variability in sulfation, and hexuronic acid stereochemistry. Recent advances in tandem mass spectrometry methods employing threshold and electron-based ion activation have resulted in the ability to determine the location of the labile sulfate modification as well as assign the stereochemistry of hexuronic acid residues. To facilitate the analysis of complex electron detachment dissociation (EDD) spectra, principal component analysis (PCA) is employed to differentiate the hexuronic acid stereochemistry of four synthetic GAG epimers whose EDD spectra are nearly identical upon visual inspection. For comparison, PCA is also applied to infrared multiphoton dissociation spectra (IRMPD) of the examined epimers. To assess the applicability of multivariate methods in GAG mixture analysis, PCA is utilized to identify the relative content of two epimers in a binary mixture.

  2. Acid fog Deposition of Crusts on Basaltic Tephra Deposits in the Sand Wash Region of Kilauea Volcano: A Possible Mechanism for Siliceous-Sulfatic Crusts on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, P.; Zierenberg, R.; Marks, N.; Bishop, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Although the presence of sulfate minerals in martian outcrops may imply the prior existence of standing bodies of surface water, in terrestrial volcanic settings, sulfatic alteration may also occur above the water table within the vadose zone. On the summit of Kilauea volcano, sulfur dioxide, which is continuously emitted from Halemaumau crater and rapidly sequestered into sulfuric acid-rich aerosol entrained in the prevailing trade winds, is subsequently precipitated as acid-fog immediately downwind from the caldera in the Kau Desert. The characteristic pH of surface tephra deposits is < 4.0 in Sand Wash, a region of continuous, acidic aerosol fall-out immediately SW of the caldera. The upper portion of the Keanakakoi Ash tephra in Sand Wash, deposited in the late 18th century, has a ubiquitous, 0.1-0.2 mm-thick coating of amorphous silica. Conversely, vertical walls of unconsolidated tephra, exposed within small, dry gullies eroded into the ca. 3-4 m-thick Keanakakoi section at Sand Wash, are coated with ca. 0.5-1.0 mm-thick, mixed amorphous silica and jarosite-bearing crusts. Since these crusts are denuded from their outcrops during ephemeral, but probably annual flooding events in Sand Wash, we believe that they must accumulate rapidly. These crusts are apparently formed via an evaporative mechanism whereby acidic pore fluids, circulating in the upper few m's within the highly porous tephra, are wicked towards the walls of the gullies. Geochemical modeling of the crust-forming process implies that the sulfate formation via evaporation occurs subsequent to minimal interaction of acidic pore fluids with the basaltic tephra. This also suggests that the cycle from acid-fog fall-out to precipitation of the siliceous-sulfatic crusts must occur quite rapidly. Production of siliceous-sulfatic crusts via acid-fog alteration may also be occurring on Mars. The occurrence of evaporitic sulfate and silica at Sand Wash in Kilauea may serve as an example of how the jarosite

  3. Enhanced biodegradation of anthracene in acidic soil by inoculated Burkholderia sp. VUN10013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somtrakoon, Khanitta; Suanjit, Sudarat; Pokethitiyook, Prayad; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Lee, Hung; Upatham, Suchart

    2008-08-01

    The ability of Burkholderia sp. VUN10013 to degrade anthracene in microcosms of two acidic Thai soils was studied. The addition of Burkholderia sp. VUN10013 (initial concentration of 10(5) cells g(-1) dry soil) to autoclaved soil collected from the Plew District, Chanthaburi Province, Thailand, supplemented with anthracene (50 mg kg(-1) dry soil) resulted in complete degradation of the added anthracene within 20 days. In contrast, under the same test conditions but using autoclaved soil collected from the Kitchagude District, Chanthaburi Province, Thailand, only approximately 46.3% of the added anthracene was degraded after 60 days of incubation. In nonautoclaved soils, without adding the VUN10013 inocula, 22.8 and 19.1% of the anthracene in Plew and Kitchagude soils, respectively, were degraded by indigenous bacteria after 60 days. In nonautoclaved soil inoculated with Burkholderia sp. VUN10013, the rate and extent of anthracene degradation were considerably better than those seen in autoclaved soils or in uninoculated nonautoclaved soils in that only 8.2 and 9.1% of anthracene remained in nonautoclaved Plew and Kitchagude soils, respectively, after 10 days of incubation. The results showed that the indigenous microorganisms in the pristine acidic soils have limited ability to degrade anthracene. Inoculation with the anthracene-degrading Burkholderia sp. VUN10013 significantly enhanced anthracene degradation in such acidic soils. The indigenous microorganisms greatly assisted the VUN10013 inoculum in anthracene degradation, especially in the more acidic Kitchagude soil.

  4. Different pathways of canalicular secretion of sulfated and non-sulfated fluorescent bile acids : a study in isolated hepatocyte couplets and TR- rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mills, CO; Milkiewicz, P; Muller, M; Roma, MG; Havinga, R; Coleman, R; Kuipers, F; Jansen, PLM; Elias, E

    1999-01-01

    Background/Aims: Fluorescent bile acids have proved useful for characterizing bile salt transport mechanisms, The aim of this study was to further validate the use of lysyl-fluorescein conjugated bile acid analogues as surrogate bile acids, Methods: We analyzed biliary excretion kinetics of cholyl l

  5. Alterations of lead speciation by sulfate from addition of flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) in two contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the first study to evaluate the potential application of FGDG as an in situ Pb stabilizer in contaminated soils with two different compositions and to explain the underlying mechanisms. A smelter Pb contaminated soil (SM-soil), rich in ferrihydrite bound Pb (FH-Pb), ceru...

  6. Application of Ground Phosphate Rock to Diminish the Effects of Simulated Acid Rain of Soil Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGYUAN-YAN; LIXUE-YUAN

    1992-01-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain retained in soil on the properties of acid soil and its diminishing by application of ground phosphate rock were investigated by using the sorption method.Results show as follows:(1)For yellow brown soil,the effect of simulated acid rain on the properties of soil with a pH value of 5.9 was relatively small,except a great quantity of acid rain deposited on it.(2) for red soil,the effect of simulated acid rain on the properties of soil was significant.With the increase of the amount of acid deposition,the pH value of soil was declined,but the contents of exchangeable H+,Al3+ and Mn2+ and the amount of SO41- retention were increased.(3) Many properties of acid soils could be improved by applying ground phosphate rock.For example,pH value of soils and the amounts of available P and exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ were increased,and the amounts of exchangeable H+ and Al3+ and SO42- retained was reduced.The application of ground posphate rock could effctively diminish the pollution of acid rain to soil.

  7. Strategy Approach for Direct Enantioseparation of Hyoscyamine Sulfate and Zopiclone on a Chiral αl-Acid Glycoprotein Column and Determination of Their Eutomers: Thermodynamic Study of Complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaazaa, Hala E; Salama, Nahla N; Abd El Halim, Lobna M; Salem, Maissa Y; Abd El Fattah, Laila E

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and simple isocratic high-performance liquid chromatographic methods with UV detection were developed and validated for the direct resolution of racemic mixtures of hyoscyamine sulfate and zopiclone. The method involved the use of αl -acid glycoprotein (AGP) as chiral stationary phase. The stereochemical separation factor (ά) and the stereochemical resolution factor (Rs ) obtained were 1.29 and 1.60 for hyoscyamine sulfate and 1.47 and 2.45 for zopiclone, respectively. The method was used for determination of chiral switching (eutomer) isomers: S-hyoscyamine sulfate and eszopiclone. Several mobile phase parameters were investigated for controlling enantioselective retention and resolution on the chiral AGP column. The influence of mobile phase, concentration and type of uncharged organic modifier, ionic strength, and column temperature on enantioselectivity were studied. Calibration curves were linear in the ranges of 1-10 µg mL(-1) and 0.5-5 µg mL(-1) for S-hyoscyamine sulfate and eszopiclone, respectively. The method is specific and sensitive, with lower limits of detection and quantifications of 0.156, 0.515 and 0.106, 0.349 for S-hyoscyamine sulfate and eszopiclone, respectively. The method was used to identify quantitatively the enantiomers profile of the racemic mixtures of the studied drugs in their pharmaceutical preparations. Thermodynamic studies were performed to calculate the enthalpic ΔH and entropic ΔS terms. The results showed that enantiomer separation of the studied drugs were an enthalpic process.

  8. Effect of some soil amendments on soil properties and plant growth in Southern Thailand acid upland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onthong, C.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major factors limiting plant growth is acid soil. In general lime is used for soil amendment in acid soil. However, It has been reported that gypsum or phosphogypsum can be used for ameliorating soilacidity. Pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of lime, phosphogypsum and kieserite on soil properties and plant growth in Kho Hong soil series (coarse loamy, kaolinitic,isohyperthermic, TypicKandiudults which was considered as acid upland soil (pH 5.07. Sweet corn variety INSEE 2 was used as the test crop. The experiment was a completely randomized design with 4 replications and 19 treatments asfollow : unamended, application of hydrated lime and dolomite to raise soil pH at 5.5, application of hydrated lime and dolomite combined with phosphogypsum at the rate that can supply calcium 0.25, 0.50,0.75 and 1 time of both limes, application of hydrated lime and dolomite combined with kieserite at the rate 0.25, 0.50,0.75 and 1 times of sulfur requirement for corn (40 kg S ha-1. The result showed that shoot and root dry weights of corn were increased when lime materials, phosphogypsum and kieserite were applied and the drymatter weights were increased according to the increasing of phosphogypsum and kieserite. The maximum shoot dry weight (18.98 g pot-1 was obtained when 1 times of kieserite was supplied with dolomite and wassignificantly (P<0.01 higher than those of the unamended treatment, only hydrated lime and dolomite treatments, which had dry weights of 12.64, 15.18 and 15.67 g pot-1 respectively. Phosphorus and K uptakewere not significantly different in all treatments and the lowest uptake of N, Ca, Mg and S was obtained in the unamended treatment. The maximum uptake of N (512.10 mg pot-1 was found when 0.5 times ofphosphogypsum was applied together with dolomite. Calcium and Mg uptake was likely to increase according to the increasing rate of soil amendment application. Highest uptake of Ca (42.51 mg pot-1 was obtainedwhen

  9. The effect of acid rain and altitude on concentration, δ34S, and δ18O of sulfate in the water from Sudety Mountains, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szynkiewicz, Anna; Modelska, Magdalena; Jedrysek, Mariusz Orion; Mastalerz, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The analyses of sulfate content, δ34S and δ18O of dissolved sulfate, and δ18O of water were carried out in a 14 km2 crystalline massif located in the Sudety Mountains (SW Poland) to 1) assess the amount of the sulfate delivered to the surface and groundwater systems by modern atmospheric precipitation, 2) determine the effect of altitude on these parameters, and 3) investigate their seasonal variations. In April and November of 2002, August 2003, and March and September of 2005, samples of water were collected from springs and streams of the massif. During these seasons, sulfate contents and δ18O(SO42−) values varied from 5.80 to 18.00 mg/l and from 3.96 to 8.23‰, respectively, showing distinctively higher values ofδ18O(SO42−) in wet seasons. The δ34S(SO42−) values had a relatively narrow range from 4.09 to 5.28‰ and were similar to those reported for organic matter in soil and the canopy throughfall in the Sudety Mountains.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS Reg. No. 10028-22-5) is a yellow substance that may be prepared by oxidizing iron (II) sulfate or by treating ferric oxide or ferric hydroxide with sulfuric acid. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  11. Excretion of 3-Mercaptolactate-Cysteine Disulfide, Sulfate and Taurine in human Urine before and after Oral Administration of Sulfur-containing Amino Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuasa,Shigeki

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available The excretion of 3-mercaptolactate-cysteine mixed disulfide [S-(2-hydroxy-2-carboxyethylthio-L-cysteine, HCETC], sulfate and taurine in the urine of normal adults was investigated before and after oral administration of L-cysteine and related sulfur-containing amino acids. Before the loading of amino acids, the excretion (mean +/- SD per kg of body weight per day of HCETC, free sulfate and taurine was 0.096 +/- 0.042, 305.7 +/- 66.1 and 31.9 +/- 8.7 mumols, respectively. After the loading of L-cysteine (800 mumols/kg of body weight, the average excretion in the 24-h urine of HCETC increased 2-fold and that of taurine increased 1.6-fold. The average excretion of free sulfate after the L-cysteine loading was 989.4 +/- 145.1 and 388.8 +/- 51.6 mumols/kg per day in the first and second 24-h urine, respectively, indicating that the sulfur corresponding to 85% of the L-cysteine loaded was excreted as free sulfate in 24 h. Administration of L-cystine (400 mumols/kg resulted in similar results. The increase in HCETC after L-cysteine or L-cystine administration indicates that L-cysteine is metabolized in part through the transamination pathway (3-mercaptopyruvate pathway and that an equilibrium exists between the intake and excretion of sulfur in humans.

  12. Selection and breeding for acid-soil tolerance in crops: Upland rice and tropical forages as case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, R. (Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical, Cali (Colombia)); Zeigler, R.S.; Sarkarung, S. (International Rice Research Institute, Manila (Philippines)); Rao, I.M.

    Soil acidity and associated infertility and mineral toxicities are major constraints to agricultural production in extensive areas of the humid tropics and subtropics. The natural process of soil acidification is often intensified by agricultural practices, particularly nitrogen fertilization, and acid precipitation. This paper briefly discusses the factors contributing to acid-soil infertility, effects on plant growth, and acid-soil treatments in temperate climates particularly liming. However, these treatments are not easily adaptable to tropical regions. However, the development of cultivars adapted to the acid soil complex is a promising alternative. The paper goes on to present several topics related to cultivar development: acid soils of tropical America; identification of germplasm adapted to acid soils; plant adaptation mechanisms for acid soils; improvement of acid-soil adaptation in crops; case study of upland rice by the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical; tropical foages for livestock; and contribution of adapted plants to sustainable production systems. 50 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Occurrence and role of algae and fungi in acid mine drainage environment with special reference to metals and sulfate immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B.K.; Roy, A.; Koschorreck, M.; Mandal, S.M.; Wendt-Potthoff, K.; Bhattacharya, J. [Indian Institute for Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2009-03-15

    Passive remediation of Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) is a popular technology under development in current research. Roles of algae and fungi, the natural residents of AMD and its attenuator are not emphasized adequately in the mine water research. Living symbiotically various species of algae and fungi effectively enrich the carbon sources that help to maintain the sulfate reducing bacterial (SRB) population in predominantly anaerobic environment. Algae produce anoxic zone for SRB action and help in biogenic alkalinity generation. While studies on algal population and actions are relatively available those on fungal population are limited. Fungi show capacity to absorb significant amount of metals in their cell wall, or by extracellular polysaccharide slime. This review tries to throw light on the roles of these two types of microorganisms and to document their activities in holistic form in the mine water environment. This work, inter alia, points out the potential and gap areas of likely future research before potential applications based on fungi and algae initiated AMD remediation can be made on sound understanding.

  14. Biocompatibility Assessment of Novel Collagen-Sericin Scaffolds Improved with Hyaluronic Acid and Chondroitin Sulfate for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina Dinescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage tissue engineering (CTE applications are focused towards the use of implantable biohybrids consisting of biodegradable scaffolds combined with in vitro cultured cells. Hyaluronic acid (HA and chondroitin sulfate (CS were identified as the most potent prochondrogenic factors used to design new biomaterials for CTE, while human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs were proved to display high chondrogenic potential. In this context, our aim was not only to build novel 3D porous scaffolds based on natural compounds but also to evaluate their in vitro biological performances. Therefore, for prospective CTE, collagen-sericin (Coll-SS scaffolds improved with HA (5% or 10% and CS (5% or 10% were used as temporary physical supports for ASCs and were analyzed in terms of structural, thermal, morphological, and swelling properties and cytotoxic potential. To complete biocompatibility data, ASCs viability and proliferation potential were also assessed. Our studies revealed that Coll-SS hydrogels improved with 10% HA and 5% CS displayed the best biological performances in terms of cell viability, proliferation, morphology, and distribution. Thus, further work will address a novel 3D system including both HA 10% and CS 5% glycoproteins, which will probably be exposed to prochondrogenic conditions in order to assess its potential use in CTE applications.

  15. Effects of organic acids on cadmium and copper sorption and desorption by two calcareous soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Sarvenaz; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-09-01

    Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) present in soil alter equilibrium pH of soil, and consequently, affect heavy metal sorption and desorption on soil constitutes. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different concentrations (0.1, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 30, 40, 50, 70, and 100 mM) of citric, malic, and oxalic acids on sorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) in two calcareous soils. Increasing the concentrations of three LMWOAs decreased the equilibrium pH of soil solutions. The results indicated that increase in organic acids concentrations generally reduced Cd and Cu sorption in soils. Increase concentrations of LMWOAs generally promoted Cd and Cu desorption from soils. A valley-like curve was observed for desorption of Cu after the citric acid concentration increment in soil 2. Increasing the concentrations of three LMWOAs caused a marked decrease in Kd(sorp) values of Cd and Cu in soils. In general, citric acid was the most effective organic acid in reducing sorption and increasing desorption of both metals, and oxalic acid had the minimal impact. The results indicated that LMWOAs had a greater impact on Cu sorption and desorption than Cd, which can be attributed to higher stability constants of organic acids complexes with Cu compared to Cd. It can be concluded that by selecting suitable type and concentration of LMWOAs, mobility, and hence, bioavailability of heavy metals can be changed. So, environmental implications concerning heavy metals mobility might be derived from these findings.

  16. ANALYSIS OF PERFLUORINATED CARBOXYLIC ACIDS IN SOILS II: OPTIMIZATION OF CHROMATOGRAPHY AND EXTRACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the objective of detecting and quantitating low concentrations of perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), including perfluorinated octanoic acid (PFOA), in soils, we compared the analytical suitability of liquid chromatography columns containing three different stationary p...

  17. Gamma ray-induced synthesis of hyaluronic acid/chondroitin sulfate-based hydrogels for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Linlin; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Lim, Youn-Mook; Nho, Young-Chang; Kim, So Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)/chondroitin sulfate (CS)/poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) hydrogel systems were synthesized by gamma-ray irradiation without the use of additional initiators or crosslinking agents to achieve a biocompatible hydrogel system for skin tissue engineering. HA and CS derivatives with polymerizable residues were synthesized. Then, the hydrogels composed of glycosaminoglycans, HA, CS, and a synthetic ionic polymer, PAAc, were prepared using gamma-ray irradiation through simultaneous free radical copolymerization and crosslinking. The physicochemical properties of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels having various compositions were investigated to evaluate their feasibility as artificial skin substitutes. The gel fractions of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels increased in absorbed doses up to 15 kGy, and they exhibited 91-93% gel fractions under 15 kGy radiation. All of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels exhibited relatively high water contents of over 90% and reached an equilibrium swelling state within 24 h. The enzymatic degradation kinetics of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels depended on both the concentration of the hyaluronidase solution and the ratio of HA/CS/PAAc. The in vitro drug release profiles of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels were significantly influenced by the interaction between the ionic groups in the hydrogels and the ionic drug molecules as well as the swelling of the hydrogels. From the cytotoxicity results of human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells cultured with extracts of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels, all of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogel samples tested showed relatively high cell viabilities of more than 82%, and did not induce any significant adverse effects on cell viability.

  18. Influence of chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid on structure, mechanical properties, and glioma invasion of collagen I gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-li; Sun, Charles; Wilhelm, Matthew E; Fox, Laura J; Zhu, Jieling; Kaufman, Laura J

    2011-11-01

    To mimic the extracellular matrix surrounding high grade gliomas, composite matrices composed of either acid-solubilized (AS) or pepsin-treated (PT) collagen and the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin sulfate (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) are prepared and characterized. The structure and mechanical properties of collagen/CS and collagen/HA gels are studied via confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) and rheology. CRM reveals that CS induces fibril bundling and increased mesh size in AS collagen but not PT collagen networks. The presence of CS also induces more substantial changes in the storage and loss moduli of AS gels than of PT gels, in accordance with expectation based on network structural parameters. The presence of HA significantly reduces mesh size in AS collagen but has a smaller effect on PT collagen networks. However, both AS and PT collagen network viscoelasticity is strongly affected by the presence of HA. The effects of CS and HA on glioma invasion is then studied in collagen/GAG matrices with network structure both similar to (PT collagen-based gels) and disparate from (AS collagen-based gels) those of the corresponding pure collagen matrices. It is shown that CS inhibits and HA has no significant effect on glioma invasion in 1.0 mg/ml collagen matrices over 3 days. The inhibitory effect of CS on glioma invasion is more apparent in AS than in PT collagen gels, suggesting invasive behavior in these environments is affected by both biochemical and network morphological changes induced by GAGs. This study is among the few efforts to differentiate structural, mechanical and biochemical effects of changes to matrix composition on cell motility in 3D.

  19. Metagenomic analysis of the rhizosphere soil microbiome with respect to phytic acid utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Yusuke; Shinano, Takuro

    2013-01-01

    While phytic acid is a major form of organic phosphate in many soils, plant utilization of phytic acid is normally limited; however, culture trials of Lotus japonicus using experimental field soil that had been managed without phosphate fertilizer for over 90 years showed significant usage of phytic acid applied to soil for growth and flowering and differences in the degree of growth, even in the same culture pot. To understand the key metabolic processes involved in soil phytic acid utilization, we analyzed rhizosphere soil microbial communities using molecular ecological approaches. Although molecular fingerprint analysis revealed changes in the rhizosphere soil microbial communities from bulk soil microbial community, no clear relationship between the microbiome composition and flowering status that might be related to phytic acid utilization of L. japonicus could be determined. However, metagenomic analysis revealed changes in the relative abundance of the classes Bacteroidetes, Betaproteobacteria, Chlorobi, Dehalococcoidetes and Methanobacteria, which include strains that potentially promote plant growth and phytic acid utilization, and some gene clusters relating to phytic acid utilization, such as alkaline phosphatase and citrate synthase, with the phytic acid utilization status of the plant. This study highlights phylogenetic and metabolic features of the microbial community of the L. japonicus rhizosphere and provides a basic understanding of how rhizosphere microbial communities affect the phytic acid status in soil.

  20. Biogenic arsenic volatilisation from an acidic wetland soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgen, Gunter; Huang, Jen-How; Lu, Shipeng; Tian, Liyan; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic arsenic (As) volatilisation was budgeted at 26000 t yr-1as the largest input of the global As release into the atmosphere, thereby playing an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of As in the surface environment. In order to quantify As volatilisation from wetland soils and to elucidate the geochemical and microbiological factors governing As volatilisation, a series of incubations with an acidic wetland soil collected in NE-Bavaria in Germany were performed at 15oC for 4 months with addition of NaN3, arsenite (As(III)), FeCl3, NaSO4 and NaOAc with N2 and air in the headspace. Speciation of gaseous As in the headspace using GC-ICP-MS/ ESI-MS coupling showed the predominance of either arsine (AsH3) or trimethylarsine ((CH3)3As) in all treatments during the time course of incubation. Monomethylarsine ((CH3)AsH2) and dimethylarsine ((CH3)2AsH) could be only detected in trace amounts. Arsenic speciation in porewater with HPLC-ICP-MS revealed the predominance of As(III) and methylated As was never detectable. Arsenic volatilisation summed to 2.3 ng As (88% as AsH3) in the control incubations, which accounted for ~0.25 % of the total As storage in the wetland soil. Treatments with 10 mM NaN3 resulted in emission of only 0.03 ng As. In contrast, addition of 10 mM NaOAc stimulated microbial activities in wetland soils and subsequently rose As volatilisation to 8.5 ng As. It could be therefore concluded that As volatilisation from the wetland soils was mainly biological. Spiking 67 μM As(III) increased 10 times of As volatilisation and the proportion of methylated arsines increased to 66%, which is supposed to be caused by the largely enhanced As availability in porewater for microbes (480 ppb, ~65 times higher than those in the controls). Adding 10 mM FeCl3 stimulated microbial Fe(III) reducing activities but suppressed other microbial activities by lowering soil pH from 5 to 3.6, decreasing consequently As volatilisation to 0.3 ng As. The much lower redox

  1. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Intravesical Hyaluronic Acid and Hyaluronic Acid/Chondroitin Sulfate Instillation for Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Soo Pyo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To assess the efficacy of intravesical hyaluronic acid (HA and HA/chondroitin sulfate (CS instillation in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome by systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed using the keywords: ‘interstitial cystitis' or ‘painful bladder syndrome' or ‘bladder pain syndrome' and ‘hyaluronic acid', up to March 31, 2016. The primary outcome was visual analogue scale related pain symptom (VAS. Secondary outcomes were the O'Leary-Sant Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index (ICSI and Problem Index (ICPI, frequency, nocturia, bladder volume, and voided urine volume. Results: Ten articles involving 390 patients were retrieved and assessed in analysis. A significant improvement in mean VAS on fixed-effect and random-effect models (mean difference [MD] -3.654, 95% confidence interval [CI] -3.814 to -3.495, and MD -3.206, 95% CI -4.156 to -2.257, respectively was found. Significant improvements were found in the ICSI (MD -3.223, 95% CI -4.132 to -2.315 and ICPI (MD -2.941, 95% CI -3.767 to -2.116. Similarly, the other outcomes were significantly improved. Conclusion: Intravesical HA and HA/CS instillation improved pain symptom, quality of life, and other outcomes and could be included as therapeutic modality of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

  2. [Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids on the Speciation of Pb in Purple Soil and Soil Solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Jiang, Tao; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-15

    Lead (Pb) in purple soil was selected as the research target, using one-step extraction method with 0.01 mol · L⁻¹ sodium nitrate as the background electrolyte to study the release effect of citric acid (CA), tartaric acid (TA) and acetic acid (AC) with different concentrations. Sequential extraction and geochemical model (Visual Minteq v3.0) were applied to analyze and predict the speciation of Pb in soil solid phase and soil solution phase. Then the ebvironmental implications and risks of low-molecule weight organic acid (LMWOA) on soil Pb were analyzed. The results indicated that all three types of LMWOA increased the desorption capacity of Pb in purple soil, and the effect followed the descending order of CA > TA > AC. After the action of LMWOAs, the exchangeable Pb increased; the carbonate-bound Pb and Fe-Mn oxide bound Pb dropped in soil solid phase. Organic bound Pb was the main speciation in soil solution phase, accounting for 45.16%-75.05%. The following speciation of Pb in soil solution was free Pb, accounting for 22.71%-50.25%. For CA and TA treatments, free Pb ions and inorganic bound Pb in soil solution increased with increasing LMWOAs concentration, while organic bound Pb suffered a decrease in this process. An opposite trend for AC treatment was observed compared with CA and TA treatments. Overall, LMWOAs boosted the bioavailability of Pb in purple soil and had a potential risk to contaminate underground water. Among the three LMWOAs in this study, CA had the largest potential to activate soil Pb.

  3. The effect of ammonium sulfate on the solubility of amino acids in water at (298.15 and 323.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Luisa A.; Macedo, Eugenia A. [Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Pinho, Simao P. [Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Departamento de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Instituto Politecnico de Braganca, Campus e Santa Apolonia, 5301-857 Braganca (Portugal)], E-mail: spinho@ipb.pt

    2009-02-15

    Using the analytical gravimetric method the solubility of glycine, DL-alanine, L-isoleucine, L-threonine, and L-serine in aqueous systems of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, at (298.15 and 323.15) K, were measured for salt concentrations ranging up to 2.0 molal. In the electrolyte molality range studied the experimental observations showed that ammonium sulfate is a salting-in agent for most of the amino acids studied. Furthermore, the change of the relative solubility with electrolyte concentration shows a maximum, which makes the representation of the data by a simple empirical correlation such as the Setschenow equation difficult. For the development and evaluation of a robust thermodynamic framework that makes it possible to more profoundly understand aqueous amino acid solutions with ammonium sulfate additional experimental information is needed.

  4. Effects of buffered vinegar and sodium dodecyl sulfate plus levulinic acid on Salmonella Typhimurium survival, shelf-life, and sensory characteristics of ground beef patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzleni, Alexander M; Ponrajan, Amudhan; Harrison, Mark A

    2013-09-01

    The inclusion of two sources of buffered vinegar and sodium dodecyl sulfate plus levulinic acid were studied as interventions for Salmonella Typhimurium and for their effect on shelf-life and sensory characteristics of ground beef. For the Salmonella challenge, beef trimmings (80/20) were inoculated then treated with 2% (w/v) liquid buffered vinegar (LVIN), 2.5% (w/w) powdered buffered vinegar (PVIN), a solution containing 1.0% levulinic acid plus 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDLA) at 10% (w/v), or had no intervention applied (CNT). The same trim source and production methods were followed during production of patties for shelf-life and sensory testing without inoculation. SDLA patties had the largest reduction (PSalmonella. However, LVIN and PVIN had the least (Pcharacteristics, except PVIN exhibited stronger off-flavor (P<0.05).

  5. Quantification of phenolic acids and their methylates, glucuronides, sulfates and lactones metabolites in human plasma by LC-MS/MS after oral ingestion of soluble coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmet, Cynthia; Actis-Goretta, Lucas; Renouf, Mathieu; Giuffrida, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Chlorogenic acids and derivatives like phenolic acids are potentially bioactive phenolics, which are commonly found in many foods. Once absorbed, chlorogenic and phenolic acids are highly metabolized by the intestine and the liver, producing glucuronidated and/or sulphated compounds. These metabolites were analyzed in human plasma using a validated liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method. After protein precipitation, phenolic acids and their metabolites were extracted by using ethanol and chromatographic separation was achieved by reversed-phase using an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column combined with a gradient elution system using 1% acetic acid aqueous solution and 1% acetic acid with 100% acetonitrile. The method was able to quantify 56 different compounds including 24 phenolic acids, 4 lactones, 15 sulfates and 13 glucuronides metabolites between 5 and 1000nM in plasma for most of them, except for m-dihydrocoumaric acid, 5-ferulloylquinic-glucuronide, 4-methoxycinnamic acid, 3-phenylpropionic acid, 3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propionic acid (25 to 1000nM) and p-dihydrocoumaric acid (50-1000nM). Values of repeatability and intermediate reproducibility were below 15% of deviation in general, and maximum 20% for the lowest concentrations. The validated method was successfully applied to quantify phenolic acids and their metabolites in plasma obtained after oral ingestion of soluble coffee. In conclusion, the developed and validated method is proved to be very sensitive, accurate and precise for the quantification of these possible dietary phenols.

  6. Solvent-extractable lipids in an acid andic forest soil; variations with dept and season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naafs, Derck Ferdinand Werner; Bergen, P.F. van; Boogert, S.J.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    2004-01-01

    Total lipid extracts from an acid andic soil profile located on Madeira Island (Portugal) were analysed using gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The profile was covered mainly by grass. Bulk soil characteristics determined included soil pH (H2O) ranging from 4.5 to 4.0 and TOC

  7. Hybrid 3D structure of poly(d,l-lactic acid) loaded with chitosan/chondroitin sulfate nanoparticles to be used as carriers for biomacromolecules in tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Santo, Vítor E.; Duarte, Ana Rita C.; Gomes, Manuela E.; Mano, João F.; Rui L Reis

    2010-01-01

    In the tissue engineering (TE) field, the concept of producing multifunctional scaffolds, capable not only of acting as templates for cell transplantation but also of delivering bioactive agents in a controlled manner, is an emerging strategy aimed to enhance tissue regeneration. In this work, a complex hybrid release system consisting in a three-dimensional (3D) structure based on poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PDLLA) impregnated with chitosan/chondroitin sulfate nanoparticles (NPs) was ...

  8. Reagents for selective extraction of nickel(II), cobalt(II) and copper(II) from highly acidic sulfate feeds containing iron

    OpenAIRE

    Roebuck, James William

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on development of new regents which are suitable for recovering nickel, cobalt and copper from laterite leach solutions, specifically focusing on reagent requirements for novel base metal flowsheets developed by Anglo American. The work aims to design reagents which can extract nickel(II), cobalt(II) and copper(II) from a highly acidic aqueous sulfate solutions whilst showing selectivity over iron(II) and iron(III). Chapter 1 reviews current extractive metallur...

  9. Colominic acid inhibits the proliferation of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells and injures their monolayers: cell density-dependent effects prevented by sulfation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Chika; Morita, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Hayashi, Toshimitsu; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2006-01-18

    Colominic acid (CA), produced by Escherichia coli K1, is a polymer of sialic acid linked through alpha (2-->8) glycosidic linkages. Although there are several studies on the biological activities of chemically sulfated CA, the activity of CA has been incompletely understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of CA, prepared as an alpha2,8-linked homopolymer of N-acetylneuraminic acid, on the proliferation and monolayer maintenance of bovine aortic endothelial cells in culture. The results indicate that CA potently inhibits the proliferation of sparse endothelial cells without nonspecific cell damage. The inhibitory effect of CA was markedly stronger than those of sodium spirulan and calcium spirulan, known polysaccharides that inhibit endothelial cell proliferation. On the other hand, in dense endothelial cells, CA induced nonspecific cell damage and markedly injured the monolayer. These results indicate that CA has two distinct effects on vascular endothelial cells: one is the inhibition of proliferation when the cell density is low, and the other is the nonspecific cytotoxicity when the cell density is high. Interestingly, these cell density-dependent effects of CA could be prevented by sulfation of the CA chains. Therefore, it is concluded that CA not only inhibits the proliferation of sparse endothelial cells without nonspecific cell damage but also injures dense cells in a monolayer by nonspecific cytotoxicity, which can be prevented by sulfation of the polysaccharide.

  10. Impact of acid atmospheric deposition on soils: Field monitoring and aluminium chemistry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acid atmospheric deposition on concentrations and transfer of major solutes in acid, sandy soils was studied. Emphasis was given to mobilization and transport of potentially toxic aluminum. Data on solute concentrations and fluxes in meteoric water as well as soil solutions were obtain

  11. Effect of root derived organic acids on the activation of nutrients in the rhizosphere soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Four types of soils, including brown coniferous forest soil, dark brown soil, black soil, and black calic soil, sampled from three different places in northeast China were used in this test. The functions of two root-derived organic acids and water were simulated and compared in the activation of mineral nutrients from the rhizosphere soil. The results showed that the organic acids could activate the nutrients and the activated degree of the nutrient elements highly depended on the amount and types of the organic acid excreted and on the physiochemical and biochemical properties of the soil tested. The activation effect of the citric acid was obviously higher than that of malic acid in extracting Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn for all the tested soil types. However, the activation efficiencies of P, K, Ca, and Mg extracting by the citric acid were not much higher, sometimes even lower, than those by malic acid. The solution concentration of all elements increased with increase of amount of the citric acid added.

  12. Influence of Soil Humic and Fulvic Acid on the Activity and Stability of Lysozyme and Urease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yan; Tan, WenFeng; Koopal, Luuk K.; Wang, MingXia; Liu, Fan; Norde, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Humic substances (HS), including humic acids (HA) and fulvic acids (FA), are important components of soil systems. HS form strong complexes with oppositely charged proteins, which will lead to changes in the enzyme activity. The effect of soil HS on the activity and stability of two enzymes was inve

  13. Influence of soil humic and fulvic acid on the activity and stability of lysozyme and urease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Tan, W.; Koopal, L.K.; Wang, M.; Liu, Fan; Norde, W.

    2013-01-01

    Humic substances (HS), including humic acids (HA) and fulvic acids (FA), are important components of soil systems. HS form strong complexes with oppositely charged proteins, which will lead to changes in the enzyme activity. The effect of soil HS on the activity and stability of two enzymes was inve

  14. Relationship of soil qualities to maize growth under increasing phosphorus supply in acid soils of southern Cameroon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TCHIENKOUA; M.JEMO; R.NJOMGANG; C.NOLTE; N.SANGINGA; J.TAKOW

    2008-01-01

    A large array of soil properties influences plant growth response to phosphorus (P) fertilizer input in acid soils.We carried out a pot experiment using three contrasted acid soils from southern Cameroon with the following main objectives:i) to assess the main soil causal factors of different maize (Zea mays L.) growth response to applied P and ii) to statistically model soil quality variation across soil types as well as their relationships to dry matter production.The soils used are classified as Typic Kandiudox (TKO),Rhodic Kandiudult (RKU),and Typic Kandiudult (TKU).Analysis of variance,regression,and principal component analyses were used for data analysis and interpretation.Shoot dry matter yield (DMY) was significantly affected by soil type and P rate with no significant interaction.Predicted maximum attainable DMY was lowest in the TKO (26.2 g pot-1) as compared to 35.6 and 36.7 g pot-1 for the RKU and TKU,respectively.Properties that positively influenced DMY were the levels of inorganic NaHCO3-extractable P,individual basic cations (Ca,Mg,and K),and pH.Their effects contrasted with those of exchangeable A1 and C/N ratio,which significantly depressed DMY.Principal component analysis yielded similar results,identifying 4 orthogonal components,which accounted for 84.7% of the total system variance (TSV).Principal component 1 was identified as soil nutrient deficiency explaining 35.9% of TSV.This soil quality varied significantly among the studied soils,emerging as the only soil quality which significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with maize growth.The 2nd,3rd,and 4th components were identified as soil organic matter contents,texture,and HCl-extractable P,respectively.

  15. Antimicrobial Efficacy of a Sulfuric Acid and Sodium Sulfate Blend, Peroxyacetic Acid, and Cetylpyridinium Chloride against Salmonella on Inoculated Chicken Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brittney R; Yang, Xiang; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Delmore, Robert J; Woerner, Dale R; Reagan, James O; Morgan, J Brad; Belk, Keith E

    2015-11-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial blend of sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate (SSS) in reducing Salmonella on inoculated whole chilled chicken wings and to compare its efficacy to peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). Wings were spot inoculated (5 to 6 log CFU/ml of sample rinsate) with a five-strain mixture of novobiocin- and nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella and then left untreated (control) or treated by immersing individual wings in 350 ml of antimicrobial solution. An initial study evaluated two treatment immersion times, 10 and 20 s, of SSS (pH 1.1) and compared cell recoveries following rinsing of treated samples with buffered peptone water or Dey/Engley neutralizing broth. In a second study, inoculated wings were treated with SSS (pH 1.1; 20 s), PAA (700 ppm, 20 s), or CPC (4,000 ppm, 10 s) and analyzed for survivors immediately after treatment (0 h) and after 24 h of aerobic storage at 4°C. Color and pH analyses were also conducted in the latter study. Recovery of Salmonella survivors following treatment with SSS (10 or 20 s) was not (P ≥ 0.05) affected by the type of cell recovery rinse solution (buffered peptone water or Dey/Engley neutralizing broth), but there was an effect (P Salmonella at 0 h increased in the order CPC , SSS , PAA; however, after 24 h of aerobic storage, pathogen counts of SSS- and PAA-treated wings did not differ (P ≥ 0.05). Overall, the results indicated that SSS applied at pH 1.1 for 20 s was an effective antimicrobial intervention to reduce Salmonella contamination on chicken wings.

  16. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranova, Valerie; Rejsek, Klement; Formanek, Pavel

    2013-11-10

    Organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates represent important organic compounds in soil. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids play important roles in rhizosphere ecology, pedogenesis, food-web interactions, and decontamination of sites polluted by heavy metals and organic pollutants. Carbohydrates in soils can be used to estimate changes of soil organic matter due to management practices, whereas vitamins may play an important role in soil biological and biochemical processes. The aim of this work is to review current knowledge on aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil and to identify directions for future research. Assessments of organic acids (aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic) and carbohydrates, including their behaviour, have been reported in many works. However, knowledge on the occurrence and behaviour of D-enantiomers of organic acids, which may be abundant in soil, is currently lacking. Also, identification of the impact and mechanisms of environmental factors, such as soil water content, on carbohydrate status within soil organic matter remains to be determined. Finally, the occurrence of vitamins in soil and their role in biological and biochemical soil processes represent an important direction for future research.

  17. Acid-sulfate mixtures from Río Tinto, Spain: Spectral masking relationships and implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull-Hearth, Selby; van Venrooy, Alexis; Caroline Clark, M.; Cvitkovic, Adriana

    2016-06-01

    Most sulfate minerals form only in specific pH conditions, making them useful markers of past environmental conditions on Mars. However, interpreting past environments requires a full understanding of the suite of minerals present, a task which is complicated by the fact that some minerals can spectrally mask others in the visible- to near-infrared (VNIR, 0.4-2.5 μm). Here, we report VNIR spectra of two-phase mineral combinations obtained from the Río Tinto acid mine drainage system of southern Spain. Our results show that in VNIR reflectance spectroscopy: (1) copiapite masks rhomboclase and partially masks melanterite; (2) coquimbite masks copiapite, jarosite, and rhomboclase; (3) at wavelengths 1.2 μm, gypsum masks these minerals; (4) unlike copiapite, jarosite, or melanterite, halotrichite masks gypsum completely; (5) in two-phase mixtures of copiapite and jarosite, both phases are evident. No consistent VNIR relationship is observed in two-phase mixtures of melanterite and halotrichite, suggesting that microtextures are likely more important than optical properties in determining VNIR reflectance. We also show that the shorter wavelengths are more sensitive to the presence of both phases: even in mixtures where one phase is masking another, both phases usually impact absorptions in the 0.75-0.95 μm region. This region may therefore be useful in remotely identifying mineral mixtures on Mars. These results have implications for several regions on Mars: most notably, they imply that the jarosite exposures reported at Mawrth Vallis may be jarosite-copiapite mixtures.

  18. Chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid (500-730 kda) inhibit stromelysin-1 synthesis in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfort, J; Nacher, M; Montell, E; Vila, J; Verges, J; Benito, P

    2005-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) and 500-730 kDa hyaluronic acid (HA) are symptomatic slow-acting drugs for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). In addition, a growing body of evidence suggests a role for CS and this specific HA as modifiers of the course of OA. The therapeutic efficacy of CS and HA lies in their different mechanisms of action. Stromelysin-1 (metalloprotease-3 [MMP-3]) is a cartilage proteolytic enzyme, which induces cartilage destruction and acts as a mediator of the inflammatory response. However, there are few studies evaluating the in vitro effect of CS and HA on MMP-3 synthesis in human chondrocyte cultures from OA patients. Thus, the aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of CS and HA (500-730 kDa) on MMP-3 synthesis induced by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in chondrocytes from patients with hip OA. Chondrocyte cultures were incubated for 48 h with IL-1beta (2.5 ng/ml) in the absence or presence of different HA 500-730 kDa (Hyalgan, Bioibérica Farma, Barcelona, Spain) concentrations, or alternatively, CS (Condro.san, Bioibérica Farma) at concentrations of 10, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 1,000 microg/ml. The results revealed that both CS and HA (500-730 kDa) inhibited MMP-3 synthesis induced by IL-1beta in human OA chondrocytes. Specifically, CS and HA (500-730 kDa) reduced MMP-3 expression levels at all tested concentrations. Therefore, our study provides new data on the mechanism of action of these drugs, which could help to explain their clinical efficacy in OA patients.

  19. Hydroxyapatite-calcium sulfate-hyaluronic acid composite encapsulated with collagenase as bone substitute for alveolar bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sadhasivam; Fang, Yen-Hsin; Sivasubramanian, Savitha; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lin, Chun-pin

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a very severe inflammatory condition of the periodontium that progressively damages the soft tissue and destroys the alveolar bone that supports the teeth. The bone loss is naturally irreversible because of limited reparability of the teeth. Advancement in tissue engineering provides an effective regeneration of osseous defects with suitable dental implants or tissue-engineered constructs. This study reports a hydroxyapatite, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and hyaluronic acid laden collagenase (HAP/CS/HA-Col) as a bone substitute for the alveolar bone regeneration. The composite material was mechanically tested and the biocompatibility was evaluated by WST-1 assay. The in vivo bone formation was assessed in rat with alveolar bone defects and the bone augmentation by the HAP/CS/HA-Col composite was confirmed by micro-CT images and histological examination. The mechanical strength of 6.69 MPa with excellent biocompatibility was obtained for the HAP/CS/HA-Col composite. The collagenase release profile had facilitated the acceleration of bone remodeling process and it was confirmed by the findings of micro-CT and H&E staining. The bone defects implanted with HAP/CS/HA composite containing 2 mg/mL type I collagenase have shown improved new bone formation with matured bone morphology in comparison with the HAP/CS/HA composite that lacks the collagenase and the porous hydroxyapatite (p-HAP) granules. The said findings demonstrated that the collagenase inclusion in HAP/CS/HA composite is a feasible approach for the alveolar bone regeneration and the same design can also be applied to other defective tissues.

  20. Fast and sensitive quantification of human liver cytosolic lithocholic acid sulfation using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sumit; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2016-02-01

    Detoxification of lithocholic acid (LCA) to lithocholic acid sulfate (LCA-S) is catalyzed by sulfotransferases, mainly SULT2A1. We developed and validated an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (UPLC-MS/MS) method to quantify human liver cytosolic-dependent LCA sulfation. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an UPLC C18 column (2.1×50mm, 1.7μm) and a gradient elution of 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. Negative electrospray ionization with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used to quantify LCA-S (455.3→97.0) and cholic acid (407.2→343.3; internal standard). The retention time was 3.51min for LCA-S and 3.08min for cholic acid. The lower limit of quantification of LCA-S was 0.5nM (or 0.23ng/ml in 400μl total volume) and the assay was linear from 0.2 to 200pmol. Intra-day and inter-day accuracy and precision were <14%. The quality control samples were stable at room temperature for 4h, 4°C for 24h, -20°C for 14 days, and after three freeze-thaw cycles. The matrix (20-100μg cytosolic protein) did not affect LCA-S quantification. This is the first UPLC-MS/MS method applied to optimization of the human liver cytosolic LCA sulfation assay. The optimal levels of MgCl2 and 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) cofactor were 2.5mM and 20μM, respectively. Addition of reducing agents (2-mercaptoethanol and DL-dithiothreitol) did not affect LCA-S formation. Human liver cytosolic LCA sulfation was linear with 20-100μg of cytosolic protein and 5-30min incubation time. This UPLC-MS/MS approach offers a specific, sensitive, fast, and direct approach for quantifying human liver cytosolic LCA sulfation.

  1. Research of the Acidizing of Ammonium Sulfate Decomposition of Phosphate Rock%酸化硫酸铵分解磷矿研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵新菊; 李沪萍; 罗康碧; 秦令; 苏毅

    2015-01-01

    磷石膏复分解可制备硫酸铵,硫酸铵应用于磷矿分解系统可使磷钙分离简单,从而可实现磷化工企业湿法硫循环利用的目的。本研究开展了热力学分析探讨酸化硫酸铵分解磷矿的可行性,采用正交实验考察了酸化硫酸铵的酸化剂类型、H+浓度、反应温度和时间对磷矿转化率的影响,对分解滤渣进行了表征。结果表明,酸化硫酸铵分解磷矿可行,硝酸和盐酸为酸化剂的分解效果最好,硫酸和磷酸为酸化剂的效果较差,这主要是受分解过程中硫酸钙结晶的影响。正交实验的最佳方案为:酸化剂盐酸,反应时间80 min,反应温度80℃,H+浓度5.4 mol/L,磷矿最终转化率达99.89%。%Ammonium sulfate can be prepared from the phosphogypsum by the metathetical reaction, and is used for decomposition of phosphate to make separation of calcium and phosphorus simple, which can achieve the purpose of the use of wet sulfur recycling for the phosphorus chemical enterprises. To achieve this goal, this paper investigated the feasibility of acidifying ammonium sulfate to decompose phosphate by thermodynamic analysis, using orthogonal experiment to investigate the effects of types of ammonium sulfate acidiifers, concentration of H+, reaction temperature and time on the conversion rate of phosphate, and residues were characterized. The results indicate that decomposing phosphate ore through ammonium sulfate acidiifcation is feasible, the effect of nitric acid and hydrochloric acid as decomposition acidiifers are best, and sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid appear relatively poor effect, which is mainly due to the crystallization of calcium sulfate in decomposition process. The best solution for the orthogonal experiments:hydrochloric acid as an acidifying agent, reaction time 80 min, reaction temperature 80℃, H+concentration 5.4 mol/L, phosphate ifnal conversion rate can reach 99.89%.

  2. Wheat-Exuded Organic Acids Influence Zinc Release from Calcareous Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. A. MAQSOOD; S. HUSSAIN; T. AZIZ; M. ASHRAF

    2011-01-01

    Rhizosphere drives plant uptake of sparingly soluble soil zinc (Zn).An investigation with three experiments was conducted to study organic acid exudation by two contrasting wheat genotypes (Sehar-06 and Vatan),Zn fractious in 10 different calcareous soils from Punjab,Pakistan,and release of different soil Zn fractions by organic acids.The two genotypes differed significantly in biomass production and Zn accumulation under deficient and optimum Zn levels in nutrient solution.At a deficient Zn level,Sehar-06 released more maleic acid in the rhizosphere than Vatan.Ten soils used in the present study had very different physicochemical properties; their total Zn and Zn distribution among different fractions varied significantly.Zinc release behaviour was determined by extracting the soils with 0.005 mol L-1 citric acid or maleic acid.The parabolic diffusion model best described Zn release as a function of time.Parabolic diffusion model fitting indicated more maleic acid-driven than citric acid-driven soil Zn mobility from different fractions.Cumulative Zn release in six consecutive extractions during 24 h ranged from 1.85 to 13.58 mg kg-1 using maleic acid and from 0.37 to 11.84 mg kg-1 using citric acid.In the selected calcareous soils,the results of stepwise linear regression indicated significant release of Fe-Mn oxide-bounded soil Zn by maleic acid and its availability to the Zn-efficient genotype.Hence,release of maleic acid by plants roots played an important role in phytoavailability of Zn from calcareous soils.

  3. Dissolution of Aluminum in Variably Charged Soils as Affected by Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jiu-Yu; XU Ren-Kou; JI Guo-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids exist widely in soils and play an important role in soil processes such as mineral weathering, nutrient mobilization and Al detoxification. In this research, a batch experiment was conducted to examine the effects of LMW organic acids on dissolution of aluminum in two variably charged soils, an Ultisol and an Oxisol. The results showed that the LMW organic acids enhanced the dissolution of Al in the two investigated soils in the following order: citric > oxalic > malonic > malic > tartaric > salicylic > lactic > maleic. This was generally in agreement with the magnitude of the stability constants for the Al-organic complexes. The effects of LMW organic acids on Al dissolution were greater in the Ultisol than in the Oxisol as compared to their controls. Also, the accelerating effects of citric and oxalic acids on dissolution of Al increased with an increase in pH, while the effects of lactic and salicylic acids decreased. Additionally, when the organic acid concentration was less than 0.2 mmol L-1, the dissolution of Al changed little with increase in acid concentration. However, when the organic acid concentration was greater than 0.2 mmol L-1,the dissolution of Al increased with increase in acid concentration. In addition to the acid first dissociation constant and stability constant of Al-organic complexes, the promoting effects of LMW organic acids on dissolution of Al were also related to their sorption-desorption equilibrium in the soils.

  4. Low—Molecular—Weight Aliphatic Acids in Soils Inculbated with Plant Residues Under Different Moisture Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENALIN; LIXUEYUAN; 等

    1997-01-01

    Iucubation experiments were conducted to investigate the dynamics of low-molecular-weight aliphatic acids i two andosols with and without plant materials.Results showed that amount of low-molecular-weight aliphatic acids in soils alone varied considerably with water regime under which the soil was incubated,duration of incubation and soil organic matter content,ranging from 257-860μmol kg-1 soil,of which 19%-33% was in free state.Incorporation of plant matrials increased greatly both the amount and unmber of members of low-molecular-weight aliphatic acids,and also the proportion of low-molecular-weght aliphatic acids occurred in free state ,Generally,among these ,aliphatic acids detected,acetic,propionic,glyoxalic and formic acids were predominant.

  5. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ash

    Full Text Available Shredded card (SC was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water. We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4. Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49 were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC. In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC. In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC. In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil, and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC. A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption. SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing.

  6. Sulfation of chondroitin. Specificity, degree of sulfation, and detergent effects with 4-sulfating and 6-sulfating microsomal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugumaran, G.; Silbert, J.E.

    1988-04-05

    Microsomal preparations from chondroitin 6-sulfate-producing chick embryo epiphyseal cartilage, and from chondroitin 4-sulfate-producing mouse mastocytoma cells, were incubated with UDP-(14C)glucuronic acid and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine to form non-sulfated proteo(14C)chondroitin. Aliquots of the incubations were then incubated with 3'-phosphoadenylylphosphosulfate (PAPS) in the presence or absence of various detergents. In the absence of detergents, there was good sulfation of this endogenous proteo(14C)chondroitin by the original microsomes from both sources. Detergents, with the exception of Triton X-100, markedly inhibited sulfation in the mast cell system but not in the chick cartilage system. These results indicate that sulfation and polymerization are closely linked on cell membranes and that in some cases this organization can be disrupted by detergents. When aliquots of the original incubation were heat inactivated, and then reincubated with new microsomes from chick cartilage and/or mouse mastocytoma cells plus PAPS, there was no significant sulfation of this exogenous proteo(14C) chondroitin with either system unless Triton X-100 was added. Sulfation of exogenous chondroitin and chondroitin hexasaccharide was compared with sulfation of endogenous and exogenous proteo(14C)chondroitin. Sulfate incorporation into hexasaccharide and chondroitin decreased as their concentrations (based on uronic acid) approached that of the proteo(14C)chondroitin. At the same time, the degree of sulfation in percent of substituted hexosamine increased. However, the degree of sulfation did not reach that of the endogenous proteo(14C)chondroitin. Hexasaccharide and chondroitin sulfation were stimulated by the presence of Triton X-100. However, in contrast to the exogenous proteo(14C)chondroitin, there was some sulfation of hexasaccharide and chondroitin in the absence of this detergent.

  7. Effects of organic acids on Cd adsorption and desorption by two anthropic soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingui WANG; Jialong LV; Yaolong FU

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to study the effects of malic, tartaric, oxalic, and citric acid on the adsorption and desorption characteristics of Cd by two typical anthropic soils (lou soil and irrigation-silted soil) in North-west China. Cadmium adsorption and desorption were studied under a range of temperatures (25℃, 30℃, 35℃, 40℃), organic acid concentrations (0.5-5.0 mmol·L-1), and pH values (2-8). The results showed that the Cd adsorption capacity of the lou soil was significantly greater than that of the irrigation-silted soil. Generally, Cd adsorption increased as the temperature increased. In the presence of NaNO3, the adsorption of Cd was endothermic with △H values of 31.365 kJ·mo1-1 for lou soil and 28.278 kJ·mol-1 for irrigation-silted soil. The endothermic reaction indicated that H bonds were the main driving force for Cd adsorption in both soils. However, different concentrations of organic acids showed various influences on the two soils. In the presence of citric acid, chemical adsorption and van der Waals interactions were the main driving forces for Cd adsorption rather than H bonds. Although the types of organic acids and soil properties were different, the effects of the organic acids on the adsorption and desorption of Cd were similar in the two soils. The adsorption percentage of Cd generally decreased as organic acid concentrations increased. In contrast, the adsorption percentage increased as the pH of the initial solution increased. The exception was that adsorption percentage of Cd increased slightly as oxalic acid concentrations increased. In contrast, the desorption percentage of Cd increased with increasing concentrations of organic acids but decreased as the initial solution pH increased.

  8. Bioabsorbable bone fixation plates for X-ray imaging diagnosis by a radiopaque layer of barium sulfate and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung Yoon; Hur, Woojune; Kim, Byeung Kyu; Shasteen, Catherine; Kim, Myung Hun; Choi, La Mee; Lee, Seung Ho; Park, Chun Gwon; Park, Min; Min, Hye Sook; Kim, Sukwha; Choi, Tae Hyun; Choy, Young Bin

    2015-04-01

    Bone fixation systems made of biodegradable polymers are radiolucent, making post-operative diagnosis with X-ray imaging a challenge. In this study, to allow X-ray visibility, we separately prepared a radiopaque layer and attached it to a bioabsorbable bone plate approved for clinical use (Inion, Finland). We employed barium sulfate as a radiopaque material due to the high X-ray attenuation coefficient of barium (2.196 cm(2) /g). The radiopaque layer was composed of a fine powder of barium sulfate bound to a biodegradable material, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), to allow layer degradation similar to the original Inion bone plate. In this study, we varied the mass ratio of barium sulfate and PLGA in the layer between 3:1 w/w and 10:1 w/w to modulate the degree and longevity of X-ray visibility. All radiopaque plates herein were visible via X-ray, both in vitro and in vivo, for up to 40 days. For all layer types, the radio-opacity decreased with time due to the swelling and degradation of PLGA, and the change in the layer shape was more apparent for layers with a higher PLGA content. The radiopaque plates released, at most, 0.5 mg of barium sulfate every 2 days in a simulated in vitro environment, which did not appear to affect the cytotoxicity. The radiopaque plates also exhibited good biocompatibility, similar to that of the Inion plate. Therefore, we concluded that the barium sulfate-based, biodegradable plate prepared in this work has the potential to be used as a fixation device with both X-ray visibility and biocompatibility.

  9. Impact of acid atmospheric deposition on soils: Field monitoring and aluminium chemistry.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acid atmospheric deposition on concentrations and transfer of major solutes in acid, sandy soils was studied. Emphasis was given to mobilization and transport of potentially toxic aluminum. Data on solute concentrations and fluxes in meteoric water as well as soil solutions were obtained from intensive monitoring programmes conducted at a number of sites in northwestern Europe and North-America. Specific hypotheses were tested in laboratory experiments.Atmospheric acid inputs do...

  10. Solid components and acid buffering capacity of soils in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The effects of soil solid components on soil sensitivityto acid deposition were studied in this paper by sequentialextraction method. A multiple regression equation of soilsensitivity was set up on the basis of stepwise regressionanalysis. The results showed that organic matter expressed dualeffects that were decided by soil original pH value andexchangeable cation composition on acid buffering reactions. Thehydrolysis of activated oxides was a very important protonbuffering reaction when in low pH situation. The crystalline oxidesalso played a role in the buffering reactions, but the role wasrestricted by the rate of activation of oxides. Meanwhile, theresults by stepwise analysis showed that factors that hadsignificant effect on soil acid buffering capacity were content ofmontmorillite, soil original pH value, Alo, Mno and CEC indecreasing order. Finally, sixteen soils were classified into fourtypes of sensitive with single index cluster and multiple fuzzy cluster analysis respectively.

  11. Effects of simulated acid rain on microbial characteristics in a lateritic red soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua-qin; Zhang, Jia-en; Ouyang, Ying; Lin, Ling; Quan, Guo-ming; Zhao, Ben-liang; Yu, Jia-yu

    2015-11-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed to examine the impact of simulated acid rain (SAR) on nutrient leaching, microbial biomass, and microbial activities in a lateritic red soil in South China. The soil column leaching experiment was conducted over a 60-day period with the following six SAR pH treatments (levels): 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0 and one control treatment (pH = 7). Compared with the control treatment, the concentrations of soil organic matter, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium, soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), and average well color density (AWCD) in the Ecoplates were all significantly decreased by leaching with SAR at different pH levels. The decrease in MBC and MBN indicated that acid rain reduced the soil microbial population, while the decrease in AWCD revealed that acid rain had a negative effect on soil bacterial metabolic function. Soil basal respiration increased gradually from pH 4.0 to 7.0 but decreased dramatically from pH 2.5 to 3.0. The decrease in soil nutrient was the major reason for the change of soil microbial functions. A principal component analysis showed that the major carbon sources used by the bacteria were carbohydrates and carboxylic acids.

  12. "Sour gas" hydrothermal jarosite: Ancient to modern acid-sulfate mineralization in the southern Rio Grande Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueth, V.W.; Rye, R.O.; Peters, L.

    2005-01-01

    deeply circulating meteoric water. Jarosite ??34S values range from -24??? to 5???, overlapping the values for barite and gypsum at the high end of the range and for sulfides at the low end. Most ??34S values for barite are 10.6??? to 13.1???, and many ??34S values for gypsum range from 13.1??? to 13.9??? indicating that a component of aqueous sulfate was derived from Permian evaporites (??34 S=12??2???). The requisite H2SO4 for jarosite formation was derived from oxidation of H2S which was likely largely sour gas derived from the thermochemical reduction of Permian sulfate. The low ??34S values for the precursor H2S probably resulted from exchange deeper in the basin with the more abundant Permian SO42- at ???150 to 200 ??C. Jarosite formed at shallow levels after the pH buffering capacity of the host rock (typically limestone) was neutralized by precipitation of earlier minerals. Some limestone-hosted deposits contain caves that may have been caused by the low pH of the deep basin fluids due to the addition of deep-seated HF and other magmatic gases during periods of renewed rifting. Caves in other deposits may be due to sulfuric acid speleogenesis as a result of H2S incursion into oxygenated groundwaters. The isotopic data in these "sour gas" jarosite occurrences encode a record of episodic tectonic or hydrologic processes that have operated in the rift over the last 10 my. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nature of Soil Acidity in Relation to Properties and Lime Requirement of Some Inceptisols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. K. DOLUI; S. BHATTACHARJEE

    2003-01-01

    Some Inceptisols representing the Singla catchment area in Karimgaunge district of Assam, India, were studied for lime requirement as influenced by the nature of soil acidity. The electrostatically bonded (EB)-H+ and EB-Al3+ acidities constituted 33 and 67 percent of exchangeable acidity while EB-H+, EB-Al3+,exchangeable and pH-dependent acidities comprised 6, 14, 20 and 80 percent of total potential acidity. The pH-dependent acidity made a major contribution towards the total potential acidity (67%~84%). Grand mean of lime requirement determined by the laboratory incubation method and estimated by the methods of New Woodruff, Woodruff and Peech as expressed in MgCaCO3 ha-1 was in the order: Woodruff (15.6) > New Woodruff (14.9) > Peech (5.1) > incubation (5.0). Correlations analysis among different forms of acidity and lime requirement methods with selected soil properties showed that pH in three media, namely water, 1 mol L-1 KCl and 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2, had a significant negative correlation with different forms of acidity and lime requirement methods. Exchangeable Fe and Al showed significant positive correlations with EB-Al3+ acidity, exchangeable acidity, pH-dependent acidity and total potential acidity, and also lime requirement methods. Extractable Al showed positive correlations with different forms of acidity except EB-H+ and EB-Al3+ acidities. The lime requirement by different methods depended upon the extractable aluminium.Significant positive correlations existed between lime requirements and different forms of acidity of the soils except EB-H+ acidity and incubation method. The nature of soil acidity was mostly pH-dependent. Statistically, the Woodruff method did slightly better than the New Woodruff, incubation and Peech methods at estimating lime requirement and hence the Woodruff procedure may be recommended for routine soil testing because of its speed and simplicity.

  14. Utilization of maize cob biochar and rice husk charcoal as soil amendments for improving acid soil fertility and productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhidayati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The decline in soil fertility in agricultural land is a major problem that causes a decrease in the production of food crops. One of the causes of the decline in soil fertility is declining soil pH that caused the decline in the availability of nutrients in the soil. This study aimed to assess the influence of alternative liming materials derived from maize cob biochar and rice husk charcoal compared to conventional lime to improve soil pH, soil nutrient availability and maize production. The experiment used a factorial complete randomized design which consisting of two factors. The first factor is the type of soil amendment which consists of three levels (calcite lime, rice husk charcoal and cob maize biochar. The second factor is the application rates of the soil amendment consisted of three levels (3, 6 and 9 t/ha and one control treatment (without soil amendment. The results of this study showed that the application of various soil amendment increased soil pH, which the pH increase of the lime application was relatively more stable over time compared to biochar and husk charcoal. The average of the soil pH increased for each soil amendment by 23% (lime, 20% (rice husk charcoal and 23% (biochar as compared with control. The increase in soil pH can increase the availability of soil N, P and K. The greatest influence of soil pH on nutrient availability was shown by the relationship between soil pH and K nutrient availability with R2 = 0.712, while for the N by R2 = 0.462 and for the P by R2 = 0.245. The relationship between the availability of N and maize yield showed a linear equation. While the relationship between the availability of P and K with the maize yield showed a quadratic equation. The highest maize yield was found in the application of biochar and rice husk charcoal with a dose of 6-9 t/ha. The results of this study suggested that biochar and husk charcoal could be used as an alternative liming material in improving acid soil

  15. The effect of acidity on the distribution and symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia in Lithuanian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinskas, E. B.

    2007-04-01

    The distribution and symbiotic efficiency of nodule bacteria Rhizobium leguminosarum_bv. trifolii F., Sinorhizobium meliloti D., Rhizobium galegae L., and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae F. in Lithuanian soils as dependent on the soil acidity were studied in the long-term field, pot, and laboratory experiments. The critical and optimal pH values controlling the distribution of rhizobia and the symbiotic nitrogen fixation were determined for every bacterial species. The relationship was found between the soil pH and the nitrogen-fixing capacity of rhizobia. A positive effect of liming of acid soils in combination with inoculation of legumes on the efficiency of symbiotic nitrogen fixation was demonstrated.

  16. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-01

    Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 × 10(-10), 2.08 × 10(-9) and 6.8 × 10(-10)m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH=2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  17. Calibration of KE C Value in Acidic Red Soils with Fumigation-Extraction Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Commonly used KEC value (0.45) of the fumigation-extraction (FE) method was obtained on the basis of temperate neutral soils. To ascertain its applicability to acidic red soils widespread in southern China and other subtropical regions, the KEC value was investigated based on 8 acidic red soils by in situ labelling of native soil microorganisms using 14C-labelled glucose. Realistic KEC value for red soils could be obtained by in situ 14C-labelling as long as an incubation period of 72 h is adopted after addition of 14C glucose to soil. The single KEC values for the eight red soils ranged from 0.27 to 0.35 and averaged 0.31. Lower KEC value obtained in red soils probably resulted from different soil quality, compared with other types of soil,which causes possible changes in microbial community structure and extractability of cellular component.Microbial biomass C contents of the eight red soils measured using a unique and constant KEC value of 0.45 decreased by 22.2%~40% in comparison to those using variable KEC values. The results suggest that microbial biomass C would be significantly underestimated using the present KEC value and a calibration of the KEC value is necessary for red soils.``

  18. O-Linked glycome and proteome of high-molecular-mass proteins in human ovarian cancer ascites: Identification of sulfation, disialic acid and O-linked fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Niclas G; McGuckin, Michael A

    2012-07-01

    The O-linked glycosylation of the main acidic high-molecular-weight glycoprotein from ascites fluid from patients with ovarian cancer were analyzed. The O-linked oligosaccharides were shown to consist of mainly highly sialylated core 1 and 2 structures with a smaller amount of sulfated core 2 structures. These structures were shown to be able to be further extended into small keratan sulfate (KS)-type oligosaccharides with up to four N-acetyllactosamine units. Proteomic studies of the acidic fraction of ascites fluid from patients with ovarian cancer showed that this fraction was enriched in proteoglycans. Among them, lumican, agrin, versican and dystroglycans were potential candidates, with threonine- and serine-rich domains that could carry a significant amount of O-linked glycosylation, including also the O-linked KS. Glycomic analysis using liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) also showed that the disialic acid NeuAc-NeuAc- was frequently found as the terminating structure on the O-linked core 1 and 2 oligosaccharides from one ascites sample. Also, a small amount of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-associated O-linked fucose structure Gal-GlcNAc-Fucitol was detected with and without sialic acid in the LC-MS/MS analysis. Candidate proteins containing O-linked fucose were suggested to be proteoglycan-type molecules containing the O-linked fucose EGF consensus domain.

  19. Adsorption behavior of herbicide butachlor on typical soils in China and humic acids from the soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Duanping; Xu, Zhonghou; Zhu, Shuquan; Cao, Yunzhe; Wang, Yu; Du, Xiaoming; Gu, Qingbao; Li, Fasheng

    2005-05-01

    Three kinds of soils in China, krasnozem, fluvo-aquic soil, and phaeozem, as well as the humic acids (HAs) isolated from them, were used to adsorb the herbicide butachlor from water. Under the experimental conditions, the adsorption amount of butachlor on soils was positively correlated with the content of soil organic matter. HAs extracted from different kinds of soils had different adsorption capacity for the tested herbicide, which was positively correlated with their content of carbonyls. The adsorption mechanism was studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and cross-polarization with magic angle spinning 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP-MAS 13C NMR) techniques. It was showed that the adsorption mainly took place on the C=O, phenolic and alcoholic O-H groups of HAs. It was also confirmed that the adsorption mechanism was hydrogen bonds formation between the above groups of HAs and butachlor molecules.

  20. Effect of dextran and dextran sulfate on the structural and rheological properties of model acid milk gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachekrepapol, U; Horne, D S; Lucey, J A

    2015-05-01

    Various types of polysaccharides are widely used in cultured dairy products. However, the interaction mechanisms, between milk proteins and these polysaccharides, are not entirely clear. To explore the interactions between uncharged and charged polysaccharides and the caseins, we used a model acid-milk-gel system, which allowed acidification to occur separately from gelation. The effect of adding uncharged dextran (DX; molecular weight ~2.0×10(6) Da) and negatively charged dextran sulfate (DS; molecular weight ~1.4×10(6) Da) to model acid milk gels was studied. Two concentrations (0.075 and 0.5%, wt/wt) of DX or DS were added to cold milk (~0°C) that had been acidified to pH values 4.4, 4.6, 4.8, or 4.9. Acidified milks containing DX or DS were then quiescently heated at the rate of 0.5°C/min to 30°C, which induced gelation, and gels were then held at 30°C for 17 h to facilitate gel development. Dynamic small-amplitude-oscillation rheology and large-deformation (shear) tests were performed. Microstructure of gels was examined by fluorescence microscopy. Gels made with a high concentration of DX gelled at a lower temperature, but after 17 h at 30°C, these gels exhibited lower storage moduli and lower yield-stress values. At pH 4.8 or 4.9 (pH values greater than the isoelectric point of caseins), addition of 0.5% DS to acidified milk resulted in lower gelation temperature. At pH 4.4 (pH values less than the isoelectric point of caseins), addition of 0.5% DS to acidified milk resulted in gels with very high stiffness values. Gels made at pH 4.8 or 4.9 with both concentrations of DS had much lower stiffness and yield-stress values than control gels. Microstructural analysis indicated that gels made at pH 4.4 with the addition of 0.5% DX exhibited large protein strands and pores, whereas gels made with 0.075% DX or the control gels had a finer protein matrix. At higher pH values (>4.4), gels made with 0.5% DX had a finer structure. At all pH values, gels made

  1. Soil organic matter and soil acidity in Mangrove areas in the river Paraiba Estuary, Cabedelo, Paraiba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Wilma Vasconcelos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove ecosystems are of great environmental significance, because of their fragility and role in feeding and breeding various animal species. In northeastern Brazil, the disorderly occupation of estuarine areas and the urban sprawl have led to a considerable loss of the original area occupied by mangroves. In the municipality of Cabedelo, State of Paraíba, there are about 4,900 ha of remnant mangrove areas in the estuarine complex of the Paraíba River. However, information about the attributes of mangrove soils at this location is quite scarce. The aim of this study was to quantify the soil organic matter and soil acidity in mangroves located in the estuary of the Paraíba River, State of Paraíba, Brazil, in order to increase the database of soil attributes in this region. The study area is in local influence of the Restinga de Cabedelo National Forest (Flona, an environmental conservation unit of the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation. For the choice of sampling points, we considered an area that receives direct influence of the eviction of domestic and industrial effluents. The soil of the study area is an “Organossolo Háplico” in Brazilian Soil Classification (Histosol, and was sampled at four point sites: one upstream of the effluent discharge (P1, one in the watercourse receiving effluent water (P2, one downstream of the effluent discharge (P3 and another near Flona (P4, at 0-20 and 20-40 cm, in four replications in time (28/08/2012 in the morning and afternoon, and 21/01/2013 in the morning and afternoon. Potential acidity, pH and soil organic matter (SOM were determined. No significant differences were detected in the potential acidity of the four collection sites, which ranged from 0.38 to 0.45 cmolc dm-3. Soil pH was greatest at point P4 (7.0 and lowest at point P1 (5.8. The SOM was highest at point P1 (86.4 % and lowest at P2 (77.9 %. The attributes related to soil acidity were not sensitive to indicate

  2. Development of a biotechnological process for the treatment of acid mine drainages. Final report; Entwicklung eines biotechnischen Verfahrens zur Behandlung saurer, sulfat- und metallhaltiger Waesser. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tommerdich, D.; Pfeifer, F.; Schacht, S. [DMT-Inst. fuer Chemische Umwelttechnologie, Essen (Germany)

    1992-05-01

    This project was to develop a biotechnological process for the simultaneous removal of metals and sulfate from acid mine drainage. The metabolic capability of sulfate reducing bacteria was used to convert sulfates to sulfides which will induce the precipitation of metal ions as metal sulfides. Stages of the developed water treatment process should be characterized and proved for application with original waste water in laboratory scale. A sulfate reducing consortium was enriched and characterized due to its relevant growth requirements like substrate spectrum of complex and defined carbon sources, pH and temperature optimum and sulfide tolerance. The stoichiometric quotient of substrate conversion to sulfate reduction which is an important cost factor was estimated in batch and continuous cultures. For continuous cultivation a fixed bed reactor with external loop was used. The pH-shift formed during growth of the sulfate reducing bacteria was used to develop a pH auxostatic regulation system which improves process safety of continuous cultivation. As a method for biomass estimation a new enzymatic assay based on bioluminescent estimation of APS-reductase, a key enzyme of desulfuricants, was developed and tested for its applicability. Precipitation of metals was carried out in a separate reactor stage. The precipitation was preferentially efficient using gaseous H{sub 2}S rather than Na{sub 2}S as reactant resulting in a better flocculation and crystallization of the product. The complete configuration of bioreactor and precipitation stage was tested with original acid drainage from an old coal mining field. With lactic acid as carbon source and a hydraulic retention time of 7.6 h a sulfate reduction rate of 9 g/l/d was obtained. The sediment contained 30% of solid phase which after drying could be characterized as machinavite. [Deutsch] Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens war die Entwicklung eines biotechnischen Verfahrens, in welchem Sulfat durch mikrobielle Reduktion zu

  3. Effect of Simulated Acid Rain on Potential Carbon and Nitrogen Mineralization in Forest Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Xue-Jun; ZHOU Guo-Yi; HUANG Zhong-Liang; LIU Ju-Xiu; ZHANG De-Qiang; LI Jiong

    2008-01-01

    Acid rain is a serious environmental problem worldwide. In this study, a pot experiment using forest soils planted with the seedlings of four woody species was performed with weekly treatments of pH 4.40, 4.00, 3.52, and 3.05 simulated acid rain (SAR) for 42 months compared to a control of pH 5.00 lake water. The cumulative amounts of C and N mineralization in the five treated soils were determined after incubation at 25 ℃ for 65 d to examine the effects of SAR treatments.For all five treatments, cumulative CO2-C production ranged from 20.24 to 27.81 mg kg-1 dry soil, net production of available N from 17.37 to 48.95 mg kg-1 dry soil, and net production of NO-3-N from 9.09 to 46.23 mg kg-1 dry soil. SAR treatments generally enhanced the emission of CO2-C from the soils; however, SAR with pH 3.05 inhibited the emission.SAR treatments decreased the net production of available N and NO3-N. The cumulative CH4 and N2O productions from the soils increased with increasing amount of simulated acid rain. The cumulative CO2-C production and the net production of available N of the soil under Acmena acuminatissima were significantly higher (P≤0.05) than those under Schima superba and Cryptocarya concinna. The mineralization of soil organic C was related to the contents of soil organic C and N, but was not related to soil pH. However, the overall effect of acid rain on the storage of soil organic matter and the cycling of important nutrients depended on the amount of acid deposition and the types of forests.

  4. ANALYSIS OF PERFLUORINATED CARBOXYLIC ACIDS IN SOILS: DETECTION AND QUANTITATION ISSUES AT LOW CONCENTRATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods were developed for the extraction from soil, identification, confirmation and quantitation by LC/MS/MS of trace levels of perfluorinated octanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorinated nonanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluorinated decanoic acid (PFDA). Whereas PFOA, PFNA and PFDA all can...

  5. Uranium Leaching from Contaminated Soil Utilizing Rhamnolipid, EDTA, and Citric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Asselin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants have recently gained attention as “green” agents that can be used to enhance the remediation of heavy metals and some organic matter in contaminated soils. The overall objective of this paper was to investigate rhamnolipid, a microbial produced biosurfactant, and its ability to leach uranium present in contaminated soil from an abandoned mine site. Soil samples were collected from two locations in northern Arizona: Cameron (site of open pit mining and Leupp (control—no mining. The approach taken was to first determine the total uranium content in each soil using a hydrofluoric acid digestion, then comparing the amount of metal removed by rhamnolipid to other chelating agents EDTA and citric acid, and finally determining the amount of soluble metal in the soil matrix using a sequential extraction. Results suggested a complex system for metal removal from soil utilizing rhamnolipid. It was determined that rhamnolipid at a concentration of 150 μM was as effective as EDTA but not as effective as citric acid for the removal of soluble uranium. However, the rhamnolipid was only slightly better at removing uranium from the mining soil compared to a purified water control. Overall, this study demonstrated that rhamnolipid ability to remove uranium from contaminated soil is comparable to EDTA and to a lesser extent citric acid, but, for the soils investigated, it is not significantly better than a simple water wash.

  6. Effects of dicyandiamide and dolomite application on N2O emission from an acidic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Wu, Yupeng; Peng, Qi-an; Lin, Shan; Mo, Yongliang; Wu, Lei; Hu, Ronggui; Zhou, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Soil acidification is a major problem for sustainable agriculture since it limits productivity of several crops. Liming is usually adopted to ameliorate soil acidity that can trigger soil processes such as nitrification, denitrification, and loss of nitrogen (N) as nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The loss of N following liming of acidic soils can be controlled by nitrification inhibitors (such as dicyandiamide). However, effects of nitrification inhibitors following liming of acidic soils are not well understood so far. Here, we conducted a laboratory study using an acidic soil to examine the effects of dolomite and dicyandiamide (DCD) application on N2O emissions. Three levels of DCD (0, 10, and 20 mg kg(-1); DCD0, DCD10, and DCD20, respectively) were applied to the acidic soil under two levels of dolomite (0 and 1 g kg(-1)) which were further treated with two levels of N fertilizer (0 and 200 mg N kg(-1)). Results showed that N2O emissions were highest at low soil pH levels in fertilizer-treated soil without application of DCD and dolomite. Application of DCD and dolomite significantly (P ≤ 0.001) reduced N2O emissions through decreasing rates of NH4 (+)-N oxidation and increasing soil pH, respectively. Total N2O emissions were reduced by 44 and 13% in DCD20 and dolomite alone treatments, respectively, while DCD20 + dolomite reduced N2O emissions by 54% when compared with DCD0 treatment. The present study suggests that application of DCD and dolomite to acidic soils can mitigate N2O emissions.

  7. [Short-term changes of pH value and Al activity in acid soils after urea fertilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qingru; Liao, Bohan; Jiang, Zhaohui; Zhou, Xihong; Tang, Can; Zhong, Ning

    2005-02-01

    Acidic soils are widely distributed in South China, and their acidity is the major environmental stress factor limiting the growth of most crops. It is well known that soil Al solubilized at low pH is a main toxic factor for plant growth. Our study with three acidic soils showed that soil pH increased quickly, while soil exchangeable Al decreased sharply with the increasing concentrations of applied urea. The time-course experiment revealed that the increase of soil pH was short-lived, with a subsequently slow drop after reached its maximum. Urea fertilization caused a drastic change of soil pH during 2-4 weeks of the experimental period. There was a negative relationship between soil pH and soil exchangeable Al. Biological toxicity test demonstrated that applying urea to acidic soils could obviously decrease the aluminum toxicity of maize in a short-term period.

  8. Potential origin and formation for molecular components of humic acids in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDonato, Nicole; Chen, Hongmei; Waggoner, Derek; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2016-04-01

    Soil humic acids are the base soluble/acid insoluble organic components of soil organic matter. Most of what we know about humic acids comes from studies of their bulk molecular properties or analysis of individual fractions after extraction from soils. This work attempts to better define humic acids and explain similarities and differences for several soils varying in degrees of humification using advanced molecular level techniques. Our investigation using electrospray ionization coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has given new insight into the distinctive molecular characteristics of humic acids which suggest a possible pathway for their formation. Humic acids from various ecosystems, climate regions and soil textural classes are distinguished by the presence of three predominant molecular components: lignin-like molecules, carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules and condensed aromatic molecules that bear similarity to black carbon. Results show that humification may be linked to the relative abundance of these three types of molecules as well as the relative abundance of carboxyl groups in each molecular type. This work also demonstrates evidence for lignin as the primary source of soil organic matter, particularly condensed aromatic molecules often categorized as black carbon and is the first report of the non-pyrogenic source for these compounds in soils. We also suggest that much of the carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules are sourced from lignin.

  9. Phytoremediation of Cu and Zn by vetiver grass in mine soils amended with humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Carmen; Pérez-Esteban, Javier; Escolástico, Consuelo; Masaguer, Alberto; Moliner, Ana

    2016-07-01

    Phytoremediation of contaminated mine soils requires the use of fast-growing, deep-rooted, high-biomass, and metal-tolerant plants with the application of soil amendments that promote metal uptake by plants. A pot experiment was performed to evaluate the combined use of vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides) and humic acid for phytoremediation of Cu and Zn in mine soils. Vetiver plants were grown in soil samples collected from two mine sites of Spain mixed with a commercial humic acid derived from leonardite at doses of 0, 2, 10, and 20 g kg(-1). Plant metal concentrations and biomass were measured and metal bioavailability in soils was determined by a low molecular weight organic acid extraction. Results showed that humic acid addition decreased organic acid-extractable metals in soil. Although this extraction method is used to estimate bioavailability of metals, it was not a good estimator under these conditions due to competition with the strong chelators in the added humic acid. High doses of humic acid also promoted root growth and increased Cu concentrations in plants due to formation of soluble metal-organic complexes, which enhanced removal of this metal from soil and its accumulation in roots. Although humic acid was not able to improve Zn uptake, it managed to reduce translocation of Zn and Cu to aerial parts of plants. Vetiver resulted unsuitable for phytoextraction, but our study showed that the combined use of this species with humic acid at 10-20 g kg(-1) could be an effective strategy for phytostabilization of mine soils.

  10. Chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid and chitin/chitosan production using marine waste sources: characteristics, applications and eco-friendly processes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, José Antonio; Rodríguez-Amado, Isabel; Montemayor, María Ignacia; Fraguas, Javier; González, María Del Pilar; Murado, Miguel Anxo

    2013-03-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chitin and chitosan applications have been reported. Their commercial demands have been extended to different markets, such as cosmetics, medicine, biotechnology, food and textiles. Marine wastes from fisheries and aquaculture are susceptible sources for polymers but optimized processes for their recovery and production must be developed to satisfy such necessities. In the present work, we have reviewed different alternatives reported in the literature to produce and purify chondroitin sulfate (CS), hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitin/chitosan (CH/CHs) with the aim of proposing environmentally friendly processes by combination of various microbial, chemical, enzymatic and membranes strategies and technologies.

  11. Soil acidity and mobile aluminum status in pseudogley soils in Čačak-Kraljevo basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đalović Ivica G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil acidity and aluminum toxicity are considered most damaging soil conditions affecting the growth of most crops. This paper reviews the results of tests of pH, exchangeable acidity and mobile aluminum (Al concentration in profiles of pseudogley soils from Čačak-Kraljevo basin. For that purpose, 102 soil pits were dug in 2009 in several sites around Čačak- Kraljevo basin. The tests encompassed 54 field, 28 meadow, and 20 forest soil samples. Samples of soil in the disturbed state were taken from the Ah and Eg horizons (102 samples, from the B1tg horizon in 39 field, 24 meadow and 15 forest pits (a total of 78 samples and from the B2tg horizon in 14 field, 11 meadow, and 4 forest pits (a total of 29 samples. Mean pH values (1M KCl of the tested soil profiles were 4.28, 3.90 and 3.80 for the Ah, Eg and B1tg horizons, respectively. Soil pH of forest samples was lower than those in meadow and arable land samples (mean values of 4.06, 3.97 and 3.85 for arable land, meadow and forest samples, respectively. Soil acidification was especially intensive in deep horizons, as 27% (Ah, 77% (Eg and 87% (B1tg soil samples had the pH value below 4.0. Mean values of total exchangeable acidity (TEA were 1.55, 2.33 and 3.40 meq 100 g-1 for the Ah, Eg and B1tg horizons, respectively. The TEA values in forest soils were considerably higher (3.39 meq 100 g-1 than those in arable soils and meadow soils (1.96 and 1.93, respectively. Mean mobile Al contents of tested soil samples were 11.02, 19.58 and 28.33 mg Al 100 g-1 for the Ah, Eg and B1tg horizons, respectively. According to the pH and TEA values, mobile Al was considerably higher in the forest soils (the mean value of 26.08 mg Al 100 g-1 than in the arable soils and meadow soils (the mean values of 16.85 and 16.00 mg Al 100 g-1, respectively. The Eg and B1tg horizons of the forest soil had especially high mobile Al contents (the mean values of 28.50 and 32.95 mg Al 100 g-1, respectively. High levels of

  12. Influence of ingestion of aluminum, citric acid and soil on mineral metabolism of lactating beef cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, V G; Horn, F P; Fontenot, J P

    1986-05-01

    Lactating beef cows (16 Hereford and 34 Angus, 430 kg average body weight, aged 8 to 10 yr) were fed a basal diet containing 200 micrograms/g Al alone or supplemented with Al-citrate, citric acid, soil or soil plus citric acid for 56 d. Diets containing Al-citrate, soil and soil plus citric acid contained 1,730, 1,870 and 1,935 micrograms/g Al, dry-basis, respectively. Adding soil to the diet also increased Mg and Fe content of the diet. Aluminum values in ruminal contents of beef cows fed the basal alone or supplemented with citric acid, Al-citrate, soil or soil plus citric acid were 800, 990, 2,930, 3,410 and 2,910 micrograms/g, air-dry basis, respectively. Serum Mg and inorganic P declined (P less than .01) and urinary Ca concentration increased (P less than .01) for cows fed Al-citrate. By d 56, serum Mg was 1.5 and 2.2 mg/dl, and serum P was 3.8 and 6.8 mg/dl, for cows fed Al-citrate and basal diets, respectively. Calcium concentrations in urine were 281 and 11 micrograms/g for cows fed Al-citrate and basal diets, respectively. Citric acid, soil and soil plus citric acid had no detrimental effects on serum Mg and inorganic P, or urinary Ca concentration. By d 56, serum Ca was higher (P less than .06) in cows fed Al-citrate, compared with cows on the other four diets. Bone Ca, P, Zn and percent ash were not significantly affected by treatment but bone Mg tended to be slightly lower (P less than .07) for cows fed Al-citrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Regularities of extracting humic acids from soils using sodium pyrophosphate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakina, L. G.; Drichko, V. F.; Orlova, N. E.

    2017-02-01

    Regularities of extracting humic acids from different soil types (soddy-podzolic soil, gray forest soil, and all chernozem subtypes) with sodium pyrophosphate solutions at different pH values (from 5 to 13) have been studied. It is found that, regardless of soil type, the process occurs in two stages through the dissociation of carboxylic groups and phenolic hydroxyls, each of which can be described by a logistic function. Parameters of the logistic equations approximating the extraction of humic acids from soils at different pH values are independent of the content and composition of humus in soils. Changes in the optical density of humic acids extracted from soils using sodium pyrophosphate solutions with different pH values are described in the first approximation by the Gaussian function. The optically densest humic acids are extracted using sodium pyrophosphate solutions at pH 10. Therefore, it is proposed to use an extract with pH 10 for the characterization of organic matter with the maximum possible degree of humification in the given soil.

  14. Soil salinity and acidity: Spatial variability and effects on rice production in West Africa's mangrove zone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sylla, M.

    1994-01-01

    In the mangrove environment of West Africa, high spatial and temporal variability of soil constraints (salinity and acidity) to rice production is a problem for the transfer and adoption of new agronomic techniques, for land use planning, and for soil and water management. Recently, several National

  15. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on the acidity and salinity of greenhouse soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiangpei; Shi, Jiachun; Zeng, Lingzao; Xu, Jianming; Wu, Laosheng

    2015-02-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of conventional nitrogen fertilization on soil acidity and salinity. Three N rates (urea; N0, 0 kg N ha(-1); N1, 600 kg N ha(-1); and N2, 1,200 kg N ha(-1)) were applied in five soils with different greenhouse cultivation years to evaluate soil acidification and salinization rate induced by nitrogen fertilizer in lettuce production. Both soil acidity and salinity increased significantly as N input increased after one season, with pH decrease ranging from 0.45 to 1.06 units and electrolytic conductivity increase from 0.24 to 0.68 mS cm(-1). An estimated 0.92 mol H(+) was produced for 1 mol (NO2 (-) + NO3 (-))-N accumulation in soil. The proton loading from nitrification was 14.3-27.3 and 12.1-58.2 kmol H(+) ha(-1) in the center of Shandong Province under N1 and N2 rate, respectively. However, the proton loading from the uptake of excess bases by lettuces was only 0.3-4.5 % of that from nitrification. Moreover, the release of protons induced the direct release of base cations and accelerated soil salinization. The increase of soil acidity and salinity was attributed to the nitrification of excess N fertilizer. Compared to the proton loading by lettuce, nitrification contributed more to soil acidification in greenhouse soils.

  16. Effects of Fe oxide on N transformations in subtropical acid soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianjun; Xin, Xiaoping; Li, Shiwei; Zhou, Junchao; Zhu, Tongbin; Müller, Christopher; Cai, Zucong; Wright, Alan L.

    2015-02-01

    Subtropical ecosystems are often characterized by high N cycling rates, but net nitrification rates are often low in subtropical acid soils. NO3--N immobilization into organic N may be a contributing factor to understand the observed low net nitrification rates in these acid soils. The effects of Fe oxide and organic matter on soil N transformations were evaluated using a 15N tracing study. Soil net nitrification was low for highly acidic yellow soil (Ferralsols), but gross ammonia oxidation was 7 times higher than net nitrification. In weakly acidic purple soil (Cambisols), net nitrification was 8 times higher than in Ferralsols. The addition of 5% Fe oxide to Cambisols, reduced the net nitrification rate to a negative rate, while NO3--N immobilization rate increased 8 fold. NO3--N immobilization was also observed in Ferralsols which contained high Fe oxides levels. A possible mechanism for these reactions could be stimulation of NO3--N immobilization by Fe oxide which promoted the abiotic formation of nitrogenous polymers, suggesting that the absence of net nitrification in some highly acid soils may be due to high rates of NO3--N immobilization caused by high Fe oxide content rather than a low pH.

  17. 离子色谱法测定土壤中的Cl-和SO42-%Determination of Chloride Ion and Sulfate Ion in Soil by Ion Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐秀丽; 刘文全; 徐兴永; 马恭博

    2014-01-01

    Ion chromatography was used to detect chloride ion and sulfate ion in soil. The mixture of 2.0 mmol/L sodium carbonate and 1.3 mmol/L sodium bicarbonate solution was selected to be mobile phase, and the flow rate was 2 mL/min. In such circumstances, the retention time of chloride ion was 1.96 min, sulfate ion was about 12.26 min. A good linear relationship was obtained between the mass concentration and the chromatograph parameter in the range of 8-10 mg/L Cl-and 10-30 mg/L SO42-, the linear correlation coefficients were 0.999 4 and 0.999 7, the recovery rates were 93.8%and 105.4%, respectively. The measuring relative standard deviation were all less than 1%(n=6). The method was suitable for the determination of Cl-and SO42-in soil.%采用离子色谱法测定土壤浸提液中的Cl-和SO42-。选择2.0 mmol/L Na2CO3-1.3 mmol/L NaHCO3混合液为淋洗液,流速为2 mL/min,在此条件下,Cl-保留时间为1.96 min,SO42-保留时间约为12.26 min,Cl-,SO42-的质量浓度分别在2~8,10~30 mg/L范围内与色谱参数线性相关,相关系数分别为0.9994和0.9997,Cl-,SO42-的平均加标回收率分别为93.8%,105.4%,测量结果的相对标准偏差均小于1%(n=6)。该法适用于土壤中Cl-和SO42-的测定。

  18. Changes of cellular fatty acids of soil Actinobacteria producing antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    LIPENSKÁ, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Changes of cellular fatty acids in membrane of Actinobacteria. Changes of fatty acids are significant biomarkers of changing conditions of surroundings. This can also indicate production of antibiotics along with production of atypical fatty acids.

  19. Adsorption of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid onto Volcanic Ash Soils:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ei Ei Mon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of the linear adsorption coefficient (Kd for soils plays a vital role to predict fate and transport of pesticides in the soil-water environment. In this study, we measured Kd values for 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D adsorption onto Japanese volcanic ash soils with different amount of soil organic matter (SOM in batch experiments under different pH conditions. All measurements followed well both linear and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. Strong correlations were found between measured Kd values and pH as well as SOM. The 2,4-D adsorption increased with decreasing pH and with increasing SOM. Based on the data, a predictive Kd equation for volcanic ash soils, log (Kd = 2.04 - 0.37 pH + 0.91 log (SOM, was obtained by the multiple regression analysis. The predictive Kd equation was tested against measured 2,4-D sorption data for other volcanic ash soils and normal mineral soils from literature. The proposed Kd equation well predicted Kd values for other volcanic ash soils and slightly over- or under-predicted Kd values for normal mineral soils. The proposed Kd equation performed well against volcanic ash soils from different sites and countries, and is therefore recommended for predicting Kd values at different pH and SOM conditions for volcanic ash soils when calculating and predicting 2,4-D mobility and fate in soil and groundwater.

  20. Sequestration and bioavailability of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in soils: Implications for their underestimated risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lixia; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhao, Shuyan; Ma, Xinxin

    2016-12-01

    Different from typical hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs), perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are more soluble in water and less partitioned to soil than the HOCs. It remains unclear whether and to what extent PFAAs could be sequestrated in soil. In this study, sequential extraction of PFAAs in soil and bioaccumulation of PFAAs in earthworm were carried out to understand the sequestration and bioavailability of PFAAs in soils with different soil organic matter (SOM) and aged for different time periods (7 and 47d). Sequestration occurred in different degrees depending on the amount and compositions of SOM in soil, structural properties of PFAAs and aging time. Surprisingly, in one peat soil with high fraction of organic carbon (foc, 59%), the PFAAs were completely sequestrated in the soil. Aging might lead to further sequestration of PFAAs in soil with relatively lower foc. As a consequence of sequestration, the bioavailability of PFAAs in peat soils was reduced 3-10 times compared to that in the plain farmland soil. However, the sequestrated PFAAs were still bioaccumulative in earthworms to some extent. The results indicated that the risk of PFAAs in field soil with high content of SOM could be underestimated if only free PFAAs using mild solvent extraction were monitored.

  1. Dolomite application to acidic soils: a promising option for mitigating N2O emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Peng, Qi-An; Hu, Ronggui; Wu, Yupeng; Lin, Shan; Zhao, Jinsong

    2015-12-01

    Soil acidification is one of the main problems to crop productivity as well as a potent source of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O). Liming practice is usually performed for the amelioration of acidic soils, but the effects of dolomite application on N2O emissions from acidic soils are still not well understood. Therefore, a laboratory study was conducted to examine N2O emissions from an acidic soil following application of dolomite. Dolomite was applied to acidic soil in a factorial design under different levels of moisture and nitrogen (N) fertilizer. Treatments were as follows: dolomite was applied as 0, 1, and 2 g kg(-1) soil (named as CK, L, and H, respectively) under two levels of moisture [i.e., 55 and 90 % water-filled pore space (WFPS)]. All treatments of dolomite and moisture were further amended with 0 and 200 mg N kg(-1) soil as (NH4)2SO4. Soil properties such as soil pH, mineral N (NH4 (+)-N and NO3 (-)-N), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and soil N2O emissions were analyzed throughout the study period. Application of N fertilizer rapidly increased soil N2O emissions and peaked at 0.59 μg N2O-N kg(-1) h(-1) under 90 % WFPS without dolomite application. The highest cumulative N2O flux was 246.32 μg N2O-N kg(-1) under 90 % WFPS without dolomite addition in fertilized soil. Addition of dolomite significantly (p ≤ 0.01) mitigated N2O emissions as soil pH increased, and H treatment was more effective for mitigating N2O emissions as compared to L treatment. The H treatment decreased the cumulative N2O emissions by up to 73 and 67 % under 55 and 90 % WFPS, respectively, in fertilized soil, and 60 and 68 % under 55 and 90 % WFPS, respectively, in unfertilized soil when compared to those without dolomite addition. Results demonstrated that application of dolomite to acidic soils is a promising option for mitigating N2O emissions.

  2. Cu and Zn Speciation in an Acid Soil Amended with Alkaline Biosolids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Fractionation of metals in a granite-derived acid sandy loam soil amended with alkaline-stabilised sewage sludge biosolids was conducted in order to assess metal bioavailability and environmental mobility. Soil solution was extracted by a centrifugation and filtration technique. Metal speciation in the soil solution was determined by a cation exchange resin method. Acetic acid and EDTA extracting solutions were used for extraction of metals in soil solid surfaces. Metal distribution in different fractions of soil solid phase was determined using a three-step sequential extraction scheme. The results show that the metals in the soil solution existed in different fractions with variable lability and metals in the soil solid phase were also present in various chemical forms with potentially different bioavailability and environmental mobility. Alkalinestabilised biosolids could elevate solubility of Cu and proportion of Cu in organically complexed fractions both in soil liquid and solid phases, and may therefore increase Cu mobility. In contrast, the biosolids lowered the concentrations of water-soluble Zn (labile fraction) and exchangeable Zn and may hence decrease bioavailability and mobility of Zn. However, Fe and Mn oxides bound and organic matter bound fractions are likely to be Zn pools in the sludge-amended soil. These consequences possibly result from the liming effect and metal speciation of the sludge product and the difference in the chemistry between the metals in soil.

  3. Sorption of a triazol derivative by soils: importance of surface acidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of a triazol derivative, 1-(4-chlorophenyl)- 4,4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)penten-3-ol with a common name of S3307D, on fifteen soils and three H2O2-treated soils was investigated. The sorption isotherm for each untreated and treated soil was non-linear, and was best fitted to Freundlich sorption equation. Soils containing high amount of clay content or organic matter or both sorbed much higher amounts of the chemical than soils that had low contents of these soil constituents. H2O2-treated soils showed considerable sorptive affinity for S3307D. It was concluded that both organic matter and mineral fraction in natural soils contributed to the sorption of the basic compound. Sorption by the H2O2 treated soils increased as suspension pH decreased, but all suspension pHs exceeded the pKa of the compound by more than two units. This implies that organic base protonation can occur on surfaces of soil components, and surface acidity (exchangeable acidity ) is important in sorption process of the organic base rather than suspension pH.

  4. Determination of water-soluble forms of oxalic and formic acids in soils by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karicheva, E.; Guseva, N.; Kambalina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic acids (CA) play an important role in the chemical composition origin of soils and migration of elements. The content of these acids and their salts is one of the important characteristics for agrochemical, ecological, ameliorative and hygienic assessment of soils. The aim of the article is to determine water-soluble forms of same carboxylic acids — (oxalic and formic acids) in soils by ion chromatography with gradient elution. For the separation and determination of water-soluble carboxylic acids we used reagent-free gradient elution ion-exchange chromatography ICS-2000 (Dionex, USA), the model solutions of oxalate and formate ions, and leachates from soils of the Kola Peninsula. The optimal gradient program was established for separation and detection of oxalate and formate ions in water solutions by ion chromatography. A stability indicating method was developed for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organic acids in soils. The method has shown high detection limits such as 0.03 mg/L for oxalate ion and 0.02 mg/L for formate ion. High signal reproducibility was achieved in wide range of intensities which correspond to the following ion concentrations: from 0.04 mg/g to 10 mg/L (formate), from 0.1 mg/g to 25 mg/L (oxalate). The concentration of formate and oxalate ions in soil samples is from 0.04 to 0.9 mg/L and 0.45 to 17 mg/L respectively.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium sulfate. 184.1643 Section 184.1643 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Potassium sulfate (K2SO4, CAS Reg... having a bitter, saline taste. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  7. Inhibition of synthesis of heparan sulfate by selenate: Possible dependence on sulfation for chain polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, C.P.; Nader, H.B. (Paulist School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)); Buonassisi, V.; Colburn, P. (W. Alton Jones Cell Science Center, Lake Placid, NY (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Selenate, a sulfation inhibitor, blocks the synthesis of heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate by cultured endothelial cells. In contrast, selenate does not affect the production of hyaluronic acid, a nonsulfated glycosaminoglycan. No differences in molecular weight, ({sup 3}H)glucosamine/({sup 35}S)sulfuric acid ratios, or disaccharide composition were observed when the heparan sulfate synthesized by selenate-treated cells was compared with that of control cells. The absence of undersulfated chains in preparations from cultures exposed to selenate supports the concept that, in the intact cell, the polymerization of heparan sulfate might be dependent on the sulfation of the saccharide units added to the growing glycosaminoglycan chain.

  8. Mobility and speciation of Cd,Cu,and Zn in two acidic soils affected by simulated acid rain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhao-hui; LIAO Bo-han; HUANG Chang-yong

    2005-01-01

    Through a batch experiment, the mobility and speciation of heavy metals(Cd, Cu, Zn) in two acidic forest soils from Hunan Province were studied. The results showed that the release and potential active speciation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in the tested contaminated red soil(CRS) and yellow red soil(CYRS) increased significantly with pH decreasing and ion concentrations increasing of simulated acid rain, and these effects were mainly decided by the pH value of simulated acid rain. Cd had the highest potential risk on the environment compared with Cu and Zn. Cd existed mainly in exchangeable form in residual CRS and CYRS, Cu in organically bound and Mn-oxide occluded forms, and Zn in mineral forms due to the high background values.

  9. Nitrogen saturation, soil acidification, and ecological effects in a subtropical pine forest on acid soil in southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongmei; Kang, Ronghua; Mulder, Jan; Zhang, Ting; Duan, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Elevated anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition has caused nitrate (NO3-) leaching, an indication of N saturation, in several temperate and boreal forests across the Northern Hemisphere. So far, the occurrence of N saturation in subtropical forests and its effects on the chemistry of the typically highly weathered soils, forest growth, and biodiversity have received little attention. Here we investigated N saturation and the effects of chronically high N inputs on soil and vegetation in a typical, subtropical Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest at Tieshanping, southwest China. Seven years of N flux data obtained in ambient conditions and in response to field manipulation, including a doubling of N input either as ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) or as sodium nitrate (NaNO3) solution, resulted in a unique set of N balance data. Our data showed extreme N saturation with near-quantitative leaching of NO3-, by far the dominant form of dissolved inorganic N in soil water. Even after 7 years, NH4+, added as NH4NO3, was nearly fully converted to NO3-, thus giving rise to a major acid input into the soil. Despite the large acid input, the decrease in soil pH was insignificant, due to pH buffering caused by Al3+ mobilization and enhanced SO42- adsorption. In response to the NH4NO3-induced increase in soil acidification and N availability, ground vegetation showed significant reduction of abundance and diversity, while Masson pine growth further declined. By contrast, addition of NaNO3 did not cause soil acidification. The comparison of NH4NO3 treatment and NaNO3 treatment indicated that pine growth decline was mainly attributed to acidification-induced nutrient imbalance, while the loss in abundance of major ground species was the combining effect of N saturation and acidification. Therefore, N emission control is of primary importance to curb further acidification and eutrophication of forest soils in much of subtropical south China.

  10. 硫酸铝改良苏打盐碱土后各离子的变化%The Change of Adding Aluminum Sulfate on Saline Alkali Soil's Ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宇男; 耿玉辉; 赵兰坡

    2011-01-01

    为了更好地利用苏打盐碱土,对其进行更好地开发和改良,通过室内模拟,分析施用不同含量硫酸铝对土壤中可溶性盐及pH的影响.结果表明,添加硫酸铝后,使土壤溶液中钠离子、碳酸根和碳酸氢根明显增加,土壤溶液pH值明显下降,土壤性质明显改善.随着硫酸铝的增加,土壤颗粒释放出的可溶性盐也大量增加,明显减少土壤中的盐类物质.在加入不同浓度硫酸铝和不同淋洗次数的比较后,淋洗次数对苏打盐碱土中的盐类也有明显的影响,综合多项指标,加入硫酸铝浓度为0.8%时,淋洗2次,效果最佳.同时,苏打盐碱土理化性质的改良也为作物生长创造了良好的土壤环境.%In order to make better use of saline alkali soil, it should have better improvement. In this paper, effect of different concentrations of aluminum sulfate on soluble salts and pH value of the soil was studied through indoor simulation experiments. The results indicated that after a table 1 aluminum sulfate, Na+, CO32-and HCO3- contents of the soil solutions increased significantly, pH value of the soil solutions decreased significantly and properties of the soil had remarkable improvement. With the aluminum sulfate amount increasing, the soluble salt contents released from the soil particles increased, the salt contents in the soil reduced. Different density and washed times of aluminum sulfate influenced the outcome. At the same time, the improvement of physics-chemical properties of soda alkali-saline soils had created the good soil environment for the crops growth.

  11. Quantifying Heavy Metals Sequestration by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in an Acid Mine Drainage-Contaminated Natural Wetland

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, John W.; Fournelle, John H.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals ...

  12. Effect of Polylactic Acid-Degradable Film Mulch on Soil Temperature and Cotton Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Concern on biodegradable plastic film is increasing because of pollution problems caused by the plastic films currently used. The objective of this field experiment is to evaluate the effect of two thicknesses of polyactic acid-degradable film on soil temperature and cotton yield. The results showed that small holes appeared in the polyactic acid-degradable film at 17~22 d after it was installed. Burst period appeared about 60 d after installation. Splits were observed in the polyactic acid-degradable film at 130 d after installation. Soil temperatures rose slowly under polyactic acid-degradable film during the cotton seedling stage. Daytime soil temperatures were 0.8℃ and 6.2℃ lower under 18μm and 15μm thick polyactic acid-degradable film than non-degradable plastic film(CK, respectively. Nighttime soil temperatures under the polyactic acid-degradable film were about 1℃ warmer than CK. There was no significant difference in cotton yields between the 18μm polyactic acid degradable film treatment and CK. In contrast, yields in the 15μm degradable plastic film treatment were 8.9% less than that in CK. This study indicated that 18μm polyactic acid degradable plastic film had good degradability and no negative effect on cotton growth. The 18μm polyactic acid degradable plastic film can replace ordinary plastic film in agricultural production.

  13. Retention of available P in acid soils of tropical and subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jianhui; ZOU Xiaoming; YANG Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation of mineral phosphate is often recognized as a factor of limiting the availability of P in acidic soils of tropical and subtropical forests.For this paper,we studied the extractable P pools and their transformation rates in soils of a tropical evergreen forest at Xishuangbanna and a subtropical montane wet forest at the Ailao Mountains in order to understand the biogeochemical processes regulating P availability in acidic soils.The two forests differ in forest humus layer;it is deep in the Ailao forest while little is present in the Xishuangbanna forest.The extractable P pools by resin and sodium-bicarbonate decreased when soil organic carbon content was reduced.The lowest levels of extractable P pools occurred in the surface (0-10 era) mineral soils of the Xishuangbanna forest.However,microbial P in the mineral soil of the Xishuangbauna forest was twice that in the Ailao forest.Potential rates of microbial P immobilization were greater than those of organic P mineralization in mineral soils for both forests.We suggest that microbial P immobilization plays an essential role in avoiding mineral P precipitation and retaining available P of plant in tropical acidic soils,whereas both floor mass accumulation and microbial P immobilization function benefit retaining plant available P in subtropical montane wet forests.

  14. Removal of heavy metals from a contaminated soil using tartaric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Xin; LI Pei-jun; ZHOU Qi-xing; ZHANG Yun; SUN Tie-heng

    2006-01-01

    This study reports the feasibility of remediation of a heavy metal (HM) contaminated soil using tartaric acid, an environmentally-friendly extractant. Batch experiments were performed to test the factors influencing remediation of the HM contaminated soil. An empirical model was employed to describe the kinetics of HM dissolution/desorption and to predict equilibrium concentrations of HMs in soil leachate. The changes of HMs in different fractions before and after tartaric acid treatment were also investigated. Tartaric acid solution containing HMs was regenerated by chestnut shells. Results show that utilization of tartaric acid was effective for removal of HMs from the contaminated soil, attaining 50%-60% of Cd, 40%-50% of Pb, 40%-50% of Cu and 20%-30% of Zn in the pH range of 3.5-4.0 within 24 h. Mass transfer coefficients for cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were much higher than those for copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). Sequential fractionations of treated and untreated soil samples showed that tartaric acid was effective in removing the exchangeable, carbonate fractions of Cd, Zn and Cu from the contaminated soil. The contents of Pb and Cu in Fe-Mn oxide fraciton were also significantly decreased by tartaric acid treatment. One hundred milliliters of tartaric acid solution containing HMs could be regenerated by 10 g chestnut shells in a batch reactor. Such a remediation procedure indicated that tartaric acid is a promising agent for remediation of HM contaminated soils. However, further research is needed before the method can be practically used for in situ remediation of contaminated sites.

  15. Effect of crushed mussel shell addition on bacterial growth in acid polluted soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Calviño, David; Garrido-Rodríguez, B.; Arias-Estévez, M.

    2015-01-01

    We applied three different doses of crushed mussel shell (CMS) on two Cu-polluted acid soils to study the effect of these amendments on the growth of the bacterial community during 730 days. Soil pH increased in the short and medium term due to CMS addition. In a first stage, bacterial growth...... was lower in the CMS-amended than in the un-amended samples. Thereafter, bacterial growth increased slowly. The soil having the highest initial pH value (4.5) showed the first significant increase in bacterial growth 95 days after the CMS amendment. However, in the soil with the lowest initial pH value (3...... as an agronomic sound practice for strongly acid soils (pH

  16. Organic Matter, Carbon and Humic Acids in Rehabilitated and Secondary Forest Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Y. Leng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Tropical rainforests cover about 19.37 million ha (60% of Malaysia’s total area and about 8.71 million ha can be found in Sarawak, Malaysia. Excessive logging, mining and shifting cultivation contribute to deforestation in Sarawak. The objectives of this study were to: (i Quantify soil Organic Matter (SOM, Soil Organic Carbon (SOC and Humic Acids (HA in rehabilitated and secondary forest soils and (ii Compare SOM, SOC and HA sequestrations of both forests. Approach: Soil samples were collected from a 16 year old rehabilitated forest and a secondary forest at Universiti Putra Malaysia, Bintulu Campus. Fifteen samples were taken at random with a soil auger at 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm depths. The bulk densities at these depths were determined by the coring method. The bulk density method was used to quantify the total C (TC, Total Organic Carbon (TOC, Organic Matter (OM, Humic Acids (HA and total N at the stated sampling depths. Results: Regardless of forest soil type and depth, the amount of SOM of the two forests was similar. Except for 20-40 cm of the secondary forest soil whereby the quantity of total C sequestered was significantly lower than that of the rehabilitated forest soil, C sequestration was similar irrespective of forest type and depth. Nevertheless, stable C (organic carbon sequestered in HA was generally higher in the rehabilitated forest soil compared with the secondary forest soil. This was attributed to higher yield of HA in the rehabilitated forest soil partly due to better humification at 20-40 cm in the rehabilitated forest soil. Conclusion: Hence, the findings suggest that organic C in HA realistically reflects C sequestration in the soils of the two forests investigated.

  17. One-pot Green Synthesis of Pyrrole Derivatives Catalyzed by Nano Sulfated Zirconia as a Solid Acid Catalyst%One-pot Green Synthesis of Pyrrole Derivatives Catalyzed by Nano Sulfated Zirconia as a Solid Acid Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teimouri, Abbas; Chermahini, Alireza Najafi

    2012-01-01

    A new and efficient method for the preparation of N-substituted pyrroles from one-pot Paal-Knorr condensation has been accomplished using nano-crystalline sulfated zirconia (SZ) as the catalyst in ethanol at moderate temperature. This new protocol has the advantages of easy availability, stability, reusability and eco-friendliness of the catalyst, high to excellent yields, simple experimental and work-up procedure. The synthesized compounds were confirmed through spectral characterization using IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectra.

  18. Organic acid enhanced electrodialytic extraction of lead from contaminated soil fines in suspension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of soil washing technology for the treatment of heavy metal contaminated soils is limited by the toxicity and unwieldiness of the remaining heavy metal contaminated sludge. In this work, the feasibility of combining electrodialytic remediation with heterotrophic leaching...... for decontamination of the sludge was investigated. The ability of 11 organic acids to extract Pb from the fine fraction of contaminated soil (grains ... was tested. Five of the acids showed the ability to extract Ph from the soil fines in excess of the effect caused solely by pH changes. Addition of the acids, however, severely impeded EDR, hence promotion of EDR by combination with heterotrophic leaching was rejected. In contrast, enhancement of EDR...

  19. Prolonged acid rain facilitates soil organic carbon accumulation in a mature forest in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Xiong, Xin; Qiu, Qingyan; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-15

    With the continuing increase in anthropogenic activities, acid rain remains a serious environmental threat, especially in the fast developing areas such as southern China. To detect how prolonged deposition of acid rain would influence soil organic carbon accumulation in mature subtropical forests, we conducted a field experiment with simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at Dinghushan National Nature Reserve in southern China. Four levels of SAR treatments were set by irrigating plants with water of different pH values: CK (the control, local lake water, pH ≈ 4.5), T1 (water pH=4.0), T2 (water pH=3.5), and T3 (water pH=3.0). Results showed reduced pH measurements in the topsoil exposed to simulated acid rains due to soil acidification. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass and litter decomposition rates were significantly decreased by the SAR treatments. As a result, T3 treatment significantly increased the total organic carbon by 24.5% in the topsoil compared to the control. Furthermore, surface soil became more stable as more recalcitrant organic matter was generated under the SAR treatments. Our results suggest that prolonged acid rain exposure may have the potential to facilitate soil organic carbon accumulation in the subtropical forest in southern China.

  20. Sulfate deterioration of cement-based materials examined by x-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Nikhila N.; Kurtis, Kimberly E.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Jupe, Andrew C.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2004-10-01

    Sulfate ions present in soil, groundwater, seawater, decaying organic matter, acid rain, and industrial effluent adversely affect the long-term durability of portland cement concrete, but lack of complete understanding of the nature and consequences of sulfate attack hamper our ability to accurately predict performance of concrete in sulfate-rich environments. One impediment to improved understanding of sulfate deterioration of cement-based materials has been the lack of appropriate non-destructive characterization techniques. Laboratory x-ray microtomography affords an opportunity to study in situ the evolution of physical manifestations of damage due to sulfate exposure. The influence of materials selection and mixture parameters - including water-to-cement ratio, cement type, and presence or absence of aggregate, as well as the influence of sulfate exposure conditions, including sulfate and cation type (i.e., Na2SO4 and MgSO4) and concentration - have been examined by microtomography to determine their influence on the rate and character of the sulfate-induced deterioration.

  1. Study on Humic Acids of the Soil Applied with Corn Stalk by Spectroscopy Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jing-gui; WANG Ming-hui; JIANG Yi-mei; XU Yan

    2005-01-01

    Spectroscopy measurements (Fourier transform infrared differential spectroscopy, Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry) were performed to study the humic acids of the soil applied with corn stalk. The results showed that after incorporation of corn stalks into the soil, the soil humic acid (HA) changed significantly in different stages. During first 60 days, new HAs were formed by polymerization and seems to be similar to that of initial HAs from composting corn stalk, some little molecular organic matters also reacted with soil HAs and turned into parts of soil HAs. After 60 days of the corn stalk residue incorporation, new HAs were formed by polymerization of decomposed lignin molecules, some methylenes transformed into methyls and methoxyls since the 90th day. Application of corn stalk led to the increase of aliphatic components in soil HAs, the decrease in aromatic components of soil HAs and the suppression in oxidation degree of soil HAs. The average molecular weight of soil HAs also declined because of application of corn stalk.

  2. The tillage effect on the soil acid and alkaline phosphatase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacramioara Oprica

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatases (acid and alkaline are important in soils because these extracellular enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of organic phosphate esters to orthophosphate; thus they form an important link between biologically unavailable and mineral phosphorous. Phosphatase activity is sensitive to environmental perturbations such as organic amendments, tillage, waterlogging, compaction, fertilizer additions and thus it is often used as an environmental indicator of soil quality in riparian ecosystems. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of tillage systems on phosphatases activity in a field experiment carried out in Ezăreni farm. The phosphatase activitiy were determined at two depths (7-10 cm and 15-25cm layers of a chernozem soil submitted to conventional tillage (CT in a fertilised and unfertilised experiment. Monitoring soil alkaline phosphatase activity showed, generally, the same in fertilized soil profiles collected from both depths; the values being extremely close. In unfertilized soils, alkaline phosphatase activity is different only in soils that were exposed to unconventional work using disc harrows and 30cm tillage. Both works type (no tillage and conventional tillage cause an intense alkaline phosphatase activity in 7-10 cm soil profile. Acid phosphatase activity is highly fluctuating in both fertilized as well unfertilized soil, this enzyme being influenced by the performed works.

  3. Effect of copper on phospholipid fatty acid composition of microbial communities in two red soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Huai-ying; LIU Yue-yan; XUE Dong; HUANG Chang-yong

    2006-01-01

    The phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition was analyzed in two red soils experimentally contaminated with copper at different concentrations. The total amounts ofphospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in both red soils were significantly correlated with soil microbial biomass C and N, which decreased consistently with increasing levels of copper. The relative quantities of the PLFAs 17:0(10 Me), i 16:0, il 5:0 and 16:1 w5c, decreased with increasing heavy metal concentration, while those of cy 17:0, which is an indicator of gram-negative bacteria, increased. The Shannon index calculated from the PLFA data indicated that Cu addition in the red soils decreased the population diversity of soil microbial communities. Multivariate analysis of PLFA data demonstrated that high levels of Cu application had a significant impact on microbial community structure and there is a threshold metal concentration for PLFA composition. Comparatively higher toxic effect on microbial biomass and community structure were found in the red sandy soil than those in the red clayey soil. The differential effect of Cu addition on microbial communities in the two soils may be due to differences in soil texture and cation exchange capacity.

  4. The effect of organic acid on the spectral-induced polarization response of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, N.; Shalem, T.; Furman, A.

    2014-04-01

    In spectral-induced polarization (SIP) studies of sites contaminated by organic hydrocarbons, it was shown that biodegradation by-products in general, and organic acids in particular, significantly alter the SIP signature of the subsurface. Still a systematic study that considers the effect of organic acid on the physicochemical and electrical (SIP) properties of the soil is missing. The goal of this work is to relate between the effect of organic acid on the physicochemical properties of the soil, and the soil electrical properties. To do so, we measured the temporal changes of the soil chemical (ion content) and electrical (low-frequency SIP) properties in response to influx of organic acid at different concentrations, gradually altering the soil pH. Our results show that organic acid reduces the soil pH, enhances mineral weathering and consequently reduces both the in-phase and quadrature conductivity. At the pH range where mineral weathering is most significant (pH 6-4.5) a negative linear relation between the soil pH and the soil formation factor was found, suggesting that mineral weathering changes the pore space geometry and hence affecting the in-phase electrical conductivity. In addition, we attribute the reduction in the quadrature conductivity to an exchange process between the natural cation adsorbed on the mineral surface and hydronium, and to changes in the width of the pore bottleneck that results from the mineral weathering. Overall, our results allow a better understanding of the SIP signature of soil undergoing acidification process in general and as biodegradation process in particular.

  5. Response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests of different maturity in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Liang

    Full Text Available The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF, a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0. Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types.

  6. Response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests of different maturity in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guohua; Liu, Xingzhao; Chen, Xiaomei; Qiu, Qingyan; Zhang, Deqiang; Chu, Guowei; Liu, Juxiu; Liu, Shizhong; Zhou, Guoyi

    2013-01-01

    The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF), a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF) and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF)] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0). Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types.

  7. Assessment of bioavailable organic phosphorus in tropical forest soils by organic acid extraction and phosphatase hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darch, Tegan; Blackwell, Martin S A; Chadwick, David; Haygarth, Philip M; Hawkins, Jane M B; Turner, Benjamin L

    2016-12-15

    Soil organic phosphorus contributes to the nutrition of tropical trees, but is not accounted for in standard soil phosphorus tests. Plants and microbes can release organic anions to solubilize organic phosphorus from soil surfaces, and synthesize phosphatases to release inorganic phosphate from the solubilized compounds. We developed a procedure to estimate bioavailable organic phosphorus in tropical forest soils by simulating the secretion processes of organic acids and phosphatases. Five lowland tropical forest soils with contrasting properties (pH 4.4-6.1, total P 86-429 mg P kg(- 1)) were extracted with 2 mM citric acid (i.e., 10 μmol g(- 1), approximating rhizosphere concentrations) adjusted to soil pH in a 4:1 solution to soil ratio for 1 h. Three phosphatase enzymes were then added to the soil extract to determine the forms of hydrolysable organic phosphorus. Total phosphorus extracted by the procedure ranged between 3.22 and 8.06 mg P kg(- 1) (mean 5.55 ± 0.42 mg P kg(- 1)), of which on average three quarters was unreactive phosphorus (i.e., organic phosphorus plus inorganic polyphosphate). Of the enzyme-hydrolysable unreactive phosphorus, 28% was simple phosphomonoesters hydrolyzed by phosphomonoesterase from bovine intestinal mucosa, a further 18% was phosphodiesters hydrolyzed by a combination of nuclease from Penicillium citrinum and phosphomonoesterase, and the remaining 51% was hydrolyzed by a broad-spectrum phytase from wheat. We conclude that soil organic phosphorus can be solubilized and hydrolyzed by a combination of organic acids and phosphatase enzymes in lowland tropical forest soils, indicating that this pathway could make a significant contribution to biological phosphorus acquisition in tropical forests. Furthermore, we have developed a method that can be used to assess the bioavailability of this soil organic phosphorus.

  8. Aluminum-contaminant transport by surface runoff and bypass flow from an acid sulphate soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minh, L.Q.; Tuong, T.P.; Mensvoort, van M.E.F.; Bouma, J.

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying the process and the amount of acid-contaminant released to the surroundings is important in assessing the environmental hazards associated with reclaiming acid sulphate soils (ASS). The roles of surface runoff and bypass flow (i.e. the rapid downward flow of free water along macropores t

  9. Early indications of soil recovery from acidic deposition in U.S. red spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Shortle, Walter C.; David, Mark B.; Smith, Kevin T.; Warby, Richard A.F.; Lapenis, Andrei G.

    2012-01-01

    Forty to fifty percent decreases in acidic deposition through the 1980s and 1990s led to partial recovery of acidified surface waters in the northeastern United States; however, the limited number of studies that have assessed soil change found increased soil acidification during this period. From existing data, it's not clear whether soils continued to worsen in the 1990s or if recovery had begun. To evaluate possible changes in soils through the 1990s, soils in six red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, first sampled in 1992 to 1993, were resampled in 2003 to 2004. The Oa-horizon pH increased (P 42−, which decreased the mobility of Al throughout the upper soil profile. Results indicate a nascent recovery driven largely by vegetation processes.

  10. Influence of some agricultural practices on the soil acidification in acid precipitation areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Both acid precipitation and unreasonable agricultural practices are notorious artificial factors resulting in soil acidification. To sort out reasonable agricultural practices favorable to abating soil acidification, the task of this study was directed to a long-term field trial in Chongqing, during which chemical fertilizer, organic fertilizer were applied to different crop rotations and the soil pH value was measured. The results indicated that all treatments decreased pH value in the 0 to 20 cm soil layer after ten years. Problems were more serious when chlorine-containing fertilizer, excessive chemical fertilizer and mixed fertilizer were applied. It is demonstrated that balance rates of N, P and K fertilizers, application of muck in field are advantageous to abating soil acidification. Oil plants affect soil acidification more than cereal in different crop rotation.

  11. Serum amino acids profile and the beneficial effects of L-arginine or L-glutamine supplementation in dextran sulfate sodium colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Wu, Miaomiao; Liu, Gang; Yang, Guan; Xion, Yan; Su, Dingding; Wu, Li; Li, Tiejun; Chen, Shuai; Duan, Jielin; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate serum amino acids profile in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, and impacts of graded dose of arginine or glutamine supplementation on the colitis. Using DSS-induced colitis model, which is similar to human ulcerative colitis, we determined serum profile of amino acids at day 3, 7, 10 and 12 (5 days post DSS treatment). Meanwhile, effects of graded dose of arginine (0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.5%) or glutamine (0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0%) supplementation on clinical parameters, serum amino acids, colonic tight junction proteins, colonic anti-oxidative indicators [catalase, total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px)], colonic pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-17 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)] in DSS-induced colitis were fully analyzed at day 7 and 12. Additionally, the activation of signal transduction pathways, including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphoinositide-3-kinases (PI3K)/PI3K-protein kinase B (Akt), and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-myosin light chain (MLC20), were analyzed using immunoblotting. Serum amino acids analysis showed that DSS treatment changed the serum contents of amino acids, such as Trp, Glu, and Gln (Parginine or glutamine supplementation had significant (Parginine or glutamine could be a potential therapy for intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  12. Acetylsalicylic Acid reduces the severity of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases the formation of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhnke, Thomas; Gomolka, Beate; Bilal, Süleyman; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Sun, Yanping; Rothe, Michael; Baumgart, Daniel C; Weylandt, Karsten H

    2013-01-01

    The role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in inflammatory bowel disease is controversial, as they have been implicated in disease aggravation. Different from other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) enhances the formation of anti-inflammatory and proresolution lipoxins derived from arachidonic acid as well as resolvins from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this study, we examined the effect of ASA on murine dextran sodium sulfate colitis. A mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and post mortem assessment were used to assess disease severity, and lipid metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Decreased colitis activity was demonstrated by phenotype and MRI assessment in mice treated with ASA, and confirmed in postmortem analysis. Analysis of lipid mediators showed sustained formation of lipoxin A4 and an increase of DHA-derived 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) after treatment with ASA. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in RAW264.7 murine macrophages demonstrated significantly increased phagocytosis activity after incubation with 17-HDHA, supporting its proresolution effect. These results show a protective effect of ASA in a murine colitis model and could give a rationale for a careful reassessment of ASA therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and particularly ulcerative colitis, possibly combined with DHA supplementation.

  13. Effects of heating on composition, degree of darkness, and stacking nanostructure of soil humic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsumi, Naoya, E-mail: n-katsu@ishikawa-pu.ac.jp; Yonebayashi, Koyo; Okazaki, Masanori

    2016-01-15

    Wildfires and prescribed burning can affect both the quality and the quantity of organic matter in soils. In this study, we investigated qualitative and quantitative changes of soil humic substances in two different soils (an Entisol from a paddy field and an Inceptisol from a cedar forest) under several controlled heating conditions. Soil samples were heated in a muffle furnace at 200, 250, or 300 °C for 1, 3, 5, or 12 h. The humic acid and fulvic acid contents of the soil samples prior to and after heating were determined. The degree of darkness, elemental composition, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios, {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and X-ray diffraction patterns of humic acids extracted from the soils before and after heating were measured. The proportion of humic acids in total carbon decreased with increasing heating time at high temperature (300 °C), but increased with increasing heating time at ≤ 250 °C. The degree of darkness of the humic acids increased with increasing heating time and temperature. During darkening, the H/C atomic ratios, the proportion of aromatic C, and the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios increased, whereas the proportions of alkyl C and O-alkyl C decreased. X-ray diffraction analysis verified that a stacking nanostructure developed by heating. Changes in the chemical structure of the humic acids from the heated soils depended on the type of soil. The major structural components of the humic acids from the heated Entisol were aromatic C and carboxylic C, whereas aliphatic C, aromatic C, and carboxylic C structural components were found in the humic acids from the heated Inceptisol. These results suggest that the heat-induced changes in the chemical structure of the humic acids depended on the source plant. - Highlights: • Darkness of humic acids increased with increasing heating time and temperature. • Aromatic carbon content increased during darkening. • Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope

  14. Understanding the mechanism behind the nitrous acid (HONO) emissions from the northern soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Hem Raj; Siljanen, Henri MP; Biasi, Christina; Maljanen, Marja

    2016-04-01

    The interest of the flux of nitrous acid (HONO) from soils has recently increased. HONO is an important source of the oxidant OH- radical in the troposphere and thus results a reduction of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the atmosphere. Soils have been recently found to be potential sources of HONO as these emissions are linked to other nitrogen cycle processes, especially presence of nitrite in soils. Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been suggested as possible yet substantial sources of HONO. Along with soil pH, other physical properties such as C:N, nitrogen availability, soil moisture and temperature may effect HONO emissions. Our preliminary results demonstrate that drained acidic peatlands with a low C:N produces higher NO, N2O and HONO emissions compared to those in pristine peatlands and upland forest soils. This study will identify the hotspots and the process involved in HONO emissions in northern ecosystems. Along with HONO, we will examine the emissions of NO and N2O to quantify the related N-gases emitted. These results will add a new piece of information in our knowledge of the nitrogen cycle. Soil samples will be collected from several boreal and arctic sites in Finland, Sweden and Russia. In the laboratory, soil samples will be manipulated based on previously described soil physical properties. This will be followed by labelling experiment coupled with selective nitrification inhibitor experiment in the soils. Our first hypothesis is that northern ecosystems are sources of HONO. Second, is that the soil properties (C:N ratio, moisture, N-availability, pH) regulate the magnitude of HONO emissions from northern soils. Third is that the first step of nitrification (ammonium oxidation) is the main pathway to produce HONO. This study will show that the northern ecosystems could be sources of HONO and therefore increasing the oxidizing capacity of the lower atmosphere.

  15. Effects of Hg and Cu on the activities of soil acid phosphatase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Dong-mei; CHEN Bo; LIU Wen-li; LIU Guang-shen; LIU Wei-ping

    2007-01-01

    Comparative study on the activity and kinectic properties of acid phosphatase (ACPase) of three soils amended with Hg and Cu at constant temperature and humidity was carried out. The results indicated that the inhibition on ACPase of the three sample soils by Hg and Cu varied with the content of soil organic matter and pH, where, Soil 1 was the most seriously contaminated due to its lowest content of organic matter and the lowest pH among three samples, Soil 2 took the second place, and Soil 3was the least contaminated. Except Soil 3, the activity of soil ACPase tended to increase along with the contact time under the same type and the same concentration of heavy metal. In particular the Vmax values of ACPase in all three samples decreased with increasing Hg and Cu concentration, whereas the Km values were affected weakly. According to the change of Vmax and Km values,Cu and Hg had the same inhibition effect on soil ACPase. Both of them may be a type of compound of non-competitive and anti-competitive inhibition. Statistic analyses indicated that activities of soil ACPase and Vmax values could serve as bioindicator to partially denote the heavy metal Hg and Cu contamination degree.

  16. Carbon stabilization and microbial growth in acidic mine soils after addition of different amendments for soil reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Acosta, Jose; Ángeles Muñoz, María; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Faz, Ángel; Bååth, Erland

    2016-04-01

    The extreme soil conditions in metalliferous mine soils have a negative influence on soil biological activity and therefore on soil carbon estabilization. Therefore, amendments are used to increase organic carbon content and activate microbial communities. In order to elucidate some of the factors controlling soil organic carbon stabilization in reclaimed acidic mine soils and its interrelationship with microbial growth and community structure, we performed an incubation experiment with four amendments: pig slurry (PS), pig manure (PM) and biochar (BC), applied with and without marble waste (MW; CaCO3). Results showed that PM and BC (alone or together with MW) contributed to an important increment in recalcitrant organic C, C/N ratio and aggregate stability. Bacterial and fungal growths were highly dependent on pH and labile organic C. PS supported the highest microbial growth; applied alone it stimulated fungal growth, and applied with MW it stimulated bacterial growth. BC promoted the lowest microbial growth, especially for fungi, with no significant increase in fungal biomass. MW+BC increased bacterial growth up to values similar to PM and MW+PM, suggesting that part of the biochar was degraded, at least in short-term mainly by bacteria rather than fungi. PM, MW+PS and MW+PM supported the highest microbial biomass and a similar community structure, related with the presence of high organic C and high pH, with immobilization of metals and increased soil quality. BC contributed to improved soil structure, increased recalcitrant organic C, and decreased metal mobility, with low stimulation of microbial growth.

  17. Rhizosheaths on wheat grown in acid soils: phosphorus acquisition efficiency and genetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Richard A; Weligama, Chandrakumara; Verbyla, Klara; Ryan, Peter R; Rebetzke, Gregory J; Rattey, Allan; Richardson, Alan E; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Rhizosheaths comprise soil bound to roots, and in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rhizosheath size correlates with root hair length. The aims of this study were to determine the effect that a large rhizosheath has on the phosphorus (P) acquisition by wheat and to investigate the genetic control of rhizosheath size in wheat grown on acid soil.Near-isogenic wheat lines differing in rhizosheath size were evaluated on two acid soils. The soils were fertilized with mineral nutrients and included treatments with either low or high P. The same soils were treated with CaCO3 to raise the pH and detoxify Al(3+) Genotypic differences in rhizosheath size were apparent only when soil pH was low and Al(3+) was present. On acid soils, a large rhizosheath increased shoot biomass compared with a small rhizosheath regardless of P supply. At low P supply, increased shoot biomass could be attributed to a greater uptake of soil P, but at high P supply the increased biomass was due to some other factor. Generation means analysis indicated that rhizosheath size on acid soil was controlled by multiple, additive loci. Subsequently, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of an F6 population of recombinant inbred lines identified five major loci contributing to the phenotype together accounting for over 60% of the total genetic variance. One locus on chromosome 1D accounted for 34% of the genotypic variation. Genetic control of rhizosheath size appears to be relatively simple and markers based on the QTL provide valuable tools for marker assisted breeding.

  18. Quantification of Tinto River sediment microbial communities: importance of sulfate-reducing bacteria and their role in attenuating acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Amils, Ricardo; Sanz, José Luis

    2012-07-01

    Tinto River (Huelva, Spain) is a natural acidic rock drainage (ARD) environment produced by the bio-oxidation of metallic sulfides from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. This study quantified the abundance of diverse microbial populations inhabiting ARD-related sediments from two physicochemically contrasting sampling sites (SN and JL dams). Depth profiles of total cell numbers differed greatly between the two sites yet were consistent in decreasing sharply at greater depths. Although catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization with domain-specific probes showed that Bacteria (>98%) dominated over Archaea (important differences were detected at the class and genus levels, reflecting differences in pH, redox potential, and heavy metal concentrations. At SN, where the pH and redox potential are similar to that of the water column (pH 2.5 and +400 mV), the most abundant organisms were identified as iron-reducing bacteria: Acidithiobacillus spp. and Acidiphilium spp., probably related to the higher iron solubility at low pH. At the JL dam, characterized by a banded sediment with higher pH (4.2 to 6.2), more reducing redox potential (-210 mV to 50 mV), and a lower solubility of iron, members of sulfate-reducing genera Syntrophobacter, Desulfosporosinus, and Desulfurella were dominant. The latter was quantified with a newly designed CARD-FISH probe. In layers where sulfate-reducing bacteria were abundant, pH was higher and redox potential and levels of dissolved metals and iron were lower. These results suggest that the attenuation of ARD characteristics is biologically driven by sulfate reducers and the consequent precipitation of metals and iron as sulfides.

  19. Improved hemocompatibility and endothelialization of vascular grafts by covalent immobilization of sulfated silk fibroin on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haifeng; Li, Xiaoming; Niu, Xufeng; Zhou, Gang; Li, Ping; Fan, Yubo

    2011-08-08

    Endothelialization of vascular grafts prior to implantation has been investigated widely to enhance biocompatibility and antithrombogenicity. Thrombosis of artificial vessels is typically caused by platelet adhesion and agglomeration following endothelial cells detachment when exposed to the shear stress of blood circulation. The present study thus aimed at preventing platelet adhesion and aggregation onto biomaterials before the endothelial confluence is fully achieved. We report this modification of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds, both to impart hemocompatibility to prevent platelet adhesion and aggregation before the endothelial confluence is fully achieved and to support EC growth to accelerate endothelialization. The modification was achieved by covalent immobilization of sulfated silk fibroin on PLGA scaffolds using γ irradiation. Using phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as an aging medium, it was demonstrated that the scaffolds prepared by γ irradiation had a good retention of sulfated silk fibroin. The systematic in vitro hemocompatibility evaluation revealed that sulfated silk fibroin covalently immobilized PLGA (S-PLGA) scaffolds-reduced platelet adhesion and activation, prolonged whole blood clotting time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), and prothrombin time (PT). To evaluate further in vitro cytocompatibility of the scaffolds, we seeded vascular ECs on the scaffolds and cultured them for 2 weeks. The ECs were seen to attach and proliferate well on S-PLGA scaffolds, forming cell aggregates that gradually increased in size and fused with adjacent cell aggregates to form a monolayer covering the scaffold surface. Moreover, it was demonstrated through the gene transcript levels and the protein expressions of EC-specific markers that the cell functions of ECs on S-PLGA scaffolds were better preserved than those on PLGA scaffolds. Therefore, this study has described the generation of a vascular graft that

  20. The gut microbiota ellagic acid-derived metabolite urolithin A and its sulfate conjugate are substrates for the drug efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Miguel, Verónica; Merino, Gracia; Lucas, Ricardo; Morales, Juan C; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Alvarez, Ana I; Espín, Juan C

    2013-05-08

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is a drug efflux transporter that can affect the pharmacological and toxicological properties of many molecules. Urolithins, metabolites produced by the gut microbiota from ellagic acid (EA) and ellagitannins, have been acknowledged with in vivo anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive properties. This study evaluated whether urolithins (Uro-A, -B, -C, and -D) and their main phase II metabolites Uro-A sulfate, Uro-A glucuronide, and Uro-B glucuronide as well as their precursor EA were substrates for ABCG2/BCRP. Parental and Bcrp1-transduced MDCKII cells were used for active transport assays. Uro-A and, to a lesser extent, Uro-A sulfate showed a significant increase in apically directed translocation in Bcrp1-transduced cells. Bcrp1 did not show affinity for the rest of the tested compounds. Data were confirmed for murine, human, bovine, and ovine BCRP-transduced subclones as well as with the use of the selective BCRP inhibitor Ko143. The transport inhibition by Uro-A was analyzed by flow cytometry compared to Ko143 using the antineoplastic agent mitoxantrone as a model substrate. Results showed that Uro-A was able to inhibit mitoxantrone transport in a dose-dependent manner. This study reports for the first time that Uro-A and its sulfate conjugate are ABCG2/BCRP substrates. The results suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of these gut microbiota-derived metabolites could modulate ABCG2/BCRP-mediated transport processes and mechanisms of cancer drug resistance. Further in vivo investigations are warranted.

  1. Effect of Humic Acid on Soil Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Embankment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Munawar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the treatment of pathogens disease in fish using chemicals is very limited because of the stress of toxic ions. A treatment of humic acid of 50-90 mg /L on a farmland has been able to reduce illness and death compared to a mixture of formaldehyde and blue-green methylene. Humic acid is suspected to be able to increase yield, through improved conditions and resistance to diseases, health, and cultural vitality, either by itself or combined with cation species toxic. Humic acid can balance the soil cation so that the soil pH reached 7-8, through a chelate of Al, Fe, Ca or exchanged with NH4, Na and K. Humic acids were extracted from compost plants with a weak base of 0.1 N NaOH and precipitated at pH 2. The concentration of AH 0- 400 ml was applied to three soil types with an area of 0.12 m2 and 15 cm thickness. The results showed that the application of 100-200 ml HA/0.12 m2 gave optimum yield in improving the physical-chemical characteristics of the soil embankment. Soil pH reached a value of 7-8, cation exchange to 60% saturated, and soil bulk density was reached in the range of 1.1- 0.97 g / cm3.This condition is suitable for fish or shrimp in the embankment.

  2. Regional scale assessment of soil predictors of groundwater phosphate (P) levels in acidic sandy agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabilde, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Possible factors affecting the leaching of P to the groundwater in the Belgian sandy area are examined via regression analysis. The main objective is to investigate the dependency of phreatic groundwater phosphate concentrations (Flemish VMM monitoring net, monitoring period 2010-2013) on soil phosphate saturation degree (PSD) (1994-1997 mapping for Flemish Land Agency) (n = 1032). Additionally explored parameters include: depth distributions of Fe- and Al-oxides, sorbed P and phosphate sorption capacity (PSC) and soil pH. Interpolated data of these soil parameters in 3 depth layers (0-30, 30-60, 60-90 cm) were generated by ordinary kriging. Secondly, we assessed the significance of other edaphic factors potentially controlling the groundwater P: topsoil organic carbon content (OC %), soil clay content and fluctuation of the groundwater table. Overall, the mean PSD halved with each 30 cm depth layer (56 > 24 > 13 %) and was correlated to groundwater PO43- level. The statistical significance of the correlation with groundwater PO43- concentrations increased with depth layer. The poor correlation (R2 = 0.01) between PSD and groundwater phosphate concentration indicates that many factors, other than soil P status, control the transport of P from soil solution to the groundwater in Belgian sandy soils. A significant (PStructural equation modeling for example could be used to understand the practical importance of individual soil, management and hydrological potential predictors of groundwater PO4.

  3. Models of Metabolic Community Structure in Martian Habitable Environments: Constraints from a Terrestrial Analog Acid-Sulfate Fumarole Environment, Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K. L.; McCollom, T. M.; Hynek, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial habitability in extreme environments on Earth is described by microscale geochemical conditions that constrain metabolic niches in concert with long-term habitat stability that is governed by dynamic geologic processes. Using terrestrial analogs to identify habitable martian environments requires correlating microscale geochemical constraints with reconstructions of past martian environments that are based on global-scale observations. While past martian environments can be characterized by primary parameters (e.g. pH, redox, mineralogy, thermal history), microbial habitability on Earth is a complex function of both primary and derived parameters (e.g. metabolic reaction energetics, chemical & thermal gradients, flow dynamics). In recent years we have been investigating acid-sulfate fumaroles at the Mars analog site, Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua, where habitability is constrained by steep thermal gradients, spatially- and temporally-variable vent dynamics, and limited water and nutrient availability. The most common niche identified thus far is found in fumaroles that host mixed photosynthetic and chemosynthetic endolithic microbial communities. One such endolith is dominated by acidic red algae (Cyanidiales), aerobic bacterial heterotrophs (Ktedonobacteria), and archaeal thermoacidophiles (Hyperthermus, Caldisphaera, and Thermofilum). An analysis of the metabolic structure suggests that primary production by the red algae supports the growth of heterotrophic thermoacidophiles. Diversification among the chemoheterotrophs with respect to temperature and oxygen tolerance suggests community adaptation to environmental gradients or variable venting dynamics. Furthermore, individual cells within the endolith are silica-encrusted, providing the possibility for biosignature formation and preservation. Putative hydrothermal environments on early Mars with similar conditions could have supported endolithic communities with comparable metabolic strategies. Even

  4. Formation of sulphite, cysteic acid and taurine from sulphate by the egg embryo; Formation de sulfite, d'acide cysteique et de taurine a partir de sulfate par l'oeuf embryonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapeville, F.; Fromageot, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    It is shown that the formation of taurine from sulphate by the chicken embryo involves the reduction of sulphate to sulphite (I), the synthesis of cysteic acid (II) and its decarboxylation (Ill). The reaction (I) takes place in the vitellin sac. The reaction (II) results from the condensation of the sulphite with a-amino-acrylic acid and is carried out by the yolk. The enzymes responsible for the decarboxylation (III) are distributed both in the embryo and in its appendages. (author) [French] On demontre que la formation de taurine a partir de sulfate par l'embryon de poulet implique la reduction du sulfate en sulfite (1), la synthese de l'acide cysteique (Il) et sa decarboxylation (III). La reaction (I) a lieu dans le sac vitellin. La reaction (II) resulte de la condensation du sulfite avec l'acide a-amino-acrylique et est realisee par le jaune. Les enzymes assurant la decarboxylation (III) sont repartis aussi bien dans l'embryon que dans ses annexes. (auteur)

  5. Emission control for precursors causing acid rain(V):Improvement of acid soil with the bio-briquette combustion ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Xu-hui; SAKAMOTO Kazuhiko; WANG Wei; GAO Shi-dong; ISOBE Yugo

    2004-01-01

    The bio-briquette technique which mixes coal, biomass and sulfur fixation agent and bio-briquettes under 3-5 t/cm2 line pressure has aroused people's attention in view of controlling the air pollution and the acid rain. In this paper, the physicochemical properties of bio-briquette and its ash were investigated. And the acid soil was improved by the bio-briquette combustion ash, which contained nutritive substances such as P, N, K and had the acid-neutralizing capacity(ANC). The pH, EC, effective nutrient elements(Ca, Mg, K, P and N), heavy metal elements(Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn) and acid-neutralizing capacity change of ash-added soils within the range of 0%-10%, were also studied. Specially, when 5% bio-briquette combustion ash was added to the tested soil, the content of the effective elements such as Ca, Mg and K rose by 100 times, 7 times and twice, respectively. The total nitrogen also increased by about twice. The results showed the oxyanions such as that of Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn were not potentially dangerous, because they were about the same as the averages of them in Chinese soil. It is shown that the ANC became stronger, though the ANC hardly increases in the ash-added soil. On the basis of the evaluation indices, it is concluded that the best mixture ratio is to add 2.5%-8% of the bio-briquette combustion ash to the tested soil.

  6. A slight recovery of soils from Acid Rain over the last three decades is not reflected in the macro nutrition of beech (Fagus sylvatica) at 97 forest stands of the Vienna Woods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Torsten W; Türtscher, Selina; Berger, Pétra; Lindebner, Leopold

    2016-09-01

    Rigorous studies of recovery from soil acidification are rare. Hence, we resampled 97 old-growth beech stands in the Vienna Woods. This study exploits an extensive data set of soil (infiltration zone of stemflow and between trees area at different soil depths) and foliar chemistry from three decades ago. It was hypothesized that declining acidic deposition is reflected in soil and foliar chemistry. Top soil pH within the stemflow area increased significantly by 0.6 units in both H2O and KCl extracts from 1984 to 2012. Exchangeable Ca and Mg increased markedly in the stemflow area and to a lower extent in the top soil of the between trees area. Trends of declining base cations in the lower top soil were probably caused by mobilization of organic S and associated leaching with high amounts of sulfate. Contents of C, N and S decreased markedly in the stemflow area from 1984 to 2012, suggesting that mineralization rates of organic matter increased due to more favorable soil conditions. It is concluded that the top soil will continue to recover from acidic deposition. However, in the between trees areas and especially in deeper soil horizons recovery may be highly delayed. The beech trees of the Vienna Woods showed no sign of recovery from acidification although S deposition levels decreased. Release of historic S even increased foliar S contents. Base cation levels in the foliage declined but are still adequate for beech trees. Increasing N/nutrient ratios over time were considered not the result of marginally higher N foliar contents in 2012 but of diminishing nutrient uptake due to the decrease in ion concentration in soil solution. The mean foliar N/P ratio already increased to the alarming value of 31. Further nutritional imbalances will predispose trees to vitality loss.

  7. Influence of soil tillage and erosion on the dispersion of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Gorana Rampazzo; Rampazzo, Nicola; Mentler, Axel; Blum, Winfried E. H.; Eder, Alexander; Strauss, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Erosion processes can strongly influence the dissipation of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid applied with Roundup Max® in agricultural soils; in addition, the soil structure state shortly before erosive precipitations fall can be a key parameter for the distribution of glyphosate and its metabolite. Field rain simulation experiments showed that severe erosion processes immediately after application of Roundup Max® can lead to serious unexpected glyphosate loss even in soils with a high presumed adsorption like the Cambisols, if their structure is unfavourable. In one of the no-tillage-plot of the Cambisol, up to 47% of the applied glyphosate amount was dissipated with surface run-off. Moreover, at the Chernozem site with high erosion risk and lower adsorption potential, glyphosate could be found in collected percolation water transported far outside the 2x2 m experimental plots. Traces of glyphosate were found also outside the treated agricultural fields.

  8. Immobilization of lead in anthropogenic contaminated soils using phosphates with/without oxalic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Jun; Fu, Qingling; Zuo, Jichao; Liu, Yonghong; Hu, Hongqing

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effects of oxalic acid (OA) on the immobilization of Pb(II) in contaminated soils by phosphate materials, has considerable benefits for risk assessment and remediation strategies for the soil. A series of phosphate amendments with/without oxalic acid were applied to two anthropogenic contaminated soils. We investigated the immobilization of Pb(II) by KH2PO4, phosphate rock (PR), activated phosphate rock (APR) and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) at different phosphate:Pb (P:Pb) molar ratios (0, 0.6, 2.0 and 4.0) in the presence/absence of 50 mmol oxalic acid/kg soil, respectively. The effects of treatments were evaluated using single extraction with deionized water or CaCl2, Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) methods. Our results showed that the concentration of water extractable, exchangeable and TCLP-Pb all decreased with incubation time. The concentration of water-extractable Pb after 120 days was reduced by 100% when soils were amended with APR, HAP and HAP+OA, and the TCLP-Pb was phosphate was detected at the P:Pb molar ratio 4.0 at the beginning of incubation. Oxalic acid activated phosphates, and so mixing insoluble phosphates with oxalic acid may be a useful strategy to improve their effectiveness in reducing Pb bioavailability.

  9. Plant Adaptation to Acid Soils: The Molecular Basis for Crop Aluminum Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochian, Leon V; Piñeros, Miguel A; Liu, Jiping; Magalhaes, Jurandir V

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity in acid soils is a significant limitation to crop production worldwide, as approximately 50% of the world's potentially arable soil is acidic. Because acid soils are such an important constraint to agriculture, understanding the mechanisms and genes conferring resistance to Al toxicity has been a focus of intense research interest in the decade since the last article on crop acid soil tolerance was published in this journal. An impressive amount of progress has been made during that time that has greatly increased our understanding of the diversity of Al resistance genes and mechanisms, how resistance gene expression is regulated and triggered by Al and Al-induced signals, and how the proteins encoded by these genes function and are regulated. This review examines the state of our understanding of the physiological, genetic, and molecular bases for crop Al tolerance, looking at the novel Al resistance genes and mechanisms that have been identified over the past ten years. Additionally, it examines how the integration of molecular and genetic analyses of crop Al resistance is starting to be exploited for the improvement of crop plants grown on acid soils via both molecular-assisted breeding and biotechnology approaches.

  10. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of carbofuran in acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Pateiro-Moure, Miriam; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2011-06-15

    Carbofuran adsorption and desorption were investigated in batch and stirred flow chamber (SFC) tests. The carbofuran adsorption capacity of the soils was found to be low and strongly dependent on their clay and organic carbon contents. Carbofuran sorption was due mainly (>80%) to fast adsorption processes governed by intraparticle diffusion. The adsorption kinetic constant for the pesticide ranged from 0.047 to 0.195 min(-1) and was highly correlated with constant n in the Freundlich equation (r=0.965, Pcarbofuran desorption to be highly variable and negatively correlated with eCEC and the clay content. The SFC tests showed that soil organic carbon (C) plays a key role in the irreversibility of carbofuran adsorption. Carbofuran desorption increased rapidly at C contents below 4%. The desorption kinetic constant for the compound (0.086-0.195 min(-1)) was generally higher than its adsorption kinetic constant; therefore, carbofuran is more rapidly desorbed than it is adsorbed in soil.

  11. Sulfated Carbon Quantum Dots as Efficient Visible-Light Switchable Acid Catalysts for Room-Temperature Ring-Opening Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Sun, Chenghua; Ali, Muataz; Zhou, Fengling; Zhang, Xinyi; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2015-07-13

    Acid catalytic processes play a classic and important role in modern organic synthesis. How well the acid can be controlled often plays the key role in the controllable synthesis of the products with high conversion yield and selectivity. The preparation of a novel, photo-switchable solid-acid catalyst based on carbon quantum dots is described. The carbon quantum dots are decorated with small amounts of hydrogensulfate groups and thus exhibit a photogenerated acidity that produces a highly efficient acid catalysis of the ring opening of epoxides with methanol and other primary alcohols. This reversible, light-switchable acidity is shown to be due to photoexcitation and charge separation in the carbon quantum dots, which create an electron withdrawing effect from the acidic groups. The catalyst is easily separated by filtration, and we demonstrate multiple cycles of its recovery and reuse.

  12. Impacts of simulated acid rain on recalcitrance of two different soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhongmin; Liu, Xingmei; Wu, Jianjun; Xu, Jianming

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to estimate the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) on recalcitrance in a Plinthudult and a Paleudalfs soil in south China, which were a variable and a permanent charge soil, respectively. Simulated acid rains were prepared at pH 2.0, 3.5, 5.0, and 6.0, by additions of different volumes of H2SO4 plus HNO3 at a ratio of 6 to 1. The leaching period was designed to represent 5 years of local annual rainfall (1,200 mm) with a 33 % surface runoff loss. Both soils underwent both acidification stages of (1) cation exchange and (2) mineral weathering at SAR pH 2.0, whereas only cation exchange occurred above SAR pH 3.5, i.e., weathering did not commence. The cation exchange stage was more easily changed into that of mineral weathering in the Plinthudult than in the Paleudalfs soil, and there were some K(+) and Mg(2+) ions released on the stages of mineral weathering in the Paleudalfs soil. During the leaching, the release of exchangeable base cations followed the order Ca(2+) >K(+) >Mg(2+) >Na(+) for the Plinthudult and Ca(2+) >Mg(2+) >Na(+) >K(+) for the Paleudalfs soil. The SARs above pH 3.5 did not decrease soil pH or pH buffering capacity, while the SAR at pH 2.0 decreased soil pH and the buffering capacity significantly. We conclude that acid rain, which always has a pH from 3.5 to 5.6, only makes a small contribution to the acidification of agricultural soils of south China in the short term of 5 years. Also, Paleudalfs soils are more resistant to acid rain than Plinthudult soils. The different abilities to prevent leaching by acid rain depend upon the parent materials, types of clay minerals, and soil development degrees.

  13. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS induces colitis in mice by forming nano-lipocomplexes with medium-chain-length fatty acids in the colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Laroui

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs, primarily ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are inflammatory disorders caused by multiple factors. Research on IBD has often used the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis mouse model. DSS induces in vivo but not in vitro intestinal inflammation. In addition, no DSS-associated molecule (free glucose, sodium sulfate solution, free dextran induces in vitro or in vivo intestinal inflammation. We find that DSS but not dextran associated molecules established linkages with medium-chain-length fatty acids (MCFAs, such as dodecanoate, that are present in the colonic lumen. DSS complexed to MCFAs forms nanometer-sized vesicles ~200 nm in diameter that can fuse with colonocyte membranes. The arrival of nanometer-sized DSS/MCFA vesicles in the cytoplasm may activate intestinal inflammatory signaling pathways. We also show that the inflammatory activity of DSS is mediated by the dextran moieties. The deleterious effect of DSS is localized principally in the distal colon, therefore it will be important to chemically modify DSS to develop materials beneficial to the colon without affecting colon-targeting specificity.

  14. Role of Low-Molecule-Weight Organic Acids and Their Salts in Regulating Soil pH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-An; ZOU Bi; XIA Han-Ping; DING Yong-Zhen; TAN Wan-Neng; FU Sheng-Lei

    2008-01-01

    The process of organic materials increasing soil pH has not yet been fully understood.This study examined the role of cations and organic anions in regulating soil pH using organic compounds.Calcareous soil,acid soil,and paddy soil were incubated with different simple organic compounds,pH was determined periodically and CO2 emission was also measured.Mixing organic acids with the soil caused an instant decrease of soil pH.The magnitude of pH decrease depended on the initial soil acidity and dissociation degree of the acids.Decomposition of organic acids could only recover the soil pH to about its original level.Mixing organic salts with soil caused an instant increase of soil pH.Decomposition of organic salts of sodium resulted in a steady increase of soil pH,with final soil pH being about 2.7-3.2 pH units over the control.Organic salts with the same anions (citrate) but different cations led to different magnitudes of pH increase,while those having the same cations but different anions led to very similar pH increases.Organic salts of sodium and sodium carbonate caused very similar pH increases of soil when they were added to the acid soil at equimolar concentrations of Na+.The results suggested that cations played a central role in regulating soil pH.Decarboxylation might only consume a limited number of protons.Conversion of organic salts into inorganic salts (carbonate) was possibly responsible for pH increase during their decomposition,suggesting that only those plant residues containing high excess base cations could actually increase soil pH.

  15. Contribution of ants in modifying of soil acidity and particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgun, Alexandra; Golichenkov, Maxim

    2015-04-01

    Being a natural body, formed by the influence of biota on the upper layers of the Earth's crust, the soil is the most striking example of biogenic-abiogenic interactions in the biosphere. Invertebrates (especially ants that build soil nests) are important agents that change soil properties in well developed terrestrial ecosystems. Impact of soil microorganisms on soil properties is particularly described in numerous literature and concerns mainly chemical properties and general indicators of soil biological activity. Influence of ants (as representatives of the soil mesofauna) mostly appears as mechanical movement of soil particles and aggregates, and chemical effects caused by concentration of organic matter within the ant's nest. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of ants on physical and chemical soil attributes such as particle size distribution and soil acidity. The samples were taken from aerial parts of Lasius niger nests, selected on different elements of the relief (summit position, slope, terrace and floodplain) in the Arkhangelsk region (north of the European part of Russia) and compared with the specimens of the upper horizons of the reference soils. Particle size distribution was determined by laser diffraction method using laser diffraction particle size analyzer «Analysette 22 comfort» (FRITSCH, Germany). The acidity (pH) was determined by potentiometry in water suspension. Particle size distribution of the samples from the nests is more variable as compared to the control samples. For example, the content of 5-10 μm fraction ranges from 9% to 12% in reference soils, while in the anthill samples the variation is from 8% to 15%. Similarly, for 50-250 μm fraction - it ranges from 15% to 18% in reference soils, whereas in anthills - from 6% to 29%. The results of particle size analysis showed that the reference sample on the terrace has silty loam texture and nests soil L. niger are medium loam. The reference soil on the slope is

  16. A conceptual framework: Redefining forest soil's critical acid loads under a changing climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNulty, Steven G., E-mail: steve_mcnulty@ncsu.ed [USDA Forest Service, Eastern Forests Environmental Assessment Threats Center, Southern Global Change Program, 920 Main Campus Dr. Suite 300, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Boggs, Johnny L. [USDA Forest Service, Eastern Forests Environmental Assessment Threats Center, Southern Global Change Program, 920 Main Campus Dr. Suite 300, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Federal agencies of several nations have or are currently developing guidelines for critical forest soil acid loads. These guidelines are used to establish regulations designed to maintain atmospheric acid inputs below levels shown to damage forests and streams. Traditionally, when the critical soil acid load exceeds the amount of acid that the ecosystem can absorb, it is believed to potentially impair forest health. The excess over the critical soil acid load is termed the exceedance, and the larger the exceedance, the greater the risk of ecosystem damage. This definition of critical soil acid load applies to exposure of the soil to a single, long-term pollutant (i.e., acidic deposition). However, ecosystems can be simultaneously under multiple ecosystem stresses and a single critical soil acid load level may not accurately reflect ecosystem health risk when subjected to multiple, episodic environmental stress. For example, the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina receive some of the highest rates of acidic deposition in the eastern United States, but these levels are considered to be below the critical acid load (CAL) that would cause forest damage. However, the area experienced a moderate three-year drought from 1999 to 2002, and in 2001 red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) trees in the area began to die in large numbers. The initial survey indicated that the affected trees were killed by the southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm.). This insect is not normally successful at colonizing these tree species because the trees produce large amounts of oleoresin that exclude the boring beetles. Subsequent investigations revealed that long-term acid deposition may have altered red spruce forest structure and function. There is some evidence that elevated acid deposition (particularly nitrogen) reduced tree water uptake potential, oleoresin production, and caused the trees to become more susceptible to insect colonization during the drought period

  17. [Effects of different tillage methods on phospholipid fatty acids and enzyme activities in calcareous cinnamon soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xue-Xia; Dang, Jian-You; Zhang, Ding-Yi; Wang, Jiao-Ai; Zhang, Jing

    2014-08-01

    In order to study changes of physical and chemical characteristics and microbial activities in soil under different tillage methods, effects of four tillage methods, rotary tillage (RT), subsoil tillage (ST), conventional tillage (CT) with corn straw returned to soil, and rotary tillage with no corn straw returned to soil (CK), on phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) characteristics and hydrolase enzymes activities in calcareous cinnamon soil were investigated. The results showed that soil hydrolase enzymes activities, nutrient contents, microbial diversity varied greatly with the different tillage methods. Returning corn straw to soil increased the kinds, amount of soil total PLFAs, bacteria PLFAs and actonomycetes PLFAs, while decreased the fungi PLFAs, indicating that fungi was more adaptable than bacteria to an infertile environment. ST and CT resulted in higher amounts of total PLFAs, which were 74.7% and 53.3% higher than that of CK, indicating they were more beneficial to the growth of plants. They could also improve soil physical and chemical properties, increase alk-phosphatase, protease and urease activities, which would provide a favorable soil condition for high and stable crop yields.

  18. Toxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid towards earthworm and enzymatic activities in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenxiang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread persistent organic contaminant in the environment that has recently raised much of regulatory and public concern. Therefore, assessment of its ecological risk is a top priority research. Hence, this study investigated the toxicity of PFOA to beneficial microbial processes in the soil such as activities of dehydrogenase, urease and potential nitrification in addition to earthworm survival, weight loss and PFOA bioaccumulation in two contrasting soils. In general, PFOA caused inhibition of all the measured microbial processes in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibition was higher in Williamtown (WT) soil than Edinburgh (EB) soil. Thus, WT soil being sandy in nature with low clay content showed higher PFOA bioavailability and hence showed higher toxicity. There was no mortality in earthworms exposed up to 100 mg PFOA/kilogram soil in both the soils; however, there was a significant weight loss from 25 mg/kg onwards. This study clearly demonstrates that soil contamination of PFOA can lead to adverse effects on soil health.

  19. Regional trends in soil acidification and exchangeable metal concentrations in relation to acid deposition rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Carly J; Dise, Nancy B; Gowing, David J

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of high levels of reactive nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S), or the legacy of that deposition, remain among the world's most important environmental problems. Although regional impacts of acid deposition in aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, quantitative evidence of wide-scale impacts on terrestrial ecosystems is not common. In this study we analysed surface and subsoil chemistry of 68 acid grassland sites across the UK along a gradient of acid deposition, and statistically related the concentrations of exchangeable soil metals (1 M KCl extraction) to a range of potential drivers. The deposition of N, S or acid deposition was the primary correlate for 8 of 13 exchangeable metals measured in the topsoil and 5 of 14 exchangeable metals in the subsoil. In particular, exchangeable aluminium and lead both show increased levels above a soil pH threshold of about 4.5, strongly related to the deposition flux of acid compounds.

  20. Distribution patterns of phthalic acid esters in soil particle-size fractions determine biouptake in soil-cereal crop systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenbing; Zhang, Yuan; He, Xiaosong; Xi, Beidou; Gao, Rutai; Mao, Xuhui; Huang, Caihong; Zhang, Hui; Li, Dan; Liang, Qiong; Cui, Dongyu; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2016-08-01

    The use of wastewater irrigation for food crops can lead to presence of bioavailable phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in soils, which increase the potential for human exposure and adverse carcinogenic and non-cancer health effects. This study presents the first investigation of the occurrence and distribution of PAEs in a maize-wheat double-cropping system in a wastewater-irrigated area in the North China Plain. PAE levels in maize and wheat were found to be mainly attributed to PAE stores in soil coarse (250–2000 μm) and fine sand (53–250 μm) fractions. Soil particle-size fractions with higher bioavailability (i.e., coarse and fine sands) showed greater influence on PAE congener bioconcentration factors compared to PAE molecular structures for both maize and wheat tissues. More PAEs were allocated to maize and wheat grains with increased soil PAE storages from wastewater irrigation. Additional findings showed that levels of both non-cancer and carcinogenic risk for PAE congeners in wheat were higher than those in maize, suggesting that wheat food security should be prioritized. In conclusion, increased soil PAE concentrations specifically in maize and wheat grains indicate that wastewater irrigation can pose a contamination threat to food resources.

  1. [Release of Si, Al and Fe in red soil under simulated acid rain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Song, Cun-yi; Li, Fa-sheng

    2007-10-01

    bstract:A laboratory leaching experiment on simulated acid rain was carried out using soil columns. The release of Si, Al and Fe from soils and pH values of eluates were investigated. The results showed that under the given leaching volume, the release amounts of cations were influenced by the pH value of simulated acid rain, while their response to acid rain was different. Acid rain led to Si release, nearly none of Fe. Within the range from pH 3.0 to 5.6, a little Al release but mass Al only release at the pH below 3.0, both Si and Al had a declining release ability with the undergoing eluviation. At pH 2.5, the release amounts of Si and Al, especially Al, increased significantly with the strengthened weathering process of soil mineral. With an increase of the leaching amount of acid rain, the release of Si and Al increased, but acceleration of Si was slower than Al which was slower and slower. When the soil pH falling down to a certain grade, there are negative correlation between pH and both Al and DOC concentration of eluate. released, but most of Al derived from the aluminosilicates dissolved. Acid deposition can result in solid-phase alumino-organics broken and Al released, but most of Al derived from the aluminosilicates dissolved.

  2. Assessing the effects of soil liming with dolomitic limestone and sugar foam on soil acidity, leaf nutrient contents, grape yield and must quality in a Mediterranean vineyard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olego, M.A.; Visconti, F.; Quiroga, M.J.; Paz, J.M. De; Garzón-Jimeno, E.

    2016-11-01

    Aluminium toxicity has been recognized as one of the most common causes of reduced grape yields in vineyard acid soils. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two liming materials, i.e. dolomitic lime and sugar foam, on a vineyard cultivated in an acid soil. The effects were studied in two soil layers (0-30 and 30-60 cm), as well as on leaf nutrient contents, must quality properties and grape yield, in an agricultural soil dedicated to Vitis vinifera L. cv. ‘Mencía’ cultivation. Data management and analysis were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). As liming material, sugar foam was more efficient than dolomitic limestone because sugar foam promoted the highest decrease in soil acidity properties at the same calcium carbonate equivalent dose. However, potassium contents in vines organs, including leaves and berries, seemed to decrease as a consequence of liming, with a concomitant increase in must total acidity. Soil available phosphorus also decreased as a consequence of liming, especially with sugar foam, though no effects were observed in plants. For these reasons fertilization of this soil with K and P is recommended along with liming. Grape yields in limed soils increased, although non-significantly, by 30%. This research has therefore provided an important opportunity to advance in our understanding of the effects of liming on grape quality and production in acid soils. (Author)

  3. Transformation of acetate carbon into carbohydrate and amino acid metabilites during decomposition in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Paul, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Carbon-14-labelled acetate was added to a heavy clay soil of pH 7.6 to study the transformation of acetate carbon into carbohydrate and amino acid metabolites during decomposition. The acetate was totally metabolized after 6 days of incubation at 25°C when 70% of the labelled carbon had been...... evolved as CO2. Maximum incorporation of trace-C into the various organic fractions was observed after 4 days when 19% of residual, labelled carbon in the soil was located in carbohydrates, 29 % in amino acids and 21 % in the insoluble residue of the soil. The curves showing the amounts of labelled carbon...... located in carbohydrates and amino acid metabolites show a curvilinear form during the first 30 days of incubation, indicating a variety of chemical compounds decaying at different rates. After this time, the decay curves became straight lines indicating a greater homogeneity of the metabolites. After 200...

  4. Organic Carbon Stabilization of Soils Formed on Acidic and Calcareous Bedrocks in Neotropical Alpine Grassland, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Songyu; Cammeraat, Erik; Jansen, Boris; Cerli, Chiara; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence shows that Neotropical alpine ecosystems are vulnerable to global change. Since soils in the alpine grasslands of the Peruvian Andean region have large soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, profound understanding of soil organic matter (OM) stabilization mechanisms will improve the prediction of the feedback between SOC stocks and global change. It is well documented that poor-crystalline minerals and organo-metallic complexes significantly contribute to the OM stabilization in volcanic ash soils, including those in the Andean region. However, limited research has focused on non-ash soils that also express significant SOC accumulation. A pilot study of Peruvian Andean grassland soils suggests that lithology is a prominent factor for such carbon accumulation. As a consequence of contrasting mineral composition and pedogenic processes in soils formed on different non-volcanic parent materials, differences in OM stabilization mechanisms may be profound and consequently may respond differently to global change. Therefore, our study aims at a further understanding of carbon stocks and OM stabilization mechanisms in soils formed on contrasting bedrocks in the Peruvian Andes. The main objective is to identify and compare the roles that organo-mineral associations and aggregations play in OM stabilization, by a combination of selective extraction methods and fractionations based on density, particle size and aggregates size. Soil samples were collected from igneous acidic and calcareous sedimentary bedrocks in alpine grassland near Cajamarca, Peru (7.17°S, 78.63°W), at around 3700m altitude. Samples were taken from 3 plots per bedrock type by sampling distinguishable horizons until the C horizons were reached. Outcomes confirmed that both types of soil accumulate large amounts of carbon: 405.3±41.7 t/ha of calcareous bedrock soil and 226.0±5.6 t/ha of acidic bedrock soil respectively. In addition, extremely high carbon contents exceeding 90g carbon per

  5. Dethiosulfatibacter aminovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thiosulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from coastal marine sediment via sulfate-reducing enrichment with Casamino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takii, Susumu; Hanada, Satoshi; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Ueno, Yutaka; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Ibe, Akihiro; Matsuura, Katsumi

    2007-10-01

    A sulfate-reducing enrichment culture originating from coastal marine sediment of the eutrophic Tokyo Bay, Japan, was successfully established with Casamino acids as a substrate. A thiosulfate reducer, strain C/G2(T), was isolated from the enrichment culture after further enrichment with glutamate. Cells of strain C/G2(T) were non-motile rods (0.6-0.8 microm x 2.2-4.8 microm) and were found singly or in pairs and sometimes in short chains. Spores were not formed. Cells of strain C/G2(T) stained Gram-negatively, despite possessing Gram-positive cell walls. The optimum temperature for growth was 28-30 degrees C, the optimum pH was around 7.8 and the optimum salt concentration was 20-30 g l(-1). Lactate, pyruvate, serine, cysteine, threonine, glutamate, histidine, lysine, arginine, Casamino acids, peptone and yeast extract were fermented as single substrates and no sugar was used as a fermentative substrate. A Stickland reaction was observed with some pairs of amino acids. Fumarate, alanine, proline, phenylalanine, tryptophan, glutamine and aspartate were utilized only in the presence of thiosulfate. Strain C/G2(T) fermented glutamate to H2, CO2, acetate and propionate. Thiosulfate and elemental sulfur were reduced to sulfide. Sulfate, sulfite and nitrate were not utilized as electron acceptors. The growth of strain C/G2(T) on Casamino acids or glutamate was enhanced by co-culturing with Desulfovibrio sp. isolated from the original mixed culture enriched with Casamino acids. The DNA G+C content of strain C/G2(T) was 41.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain C/G2(T) formed a distinct cluster with species of the genus Sedimentibacter. The closest relative was Sedimentibacter hydroxybenzoicus (with a gene sequence similarity of 91 %). On the basis of its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain C/G2(T) (=JCM 13356(T)=NBRC 101112(T)=DSM 17477(T)) is proposed as representing a new genus and novel species, Dethiosulfatibacter

  6. A conceptual framework: redefining forest soil's critical acid loads under a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Steven G; Boggs, Johnny L

    2010-06-01

    Federal agencies of several nations have or are currently developing guidelines for critical forest soil acid loads. These guidelines are used to establish regulations designed to maintain atmospheric acid inputs below levels shown to damage forests and streams. Traditionally, when the critical soil acid load exceeds the amount of acid that the ecosystem can absorb, it is believed to potentially impair forest health. The excess over the critical soil acid load is termed the exceedance, and the larger the exceedance, the greater the risk of ecosystem damage. This definition of critical soil acid load applies to exposure of the soil to a single, long-term pollutant (i.e., acidic deposition). However, ecosystems can be simultaneously under multiple ecosystem stresses and a single critical soil acid load level may not accurately reflect ecosystem health risk when subjected to multiple, episodic environmental stress. For example, the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina receive some of the highest rates of acidic deposition in the eastern United States, but these levels are considered to be below the critical acid load (CAL) that would cause forest damage. However, the area experienced a moderate three-year drought from 1999 to 2002, and in 2001 red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) trees in the area began to die in large numbers. The initial survey indicated that the affected trees were killed by the southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm.). This insect is not normally successful at colonizing these tree species because the trees produce large amounts of oleoresin that exclude the boring beetles. Subsequent investigations revealed that long-term acid deposition may have altered red spruce forest structure and function. There is some evidence that elevated acid deposition (particularly nitrogen) reduced tree water uptake potential, oleoresin production, and caused the trees to become more susceptible to insect colonization during the drought period

  7. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizers on Movement and Transformation of Phosphorus in an Acid Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Zhen-Yu; ZHOU Jian-Min; WANG Huo-Yan; DU Chang-Wen; CHEN Xiao-Qin

    2005-01-01

    The effects of two different nitrogen fertilizers (urea and NH4Cl) with monocalcium phosphate (MCP) on the movement and transformation of fertilizer P in soil microsites along with soil pH changes at different distances from the fertilizer application site were studied in an incubation experiment. A highly acidic red soil (Ultisol, pH 4.57) from south China with MCP fertilizer alone or in combination with NH4Cl or urea was added to the surface of soil cylinders and packed in wax blocks. After 7 and 28 days, the extraction and analysis of each 2 mm layer from the interface of the soil and fertilizer showed that added NH4Cl or urea did not change the movement distance of fertilizer P. However, P transformation was significantly affected (P < 0.05). After 7 days, at 0-8 mm distance from the fertilizer site the addition of urea significantly decreased the water-extractable P concentration; however, after 28 days the effect of N addition had disappeared. Also,at limited distances close to the fertilizer site NH4Cl application with MCP significantly increased acid-extractable P and available P, while with the addition of urea they significantly decreased. Compared with application of MCP alone,addition of urea significantly increased soil pH in fertilizer microsites, whereas the addition of NH4Cl significantly decreased soil pH.

  8. Ion activity and distribution of heavy metals in acid mine drainage polluted subtropical soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yongtao [College of Natural Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, 510642 Guangzhou (China); Laboratoire de Geochimie des Eaux, Universite Paris-Diderot - IPGP, Case 7052, Batiment Lamarck, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Becquer, Thierry [UMR 137 Biodiversite et Fonctionnement des Sols, IRD/Universites Paris VI and XII, SupAgro - Bat. 12, 2 Place Viala, 34060 Montpellier Cedex 2 (France); Dai Jun [College of Natural Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, 510642 Guangzhou (China); Quantin, Cecile [UMR 8148 IDES, Universite Paris Sud XI - CNRS, Bat. 504, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Benedetti, Marc F. [Laboratoire de Geochimie des Eaux, Universite Paris-Diderot - IPGP, Case 7052, Batiment Lamarck, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)], E-mail: benedetti@ipgp.fr

    2009-04-15

    The oxidative dissolution of mine wastes gives rise to acidic, metal-enriched mine drainage (AMD) and has typically posed an additional risk to the environment. The poly-metallic mine Dabaoshan in South China is an excellent test site to understand the processes affecting the surrounding polluted agricultural fields. Our objectives were firstly to investigate metal ion activity in soil solution, distribution in solid constituents, and spatial distribution in samples, secondly to determine dominant environment factors controlling metal activity in the long-term AMD-polluted subtropical soils. Soil Column Donnan Membrane Technology (SC-DMT) combined with sequential extraction shows that unusually large proportion of the metal ions are present as free ion in the soil solutions. The narrow range of low pH values prevents any pH effects during the binding onto oxides or organic matter. The differences in speciation of the soil solutions may explain the different soil degradation observed between paddy and non-paddy soils. - First evidence of the real free metal ion concentrations in acid mine drainage context in tropical systems.

  9. Studies on bile acid and bilirubin in liver diseases Part 2. Clinical significance of serum bilirubin sulfate in various liver diseases

    OpenAIRE

    石川, 泰祐

    1980-01-01

    The clinical significance of serum bilirubin sulfate, one of the direct bilirubin, was evaluated in various liver diseases with over 2 mg/dl of serum bilirubin concentration. The diagnosis included 25 cases of acute hepatitis, 8 cases of chronic hepatitis, 8 cases of liver cirrhosis and 16 cases of liver cirrhosis with hepatoma. Bilirubin sulfate was fractioned by Yonei's solvent partition method. The clinical significance of bilirubin sulfate was assessed by comparison of bilirubin sulfate w...

  10. Back to Acid Soil Fields: The Citrate Transporter SbMATE Is a Major Asset for Sustainable Grain Yield for Sorghum Cultivated on Acid Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Geraldo; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; Malosetti, Marcos; Viana, Joao Herbert Moreira; Menezes, Cicero Bezerra; Silva, Lidianne Assis; Guimaraes, Claudia Teixeira; Coelho, Antonio Marcos; Kochian, Leon V; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Magalhaes, Jurandir Vieira

    2015-12-17

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity damages plant roots and limits crop production on acid soils, which comprise up to 50% of the world's arable lands. A major Al tolerance locus on chromosome 3, AltSB, controls aluminum tolerance in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] via SbMATE, an Al-activated plasma membrane transporter that mediates Al exclusion from sensitive regions in the root apex. As is the case with other known Al tolerance genes, SbMATE was cloned based on studies conducted under controlled environmental conditions, in nutrient solution. Therefore, its impact on grain yield on acid soils remains undetermined. To determine the real world impact of SbMATE, multi-trait quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in hydroponics, and, in the field, revealed a large-effect QTL colocalized with the Al tolerance locus AltSB, where SbMATE lies, conferring a 0.6 ton ha(-1) grain yield increase on acid soils. A second QTL for Al tolerance in hydroponics, where the positive allele was also donated by the Al tolerant parent, SC283, was found on chromosome 9, indicating the presence of distinct Al tolerance genes in the sorghum genome, or genes acting in the SbMATE pathway leading to Al-activated citrate release. There was no yield penalty for AltSB, consistent with the highly localized Al regulated SbMATE expression in the root tip, and Al-dependent transport activity. A female effect of 0.5 ton ha(-1) independently demonstrated the effectiveness of AltSB in hybrids. Al tolerance conferred by AltSB is thus an indispensable asset for sorghum production and food security on acid soils, many of which are located in developing countries.

  11. Back to Acid Soil Fields: The Citrate Transporter SbMATE Is a Major Asset for Sustainable Grain Yield for Sorghum Cultivated on Acid Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Carvalho Jr

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity damages plant roots and limits crop production on acid soils, which comprise up to 50% of the world’s arable lands. A major Al tolerance locus on chromosome 3, AltSB, controls aluminum tolerance in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench] via SbMATE, an Al-activated plasma membrane transporter that mediates Al exclusion from sensitive regions in the root apex. As is the case with other known Al tolerance genes, SbMATE was cloned based on studies conducted under controlled environmental conditions, in nutrient solution. Therefore, its impact on grain yield on acid soils remains undetermined. To determine the real world impact of SbMATE, multi-trait quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping in hydroponics, and, in the field, revealed a large-effect QTL colocalized with the Al tolerance locus AltSB, where SbMATE lies, conferring a 0.6 ton ha–1 grain yield increase on acid soils. A second QTL for Al tolerance in hydroponics, where the positive allele was also donated by the Al tolerant parent, SC283, was found on chromosome 9, indicating the presence of distinct Al tolerance genes in the sorghum genome, or genes acting in the SbMATE pathway leading to Al-activated citrate release. There was no yield penalty for AltSB, consistent with the highly localized Al regulated SbMATE expression in the root tip, and Al-dependent transport activity. A female effect of 0.5 ton ha–1 independently demonstrated the effectiveness of AltSB in hybrids. Al tolerance conferred by AltSB is thus an indispensable asset for sorghum production and food security on acid soils, many of which are located in developing countries.

  12. Influence of Biomass Burning on Temporal and Diurnal Variations of Acidic Gases, Particulate Nitrate, and Sulfate in a Tropical Urban Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailesh N. Behera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the temporal and diurnal distributions of atmospheric acidic gases (sulphur dioxide (SO2, nitrous acid (HONO, and nitric acid (HNO3 and those of particulate nitrate (NO3- and sulfate (SO42- through a comprehensive field campaign during the largest smoke haze episode in Singapore, a representative country in Southeast Asia (SEA. To identify the atmospheric behavior of these pollutants during the smoke haze period, the data generated from the measurement campaign were divided into three distinct periods: prehaze, during haze, and posthaze periods. The 24 hr average data indicated that ambient SO2, HONO, and HNO3 during the smoke haze episodes increased by a factor ranging from 1.2 to 2.6 compared to those during the prehaze and posthaze periods. Similarly, in the case of particulates SO42- and NO3-, the factor ranged from 2.3 to 4.2. Backward air trajectories were constructed and used to find the sources of biomass burning to the recurring smoke haze in this region. The air trajectory analysis showed that the smoke haze episodes experienced in Singapore were influenced by transboundary air pollution, caused by severe biomass burning events in the islands of Indonesia.

  13. Soil washing of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge using acids and ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid chelating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitipour, Saeid; Ahmadi, Soheil; Madadian, Edris; Ardestani, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of soil washing in the removal of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge samples collected from Pond 2 of the Tehran Oil Refinery was investigated. These metals are considered as hazardous substances for human health and the environment. The carcinogenicity of chromate dust has been established for a long time. Cadmium is also a potential environmental toxicant. This study was carried out by collecting sludge samples from different locations in Pond 2. Soil washing was conducted to treat the samples. Chemical agents, such as acetic acid, ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) and hydrochloric acid, were used as washing solutions to remove chromium and cadmium from sludge samples. The results of this study indicated that the highest removal efficiencies from the sludge samples were achieved using a 0.3 M HCl solution with 82.69% and 74.47% for chromium and cadmium, respectively. EDTA (0.1 M) in the best condition extracted 66.81% of cadmium and 72.52% of chromium from the sludges. The lowest efficiency values for the samples, however, were achieved using 3 M acetic acid with 41.7% and 46.96% removals for cadmium and chromium, respectively. The analysis of washed sludge indicated that the heavy metals removal decreased in the order of 3 M acetic acid acid appears to offer a greater potential as a washing agent in remediating the sludge samples.

  14. Application of alkaline waste from pulp industry to acid soil with pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pértile

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil extensive areas are covered with pine forests, planted for pulp and paper production. This industry generates solid alkaline waste, such as dregs. The application of this dregs to forest soils is an alternative for soil acidity correction and plant nutrient supply, as well as a solution for its proper disposal. The purpose of this study was to compare the residual effect of surface application of dregs and dolomitic lime on (a changes in the physical and chemical properties of an acidic soil and (b pine tree development. The experiment was carried out in 2004 in Bocaina do Sul, Santa Catarina, consisting of the application of increasing dreg and lime rates to a Pinus taeda L. production area, on a Humic Cambisol, in a randomized block design with four replications and 10 x 10 m plots. The treatments consisted of levels of soil acidity amendments corresponding to the recommendations by the SMP method to reach pH 5.5 in the 0-20 cm layer, as follows: no soil amendment; dregs at 5.08 (1/4 SMP, 10.15 (1/2 SMP and 20.3 Mg ha-1 (1 SMP; and lime at 8.35 (1/2 SMP and 16.7 Mg ha-1 (1 SMP. Soil layers were sampled in 2010 for analyses of soil chemical and physical properties. The diameter at breast height of the 6.5 year old pine trees was also evaluated. Surface application of dregs improved soil chemical fertility by reducing acidity and increasing base saturation, similar to liming, especially in surface layers. Dregs, comparable to lime, reduced the degree of clay flocculation, but did not affect the soil physical quality. There was no effect of the amendments on increase in pine tree diameter. Thus, the alternative to raise the pH in forest soils to 5.5 with dregs is promising for the forestry sector with a view to dispose of the waste and increase soil fertility.

  15. Phospholipid Fatty Acid Profiles of Chinese Red Soils with Varying Fertility Levels and Land Use Histories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) was used to estimate the microbial community structures of eight Chinese red soils with different fertility levels and land use histories.The total amounts of PLFAs in the soils were significantly correlated with soil organic carbon,total nitrogen,microbial biomass C and basal respiration,indicating that total PLFA was closely related to fertility and sustalnability in these highly weathered soils.Soils for the eroded wasteland were rich in Gram-positive species.When the eroded soils were planted with citrus trees,the soil microbial population had changed little in 4 years but took up to 8~12 years before it reached a significantly different population.Multivariate analysis of PLFAs demonstrated that land use history and plant cover type had a significant impact on microbial community structure.However,the difference of soil microbial community structure in the paddy field compared to other land uses was not larger than expected in this experiment.

  16. Active ammonia oxidizers in an acidic soil are phylogenetically closely related to neutrophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baozhan; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Wang, Dongmei; He, Yuanqiu; Jia, Zhongjun

    2014-03-01

    All cultivated ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the Nitrososphaera cluster (former soil group 1.1b) are neutrophilic. Molecular surveys also indicate the existence of Nitrososphaera-like phylotypes in acidic soil, but their ecological roles are poorly understood. In this study, we present molecular evidence for the chemolithoautotrophic growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in an acidic soil with pH 4.92 using DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). Soil microcosm incubations demonstrated that nitrification was stimulated by urea fertilization and accompanied by a significant increase in the abundance of AOA rather than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Real-time PCR analysis of amoA genes as a function of the buoyant density of the DNA gradient following the ultracentrifugation of the total DNA extracted from SIP microcosms indicated a substantial growth of soil AOA during nitrification. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes in the "heavy" DNA fractions suggested that archaeal communities were labeled to a much greater extent than soil AOB. Acetylene inhibition further showed that (13)CO2 assimilation by nitrifying communities depended solely on ammonia oxidation activity, suggesting a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle. Phylogenetic analysis of both (13)C-labeled amoA and 16S rRNA genes revealed that most of the active AOA were phylogenetically closely related to the neutrophilic strains Nitrososphaera viennensis EN76 and JG1 within the Nitrososphaera cluster. Our results provide strong evidence for the adaptive growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in acidic soil, suggesting a greater metabolic versatility of soil AOA than previously appreciated.

  17. Gulf of Bothnia receives high concentrations of potentially toxic metals from acid sulphate soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, M.; Aastroem, M. [Kalmar Univ., Kalmar (Sweden)

    2006-07-01

    An estimated 460000 ha of acid sulphate soil (AS soil) occur within the river catchments bordering the Gulf of Bothnia in Finland and Sweden. This soil type exists because extensive areas of sulphide-bearing Holocene sediments have been drained for agricultural purposes, resulting in oxidation of metal sulphides to sulphuric acid and the concomitant formation of these acidic, environmentally-unfriendly soils. The aim of this study was to compare median values of metal concentrations in rivers discharging into the Gulf of Bothnia and obtain a uniform picture of to what extent these rivers are affected by AS-soil leaching. Dissolved element concentrations for arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were determined in 47 rivers (catchment size > 500 km2) discharging into Gulf of Bothnia (a few into Gulf of Finland) along the coastline of Finland and Sweden. Water chemistry data was obtained from the Environmental Information System (HERTTA) database at the Finnish Environment Institute, the publicly available online database at Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Environmental Assessment, and from a previous study of the authors. One area in central-western Finland proved to have highly elevated concentrations of Cd, Ni and Zn, and they all occurred with a similar spatial pattern and had the highest concentrations in rivers Teuvanjoki and Maalahdenjoki. This is caused by AS-soil leaching. The metalloid As and the metals Cr, Fe, Pb did not display this pattern and are, therefore, in line with previous studies, not leached abundantly from the AS soils, although they overall occur at somewhat higher concentrations in the Finnish as compared with those in the Swedish rivers. Thorough planning of land-use operations (e.g. land reclamation through ditching, dredging of rivers and estuaries, etc.) in AS-soil landscapes should be necessary, which is currently not the case, to reduce the high

  18. Serum amino acids profile and the beneficial effects of L-arginine or L-glutamine supplementation in dextran sulfate sodium colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenkai Ren

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate serum amino acids profile in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis, and impacts of graded dose of arginine or glutamine supplementation on the colitis. Using DSS-induced colitis model, which is similar to human ulcerative colitis, we determined serum profile of amino acids at day 3, 7, 10 and 12 (5 days post DSS treatment. Meanwhile, effects of graded dose of arginine (0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.5% or glutamine (0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% supplementation on clinical parameters, serum amino acids, colonic tight junction proteins, colonic anti-oxidative indicators [catalase, total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px], colonic pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α] in DSS-induced colitis were fully analyzed at day 7 and 12. Additionally, the activation of signal transduction pathways, including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK, phosphoinositide-3-kinases (PI3K/PI3K-protein kinase B (Akt, and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK-myosin light chain (MLC20, were analyzed using immunoblotting. Serum amino acids analysis showed that DSS treatment changed the serum contents of amino acids, such as Trp, Glu, and Gln (P<0.05. Dietary arginine or glutamine supplementation had significant (P<0.05 influence on the clinical and biochemical parameters (T-SOD, IL-17 and TNF-α in colitis model. These results were associated with colonic NF-κB, PI3K-Akt and MLCK signaling pathways. In conclusion, arginine or glutamine could be a potential therapy for intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  19. [Effects of thiourea on pH and availability of metal ions in acid red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Wen; Zeng, Qing-Ru; Zhou, Xi-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Through the simulation research, the effects of application of thiourea and urea on pH and availability of metal ions in acid red soil were studied, and the results showed that after applying urea, the soil pH increased in the first experimental stage and then reduced gradually to a low level, however, decreased trends of soil pH values were inhibited by the application of thiourea, especially when the concentration of thiourea reached to 5.0 mmol x kg(-1) dry soil, the soil pH was stable at high level, which exceeded to 6.0. It proved that the application of thiourea could inhibit the soil acidification due to urea application. After applying urea with different concentrations of thiourea, the available contents of Zn and Al decreased with the increasing concentration of thiourea, nevertheless, when the concentration of thiourea reached to 5.0 mmol x kg(-1), the available content of Mn was stable at high level which was over 110 mg x kg(-1). In addition, the results showed a highly significant negative correlation between the soil pH and the available content of Cu, Zn and Al, but for Mn, no discipline was found between the soil pH and the availability after applying thiourea. Moreover, the soil pH became higher after applying urea with thiourea compared to add urea only, which led to the decreasing of available content of Al, and it was benefited for the control of the phytotoxic effect of Al. The available content of Mn in the soil not only depended on soil pH but also the content of thiourea due to its redox and complexing reaction with Mn.

  20. Development of Sorghum Tolerant to Acid Soil Using Induced Mutation with Gamma Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Human

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity still becomes a problem in some dryland agricultural areas in Indonesia. Development of dryland farming system may be focused on crops that are required less water such as sorghum. Sorghum is a cereal crop that is usually grown under hot and dry condition and it is ideal for Indonesia. Sorghum is a good source of food, animal feed and raw material for ethanol. Indonesia is currently looking for alternative renewable energy resources and sorghum is regarded as one of the promising source of bioethanol as bioenergy. Unfortunately, most agricultural land in western part of the country particularly in Sumatera and Kalimantan is dryland and dominated by acid soil. The main constraint of crop production in acid soil is deficiency and Al toxicity. Therefore, development of sorghum cultivation in dryland farming system requires a variety which is tolerant to such conditions. Sorghum breeding for acid soil tolerance had been conducted at PATIR-BATAN by using induced mutations with gamma irradiation. The breeding objective was to search for sorghum genotypes tolerant to acid soil condition and with regard to sorghum use for bioethanol production. A number of 66 breeding materials, including the mutants, had been screened for acid soil tolerance on land with soil pH of 4.2 and 39% Al saturation in Lampung Province. Ten sorghum genotypes had been identified as high yielding in the acid soil condition. The mutant lines GH-ZB-41-07, YT30-39-07, B-76 and B-92 had grain yield higher (>4.5 t/ha than the control plants (Durra, Mandau and Numbu. Sorghum mutants ZH30-29-07, ZH30-30-07 and ZH30-35-07 were promising for grain-base bioethanol production with ethanol yield exceeded 2,000 l/ha. Meanwhile, the sweet sorghum mutants ZH30-35-07, ZH30-30-07 and ZH30-29-07 had brix content of 11.59, 11.95 and 10.50%, respectively. These mutant lines are promising to be developed further in sorghum breeding since they are highly tolerant to acid soils.

  1. Acidity Regimes of Soils Under Different Vegetations in the Changbai Mountains Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUTIANREN; GAOZIQIN; 等

    1997-01-01

    The acidity regimes of representative soils on the north slope of the Changbai Mountains were examined through determinations of pH and pCa of the soil paste as well as in-situ determinations,For soils under broad-leaf forest or broad-leaf-Korean pine forest,the pH decreased from the litte to lower layers gradually until it did not change or decreased further slightly .For soils under coniferous of Erans birch forest,ther was a minimum in pH at a depth of 3-6 cm where the content of humus was high,The pCa increased gradually from the soil surface downward to a constant value.The lime potential(pH-0.5pCa) showed a similar trend as the pH in its distribution.For a given soil,the measured pH value of the thick paste,ranging from 4.5 to 5.5,was lower by about 0.5 units than the value determined by the conventional method with a water to soil ratio of 5:1 ,The pH determined in situ was even lower.It was found that there was a firly close relationship between soil acidity and the type of vegetation.The pH showed a trend of decreasing from soils under broda-leaf forest through broad-leaf-conifer mixed rorest and coniferos forest to Ermans birch forest,and the pCa showed an opposite trend in variation.

  2. Effects of simulated acid rain on soil and soil solution chemistry in a monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qingyan; Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-05-01

    Acid rain is an environmental problem of increasing concern in China. In this study, a laboratory leaching column experiment with acid forest soil was set up to investigate the responses of soil and soil solution chemistry to simulated acid rain (SAR). Five pH levels of SAR were set: 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, and 4.5 (as a control, CK). The results showed that soil acidification would occur when the pH of SAR was ≤3.5. The concentrations of NO₃(-)and Ca(2+) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR fell 3.5. The concentration of SO₄(2-) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR was acidity of SAR. The releases of soluble Al and Fe were SAR pH dependent, and their net exports under pH 2.5 treatment were 19.6 and 5.5 times, respectively, higher than that under CK. The net export of DOC was reduced by 12-29% under SAR treatments as compared to CK. Our results indicate the chemical constituents in the soil are more sensitive to SAR than those in the soil solution, and the effects of SAR on soil solution chemistry depend not only on the intensity of SAR but also on the duration of SAR addition. The soil and soil solution chemistry in this region may not be affected by current precipitation (pH≈4.5) in short term, but the soil and soil leachate chemistry may change dramatically if the pH of precipitation were below 3.5 and 3.0, respectively.

  3. Agronomic Potential of Partially Acidulated Rock Phosphates in Acid Soils of Subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONGLI-MING; B.TRUONG; 等

    1995-01-01

    A glasshouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the agronomic potential of four partially acidulated rock phosphates(PARP) in three representative solis sampled from subtripical China.The PARPs were manufactured by attacking a moderately reactive phosphate rock either with sulfuric acid alone or with combination of sulfuric and phosphoric acids at 30 or 60 percent of acidulation.Shoot dry weight and P accumulation of six successive cuttings of ryegrass were used to compare the agronomic potential of these fertilizers with that of the raw rock phosphate(RP) and monocalcium phosphate (MCP).Results indicated that the effectiveness of various phosphates was determined both by the solubility of the phosphates and by the acidity and P-fixing capacity of the soils.The higher the watersoluble P contained,the better the effectiveness of the fertilizer was.Although plant P accumulation of PARP treatments was constantly lower than that of MCP treatment,some PARPs could still get a dry matter production similar to that of MCP treatment.PARP SP60,which was acidulated with a mixture of sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid at 60 percent of acidulation and contained the highest soluble,P,was as effective as MCP in terms of dry matter production on all the soils.S60 and C1 which were both acidulated with sulfuric acid with the former at 60 percent of acidulation and the latter at 30 percent but with a further addition of monoammonium phosphate,were more than 80 percent as efective as MCP,Raw RP also showed a reasonable effectiveness which increased with soil acidity.It was suggested from the study that some of these APRPs could be expected to have a comparable field performance as soluble P fertilizers in the acid soil regions.

  4. SMASS - a simulation model of physical and chemical processes in acid sulphate soils; Version 2.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, van den H.; Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Groenenberg, J.E.; Ritsema, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Simulation Model for Acid Sulphate Soils (SMASS) has been developed to predict the effects of water management strategies on acidification and de-acidification in areas with acid sulphate soils. It has submodels for solute transport, chemistry, oxygen transport and pyrite oxidation. The model mu

  5. Climate dependency of tree growth suppressed by acid deposition effects on soils in Northwest Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, G.B.; Lapenis, A.G.; Berggren, D.; Aparin, B.F.; Smith, K.T.; Shortle, W.C.; Bailey, S.W.; Varlyguin, D.L.; Babikov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Increased tree growth in temperate and boreal forests has been proposed as a direct consequence of a warming climate. Acid deposition effects on nutrient availability may influence the climate dependency of tree growth, however. This study presents an analysis of archived soil samples that has enabled changes in soil chemistry to be tracked with patterns of tree growth through the 20th century. Soil samples collected in 1926, 1964, and 2001, near St. Petersburg, Russia, showed that acid deposition was likely to have decreased root-available concentrations of Ca (an essential element) and increased root-available concentrations of Al (an inhibitor of Ca uptake). These soil changes coincided with decreased diameter growth and a suppression of climate-tree growth relationships in Norway spruce. Expected increases in tree growth from climate warming may be limited by decreased soil fertility in regions of northern and eastern Europe, and eastern North America, where Ca availability has been reduced by acidic deposition. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  6. Improving phosphorus availability in an acid soil using organic amendments produced from agroindustrial wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Huck Ywih; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Majid, Nik Muhamad Ab

    2014-01-01

    In acid soils, soluble inorganic phosphorus is fixed by aluminium and iron. To overcome this problem, acid soils are limed to fix aluminium and iron but this practice is not economical. The practice is also not environmentally friendly. This study was conducted to improve phosphorus availability using organic amendments (biochar and compost produced from chicken litter and pineapple leaves, resp.) to fix aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus. Amending soil with biochar or compost or a mixture of biochar and compost increased total phosphorus, available phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus fractions (soluble inorganic phosphorus, aluminium bound inorganic phosphorus, iron bound inorganic phosphorus, redundant soluble inorganic phosphorus, and calcium bound phosphorus), and organic phosphorus. This was possible because the organic amendments increased soil pH and reduced exchangeable acidity, exchangeable aluminium, and exchangeable iron. The findings suggest that the organic amendments altered soil chemical properties in a way that enhanced the availability of phosphorus in this study. The amendments effectively fixed aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus, thus rendering phosphorus available by keeping the inorganic phosphorus in a bioavailable labile phosphorus pool for a longer period compared with application of Triple Superphosphate without organic amendments.

  7. Improving Phosphorus Availability in an Acid Soil Using Organic Amendments Produced from Agroindustrial Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huck Ywih Ch’ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In acid soils, soluble inorganic phosphorus is fixed by aluminium and iron. To overcome this problem, acid soils are limed to fix aluminium and iron but this practice is not economical. The practice is also not environmentally friendly. This study was conducted to improve phosphorus availability using organic amendments (biochar and compost produced from chicken litter and pineapple leaves, resp. to fix aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus. Amending soil with biochar or compost or a mixture of biochar and compost increased total phosphorus, available phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus fractions (soluble inorganic phosphorus, aluminium bound inorganic phosphorus, iron bound inorganic phosphorus, redundant soluble inorganic phosphorus, and calcium bound phosphorus, and organic phosphorus. This was possible because the organic amendments increased soil pH and reduced exchangeable acidity, exchangeable aluminium, and exchangeable iron. The findings suggest that the organic amendments altered soil chemical properties in a way that enhanced the availability of phosphorus in this study. The amendments effectively fixed aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus, thus rendering phosphorus available by keeping the inorganic phosphorus in a bioavailable labile phosphorus pool for a longer period compared with application of Triple Superphosphate without organic amendments.

  8. Movement of Phosphorus in a Calcareous Soil as Affected by Humic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Zhen-Yu; WANG Qing-Hua; LIU Fang-Chun; MA Hai-Lin; MA Bing-Yao; S.S.MALHI

    2013-01-01

    When humic acid (HA) and phosphorus (P) fertilizer are simultaneously applied to soil,HA may affect the movement of P.A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of a commercial HA product co-applied with monocalcium phosphate (MCP) on the distance of P movement and the concentration of P in various forms at different distances from the P fertilizer application site in a calcareous soil from northern China.Fertilizer MCP (at a rate equivalent to 26.6 kg P ha-1) was applied alone or in combination with HA (at 254.8 kg HA ha-1) to the surface of soil packed in cylinders (150 mm high and 50 mm internal diameter),and then incubated at 320 g kg-1 moisture content for 7 and 28 d periods.Extraction and analysis of each 2 mm soil layer in columns showed that the addition of HA to MCP increased the distance of P movement and the concentrations of water-extractable P,acid-extractable P and Olsen P in soil.The addition of HA to MCP could enhance P availability by increasing the distance of P movement and the concentration of extractable P in soil surrounding the P fertilizer.

  9. Electrokinetic removal of chromium and copper from contaminated soils by lactic acid enhancement in the catholyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dong-mei; Alshawabkeh Akram N; DENG Chang-fen; CANG Long; SI You-bin

    2004-01-01

    The electrokinetic removal of chromium and copper from contaminated soils by adding lactic acid in cathode chamber as an enhancing reagent was evaluated. Two sets of duplicate experiments with chromium contaminated kaolinite and with a silty soil sampled from a superfund site in California of USA and polluted by Cr and Cu, were carried out in a constant current mode. Changes of soil water content and soil pH before and after the electrokinetic experiments, and variations of voltage drop and electroosmosis flow during the treatments were examined. The results indicated that Cr, spiked as Cr(Ⅵ) in the kaolinite, was accumulated mainly in the anode chamber, and some of Cr and metal hydroxides precipitated in the soil sections in contact with the cathode, which significantly increased electrical energy consumption. Treatment of the soil collected from the site showed accumulation of large amounts of Cr and Cu in the anode chamber while none was detected in the cathode one. The results suggested that the two metals either complexed with the injected lactic acid at the cathode or existed as negatively charged complex, and electromigrated toward the anode under a voltage gradient.

  10. Decomposition of Organic Substrates and their Effect on Mungbean Growth in Two Soils of the Mekong Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Becker

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural land use in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam is dominated by intensive irrigated rice cropping systems on both alluvial and acid sulfate soils. A stagnating and occasionally declining productivity may be linked on the alluvial soils to low N use efficiency and low soil organic matter content while on acid sulfate soils to acidity, Al toxicity and P deficiency. For economic reasons, farmers increasingly diversify their cropping system by replacing the dry season rice by high-value horticultural crops grown under upland conditions. However, upland cropping is likely to further exacerbate the soil-related problems. Organic substrates from decentralized waste and waste water management are widely available and may help to alleviate the reported soil problems. During the dry season of 2003/2004, the effect of the application of various types and rates of locally available waste products on crop performance was evaluated at both an alluvial and an acid sulfate soil site. The C and N mineralization dynamics of nine organic substrates from waste and waste water treatment were determined by anaerobic (N and aerobic (C incubation in the laboratory. The response of 12 week-old mungbean (dry matter accumulation to substrate application (1.5 – 6.0 Mg ha−1 was evaluated on a degraded alluvial and on an acid sulfate soil. In the alluvial soil, largest mineralization rates were observed from anaerobic sludge. Biomass increases in 12 week-old mungbean ranged from 25-98% above the unfertilized control. In the acid sulfate soil, highest net-N release rates were observed from aerobic composts with high P content. Mungbean biomass was related to soil pH and exchangeable Al3+ and was highest with the application of aerobic composts. We conclude that the use of organic substrates in the rice-based systems of the Mekong Delta needs to be soil specific.

  11. Glucosamine sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bark extract, ginger root concentrate, Indian frankincense extract, turmeric root extract, cayenne, and hyaluronic acid (Instaflex Joint ... bark extract, ginger root concentrate, Indian frankincense extract, turmeric root extract, cayenne, and hyaluronic acid (Instaflex Joint ...

  12. Phthalic acid and benzo[a]pyrene in soil-plant-water systems amended with contaminated sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mougin, C.; Dappozze, F.; Brault, A.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the fate of C-14-labelled phthalic acid and benzo[a]pyrene applied to the soil by the way of contaminated sewage sludge in model ecosystems allowing the simultaneous assessment of physicochemical and biological descriptors. Here we show that the mineralisation of phthalic acid is highe......[a]pyrene is recalcitrant to biodegradation whatever the type of soil contamination. We show also that the chemicals present in the sludge are poorly transferred to soil leachates and plant seedlings....

  13. Impacts of simulated acid rain on soil enzyme activities in a latosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Da-Jiong; Huang, Qian-Chun; Ouyang, Ying

    2010-11-01

    Acid rain pollution is a serious environmental problem in the world. This study investigated impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon four types of soil enzymes, namely the catalase, acid phosphatase, urease, and amylase, in a latosol. Latosol is an acidic red soil and forms in the tropical rainforest biome. Laboratory experiments were performed by spraying the soil columns with the SAR at pH levels of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5., 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, and 7.0 (control) over a 20-day period. Mixed results were obtained in enzyme activities for different kinds of enzymes under the influences of the SAR. The catalase activities increased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then decreased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased sharply to the end of the experiments, whereas the acid phosphatase activities decreased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then increased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased dramatically to the end of the experiments. A decrease in urease activities was observed at all of the SAR pH levels for the entire experimental period, while an increase from day 0 to 5 and then a decrease from day 5 to 20 in amylase activities were observed at all of the SAR pH levels. In general, the catalase, acid phosphatase, and urease activities increased with the SAR pH levels. However, the maximum amylase activity was found at pH 4.0 and decreased as the SAR pH increased from 4.0 to 5.0 or decreased from 4.0 to 2.5. It is apparent that acid rain had adverse environmental impacts on soil enzyme activities in the latosol. Our study further revealed that impacts of the SAR upon soil enzyme activities were in the following order: amylase>catalase>acid phosphatase>urease. These findings provide useful information on better understanding and managing soil biological processes in the nature under the influence of acid rains.

  14. Spatio-temporal variability of acid sulphate soils in the plain of reeds, Vietnam : impact of soil properties, water management and crop husbandry on the growth and yield of rice in relation to microtopography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husson, O.

    1998-01-01

    Acid sulphate soils in the Mekong delta cover 1.6 million hectares, of which 400 000 ha are located in the Plain of Reeds. Due to the presence of pyrite that yields acid when oxidised, all acid sulphate soils are (potentially) strongly acidic. Reclamation of the 150 000 ha of severely acid sulphate

  15. Interaction between uranium and humic acid (Ⅰ): Adsorption behaviors of U(Ⅵ) in soil humic acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Min; LIAO Jiali; LIU Ning; ZHANG Dong; KANG Houjun; YANG Yuanyou; YANG Yong; JIN Jiannan

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of uranium on three soil humic acids (HAs), which were extracted from soils of different depths at the same site, were investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorption results showed that U(Ⅵ) in solutions can be adsorbed by the three soil HAs, with the order of FHA (HA from 5 m depth of soil) >SHA (HA from the surface) >THA (HA from 10 m depth of soil) for adsorption efficiency in each desirable condition, and the adsorption reached equilibrium in about 240 min. Although the maximum adsorption efficiency was adsorption could be described with Langmiur isotherm or Freundlich isotherm equation. The L/S (liquid/solid, mL/g)ratio and pH were important factors influencing the adsorption in our adsorption system besides uranium concentration. The adsorption efficiency decreased with the increase of the L/S ratio and pH at the pH range of 2.0-3.0 for SHA and THA or 2.5 - 6.0 for FHA. However, no significant difference in adsorption of U(Ⅵ) was observed at the experimental temperature. All the results implied that humic substances have different characteristics in samples even collected at the same site.

  16. Biological nitrogen fixation of soybean in acid soils of Sumatra, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waluyo, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to improve soybean cultivation in transmigration areas, especially in Sitiung, West Sumatra. However, these soils are very acid, and have a high P-fixing capacity. To reduce the amounts of fertilisers, normally 5 - 7 ton lime ha -1 and 100 kg P as TSP, seed, pelle

  17. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jinzhong; Meng, Die; Long, Tao; Ying, Rongrong; Ye, Mao; Zhang, Shengtian; Li, Qun; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Yusuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils.

  18. Perfluoroalkyl acid distribution in various plant compartments of edible crops grown in biosolids-amended soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) from biosolids-amended soil has been identified as a potential pathway for PFAA entry into the terrestrial food chain. This study compared the uptake of PFAAs in greenhouse-grown radish (Raphanus sativus), celery (Apium graveolens var.d...

  19. Bacterial inoculants of forage grasses that enhance degradation of 2-chlorobenzoic acid in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, S.D.; Germida, J.J. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    Biological remediation of contaminated soil is an effective method of reducing risk to human and ecosystem health. Bacteria and plants might be used to enhance remediation of soil pollutants in situ. This study assessed the potential of bacteria, plants, and plant-bacteria associations to remediate 2-chlorobenzoic acid (2CBA) contaminated soil. Initially, grass viability was assessed in 2CBA-contaminated soil. Soil was contaminated with 2CBA, forage grasses were grown under growth chamber conditions for 42 or 60 d, and the 2CBA concentration in soil was determined by gas chromatography. Only five of 16 forage grasses grew in 2CBA-treated soil. Growth of Bromus inermis had no effect on 2CBA concentration, whereas Agropyron intermedium, B. biebersteinii, A. riparum, and Elymus dauricus decreased 2CBA relative to nonplanted control soil by 32 to 42%. The 12 bacteria isolates were screened for their ability to promote the germination of the five grasses in 2CBA-contaminated soil. Inoculation of A. riparum with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain R75, a proven plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, increased seed germination by 80% and disappearance of 2CBA by 20% relative to noninoculated plants. Inoculation of E. dauricus with a mixture of P. savastanoi strain CB35, a 2CBA-degrading bacterium, and P. aeruginosa strain R75 increased disappearance of 2CBA by 112% relative to noninoculated plants. No clear relationship between enhanced 2CBA disappearance and increased plant biomass was found. These results suggest that specific plant-microbial systems can be developed to enhance remediation of pollutants in soil.

  20. Enhancing the intestinal absorption of low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate by conjugation with α-linolenic acid and the transport mechanism of the conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuliang; Li, Pingli; Cheng, Yanna; Zhang, Xinke; Sheng, Juzheng; Wang, Decai; Li, Juan; Zhang, Qian; Zhong, Chuanqing; Cao, Rui; Wang, Fengshan

    2014-04-25

    The purpose of this report was to demonstrate the effect of amphiphilic polysaccharides-based self-assembling micelles on enhancing the oral absorption of low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate (LMCS) in vitro and in vivo, and identify the transepithelial transport mechanism of LMCS micelles across the intestinal barrier. α-Linolenic acid-low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate polymers(α-LNA-LMCS) were successfully synthesized, and characterized by FTIR, (1)HNMR, TGA/DSC, TEM, laser light scattering and zeta potential. The significant oral absorption enhancement and elimination half-life (t₁/₂) extension of LNA-LMCS2 in rats were evidenced by intragastric administration in comparison with CS and LMCS. Caco-2 transport studies demonstrated that the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of LNA-LMCS2 was significantly higher than that of CS and LMCS (p<0.001), and no significant effects on the overall integrity of the monolayer were observed during the transport process. In addition, α-LNA-LMCS micelles accumulated around the cell membrane and intercellular space observed by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Furthermore, evident alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton were detected by CLSM observation following the treatment of the cell monolayers with α-LNA-LMCS micelles, which further certified the capacity of α-LNA-LMCS micelles to open the intercellular tight junctions rather than disrupt the overall integrity of the monolayer. Therefore, LNA-LMCS2 with low cytotoxicity and high bioavailability might be a promising substitute for CS in clinical use, such as treating osteoarthritis, atherosclerosis, etc.

  1. Expression of Genes Involved in Iron and Sulfur Respiration in a Novel Thermophilic Crenarchaeon Isolated from Acid-Sulfate-Chloride Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozubal, M.; Macur, R.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2007-12-01

    Acidic geothermal springs within Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an excellent opportunity to study microbial populations and their relationship with geochemical processes such as redox cycling and biomineralization of iron. Fourteen acid-sulfate-chloride (ASC) and acid-sulfate (AS) geothermal springs located in (YNP) have been extensively characterized for aqueous chemistry, solid phase mineral deposition and microbial diversity and distribution. The oxidation of Fe(II) with oxygen as an electron acceptor is exergonic under these conditions, consequently, Fe(II) may be an important electron donor driving primary production in ASC and AS habitats, and products of biomineralization (e.g. Fe[III]-oxides of varying crystallinity and structure, as well as jarosite in some cases) are common in the outflow channels of these environments. Recently, we isolated a novel Metallosphaera-like microorganism (Metallosphaera strain MK1) from an ASC spring in Norris Geyser Basin, YNP. Clone libraries (16S rRNA gene) from multiple sites suggest that microorganisms closely related to strain MK1 (between 98-100 percent similarity) dominate many spring locations between 55-80 C. The in situ abiotic oxidation rate of Fe(II) has been shown to be very slow in these systems and Metallosphaera strain MK1 has been directly implicated in biotic Fe(II) oxidation. Metallosphaera strain MK1 has been submitted for full genome sequencing and is yielding gene sequences related to the terminal oxidases SOXABC and SOXM super-complex. In addition, sequences from a recently characterized terminal oxidase FOX complex involved in Fe(II) and pyrite oxidation from Sulfolobus metallicus have been found in Metallosphaera strain MK1. A protein complex analogous to Metallosphaera sedula has been identified in strain MK1 and this complex has also been expressed in cells grown on pyrite and Fe(II). Other sequences identified in Metallosphaera strain MK1 that are involved in respiration are the TQO

  2. Balance of trichloroacetic acid in the soil top layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.J.; Leer, E.W.B. de; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    Since the ban on the use of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) as a herbicide in several countries, TCAA is still found ubiquitously in the environment. The presence of TCAA nowadays is suggested to originate mainly from the atmospheric degradation of tetrachloroethene. Our mass balance calculations indica

  3. Fractionation of Moderately and Highly Stable Organic Phosphorus in Acid Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANYEKUAN; LISHIJUN

    1998-01-01

    The fractionation of moderately and highly organic phosphorus(Po) in acid soil was studied by two methods .By the first method,after incubation for 40 d; the mineralization rates of eight constituents of stable Po in the soil were determined.By the second method ,five constituents of peecipitates of stable Po in the soil were separated,then the five precipiates were put back into the original soils and incubated for 40 d and 60 d .Then,mineralization rates of the five precipitates were determined.The same results were obtained by the two methods.When the pH of the alkali solution containing stable Po was adjusted from 3.00 to 3.10,the mineralization rate of moderately stable Po Was rapidly raised.Therefore,the pH 3.00 is the critical point between moderately and highly stable Po.

  4. Orbital evidence for clay and acidic sulfate assemblages on Mars based on mineralogical analogs from Rio Tinto, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Hannah H.; Milliken, Ralph E.; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Robertson, Kevin; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2016-09-01

    Outcrops of hydrated minerals are widespread across the surface of Mars, with clay minerals and sulfates being commonly identified phases. Orbitally-based reflectance spectra are often used to classify these hydrated components in terms of a single mineralogy, although most surfaces likely contain multiple minerals that have the potential to record local geochemical conditions and processes. Reflectance spectra for previously identified deposits in Ius and Melas Chasma within the Valles Marineris, Mars, exhibit an enigmatic feature with two distinct absorptions between 2.2 and 2.3 μm. This spectral 'doublet' feature is proposed to result from a mixture of hydrated minerals, although the identity of the minerals has remained ambiguous. Here we demonstrate that similar spectral doublet features are observed in airborne, field, and laboratory reflectance spectra of rock and sediment samples from Rio Tinto, Spain. Combined visible-near infrared reflectance spectra and X-ray diffraction measurements of these samples reveal that the doublet feature arises from a mixture of Al-phyllosilicate (illite or muscovite) and jarosite. Analyses of orbital data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) shows that the martian spectral equivalents are also consistent with mixtures of Al-phyllosilicates and jarosite, where the Al-phyllosilicate may also include kaolinite and/or halloysite. A case study for a region within Ius Chasma demonstrates that the relative proportions of the Al-phyllosilicate(s) and jarosite vary within one stratigraphic unit as well as between stratigraphic units. The former observation suggests that the jarosite may be a diagenetic (authigenic) product and thus indicative of local pH and redox conditions, whereas the latter observation may be consistent with variations in sediment flux and/or fluid chemistry during sediment deposition.

  5. Resistance of different materials used in sewers systems:Polyvinyl chloride (PVC, polypropylene (PP and High density polyethylene (HDPE, to sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate attack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LASFAR Sara

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of PVC, PP and HDPE used in sewer systems exposed to acid and sulfate solutions was investigated at 25°C and 40°C. Gravimetric characterization proves that PVC has a fickian behavior. It shows also, that PP has a non-fickian behavior, characterized by a rapid acceleration of water absorption, and the HDPE has a fickian behavior at 25°C, while it has a non-fickian behavior at 40°C, characterized by a weight loss after a certain aging period. The prolongation of the time of exposure to sulfuric acid solution leads to a progressive increase in tensile strength followed by a slight decrease at 40°C. The unaged samples of all materials have a much lower tensile strength than those of the aged samples, and a drop in elongation at break could be observed. These results can be explained by the increase of crystallinity, followed by the increase of crosslinking density due to the diffusion of the solvent and the effect of the temperature as the exposure time increases. These results prove that there is a correlation between the diffusion of the solvent as well as the increased exposure time and temperature on the mechanical properties of polymer.

  6. Effect of a sulfonated azo dye and sulfanilic acid on nitrogen transformation processes in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaç, F Olcay; Dindar, Efsun; Uçaroğlu, Selnur; Başkaya, Hüseyin S

    2009-10-30

    Introduction of organic dyes into soil via wastewater and sludge applications has been of increasing concern especially in developing or under-developed countries where appropriate management strategies are scarce. Assessing the response of terrestrial ecosystems to organic dyes and estimating the inhibition concentrations will probably contribute to soil remediation studies in regions affected by the same problem. Hence, an incubation study was conducted in order to investigate the impact of a sulfonated azo dye, Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and sulfanilic acid (SA), a typical representative of aromatic sulfonated amines, on soil nitrogen transformation processes. The results apparently showed that nitrogen related processes in soil can be used as bioindicators of anthropogenic stress caused by organic dyes. It was found that urease activity, arginine ammonification rate, nitrification potential and ammonium oxidising bacteria numbers decreased by 10-20% and 7-28% in the presence of RB5 (> 20 mg/kg dry soil) and SA (> 8 mg/kg dry soil), respectively. Accordingly, it was concluded that organic dye pollution may restrict the nitrogen-use-efficiency of plants, thus further reducing the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. Furthermore, the response of soil microbiota to SA suggested that inhibition effects of the organic dye may continue after the possible reduction of the parent dye to associated aromatic amines.

  7. Ion activity and distribution of heavy metals in acid mine drainage polluted subtropical soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Tao; Becquer, Thierry; Dai, Jun; Quantin, Cécile; Benedetti, Marc F

    2009-04-01

    The oxidative dissolution of mine wastes gives rise to acidic, metal-enriched mine drainage (AMD) and has typically posed an additional risk to the environment. The poly-metallic mine Dabaoshan in South China is an excellent test site to understand the processes affecting the surrounding polluted agricultural fields. Our objectives were firstly to investigate metal ion activity in soil solution, distribution in solid constituents, and spatial distribution in samples, secondly to determine dominant environment factors controlling metal activity in the long-term AMD-polluted subtropical soils. Soil Column Donnan Membrane Technology (SC-DMT) combined with sequential extraction shows that unusually large proportion of the metal ions are present as free ion in the soil solutions. The narrow range of low pH values prevents any pH effects during the binding onto oxides or organic matter. The differences in speciation of the soil solutions may explain the different soil degradation observed between paddy and non-paddy soils.

  8. Sulfate inhibition effect on sulfate reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Al Zuhair

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in the potential of bacterial sulfate reduction as an alternative method for sulfate removal from wastewater. Under anaerobic conditions, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB utilize sulfate to oxidize organic compounds and generate sulfide (S2-. SRB were successfully isolated from sludge samples obtained from a local petroleum refinery, and used for sulfate removal. The effects of initial sulfate concentration, temperature and pH on the rate of bacterial growth and anaerobic sulfate removal were investigated and the optimum conditions were identified. The experimental data were used to determine the parameters of two proposed kinetic model, which take into consideration substrate inhibition effect. Keywords: Sulfate Reducing Bacteria, Sulfate, Kinetic Model, Biotreatement, Inhibition Received: 31 August 2008 / Received in revised form: 18 September 2008, Accepted: 18 September 2008 Published online: 28 September 2008

  9. Changes in Soil Chemical Properties and Lettuce Yield Response Following Incorporation of Biochar and Cow Dung to Highly Weathered Acidic Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agyei Frimpong, Kwame; Amoakwah, Emmanuel; Osei, Benjamin A;

    2016-01-01

    imposed on two highly weathered, acidic soils from the coastal savanna and tropical rainforest agroecological zones of Ghana, respectively, to elucidate their effect on yield of lettuce. The study showed that application of biochar solely or in combination with cow dung increased soil pH, total organic...

  10. Molecular Basis of the Receptor Interactions of Polysialic Acid (polySia), polySia Mimetics, and Sulfated Polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ruiyan; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta; Boelens, Rolf; Wienk, Hans; Siebert, Simone; Eckert, Thomas; Kraan, Stefan; Rojas-Macias, Miguel A.; Lütteke, Thomas; Galuska, Sebastian P.; Scheidig, Axel; Petridis, Athanasios K.; Liang, Songping; Billeter, Martin; Schauer, Roland; Steinmeyer, Jürgen; Schröder, Jens Michael; Siebert, Hans Christian

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) and polySia glycomimetic molecules support nerve cell regeneration, differentiation, and neuronal plasticity. With a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods, as well as data mining and molecular modeling techniques, it is possible to correlate specific ligand-rec

  11. Sulfation and biological activities of konjac glucomannan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Surina; Muschin, Tegshi; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Yoshida, Takashi

    2013-05-15

    The sulfation of konjac glucomannan and its anti-HIV and blood anticoagulant activities were investigated. Konjac glucomannan is a polysaccharide occurring naturally in konjac plant tubers and has high molecular weights. Solubility in water is very low, and the aqueous solutions at low concentrations have high viscosity. Before sulfation, hydrolysis by diluted sulfuric acid was carried out to decrease the molecular weights of M¯n=19.2 × 10(4)-0.2 × 10(4). Sulfation with piperidine-N-sulfonic acid or SO3-pyridine complex gave sulfated konjac glucomannans with molecular weights of M¯n=1.0 × 10(4)-0.4 × 10(4) and degrees of sulfation (DS) of 1.3-1.4. It was found that the sulfated konjac glucomannans had potent anti-HIV activity at a 50% effective concentration, (EC50) of 1.2-1.3 μg/ml, which was almost as high as that of an AIDS drug, ddC, whose EC50=3.2 μg/ml, and moderate blood anticoagulant activity, AA=0.8-22.7 units/mg, compared to those of standard sulfated polysaccharides, curdlan (10 units/mg) and dextran (22.7 units/mg) sulfates. Structural analysis of sulfated konjac glucomannans with negatively charged sulfated groups was performed by high resolution NMR, and the interaction between poly-l-lysine with positively charged amino groups as a model compound of proteins and peptides was measured by surface plasmon resonance measurement, suggesting that the sulfated konjac glucomannans had a high binding stability on immobilized poly-l-lysine. The binding of sulfated konjac glucomannan was concentration-dependent, and the biological activity of the sulfated konjac glucomannans may be due to electrostatic interaction between the sulfate and amino groups.

  12. RETRACTED: Crystal growth and spectroscopic characterization of Aloevera amino acid added lithium sulfate monohydrate: A non-linear optical crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimekalai, R.; Antony Joseph, A.; Ramachandra Raja, C.

    2014-03-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. This article has been retracted at the request of authors. According to the author we have reported Aloevera Amino Acid added Lithium sulphate monohydrate [AALSMH] crystal is a new nonlinear optical crystal. From the recorded high performance liquid chromatography spectrum, by matching the retention times with the known compounds, the amino acids present in our extract are identified as homocystine, isoleucine, serine, leucine and tyrosine. From the thin layer chromatography and colorimetric estimation techniques, presence of isoleucine was identified and it was also confirmed by NMR spectrum. From the above studies, we came to conclude that AALSMH is new nonlinear optical crystal. After further investigation, lattice parameter values of AALSMH are coinciding with lithium sulphate. Therefore we have decided to withdraw our paper. Sorry for the inconvenience and time spent.

  13. Understory vegetation leads to changes in soil acidity and in microbial communities 27 years after reforestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoli; Yang, Fengting; Wang, Jianlei; Di, Yuebao; Dai, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with potted plants and removed understories have indicated that understory vegetation often affects the chemical and microbial properties of soil. In this study, we examined the mechanism and extent of the influence of understory vegetation on the chemical and microbial properties of soil in plantation forests. The relationships between the vegetational structure (diversity for different functional layers, aboveground biomass of understory vegetation, and species number) and soil properties (pH, microbial community structure, and levels of soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen) were analyzed across six reforestation types (three pure needleleaf forests, a needle-broadleaf mixed forest, a broadleaf forest, and a shrubland). Twenty-seven years after reforestation, soil pH significantly decreased by an average of 0.95 across reforestation types. Soil pH was positively correlated with the aboveground biomass of the understory. The levels of total, bacterial, and fungal phospholipid fatty acids, and the fungal:bacterial ratios were similar in the shrubland and the broadleaf forest. Both the aboveground biomass of the understory and the diversity of the tree layer positively influenced the fungal:bacterial ratio. Improving the aboveground biomass of the understory could alleviate soil acidification. An increase in the aboveground biomass of the understory, rather than in understory diversity, enhanced the functional traits of the soil microbial communities. The replacement of pure plantations with mixed-species stands, as well as the enhancement of understory recruitment, can improve the ecological functions of a plantation, as measured by the alleviation of soil acidification and increased fungal dominance.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a diverse group of phenylacetic acid degrading microorganisms from pristine soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kevin E; O'Leary, Niall P; Marchesi, Julian R; Dobson, Alan D W; Duetz, Wouter

    2005-11-01

    A diverse range of microorganisms capable of growth on phenylacetic acid as the sole source of carbon and energy were isolated from soil. Sixty six different isolates were identified and grouped according to 16S rRNA gene RFLP analysis. Subsequent sequencing of 16S rDNA from selected strains allowed further characterization of the phenylacetic acid degrading population isolated from soil. Nearly half (30) of the isolates are Bacillus species while the rest of the isolates are strains from a variety of genera namely, Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Flavobacterium, and Paenibacillus. Sixty-one of the sixty-six strains reproducibly grew in defined minimal liquid culture medium (E2). All strains isolated grew when at least one hydroxylated derivative of phenylacetic acid was supplied as the carbon source, while 59 out of the 61 strains tested, accumulated ortho-hydroxyphenylacetic acid in the assay buffer; when pulsed with phenylacetic acid. Oxygen consumption experiments failed to indicate a clear link between phenylacetic acid and hydroxy-substituted phenylacetic acid in isolates from a broad range of genera.

  15. Crystallization of calcium sulfate dihydrate under simulated conditions of phosphoric acid production in the presence of aluminum and magnesium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashad, M. M.; Mahmoud, M. H. H.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Abdel-Aal, E. A.

    2004-06-01

    The effect of Al 3+ and Mg 2+ ions, as additives, on the crystallization of gypsum was studied under simulated conditions of the phosphoric acid production. Calcium hydrogen phosphate and sulfuric acid were mixed with dilute phosphoric acid at 80°C, and the turbidity of the reaction mixture was measured at different time periods to calculate the induction time of gypsum crystals formation. Addition of Al 3+ ions up to 2% decreased the induction time and increased the growth efficiency while addition of Mg 2+ increased the induction time and decreased the growth efficiency compared with in absence of additives. Interestingly, the crystals mean and median diameters were found to increase in the presence of Al 3+ and decrease in the presence of Mg 2+. The surface energy increased with Al 3+ and decreased with Mg 2+ compared to the baseline (without additives). Gypsum morphology changed from needle-like type in absence of additives to thick-rhombic in the presence of Al 3+ ions.

  16. Archaea rather than bacteria control nitrification in two agricultural acidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Nicol, Graeme W; Prosser, James I

    2010-12-01

    Nitrification is a central component of the global nitrogen cycle. Ammonia oxidation, the first step of nitrification, is performed in terrestrial ecosystems by both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Published studies indicate that soil pH may be a critical factor controlling the relative abundances of AOA and AOB communities. In order to determine the relative contributions of AOA and AOB to ammonia oxidation in two agricultural acidic Scottish soils (pH 4.5 and 6), the influence of acetylene (a nitrification inhibitor) was investigated during incubation of soil microcosms at 20 °C for 1 month. High rates of nitrification were observed in both soils in the absence of acetylene. Quantification of respective amoA genes (a key functional gene for ammonia oxidizers) demonstrated significant growth of AOA, but not AOB. A significant positive relationship was found between nitrification rate and AOA, but not AOB growth. AOA growth was inhibited in the acetylene-containing microcosms. Moreover, AOA transcriptional activity decreased significantly in the acetylene-containing microcosms compared with the control, whereas no difference was observed for the AOB transcriptional activity. Consequently, growth and activity of only archaeal but not bacterial ammonia oxidizer communities strongly suggest that AOA, but not AOB, control nitrification in these two acidic soils.

  17. Ecotoxicity of boric acid in standard laboratory tests with plants and soil organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princz, Juliska; Becker, Leonie; Scheffczyk, Adam; Stephenson, Gladys; Scroggins, Rick; Moser, Thomas; Römbke, Jörg

    2017-03-17

    To verify the continuous sensitivity of ecotoxicological tests (mainly the test organisms), reference substances with known toxicity are regularly tested. Ideally, this substance(s) would lack specificity in its mode action, be bioavailable and readily attainable with cost-effective means of chemical characterization. Boric acid has satisfied these criteria, but has most recently been characterized as a substance of very high concern, due to reproductive effects in humans, thus limiting its recommendation as an ideal reference toxicant. However, there is probably no other chemical for which ecotoxicity in soil has been so intensively studied; an extensive literature review yielded lethal (including avoidance) and sublethal data for 38 taxa. The ecotoxicity data were evaluated using species sensitivity distributions, collectively across all taxa, and separately according to species type, endpoints, soil type and duration. The lack of specificity in the mode of action yielded broad toxicity among soil taxa and soil types, and provided a collective approach to assessing species sensitivity, while taking into consideration differences in test methodologies and exposure durations. Toxicity was species-specific with Folsomia candida and enchytraied species demonstrating the most sensitivity; among plants, the following trend occurred: dicotyledonous (more sensitive) ≫ monocotyledonous ≫ gymnosperm species. Sensitivity was also time and endpoint specific, with endpoints such as lethality and avoidance being less sensitive than reproduction effects. Furthermore, given the breadth of data and toxicity demonstrated by boric acid, lessons learned from its evaluation are discussed to recommend the properties required by an ideal reference substance for the soil compartment.

  18. Remediation of Steel Slag on Acidic Soil Contaminated by Heavy Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haihong; GU; Fuping; LI; Xiang; GUAN; Zhongwei; LI; Qiang; YU

    2013-01-01

    The technology of in situ immobilization with amendments is an important measure that remediates the soil contaminated by heavy metals, and selecting economical and effective amendments is the key. The effects and mechanism of steel slag, the silicon-rich alkaline byproduct which can remediate acidic soil contaminated by heavy metal, are mainly introduced in this paper to provide theory reference for future research. Firstly, the paper analyzes current research situation of in situ immobilization with amendments. Then, it introduces the main physicochemical properties of steel slag, and the effect on soil pH value as well as heavy metal activity. Besides, the paper elaborates the promoting effect on silicon-requiring plant and the strengthening mechanism for its resistant capability of heavy metal. According to the analysis, the application of steel slag could be a potential valuable strategy to remediate acidic soil contaminated by heavy metal by modifying the transformation of heavy metals in both soil and plant, so that the translocation of heavy metal in food chain is reduced.

  19. Abiotic oxidation of pyrite by Fe(III) in acidic media and its implications for sulfur isotope measurements of lattice-bound sulfate in sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumdar, A.; Goldberg, T.; Strauss, H.

    generation by application of some reducing agent during sample dissolution in order to understand the truegeochemicalprocessesinvolvedinsulfurisotopiccompositionof lattice sulfate. Acknowledgments Funding for this research by the Deutsche...

  20. Effect of EDTA and citric acid on phytoremediation of Cr- B[a]P-co-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigbo, Chibuike; Batty, Lesley

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals in the environment are a concern, and their removal to acceptable level is required. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to treat contaminated soils, could be an interesting alternative to conventional remediation processes. This work evaluates the role of single and combined applications of chelates to single or mixed Cr + benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-contaminated soil. Medicago sativa was grown in contaminated soil and was amended with 0.3 g citric acid, 0.146 g ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or their combination for 60 days. The result shows that in Cr-contaminated soil, the application of EDTA + citric acid significantly (pEDTA and EDTA + citric acid in co-contaminated soil increased the removal of Cr from the soil (34 and 54 %, respectively). The dissipation of B[a]P in single B[a]P-contaminated soil was effective even without planting and amendment with chelates, while in co-contaminated soil, it was related to the application of either EDTA or EDTA + citric acid. This suggests that M. sativa with the help of chelates in single or co-contaminated soil can be effective in phytoextraction of Cr and promoting the biodegradation of B[a]P.

  1. Effect of acid rain pH on leaching behavior of cement stabilized lead-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan-Jun; Wei, Ming-Li; Reddy, Krishna R; Liu, Zhao-Peng; Jin, Fei

    2014-04-30

    Cement stabilization is a practical approach to remediate soils contaminated with high levels of lead. However, the potential for leaching of lead out of these stabilized soils under variable acid rain pH conditions is a major environmental concern. This study investigates the effects of acid rain on the leaching characteristics of cement stabilized lead contaminated soil under different pH conditions. Clean kaolin clay and the same soil spiked with 2% lead contamination are stabilized with cement contents of 12 and 18% and then cured for 28 days. The soil samples are then subjected to a series of accelerated leaching tests (or semi-dynamic leaching tests) using a simulated acid rain leachant prepared at pH 2.0, 4.0 or 7.0. The results show that the strongly acidic leachant (pH ∼2.0) significantly altered the leaching behavior of lead as well as calcium present in the soil. However, the differences in the leaching behavior of the soil when the leachant was mildly acidic (pH ∼4.0) and neutral (pH ∼7.0) prove to be minor. In addition, it is observed that the lead contamination and cement content levels can have a considerable impact on the leaching behavior of the soils. Overall, the leachability of lead and calcium is attributed to the stability of the hydration products and their consequent influence on the soil buffering capacity and structure.

  2. Using humic acid for remediation of sandy soils contaminated by heavy metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a new remediation technology for contaminated sandy soil using humic acid (HA). Distribution of amount of Cr (VI) in the aqueous or solid system containing humic acid and sandy soil, was studied using batch experiments, es-pecially for effects of reaction time, pH, concentrations, temperature and irradiation on the reduction of Cr (VI), and the optimum reaction conditions. The results indicated a significant increase of the adsorption of Cr (VI) because of the complexion reaction between HA and Cr (VI) that occurred under acidic condition. The reaction mechanisms of HA with chromium on sand surfaces were certified. Thus it came to a conclusion that HA could be used effectively on remediation of Cr (VI)-contaminated soil and groundwater in a wide range of pH, with or without sunlight. These results suggest that the organic-inorganic complex-such as sandy soils coated with humic substances-is important as a metal reservoir in the environment.

  3. Copper Recovery from Polluted Soils Using Acidic Washing and Bioelectrochemical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Karlfeldt Fedje

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Excavation followed by landfilling is the most common method for treating soils contaminated by metals. However, as this solution is not sustainable, alternative techniques are required. Chemical soil washing is one such alternative. The aim of this experimental lab-scale study is to develop a remediation and metal recovery method for Cu contaminated sites. The method is based on the washing of soil or ash (combusted soil/bark with acidic waste liquids followed by electrolytic Cu recovery by means of bioelectrochemical systems (BES. The results demonstrate that a one- or two-step acidic leaching process followed by water washing removes >80 wt. % of the Cu. Copper with 99.7–99.9 wt. % purity was recovered from the acidic leachates using BES. In all experiments, electrical power was generated during the reduction of Cu. This clearly indicates that Cu can also be recovered from dilute solutions. Additionally, the method has the potential to wash co-pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and oxy-PAHs.

  4. Microsymbionts of Phaseolus vulgaris in acid and alkaline soils of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verástegui-Valdés, Myrthala M; Zhang, Yu Jing; Rivera-Orduña, Flor N; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Sui, Xing Hua; Wang, En Tao

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate bean-nodulating rhizobia in different types of soil, 41 nodule isolates from acid and alkaline soils in Mexico were characterized. Based upon the phylogenetic studies of 16S rRNA, atpD, glnII, recA, rpoB, gyrB, nifH and nodC genes, the isolates originating from acid soils were identified as the phaseoli symbiovar of the Rhizobium leguminosarum-like group and Rhizobium grahamii, whereas the isolates from alkaline soils were defined as Ensifer americanum sv. mediterranense and Rhizobium radiobacter. The isolates of "R. leguminosarum" and E. americanum harbored nodC and nifH genes, but the symbiotic genes were not detected in the four isolates of the other two species. It was the first time that "R. leguminosarum" and E. americanum have been reported as bean-nodulating bacteria in Mexico. The high similarity of symbiotic genes in the Rhizobium and Ensifer populations showed that these genes had the same origin and have diversified recently in different rhizobial species. Phenotypic characterization revealed that the "R. leguminosarum" population was more adapted to the acid and low salinity conditions, while the E. americanum population preferred alkaline conditions. The findings of this study have improved the knowledge of the diversity, geographic distribution and evolution of bean-nodulating rhizobia in Mexico.

  5. Influence of Lime and Phosphorus Application Rates on Growth of Maize in an Acid Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Asbon Opala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactive effects of lime and phosphorus on maize growth in an acid soil were investigated in a greenhouse experiment. A completely randomized design with 12 treatments consisting of four lime levels, 0, 2, 10, and 20 t ha−1, in a factorial combination with three phosphorus rates, 0, 30, and 100 kg ha−1, was used. Maize was grown in pots for six weeks and its heights and dry matter yield were determined and soils were analyzed for available P and exchangeable acidity. Liming significantly reduced the exchangeable acidity in the soils. The effect of lime on available P was not significant but available P increased with increasing P rates. There was a significant effect of lime, P, and P by lime interactions on plant heights and dry matter. Without lime application, dry matter increased with increasing P rates but, with lime, dry mattes increased from 0 to 30 kg P ha−1 but declined from 30 to 100 kg P ha−1. The highest dry matter yield (13.8 g pot−1 was obtained with a combined 2 t ha−1 of lime with 30 kg P ha−1 suggesting that lime application at low rates combined with moderate amounts of P would be appropriate in this soil.

  6. Solubilization of manganese and trace metals in soils affected by acid mine runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C H; Heil, D M; Cardon, G E; Butters, G L; Kelly, E F

    2003-01-01

    Manganese solubility has become a primary concern in the soils and water supplies in the Alamosa River basin, Colorado due to both crop toxicity problems and concentrations that exceed water quality standards. Some of the land in this region has received inputs of acid and trace metals as a result of irrigation with water affected by acid mine drainage and naturally occurring acid mineral seeps. The release of Mn, Zn, Ni, and Cu following saturation with water was studied in four soils from the Alamosa River basin. Redox potentials decreased to values adequate for dissolution of Mn oxides within 24 h following saturation. Soluble Mn concentrations were increased to levels exceeding water quality standards within 84 h. Soluble concentrations of Zn and Ni correlated positively with Mn following reduction for all four soils studied. The correlation between Cu and Mn was significant for only one of the soils studied. The soluble concentrations of Zn and Ni were greater than predicted based on the content of each of these metals in the Mn oxide fraction only. Increases in total electrolyte concentration during reduction indicate that this may be the result of displacement of exchangeable metals by Mn following reductive dissolution of Mn oxides.

  7. Adsorption of Acid Phosphatase on Minerals and Soil Colloids in Presence of Citrate and Phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of phosphate and citrate, which are common inorganic andorganic anions in soils, on the adsorption of acid phosphatase by kaolin, goethite and the colloids separatedfrom yellow-brown soil (YBS) and latosol (LS) in central-south China. The YBS colloid has the major claymineral composition of 1.4 nm mineral, illite and kaolinite while the LS colloid mainly contains kaolinite andoxides. The adsorption isotherm of acid phosphatase on the examined soil colloids and minerals fitted tothe Langmuir model. The amount of enzyme adsorbed in the absence of ligands was in the order of YBScolloid >LS colloid>kaolin≈goethite. In the presence of phosphate or citrate, the amounts of the enzymeadsorbed followed the sequence YBS colloid>kaolin>LS colloid>goethite. The presence of ligands alsodecreased the binding energy between the enzyme and soil colloids or minerals. With the increase of ligandconcentration from 10 mmol L-1 to 400 m mol L-1, different behaviors for the adsorption of enzyme werefound in the colloid and mineral systems studied. A sharp decrease in enzyme adsorption was observed ongoethite while gradual decreases of enzyme adsorption were recorded in the two soil colloid systems. However,no any decrease was found for the amount of enzyme adsorbed on kaolin at higher ligand concentrations.When phosphate or citrate was introduced to the system before the addition of enzyme, the ligands usuallyenhanced the adsorption of enzyme. The results obtained in this study suggested the important role ofkaolinite mineral in the adsorption of enzyme molecules in acidic soils in the presence of various ligands.

  8. Different low-molecular-mass organic acids specifically control leaching of arsenic and lead from contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Christopher; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass organic acids (LMMOA) are of key importance for mobilisation and fate of metals in soil, by functioning as ligands that increase the amount of dissolved metal in solution or by dissociation of metal binding minerals. Column leaching experiments were performed on soil polluted with As and Pb, in order to determine the specificity of LMMOA related release for individual elements, at varying organic acid concentrations. Acetic, citric and oxalic acids were applied in 12 h leaching experiments over a concentration range (0.5-25 mM) to soil samples that represent organic and mineral horizons. The leaching of As followed the order: oxalic > citric > acetic acid in both soils. Arsenic leaching was attributed primarily to ligand-enhanced dissolution of mineral oxides followed by As released into solution, as shown by significant correlation between oxalic and citric acids and content of Al and Fe in leaching solutions. Results suggest that subsurface mineral soil layers are more vulnerable to As toxicity. Leaching of Pb from both soils followed the order: citric > oxalic > acetic acid. Mineral soil samples were shown to be more susceptible to leaching of Pb than samples characterised by a high content of organic matter. The leaching efficiency of citric acid was attributed to formation of stable complexes with Pb ions, which other acids are not capable of. Results obtained in the study are evidence that the extent of As and Pb leaching in contaminated surface and subsurface soil depends significantly on the types of carboxylic acid involved. The implications of the type of acid and the specific element that can be mobilised become increasingly significant where LMMOA concentrations are highest, such as in rhizosphere soil.

  9. Nitrogen release from forest soils containing sulfide-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maileena Nieminen, Tiina; Merilä, Päivi; Ukonmaanaho, Liisa

    2014-05-01

    Soils containing sediments dominated by metal sulfides cause high acidity and release of heavy metals, when excavated or drained, as the aeration of these sediments causes formation of sulfuric acid. Consequent leaching of acidity and heavy metals can kill tree seedlings and animals such as fish, contaminate water, and corrode concrete and steel. These types of soils are called acid sulfate soils. Their metamorphic equivalents, such as sulfide rich black shales, pose a very similar risk of acidity and metal release to the environment. Until today the main focus in treatment of the acid sulfate soils has been to prevent acidification and metal toxicity to agricultural crop plants, and only limited attention has been paid to the environmental threat caused by the release of acidity and heavy metals to the surrounding water courses. Even less attention is paid on release of major nutrients, such as nitrogen, although these sediments are extremely rich in carbon and nitrogen and present a potentially high microbiological activity. In Europe, the largest cover of acid sulfate soils is found in coastal lowlands of Finland. Estimates of acid sulfate soils in agricultural use range from 1 300 to 3 000 km2, but the area in other land use classes, such as managed peatland forests, is presumably larger. In Finland, 49 500 km2 of peatlands have been drained for forestry, and most of these peatland forests will be at the regeneration stage within 10 to 30 years. As ditch network maintenance is often a prerequisite for a successful establishment of the following tree generation, the effects of maintenance operations on the quality of drainage water should be under special control in peatlands underlain by sulfide-bearing sediments. Therefore, identification of risk areas and effective prevention of acidity and metal release during drain maintenance related soil excavating are great challenges for forestry on coastal lowlands of Finland. The organic and inorganic nitrogen

  10. [Relationships between soil moisture and needle-fall in Masson pine forests in acid rain region of Chongqing, Southwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Hao; Wang, Yan-Hui; Li, Zhen-Hua; Yu, Peng-Tao; Xiong, Wei; Hao, Jia; Duan, Jian

    2012-10-01

    From March 2009 to November 2011, an investigation was conducted on the spatiotemporal variation of soil moisture and its effects on the needle-fall in Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forests in acid rain region of Chongqing, Southeast China, with the corresponding soil moisture thresholds determined. No matter the annual precipitation was abundant, normal or less than average, the seasonal variation of soil moisture in the forests could be obviously divided into four periods, i.e., sufficient (before May), descending (from June to July), drought (from August to September), and recovering (from October to November). With increasing soil depth, the soil moisture content increased after an initial decrease, but the difference of the soil moisture content among different soil layers decreased with decreasing annual precipitation. The amount of monthly needle-fall in the forests in growth season was significantly correlated with the water storage in root zone (0-60 cm soil layer), especially in the main root zone (20-50 cm soil layer). Soil field capacity (or capillary porosity) and 82% of field capacity (or 80% of capillary porosity) were the main soil moisture thresholds affecting the litter-fall. It was suggested that in acid rain region, Masson pine forest was easily to suffer from water deficit stress, especially in dry-summer period. The water deficit stress, together with already existed acid rain stress, would further threaten the health of the Masson forest.

  11. Microbial Substrate Usage Indicated by C-14 Contents of Phospholipid Fatty Acids From Soil Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethemeyer, J.; Nadeau, M. J.; Grootes, P. M.; Kramer, C.; Gleixner, G.

    2004-05-01

    Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA's) are generally associated with viable (bacterial) cell membranes. They are thought to be short-lived under normal soil conditions. We compare the C-14 levels in PLFA's obtained from soil samples from the,clean" experimental site at Rotthalmünster (Germany) with those from the agricultural research station at Halle (Germany), where the soil is contaminated with,old" carbon from lignite mining and industry. The most abundant PLFA's were isolated via preparative capillary gas chromatography of their methyl-esters at the Max-Planck Institute, Jena, and their C-14 concentration was determined via accelerator mass spectrometry at the Leibniz-Labor, Kiel. The C-14 levels of three mono-unsaturated fatty acids (n-C17:1, n-C18:1 (and n-C16:1)) are not statistically significant different from those of the contemporaneous atmosphere, indicating these fatty acids were derived from fresh plant material. C-14 levels significantly above those of the atmosphere in three saturated fatty acids (i/a-C15:0, n-C16:0 and cy-C18:0) from the surface soil of Rotthalmünster must derive from carbon fixed from the atmosphere several years earlier, when levels of bomb-C-14, remaining from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, especially of the early 1960's, were still higher. Lower C-14 levels in the same compounds from the Halle surface soil indicate the incorporation of "old" contaminant carbon. A below- atmospheric C-14 concentration in n-C18:0 in Rotthalmünster surface soil may reflect the partial incorporation of carbon from older, pre-bomb times. The C-14 concentrations show these PLFA's were synthesized predominantly from recent to sub-recent photosynthetic compounds, while the significant differences in C-14 concentration, observed between the PLFA's, indicate their production from soil organic matter fractions of different (recent) age and C-14 content. The Halle results show "old" carbon may be incorporated into PLFA's and thus reenter the soil

  12. Fluorine distribution in soil in the vicinity of an accidental spillage of hydrofluoric acid in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jinsung; Lee, Hyun A; Lee, Junseok; Yoon, Hye-On

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the status of fluorine (F) in soil in the vicinity of a spillage of anhydrous hydrofluoric acid in Korea. Gaseous hydrogen fluoride dispersed was suspected to have contaminated the surrounding soil environment. Total and water soluble F concentrations in soil within a 1 km radius of the spillage were determined. Total F concentrations (mean=222±70.1 mg kg(-1)) were lower than the Korean limit value (i.e., 400 mg kg(-1)) and several reported measurements of background F concentrations in soils except for a single outlying case. Soluble F concentrations ranged from 0.111 to 6.40 mg kg(-1) (mean=2.20±1.80 mg kg(-1)). A negative correlation between the soluble F concentration of soil and distance from the spillage was observed. This indicates that the soluble F concentration has a crucial role in fractionating the F concentration arising from a 'non natural input' i.e., the spillage. The F content of rice samples seemed to be significantly influenced by the soluble F concentrations of soils. Rice samples collected from the control and affected areas contained 41 mg kg(-1) and 578 mg kg(-1) of total F, respectively.

  13. Rice straw incorporated just before soil flooding increases acetic acid formation and decreases available nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldir Knoblauch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of rice straw into the soil just before flooding for water-seeded rice can immobilize mineral nitrogen (N and lead to the production of acetic acid harmful to the rice seedlings, which negatively affects grain yield. This study aimed to evaluate the formation of organic acids and variation in pH and to quantify the mineral N concentration in the soil as a function of different times of incorporation of rice straw or of ashes from burning the straw before flooding. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse using an Inceptisol (Typic Haplaquept soil. The treatments were as follows: control (no straw or ash; incorporation of ashes from previous straw burning; rice straw incorporated to drained soil 60 days before flooding; straw incorporated 30 days before flooding; straw incorporated 15 days before flooding and straw incorporated on the day of flooding. Experimental units were plastic buckets with 6.0 kg of soil. The buckets remained flooded throughout the trial period without rice plants. Soil samples were collected every seven days, beginning one day before flooding until the 13th week of flooding for determination of mineral N- ammonium (NH4+ and nitrate (NO3-. Soil solution pH and concentration of organic acids (acetic, propionic and butyric were determined. All NO3- there was before flooding was lost in approximately two weeks of flooding, in all treatments. There was sigmoidal behavior for NH4+ formation in all treatments, i.e., ammonium ion concentration began to rise shortly after soil flooding, slightly decreased and then went up again. On the 91st day of flooding, the NH4+ concentrations in soil was 56 mg kg-1 in the control treatment, 72 mg kg-1 for the 60-day treatment, 73 mg kg-1 for the 30-day treatment and 53 mg kg-1 for the ash incorporation treatment. These ammonium concentrations correspond to 84, 108, 110 and 80 kg ha-1 of N-NH4+, respectively. When the straw was incorporated on the day of flooding or 15 days

  14. Influence of different fertilization on the dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus accumulation in acid and limed soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva Jokubauskaite

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil quality has become an important issue in soil science. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC is believed to play an important role in soil processes and in the C, N and P balances, their supplies to plants in all types of soils. It is much more sensitive to soil management than is soil organic matter as a whole, and can be used as a key indicator of soil natural functions. This study aimed to assess the influence of different organic fertilizers on DOC and N, P accumulation. The study was carried out on a moraine loam soil at the Vezaiciai Branch of Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry in 2012. Farmyard manure (FYM (60 t ha -1 and alternative organic fertilizers (wheat straw, rape residues, roots, stubble, perennial grasses were applied on two soil backgrounds - acid and limed. DOC was analysed using an ion chromatograph SKALAR. Application of organic amendments resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon (SOC content, which demonstrates a positive role of organic fertilizers in SOC conservation. The combination of different organic fertilizers and liming had a significant positive effect on DOC concentration in the soil. The highest DOC content (0.241 g kg-1 was established in the limed soil fertilized with farmyard manure. The most unfavourable status of DOC was determined in the unlimed, unfertilized soil. The limed and FYM-applied soil had the highest nitrogen (1.47 g kg-1 and phosphorus (0.84 g kg-1 content compared to the other treatments. Organic fertilizers gave a significant positive effect on SOC and DOC content increase in the topsoil. This immediate increase is generally attributed to the presence of soluble materials in the amendments. Application of organic fertilizers in acid and limed soil increased the nutrient stocks and ensured soil chemical indicators at the optimal level for plant growth and thus may provide a mechanism as well as prediction opportunities for soil fertility, conservation

  15. Persistence of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in loess soil under different combinations of temperature, soil moisture and light/darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Célia P M; Yang, Xiaomei; Gort, Gerrit; Xue, Sha; van Dam, Ruud; Zomer, Paul; Mol, Hans G J; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2016-12-01

    The dissipation kinetics of glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were studied in loess soil, under biotic and abiotic conditions, as affected by temperature, soil moisture (SM) and light/darkness. Nonsterile and sterile soil samples were spiked with 16mgkg(-1) of glyphosate, subjected to three SM contents (20% WHC, 60% WHC, saturation), and incubated for 30days at 5°C and 30°C, under dark and light regimes. Glyphosate and AMPA dissipation kinetics were fit to single-first-order (SFO) or first-order-multicompartment (FOMC) models, per treatment combination. AMPA kinetic model included both the formation and decline phases. Glyphosate dissipation kinetics followed SFO at 5°C, but FOMC at 30°C. AMPA followed SFO dissipation kinetics for all treatments. Glyphosate and AMPA dissipation occurred mostly by microbial activity. Abiotic processes played a negligible role for both compounds. Under biotic conditions, glyphosate dissipation and AMPA formation/dissipation were primarily affected by temperature, but also by SM. Light regimes didn't play a significant role. Glyphosate DT50 varied between 1.5 and 53.5days, while its DT90 varied between 8.0 and 280days, depending on the treatment. AMPA persisted longer in soil than glyphosate, with its DT50 at 30°C ranging between 26.4 and 44.5days, and its DT90 between 87.8 and 148days. The shortest DT50/DT90 values for both compounds occurred at 30°C and under optimal/saturated moisture conditions, while the largest occurred at 5°C and reaching drought stress conditions. Based on these results, we conclude that glyphosate and AMPA dissipate rapidly under warm and rainy climate conditions. However, repeated glyphosate applications in fallows or winter crops in countries where cold and dry winters normally occur could lead to on-site soil pollution, with consequent potential risks to the environment and human health. To our knowledge, this study is the first evaluating the combined effect of

  16. Cysteic acid and taurine synthesis from sulphate in the chick embryo; Synthese de l'acide cysteique et de la taurine a partir du sulfate dans l'oeuf embryonne de poule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapeville, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The formation of taurine from sulphate was studied in the chick embryo using the radioisotopes of: sulphur, carbon and hydrogen. The following reactions occur: 1) reduction of sulphate to sulphite; 2) fixation of the sulphite on a carbon chain with an amino group, resulting from desulphydration of L-cysteine, which leads to the formation of L-cysteic acid; 3) decarboxylation of L-cysteic acid. Reaction (1) takes place only in the endo-dermal cells of the yolk sac; reaction (2) in these same cells and in the yolk; reaction (3) is general, localized in the yolk sac, in the yolk as well as in the tissues of the embryo itself. The enzyme which catalyses reaction (2) has been purified; the coenzyme is pyridoxal phosphate. The desulphydration of cysteine by this enzyme is a reversible reaction. In non-physiological conditions of concentration and temperature, pyridoxal phosphate catalyses in the presence of metallic ions, the desulphydration of cysteine and the formation of cysteic acid from sulphite. (author) [French] On a montre que la formation de taurine a partir de sulfate dans I'oeuf embryonne de poule, etudiee a l'aide des radioisotopes, du soufre, du carbone et de l'hydrogene, correspond aux reactions suivantes: 1) reduction du sulfate en sulfite; 2) fixation du sulfite sur une chaine tricarbonee et aminee provenant de la desulfhydration de la L-cysteine, fixation conduisant a la formation d'acide L-cysteique; 3) decarboxylation de l'acide L-cysteique. La reaction (1) a lieu uniquement dans les cellules de l'endoderme du sac vitellin; la reaction (2) dans les memes cellules et dans le vitellus; la reaction (3) est plus generale, elle est localisee dans le sac vitellin, dans le vitellus et dans les tissus de l'embryon. L'enzyme qui catalyse la reaction (2) a ete purifie; il possede le phosphate de pyridoxal comme coenzyme. La desulfhydration de la cysteine par cet enzyme est une reaction reversible. Dans les conditions non

  17. Adsorption and degradation of phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides in soils: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszko, Tadeusz; Muszyński, Paweł; Materska, Małgorzata; Bojanowska, Monika; Kostecka, Małgorzata; Jackowska, Izabella

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of the present review on phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid (2,4-D), 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (MCPA), (2R)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) propanoic acid (dichlorprop-P), (2R)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid (mecoprop-P), 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) butanoic acid (2,4-DB), and 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) butanoic acid (MCPB)-was to compare the extent of their adsorption in soils and degradation rates to assess their potential for groundwater contamination. The authors found that adsorption decreased in the sequence of 2,4-DB > 2,4-D > MCPA > dichlorprop-P > mecoprop-P. Herbicides are predominantly adsorbed as anions-on organic matter and through a water-bridging mechanism with adsorbed Fe cations-and their neutral forms are adsorbed mainly on organic matter. Adsorption of anions of 2,4-D, MCPA, dichlorprop-P, and mecoprop-P is inversely correlated with their lipophilicity values, and modeling of adsorption of the compounds based on this relationship is possible. The predominant dissipation mechanism of herbicides in soils is bacterial degradation. The contribution of other mechanisms, such as degradation by fungi, photodegradation, or volatilization from soils, is much smaller. The rate of bacterial degradation decreased in the following order: 2,4-D > MCPA > mecoprop-P > dichlorprop-P. It was found that 2,4-D and MCPA have the lowest potential for leaching into groundwater and that mecoprop-P and dichlorprop-P have slightly higher potential. Because of limited data on adsorption and degradation of 2,4-DB and MCPB, estimation of their leaching potential was not possible.

  18. Influence of the selective EDTA derivative phenyldiaminetetraacetic acid on the speciation and extraction of heavy metals from a contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wei, Hang; Yang, Xiu-Hong; Xia, Bing; Liu, Jun-Min; Su, Cheng-Yong; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2014-08-01

    The development of more selective chelators for the washing of heavy metal contaminated soil