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Sample records for acid soil solution

  1. Effect of wood ash application on soil solution chemistry of tropical acid soils: incubation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkana, J C Voundi; Demeyer, A; Verloo, M G

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of wood ash application on soil solution composition of three tropical acid soils. Calcium carbonate was used as a reference amendment. Amended soils and control were incubated for 60 days. To assess soluble nutrients, saturation extracts were analysed at 15 days intervals. Wood ash application affects the soil solution chemistry in two ways, as a liming agent and as a supplier of nutrients. As a liming agent, wood ash application induced increases in soil solution pH, Ca, Mg, inorganic C, SO4 and DOC. As a supplier of elements, the increase in the soil solution pH was partly due to ligand exchange between wood ash SO4 and OH- ions. Large increases in concentrations of inorganic C, SO4, Ca and Mg with wood ash relative to lime and especially increases in K reflected the supply of these elements by wood ash. Wood ash application could represent increased availability of nutrients for the plant. However, large concentrations of basic cations, SO4 and NO3 obtained with higher application rates could be a concern because of potential solute transport to surface waters and groundwater. Wood ash must be applied at reasonable rates to avoid any risk for the environment.

  2. The response of soil solution chemistry in European forests to decreasing acid deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, James; Pannatier, Elisabeth Graf; Carnicelli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    to emissions controls. In this study, we assessed the response of soil solution chemistry in mineral horizons of European forests to these changes. Trends in pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), major ions, total aluminium (Altot) and dissolved organic carbon were determined for the period 1995–2012. Plots...... with at least 10 years of observations from the ICP Forests monitoring network were used. Trends were assessed for the upper mineral soil (10–20 cm, 104 plots) and subsoil (40–80 cm, 162 plots). There was a large decrease in the concentration of sulphate () in soil solution; over a 10‐year period (2000...... over the entire dataset. The response of soil solution acidity was nonuniform. At 10–20 cm, ANC increased in acid‐sensitive soils (base saturation ≤10%) indicating a recovery, but ANC decreased in soils with base saturation >10%. At 40–80 cm, ANC remained unchanged in acid‐sensitive soils (base...

  3. Soil Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the soil solution in the root environment in the greenhouse industry differ much from those for field grown crops. This is caused firstly by the growing conditions in the greenhouse, which strongly differ from those in the field and secondly the function attributed to the soil

  4. Interactive effects of soil acidity and fluoride on soil solution aluminium chemistry and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, V; Loganathan, P; Tillman, R W; Parfitt, R L

    2007-02-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine if concentrations of fluoride (F), which would be added to acid soils via P fertilisers, were detrimental to barley root growth. Increasing rates of F additions to soil significantly increased the soil solution concentrations of aluminium (Al) and F irrespective of the initial adjusted soil pH, which ranged from 4.25 to 5.48. High rates of F addition severely restricted root growth; the effect was more pronounced in the strongly acidic soil. Speciation calculations demonstrated that increasing rates of F additions substantially increased the concentrations of Al-F complexes in the soil. Stepwise regression analysis showed that it was the combination of the activities of AlF2(1+) and AlF(2+) complexes that primarily controlled barley root growth. The results suggested that continuous input of F to soils, and increased soil acidification, may become an F risk issue in the future.

  5. Effects of EDTA and low molecular weight organic acids on soil solution properties of a heavy metal polluted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L H; Luo, Y M; Christie, P; Wong, M H

    2003-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of EDTA and low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) on the pH, total organic carbon (TOC) and heavy metals in the soil solution in the rhizosphere of Brassica juncea grown in a paddy soil contaminated with Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd. The results show that EDTA and LMWOA have no effect on the soil solution pH. EDTA addition significantly increased the TOC concentrations in the soil solution. The TOC concentrations in treatments with EDTA were significantly higher than those in treatments with LMWOA. Adding 3 mmol kg(-1) EDTA to the soil markedly increased the total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd in the soil solution. Compared to EDTA, LMWOA had a very small effect on the metal concentrations. Total concentrations in the soil solution followed the sequence: EDTA > citric acid (CA) approximately oxalic acid (OA) approximately malic acid (MA) for Cu and Pb; EDTA > MA > CA approximately OA for Zn; and EDTA > MA > CA > OA for Cd. The labile concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd showed similar trends to the total concentrations.

  6. Interactive effects of soil acidity and fluoride on soil solution aluminium chemistry and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) root growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoharan, V.; Loganathan, P.; Tillman, R.W.; Parfitt, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine if concentrations of fluoride (F), which would be added to acid soils via P fertilisers, were detrimental to barley root growth. Increasing rates of F additions to soil significantly increased the soil solution concentrations of aluminium (Al) and F irrespective of the initial adjusted soil pH, which ranged from 4.25 to 5.48. High rates of F addition severely restricted root growth; the effect was more pronounced in the strongly acidic soil. Speciation calculations demonstrated that increasing rates of F additions substantially increased the concentrations of Al-F complexes in the soil. Stepwise regression analysis showed that it was the combination of the activities of AlF 2 1+ and AlF 2+ complexes that primarily controlled barley root growth. The results suggested that continuous input of F to soils, and increased soil acidification, may become an F risk issue in the future. - Addition of high rates of fluoride to strongly acidic soils can reduce barley root growth due to the toxicity of aluminium-fluoride complexes formed in soil solution

  7. [Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids on the Speciation of Pb in Purple Soil and Soil Solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Jiang, Tao; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-15

    Lead (Pb) in purple soil was selected as the research target, using one-step extraction method with 0.01 mol · L⁻¹ sodium nitrate as the background electrolyte to study the release effect of citric acid (CA), tartaric acid (TA) and acetic acid (AC) with different concentrations. Sequential extraction and geochemical model (Visual Minteq v3.0) were applied to analyze and predict the speciation of Pb in soil solid phase and soil solution phase. Then the ebvironmental implications and risks of low-molecule weight organic acid (LMWOA) on soil Pb were analyzed. The results indicated that all three types of LMWOA increased the desorption capacity of Pb in purple soil, and the effect followed the descending order of CA > TA > AC. After the action of LMWOAs, the exchangeable Pb increased; the carbonate-bound Pb and Fe-Mn oxide bound Pb dropped in soil solid phase. Organic bound Pb was the main speciation in soil solution phase, accounting for 45.16%-75.05%. The following speciation of Pb in soil solution was free Pb, accounting for 22.71%-50.25%. For CA and TA treatments, free Pb ions and inorganic bound Pb in soil solution increased with increasing LMWOAs concentration, while organic bound Pb suffered a decrease in this process. An opposite trend for AC treatment was observed compared with CA and TA treatments. Overall, LMWOAs boosted the bioavailability of Pb in purple soil and had a potential risk to contaminate underground water. Among the three LMWOAs in this study, CA had the largest potential to activate soil Pb.

  8. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  9. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ash

    Full Text Available Shredded card (SC was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water. We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4. Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49 were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC. In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC. In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC. In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil, and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC. A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption. SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing.

  10. Chemically modified carbon paste electrode for fast screening of oxalic acid levels in soil solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šestáková, Ivana; Jakl, M.; Jaklová Dytrtová, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 102, - (2008), s. 140-140 E-ISSN 1213-7103. [International Conference on Electroanalysis /12./. 16.06.2008-19.06.2008, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/06/0496 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : oxalic acid * carbon paste electrodes * soil solutions Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  11. A new approach to study cadmium complexes with oxalic acid in soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dytrtová, Jana Jaklová; Jakl, Michal; Sestáková, Ivana; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Schröder, Detlef; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2011-05-05

    This study presents a new analytical approach for the determination of heavy metals complexed to low-molecular-weight-organic acids in soil solutions, which combines the sensitivity of differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) with the molecular insight gained by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The combination of these analytical methods allows the investigation of such complexes in complex matrixes. On the voltammograms of the soil solutions, in addition to the expected complexes of oxalic acid with cadmium and lead, respectively, also peaks belonging to mixed complexes of cadmium, lead, and oxalic acid (OAH(2)) were observed. In order to verify the possible formation of complexes with OAH(2), aqueous solutions of OAH(2) with traces of Cd(II) were investigated as model systems. Signals corresponding to several distinct molecular complexes between cadmium and oxalic acid were detected in the model solutions using negative-ion ESI-MS, which follow the general formula [Cd(n)(X,Y)((2n+1))](-), where n is the number of cadmium atoms, X=Cl(-), and Y=OAH(-). Some of these complexes were also identified in the ESI mass spectra taken from the soil solutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A new approach to study cadmium complexes with oxalic acid in soil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaklova Dytrtova, Jana; Jakl, Michal; Sestakova, Ivana; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Schroeder, Detlef; Navratil, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new analytical approach for the determination of heavy metals complexed to low-molecular-weight-organic acids in soil solutions, which combines the sensitivity of differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) with the molecular insight gained by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The combination of these analytical methods allows the investigation of such complexes in complex matrixes. On the voltammograms of the soil solutions, in addition to the expected complexes of oxalic acid with cadmium and lead, respectively, also peaks belonging to mixed complexes of cadmium, lead, and oxalic acid (OAH 2 ) were observed. In order to verify the possible formation of complexes with OAH 2 , aqueous solutions of OAH 2 with traces of Cd(II) were investigated as model systems. Signals corresponding to several distinct molecular complexes between cadmium and oxalic acid were detected in the model solutions using negative-ion ESI-MS, which follow the general formula [Cd n (X,Y) (2n+1) ] - , where n is the number of cadmium atoms, X = Cl - , and Y = OAH - . Some of these complexes were also identified in the ESI mass spectra taken from the soil solutions.

  13. A new approach to study cadmium complexes with oxalic acid in soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaklova Dytrtova, Jana, E-mail: dytrtova@uochb.cas.cz [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the AS CR, v.v.i., Flemingovo namesti 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Jakl, Michal [Department of Agro-Environmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences, Kamycka 129, 16521 Prague - Suchdol (Czech Republic); Sestakova, Ivana [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry of the AS CR, v.v.i., Dolejskova 3, 182 23 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Zins, Emilie-Laure; Schroeder, Detlef [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the AS CR, v.v.i., Flemingovo namesti 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Navratil, Tomas [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry of the AS CR, v.v.i., Dolejskova 3, 182 23 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2011-05-05

    This study presents a new analytical approach for the determination of heavy metals complexed to low-molecular-weight-organic acids in soil solutions, which combines the sensitivity of differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) with the molecular insight gained by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The combination of these analytical methods allows the investigation of such complexes in complex matrixes. On the voltammograms of the soil solutions, in addition to the expected complexes of oxalic acid with cadmium and lead, respectively, also peaks belonging to mixed complexes of cadmium, lead, and oxalic acid (OAH{sub 2}) were observed. In order to verify the possible formation of complexes with OAH{sub 2}, aqueous solutions of OAH{sub 2} with traces of Cd(II) were investigated as model systems. Signals corresponding to several distinct molecular complexes between cadmium and oxalic acid were detected in the model solutions using negative-ion ESI-MS, which follow the general formula [Cd{sub n}(X,Y){sub (2n+1)}]{sup -}, where n is the number of cadmium atoms, X = Cl{sup -}, and Y = OAH{sup -}. Some of these complexes were also identified in the ESI mass spectra taken from the soil solutions.

  14. The response of soil solution chemistry in European forests to decreasing acid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Carnicelli, Stefano; Cecchini, Guia; Clarke, Nicholas; Cools, Nathalie; Hansen, Karin; Meesenburg, Henning; Nieminen, Tiina M; Pihl-Karlsson, Gunilla; Titeux, Hugues; Vanguelova, Elena; Verstraeten, Arne; Vesterdal, Lars; Waldner, Peter; Jonard, Mathieu

    2018-03-31

    Acid deposition arising from sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions from fossil fuel combustion and agriculture has contributed to the acidification of terrestrial ecosystems in many regions globally. However, in Europe and North America, S deposition has greatly decreased in recent decades due to emissions controls. In this study, we assessed the response of soil solution chemistry in mineral horizons of European forests to these changes. Trends in pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), major ions, total aluminium (Al tot ) and dissolved organic carbon were determined for the period 1995-2012. Plots with at least 10 years of observations from the ICP Forests monitoring network were used. Trends were assessed for the upper mineral soil (10-20 cm, 104 plots) and subsoil (40-80 cm, 162 plots). There was a large decrease in the concentration of sulphate (SO42-) in soil solution; over a 10-year period (2000-2010), SO42- decreased by 52% at 10-20 cm and 40% at 40-80 cm. Nitrate was unchanged at 10-20 cm but decreased at 40-80 cm. The decrease in acid anions was accompanied by a large and significant decrease in the concentration of the nutrient base cations: calcium, magnesium and potassium (Bc = Ca 2+  + Mg 2+  + K + ) and Al tot over the entire dataset. The response of soil solution acidity was nonuniform. At 10-20 cm, ANC increased in acid-sensitive soils (base saturation ≤10%) indicating a recovery, but ANC decreased in soils with base saturation >10%. At 40-80 cm, ANC remained unchanged in acid-sensitive soils (base saturation ≤20%, pHCaCl2 ≤ 4.5) and decreased in better-buffered soils (base saturation >20%, pHCaCl2 > 4.5). In addition, the molar ratio of Bc to Al tot either did not change or decreased. The results suggest a long-time lag between emission abatement and changes in soil solution acidity and underline the importance of long-term monitoring in evaluating ecosystem response to decreases in deposition. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons

  15. Interaction between Al3+ and acrylic acid and polyacrylic acid in acidic aqueous solution: a model experiment for the behavior of Al3+ in acidified soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etou, Mayumi; Masaki, Yuka; Tsuji, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Bai, Shuqin; Nishida, Ikuko; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2011-01-01

    From the viewpoint of the phytotoxicity and mobility of Al(3+) released from soil minerals due to soil acidification, the interaction between Al(3+) and acrylic acid (AA) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) as a model compound of fulvic acid was investigated. The interaction was examined at pH 3 so as to avoid the hydrolysis of Al(3+). The interaction between Al(3+) and AA was weak. However, the interaction between Al(3+) and PAA was strong and depended on the initial (COOH in PAA)/Al molar ratio (R(P)) of the solution. For the range of 1/R(P), the interaction between Al(3+) and PAA can be divided into three categories: (1) 1:1 Al-PAA-complex (an Al(3+) combines to a carboxyl group), (2) intermolecular Al-PAA-complex (an Al(3+) combines to more than 2 carboxyl groups of other Al-PAA-complexes) in addition to the 1:1 Al-PAA-complex and (3) precipitation of intermolecular complexes. In conclusion, R(P) is an important factor affecting the behavior of Al(3+) in acidic soil solution.

  16. Biodegradation and speciation of residual SS-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) in soil solution left after soil washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandy, Susan; Ammann, Adrian; Schulin, Rainer; Nowack, Bernd

    2006-07-01

    This paper aims to investigate the degradation and speciation of EDDS-complexes (SS-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid) in soil following soil washing. The changes in soil solution metal and EDDS concentrations were investigated for three polluted soils. EDDS was degraded after a lag phase of 7-11 days with a half-life of 4.18-5.60 days. No influence of EDDS-speciation on the reaction was observed. The decrease in EDDS resulted in a corresponding decrease in solubilized metals. Changes in EDDS speciation can be related to (1) initial composition of the soil, (2) temporarily anoxic conditions in the soil slurry after soil washing, (3) exchange of EDDS complexes with Cu even in soils without elevated Cu and (4) formation of NiEDDS. Dissolved organic matter is important for metal speciation at low EDDS concentrations. Our results show that even in polluted soils EDDS is degraded from a level of several hundred micromoles to below 1 microM within 50 days.

  17. Citric acid-modified Fenton's reaction for the oxidation of chlorinated ethylenes in soil solution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-06-01

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H2O2 concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H2O2 relative to iron catalysts (Fe2+/H2O2<1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelation in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  18. Extraction of Pentachlorophenol from Soils using Environmentally Benign Lactic Acid Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil contamination with pentachlorophenol (PCP) is widespread across the globe. Soil washing/extraction is a common technique to remove this compound. Several soil washing/extraction solutions have been used but a majority of them have the problem of persistence in the environmen...

  19. Effect of humic acid on the underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry of copper in acetic acid soil extract solutions at mercaptoacetic acid-modified gold electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Gregoire; Beni, Valerio; Dillon, Patrick H.; Barry, Thomas; Arrigan, Damien W.M

    2004-05-24

    Electrochemical measurements were undertaken for the investigation of the underpotential deposition-stripping process of copper at bare and modified gold electrodes in 0.11 M acetic acid, the first fraction of the European Union's Bureau Communautaire de References (BCR) sequential extraction procedure for fractionating metals within soils and sediments. Gold electrodes modified with mercaptoacetic acid showed higher sensitivity for the detection of copper than bare gold electrodes, both in the absence and in the presence of humic acid in acetic acid solutions, using the underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry (UPD-SV) method. In the presence of 50 mg l{sup -1} of humic acid, the mercaptoacetic acid modified electrode proved to be 1.5 times more sensitive than the bare gold electrode. The mercaptoacetic acid monolayer formed on the gold surface provided efficient protection against the adsorption of humic acid onto the gold electrode surface. Variation of the humic acid concentration in the solution showed little effect on the copper stripping signal at the modified electrode. UPD-SV at the modified electrode was applied to the analysis of soil extract samples. Linear correlation of the electrochemical results with atomic spectroscopic results yielded the straight-line equation y ({mu}g l{sup -1}) = 1.10x - 44 (ppb) (R=0.992, n=6), indicating good agreement between the two methods.

  20. A decade of monitoring at Swiss Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) sites: can we observe trends in atmospheric acid deposition and in soil solution acidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannatier, Elisabeth Graf; Thimonier, Anne; Schmitt, Maria; Walthert, Lorenz; Waldner, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Trends in atmospheric acid deposition and in soil solution acidity from 1995 or later until 2007 were investigated at several forest sites throughout Switzerland to assess the effects of air pollution abatements on deposition and the response of the soil solution chemistry. Deposition of the major elements was estimated from throughfall and bulk deposition measurements at nine sites of the Swiss Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research network (LWF) since 1995 or later. Soil solution was measured at seven plots at four soil depths since 1998 or later. Trends in the molar ratio of base cations to aluminum (BC/Al) in soil solutions and in concentrations and fluxes of inorganic N (NO(3)-N + NH(4)-N), sulfate (SO(4)-S), and base cations (BC) were used to detect changes in soil solution chemistry. Acid deposition significantly decreased at three out of the nine study sites due to a decrease in total N deposition. Total SO(4)-S deposition decreased at the nine sites, but due to the relatively low amount of SO(4)-S load compared to N deposition, it did not contribute to decrease acid deposition significantly. No trend in total BC deposition was detected. In the soil solution, no trend in concentrations and fluxes of BC, SO(4)-S, and inorganic N were found at most soil depths at five out of the seven sites. This suggests that the soil solution reacted very little to the changes in atmospheric deposition. A stronger reduction in base cations compared to aluminum was detected at two sites, which might indicate that acidification of the soil solution was proceeding faster at these sites.

  1. Effects of simulated acid rain on soil and soil solution chemistry in a monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qingyan; Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-05-01

    Acid rain is an environmental problem of increasing concern in China. In this study, a laboratory leaching column experiment with acid forest soil was set up to investigate the responses of soil and soil solution chemistry to simulated acid rain (SAR). Five pH levels of SAR were set: 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, and 4.5 (as a control, CK). The results showed that soil acidification would occur when the pH of SAR was ≤3.5. The concentrations of NO₃(-)and Ca(2+) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR fell 3.5. The concentration of SO₄(2-) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR was soil solution chemistry became increasingly apparent as the experiment proceeded (except for Na(+) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC)). The net exports of NO₃(-), SO₄(2-), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) increased about 42-86% under pH 2.5 treatment as compared to CK. The Ca(2+) was sensitive to SAR, and the soil could release Ca(2+) through mineral weathering to mitigate soil acidification. The concentration of exchangeable Al(3+) in the soil increased with increasing the acidity of SAR. The releases of soluble Al and Fe were SAR pH dependent, and their net exports under pH 2.5 treatment were 19.6 and 5.5 times, respectively, higher than that under CK. The net export of DOC was reduced by 12-29% under SAR treatments as compared to CK. Our results indicate the chemical constituents in the soil are more sensitive to SAR than those in the soil solution, and the effects of SAR on soil solution chemistry depend not only on the intensity of SAR but also on the duration of SAR addition. The soil and soil solution chemistry in this region may not be affected by current precipitation (pH≈4.5) in short term, but the soil and soil leachate chemistry may change dramatically if the pH of precipitation were below 3.5 and 3.0, respectively.

  2. The influence of surface incorporated lime and gypsiferous by-products on surface and subsurface soil acidity. I. Soil solution chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Hedley, M.J.; Bolan, N.S.; Horne, D.J. [New Zealand Forest Research Institute, Rotorua (New Zealand)

    1999-04-01

    Lime, fluidised bed boiler ash (FBA) and flue gas desulfurisation gypsum (FGDG) were incorporated in the top 50 mm of repacked columns of either an Allophanic (the Patua sand loam) or an Ultic (the Kaawa clay loam) soil, at rates containing calcium equivalent to 5000 kg/ha of CaCO{sub 3}. After leaching with water, the columns were sliced into sections for chemical analysis. In the columns of the variable-charged, allophanic Patua soil, topsoil-incorporated FBA ameliorated top and subsurface soil acidity through liming and the `self liming effect` induced by sulfate sorption, respectively. The soil solution pH of the top and subsurface layers of the Patua soil were raised to pH 6.40 and 5.35, respectively, by the FBA treatment. Consequently , phytotoxic labile monomeric aluminium (Al) concentration in the soil solution of the FBA treatment was reduced to {lt} 0.1 {mu}M Al. FGDG had a similar `self-liming effect` on subsurface of the Patua soil, but not the topsoil. Whereas FBA raised the pH of the Kaawa topsoil, no `self-liming effect` of subsurface soil by sulfate sorption was observed on the Kaawa subsurface soil, which is dominated by permanently charged clay minerals. Application of FBA and FGDG to both soils, however, caused significantly leaching of native soil Mg{sup 2+} and K{sup +}.

  3. Acid-base and copper-binding properties of three organic matter fractions isolated from a forest floor soil solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Joris W. J.; Kleja, Dan B.; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2010-02-01

    Vast amounts of knowledge about the proton- and metal-binding properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters have been obtained in studies on isolated humic and fulvic (hydrophobic) acids. Although macromolecular hydrophilic acids normally make up about one-third of DOM, their proton- and metal-binding properties are poorly known. Here, we investigated the acid-base and Cu-binding properties of the hydrophobic (fulvic) acid fraction and two hydrophilic fractions isolated from a soil solution. Proton titrations revealed a higher total charge for the hydrophilic acid fractions than for the hydrophobic acid fraction. The most hydrophilic fraction appeared to be dominated by weak acid sites, as evidenced by increased slope of the curve of surface charge versus pH at pH values above 6. The titration curves were poorly predicted by both Stockholm Humic Model (SHM) and NICA-Donnan model calculations using generic parameter values, but could be modelled accurately after optimisation of the proton-binding parameters (pH ⩽ 9). Cu-binding isotherms for the three fractions were determined at pH values of 4, 6 and 9. With the optimised proton-binding parameters, the SHM model predictions for Cu binding improved, whereas the NICA-Donnan predictions deteriorated. After optimisation of Cu-binding parameters, both models described the experimental data satisfactorily. Iron(III) and aluminium competed strongly with Cu for binding sites at both pH 4 and pH 6. The SHM model predicted this competition reasonably well, but the NICA-Donnan model underestimated the effects significantly at pH 6. Overall, the Cu-binding behaviour of the two hydrophilic acid fractions was very similar to that of the hydrophobic acid fraction, despite the differences observed in proton-binding characteristics. These results show that for modelling purposes, it is essential to include the hydrophilic acid fraction in the pool of 'active' humic substances.

  4. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  5. Improving the mining soil quality for a vegetation cover after addition of sewage sludges: inorganic ions and low-molecular-weight organic acids in the soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Aránzazu; Mingorance, Mª Dolores; Guzmán-Carrizosa, Ignacio; Fernández-Espinosa, Antonio J

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the effects of applying stabilized sewage sludge (SSL) and composted sewage sludge (CLV), at 5 and 10% to an acid mining soil. Limed soil (NCL) amended or not with SSL and CLV was incubated for 47 days. We studied the cations and organic and inorganic anions in the soil solution by means of ion chromatography. Liming led to big increases in Ca(2+) and SO4(2-) and to significant decreases in K(+), Mg(2+), NH4(+) and NO3(-). Addition of both organic amendments increased some cations (NH4(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Na(+)) and anions (Cl(-), NO3(-) only with CLV and PO4(3-) only with SSL) and provided a greater amount of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) (SSL more than CLV). Incubation led to decreases in all cations, particularly remarkable for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in SSL-10. A decrease in NH4(+) was associated with variations in NO2(-) and NO3(-) resulting from nitrification reactions. During incubation the LMWOAs content tended to decrease similarly to the cations, especially in SSL-10. Chemometric tools revealed a clear discrimination between SSL, CLV and NCL. Furthermore, treatment effects depended upon dose, mainly in SSL. Amendment nature and dose affect the quality of a mining soil and improve conditions for plant establishment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of acidic atmospheric deposition on soil solution composition in the Daniel Boone National Forest, Kentucky, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.D. Barton; A.D. Karathanasis; G. Chalfant

    2002-01-01

    Acid atmosperic depositoin may enter an environmental ecosystem in a variety of forms and pathways, but the most common components include sulfuric and nitric acids formed when rainwater interacts with sulfur (SO3) and nitrogen (NO3) emmissions. For many soils and watersheds sensitive to acid deposition, the predominant...

  7. Removal of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol from a solution by humic acids repeatedly extracted from a peat soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzou, Y.-M.; Wang, S.-L.; Liu, J.-C.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Chen, J.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Humic acid (HA) is one of the major components of soil organic matter. It strongly affects the sorption behavior of organic and inorganic contaminants in soils. To obtain a better understanding of the interactions of contaminants with HA, a repeated extraction technique has been applied to a peat soil to obtain HA fractions with varying aliphaticity and aromaticity, which were subsequently correlated to the sorption properties of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP). HA fractions were extracted repeatedly using an alkaline solution and each HA fraction was separated into two portions with an air-drying or re-suspending (denoted as RSHAs) process. Solid-state 13 C NMR and elemental analysis demonstrated that the aromaticity and polarity of HAs decreased with extractions. Kinetic results indicated that air-dried HAs exhibited two-step first order sorption behavior with a rapid stage followed by a slower stage. The slower sorption is attributed to the diffusion of 2,4,6-TCP in the condensed aromatic domains of HAs. Conversely, sorption of 2,4,6-TCP on RSHAs was extremely rapid and could not be fitted with any kinetic model. For air-dried HAs the sorption capacity (K oc ) was weakly correlated with the chemical compositions of HAs. However, a positive trend between K oc and aromaticity was observed for RSHAs. Compared with the results of air-dried HAs with their counterparts of RSHAs, it is therefore concluded that air-drying may alter the structure of HAs through artificially creating a more condensed domain in HAs. The structural alternation may result in an incorrect interpretation of the relationship between sorption capacity and chemical composition of HAs and a misjudgment of the transport behavior of 2,4,6-TCP in soils and sediments

  8. Effects of low-molecular-weight organic acids on the acute lethality, accumulation, and enzyme activity of cadmium in Eisenia fetida in a simulated soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Long; Wang, Yu-Jun; Xuan, Liang; Dang, Fei; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the toxicity of cadmium (Cd) to Eisenia fetida were investigated in a simulated soil solution. The LMWOAs protected E. fetida from Cd toxicity, as indicated by the increased median lethal concentration (LC50) values and the increased activity of superoxide dismutase. In addition, Cd concentrations in E. fetida decreased dramatically in the presence of LMWOAs. These results were likely because of the complexation between Cd and LMWOAs, which decreased the bioavailability and consequential toxicity of Cd to E. fetida. Notably, LMWOAs reduced Cd toxicity in decreasing order (ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid [EDTA] > citric acid > oxalic acid > malic acid > acetic acid), which was consistent with the decreasing complexation constants between LMWOAs and Cd. These results advance our understanding of the interactions between Cd and LMWOAs in soil. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1005-1011. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  9. Solute diffusivity in undisturbed soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægdsmand, Mette; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    Solute diffusivity in soil plays a major role in many important processes with relation to plant growth and environmental issues. Soil solute diffusivity is affected by the volumetric water content as well as the morphological characteristics of water-filled pores. The solute diffusivity in intact...

  10. Influence of solution acidity and CaCl2 concentration on the removal of heavy metals from metal-contaminated rice soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S.; Lai, M.S.; Lin, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    Soil washing is considered a useful technique for remediating metal-contaminated soils. This study examined the release edges of Cd, Zn, Ni, Cr, Cu or Pb in two contaminated rice soils from central Taiwan. The concentrations exceeding the trigger levels established by the regulatory agency of Taiwan were Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr for the Ho-Mei soil and Pb for the Nan-Tou soil. Successive extractions with HCl ranging from 0 to 0.2 M showed increased release of the heavy metals with declining pH, and the threshold pH value below which a sharp increase in the releases of the heavy metals was highest for Cd, Zn, and Ni (pH 4.6 to 4.9), intermediate for Pb and Cu (3.1 to 3.8) and lowest for Fe (2.1), Al (2.2) and Cr (1.7) for the soils. The low response slope of Ni and Cr particularly for the rice soils make soil washing with the acid up to the highest concentration used ineffective to reduce their concentrations to below trigger levels. Although soil washing with 0.1 M HCl was moderately effective in reducing Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd, which brought pH of the soils to 1.1 ± 0.1 (S.D.), the concurrent release of large quantities of Fe and Al make this remediation technique undesirable for the rice soils containing high clay. Successive washings with 0.01 M HCl could be considered an alternative as the dissolution of Fe and Al was minimal, and between 46 to 64% of Cd, Zn, and Cu for the Ho-Mei soil and 45% of Pb in the Na-Tou soil were extracted after four successive extractions with this dilute acid solution. The efficacy of Cd extraction improved if CaCl 2 was added to the acid solution. The correlation analysis revealed that Cr extracted was highly correlated (P < 0.001) with Fe extracted, whereas the Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd or Pb extracted was better correlated (P < 0.001) with Al than with Fe extracted. It is possible that the past seasonal soil flooding and drainage in the soils for rice production was conducive to incorporating Cr within the structure of Fe oxide, thereby making them

  11. Effect of different soil washing solutions on bioavailability of residual arsenic in soils and soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Jho, Eun Hea; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-11-01

    The effect of soil washing used for arsenic (As)-contaminated soil remediation on soil properties and bioavailability of residual As in soil is receiving increasing attention due to increasing interest in conserving soil qualities after remediation. This study investigates the effect of different washing solutions on bioavailability of residual As in soils and soil properties after soil washing. Regardless of washing solutions, the sequential extraction revealed that the residual As concentrations and the amount of readily labile As in soils were reduced after soil washing. However, the bioassay tests showed that the washed soils exhibited ecotoxicological effects - lower seed germination, shoot growth, and enzyme activities - and this could largely be attributed to the acidic pH and/or excessive nutrient contents of the washed soils depending on washing solutions. Overall, this study showed that treated soils having lower levels of contaminants could still exhibit toxic effects due to changes in soil properties, which highly depended on washing solutions. This study also emphasizes that data on the As concentrations, the soil properties, and the ecotoxicological effects are necessary to properly manage the washed soils for reuses. The results of this study can, thus, be utilized to select proper post-treatment techniques for the washed soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solid-solution partitioning and thionation of diphenylarsinic acid in a flooded soil under the impact of sulfate and iron reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Meng [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Tu, Chen [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Hu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Haibo [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Lijuan [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wei, Jing [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Li, Yuan [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Luo, Yongming, E-mail: ymluo@yic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Christie, Peter [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a major organic arsenic (As) compound derived from abandoned chemical weapons. The solid-solution partitioning and transformation of DPAA in flooded soils are poorly understood but are of great concern. The identification of the mechanisms responsible for the mobilization and transformation of DPAA may help to develop effective remediation strategies. Here, soil and Fe mineral incubation experiments were carried out to elucidate the partitioning and transformation of DPAA in anoxic (without addition of sulfate or sodium lactate) and sulfide (with the addition of sulfate and sodium lactate) soil and to examine the impact of sulfate and Fe(III) reduction on these processes. Results show that DPAA was more effectively mobilized and thionated in sulfide soil than in anoxic soil. At the initial incubation stages (0–4 weeks), 6.7–74.5% of the total DPAA in sulfide soil was mobilized likely by sorption competition with sodium lactate. At later incubation stage (4–8 weeks), DPAA was almost completely released into the solution likely due to the near-complete Fe(III) reduction. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) results provide further direct evidence of elevated DPAA release coupled with Fe(III) reduction in sulfide environments. The total DPAA fraction decreased significantly to 24.5% after two weeks and reached 3.4% after eight weeks in sulfide soil, whereas no obvious elimination of DPAA occurred in anoxic soil at the initial two weeks and the total DPAA fraction decreased to 10.9% after eight weeks. This can be explained in part by the enhanced mobilization of DPAA and sulfate reduction in sulfide soil compared with anoxic soil. These results suggest that under flooded soil conditions, Fe(III) and sulfate reduction significantly promote DPAA mobilization and thionation, respectively, and we suggest that it is essential to consider both sulfate and Fe(III) reduction to further our understanding of the environmental fate of

  13. Solute transport in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Leijnse, A.

    2013-01-01

    Solute transport is of importance in view of the movement of nutrient elements, e.g. towards the plant root system, and because of a broad range of pollutants. Pollution is not necessarily man induced, but may be due to geological or geohydrological causes, e.g. in the cases of pollution with

  14. Chemical composition and Zn bioavailability of the soil solution extracted from Zn amended variable charge soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampella, Mariavittoria; Adamo, Paola

    2010-01-01

    A study on variable charge soils (volcanic Italian and podzolic Scottish soils) was performed to investigate the influence of soil properties on the chemical composition of soil solution. Zinc speciation, bioavailability and toxicity in the soil solution were examined. The soils were spiked with increasing amounts of Zn (0, 100, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg) and the soil solutions were extracted using rhizon soil moisture samplers. The pH, total organic carbon (TOC), base cations, anions, total Zn and free Zn2+ in soil solution were analysed. A rapid bioassay with the luminescent bacterium Escherichia coli HB101 pUCD607 was performed to assess Zn toxicity. The influence of soil type and Zn treatments on the chemical composition of soil solution and on Zn toxicity was considered and discussed. Different trends of total and free Zn concentrations, base cations desorption and luminescence of E. coli HB101 pUCD607 were observed. The soil solution extracted from the volcanic soils had very low total and free Zn concentrations and showed specific Zn2+/Ca2+ exchange. The soil solution from the podzolic soil had much higher total and free Zn concentrations and showed no evidence of specific Zn2+/Ca2+ exchange. In comparison with the subalkaline volcanic soils, the acidic podzol showed enhanced levels of toxic free Zn2+ and consequently stronger effects on E. coli viability.

  15. Metals in European roadside soils and soil solution--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkenthin, Moritz; Kluge, Björn; Wessolek, Gerd

    2014-06-01

    This review provides a summary of studies analysing metal concentrations in soils and soil solution at European roadsides. The data collected during 27 studies covering a total of 64 sites across a number of European countries were summarised. Highest median values of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined in the top soil layer at the first 5 m beside the road. Generally, the influence of traffic on soil contamination decreased with increasing soil depth and distance to the road. The concentration patterns of metals in soil solution were independent from concentrations in the soil matrix. At 10-m distance, elevated soil metal concentrations, low pH, and low percolation rates led to high solute concentrations. Directly beside the road, high percolation rates lead to high annual loadings although solute concentrations are comparatively low. These loadings might be problematic, especially in regions with acidic sandy soils and a high groundwater table. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aluminium release from acidic forest soil following deforestation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acidic tropical soils often have high Al3+ concentrations in soil solutions, which can be toxic to plants and, thereby, reduce agricultural yields. This study focuses on the impact of deforestation and cultivation on the short and long-term Al geochemistry of acidic soils in Ghana, West Africa. Site-specific investigations were ...

  17. Metals in European roadside soils and soil solution – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werkenthin, Moritz; Kluge, Björn; Wessolek, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a summary of studies analysing metal concentrations in soils and soil solution at European roadsides. The data collected during 27 studies covering a total of 64 sites across a number of European countries were summarised. Highest median values of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined in the top soil layer at the first 5 m beside the road. Generally, the influence of traffic on soil contamination decreased with increasing soil depth and distance to the road. The concentration patterns of metals in soil solution were independent from concentrations in the soil matrix. At 10-m distance, elevated soil metal concentrations, low pH, and low percolation rates led to high solute concentrations. Directly beside the road, high percolation rates lead to high annual loadings although solute concentrations are comparatively low. These loadings might be problematic, especially in regions with acidic sandy soils and a high groundwater table. - Highlights: • Summary of studies analysing metals in soils and soil solution at European roadsides. • Metal concentrations in topsoil 5 m beside the road are influenced strongly by traffic. • Solute concentrations of metals are mostly independent from soil concentrations. • High percolation rates lead to high annual loadings directly beside the road. - Summarised data showed typical distance related metal patterns of European roadside soils; solute concentrations are mostly independent from soil matrix concentrations

  18. Soil–solution partitioning of DOC in acid organic soils. Results from a UK field acidification and alkalization experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oulehle, Filip; Jones, T.; Burden, A.; Cooper, M.; Lebron, I.; Zielinski, P.; Evans, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2013), s. 787-796 ISSN 1351-0754 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : humic substances * forest soils * carbon * matter * deposition * water * Aluminium * chemistry * mobility * release Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.387, year: 2013

  19. Mechanisms of adaptation of small grains to soil acidity

    OpenAIRE

    Đalović Ivica G.; Maksimović Ivana V.; Kastori Rudolf R.; Jelić Miodrag Ž.

    2010-01-01

    Acid soils limit crop production on 30-40% of the world's arable land and up to 70% of the world's potentially arable land. Over 60% of the total arable lands in Serbia are acid soils. Soil acidity is determined by hydrogen (H+) in soil solution and it is influenced by edaphic, climatic, and biological factors. Major constraints for plant growth on acid mineral soils are toxic concentrations of mineral elements like Al of H+ and/or low mineral nutrient availability due to low solubility (e.g....

  20. Aluminium, extractable from soil samples by the acid ammonium acetate soil-testing method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmo Mäkitie

    1968-05-01

    Full Text Available The extractant, 0.5 M acetic acid –0.5 M ammonium acetate at pH 4.65, which is used in soil-testing, extracts relatively high amounts of aluminium from acid soils. The mean values of acetate-extractable aluminium at pH 4.65, 1.75 meq Al/100 g of soil, and of exchangeable aluminium (M KCI extraction, 0.41 meq Al were obtained from a material of 30 samples of acid soils (Table 2. Several other acetic acid ammonium acetate extractants, from M acetic acid to M ammonium acetate solution were also used for studying the extractability of soil aluminium. The soil-testing extractant can be used for the estimation of the soluble amounts of aluminium in acid soils, however, further studies are needed for a better interpretation of the ammonium acetate extractable (at pH 4.65 aluminium in our soils.

  1. Zirconium for nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The excellent corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid has been known for over 30 years. Recently, there is an increasing interest in using zirconium for nitric acid services. Therefore, an extensive research effort has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the corrosion properties of zirconium in nitric acid. Particular attention is paid to the effect of concentration, temperature, structure, solution impurities, and stress. Immersion, autoclave, U-bend, and constant strain-rate tests were used in this study. Results of this study indicate that the corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid is little affected by changes in temperature and concentration, and the presence of common impurities such as seawater, sodium chloride, ferric chloride, iron, and stainless steel. Moreover, the presence of seawater, sodium chloride, ferric chloride, and stainless steel has little effect on the stress corrosion craking (SCC) susceptibility of zirconium in 70% nitric acid at room temperatures. However, zirconium could be attacked by fluoride-containing nitric acid and the vapors of chloride-containing nitric acid. Also, high sustained tensile stresses should be avoided when zirconium is used to handle 70% nitric acid at elevated temperatures or > 70% nitric acid

  2. Effect of dissolved humic acid on the Pb bioavailability in soil solution and its consequence on ecological risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jinsung; Jho, Eun Hea; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-04-09

    Current risk characterization in ecological risk assessment does not consider bioavailability of heavy metals, which highly depends on physicochemical properties of environmental media. This study was set to investigate the effect of humic acid (HA), used as a surrogate of organic matter, on Pb toxicity and the subsequent effect on risk characterization in ecological risk assessment. Pb toxicity was assessed using Microtox(®) in the presence and absence of two different forms of HA, particulate HA (pHA) and dissolved HA (dHA). With increasing contact time, the EC10 values increased (i.e., the toxic effects decreased) and the dissolved Pb concentrations of the filtrates decreased. The high correlation (R = 0.88, p < 0.001) between toxic effects determined using both the mixture and its filtrate as exposure media leads us to conclude that the Pb toxicity highly depends on the soluble fraction. Also, reduced Pb toxicity with increasing dHA concentrations, probably due to formation of Pb-dHA complexes, indicated that Pb toxicity largely comes from free Pb ions. Overall, this study shows the effect of HA on metal toxicity alleviation, and emphasizes the need for incorporating the bioavailable heavy metal concentrations in environmental media as a point of exposure in ecological risk assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Soil solution interactions may limit Pb remediation using P amendments in an urban soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrycki, John F; Scheckel, Kirk G; Basta, Nicholas T

    2017-01-01

    Lead (Pb) contaminated soils are a potential exposure hazard to the public. Amending soils with phosphorus (P) may reduce Pb soil hazards. Soil from Cleveland, OH containing 726 ± 14 mg Pb kg -1 was amended in a laboratory study with bone meal and triple super phosphate (TSP) at 5:1 P:Pb molar ratios. Soil was acidified, neturalized and re-acidified to encourage Pb phosphate formation. PRSTM-probes were used to evaluate changes in soil solution chemistry. Soil acidification did not decrease in vitro bioaccessible (IVBA) Pb using either a pH 1.5, 0.4 M glycine solution or a pH 2.5 solution with organic acids. PRSTM-probe data found soluble Pb increased 10-fold in acidic conditions compared to circumnetural pH conditions. In acidic conditions (p = 3-4), TSP treated soils increased detected P 10-fold over untreated soils. Bone meal application did not increase PRSTM-probe detected P, indicating there may have been insufficient P to react with Pb. X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggested a 10% increase in pyromorphite formation for the TSP treated soil only. Treatments increased soil electrical conductivity above 16 mS cm -1 , potentially causing a new salinity hazard. This study used a novel approach by combining the human ingestion endpoint, PRSTM-probes, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to evaluate treatment efficacy. PRSTM-probe data indicated potentially excess Ca relative to P across incubation steps that could have competed with Pb for soluble P. More research is needed to characterize soil solutions in Pb contaminated urban soils to identify where P treatments might be effective and when competing cations, such as Ca, Fe, and Zn may limit low rate P applications for treating Pb soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Soil solution interactions may limit Pb remediation using P ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead (Pb) contaminated soils are a potential exposure hazard to the public. Amending soils with phosphorus (P) may reduce Pb soil hazards. Soil from Cleveland, OH containing 726 ± 14 mg Pb kg-1 was amended in a laboratory study with bone meal and triple super phosphate (TSP) at 5:1 P:Pb molar ratios. Soil was acidified, neturalized and re-acidified to encourage Pb phosphate formation. PRSTM-probes were used to evaluate changes in soil solution chemistry. Soil acidification did not decrease in vitro bioaccessible (IVBA) Pb using either a pH 1.5, 0.4 M glycine solution or a pH 2.5 solution with organic acids. PRSTM-probe data found soluble Pb increased 10-fold in acidic conditions compared to circumnetural pH conditions. In acidic conditions (p = 3-4), TSP treated soils increased detected P 10-fold over untreated soils. Bone meal application did not increase PRSTM-probe detected P, indicating there may have been insufficient P to react with Pb. X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggested a 10% increase in pyromorphite formation for the TSP treated soil only. Treatments increased soil electrical conductivity above 16 mS cm-1, potentially causing a new salinity hazard. This study used a novel approach by combining the human ingestion endpoint, PRSTM-probes, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to evaluate treatment efficacy. PRSTM-probe data indicated potentially excess Ca relative to P across incubation steps that could have competed with Pb for soluble P. Mor

  5. Influence of indian mustard (Brassica juncea) on rhizosphere soil solution chemistry in long-term contaminated soils: a rhizobox study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Owens, Gary; Kwon, Soon-lk

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) root exudation on soil solution properties (pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), metal solubility) in the rhizosphere using a rhizobox. Measurement was conducted following the cultivation of Indian mustard in the rhizobox filled four different types of heavy metal contaminated soils (two alkaline soils and two acidic soils). The growth of Indian mustard resulted in a significant increase (by 0.6 pH units) in rhizosphere soil solution pH of acidic soils and only a slight increase (soil solution varied considerably amongst different soils, resulting in significant changes to soil solution metals in the rhizosphere. For example, the soil solution Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations increased in the rhizosphere of alkaline soils compared to bulk soil following plant cultivation. In contrast, the soluble concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn in acidic soils decreased in rhizosphere soil when compared to bulk soils. Besides the influence of pH and DOC on metal solubility, the increase of heavy metal concentration having high stability constant such as Cu and Pb resulted in a release of Cd and Zn from solid phase to liquid phase.

  6. Back to acid soil fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, Geraldo; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; Malosetti Zunin, Marcos; Eeuwijk, van Fred

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity damages plant roots and limits crop production on acid soils, which comprise up to 50% of the world's arable lands. A major Al tolerance locus on chromosome 3, AltSB, controls aluminum tolerance in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] via SbMATE, an Al-activated plasma

  7. Electrical Conductivity and Chemical Composition of Soil Solution: Comparison of Solution Samplers in Tropical Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Lopes do Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soil solution samplers may have the same working principle, but they differ in relation to chemical and physical characteristics, cost and handling, and these aspects exert influence on the chemical composition of the soil solution obtained. This study was carried out to evaluate, over time, the chemical composition of solutions extracted by Suolo Acqua, with the hydrophilic membrane (HM as a standard, using soils with contrasting characteristics, and to determine the relationship between electrical conductivity (EC and concentration of ions and pH of soil solution samples. This study was carried out under laboratory conditions, using three soils samples with different clay and organic matter (OM contents. Soil solution contents of F−, Cl−, NO−3, Br−, SO42−, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, were analyzed, as well as inorganic, organic, and total C contents, pH, and EC, in four successive sampling times. Soil solution chemical composition extracted by the Suolo Acqua sampler is similar to that collected by the HM, but the Suolo Acqua extracted more Na+ and soluble organic C than the HM solution. Solution EC, cation and anion concentrations, and soluble C levels are higher in the soil with greater clay and OM contents (Latossolo and Cambissolo in this case. Soil solution composition varied over time, with considerable changes in pH, EC, and nutrient concentrations, especially associated with soil OM. Thus, single and isolated sampling of the soil solution must be avoided, otherwise composition of the soil solution may not be correctly evaluated. Soil solution EC was regulated by pH, as well as the sum of cation and anion concentrations, and the C contents determined in the soil liquid phase.

  8. Kinetics of radiocesium released from contaminated soil by fertilizer solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, P.N.; Wang, M.K.; Huang, P.M.; Wang, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    137 Cs is one of the major artificial radionuclides found in environments; but the mechanisms behind fertilizer-induced 137 Cs desorption from soil remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate the kinetics and mechanisms underlying the various cations and anions that cause Cs release from soil under acidic conditions. NH 4 H 2 PO 4 (1 M), 0.5 M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , 1 M NH 4 Cl, 1 M KCl or 1 M NaCl solutions were added to 137 Cs-contaminated soil. The power function model well described the short term 137 Cs desorption with the solutions. The rate coefficients for 137 Cs release from soil in NH 4 H 2 PO 4 , (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , NH 4 Cl, and KCl solutions were 7.7, 7.3, 6.8, and 6.1 times higher than the rate observed in a NaCl solution, respectively. The NH 4 H 2 PO 4 and (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 solutions induced significantly greater 137 Cs release from the contaminated soil than the NH 4 Cl, KCl and NaCl solutions. After four times repeated extractions with the fertilizer solutions, the total amount of 137 Cs extracted by (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and NH 4 Cl solutions reached equilibrium, while that extracted using an NH 4 H 2 PO 4 solution continued to increase. The combined effect of phosphate and protons was the major mechanism behind 137 Cs release from contaminated soils, when an NH 4 H 2 PO 4 solution was used

  9. A Primary Solution to Soiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, Veronica; Berger, Michael

    1982-01-01

    A five-and-one-half-year-old boy with encopresis (fecal soiling) was successfully treated by a cognitive behavior modification approach in which the child's lavatory time was scheduled and the situation was discussed in an accepting but positive manner. (CL)

  10. Influence of Soil Solution Salinity on Molybdenum Adsorption by Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molybdenum (Mo) adsorption on five arid-zone soils from California was investigated as a function of equilibrium solution Mo concentration (0-30 mg L-1), solution pH (4-8), and electrical conductivity (EC = 0.3 or 8 dS m-1). Molybdenum adsorption decreased with increasing pH. An adsorption maximum...

  11. Degradation kinetics of ptaquiloside in soil and soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovesen, Rikke Gleerup; Rasmussen, Lars Holm; Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun

    2008-02-01

    Ptaquiloside (PTA) is a carcinogenic norsesquiterpene glycoside produced in bracken (Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn), a widespread, aggressive weed. Transfer of PTA to soil and soil solution eventually may contaminate groundwater and surface water. Degradation rates of PTA were quantified in soil and soil solutions in sandy and clayey soils subjected to high natural PTA loads from bracken stands. Degradation kinetics in moist soil could be fitted with the sum of a fast and a slow first-order reaction; the fast reaction contributed 20 to 50% of the total degradation of PTA. The fast reaction was similar in all horizons, with the rate constant k(1F) ranging between 0.23 and 1.5/h. The slow degradation, with the rate constant k(1S) ranging between 0.00067 and 0.029/ h, was more than twice as fast in topsoils compared to subsoils, which is attributable to higher microbial activity in topsoils. Experiments with sterile controls confirmed that nonmicrobial degradation processes constituted more than 90% of the fast degradation and 50% of the slow degradation. The lower nonmicrobial degradation rate observed in the clayey compared with the sandy soil is attributed to a stabilizing effect of PTA by clay silicates. Ptaquiloside appeared to be stable in all soil solutions, in which no degradation was observed within a period of 28 d, in strong contrast to previous studies of hydrolysis rates in artificial aqueous electrolytes. The present study predicts that the risk of PTA leaching is controlled mainly by the residence time of pore water in soil, soil microbial activity, and content of organic matter and clay silicates.

  12. Acidity field of soils as ion-exchange systems and the diagnostics of genetic soil horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotov, Yu. A.; Sukhacheva, E. Yu.; Aparin, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    For the comprehensive description of the acidity of a two-phase ion-exchange system, we should analyze two curves of the ionite titration by a strong base in water and salt solutions and find the quantitative relationships between the corresponding pH characteristics. An idea of the three-dimensional field of acidity of ion-exchange systems (the phase space of the soil acidity characteristics) and its three two-dimensional projections is suggested. For soils, three interrelated characteristics—the pH values of the salt and water extracts and the degree of base saturation—can serve as spatial coordinates for the acidity field. Representation of factual data in this field makes it possible to compare and analyze the acidity characteristics of different soils and soil horizons and to determine their specific features. Differentiation of the field into separate volumes allows one to present the data in a discrete form. We have studied the distribution patterns of the groups of soil horizons from Leningrad oblast and other regions of northwestern Russia in the acidity field. The studied samples are grouped in different partially overlapping areas of the projections of the acidity field. The results of this grouping attest to the correctness of the modern classification of Russian soils. A notion of the characteristic soil area in the acidity field is suggested; it can be applied to all the soils with a leaching soil water regime.

  13. Removal of Uranium by Exchanger Resins from Soil Washing Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Uranyl ions in the acidic waste solution were sorbed on AM-resin resin with a high sorption efficiency, and desorbed from the resin by a batch-type washing with a 60 .deg. C heated 0.5 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution. However, the uranium dissolved in the sulfuric acid solution was not sorbed onto the strong anion exchanger resins. Our group has developed a decontamination process with washing and electrokinetic methods for uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) soil. However, this process generates a large amount of waste solution containing various metal ions. If the uranium selectively removed from the waste solution, a very small amount of the 2nd waste would be generated. Thus, selective sorption of uranium by ion exchange resins was examined in this study.

  14. Impact of acid atmosphere deposition on soils : field monitoring and aluminum chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acid atmospheric deposition on concentrations and transfer of major solutes in acid, sandy soils was studied. Emphasis was given to mobilization and transport of potentially toxic aluminum. Data on solute concentrations and fluxes in meteoric water as well as soil solutions

  15. Relating soil solution Zn concentration to diffusive gradients in thin films measurements in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degryse, Fien; Smolders, Erik; Oliver, Ian; Zhang, Hao

    2003-09-01

    The technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) has been suggested to sample an available fraction of metals in soil. The objectives of this study were to compare DGT measurements with commonly measured fractions of Zn in soil, viz, the soil solution concentration and the total Zn concentration. The DGT technique was used to measure fluxes and interfacial concentrations of Zn in three series of field-contaminated soils collected in transects toward galvanized electricity pylons and in 15 soils amended with ZnCl2 at six rates. The ratio of DGT-measured concentration to pore water concentration of Zn, R, varied between 0.02 and 1.52 (mean 0.29). This ratio decreased with decreasing distribution coefficient, Kd, of Zn in the soil, which is in agreement with the predictions of the DGT-induced fluxes in soils (DIFS) model. The R values predicted with the DIFS model were generally larger than the observed values in the ZnCl2-amended soils at the higher Zn rates. A modification of the DIFS model indicated that saturation of the resin gel was approached in these soils, despite the short deployment times used (2 h). The saturation of the resin with Zn did not occur in the control soils (no Zn salt added) or the field-contaminated soils. Pore water concentration of Zn in these soils was predicted from the DGT-measured concentration and the total Zn content. Predicted values and observations were generally in good agreement. The pore water concentration was more than 5 times underpredicted for the most acid soil (pH = 3) and for six other soils, for which the underprediction was attributed to the presence of colloidal Zn in the soil solution.

  16. Soil solid-phase controls lead activity in soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, S H; Helal, M I D; Chaudri, A M; Lawlor, K; McGrath, S P

    2002-01-01

    Lead pollution of the environment is synonymous with civilization. It has no known biological function, and is naturally present in soil, but its presence in food crops is deemed undesirable. The concern regarding Pb is mostly due to chronic human and animal health effects, rather then phytotoxicity. However, not much is known about the chemistry and speciation of Pb in soils. We determined the activity of Pb2+, in near neutral and alkaline soils, representative of alluvial, desertic and calcareous soils of Egypt, using the competitive chelation method. Lead activity ranged from 10(-6.73) to 10(-4.83) M, and was negatively correlated with soil and soil solution pH (R2 = -0.92, P soil solution from the equation: log(Pb2+) = 9.9 - 2pH. A solubility diagram for the various Pb minerals found in soil was constructed using published thermodynamic data obtained from the literature, and our measured Pb2+ activities compared with this information. The measured Pb2+ activities were undersaturated with regard to the solubility of PbSiO3 in equilibrium with SiO2 (soil). However, they were supersaturated with regard to the solubilities of the Pb carbonate minerals PbCO3 (cerussite) and Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2 in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 and hydroxide Pb(OH)2. They were also supersaturated with regard to the solubilities of the Pb phosphate minerals Pb3(PO4)2, Pb5(PO4)3OH, and Pb4O(PO4)2 in equilibrium with tricalcium phosphate and CaCO3. The activity of Pb2+ was not regulated by any mineral of known solubility in our soils, but possibly by a mixture of Pb carbonate and phosphate minerals.

  17. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; Schuur, Boelo

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  18. Numerical solution for heave of expansive soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadrnezhad, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    A numerical solution for heave prediction is developed within the context theories for both saturated and unsaturated soil behaviors. Basically, lowering the potential level of compressing on a saturated layer will cause heaving due to water absorption. This water absorption is in an opposite way, similar to water dissipation as what happens during unloading in consolidation process. However, in unsaturated layers any change of the stability of potential energy level will cause the tendency of change in particle interconnection forces. So, any change by either distressing or the variation of moisture ratio will lead to soil heave. In this paper a finite element solution is employed for predicting the heave in saturated soil similar to unloading in consolidation. Also, in the case of unsaturated soil, equivalent soil suction as negative pore water pressures in applied to soil elements as equivalent nodal forces. To show the potential of this method, test results were com pated with those obtained from computations. These comparisons show that the presented method is capable of predicting the heave phenomenon quite well

  19. Mechanisms of adaptation of small grains to soil acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đalović Ivica G.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid soils limit crop production on 30-40% of the world's arable land and up to 70% of the world's potentially arable land. Over 60% of the total arable lands in Serbia are acid soils. Soil acidity is determined by hydrogen (H+ in soil solution and it is influenced by edaphic, climatic, and biological factors. Major constraints for plant growth on acid mineral soils are toxic concentrations of mineral elements like Al of H+ and/or low mineral nutrient availability due to low solubility (e.g. P and Mo or low reserves and impaired uptake (e.g. Mg2+ at high H+ concentrations. Aluminum (Al toxicity is primary factor limiting crop production on acid soils. This review examines our current understanding of mechanisms of Al-toxicity, as well as the physiological and genetic basis for Al-toxicity and tolerance. Inhibition of root growth by Al leads to more shallow root systems, which may affect the capacity for mineral nutrient acquisition and increase the risk of drought stress. Of the two principal strategies (tolerance and avoidance of plants for adaptation to adverse soil conditions, the strategy of avoidance is more common for adaptation to acid mineral soils. At the same, the short view of the most important genetics tolerance mechanisms, developed and determined in some small grains genotypes, is showed as well.

  20. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    KAUST Repository

    Oburger, E.

    2011-07-26

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal uptake. Little is known about the interaction dynamics of organic acid anions with the soil matrix and the potential impact of adsorption and desorption processes on the functional significance of these effects. The aim of this study was to characterize experimentally the adsorption and desorption dynamics of organic acid anions in five agricultural soils differing in iron and aluminium oxide contents and using citrate as a model carboxylate. Results showed that both adsorption and desorption processes were fast in all soils, reaching a steady state within approximately 1 hour. However, for a given total soil citrate concentration (ct) the steady state was critically dependent on the starting conditions of the experiment, whether most of the citrate was initially present in solution (cl) or held on the solid phase (cs). Specifically, desorption-led processes resulted in significantly smaller steady-state solution concentrations than adsorption-led processes, indicating that hysteresis occurred. As it is not possible to distinguish between different adsorption and desorption pools in soil experimentally, a new dynamic hysteresis model that relies only on measured soil solution concentrations was developed. The model satisfactorily explained experimental data and was able to predict dynamic adsorption and desorption behaviour. To demonstrate its use, we applied the model to two relevant situations involving exudation and microbial degradation. The study highlighted the complex nature of citrate adsorption and desorption dynamics in soil. We conclude that existing models need to incorporate both temporal and hysteresis components to describe realistically the role and fate of organic acids in soil processes. © 2011 The

  1. Degradation kinetics of ptaquiloside in soil and soil solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Rikke Gleerup; Rasmussen, Lars Holm; Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun

    2008-01-01

    and soil solutions in sandy and clayey soils subjected to high natural PTA loads from bracken stands. Degradation kinetics in moist soil could be fitted with the sum of a fast and a slow first-order reaction; the fast reaction contributed 20 to 50% of the total degradation of PTA. The fast reaction...... was similar in all horizons, with the rate constant k1F ranging between 0.23 and 1.5/h. The slow degradation, with the rate constant k1S ranging between 0.00067 and 0.029/h, was more than twice as fast in topsoils compared to subsoils, which is attributable to higher microbial activity in topsoils....... Experiments with sterile controls confirmed that nonmicrobial degradation processes constituted more than 90% of the fast degradation and 50% of the slow degradation. The lower nonmicrobial degradation rate observed in the clayey compared with the sandy soil is attributed to a stabilizing effect of PTA...

  2. Radionuclides distribution coefficient of soil to soil-solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The present book addresses various issues related with the coefficient of radionuclides distribution between soil and soil solution. It consists of six sections and two appendices. The second section, following an introductory one, describes the definition of the coefficient and a procedures of its calculation. The third section deals with the application of the distribution coefficient to the prediction of movements of radionuclides through soil. Various methods for measuring the coefficient are described in the fourth section. The next section discusses a variety of factors (physical and chemical) that can affect the distribution coefficient. Measurements of the coefficient for different types of oils are listed in the sixth section. An appendix is attached to the book to show various models that can be helpful in applying the coefficient of distribution of radionuclides moving from soil into agricultural plants. (N.K.)

  3. Migration of 137Cs, 90Sr, 239,240Pu and 241Am in the chain soil-soil solution-plant. The soil-soil solution link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsyannikova, S.V.; Kil'chitskaya, S.L.; Ehjsmont, E.A.; Zhukovich, N.V.; Kimlenko, I.M.; Duksina, V.V.; Rubinchik, S.Ya.

    1999-01-01

    The mobility of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239,240 Pu and 241 Am in the link soil-soil solution is analysed for different soil types on the basis of radionuclide distribution coefficients between solid and liquid soil phases. The distribution coefficients allow to differentiate soils in correlation with radionuclide migration rate from the solid phase to the soil solution. The reasons of different radionuclide mobility are considered

  4. Examination of soil contaminated by coal-liquids by size exclusion chromatography in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone solution to evaluate interference from humic and fulvic acids and extracts from peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T J; Herod, A A; Brain, S A; Chambers, F M; Kandiyoti, R

    2005-11-18

    Soil from a redundant coke oven site has been examined by extraction of soluble materials using 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of the extracted material. The extracted material was found to closely resemble a high temperature coal tar pitch. Standard humic and fulvic acids were also examined since these materials are very soluble in NMP and would be extracted with pitch if present in the soil. Humic substances derived from peat samples and NMP-extracts of peats were also examined. The results show that the humic and fulvic substances were not extracted directly by NMP from peats. They were extracted using caustic soda solution and were different from the peat extracts in NMP. These results indicate that humic and fulvic acids were soluble in NMP in the protonated polyelectrolyte form but not in the original native polyelectrolyte form. The extraction of soil using NMP followed by SEC appears to be a promising method for identifying contamination by coal-based industries.

  5. The influence of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and stream waters on a seasonal basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Pippa J.; Clark, Joanna M.; Reynolds, Brian; Adamson, John K.

    2008-01-01

    Much uncertainty still exists regarding the relative importance of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and surface waters. This paper contributes to this debate by presenting analysis of seasonal variations in atmospheric deposition, soil solution and stream water chemistry for two UK headwater catchments with contrasting soils. Acid neutralising capacity (ANC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and the Na:Cl ratio of soil and stream waters displayed strong seasonal patterns with little seasonal variation observed in soil water pH. These patterns, plus the strong relationships between ANC, Cl and DOC, suggest that cation exchange and seasonal changes in the production of DOC and seasalt deposition are driving a shift in the proportion of acidity attributable to strong acid anions, from atmospheric deposition, during winter to predominantly organic acids in summer. - Seasonal variations in soil solution ANC is controlled by seasonal variations in seasalt deposition and production of dissolved organic acids

  6. Impact of electrochemical treatment of soil washing solution on PAH degradation efficiency and soil respirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousset, Emmanuel; Huguenot, David; Hullebusch, Eric D. van; Oturan, Nihal; Guibaud, Gilles; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A.

    2016-01-01

    The remediation of a genuinely PAH-contaminated soil was performed, for the first time, through a new and complete investigation, including PAH extraction followed by advanced oxidation treatment of the washing solution and its recirculation, and an analysis of the impact of the PAH extraction on soil respirometry. The study has been performed on the remediation of genuine PAH-contaminated soil, in the following three steps: (i) PAH extraction with soil washing (SW) techniques, (ii) PAH degradation with an electro-Fenton (EF) process, and (iii) recirculation of the partially oxidized effluent for another SW cycle. The following criteria were monitored during the successive washing cycles: PAH extraction efficiency, PAH oxidation rates and yields, extracting agent recovery, soil microbial activity, and pH of soil. Two representative extracting agents were compared: hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and a non-ionic surfactant, Tween"® 80. Six PAH with different numbers of rings were monitored: acenaphthene (ACE), phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLA), pyrene (PYR), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP). Tween"® 80 showed much better PAH extraction efficiency (after several SW cycles) than HPCD, regardless of the number of washing cycles. Based on successive SW experiments, a new mathematical relation taking into account the soil/water partition coefficient (Kd*) was established, and could predict the amount of each PAH extracted by the surfactant with a good correlation with experimental results (R"2 > 0.975). More HPCD was recovered (89%) than Tween"® 80 (79%), while the monitored pollutants were completely degraded (>99%) after 4 h and 8 h, respectively. Even after being washed with partially oxidized solutions, the Tween"® 80 solutions extracted significantly more PAH than HPCD and promoted better soil microbial activity, with higher oxygen consumption rates. Moreover, neither the oxidation by-products nor the acidic media (p

  7. Replenishing Humic Acids in Agricultural Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Susic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For many decades, it was commonly believed that humic acids were formed in soils by the microbial conversion of plant lignins. However, an experiment to test whether these humic acids were formed prior to plant matter reaching the soil was never reported until the late 1980s (and then only as a side issue, even though humic acids were first isolated and reported in 1786. This was a serious omission, and led to a poor understanding of how the humic acid content of soils could be maintained or increased for optimum fertility. In this study, commercial sugar cane mulch and kelp extracts were extracted with alkali and analyzed for humic acid content. Humic acids in the extracts were positively identified by fluorescence spectrophotometry, and this demonstrated that humic acids are formed in senescent plant and algal matter before they reach the soil, where they are then strongly bound to the soil and are also resistant to microbial metabolism. Humic acids are removed from soils by wind and water erosion, and by water leaching, which means that they must be regularly replenished. This study shows that soils can be replenished or fortified with humic acids simply by recycling plant and algal matter, or by adding outside sources of decomposed plant or algal matter such as composts, mulch, peat, and lignite coals.

  8. Soil erosion in Iran: Issues and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Iran currently faces many soil erosion-related problems (see citations below). These issues are resulted from some inherent characteristic and anthropogenic triggering forces. Nowadays, the latter plays more important rule to accelerate the erosion with further emphasis on soil erosion-prone arid and semi arid regions of the country. This contribution attempts to identify and describe the existing main reasons behind accelerated soil erosion in Iran. Appropriate solutions viz. structural and non-structural approaches will be then advised to combat or minimise the problems. Iran can be used as a pilot research site to understand the soil erosion processes in semiarid, arid and mountainous terrain and our research will review the scientific literature and will give an insight of the soil erosion rates in the main factors of the soil erosion in Iran. Key words: Anthropogenic Erosion, Land Degradation; Sediment Management; Sediment Problems Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References Aghili Nategh, N., Hemmat, A., & Sadeghi, M. (2014). Assessing confined and semi-confined compression curves of highly calcareous remolded soil amended with farmyard manure. Journal of Terramechanics, 53, 75-82. Arekhi, S., Bolourani, A. D., Shabani, A., Fathizad, H., Ahamdy-Asbchin, S. 2012. Mapping Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield Susceptibility using RUSLE, Remote Sensing and GIS (Case study: Cham Gardalan Watershed, Iran). Advances in Environmental Biology, 6(1), 109-124. Arekhi, S., Shabani, A., Rostamizad, G. 2012. Application of the modified universal soil loss equation (MUSLE) in prediction of sediment yield (Case study: Kengir Watershed, Iran). Arabian Journal of Geosciences, 5(6), 1259-1267.Sadeghi, S. H., Moosavi, V., Karami, A., Behnia, N. 2012. Soil erosion assessment and prioritization of affecting factors at plot

  9. Soil remediation: humic acids as natural surfactants in the washings of highly contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, Pellegrino; Agretto, Anna; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    The remediation of the highly contaminated site around the former chemical plant of ACNA (near Savona) in Northern Italy is a top priority in Italy. The aim of the present work was to contribute in finding innovative and environmental-friendly technology to remediate soils from the ACNA contaminated site. Two soils sampled from the ACNA site (A and B), differing in texture and amount and type of organic contaminants, were subjected to soil washings by comparing the removal efficiency of water, two synthetic surfactants, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and Triton X-100 (TX100), and a solution of a natural surfactant, a humic acid (HA) at its critical micelle concentration (CMC). The extraction of pollutants by sonication and soxhlet was conducted before and after the soil washings. Soil A was richer in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whereas soil B had a larger content of thiophenes. Sonication resulted more analytically efficient in the fine-textured soil B. The coarse-textured soil A was extracted with a general equal efficiency also by soxhlet. Clean-up by water was unable to exhaustively remove contaminants from the two soils, whereas all the organic surfactants revealed very similar efficiencies (up to 90%) in the removal of the contaminants from the soils. Hence, the use of solutions of natural HAs appears as a better choice for soil washings of highly polluted soils due to their additional capacity to promote microbial activity, in contrast to synthetic surfactants, for a further natural attenuation in washed soils. - Solutions of natural humic acids appear to be a better choice for washing highly polluted soils

  10. Extraction of cesium from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katykhin, G.S.; Simonov, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The extraction of cesium from acidic solutions is studied. Halogen-substituted carboxylic acids were chosen for the aqueous phase and nitrobenzene the diluent. The distribution coefficients are determined by the use of radioactive tracers 134 Cs and 137 Cs. It is believed that large singly charged anions of strong acids are necessary for the extraction of cesium. Metal halide acids are selected for supplying the anions

  11. Organic Acids Regulation of Chemical-Microbial Phosphorus Transformations in Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Paredes, Cecilia; Zhang, Hao; Giles, Courtney D; Darch, Tegan; Stutter, Marc; George, Timothy S; Shand, Charles; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Blackwell, Martin; Wearing, Catherine; Haygarth, Philip M

    2016-11-01

    We have used an integrated approach to study the mobility of inorganic phosphorus (P) from soil solid phase as well as the microbial biomass P and respiration at increasing doses of citric and oxalic acid in two different soils with contrasting agronomic P status. Citric or oxalic acids significantly increased soil solution P concentrations for doses over 2 mmol kg -1 . However, low organic acid doses (<2 mmol kg -1 ) were associated with a steep increase in microbial biomass P, which was not seen for higher doses. In both soils, treatment with the tribasic citric acid led to a greater increase in soil solution P than the dibasic oxalic acid, likely due to the rapid degrading of oxalic acids in soils. After equilibration of soils with citric or oxalic acids, the adsorbed-to-solution distribution coefficient (K d ) and desorption rate constants (k -1 ) decreased whereas an increase in the response time of solution P equilibration (T c ) was observed. The extent of this effect was shown to be both soil and organic acid specific. Our results illustrate the critical thresholds of organic acid concentration necessary to mobilize sorbed and precipitated P, bringing new insight on how the exudation of organic acids regulate chemical-microbial soil phosphorus transformations.

  12. Uranium and radium content in the soil solutions of the south-western part of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsyannikova, S.V.; Vojnikova, E.V.; Popenya, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    The contents of uranium and radium in the pore soil solutions, which are the main chain in the geochemical and biological migration of the chemical elements, has been determined for the first time in Belarus. The control sites have been located outside the zone of Chernobyl fallout radionuclide contamination, that allowed evaluating the current background level of uranium and radium content in the soil solutions. The data on accumulation of the radioactive elements in the pore solutions give the opportunity to estimate the reserve of the radioactive elements in the migratory active forms in the soils. In the majority of soils studied, uranium content in the pore solution is higher than radium content, that points to the higher migratory ability of uranium. The direct correlation between content of fulvic acids' components in the soil solutions and accumulation of uranium in such solutions has been established. (authors)

  13. NIR spectroscopic properties of aqueous acids solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; Atan, Hanafi; Matjafri, Mohd Zubir

    2012-06-15

    Acid content is one of the important quality attributes in determining the maturity index of agricultural product, particularly fruits. Despite the fact that much research on the measurement of acidity in fruits through non-destructive spectroscopy analysis at NIR wavelengths between 700 to 1,000 nm has been conducted, the same response towards individual acids is not well known. This paper presents NIR spectroscopy analysis on aqueous citric, tartaric, malic and oxalic solutions through quantitative analysis by selecting a set of wavelengths that can best be used to measure the pH of the solutions. The aquaphotomics study of the acid solutions has generated R² above 0.9 for the measurement of all acids. The most important wavelengths for pH are located at 918-925 nm and 990-996 nm, while at 975 nm for water.

  14. Comparative scrub solution tests for decontamination of transuranic radionuclides from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.R.; Kochen, R.L.; Rutherford, D.W.; Riordan, G.A.; Delaney, I.C.

    1982-08-01

    Soil decontamination tests were done using three scrubbing solutions on five different transuranic-contaminated soils from Department of Energy sites. The soils came from Rocky Flats, Colorado; Hanford, Washington; Mound Facility, Ohio; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho; and Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. Decontamination was effected by physical and chemical means. A pH 12.5 scrub effected decontamination by serving as a hydraulic grading and attrition scrub medium; this solution did not solubilize the actinide contamination. A 2% HNO 3 , 0.2% HF, 2% pine oil, and 5% Calgon solution effected decontamination by physical and chemical means; this solution solubilized particulate actinide and actinide dispersed on the surface of soil particles. A 2N HCl scrub was also used to effect decontamination by physical and chemical means; this reagent solubilized soil constituents, removing contamination that had migrated into mineral surfaces. Only Rocky Flats soil was effectively decontaminated by the high pH solution although all soils had an enrichment of the activity in the -150 mesh fraction. Attrition scrubbing with both acid solutions had a better decontamination ability for the +150 mesh fraction for Hanford, INEL, and LANL soils. In addition, the acid solutions solubilized some of the plutonium and had a decontamination effect on the fine fractions

  15. Multi-element determination of soil solution by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Qinfang; Wu Shuiqing; Tian Jibing

    1992-01-01

    One of the factors influencing crop growth is the effective elemental contents, especially trace elements, under the circumstances of the same concentrations of N, P and K in soil. In order to obtain the data of effective elemental contents in soil, a novel method was introduced. In this method, soil solution was extracted by a squeezer. The concentrations of elements in soil solution were determined by INAA. Study on the compositions and the contents of elements in soil solution will provide information on making a suitable soil environment for plant growth and on rational and economical manuring

  16. Migration of leachate solution through clay soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Warith, M M

    1987-01-01

    The problem of domestic solid wastes buried in landfill sites is viewed from the aspect of leachate contamination and migration in the substrate, and the efficiency of natural clay barriers as an expedient economic lining material is assessed. Various chemical constituents of the landfill leachate of an actual waste containment site at Lachenaie (35 km east of Montreal) were determined from samples collected from specially designed basins. Data for companion tests on laboratory columns are also presented. Chemical analysis on samples from the basins and leachates from the columns measured changes in the concentration of: (a) cations (Na, K, Ca, and Mg), (b) anions (Cl, HCO/sub 3/, and CO/sub 3/) (c) total organic carbon (TOC), and (d) heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Pb, and Cu). The physical parameters measured included: (a) pH, and (b) specific conductivity. Predictions, using a dispersion-convection model for concentration profile development for either adsorbed or retained contaminants, were compared with the experimentally determined profiles (both in leaching columns and landfill laboratory model). Another set of experiments was also conducted to evaluate the effect of some organic fluids on the geotechnical properties of different clay soils (natural clay and two reference clay soils: illite and kaolinite). The results from this study have demonstrated that the natural clay soil can be used to adequately contain the different contaminant species usually present in the leachate solutions. Furthermore, the data suggested that under favorable soil conditions, landfill leachates containing low levels of trace metals will not pose a substantial contamination threat to the subsurface environment, provided that a proper thickness of barrier is used.

  17. Bromine accumulation in acidic black colluvial soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Cortizas, Antonio; Ferro Vázquez, Cruz; Kaal, Joeri; Biester, Harald; Costa Casais, Manuela; Taboada Rodríguez, Teresa; Rodríguez Lado, Luis

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations showed that bromine is incorporated to soil organic matter (SOM), its content increasing with humification. But few research was done on its long-term accumulation and the role played by pedogenetic processes, as those involved in organic matter stabilization. We investigated bromine content and distribution in four deep, acidic, organic-rich, Holocene soils from an oceanic area of Western Europe. Bromine concentrations (93-778 μg g-1) in the silt + clay (stabilized as aluminium-OM associations, and to a lesser extent on soil acidity (pH) and iron-OM associations. Thus, at scales of thousands of years, bromine accumulation in acidic soils is linked to the pool of metal-clay-stabilized organic matter.

  18. HONO (nitrous acid) emissions from acidic northern soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maljanen, Marja; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Martikainen, Pertti J.

    2015-04-01

    The photolysis of HONO (nitrous acid) is an important source of OH radical, the key oxidizing agent in the atmosphere, contributing also to removal of atmospheric methane (CH4), the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide (CO2). The emissions of HONO from soils have been recently reported in few studies. Soil HONO emissions are regarded as missing sources of HONO when considering the chemical reactions in the atmosphere. The soil-derived HONO has been connected to soil nitrite (NO2-) and also directly to the activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria, which has been studied with one pure culture. Our hypothesis was that boreal acidic soils with high nitrification activity could be also sources of HONO and the emissions of HONO are connected with nitrification. We selected a range of dominant northern acidic soils and showed in microcosm experiments that soils which have the highest nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO) emissions (drained peatlands) also have the highest HONO production rates. The emissions of HONO are thus linked to nitrogen cycle and also NO and N2O emissions. Natural peatlands and boreal coniferous forests on mineral soils had the lowest HONO emissions. It is known that in natural peatlands with high water table and in boreal coniferous forest soils, low nitrification activity (microbial production of nitrite and nitrate) limits their N2O production. Low availability of nitrite in these soils is the likely reason also for their low HONO production rates. We also studied the origin of HONO in one peat soil with acetylene and other nitrification inhibitors and we found that HONO production is not closely connected to ammonium oxidation (nitrification). Acetylene blocked NO emissions but did not affect HONO or N2O emissions, thus there is another source behind HONO emission from these soils than ammonium oxidation. It is still an open question if this process is microbial or chemical origin.

  19. Impact of acid atmospheric deposition on soils : quantification of chemical and hydrologic processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinsven, van J.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of SO x , NOx and NHx will cause major changes in the chemical composition of solutions in acid soils, which may affect the biological functions of the soil. This thesis deals with quantification of soil acidification by means of chemical

  20. Volumetric properties of itaconic acid aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisenbaum, Alexander; Apelblat, Alexander; Manzurola, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Densities of itaconic acid aqueous solutions in a wide range of concentrations and temperatures. ► The apparent molar volumes and the cubic expansion coefficients. ► The derivatives of isobaric heat capacities with respect to pressure. ► Changes in the structure of water when itaconic acid is dissolved. - Abstract: Densities of itaconic acid aqueous solutions were measured at 5 K intervals from T = (278.15 to 343.15) K. From the determined densities, the apparent molar volumes, the cubic expansion coefficients and the second derivatives of volume with respect to temperature which are interrelated with the derivatives of isobaric heat capacities with respect to pressure were evaluated. These derivatives were qualitatively correlated with the changes in the structure of water when itaconic acid is dissolved in it.

  1. Impact of electrochemical treatment of soil washing solution on PAH degradation efficiency and soil respirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousset, Emmanuel; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Nihal; Guibaud, Gilles; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-04-01

    The remediation of a genuinely PAH-contaminated soil was performed, for the first time, through a new and complete investigation, including PAH extraction followed by advanced oxidation treatment of the washing solution and its recirculation, and an analysis of the impact of the PAH extraction on soil respirometry. The study has been performed on the remediation of genuine PAH-contaminated soil, in the following three steps: (i) PAH extraction with soil washing (SW) techniques, (ii) PAH degradation with an electro-Fenton (EF) process, and (iii) recirculation of the partially oxidized effluent for another SW cycle. The following criteria were monitored during the successive washing cycles: PAH extraction efficiency, PAH oxidation rates and yields, extracting agent recovery, soil microbial activity, and pH of soil. Two representative extracting agents were compared: hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and a non-ionic surfactant, Tween(®) 80. Six PAH with different numbers of rings were monitored: acenaphthene (ACE), phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLA), pyrene (PYR), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP). Tween(®) 80 showed much better PAH extraction efficiency (after several SW cycles) than HPCD, regardless of the number of washing cycles. Based on successive SW experiments, a new mathematical relation taking into account the soil/water partition coefficient (Kd*) was established, and could predict the amount of each PAH extracted by the surfactant with a good correlation with experimental results (R(2) > 0.975). More HPCD was recovered (89%) than Tween(®) 80 (79%), while the monitored pollutants were completely degraded (>99%) after 4 h and 8 h, respectively. Even after being washed with partially oxidized solutions, the Tween(®) 80 solutions extracted significantly more PAH than HPCD and promoted better soil microbial activity, with higher oxygen consumption rates. Moreover, neither the oxidation by-products nor the acidic media (p

  2. Estimation of soil-soil solution distribution coefficient of radiostrontium using soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Nao K; Uchida, Shigeo; Tagami, Keiko

    2009-02-01

    We propose a new approach for estimation of soil-soil solution distribution coefficient (K(d)) of radiostrontium using some selected soil properties. We used 142 Japanese agricultural soil samples (35 Andosol, 25 Cambisol, 77 Fluvisol, and 5 others) for which Sr-K(d) values had been determined by a batch sorption test and listed in our database. Spearman's rank correlation test was carried out to investigate correlations between Sr-K(d) values and soil properties. Electrical conductivity and water soluble Ca had good correlations with Sr-K(d) values for all soil groups. Then, we found a high correlation between the ratio of exchangeable Ca to Ca concentration in water soluble fraction and Sr-K(d) values with correlation coefficient R=0.72. This pointed us toward a relatively easy way to estimate Sr-K(d) values.

  3. Soil amino acid composition across a boreal forest successional sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy R. Werdin-Pfisterer; Knut Kielland; Richard D. Boone

    2009-01-01

    Soil amino acids are important sources of organic nitrogen for plant nutrition, yet few studies have examined which amino acids are most prevalent in the soil. In this study, we examined the composition, concentration, and seasonal patterns of soil amino acids across a primary successional sequence encompassing a natural gradient of plant productivity and soil...

  4. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochuang Cao

    Full Text Available Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N, which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N. On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10. The compositional

  5. Study of solution speciation, soil retention and soil-plant transfer of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrand, E.

    2005-12-01

    Within the framework of the risks prevention policy of Andra, the radioactive zirconium introduction ( 93 Zr and 95 Zr) into the environment could be carried out starting from the nuclear waste whose storage is envisaged in deep geological layers. Thus, the goal of this study was to evaluate the parameters and phenomena influencing speciation (various chemical forms) and the soil-plant transfer of zirconium. Experiments of adsorption/desorption of zirconium with different ligands likely to be present in soils (goethite and humic acid) and with two soils, with contrasted characteristics, close to the underground research laboratory of Andra (Meuse) were carried out. These results of adsorption were then confronted with those obtained by the MUSIC and NICA-DONNAN models carried out using the computer code ECOSAT. Zr presents a strong affinity for the two types of soils and the soils constituents. Specific interactions of internal sphere type with the goethite were highlighted using the model. Soil-solution partition coefficients, or K d , values increase with pH and contact time. Various types of edible plants, pea (Pisum sativum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L cv. St Pierre) were cultivated in hydroponic conditions and in soils spiked with various sources of Zirconium. The maximum zirconium contents are mainly measured in the roots of the plants. The soil-plant transfer factors measured during these experiments show a weak bioavailability of zirconium. An influence of speciation on Zr bioavailability is however highlighted. Some chemical forms, such as oxychloride or acetate, are more easily mobilized than others by the plant. (author)

  6. Modelling multicomponent solute transport in structured soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beinum, van G.W.

    2007-01-01

    The mobility of contaminants in soil is an important factor in determining their ability to spread into the wider environment. For non-volatile substances, transport within the soil is generally dominated by transport of dissolved fractions in the soil water phase, via either diffusion or

  7. Soil solution Ni concentrations over which Kd is constant in Japanese agricultural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei-Ishikawa, Nao; Uchida, Shigeo; Tagami, Keiko; Satta, Naoya

    2011-01-01

    The soil-soil solution distribution coefficient (K d ) is one of the most important parameters required by the models used for radioactive waste disposal environmental impact assessment. The models are generally based on the assumption that K d is independent of the element concentration in soil solution. However, at high soil solution concentrations, this assumption is not valid. Since the sorption of most radionuclides in soil is influenced by their stable isotope concentrations, it is necessary to consider if the range in the naturally occurring stable isotope concentrations in the soil solution is within the range over which K d is valid. The objective of this study was to determine if the K d for nickel (Ni) can be assumed to be constant over the ranges of stable Ni concentration in five main Japanese agricultural soil types. To obtain Ni sorption isotherms for five Japanese soils, two types of batch sorption tests were carried out using radioactive 63 Ni as a tracer. The concentration at which the relationship between soil and soil solution concentration became nonlinear was determined using the two types of sorption isotherms: the Langmuir and Henry isotherms. The result showed that the Ni concentration in the soil solution at which the assumption of a constant K d becomes valid is at least ten times higher than the natural Ni concentrations in solutions of Japanese agricultural soils. This value is sufficient to treat K d for Ni as constant for environmental impact assessment models for the disposal of radioactive waste. (author)

  8. Radiolysis of concentrated nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaishi, R.; Jiang, P.Y.; Katsumura, Y.; Domae, M.; Ishigure, K.

    1995-01-01

    A study on electron pulse- and 60 Co γ-radiolysis of concentrated nitric acid and nitrate solutions has been carried out to elucidate the radiation induced reactions taking place in the solutions. Dissociation into NO 2 - and O( 3 P) was proposed as a direct action of the radiation on nitrate and gave the G-values were dependent on the chemical forms of nitrate: g s2 (-NO 3 - )=1.6 and g s2 (-HNO 3 )=2.2 (molecules/100eV). Based on the experimental yields of HNO 2 and reduced Ce IV , the primary yields of radiolysis products of water, g w , were evaluated to clarify the effects of nitrate on spur reactions of water in various nitrate solutions. (author)

  9. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  10. Influence of organic components on plutonium and americium speciation in soils and soil solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsyannikova, S.V.; Kimlenko, I.M.

    2003-01-01

    Group composition of humic substances of organic and mineral soils sampled in the 30-km zone of the Chernobyl accident was analyzed for studying influence of organic components on migration properties of plutonium and americium in soils and soil solutions by the method of gel-chromatography and chemical fractionation. It was ascertained that humus of organic soils binds plutonium and americium stronger than humus of mineral soils. Elevated mobility of americium compared to plutonium one stems from lower ability of the latter to from hard to solve organic and organomineral complexes, as well as from its ability to form anionic complexes in soil solutions [ru

  11. Subcritical water extraction of amino acids from Mars analog soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, Aaron C; Fisher, Anita M; Fors-Francis, Kisa; Sherrit, Stewart

    2018-01-18

    For decades, the Martian regolith has stymied robotic mission efforts to catalog the organic molecules present. Perchlorate salts, found widely throughout Mars, are the main culprit as they breakdown and react with organics liberated from the regolith during pyrolysis, the primary extraction technique attempted to date on Mars. This work further develops subcritical water extraction (SCWE) as a technique for extraction of amino acids on future missions. The effect of SCWE temperature (185, 200, and 215°C) and duration of extraction (10-120 min) on the total amount and distribution of amino acids recovered was explored for three Mars analog soils (JSC Mars-1A simulant, an Atacama desert soil, and an Antarctic Dry Valleys soil) and bovine serum albumin (as a control solution of known amino acid content). Total amounts of amino acids extracted increased with both time and temperature; however, the distribution shifted notably due to the destruction of the amino acids with charged or polar side chains at the higher temperatures. The pure bovine serum albumin solution and JSC Mars 1A also showed lower yields than the Atacama and Antarctic extractions suggesting that SCWE may be less effective at hydrolyzing large or aggregated proteins. Changing solvent from water to a dilute (10 mM) HCl solution allowed total extraction efficiencies comparable to the higher temperature/time combinations while using the lowest temperature/time (185°C/20 min). The dilute HCl extractions also did not lead to the shift in amino acid distribution observed at the higher temperatures. Additionally, adding sodium perchlorate salt to the extraction did not interfere with recoveries. Native magnetite in the JSC Mars-1A may have been responsible for destruction of glycine, as evidenced by its uncharacteristic decrease as the temperature/time of extraction increased. This work shows that SCWE can extract high yields of native amino acids out of Mars analog soils with minimal disruption of the

  12. EDTA and HCl leaching of calcareous and acidic soils polluted with potentially toxic metals: remediation efficiency and soil impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovic, Metka; Lestan, Domen

    2012-07-01

    The environmental risk of potentially toxic metals (PTMs) in soil can be diminished by their removal. Among the available remediation techniques, soil leaching with various solutions is one of the most effective but data about the impact on soil chemical and biological properties are still scarce. We studied the effect of two common leaching agents, hydrochloric acid (HCl) and a chelating agent (EDTA) on Pb, Zn, Cd removal and accessibility and on physico-chemical and biological properties in one calcareous, pH neutral soil and one non-calcareous acidic soil. EDTA was a more efficient leachant compared to HCl: up to 133-times lower chelant concentration was needed for the same percentage (35%) of Pb removal. EDTA and HCl concentrations with similar PTM removal efficiency decreased PTM accessibility in both soils but had different impacts on soil properties. As expected, HCl significantly dissolved carbonates from calcareous soil, while EDTA leaching increased the pH of the acidic soil. Enzyme activity assays showed that leaching with HCl had a distinctly negative impact on soil microbial and enzyme activity, while leaching with EDTA had less impact. Our results emphasize the importance of considering the ecological impact of remediation processes on soil in addition to the capacity for PTM removal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dinâmica de íons em solo ácido lixiviado com extratos de resíduos de adubos verdes e soluções puras de ácidos orgânicos Dynamic of ions in acid soil leached with green manure residues extracts and pure solutions of organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Cezar Franchini

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available A influência da aplicação de resíduos vegetais na dinâmica de íons em solos ácidos é pouco conhecida. Neste estudo, a mobilidade de íons em amostra do horizonte Bw de um Latossolo Vermelho-Escuro álico lixiviado com soluções puras de ácidos cítrico e succínico e extratos aquosos de resíduos de nabo forrageiro (Raphanus sativus e aveia-preta (Avena strigosa foi avaliada em colunas de solo (5, 10, 20 e 40 cm de altura por 4 cm de diâmetro. Após a percolação das soluções e extratos pelas colunas de solo determinaram-se, nas soluções efluentes, os teores de Ca (Ca s, Mg (Mg s, K (Ks, Al total (Al st, orgânico (Al so, monomérico (Al sm e carbono orgânico dissolvido. No solo, foram determinados os teores trocáveis de Ca (Ca tr, Mg (Mg tr, K (Ktr e Al (Al tr e o pH (CaCl2. Os ácidos cítrico e succínico aumentaram os teores de Al st e Ca s, respectivamente, causando reduções nas frações trocáveis desses elementos no solo. O extrato de aveia-preta foi mais efetivo na remoção do Ca tr e o de nabo forrageiro na do Al tr. O decréscimo de Ca tr e Al tr foi seguido do aumento do Ktr. A formação de complexos entre Ca s e Al tr com compostos orgânicos de baixo peso molecular foi sugerida como o provável mecanismo responsável pela mobilidade dos íons polivalentes no subsolo de solos ácidos após a aplicação dos extratos de resíduos vegetais e das soluções puras de ácidos orgânicos.The influence of green manure residues addition in the dynamic of ions in acid soils is not well known. In this study, ion mobility in a sample of the Bw horizon of an Dark-Red Latosol (Oxisol, leached with citric and succinic acid pure solutions and with aqueous residue extracts of black oats (Avena strigosa and oil seed radish (Raphanus sativus were evaluated in soil columns (5, 10, 20, and 40 cm long by 4 cm diameter. After the solutions and extracts passed through the soil columns, the following parameters were determined

  14. Organic components and plutonium and americium state in soils and soil solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsyannikova, S.V.; Kimlenko, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The fraction composition of humus substances of different type soils and soil solutions have been studied. A distribution of Pu 239, 240 and Am 241 between humus substances fractions of different dispersity and mobility in soil-vegetation cover has been established. It was shown that humus of organic soils fixes plutonium and americium in soil medium in greater extent than humus of mineral soils. That leads to lower migration ability of radionuclides in organic soils. The lower ability of americium to form difficultly soluble organic and organic-mineral complexes and predomination of its anion complexes in soil solutions may be a reason of higher mobility and biological availability of americium in comparison to plutonium during soil-plant transfer (authors)

  15. Soil solution dynamics of Cu and Zn in a Cu- and Zn-polluted soil as influenced by gamma-irradiation and Cu-Zn interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y M; Yan, W D; Christie, P

    2001-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study soil solution dynamics of Cu and Zn in a Cu/Zn-polluted soil as influenced by gamma-irradiation and Cu-Zn interaction. A slightly acid sandy loam was amended with Cu and Zn (as nitrates) either singly or in combination (100 mg Cu and 150 mg Zn kg(-1) soil) and was then gamma-irradiated (10 kGy). Unamended and unirradiated controls were included, and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Forrester) was grown for 50 days. Soil solution samples obtained using soil moisture samplers immediately before transplantation and every ten days thereafter were used directly for determination of Cu, Zn, pH and absorbance at 360 nm (A360). Cu and Zn concentrations in the solution of metal-polluted soil changed with time and were affected by gamma-irradiation and metal interaction. gamma-Irradiation raised soil solution Cu substantially but generally decreased soil solution Zn. These trends were consistent with increased dissolved organic matter (A360) and solution pH after gamma-irradiation. Combined addition of Cu and Zn usually gave higher soil solution concentrations of Cu or Zn compared with single addition of Cu or Zn in gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated soils, indicating an interaction between Cu and Zn. Cu would have been organically complexed and consequently maintained a relatively high concentration in the soil solution under higher pH conditions. Zn tends to occur mainly as free ion forms in the soil solution and is therefore sensitive to changes in pH. The extent to which gamma-irradiation and metal interaction affected solubility and bioavailability of Cu and Zn was a function of time during plant growth. Studies on soil solution metal dynamics provide very useful information for understanding metal mobility and bioavailability.

  16. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  17. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO 4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO 2 F 2 . Studies on the effect of added LiNO 3 or Na 2 WO 4 ·2H 2 O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF 6 content of WF 6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF 6

  18. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson R. Meda

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.Foram conduzidos experimentos de laboratórios para avaliar os efeitos de extratos de plantas solúveis em água na acidez do solo. Os materiais de plantas foram: aveia preta, nabo, tremoço branco e azul, mucuna cinza e anã, Crotalaria spectabilis e C. breviflora, milheto, guandu, grama estrela, grama mato grosso, folhas de café, folhas de cana-de-açúcar, palhada de arroz e palhada de trigo. Foi utilizado o seguinte procedimento para o extrato da planta solúvel em água: pesar 3g de material de planta, adicionar 150 ml de água, agitar por 8h e filtrar. Os extratos de plantas foram adicionados na superfície do solo em uma coluna de PVC (1 ml min-1. Após, adicionou-se água deionizada em quantidade equivalente a três volumes de poros. Os extratos de plantas aumentaram o pH, Ca e K trocável e diminuíram Al. Nabo, aveia preta e tremoço azul foram os melhores e milheto o pior material para amenizar a acidez do solo. Nabo aumentou Al na água de drenagem. As altera

  19. Impact of tree species on soil carbon stocks and soil acidity in southern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oostra, Swantje; Majdi, Hooshang; Olsson, Mats

    2006-01-01

    The impact of tree species on soil carbon stocks and acidity in southern Sweden was studied in a non-replicated plantation with monocultures of 67-year-old ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.), beech (Fagus silvatica L.), elm (Ulmus glabra Huds.), hornbeam (Carpinusbetulus L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.). The site was characterized by a cambisol on glacial till. Volume-determined soil samples were taken from the O-horizon and mineral soil layers to 20 cm. Soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), pH (H2O), cation-exchange capacity and base saturation at pH 7 and exchangeable calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium ions were analysed in the soil fraction hornbeam > oak > beech > ash > elm. The pH in the O-horizon ranged in the order elm > ash > hornbeam > beech > oak > spruce. In the mineral soil, SOC and TN ranged in the order elm > oak > ash = hornbeam > spruce > beech, i.e. partly reversed, and pH ranged in the same order as for the O-horizon. It is suggested that spruce is the best option for fertile sites in southern Sweden if the aim is a high carbon sequestration rate, whereas elm, ash and hornbeam are the best solutions if the aim is a low soil acidification rate

  20. Soil degradation by sulfuric acid disposition on uranium producing sites in south Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atanasov, I.; Gribachev, P.

    1997-01-01

    This study assesses the damage of soils caused by spills of sulfuric acid solutions used for in situ leaching of uranium at eight uranium producing (by open-cast method) sites (total area of approximately 220 ha) in the region of Momino-Rakovski (South Bulgaria). The upper soil layer is cinnamonic pseudopodzolic ( or Eutric Planosols by FAO Legend, 1974). The results of the investigation show that the sulfuric acid spills caused strong acidification of upper (0-20 cm) and subsurface (20-60 cm) soil horizons which is expressed as decreasing of pH (H 2 O) to 2.9-3.5 and increasing of exchangeable H + and Al 3+ to 18 and 32% from CEC. Acid degradation of soils is combined with reducing of organic matter content. The average concentration of the total heavy metal content in the upper soil horizon (in ppm) is: Cd=1.5; Cu=30; Pb=25; Zn=40 and U=8. No significant differences were detected between the upper and subsurface soil layers . The heavy metal concentration did not exceed the Bulgarian standards for heavy metals and uranium content of soils. But the coarse texture of the top soil layers, the lack of carbonates, The low CEC and strong acidity determine a low buffering capacity of the investigated soils and this can be considered as hazardous for plants. This indicates that a future soil monitoring should be carried out in the region together with measures for neutralizing of soil acidity

  1. Modelling trends in soil solution concentrations under five forest-soil combinations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, van der C.; Vries, de W.; Kros, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of forest and soil properties on changes in soil solution concentration upon a reduction deposition was examined for five forest-soil combinations with the dynamic RESAM model. Predicted concentrations decreased in the direction Douglas fir - Scotch pine - oak, due to decreased

  2. Containment of Nitric Acid Solutions of Plutonium-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Silver, G.L.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, L.; Ramsey, K.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion of various metals that could be used to contain nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 has been studied. Tantalum and tantalum/2.5% tungsten resisted the test solvent better than 304L stainless steel and several INCONEL alloys. The solvent used to imitate nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 contained 70% nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and ammonium hexanitratocerate

  3. Cadmium and zinc in plants and soil solutions from contaminated soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, S.E.; Hamon, R.E.; Holm, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    In an experiment using ten heavy metal-contaminated soils from six European countries, soil solution was sampled by water displacement before and after the growth of radish. Concentrations of Cd, Zn and other elements in solution (K, Ca, Mg, Mn) generally decreased during plant growth, probably...

  4. Influence of Height Waterlogging on Soil Physical Properties of Potential and Actual Acid Sulphate Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifin Fahmi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Water management is main factor that determines the successful of rice cultivation in acid sulphate soil. Soil waterlogging determines the direction and rate of chemical, geochemical and biological reaction in the soil, indirectly these reactions may influence to the changes of soil psycal properties during soil waterlogging process. The experiment was aimed to study the changes of two type of acid sulphate soils physical properties during rice straw decomposition processes. The research was conducted in the greenhouse consisting of the three treatment factors using the completely randomized design with three replications. The first factor was soil type: potential acid sulphate soil (PASS and actual acid sulphate soil (AASS. The second factor was height of water waterlogging: 0.5-1.0 cm (muddy water–level condition and 4.0 cm from above the soil surface (waterlogged. The third factor was organic matter type: rice straw (RS, purun tikus (Eleocharis dulcis (PT and mixed of RS and PT (MX. Soil physical properties such as aggregate stability, total soil porosity, soil permeability, soil particle density and bulk density were observed at the end of experiment (vegetative maximum stage. The results showed that acid sulphate soil type had large effect on soil physicl properties, soil waterlogging decreased aggregate stability, soil particle density and bulk density both of soil type.

  5. Ácidos orgânicos na solução de um gleissolo sob diferentes sistemas de cultivo com arroz irrigado Organic acids in the soil solution of a gley soil cropped with lowland rice under different systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Bohnen

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O alagamento do solo para o cultivo do arroz irrigado promove condições anaeróbias que favorecem a produção de ácidos orgânicos de cadeia curta, os quais podem ser tóxicos para a cultura. Entretanto, a quantidade produzida destes ácidos depende, dentre outros fatores, do sistema de manejo empregado para o cultivo do arroz. Para avaliar a formação de ácidos orgânicos durante o cultivo do arroz irrigado nos sistemas: convencional, semeadura direta e pré-germinado sobre resíduos de azevém, foram instalados coletores de solução do solo em duas profundidades (2,5 e 5,0 cm em parcelas de campo e retiradas amostras da solução do solo aos 3, 5, 9, 11 e 17 dias de alagamento. Nestas amostras, foram determinados os teores dos ácidos: acético, butírico e propiônico por cromatografia gasosa. Independentemente da profundidade de coleta, os maiores teores dos três ácidos avaliados ocorreram no sistema de semeadura direta, em comparação com o sistema convencional e pré-germinado. Entretanto, as diferenças significativas entre os sistemas perduraram, no máximo, até os primeiros 11 dias de alagamento. Teores mais elevados de ácidos orgânicos foram encontrados aos 5,0 cm de profundidade em comparação com 2,5 cm em todos os sistemas, com picos no quinto dia de alagamento. O ácido acético foi o ácido produzido em maior quantidade, independentemente do sistema de cultivo de arroz.The production of short-chain organic acids is favoured by anaerobic conditions in flooded soil during rice cultivation and they can be toxic for the crop. However, the amount of acids formed depends on the system used for the rice cultivation. In order to measure the amount and type of organic acids formed in three different systems (conventional tillage, no tillage and pre-germinated planting, soil solution samples were collected from two depths (2.5 and 5.0 cm after 3, 5, 9, 11, and 17 days of flooding. The soil solutions were analysed for acetic

  6. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions below Danish forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Gundersen, Per

    1999-01-01

    leaching in relation to land-use, a national monitoring programme has established sampling routines in a 7x7 km grid including 111 points in forests. During winters of 1986-1993, soil samples were obtained from a depth of 0-25, 25-50, 50-75 and 75-100 cm. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions were...... species. A few sites deviated radically from the general pattern of low concentrations. The elevated concentrations recorded there were probably caused by high levels of N deposition due to emission from local sources or temporal disruptions of the N cycle. The nitrate concentration in the soil solution...

  7. Interpretation of soil-to-plant transfer on the basis of soil solution chemical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembrechts, J.F.; Van Loon, L.R.; Van Ginkel, J.H.; Desmet, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Soil-to-plant translocation of a radionuclide depends on its availability on the one hand and on the efficiency of the uptake process on the other. Criticism on the use of transfer coefficients for the description of translocation mainly concerns the fact that the complex variety of processes, a.o. dependent on plant characteristics and soil type and treatment, is integrated in a single ratio. For the interpretation of the effect of counter-measures the static transfer coefficient proved to be hard to handle and knowledge of the separate underlying processes and their time dependence showed to be indispensible. Based upon translocation experiments with technetium, cobalt, strontium and zinc transfer was shown to be primarily related to the concentration of the plant available fraction in the soil solution as well as to the soil solution chemistry in general. The transfer factor of the first three elements expressed in the basis of soil solution activity (ml/g), was observed to decrease when the nutrient content of the soil solution -- reflected by its conductivity -- increased. The characteristics of the soil matrix (solid phase) furthermore showed to be of secondary importance for the explanation of the observed accumulation. Since the interstitial soil liquid phase mediates between solid phase and plant root, reliable interpretations of soil-to-plant transfer might as a rule be based on a separate study of the effect of soil properties on availability on the one hand of the uptake from nutrient solutions on the other

  8. Model study of acid rain effect on adsorption of trace elements on soils using a multitracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.F.; Ambe, S.; Takematsu, N.; Ambe, F.

    1998-01-01

    Using a radioactive multitracer and model acid rain (HCl or H 2 SO 4 solution), batch experiments were performed to examine the pH effect on the adsorption-desorption equilibrium of 16 elements on soils as a model study of an acid rain effect. Kaolin, black soil (original and with organic matter almost removed) and Kureha soil (original and with organic matter almost removed) were used as adsorbents. Characteristic dependence on the pH value of the suspension was observed for the adsorption of the elements on kaolin and the soils. The results of this model study indicate that acid rain decreases the retention of cations, while it increases or does not change the adsorption of anions on soils. Organic matter in soils has a positive effect on the extent of adsorption of most elements investigated. (author)

  9. Acid-base status and changes in Swedish forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karltun, Erik; Stendahl, Johan; Lundin, Lars

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use data from the Swedish National Survey of Forest Soils and Vegetation (NSFSV) to evaluate the present acid-base status of forest soils to try to answer the following questions. Which role do anthropogenic and biological acidification play for the present acid-base status of the soil profile? What is the present acid-base status of Swedish forest soils and how large areas may be considered as severely acidified? Do the current tendencies in soil acid-base status correspond with the positive development in surface waters?

  10. Removal of Radium-226 from Radium-Contaminated Soil using Distilled Water and Humic Acid: Effect of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, E.; Muhammad Samudi Yasir; Muhamat Omar

    2011-01-01

    Effect of washing solutions' pH removal of radium-226 from radium-contaminated soil using distilled water and humic acid extracted from Malaysian peat soil was studied by batch washing method. The study encompassed the extraction of humic acid and the washing of radium-contaminated soil using distilled water and humic acid solutions of 100 ppm, both with varying pHs in the range of 3 to 11. The radioactivity concentration of radium-226 was determined by gamma spectrometer.The removal of radium-226 was greater when humic acid solutions were used compared to distilled water at the pH range studied and both washing solutions showed greater removal of radium-226 when basic solutions were used. Nevertheless, comparable removal efficiencies were observed when neutral and highly basic humic acid solutions were used. (author)

  11. Migration through soil of organic solutes in an oil-shale process water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, J.A.; Stuber, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    The migration through soil of organic solutes in an oil-shale process water (retort water) was studied by using soil columns and analyzing leachates for various organic constituents. Retort water extracted significant quantities of organic anions leached from ammonium-saturated-soil organic matter, and a distilled-water rinse, which followed retort-water leaching, released additional organic acids from the soil. After being corrected for organic constitutents extracted from soil by retort water, dissolved-organic-carbon fractionation analyses of effluent fractions showed that the order of increasing affinity of six organic compound classes for the soil was as follows: hydrophilic neutrals nearly equal to hydrophilic acids, followed by the sequence of hydrophobic acids, hydrophilic bases, hydrophobic bases, and hydrophobic neutrals. Liquid-chromatographic analysis of the aromatic amines in the hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-base fractions showed that the relative order of the rates of migration through the soil column was the same as the order of migration on a reversed-phase, octadecylsilica liquid-chromatographic column.

  12. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    KAUST Repository

    Oburger, E.; Leitner, D.; Jones, D. L.; Zygalakis, K. C.; Schnepf, A.; Roose, T.

    2011-01-01

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal

  13. Soil Solution Phosphorus Status and Mycorrhizal Dependency in Leucaena leucocephala†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, Mitiku; Manjunath, Aswathanarayan

    1987-01-01

    A phosphorus sorption isotherm was used to establish concentrations of P in a soil solution ranging from 0.002 to 0.807 μg/ml. The influence of P concentration on the symbiotic interaction between the tropical tree legume Leucaena leucocephala and the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum was evaluated in pot experiments. The level of mycorrhizal infection in Leucaena roots increased as the concentration of P was raised from 0.002 to 0.153 μg/ml. Higher levels of P depressed mycorrhizal infection, but the level of infection never declined below 50%. Periodic monitoring of P contents of Leucaena subleaflets indicated that significant mycorrhizal activity was detected as early as 17 days after planting, with the activity peaking 12 to 16 days thereafter. The highest level of mycorrhizal activity was associated with a soil solution P level of 0.021 μg/ml. Even though the mycorrhizal inoculation effect diminished as the concentration of P in the soil solution was increased, mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased P uptake and dry-matter yield of Leucaena at all levels of soil solution P examined. The concentration of P required by nonmycorrhizal L. leucocephala for maximum yield was 27 to 38 times higher than that required by mycorrhizal L. leucocephala. The results illustrate the very high dependence of L. leucocephala on VAM fungi and the significance of optimizing soil solution phosphorus for enhancing the benefits of the VAM symbiosis. PMID:16347323

  14. Soil Solution Phosphorus Status and Mycorrhizal Dependency in Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, M; Manjunath, A

    1987-04-01

    A phosphorus sorption isotherm was used to establish concentrations of P in a soil solution ranging from 0.002 to 0.807 mug/ml. The influence of P concentration on the symbiotic interaction between the tropical tree legume Leucaena leucocephala and the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum was evaluated in pot experiments. The level of mycorrhizal infection in Leucaena roots increased as the concentration of P was raised from 0.002 to 0.153 mug/ml. Higher levels of P depressed mycorrhizal infection, but the level of infection never declined below 50%. Periodic monitoring of P contents of Leucaena subleaflets indicated that significant mycorrhizal activity was detected as early as 17 days after planting, with the activity peaking 12 to 16 days thereafter. The highest level of mycorrhizal activity was associated with a soil solution P level of 0.021 mug/ml. Even though the mycorrhizal inoculation effect diminished as the concentration of P in the soil solution was increased, mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased P uptake and dry-matter yield of Leucaena at all levels of soil solution P examined. The concentration of P required by nonmycorrhizal L. leucocephala for maximum yield was 27 to 38 times higher than that required by mycorrhizal L. leucocephala. The results illustrate the very high dependence of L. leucocephala on VAM fungi and the significance of optimizing soil solution phosphorus for enhancing the benefits of the VAM symbiosis.

  15. Selective Removal of Uranium from the Washing Solution of Uranium-Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Choi, J. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This study examined selective removal methods of uranium from the waste solution by ion exchange resins or solvent extraction methods to reduce amount of the 2{sup nd} waste. Alamine-336, known as an excellent extraction reagent of uranium from the leaching solution of uranium ore, did not remove uranium from the acidic washing solution of soil. Uranyl ions in the acidic waste solution were sorbed on ampholyte resin with a high sorption efficiency, and desorbed from the resin by a washing with 0.5 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution at 60 .deg. C. However, the uranium dissolved in the sulfuric acid solution was not sorbed onto the strong anion exchanger resins. A great amount of uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) soil had been generated from the decommissioning of a uranium conversion plant. Our group has developed a decontamination process with washing and electrokinetic methods to decrease the amount of waste to be disposed of. However, this process generates a large amount of waste solution containing various metal ions.

  16. Controls on accumulation and soil solution partitioning of heavy metals across upland sites in United Kingdom (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Afia; van den Berg, Leon; Ahmad, Muhammad Nauman; Riaz, Muhammad; Zia, Dania; Ashmore, Mike

    2018-05-31

    A significant body of knowledge suggests that soil solution pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) strongly influence metal concentrations and speciation in porewater, however, these effects vary between different metals. This study investigated the factors influencing soil and soil solution concentrations of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) under field conditions in upland soils from UK having a wide range of pH, DOC and organic matter contents. The study primarily focussed on predicting soil and soil solution metal concentrations from the data on total soil metal concentrations (HNO 3 extracts) and soil and soil solution properties (pH, DOC and organic matter content). We tested the multiple regression models proposed by Tipping et al. (2003) to predict heavy metal concentrations in soil solutions and the results indicated a better fit (higher R 2 values) in both studies for Pb compared to the Zn and Cu concentrations. Both studies observed consistent negative relationships of metals with pH and loss on ignition (LOI) suggesting an increase in soil solution metal concentrations with increasing acidity. The positive relationship between Pb concentrations in porewater and HNO 3 extracts was similar for both studies, however, similar relationships were not found for the Zn and Cu concentrations because of the negative coefficients for these metals in our study. The results of this study conclude that the predictive equations of Tipping et al. (2003) may not be applicable to the field sites where the range of DOC and metal concentrations is much lower than their study. Our study also suggests that the extent to which metals are partitioned into soil solution is lower in soils with a higher organic matter contents due to binding of these metals to soil organic matter. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The fate of silver nanoparticles in soil solution--Sorption of solutes and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzke, Sondra; Metreveli, George; Peters, Andre; Schaumann, Gabriele E; Lang, Friederike

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles enter soils through various pathways. In the soil, they undergo various interactions with the solution and the solid phase. We tested the following hypotheses using batch experiments: i) the colloidal stability of Ag NP increases through sorption of soil-borne dissolved organic matter (DOM) and thus inhibits aggregation; ii) the presence of DOM suppresses Ag oxidation; iii) the surface charge of Ag NP governs sorption onto soil particles. Citrate-stabilized and bare Ag NPs were equilibrated with (colloid-free) soil solution extracted from a floodplain soil for 24h. Nanoparticles were removed through centrifugation. Concentrations of free Ag ions and DOC, the specific UV absorbance at a wavelength of 254 nm, and the absorption ratio α254/α410 were determined in the supernatant. Nanoparticle aggregation was studied using time-resolved dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement following the addition of soil solution and 1.5mM Ca(2+) solution. To study the effect of surface charge on the adsorption of Ag NP onto soil particles, bare and citrate-stabilized Ag NP, differing in the zeta potential, were equilibrated with silt at a solid-to-solution ratio of 1:10 and an initial Ag concentration range of 30 to 320 μg/L. Results showed that bare Ag NPs sorb organic matter, with short-chained organic matter being preferentially adsorbed over long-chained, aromatic organic matter. Stabilizing effects of organic matter only come into play at higher Ag NP concentrations. Soil solution inhibits the release of Ag(+) ions, presumably due to organic matter coatings. Sorption to silt particles was very similar for the two particle types, suggesting that the surface charge does not control Ag NP sorption. Besides, sorption was much lower than in comparable studies with sand and glass surfaces. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Amendment of Acid Soils with Crop Residues and Biochars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Jin-Hua; XU Ren-Kou; WANG Ning; LI Jiu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The liming potential of some crop residues and their biochars on an acid Ultisol was investigated using incubation experiments. Rice hulls showed greater liming potential than rice hull biochar, while soybean and pea straws had less liming potential than their biochars. Due to their higher alkalinity, biochars from legume materials increased soil pH much compared to biochars from non-legume materials. The alkalinity of biochars was a key factor affecting their liming potential,and the greater alkalinity of biochars led to greater reductions in soil acidity. The incorporation of biochars decreased soil exchangeable acidity and increased soil exchangeable base cations and base saturation, thus improving soil fertility.

  19. Arsenic in the rhizosphere soil solution of ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chaoyang; Zheng, Huan; Yu, Jiangping

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the evidence of arsenic hyperaccumulation in plant rhizosphere solutions. Six common fern plants were selected and grown in three types of substrate: arsenic (As) -tailings, As-spiked soil, and soil-As-tailing composites. A rhizobox was designed with an in-situ collection of soil solutions to analyze changes in the As concentration and valence as well as the pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total nitrogen (TN). Arsenite composed less than 20% of the total As, and As depletion was consistent with N depletion in the rhizosphere solutions of the various treatments. The As concentrations in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere solutions in the presence of plants were lower than in the respective controls without plants, except for in the As-spiked soils. The DOC concentrations were invariably higher in the rhizosphere versus non-rhizosphere solutions from the various plants; however, no significant increase in the DOC content was observed in Pteris vittata, in which only a slight decrease in pH appeared in the rhizosphere compared to non-rhizosphere solutions. The results showed that As reduction by plant roots was limited, acidification-induced solubilization was not the mechanism for As hyperaccumulation.

  20. Effect Of Soil Acidity On Some Soybean Varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Hanafiah, Diana Sofia; Lubis, Alida; Asmarlaili

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the mechanism of adaptation and morphophysiology character of soybean genotypes to soil acidity levels. Research using randomized block design with four replications, the first factor consists of soybean varieties: Tanggamus varieties, Detam 2, Anjasmoro and Detam 1, while the second factor is the media's treatment consisted of medium acid soils and limed soil. The results showed that the low level acidity of planting medium will affect the growth and ...

  1. Decreased Soil Nitrification Rate with Addition of Biochar to Acid Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiyu LI; Xiangshu DONG; Dandan LIU; Li LIU; Feifei HE

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of mixed biochar on the nitrification rate in acidic soils. A 15N tracer experiment with (15NH4)2SO4 was conducted to determine the nitrification rates of 4 acidic agricultural soils with pH 4.03-6.02in Yunnan Province, Southern China. The accumulation of 15N-NO3 - and nitrification rates decreased with the addition of biochar at the end of incubation, suggesting that biochar could be a nitrification inhibitor in acidic fertilized soil. Nitrification rates in soil with pH 4.03 were evidently lower than those in soil with pH 4.81 -6.02 with or without biochar. Decreased nitrification rates were detected in the acidic soils with biochar. Soil pH controlled nitrification more than biochar in certain strongly acidic soils.

  2. Can we predict uranium bioavailability based on soil parameters? Part 1: Effect of soil parameters on soil solution uranium concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, H.; Hees, M. van; Wouters, K.; Wannijn, J.

    2007-01-01

    Present study aims to quantify the influence of soil parameters on soil solution uranium concentration for 238 U spiked soils. Eighteen soils collected under pasture were selected such that they covered a wide range for those parameters hypothesised as being potentially important in determining U sorption. Maximum soil solution uranium concentrations were observed at alkaline pH, high inorganic carbon content and low cation exchange capacity, organic matter content, clay content, amorphous Fe and phosphate levels. Except for the significant correlation between the solid-liquid distribution coefficients (K d , L kg -1 ) and the organic matter content (R 2 = 0.70) and amorphous Fe content (R 2 = 0.63), there was no single soil parameter significantly explaining the soil solution uranium concentration (which varied 100-fold). Above pH = 6, log(K d ) was linearly related with pH [log(K d ) = - 1.18 pH + 10.8, R 2 = 0.65]. Multiple linear regression analysis did result in improved predictions of the soil solution uranium concentration but the model was complex. - Uranium solubility in soil can be predicted from organic matter or amorphous iron content and pH or with complex multilinear models considering several soil parameters

  3. Ekspansif soil solution in the villages at Trenggalek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triastuti, Nusa Setiani

    2017-11-01

    District 2/3 hills with easy sliding and land survey results showed the soil because it consists of expansive soil Survey some villages who experience insatiability or failure, a secondary analysis of the data gathered from the expert on geology, Trenggalek geological map, Trenggalek geography. Ground location researched several villages, the Terbis village of focus discussion of the landslides and plan of relocation. In the watching a black. Colored soil and easily slide, showed very expansive soil due to montmorrelite. While soil relocation contour relative is more stable because the land of kaolin and invisible water sources that could push the land. Expansive soil in the village of solution should be cheap, easily obtainable, not damaging the fertility of the soil, groundwater should be awake to the source of life, ease of implementation, utilizing local materials and use modest tools and equipment. Under the soil surface do not get there water stored in the soil until deep the water because it will slide the ground. The analysis must meet the 7 items above and steady the contour. Design of building installed sub drain, the shallow bore foundations tied tie beam, floor plate into the unity of the structure.

  4. Influence of dissolved organic matter and manganese oxides on metal speciation in soil solution: A modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Arnaud R; Ponthieu, Marie; Cancès, Benjamin; Conreux, Alexandra; Morvan, Xavier; Gommeaux, Maxime; Marin, Béatrice; Benedetti, Marc F

    2016-06-01

    Trace element (TE) speciation modelling in soil solution is controlled by the assumptions made about the soil solution composition. To evaluate this influence, different assumptions using Visual MINTEQ were tested and compared to measurements of free TE concentrations. The soil column Donnan membrane technique (SC-DMT) was used to estimate the free TE (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) concentrations in six acidic soil solutions. A batch technique using DAX-8 resin was used to fractionate the dissolved organic matter (DOM) into four fractions: humic acids (HA), fulvic acids (FA), hydrophilic acids (Hy) and hydrophobic neutral organic matter (HON). To model TE speciation, particular attention was focused on the hydrous manganese oxides (HMO) and the Hy fraction, ligands not considered in most of the TE speciation modelling studies in soil solution. In this work, the model predictions of free ion activities agree with the experimental results. The knowledge of the FA fraction seems to be very useful, especially in the case of high DOM content, for more accurately representing experimental data. Finally, the role of the manganese oxides and of the Hy fraction on TE speciation was identified and, depending on the physicochemical conditions of the soil solution, should be considered in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J K; Minh, Luong Nhat; Nørgaard, Trine

    An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness...... of the relevance of preferential flow was broadly re-established in the community by the early 1990s. However, since then, the notion remains widespread among soil scientists that the occurrence and strength of preferential flow cannot be predicted from measurable proxy variables such as soil properties or land...

  6. Decontamination of soils by irrigation with solutions containing complexing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimpl, M.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments in laboratory scale were performed to increase the mobility of Pu, Am, and Cm in soil. Soil columns of 30 cm in diameter and 40 cm of length were contaminated on the surface with 5 μCi of Pu, Am, and Cm, applied as nitrates. By irrigation with 0.1 M DTPA-solution the actinides were mobilized and migrated with the irrigation solution through the columns. The migration velocity was measured and compared to the calculated one. Conclusions for the application of this procedure in field experiments are drawn. (author)

  7. Determination of water-soluble forms of oxalic and formic acids in soils by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karicheva, E.; Guseva, N.; Kambalina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic acids (CA) play an important role in the chemical composition origin of soils and migration of elements. The content of these acids and their salts is one of the important characteristics for agrochemical, ecological, ameliorative and hygienic assessment of soils. The aim of the article is to determine water-soluble forms of same carboxylic acids — (oxalic and formic acids) in soils by ion chromatography with gradient elution. For the separation and determination of water-soluble carboxylic acids we used reagent-free gradient elution ion-exchange chromatography ICS-2000 (Dionex, USA), the model solutions of oxalate and formate ions, and leachates from soils of the Kola Peninsula. The optimal gradient program was established for separation and detection of oxalate and formate ions in water solutions by ion chromatography. A stability indicating method was developed for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organic acids in soils. The method has shown high detection limits such as 0.03 mg/L for oxalate ion and 0.02 mg/L for formate ion. High signal reproducibility was achieved in wide range of intensities which correspond to the following ion concentrations: from 0.04 mg/g to 10 mg/L (formate), from 0.1 mg/g to 25 mg/L (oxalate). The concentration of formate and oxalate ions in soil samples is from 0.04 to 0.9 mg/L and 0.45 to 17 mg/L respectively.

  8. Extraction of rare earth elements from a contaminated cropland soil using nitric acid, citric acid, and EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailong; Shuai, Weitao; Wang, Xiaojing; Liu, Yangsheng

    2017-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) contamination to the surrounding soil has increased the concerns of health risk to the local residents. Soil washing was first attempted in our study to remediate REEs-contaminated cropland soil using nitric acid, citric acid, and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) for soil decontamination and possible recovery of REEs. The extraction time, washing agent concentration, and pH value of the washing solution were optimized. The sequential extraction analysis proposed by Tessier was adopted to study the speciation changes of the REEs before and after soil washing. The extract containing citric acid was dried to obtain solid for the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. The results revealed that the optimal extraction time was 72 h, and the REEs extraction efficiency increased as the agent concentration increased from 0.01 to 0.1 mol/L. EDTA was efficient to extract REEs over a wide range of pH values, while citric acid was around pH 6.0. Under optimized conditions, the average extraction efficiencies of the major REEs in the contaminated soil were 70.96%, 64.38%, and 62.12% by EDTA, nitric acid, and citric acid, respectively. The sequential extraction analyses revealed that most soil-bounded REEs were mobilized or extracted except for those in the residual fraction. Under a comprehensive consideration of the extraction efficiency and the environmental impact, citric acid was recommended as the most suitable agent for extraction of the REEs from the contaminated cropland soils. The XRF analysis revealed that Mn, Al, Si, Pb, Fe, and REEs were the major elements in the extract indicating a possibile recovery of the REEs.

  9. An evaluation of different soil washing solutions for remediating arsenic-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwen; Ma, Fujun; Zhang, Qian; Peng, Changsheng; Wu, Bin; Li, Fasheng; Gu, Qingbao

    2017-04-01

    Soil washing is a promising way to remediate arsenic-contaminated soils. Most research has mostly focused on seeking efficient extractants for removing arsenic, but not concerned with any changes in soil properties when using this technique. In this study, the removal of arsenic from a heavily contaminated soil employing different washing solutions including H 3 PO 4 , NaOH and dithionite in EDTA was conducted. Subsequently, the changes in soil physicochemical properties and phytotoxicity of each washing technique were evaluated. After washing with 2 M H 3 PO 4 , 2 M NaOH or 0.1 M dithionite in 0.1 M EDTA, the soil samples' arsenic content met the clean-up levels stipulated in China's environmental regulations. H 3 PO 4 washing decreased soil pH, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, and Mn concentrations but increased TN and TP contents. NaOH washing increased soil pH but decreased soil TOC, TN and TP contents. Dithionite in EDTA washing reduced soil TOC, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn and TP contents. A drastic color change was observed when the soil sample was washed with H 3 PO 4 or 0.1 M dithionite in 0.1 M EDTA. After adjusting the soil pH to neutral, wheat planted in the soil sample washed by NaOH evidenced the best growth of all three treated soil samples. These results will help with selecting the best washing solution when remediating arsenic-contaminated soils in future engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gamma radiolysis of aqueous solution of ascorbic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyola V, V.M.; Azamer B, J.A.; Laviada C, A.; Luna V, P.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary study of the gamma radiolysis of a 1.13 x 10 -4 Maqueous solution of ascorbic acid is presented. It was found that dehydroascorbic acid was the principal product at doses of about 75 Krad. An increase in the dehydroascorbic acid concentration rangins from 5 to 40% was obtained, these values depend mainly on the initial ascorbic acid concentration. (author)

  11. Mobility of arsenic and its compounds in soil and soil solution: the effect of soil pretreatment and extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Száková, J; Tlustos, P; Goessler, W; Frková, Z; Najmanová, J

    2009-12-30

    The effect of soil extraction procedures and/or sample pretreatment (drying, freezing of the soil sample) on the extractability of arsenic and its compounds was tested. In the first part, five extraction procedures were compared with following order of extractable arsenic portions: 2M HNO(3)>0.43 M CH(3)COOH>or=0.05 M EDTA>or=Mehlich III (0.2M CH(3)COOH+0.25 M NH(4)NO(3)+0.013 M HNO(3)+0.015 M NH(4)F+0.001 M EDTA) extraction>water). Additionally, two methods of soil solution sampling were compared, centrifugation of saturated soil and the use of suction cups. The results showed that different sample pretreatments including soil solution sampling could lead to different absolute values of mobile arsenic content in soils. However, the interpretation of the data can lead to similar conclusions as apparent from the comparison of the soil solution sampling methods (r=0.79). For determination of arsenic compounds mild extraction procedures (0.05 M (NH(4))(2)SO(4), 0.01 M CaCl(2), and water) and soil solution sampling using suction cups were compared. Regarding the real soil conditions the extraction of fresh samples and/or in situ collection of soil solution are preferred among the sample pretreatments and/or soil extraction procedures. However, chemical stabilization of the solutions should be allowed and included in the analytical procedures for determination of individual arsenic compounds.

  12. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. ► Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). ► Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. ► Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 × 10 −10 , 2.08 × 10 −9 and 6.8 × 10 −10 m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m 3 ). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m 3 ) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  13. Ammonium citrate as enhancement for electrodialytic soil remediation and investigation of soil solution during the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2015-01-01

    Seven electrodialytic experiments were conducted using ammonium citrate as enhancing agent to remediate copper and chromium-contaminated soil from a wood-preservation site. The purpose was to investigate the effect of current density (0.2, 1.0 and 1.5 mA cm(-2)), concentration of enhancing agent (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 M) and remediation times (21, 42 and 117 d) for the removal of Cu and Cr from a calcareous soil. To gain insight on metal behavior, soil solution was periodically collected using suction cups. It was seen that current densities higher than 1.0 mA cm(-2) did not increase removal and thus using too high current densities can be a waste of energy. Desorption rate is important and both remediation time and ammonium citrate concentration are relevant parameters. It was possible to collect soil solution samples following an adaptation of the experimental set-up to ensure continuous supply of ammonium citrate to the soil in order to keep it saturated during the remediation. Monitoring soil solution gives valuable information on the evolution of remediation and helps deciding when the soil is remediated. Final concentrations in the soil ranged from 220 to 360 mg Cu kg(-1) (removals: 78-86%) and 440-590 mg Cr kg(-1) (removals: 35-51%), being within the 500 mg kg(-1) limit for a clean soil only for Cu. While further optimization is still required for Cr, the removal percentages are the highest achieved so far, for a real Cu and Cr-contaminated, calcareous soil. The results highlight EDR potential to remediate metal polluted soils at neutral to alkaline pH by choosing a good enhancement solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation protection by ascorbic acid in sodium alginate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliste, A.J.; Mastro, N.L. Del [Center of Radiation Technology, IPEN/CNEN/SP, University City, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: ajaliste@ipen.br

    2004-07-01

    Alginates are gelling hydrocolloids extracted from brown seaweed used widely in the nourishing and pharmaceutical industries. As alginic acid gellification retard food entrance in the stomach alginate is an additive used in diets. The objective of this work was to study the protective action of the ascorbic acid in alginate solutions against the action of {sup 60} Co gamma radiation. One % (w/v) solutions of alginate had been used and concentrations of ascorbic acid varied from 0 to 2.5% (w/v). The solutions were irradiated with doses up to 10 kGy. Viscosity/dose relationship and the p H of the solutions at 25 Centigrade were determined. Ascorbic acid behaved as an antioxidant against radiation oxidative shock in this model system of an irradiated viscous solution. Besides its radiation protective role on alginate solutions ascorbic acid promoted a viscosity increase in the range of concentrations employed. (Author)

  15. Radiation protection by ascorbic acid in sodium alginate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliste, A.J.; Mastro, N.L. Del

    2004-01-01

    Alginates are gelling hydrocolloids extracted from brown seaweed used widely in the nourishing and pharmaceutical industries. As alginic acid gellification retard food entrance in the stomach alginate is an additive used in diets. The objective of this work was to study the protective action of the ascorbic acid in alginate solutions against the action of 60 Co gamma radiation. One % (w/v) solutions of alginate had been used and concentrations of ascorbic acid varied from 0 to 2.5% (w/v). The solutions were irradiated with doses up to 10 kGy. Viscosity/dose relationship and the p H of the solutions at 25 Centigrade were determined. Ascorbic acid behaved as an antioxidant against radiation oxidative shock in this model system of an irradiated viscous solution. Besides its radiation protective role on alginate solutions ascorbic acid promoted a viscosity increase in the range of concentrations employed. (Author)

  16. Solute transport model for radioisotopes in layered soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essel, P.

    2010-01-01

    The study considered the transport of a radioactive solute in solution from the surface of the earth down through the soil to the ground water when there is an accidental or intentional spillage of a radioactive material on the surface. The finite difference method was used to model the spatial and temporal profile of moisture content in a soil column using the θ-based Richard's equation leading to solution of the convective-dispersive equation for non-adsorbing solutes numerically. A matlab code has been generated to predict the transport of the radioactive contaminant, spilled on the surface of a vertically heterogeneous soil made up of two layers to determine the residence time of the solute in the unsaturated zone, the time it takes the contaminant to reach the groundwater and the amount of the solute entering the groundwater in various times and the levels of pollution in those times. The model predicted that, then there is a spillage of 7.2g of tritium, on the surface of the ground at the study area, it will take two years for the radionuclide to enter the groundwater and fifteen years to totally leave the unsaturated zone. There is therefore the need to try as much as possible to avoid intentional or accidental spillage of the radionuclide since it has long term effect. (au)

  17. Photochemical reactions of neptunium in nitric acid solution containing photocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Fumio

    1991-01-01

    Photochemical oxidation and reduction behaviors of neptunium were preliminarily investigated in 3 mol/l nitric acid solution. Nitric acid of 3 mol/l simulated the high level waste solution from a spent fuel reprocessing process. Concentrations of Np(V), Np(VI) and nitrous acid were determined with a photospectrometer, and solution potential with an electrode. Without additives, Np(VI) was reduced to Np(V) by nitrous acid which was photolytically generated from nitric acid. With a scavenger for nitrous acid, Np(V) was oxidized to extractable Np(VI) by a photolytically generated oxidizing reagent which were predicted by the solution potential measurement. The reduction rate was higher than the oxidation rate because of the larger quantity and higher reactivity of nitrous acid than an oxidizing reagent. Photocatalyst was proved to be effective for the oxidation of Np(V) to Np(VI). (author)

  18. Reduced carbon sequestration potential of biochar in acidic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yaqi; Zhan, Yu; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-12-01

    Biochar application in soil has been proposed as a promising method for carbon sequestration. While factors affecting its carbon sequestration potential have been widely investigated, the number of studies on the effect of soil pH is limited. To investigate the carbon sequestration potential of biochar across a series of soil pH levels, the total carbon emission, CO 2 release from inorganic carbon, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) of six soils with various pH levels were compared after the addition of straw biochar produced at different pyrolysis temperatures. The results show that the acidic soils released more CO 2 (1.5-3.5 times higher than the control) after the application of biochar compared with neutral and alkaline soils. The degradation of both native soil organic carbon (SOC) and biochar were accelerated. More inorganic CO 2 release in acidic soil contributed to the increased degradation of biochar. Higher proportion of gram-positive bacteria in acidic soil (25%-36%) was responsible for the enhanced biochar degradation and simultaneously co-metabolism of SOC. In addition, lower substrate limitation for bacteria, indicated by higher C-O stretching after the biochar application in the acidic soil, also caused more CO 2 release. In addition to the soil pH, other factors such as clay contents and experimental duration also affected the phsico-chemical and biotic processes of SOC dynamics. Gram-negative/gram-positive bacteria ratio was found to be negatively related to priming effects, and suggested to serve as an indicator for priming effect. In general, the carbon sequestration potential of rice-straw biochar in soil reduced along with the decrease of soil pH especially in a short-term. Given wide spread of acidic soils in China, carbon sequestration potential of biochar may be overestimated without taking into account the impact of soil pH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Online Automatic Titration of Chromic Acid in Chromium Plating Solutions and Phosphoric and Sulfuric Acids in Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    1991-01-01

    .... The analytical chemistry literature lacks an adequate online automatic titration method for the monitoring of chromic acid in chromium plating solutions and the monitoring of phosphoric and sulfuric...

  20. Soil Acidification due to Acid Deposition in Southern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Bohan

    1999-12-31

    Anthropogenic emission of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} to the atmosphere has made acid deposition one of the most serious environmental problems. In China, acid deposition research started in the late 1970s. The present thesis is part of a joint Chinese-Norwegian research project. The main goal of the thesis was to investigate the mechanism of soil acidification, to estimate soil responses to acid deposition, and to compare relative soil sensitivity to acidification in southern China. Laboratory experiments and modelling simulations were included. Specifically, the thesis (1) studies the characteristics of anion adsorption and cation release of the soils from southern China, (2) examines the effects of increased ionic strength in the precipitation and the effects of anion adsorption on cation release from the soils, (3) compares the relative sensitivity of these soils to acidification and the potentially harmful effects of acid deposition, (4) estimates likely soil responses to different deposition scenarios, including changes in soil waters and soil properties, and (5) investigates long-term changes in soils and soil waters in the Guiyang catchment due to acid deposition. 218 refs., 31 figs., 23 tabs.

  1. Soil Acidification due to Acid Deposition in Southern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Bohan

    1998-12-31

    Anthropogenic emission of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} to the atmosphere has made acid deposition one of the most serious environmental problems. In China, acid deposition research started in the late 1970s. The present thesis is part of a joint Chinese-Norwegian research project. The main goal of the thesis was to investigate the mechanism of soil acidification, to estimate soil responses to acid deposition, and to compare relative soil sensitivity to acidification in southern China. Laboratory experiments and modelling simulations were included. Specifically, the thesis (1) studies the characteristics of anion adsorption and cation release of the soils from southern China, (2) examines the effects of increased ionic strength in the precipitation and the effects of anion adsorption on cation release from the soils, (3) compares the relative sensitivity of these soils to acidification and the potentially harmful effects of acid deposition, (4) estimates likely soil responses to different deposition scenarios, including changes in soil waters and soil properties, and (5) investigates long-term changes in soils and soil waters in the Guiyang catchment due to acid deposition. 218 refs., 31 figs., 23 tabs.

  2. Chemodynamics of heavy metals in long-term contaminated soils: metal speciation in soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Owens, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The concentration and speciation of heavy metals in soil solution isolated from long-term contaminated soils were investigated. The soil solution was extracted at 70% maximum water holding capacity (MWHC) after equilibration for 24 h. The free metal concentrations (Cd2+, CU2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+) in soil solution were determined using the Donnan membrane technique (DMT). Initially the DMT was validated using artificial solutions where the percentage of free metal ions were significantly correlated with the percentages predicted using MINTEQA2. However, there was a significant difference between the absolute free ion concentrations predicted by MINTEQA2 and the values determined by the DMT. This was due to the significant metal adsorption onto the cation exchange membrane used in the DMT with 20%, 28%, 44%, and 8% mass loss of the initial total concentration of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in solution, respectively. This could result in a significant error in the determination of free metal ions when using DMT if no allowance for membrane cation adsorption was made. Relative to the total soluble metal concentrations the amounts of free Cd2+ (3%-52%) and Zn2+ (11%-72%) in soil solutions were generally higher than those of Cu2+ (0.2%-30%) and Pb2+ (0.6%-10%). Among the key soil solution properties, dissolved heavy metal concentrations were the most significant factor governing free metal ion concentrations. Soil solution pH showed only a weak relationship with free metal ion partitioning coefficients (K(p)) and dissolved organic carbon did not show any significant influence on K(p).

  3. Effect of soil compositions on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T.M. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University (China); Luo, S.X. [Department of Chemistry, Zunyi Normal College, Zunyi (China); Sun, C. [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Wu, Y.H.

    2010-04-15

    In this study, effect of cations, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and anions, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -} on electrochemical corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated soil solution was investigated through potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate that the Ca{sup 2+}and Mg{sup 2+} can decrease the corrosion current density of carbon steel in simulated soil solution, and K{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and NO{sub 3}{sup -} can increase the corrosion density. All the above ions in the simulated soil solution can decrease its resistivity, but they have different effect on the charge transfer resistivity. This finding can be useful in evaluating the corrosivity of certain soil through chemical analysis, and provide data for construction engineers. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Can we predict uranium bioavailability based on soil parameters? Part 1: effect of soil parameters on soil solution uranium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhove, H; Van Hees, M; Wouters, K; Wannijn, J

    2007-01-01

    Present study aims to quantify the influence of soil parameters on soil solution uranium concentration for (238)U spiked soils. Eighteen soils collected under pasture were selected such that they covered a wide range for those parameters hypothesised as being potentially important in determining U sorption. Maximum soil solution uranium concentrations were observed at alkaline pH, high inorganic carbon content and low cation exchange capacity, organic matter content, clay content, amorphous Fe and phosphate levels. Except for the significant correlation between the solid-liquid distribution coefficients (K(d), L kg(-1)) and the organic matter content (R(2)=0.70) and amorphous Fe content (R(2)=0.63), there was no single soil parameter significantly explaining the soil solution uranium concentration (which varied 100-fold). Above pH=6, log(K(d)) was linearly related with pH [log(K(d))=-1.18 pH+10.8, R(2)=0.65]. Multiple linear regression analysis did result in improved predictions of the soil solution uranium concentration but the model was complex.

  5. Influence of soil solution cation composition on boron adsorption by soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boron (B) adsorption on five arid-zone soil samples from California was investigated as a function of solution pH (4-10) and cation composition (Na, Ca, or Mg). Boron adsorption increased with increasing solution pH, reached an adsorption maximum near pH 9, and decreased with further increases with...

  6. Soil humic acids may favour the persistence of hexavalent chromium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leita, Liviana; Margon, Alja; Pastrello, Arnold; Arcon, Iztok; Contin, Marco; Mosetti, Davide

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between hexavalent chromium Cr(VI), as K 2 CrO 4 , and standard humic acids (HAs) in bulk solution was studied using three complementary analytical methods: UV-Visible spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and differential pulse stripping voltammetry. The observed UV-Vis and X-ray absorption spectra showed that, under our experimental conditions, HAs did not induce reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent chemical form. The interaction between Cr(VI) and HAs has rather led to the formation of Cr(VI)-HAs micelles via supramolecular chemical processes. The reported results could contribute towards explaining the relative persistence of ecotoxic hexavalent chromium in soils. - Humic acids (HAs) did not induce reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent chemical form, as the interaction between Cr(VI) and HAs rather led to the formation of Cr(VI)-HAs micelles via supramolecular chemical processes.

  7. Enhancement Solution to Improve Remediation of Soil Contaminated with Lead by Electrical Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayad Abd Al-hamza Faisal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory investigation of six different tests were conducted on silty clay soil spiked with lead in concentrations of 1500 mg/kg. A constant DC voltage gradient of 1 V/cm was applied for all these tests with duration of 7 days remediation process for each test. Different purging solutions and addition configurations, i.e. injection wells, were investigated experimentally to enhance the removal of lead from Iraqi soil during electro-kinetic remediation process. The experimental results showed that the overall removal efficiency of lead for tests conducted with distilled water, 0.1 M acetic acid, 0.2 M EDTA and 1 M ammonium citrate as the purging solutions were equal to 18 %, 37 %, 42 %, and 29 %, respectively. However, introducing the injection wells as another enhancement technique into the tests used the same purging solutions mentioned above which have vital role in increasing the removal efficiency up to 59 %.

  8. Recovery of fission products from acidic waste solutions thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin, W.W.; Darlington, W.B.; Dubois, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    Fission products, e.g., palladium, ruthenium and technetium, are removed from aqueous, acidic waste solutions thereof. The acidic waste solution is electrolyzed in an electrolytic cell under controlled cathodic potential conditions and technetium, ruthenium, palladium and rhodium are deposited on the cathode. Metal deposit is removed from the cathode and dissolved in acid. Acid insoluble rhodium metal is recovered, dissolved by alkali metal bisulfate fusion and purified by electrolysis. In one embodiment, the solution formed by acid dissolution of the cathode metal deposit is treated with a strong oxidizing agent and distilled to separate technetium and ruthenium (as a distillate) from palladium. Technetium is separated from ruthenium by organic solvent extraction and then recovered, e.g., as an ammonium salt. Ruthenium is disposed of as waste by-product. Palladium is recovered by electrolysis of an acid solution thereof under controlled cathodic potential conditions. Further embodiments wherein alternate metal recovery sequences are used are described. (U.S.)

  9. Large zero-tension plate lysimeters for soil water and solute collection in undisturbed soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Peters

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Water collection from undisturbed unsaturated soils to estimate in situ water and solute fluxes in the field is a challenge, in particular if soils are heterogeneous. Large sampling devices are required if preferential flow paths are present. We present a modular plate system that allows installation of large zero-tension lysimeter plates under undisturbed soils in the field. To investigate the influence of the lysimeter on the water flow field in the soil, a numerical 2-D simulation study was conducted for homogeneous soils with uni- and bimodal pore-size distributions and stochastic Miller-Miller heterogeneity. The collection efficiency was found to be highly dependent on the hydraulic functions, infiltration rate, and lysimeter size, and was furthermore affected by the degree of heterogeneity. In homogeneous soils with high saturated conductivities the devices perform poorly and even large lysimeters (width 250 cm can be bypassed by the soil water. Heterogeneities of soil hydraulic properties result into a network of flow channels that enhance the sampling efficiency of the lysimeter plates. Solute breakthrough into zero-tension lysimeter occurs slightly retarded as compared to the free soil, but concentrations in the collected water are similar to the mean flux concentration in the undisturbed soil. To validate the results from the numerical study, a dual tracer study with seven lysimeters of 1.25×1.25 m area was conducted in the field. Three lysimeters were installed underneath a 1.2 m filling of contaminated silty sand, the others deeper in the undisturbed soil. The lysimeters directly underneath the filled soil material collected water with a collection efficiency of 45%. The deeper lysimeters did not collect any water. The arrival of the tracers showed that almost all collected water came from preferential flow paths.

  10. Speciation and isotopic exchangeability of nickel in soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Annette L; Ma, Yibing; Lombi, Enzo; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of trace metal speciation in soil pore waters is important in addressing metal bioavailability and risk assessment of contaminated soils. In this study, free Ni(2+) activities were determined in pore waters of long-term Ni-contaminated soils using a Donnan dialysis membrane technique. The pore water free Ni(2+) concentration as a percentage of total soluble Ni ranged from 21 to 80% (average 53%), and the average amount of Ni bound to dissolved organic matter estimated by Windermere Humic Aqueous Model VI was < or = 17%. These data indicate that complexed forms of Ni can constitute a significant fraction of total Ni in solution. Windermere Humic Aqueous Model VI provided reasonable estimates of free Ni(2+) fractions in comparison to the measured fractions (R(2) = 0.83 with a slope of 1.0). Also, the isotopically exchangeable pools (E value) of soil Ni were measured by an isotope dilution technique using water extraction, with and without resin purification, and 0.1 mol L(-1) CaCl(2) extraction, and the isotopic exchangeability of Ni species in soil water extracts was investigated. The concentrations of isotopically non-exchangeable Ni in water extracts were <9% of total water soluble Ni concentrations for all soils. The resin E values expressed as a percentage of the total Ni concentrations in soil showed that the labile Ni pool ranged from 0.9 to 32.4% (average 12.4%) of total soil Ni. Therefore the labile Ni pool in these well-equilibrated contaminated soils appears to be relatively small in relation to total Ni concentrations.

  11. Predictive mapping of the acidifying potential for acid sulfate soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boman, A; Beucher, Amélie; Mattbäck, S

    Developing methods for the predictive mapping of the potential environmental impact from acid sulfate soils is important because recent studies (e.g. Mattbäck et al., under revision) have shown that the environmental hazards (e.g. leaching of acidity) related to acid sulfate soils vary depending...... on their texture (clay, silt, sand etc.). Moreover, acidity correlates, not only with the sulfur content, but also with the electrical conductivity (EC) measured after incubation. Electromagnetic induction (EMI) data collected from an EM38 proximal sensor also enabled the detailed mapping of acid sulfate soils...... over a field (Huang et al., 2014).This study aims at assessing the use of EMI data for the predictive mapping of the acidifying potential in an acid sulfate soil area in western Finland. Different supervised classification modelling techniques, such as Artificial Neural Networks (Beucher et al., 2015...

  12. Oxidation of phenolic acid derivatives by soil and its relevance to allelopathic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, T

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that phenolic acids from legume green manures may contribute to weed control through allelopathy. The objectives of this study were to investigate the oxidation reactions of phenolic acids in soil and to determine the subsequent effects of oxidation upon phytotoxicity. Soils were reacted for 18 h with 0.25 mmol L(-1) benzoic and cinnamic acid derivative solutions and Mn release from the suspension was used as a marker for phenolic acid oxidation. The extent of oxidation in soil suspensions was in the order of 3,4dihydroxy- > 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy- > 4-hydroxy-approximately 2-hydroxy-substituted benzoic and cinnamic acids. The same ranking was observed for cyclic voltammetry peak currents of the cinnamic acid derivatives. This suggests that the oxidation of phenolic acids is controlled by the electron transfer step from the sorbed phenolic acid to the metal oxide. A bioassay experiment showed that the 4-hydroxy-, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-, and 3,4-dihydroxy-substituted cinnamic acids were bioactive at 0.25 mmol L(-1) concentration. Reaction with soil for 18 h resulted in the elimination of bioactivity of these three cinnamic acids at the 5% significance level. The oxidative reactivity of phenolic acids may limit the potential of allelopathy as a component of an integrated weed management system. However, the initial phytotoxicity after soil incorporation may coincide with the early, critical stage of weed emergence and establishment, so that allelopathic phenolic acids may still play a role in weed management despite their reactivity in soil systems.

  13. Removal of radium-226 from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid by column leaching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esther Phillip; Muhamad Samudi Yasir

    2012-01-01

    In this study, evaluation of radium-226 removal from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid extracted from peat soil by column leaching method was carried out. Humic acid of concentration 100 ppm and pH 7 was leached through a column packed with radium-contaminated soil and leachates collected were analysed with gamma spectrometer to determine the leached radium-226. Results obtained indicated low removal of radium-226 between 1 - 4 %. Meanwhile, leaching profile revealed that radium-226 was bound to soil components with three different strength, thus resulting in three phases of radium-226 removal. It was estimated that the total removal of radium-226 from 10 g radium-contaminated soil sample studied could be achieved using approximately 31500 - 31850 ml HA solutions with leaching rate of 1 ml/ min. (author)

  14. Corrosion of alloy C-22 in organic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodriguez, Martin A.; Giordano, Celia M.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C degrees. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric acids. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and Picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and Acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids. (author) [es

  15. New Culture Medium Containing Ionic Concentrations of Nutrients Similar to Concentrations Found in the Soil Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, J. Scott; McGrath, Stephen P.; Chaney, Rufus L.

    1991-01-01

    A new growth medium which closely approximates the composition of the soil solution is presented. This soil solution equivalent (SSE) medium contains the following components (millimolar): NO3, 2.5; NH4, 2.5; HPO4, 0.005; Na, 2.5; Ca, 4.0; Mg, 2.0; K, 0.503; Cl, 4.0; SO4, 5.0; ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid), 0.02; and MES [2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid] (to maintain the pH at 6.0), 10, plus 0.1% arabinose. The advantages of the SSE medium are discussed. PMID:16348614

  16. Why plants grow poorly on very acid soils: are ecologists missing the obvious?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, P S; Proctor, J

    2001-04-01

    Factors associated with soil acidity are considered to be limiting for plants in many parts of the world. This work was undertaken to investigate the role of the toxicity of hydrogen (H(+)) which seems to have been underconsidered by ecologists as an explanation of the reduced plant growth observed in very acid soils. Racial differences are reported in plant growth response to increasing acidity in the grass Holcus lanatus L. (Yorkshire-fog) and the tree Betula pendula Roth (Silver Birch). Soils and seeds were collected from four Scottish sites which covered a range of soils from acid (organic and mineral) to more base-rich. The sites and their pH (1:2.5 fresh soil:0.01 M CaCl(2)) were: Flanders Moss (FM), pH 3.2+/-0.03; Kippenrait Glen (KP), pH 4.8+/- 0.05; Kinloch Rannoch (KR), pH 6.1+/-0.16; and Sheriffmuir (SMM), pH 4.3+/-0.11. The growth rates of two races of H. lanatus, FM and KP, and three races of B. pendula (SMM, KP and KR) were measured in nutrient solution cultures at pH 2.0 (H. lanatus only), 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, and 5.6. Results showed races from acid organic soils (FM) were H(+)-tolerant while those from acid mineral soils (SMM) were Al(3+)-tolerant but not necessarily H(+)-tolerant. These results confirmed that populations were separately adapted to H(+) or Al(3+) toxicity and this was dependent upon the soil characteristics at their site of collection. The fact of plant adaptation to H(+) toxicity supports the view that this is an important factor in very acid soils.

  17. Ion activity and distribution of heavy metals in acid mine drainage polluted subtropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongtao; Becquer, Thierry; Dai Jun; Quantin, Cecile; Benedetti, Marc F.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative dissolution of mine wastes gives rise to acidic, metal-enriched mine drainage (AMD) and has typically posed an additional risk to the environment. The poly-metallic mine Dabaoshan in South China is an excellent test site to understand the processes affecting the surrounding polluted agricultural fields. Our objectives were firstly to investigate metal ion activity in soil solution, distribution in solid constituents, and spatial distribution in samples, secondly to determine dominant environment factors controlling metal activity in the long-term AMD-polluted subtropical soils. Soil Column Donnan Membrane Technology (SC-DMT) combined with sequential extraction shows that unusually large proportion of the metal ions are present as free ion in the soil solutions. The narrow range of low pH values prevents any pH effects during the binding onto oxides or organic matter. The differences in speciation of the soil solutions may explain the different soil degradation observed between paddy and non-paddy soils. - First evidence of the real free metal ion concentrations in acid mine drainage context in tropical systems

  18. Corrosion control of vanadium in aqueous solutions by amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Rabiee, M.M.; Helal, N.H.; El-Hafez, Gh.M. Abd; Badawy, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of vanadium in amino acid free and amino acid containing aqueous solutions of different pH was studied using open-circuit potential measurements, polarization techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion current density, i corr , the corrosion potential, E corr and the corrosion resistance, R corr , were calculated. A group of amino acids, namely, glycine, alanine, valine, histidine, glutamic and cysteine has been investigated as environmentally safe inhibitors. The effect of Cl - on the corrosion inhibition efficiency especially in acid solutions was investigated. In neutral and basic solutions, the presence of amino acids increases the corrosion resistance of the metal. The electrochemical behavior of V before and after the corrosion inhibition process has shown that some amino acids like glutamic acid and histidine have promising corrosion inhibition efficiency at low concentration (≅25 mM). The inhibition efficiency (η) was found to depend on the structure of the amino acid and the constituents of the corrosive medium. The corrosion inhibition process is based on the adsorption of the amino acid molecules on the metal surface and the adsorption process follows the Freundlich isotherm. The adsorption free energy for valine on V in acidic solutions was found to be -9.4 kJ/mol which reveals strong physical adsorption of the amino acid molecules on the vanadium surface

  19. Coastal acid sulphate soils in Poland: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulisz Piotr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the state of knowledge on coastal acid sulphate soils in Poland. The properties of these soils are closely related to the influence of brackish water from the Baltic Sea, high accumulation of organic matter and human activity. The obtained results demonstrate that the sulphide accumulation in soils refers to a relatively small areas of the Polish coastal zone with the unique and very valuable habitats. They require an adequate regulation of the water relations to avoid the risk of strong soil acidification and environmental pollution by heavy metals. Currently, there are no relevant criteria for classification of acid sulphate soil materials in the Polish Soil Classification (2011. Therefore, based on the presented data, the authors proposed to identify these features at the lower classification level (for different soil types. The criteria for the Thionic and Sulfidic qualifiers used in the WRB classification (IUSS Working Group WRB 2015 could be accepted for this purpose.

  20. Soil Degradation in India: Challenges and Potential Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Bhattacharyya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil degradation in India is estimated to be occurring on 147 million hectares (Mha of land, including 94 Mha from water erosion, 16 Mha from acidification, 14 Mha from flooding, 9 Mha from wind erosion, 6 Mha from salinity, and 7 Mha from a combination of factors. This is extremely serious because India supports 18% of the world’s human population and 15% of the world’s livestock population, but has only 2.4% of the world’s land area. Despite its low proportional land area, India ranks second worldwide in farm output. Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries account for 17% of the gross domestic product and employs about 50% of the total workforce of the country. Causes of soil degradation are both natural and human-induced. Natural causes include earthquakes, tsunamis, droughts, avalanches, landslides, volcanic eruptions, floods, tornadoes, and wildfires. Human-induced soil degradation results from land clearing and deforestation, inappropriate agricultural practices, improper management of industrial effluents and wastes, over-grazing, careless management of forests, surface mining, urban sprawl, and commercial/industrial development. Inappropriate agricultural practices include excessive tillage and use of heavy machinery, excessive and unbalanced use of inorganic fertilizers, poor irrigation and water management techniques, pesticide overuse, inadequate crop residue and/or organic carbon inputs, and poor crop cycle planning. Some underlying social causes of soil degradation in India are land shortage, decline in per capita land availability, economic pressure on land, land tenancy, poverty, and population increase. In this review of land degradation in India, we summarize (1 the main causes of soil degradation in different agro-climatic regions; (2 research results documenting both soil degradation and soil health improvement in various agricultural systems; and (3 potential solutions to improve soil health in different regions using a

  1. Metal mobilization from metallurgical wastes by soil organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potysz, Anna; Grybos, Malgorzata; Kierczak, Jakub; Guibaud, Gilles; Fondaneche, Patrice; Lens, Piet N L; van Hullebusch, Eric D

    2017-07-01

    Three types of Cu-slags differing in chemical and mineralogical composition (historical, shaft furnace, and granulated slags) and a matte from a lead recovery process were studied with respect to their susceptibility to release Cu, Zn and Pb upon exposure to organic acids commonly encountered in soil environments. Leaching experiments (24-960 h) were conducted with: i) humic acid (20 mg/L) at pH t 0  = 4.4, ii) fulvic acid (20 mg/L) at pH t 0  = 4.4, iii) an artificial root exudates (ARE) (17.4 g/L) solution at pH t 0  = 4.4, iv) ARE solution at pH t 0  = 2.9 and v) ultrapure water (pH t 0  = 5.6). The results demonstrated that the ARE contribute the most to the mobilization of metals from all the wastes analyzed, regardless of the initial pH of the solution. For example, up to 14%, 30%, 24% and 5% of Cu is released within 960 h from historical, shaft furnace, granulated slags and lead matte, respectively, when exposed to the artificial root exudates solution (pH 2.9). Humic and fulvic acids were found to have a higher impact on granulated and shaft furnace slags as compared to the ultrapure water control and increased the release of metals by a factor up to 37.5 (Pb) and 20.5 (Cu) for granulated and shaft furnace slags, respectively. Humic and fulvic acids amplified the mobilization of metals by a maximal factor of 13.6 (Pb) and 12.1 (Pb) for historical slag and lead matte, respectively. The studied organic compounds contributed to different release rates of metallic contaminants from individual metallurgical wastes under the conditions tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimizing the molarity of a EDTA washing solution for saturated-soil remediation of trace metal contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, M.D.; Prasher, S.O.; Hendershot, W.H.

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to optimize the use of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for reclaiming urban soils contaminated with trace metals. As compared to Na 2 EDTA (NH 4 ) 2 EDTA extracted 60% more Zn and equivalent amounts of Cd, Cu and Pb from a sandy loam. When successively saturating and draining loamy sand columns during a washing cycle, which submerged it once with a (NH 4 ) 2 EDTA wash and four times with deionised water, the post-wash rinses largely contributed to the total cumulative extraction of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn. Both the washing solution and the deionised water rinses were added in a 2:5 liquid to soil (L:S) weight ratio. For equal amounts of EDTA, concentrating the washing solution and applying it and the ensuing rinses in a smaller 1:5 L:S weight ratio, instead of a 2:5 L:S weight ratio, increased the extraction of targeted Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. - A single EDTA addition is best utilised in a highly concentrated washing solution given in a small liquid to soil weight ratio

  3. Ammonium citrate as enhancement for electrodialytic soil remediation and investigation of soil solution during the process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Seven electrodialytic experiments were conducted using ammonium citrate as enhancing agent to remediate copper and chromium-contaminated soil from a wood-preservation site. The purpose was to investigate the effect of current density (0.2, 1.0 and 1.5 mA cm−2), concentration of enhancing agent (0...... to remediate metal polluted soils at neutral to alkaline pH by choosing a good enhancement solution....

  4. The dependence of the 137Cs on the parameters of a soil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulavyin, L.A.; Prorok, V.V.; Agejev, V.A.; Mel'nichenko, L.Yu.; Ostashko, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    Different kinds of rapidly maturing plants were grown simultaneously at experimental sites under natural conditions at the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. The content of 137 Cs in a plant and in the corresponding soil solution and the content of the soil solution in soil were measured. We have first established that, for all investigated plants and experimental sites, the 137 Cs plant uptake is approximately proportional to the concentration of dissolved 137 Cs in the soil - to the product of the 137 Cs content in the soil solution and the content of the soil solution per unit volume of soil

  5. Development of effective methods for determination of boron in soils and soil solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мaruan Tanasheva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is related to serious ecological problem in agriculture: soil degradation in rice fields in South Kazakhstan and in particular, to boron toxicity in rice, which resulted in reduced crop yields. The following abiotic factors were studied to determine the ability of boron to accumulate in rice fields: soil type, soil properties like salinity and acidity', season (level of precipitation, water logging /water shortage. The results shows that the severity of boron excess for fertility of rice crop which depends on boron ionic composition in soil. Adverse impact of both boron deficiency and boron excess are discussed. The necessity of boron fertilizers is shown for soils with high boron mobility.

  6. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.

  7. Determination of free acid in plutonium (IV) solutions - thermometrically, potentiometrically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.L.; Tucker, G.M.; Huff, G.A.; Jordan, L.G.

    1981-09-01

    The thermometric titration technique was found to offer certain advantages over potentiometry in the determination of free acid in Pu(IV) solutions. The thermometric technique was applied to the determination of free acid in plutonium nitrate solutions using potassium fluoride to suppress the hydrolytic interference of plutonium(IV). The results indicate that 0.2 to 2.0 milliequivalents of free acid can be determined with acceptable bias and precision in solutions containing up to 30 milligrams of plutonium. In contrast, neither the thermometric nor the potentiometric technique was suitable for samples containing more than eight milligrams of plutonium complexed with potassium oxalate

  8. Isotopically exchangeable Al in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A.M. [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Fink, D. [Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Rose, J. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Waite, T. David [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Collins, Richard N., E-mail: richard.collins@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Periodic discharges of high concentrations of aluminium (Al) causing fish kills and other adverse effects occur worldwide in waterways affected by coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS). The exchangeability — a metal's ability to readily transfer between the soil solid- and solution-phases — of Al in these soils is therefore of particular importance as it has implications for metal transport, plant availability and toxicity to living organisms. In the present study, the concentrations of isotopically exchangeable Al (E values) were measured in 27 CLASS and compared with common salt extractions (i.e. KCl and CuCl{sub 2}) used to estimate exchangeable soil pools of Al. E values of Al were high in the soils, ranging from 357 to 3040 mg·kg{sup −1}. Exchangeable concentrations estimated using 1 M KCl were consistently lower than measured E values, although a reasonable correlation was obtained between the two values (E = 1.68 × Al{sub KCl}, r{sup 2} = 0.66, n = 25). The addition of a 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extraction step improved the 1:1 agreement between extractable and isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations, but lead to significant mobilisation of non-isotopically exchangeable Al in surficial ‘organic-rich’ CLASS having E values < 1000 mg·kg{sup −1}. It was concluded that currently used (i.e. 1 M KCl) methodology severely underestimates exchangeable Al and total actual acidity values in CLASS and should be corrected by a factor similar to the one determined here. - Highlights: • Isotopically exchangeable Al was compared to 1 M KCl or 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extractable Al. • 1 M KCl always underestimated isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations. • 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} mobilised non-isotopically exchangeable Al • 1 M KCl values require correction of ~ 1.7 to reflect exchangeable Al concentrations.

  9. Different low-molecular-mass organic acids specifically control leaching of arsenic and lead from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Christopher; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass organic acids (LMMOA) are of key importance for mobilisation and fate of metals in soil, by functioning as ligands that increase the amount of dissolved metal in solution or by dissociation of metal binding minerals. Column leaching experiments were performed on soil polluted with As and Pb, in order to determine the specificity of LMMOA related release for individual elements, at varying organic acid concentrations. Acetic, citric and oxalic acids were applied in 12h leaching experiments over a concentration range (0.5-25 mM) to soil samples that represent organic and mineral horizons. The leaching of As followed the order: oxalic>citric>acetic acid in both soils. Arsenic leaching was attributed primarily to ligand-enhanced dissolution of mineral oxides followed by As released into solution, as shown by significant correlation between oxalic and citric acids and content of Al and Fe in leaching solutions. Results suggest that subsurface mineral soil layers are more vulnerable to As toxicity. Leaching of Pb from both soils followed the order: citric>oxalic>acetic acid. Mineral soil samples were shown to be more susceptible to leaching of Pb than samples characterised by a high content of organic matter. The leaching efficiency of citric acid was attributed to formation of stable complexes with Pb ions, which other acids are not capable of. Results obtained in the study are evidence that the extent of As and Pb leaching in contaminated surface and subsurface soil depends significantly on the types of carboxylic acid involved. The implications of the type of acid and the specific element that can be mobilised become increasingly significant where LMMOA concentrations are highest, such as in rhizosphere soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mathematical description of adsorption and transport of reactive solutes in soil: a review of selected literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.

    1978-10-01

    This report reviews selected literature related to the mathematical description of the transport of reactive solutes through soil. The primary areas of the literature reviewed are (1) mathematical models in current use for description of the adsorption-desorption interaction between the soil solution and the soil matrix and (2) analytic solutions of the differential equations describing the convective-dispersive transport of reactive solutes through soil

  11. Action of smoke acids on soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieler, A

    1924-01-01

    Experiments were performed over a 14 year period to determine the effects of sulfur dioxide on plants. Conifers, deciduous trees and herbs were grown on two types of soil. One type was treated by applying lime and the other soil was left to be contaminated with sulfur dioxide. Results indicate that plants grew well on the lime treated soil. However, plants did not grow on the untreated soil and they soon died. It has been determined that plants which do not require much calcium survive longer under the effects of sulfur dioxide. The author concludes that the effects of sulfur dioxide is due to the decalcification of the soil.

  12. Potentiometric titration of free acid in uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, M. Y.; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.; Sohn, S. C.; Eom, T. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Jeon, Y. S.; Han, S. H.

    1998-02-01

    Hydrolysis properties of metal cations and fundamental principles of the potentiometric titration of free acid in aqueous solutions containing metal cations were described. The published papers and reports for the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration of free acid were surveyed, and the applicability of these titration methods to the uranium and/or plutonium solutions were discussed. This technical report also includes the various results obtained from the authors' researches to establish the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration methods for the determination of free acid in nitric acid solutions containing uranium and/or oxalic acid, and aluminum. The procedure manuals used in chemical processes and the newly prepared manuals based on the authors' researches are appended. (author). 26 refs., 54 figs

  13. Potentiometric titration of free acid in uranium solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.; Sohn, S. C.; Eom, T. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Jeon, Y. S.; Han, S. H.

    1998-02-01

    Hydrolysis properties of metal cations and fundamental principles of the potentiometric titration of free acid in aqueous solutions containing metal cations were described. The published papers and reports for the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration of free acid were surveyed, and the applicability of these titration methods to the uranium and/or plutonium solutions were discussed. This technical report also includes the various results obtained from the authors` researches to establish the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration methods for the determination of free acid in nitric acid solutions containing uranium and/or oxalic acid, and aluminum. The procedure manuals used in chemical processes and the newly prepared manuals based on the authors` researches are appended. (author). 26 refs., 54 figs.

  14. Study of free acidity determinations in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kergreis, A.

    1966-04-01

    The object of this work is the study of the principal methods which can be applied to the measurement of 'free' acidity. In the first part, we define the various types of acidity which can exist in aqueous solution; then, after having studied some hydrolysis reactions, we compare the value of the neutralisation pH of the hydrated cation and that of the precipitation of the hydroxide. In the second part we have started to study the determination of the acidity of an aqueous solution. After having rapidly considered the 'total' acidity determination, we deal with the problem of the 'free' acidity titration. We have considered in particular certain methods: extrapolation of the equivalent point, colorimetric titrations with or without a complexing agent, and finally the use of ion-exchange resins with mixed aqueous and solvent solutions. (author) [fr

  15. Removal of plutonium from nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions using anion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasar, U.M.; Pawar, S.M.; Joshi, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    An anion exchange method using Amberlyst A-26 (MP) resin was developed for removal of Pu from nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions without destroying oxalate. The method consists of sorption of Pu(IV) on Amberlyst A-26, a macroporous anion exchange resin, from nitric acid-oxalic acid medium in the presence of Al(NO 3 ) 3 . Pu(IV) breakthrough capacity of Amberlyst A-26 using synthetic feed solution was determined. (author)

  16. Thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions with citrate ions. Compressibility studies in aqueous solutions of citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Korin, Eli; Manzurola, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures sound velocities were measured in aqueous solutions of citric acid. • Compressibility properties of citric acid solutions are thermodynamically characterized. • Changes in the structure of water when citric acid is dissolved are discussed. -- Abstract: Sound velocities in aqueous solutions of citric acid were measured from 15 °C to 50 °C in 5 °C intervals, within the 0.1 mol · kg −1 to 5.0 mol · kg −1 concentration range. These sound velocities served to evaluate the isentropic and isothermal compressibilities, the apparent molar compressibilities, the isochoric thermal pressure coefficients, changes of the cubic expansion coefficients with pressure at constant temperature, the changes of heat capacities with volume and hydration numbers of citric acid in aqueous solutions

  17. Reclamation of cadmium-contaminated soil using dissolved organic matter solution originating from wine-processing waste sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Guan-Bu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Increases in acidity, washing frequency, and operational temperature enhance the Cd removal. ► Approximately 80% of Cd can be removed from the soil by dissolved organic matter (DOM) washing. ► The DOM washing can moderate the loss of soil fertility. ► The DOM washing will have a great improvement if we employ NaOH, KOH, Ca(OH) 2 , and Mg(OH) 2 to prepare the DOM solution together. -- Abstract: Soil washing using an acid solution is a common practice for removing heavy metals from contaminated soil in Taiwan. However, serious loss of nutrients from soil is a major drawback of the washing. Distillery sludge can be used to prepare a dissolved organic matter (DOM) solution by extracting its organic constituents with alkaline solutions. This study employed DOM solutions to remediate Cd-contaminated soil (with concentrations up to 21.5 mg kg −1 ) and determine the factors affecting removal of Cd, such as pH, initial concentration of DOM solution, temperature, and washing frequency. When washing with pH 3.0 and 1250 mg L −1 DOM solution, about 80% and 81% of Cd were removed from the topsoil at 27 °C and subsoil at 40 °C, respectively. To summarize the changes in fertility during DOM washing with various pH solutions: the increase in organic matter content ranged from 7.7% to 23.7%; cation exchange capacity (CEC) ranged from 4.6% to 13.9%; available ammonium (N-NH 4 ) content ranged from 39.4% to 2175%; and available phosphorus content ranged from 34.5% to 182%. Exchangeable K, Ca, and Mg remained in the topsoil after DOM washing, with concentrations of 1.1, 2.4, and 1.5 times higher than those treated with HCl solution at the same pH, respectively

  18. Determination of amino acids in industrial effluents contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahar, M.T.; Khuhawar, M.Y.

    2014-01-01

    38 samples of soil for 19 locations partially irrigated on the effluents of sugar mill and oil andghee mill, bottom sediments of evaporation ponds of sugar and fertilizer industries were collected and analyzed for amino acids after acid digestion by gas chromatography using pre column derivatization with trifluroacetyleacetone and ethyl chloroformate. The results obtained were compared with the soil samples irrigated with fresh water. The soil samples were also analyzed for pH, total nitrogen contents and organic carbon. Nine essential (leucine (Leu), threonine (Thr), lysine (Lys), L-phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), histadine (His), L-valine (Val), methionine (Met) and isoleucine Ile) and ten non-essential ( alanine (Ala), cysteine (Cys), asparagine (Asn), glutamic acid (Glu), serine (Ser), glycine (Gly), proline (Pro), Glutamine (Gln), aspartic acid (Asp), tyrosine (Tyr)) amino acids were analyzed 13-15 amino acids were identified and determined quantitatively from soil samples. Amino acids Met, Asn, Gln and Trp were observed absent from all the samples. The variation in the amino acids contents in soil with the industrial effluents added and total nitrogen and organic carbon is discussed. (author)

  19. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  20. Acidity controls on dissolved organic carbon mobility in organic soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Evans, Ch. D.; Jones, T.; Burden, A.; Ostle, N.; Zielinski, P.; Cooper, M.; Peacock, M.; Clark, J.; Oulehle, Filip; Cooper, D.; Freeman, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 11 (2012), s. 3317-3331 ISSN 1354-1013 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : acidity * dissolved organic carbon * organic soil * peat * podzol * soil carbon * sulphur Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 6.910, year: 2012

  1. Compatible solutes in lactic acid bacteria subjected to water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, E.P.W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the research project described in this thesis was to investigate the protective effect of compatible solutes on tactic acid bacteria subjected to drying. Dried preparations of lactic acid bacteria are applied as starter cultures in feed and food industries. Dried starter

  2. Electrochemical dissolution of tin in methanesulphonic acid solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Greef, R.A.T.; Janssen, L.J.J.

    2001-01-01

    High-rate electroplating of tin on a moving steel strip is generally carried out in cells with dimensionally stable anodes. To obtain a matt tin deposit a concentrated acidic tin methanesulphonate solution containing a small concentration of sulphuric acid is used. The concentrated tin

  3. Extraction of fission product rhodium from nitric acid solutions. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorski, B.; Beer, M.; Russ, L.

    1988-01-01

    The extraction of noble metals from nitric acid solutions represents one problem of separating valueable substances from nuclear wastes in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Results of distribution experiments demonstrate the possibility of solvent extraction of rhodium using tertiary amines in presence of nitrite. Even short mixing times realize high distribution coefficients allowing quantitative separation from aqueous solutions. (author)

  4. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Magnesium oxide will be used as a neutralizing agent for acidic plutonium-containing solutions. It is expected that as the magnesium oxide dissolves, the pH of the solution will rise, and plutonium will precipitate. The resulting solid will be tested for suitability to storage. The liquid is expected to contain plutonium levels that meet disposal limit requirements

  5. Determination of solute organic concentration in contaminated soils using a chemical-equilibrium soil column system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Jesper; Kjeldsen, Peter; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    using two soils with different content of organic carbon (f(oc) of 1.5 and 6.5%, respectively). A quadruple blind test of the ER-V system using glass beads in stead of soil showed an acceptable recovery (65-85%) of all of the 11 VOCs tested. Only for the most volatile compound (heptane, K-H similar...... to 80) an unacceptable recovery was found (9%). The contact time needed for obtaining chemical equilibrium was tested in the ER-H system by performing five test with different duration (1, 2, 4, 7 and 19 days) using the low organic carbon soil. Seven days of contact time appeared sufficient...... for determination of solute concentration in a contaminated soil were developed; (1) a chemical Equilibrium and Recirculation column test for Volatile organic chemicals (ER-V) and (2) a chemical Equilibrium and Recirculation column test for Hydrophobic organic chemicals (ER-H). The two test systems were evaluated...

  6. Studies on removal of plutonium from oxalic acid containing hydrochloric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadse, D R; Noronha, D M; Joshi, A R [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Solution containing hydrochloric acid, oxalic acid and considerable quantities of plutonium may be generated while recycling of scrap produced during the metallic fuel fabrication. Plutonium from such waste is normally recovered by anion exchange method after the destruction of oxalic acid using suitable oxidising agent. Solvent extraction and ion exchange methods are being explored in this laboratory for recovery of Pu from oxalic acid containing HCl solutions without prior destruction of oxalic acid. This paper describes the results on the determination of distribution ratios for extraction of Pu(IV) from hydrochloric acid using Aliquot-336 or HDEHP under varying experimental conditions. (author). 5 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Radiolysis studies of uranyl nitrate solution in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siri, Sandra; Mondino, Angel V.

    2005-01-01

    The radiolysis of acidic uranyl nitrate solutions was investigated using Co-60 gamma radiation. Hydrogen peroxide was determined as a function of increasing dose. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the irradiated solutions were measured and the spectral changes were analyzed. The increasing dose increases the absorbance intensities, possibly by an increment in nitrate concentration produced by radiolysis, which can originate the formation of different uranyl complexes in solution. (author)

  8. Pyrolysis temperature influences ameliorating effects of biochars on acidic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qing; Yuan, Jin-Hua; Xu, Ren-Kou; Li, Xing-Hui

    2014-02-01

    The biochars were prepared from straws of canola, corn, soybean, and peanut at different temperatures of 300, 500, and 700 °C by means of oxygen-limited pyrolysis.Amelioration effects of these biochars on an acidic Ultisol were investigated with incubation experiments, and application rate of biochars was 10 g/kg. The incorporation of these biochars induced the increase in soil pH, soil exchangeable base cations, base saturation, and cation exchange capacity and the decrease in soil exchangeable acidity and exchangeable Al. The ameliorating effects of biochars on acidic soil increased with increase in their pyrolysis temperature. The contribution of oxygen-containing functional groups on the biochars to their ameliorating effects on the acidic soil decreased with the rise in pyrolysis temperature, while the contribution from carbonates in the biochars changed oppositely. The incorporation of the biochars led to the decrease in soil reactive Al extracted by 0.5mol/L CuCl2, and the content of reactive Al was decreased with the increase in pyrolysis temperature of incorporated biochars. The biochars generated at 300 °C increased soil organically complexed Al due to ample quantity of oxygen-containing functional groups such as carboxylic and phenolic groups on the biochars, while the biochars generated at 500 and 700 °C accelerated the transformation of soil exchangeable Al to hydroxyl-Al polymers due to hydrolysis of Al at higher pH. Therefore, the crop straw-derived biochars can be used as amendments for acidic soils and the biochars generated at relatively high temperature have great ameliorating effects on the soils.

  9. Chemical stabilization of cadmium in acidic soil using alkaline agronomic and industrial by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Tsung; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Hseu, Zeng-Yei; Jheng, Shao-Liang

    2013-01-01

    In situ immobilization of heavy metals using reactive or stabilizing materials is a promising solution for soil remediation. Therefore, four agronomic and industrial by-products [wood biochar (WB), crushed oyster shell (OS), blast furnace slag (BFS), and fluidized-bed crystallized calcium (FBCC)] and CaCO3 were added to acidic soil (Cd = 8.71 mg kg(-1)) at the rates of 1%, 2%, and 4% and incubated for 90 d. Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis L.) was then planted in the soil to test the Cd uptake. The elevation in soil pH caused by adding the by-products produced a negative charge on the soil surface, which enhanced Cd adsorption. Consequently, the diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Cd content decreased significantly (P soil. These results from the sequential extraction procedure indicated that Cd converted from the exchangeable fraction to the carbonate or Fe-Mn oxide fraction. The long-term effectiveness of Cd immobilization caused by applying the 4 by-products was much greater than that caused by applying CaCO3. Plant shoot biomass clearly increased because of the by-product soil amendment. Cd concentration in the shoots was soil.

  10. Titanium Mass-balance Analysis of Paso Robles Soils: Elemental Gains and Losses as Affected by Acid Alteration Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    The Columbia Hills soils have been exposed to aqueous alteration in alkaline [1] as well as acid conditions [2,3]. The Paso Robles class soils are bright soils that possess the highest S concentration of any soil measured on Mars [2]. Ferric-sulfate detection by Moessbauer analysis indicated that acid solutions were involved in forming these soils [4]. These soils are proposed to have formed by alteration of nearby rock by volcanic hydrothermal or fumarolic activity. The Paso Robles soils consist of the original Paso Robles-disturbed-Pasadena (PR-dist), Paso Robles- PasoLight (PR-PL), Arad-Samra, Arad-Hula, Tyrone- Berker Island1 and Tyrone-MountDarwin [2 ,3. ]Chemical characteristics indicate that the PR-dist and PR-PL soils could be derived from acid weathering of local Wishstone rocks while the Samra and Hula soils are likely derived from local Algonquin-Iroquet rock [3]. The Paso Robles soils were exposed to acidic sulfur bearing fluids; however, little else is known about the chemistry of the alteration fluid and its effects on the alteration of the proposed parent materials. The objectives of this work are to conduct titanium normalized mass-balance analysis to1) assess elemental gains and losses from the parent materials in the formation of the Paso Robles soils and 2) utilize this information to indicate the chemical nature of the alteration fluids.

  11. Effect of acid rain on soil microbial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrold, D.D.; Nason, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Acid rain is real; the pH of precipitation in many areas of the world is below its normal equilibrium value, and concentrations of inorganic N and S are elevated above background. The impact of acid rain on soil microbial processes is less clear. This is largely because of the chemical buffering of the soil ecosystem and the inherent resiliency and redundancy of soil microorganisms. Microorganisms have an amazing capacity to adapt to new situations, which is enhanced by their ability to evolve under selection pressure. Their resilience is a function of both the large number of microorganisms present in a given volume of soil and their high growth rate relative to macroorganisms. This suggests that microorganisms are likely to be able to adapt more quickly to acidification than plants or animals, which may be one reason why symbiotic associations, such as ectomycorrhizae, are more susceptible to acid inputs than their saprophytic counterparts

  12. A new method to measure effective soil solution concentration predicts copper availability to plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Zhao, F J; Sun, B; Davison, W; McGrath, S P

    2001-06-15

    Risk assessments of metal contaminated soils need to address metal bioavailability. To predict the bioavailability of metals to plants, it is necessary to understand both solution and solid phase supply processes in soils. In striving to find surrogate chemical measurements, scientists have focused either on soil solution chemistry, including free ion activities, or operationally defined fractions of metals. Here we introduce the new concept of effective concentration, CE, which includes both the soil solution concentration and an additional term, expressed as a concentration, that represents metal supplied from the solid phase. CE was measured using the technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) which, like a plant, locally lowers soil solution concentrations, inducing metal supply from the solid phase, as shown by a dynamic model of the DGT-soil system. Measurements of Cu as CE, soil solution concentration, by EDTA extraction and as free Cu2+ activity in soil solution were made on 29 different soils covering a large range of copper concentrations. Theywere compared to Cu concentrations in the plant material of Lepidium heterophyllum grown on the same soils. Plant concentrations were linearly related and highly correlated with CE but were more scattered and nonlinear with respect to free Cu2+ activity, EDTA extraction, or soil solution concentrations. These results demonstrate that the dominant supply processes in these soils are diffusion and labile metal release, which the DGT-soil system mimics. The quantity CE is shown to have promise as a quantitative measure of the bioavailable metal in soils.

  13. Impact of soil properties on critical concentrations of cadmium, lead, copper, zinc, and mercury in soil and soil solution in view of ecotoxicological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Wim; Lofts, Steve; Tipping, Ed; Meili, Markus; Groenenberg, Jan E; Schütze, Gudrun

    2007-01-01

    Risk assessment for metals in terrestrial ecosystems, including assessments of critical loads, requires appropriate critical limits for metal concentrations in soil and soil solution. This chapter presents an overview of methodologies used to derive critical (i) reactive and total metal concentrations in soils and (ii) free metal ion and total metal concentrations in soil solution for Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, and Hg, taking into account the effect of soil properties related to ecotoxicological effects. Most emphasis is given to the derivation of critical free and total metal concentrations in soil solution, using available NOEC soil data and transfer functions relating solid-phase and dissolved metal concentrations. This approach is based on the assumption that impacts on test organisms (plants, microorganisms, and soil invertebrates) are mainly related to the soil solution concentration (activity) and not to the soil solid-phase content. Critical Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, and Hg concentrations in soil solution vary with pH and DOC level. The results obtained are generally comparable to those derived for surface waters based on impacts to aquatic organisms. Critical soil metal concentrations, related to the derived soil solution limits, can be described as a function of pH and organic matter and clay content, and varying about one order of magnitude between different soil types.

  14. Polarography of hexavalent molybdenum in hypophosphorous acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.; El-Shatory, S.A.; Azab, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    The polarographic behaviour and determination of Mo(6) in hypophosphorous acid solutions of concentrations varying from 0,1 to 5,0 moll -1 and T = 25±0,1 0 C have been investigated. It was shown that reduction of MoO 4 2- takes place along a single or two waves depending upon the acid concentration. Microcoulometric experiments have been performed at the limiting region of the different waves obtained at different acid concentrations. A scheme for the mechanism of reduction occuring at the DME has been deduced. A method for analytical determination of Mo(6) on both the micro- and macro-scales in hypophosphorous acid solutions has been reported. Analysis of a binary mixture Mo(6)/Cd(2) and a tertiary mixture Mo(6)/Cd(2)/Zn(2) in moll -1 hypophosphorous acid has been investigated. (Author)

  15. Soil properties influence kinetics of soil acid phosphatase in response to arsenic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziquan; Tan, Xiangping; Lu, Guannan; Liu, Yanju; Naidu, Ravi; He, Wenxiang

    2018-01-01

    Soil phosphatase, which plays an important role in phosphorus cycling, is strongly inhibited by Arsenic (As). However, the inhibition mechanism in kinetics is not adequately investigated. In this study, we investigated the kinetic characteristics of soil acid phosphatase (ACP) in 14 soils with varied properties, and also explored how kinetic properties of soil ACP changed with different spiked As concentrations. The results showed that the Michaelis constant (K m ) and maximum reaction velocity (V max ) values of soil ACP ranged from 1.18 to 3.77mM and 0.025-0.133mMh -1 in uncontaminated soils. The kinetic parameters of soil ACP in different soils changed differently with As contamination. The K m remained unchanged and V max decreased with increase of As concentration in most acid and neutral soils, indicating a noncompetitive inhibition mechanism. However, in alkaline soils, the K m increased linearly and V max decreased with increase of As concentration, indicating a mixed inhibition mechanism that include competitive and noncompetitive. The competitive inhibition constant (K ic ) and noncompetitive inhibition constant (K iu ) varied among soils and ranged from 0.38 to 3.65mM and 0.84-7.43mM respectively. The inhibitory effect of As on soil ACP was mostly affected by soil organic matter and cation exchange capacity. Those factors influenced the combination of As with enzyme, which resulted in a difference of As toxicity to soil ACP. Catalytic efficiency (V max /K m ) of soil ACP was a sensitive kinetic parameter to assess the ecological risks of soil As contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reclamation of cadmium-contaminated soil using dissolved organic matter solution originating from wine-processing waste sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Guan-Bu

    2013-01-15

    Soil washing using an acid solution is a common practice for removing heavy metals from contaminated soil in Taiwan. However, serious loss of nutrients from soil is a major drawback of the washing. Distillery sludge can be used to prepare a dissolved organic matter (DOM) solution by extracting its organic constituents with alkaline solutions. This study employed DOM solutions to remediate Cd-contaminated soil (with concentrations up to 21.5 mg kg(-1)) and determine the factors affecting removal of Cd, such as pH, initial concentration of DOM solution, temperature, and washing frequency. When washing with pH 3.0 and 1250 mg L(-1) DOM solution, about 80% and 81% of Cd were removed from the topsoil at 27 °C and subsoil at 40 °C, respectively. To summarize the changes in fertility during DOM washing with various pH solutions: the increase in organic matter content ranged from 7.7% to 23.7%; cation exchange capacity (CEC) ranged from 4.6% to 13.9%; available ammonium (NNH(4)) content ranged from 39.4% to 2175%; and available phosphorus content ranged from 34.5% to 182%. Exchangeable K, Ca, and Mg remained in the topsoil after DOM washing, with concentrations of 1.1, 2.4, and 1.5 times higher than those treated with HCl solution at the same pH, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Organic Acids on the Release of Phosphorus and Zinc in a Calcareous Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Nezami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phosphorus (P and zinc (Zn fixation by soil minerals and their precipitation is one of the major constraints for crop production in calcareous soils. Recent Studies show that root exudates are effective for the extraction of the large amounts of nutrients in calcareous soils. A part of the root exudations are Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids (LMWOAs. LMWOAs are involved in the nutrients availability and uptake by plants, nutrients detoxification, minerals weathering and microbial proliferation in the soil. At nutrients deficiency conditions citric and oxalic acids are released by plants root in large quantities and increase nutrient solubility like P, Zn, Fe, Mn and Cu in the rhizosphere. These components are the large portion of the carbon source in the soil after exudations are mineralized by microorganisms, quickly. In addition, soil surface sorption can affect their half-life and other behaviors in the soil. In order to study the effect of oxalic and citric organic acids on the extraction of phosphorus and zinc from a calcareous soil, an experiment was conducted. Materials and Methods: Studied soil was calcareous and had P and Zn deficiency. Soil sample was collected from A horizon (0-30 cm of Damavand region. 3 g of dried soil sample was extracted with 30 ml of oxalic and citric acids extraction solutions at different concentrations (0.1, 1 and 10 mM and different time periods (10, 60, 180 and 360 minutes on an orbital shaker at 200 rev min-1.The soil extracts then centrifuged for 10 minutes (16000g. After filtering, the pH of the extractions was recorded and then phosphorus, calcium and zinc amounts were determined. Soil extraction with distilled water was used as control. Each treatment was performed in 3 replications. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA test followed by the Bonferroni method significant level adjustments due to multiple comparisons. Results and Discussion: The results of variance analysis showed

  18. Tannic acid for remediation of historically arsenic-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusiatin, Zygmunt Mariusz; Klik, Barbara; Kulikowska, Dorota

    2017-12-22

    Soil washing effectively and permanently decreases soil pollution. Thus, it can be considered for the removal of the most toxic elements, for example arsenic (As). In this study, historically As-contaminated soils (2041-4294 mg/kg) were remediated with tannic acid (TA) as the washing agent. The scope of this study included optimization of the operational conditions of As removal, determination of As distribution in soil before and after double soil washing, and measurement of TA loss during washing. The optimum conditions for As removal were 4% TA, pH 4 and 24 h washing time. The average As removal after single and double washings was 38% and 63%, respectively. TA decreased As content in amorphous and poorly crystalline oxides by >90%. Although TA increased the amount of As in the easily mobilizable As fraction, the stability of As in washed soils increased, with reduced partition indexes of 0.52-0.66 after washing. The maximum capacity of the soils to adsorb TA (q max ) was 50.2-70.4 g C/kg. TA sorption was higher at alkaline than at acidic conditions. Only TA removes As from soils effectively if the proportion of As in amorphous and poorly crystalline oxides is high. Thus, it can be considered for remediation of historically contaminated soils.

  19. Optimizing Available Phosphorus in Calcareous Soils Fertilized with Diammonium Phosphate and Phosphoric Acid Using Freundlich Adsorption Isotherm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    In calcareous soils, phosphorus (P) retention and immobilization take place due to precipitation and adsorption. Since soil pH is considered a major soil variable affecting the P sorption, an acidic P fertilizer could result in low P adsorption compared to alkaline one. Therefore, P adsorption from DAP and phosphoric acid (PA) required to produce desired soil solution P concentration was estimated using Freundlich sorption isotherms. Two soils from Faisalabad and T. T. Singh districts were spiked with 0, 10, and 20 % CaCO3 for 15 days. Freundlich adsorption isotherms (P = aC b/a) were constructed, and theoretical doses of PA and DAP to develop a desired soil solution P level (i.e., 0.20 mg L−1) were calculated. It was observed that P adsorption in soil increased with CaCO3. Moreover, at all the levels of CaCO3, P adsorption from PA was lower compared to that from DAP in both the soils. Consequently, lesser quantity of PA was required to produce desired solution P, 0.2 mg L−1, compared to DAP. However, extrapolating the developed relationship between soil CaCO3 contents and quantity of fertilizer to other similar textured soils needs confirmation. PMID:24307878

  20. Optimizing Available Phosphorus in Calcareous Soils Fertilized with Diammonium Phosphate and Phosphoric Acid Using Freundlich Adsorption Isotherm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Naeem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In calcareous soils, phosphorus (P retention and immobilization take place due to precipitation and adsorption. Since soil pH is considered a major soil variable affecting the P sorption, an acidic P fertilizer could result in low P adsorption compared to alkaline one. Therefore, P adsorption from DAP and phosphoric acid (PA required to produce desired soil solution P concentration was estimated using Freundlich sorption isotherms. Two soils from Faisalabad and T. T. Singh districts were spiked with 0, 10, and 20 % for 15 days. Freundlich adsorption isotherms ( were constructed, and theoretical doses of PA and DAP to develop a desired soil solution P level (i.e., 0.20 mg L−1 were calculated. It was observed that P adsorption in soil increased with . Moreover, at all the levels of , P adsorption from PA was lower compared to that from DAP in both the soils. Consequently, lesser quantity of PA was required to produce desired solution P, 0.2 mg L−1, compared to DAP. However, extrapolating the developed relationship between soil contents and quantity of fertilizer to other similar textured soils needs confirmation.

  1. Photolysis of Periodate and Periodic Acid in Aqueous Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Knud; Kläning, U. K.

    1978-01-01

    The photochemistry of periodate and periodic acid in aqueous solution was studied (i) by quantum yield measurements at low light intensity (ii) by flash photolysis, and (iii) by photolysis of glassy samples at 77 K. The photochemical studies were supplemented with pulse radiolysis studies...... of aqueous periodate solutions and with kinetic studies using stopped-flow technique. In strongly alkaline solution the photodecomposition of periodate proceeds via formation of O– and IVI. At pH solution O3 P is formed in a small...

  2. Uranium extraction from sulfuric acid solution using anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M. E.; Abdel Aal, M. M.; Kandil, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium is currently recovered from sulfuric acid leach liquor using anion exchange resin as Amberlite IRA 402 (CT). This technology is based on fact that, uranium exists as anionic complexes. This takes place by controlling the pH of the solution, agitation time, temperature and resin to solution ratio (R/S). In this work, batch stirrer tank used for uranium extraction from sulfate medium and after extraction, elution process was done using 1M NaCl solution. After extraction and elution process, the resin was separated from the system and uranium was determined in the solution. (Author)

  3. Density of nitric acid solutions of plutonium; Densite des solutions nitriques de plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibergia, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The report is intended to furnish an expression making it possible to determine the density of a nitric acid solution of plutonium. Under certain defined experimental conditions, the equation found makes it possible to deduce, for a solution whose concentration, free acidity and temperature are known, the corresponding value of the density of that solution. (author) [French] L'expose a pour but de donner une formule permettant la determination de la densite d'une solution nitrique de plutonium. Suivant certaines conditions experimentales precisees, l'equation trouvee permet, pour une solution dont la concentration, l'acidite libre nitrique et la temperature sont donnees, de deduire la valeur correspondant de la densite de cette solution. (auteur)

  4. Soil bacterial and fungal communities along a soil chronosequence assessed by fatty acid profiling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Welc, M.; Bünemann, E. K.; Flieβbach, A.; Frossard, E.; Jansa, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 49, JUN 2012 (2012), s. 184-192 ISSN 0038-0717 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fatty acid methyl esters * Glacier forefield * Soil chronosequence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.654, year: 2012

  5. Vibrational studies in aqueous solutions. Part II. The acid oxalate ion and oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippey, T. A.

    1980-08-01

    Assignments for oxalic acid in solution are re-examined. A detailed assignment of the IR and Raman spectra of the acid oxalate ion is presented for the first time. Raman spectroscopy is used to study the first ionization of oxalic acid.

  6. Soil microbial community responses to acid exposure and neutralization treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Doyun; Lee, Yunho; Park, Jeonghyun; Moon, Hee Sun; Hyun, Sung Pil

    2017-12-15

    Changes in microbial community induced by acid shock were studied in the context of potential release of acids to the environment due to chemical accidents. The responses of microbial communities in three different soils to the exposure to sulfuric or hydrofluoric acid and to the subsequent neutralization treatment were investigated as functions of acid concentration and exposure time by using 16S-rRNA gene based pyrosequencing and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). Measurements of soil pH and dissolved ion concentrations revealed that the added acids were neutralized to different degrees, depending on the mineral composition and soil texture. Hydrofluoric acid was more effectively neutralized by the soils, compared with sulfuric acid at the same normality. Gram-negative ß-Proteobacteria were shown to be the most acid-sensitive bacterial strains, while spore-forming Gram-positive Bacilli were the most acid-tolerant. The results of this study suggest that the Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacterial ratio may serve as an effective bio-indicator in assessing the impact of the acid shock on the microbial community. Neutralization treatments helped recover the ratio closer to their original values. The findings of this study show that microbial community changes as well as geochemical changes such as pH and dissolved ion concentrations need to be considered in estimating the impact of an acid spill, in selecting an optimal remediation strategy, and in deciding when to end remedial actions at the acid spill impacted site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Aluminium tolerance and high phosphorus efficiency helps Stylosanthes better adapt to low-P acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yu-Mei; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong; Bai, Chang-Jun; Yan, Xiao-Long; Liu, Guo-Dao

    2009-06-01

    Stylosanthes spp. (stylo) is one of the most important pasture legumes used in a wide range of agricultural systems on acid soils, where aluminium (Al) toxicity and phosphorus (P) deficiency are two major limiting factors for plant growth. However, physiological mechanisms of stylo adaptation to acid soils are not understood. Twelve stylo genotypes were surveyed under field conditions, followed by sand and nutrient solution culture experiments to investigate possible physiological mechanisms of stylo adaptation to low-P acid soils. Stylo genotypes varied substantially in growth and P uptake in low P conditions in the field. Three genotypes contrasting in P efficiency were selected for experiments in nutrient solution and sand culture to examine their Al tolerance and ability to utilize different P sources, including Ca-P, K-P, Al-P, Fe-P and phytate-P. Among the three tested genotypes, the P-efficient genotype 'TPRC2001-1' had higher Al tolerance than the P-inefficient genotype 'Fine-stem' as indicated by relative tap root length and haematoxylin staining. The three genotypes differed in their ability to utilize different P sources. The P-efficient genotype, 'TPRC2001-1', had superior ability to utilize phytate-P. The findings suggest that possible physiological mechanisms of stylo adaptation to low-P acid soils might involve superior ability of plant roots to tolerate Al toxicity and to utilize organic P and Al-P.

  8. The production and degradation of trichloroacetic acid in soil: Results from in situ soil column experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heal, M. R.; Dickey, C. A.; Heal, K.V.; Stidson, R.T.; Matucha, Miroslav; Cape, J. N.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 4 (2010), s. 401-407 ISSN 0045-6535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Trichloroacetic acid * TCA * Soil lysimeter Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 3.155, year: 2010

  9. Effects of atmospheric deposition nitrogen flux and its composition on soil solution chemistry from a red soil farmland, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Peng, Ying; Chan, Andrew; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study on the solution chemistry of red soil in South China is presented. Data are collected from two simulated column-leaching experiments with an improved setup to evaluate the effects of atmospheric N deposition (ADN) composition and ADN flux on agricultural soil acidification using a (15)N tracer technique and an in situ soil solution sampler. The results show that solution pH values decline regardless of the increase of the NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio in the ADN composition or ADN flux, while exchangeable Al(3+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) concentrations increase at different soil depths (20, 40, and 60 cm). Compared with the control, ADN (60 kg per ha per year N, NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio of 2 : 1) decreases solution pH values, increases solution concentrations of NO3(-)-N, Al(3+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) at the middle and lower soil depths, and promotes their removal. NH4(+)-N was not detected in red soil solutions of all the three soil layers, which might be attributed to effects of nitrification, absorption and fixation in farmland red soil. Some of the NO3(-)-N concentrations at 40-60 cm soil depth exceed the safe drinking level of 10 mg L(-1), especially when the ADN flux is beyond 60 kg ha(-1) N. These features are critical for understanding the ADN agro-ecological effects, and for future assessment of ecological critical loads of ADN in red soil farmlands.

  10. Soil solution Zn and pH dynamics in non-rhizosphere soil and in the rhizosphere of Thlaspi caerulescens grown in a Zn/Cd-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y M; Christie, P; Baker, A J

    2000-07-01

    Temporal changes in soil solution properties and metal speciation were studied in non-rhizosphere soil and in the rhizosphere of the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens J. & C. Presl (population from Prayon, Belgium) grown in a Zn- and Cd-contaminated soil. This paper focuses on soil solution Zn and pH dynamics during phytoextraction. The concentration of Zn in both non-rhizosphere and rhizosphere soil solutions decreased from 23 mg/l at the beginning to 2 mg/l at the end of the experiment (84 days after transplanting of seedlings), mainly due to chemical sorption. There was no significant difference in overall Zn concentration between the planted and the unplanted soil solutions (P > 0.05). Soil solution pH decreased initially and then increased slightly in both planted and unplanted soil zones. From 60 to 84 days after transplanting, the pH of the rhizosphere soil solution was higher than that of non-rhizosphere soil solution (P<0.05). Zn uptake by the hyperaccumulator plants was 8.8 mg per pot (each containing 1 kg oven-dry soil) on average. The data indicate that the potential of T. caerulescens to remove Zn from contaminated soil may not be related to acidification of the rhizosphere.

  11. Soil solution extraction techniques for microbial ecotoxicity testing: a comparative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiensing, T; Preston, S; Strachan, N; Paton, G I

    2001-02-01

    The suitability of two different techniques (centrifugation and Rhizon sampler) for obtaining the interstitial pore water of soil (soil solution), integral to the ecotoxicity assessment of metal contaminated soil, were investigated by combining chemical analyses and a luminescence-based microbial biosensor. Two different techniques, centrifugation and Rhizon sampler, were used to extract the soil solution from Insch (a loamy sand) and Boyndie (a sandy loam) soils, which had been amended with different concentrations of Zn and Cd. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), major anions (F- , CI-, NO3, SO4(2-)) and major cations (K+, Mg2+, Ca2+) in the soil solutions varied depending on the extraction technique used. Overall, the concentrations of Zn and Cd were significantly higher in the soil solution extracted using the centrifugation technique compared with that extracted using the Rhizon sampler technique. Furthermore, the differences observed between the two extraction techniques depended on the type of soil from which the solution was being extracted. The luminescence-based biosensor Escherichia coli HB101 pUCD607 was shown to respond to the free metal concentrations in the soil solutions and showed that different toxicities were associated with each soil, depending on the technique used to extract the soil solution. This study highlights the need to characterise the type of extraction technique used to obtain the soil solution for ecotoxicity testing in order that a representative ecotoxicity assessment can be carried out.

  12. Removal of sulfamic acid from plutonium sulfamate--sulfamic acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1978-10-01

    Plutonium metal can be readily dissolved in aqueous solutions of sulfamic acid. When the plutonium sulfamate--sulfamic acid solutions are added to normal purex process streams, the sulfamate ion is oxidized by addition of sodium nitrite. This generates sodium sulfate which must be stored as radioactive waste. When recovery of ingrown 241 Am or storage of the dissolved plutonium must be considered, the sulfamate ion poses major and undesirable precipitation problems in the process streams. The present studies show that 40 to 80% of the sulfamate present in the dissolver solutions can be removed by precipitation as sulfamic acid by the addition of concentrated nitric acid. Addition of 64% nitric acid allows precipitation of 40 to 50% of the sulfamate; addition of 72% nitric acid allows precipitation of 50 to 60% of the sulfamate. If the solutions are chilled, additional sulfamic acid will precipitate. If the solutions are chilled to -10 0 C, about 70 to 80% of the orginal sulfamic acid in the dissolver will precipitate. A single, low-volume wash of the sulfamic acid crystals with concentrated nitric acid will decontaminate the crystals to a plutonium content of 5 dis/(min-gram)

  13. Hydrothermal Carbonization: a feasible solution to convert biomass to soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, Walter; Tesch, Petra; Pfeifer, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    The erosion of fertile soil is a severe problem arising right after peak oil (Myers 1996). That this issue is not only a problem of arid countries is shown by the fact that even the European Commission defined certain milestones to address the problem of soil erosion in Europe (European Commission 2011). The application of bio-char produced by torrefaction or pyrolysis for the remediation, revegetation and restoration of depleted soils started to gain momentum recently (Rillig 2010, Lehmann 2011, Beesley 2011). Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a promising thermo-chemical process that can be applied to convert organic feedstock into fertile soil and water, two resources which are of high value in regions being vulnerable to erosion. The great advantage of HTC is that organic feedstock (e.g. organic waste) can be used without any special pretreatment (e.g. drying) and so far no restrictions have been found regarding the composition of the organic matter. By applying HTC the organic material is processed along a defined pathway in the Van Krevelen plot (Behrendt 2006). By stopping the process at an early stage a nutritious rich material can be obtained, which is known to be similar to terra preta. Considering that HTC-coal is rich in functional groups and can be derived from the process under "wet" conditions, it can be expected that it shall allow soil bacteria to settle more easily compared to the bio-char derived by torrefaction or pyrolysis. In addition, up to 10 tons process water per ton organic waste can be gained (Vorlop 2009). Thus, as organic waste, loss of fertile soil and water scarcity becomes a serious issue within the European Union, hydrothermal carbonization can provide a feasible solution to address these issues of our near future. The presentation reviews the different types of feedstock investigated for the HTC-Process so far and gives an overview on the current stage of development of this technology. References Beesley L., Moreno-Jiménez E

  14. Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid using a Donnan Potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinsky, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid (Armadale Bh Horizon) was evaluated over a range of calcium ion concentrations, from pH 3.8 to 7.3, using potentiometric titrations and calcium ion electrode measurements. Fulvic acid concentration was constant (100 milligrams per liter) and calcium ion concentration varied up to 8 x 10 -4 moles per liter. Experiments discussed here included: (1) titrations of fulvic acid-calcium ion containing solutions with sodium hydroxide; and (2) titrations of fully neutralized fulvic acid with calcium chloride solutions. Apparent binding constants (expressed as the logarithm of the value, log β app ) vary with solution pH, calcium ion concentration, degree of acid dissociation, and ionic strength (from log β app =2.5 to 3.9) and are similar to those reported by others. Fulvic acid charge, and the associated Donnan Potential, influences calcium ion-fulvic acid ion pair formation. A Donnan Potential correction term allowed calculation of intrinsic calcium ion-fulvic acid binding constants. Intrinsic binding constants vary from 1.2 to 2.5 (the average value is about log β=1.6) and are similar to, but somewhat higher than, stability constants for calcium ion-carboxylic acid monodentate complexes. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of soil solution sampling techniques to assess metal fluxes from contaminated soil to groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelot, F; Sappin-Didier, V; Keller, C; Atteia, O

    2014-12-01

    The unsaturated zone plays a major role in elemental fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems. A representative chemical analysis of soil pore water is required for the interpretation of soil chemical phenomena and particularly to assess Trace Elements (TEs) mobility. This requires an optimal sampling system to avoid modification of the extracted soil water chemistry and allow for an accurate estimation of solute fluxes. In this paper, the chemical composition of soil solutions sampled by Rhizon® samplers connected to a standard syringe was compared to two other types of suction probes (Rhizon® + vacuum tube and Rhizon® + diverted flow system). We investigated the effects of different vacuum application procedures on concentrations of spiked elements (Cr, As, Zn) mixed as powder into the first 20 cm of 100-cm columns and non-spiked elements (Ca, Na, Mg) concentrations in two types of columns (SiO2 sand and a mixture of kaolinite + SiO2 sand substrates). Rhizon® was installed at different depths. The metals concentrations showed that (i) in sand, peak concentrations cannot be correctly sampled, thus the flux cannot be estimated, and the errors can easily reach a factor 2; (ii) in sand + clay columns, peak concentrations were larger, indicating that they could be sampled but, due to sorption on clay, it was not possible to compare fluxes at different depths. The different samplers tested were not able to reflect the elemental flux to groundwater and, although the Rhizon® + syringe device was more accurate, the best solution remains to be the use of a lysimeter, whose bottom is kept continuously at a suction close to the one existing in the soil.

  16. Landfill cover soil, soil solution, and vegetation responses to municipal landfill leachate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Neil W; Rediske, Richard R; Scull, Brian T; Wierzbicki, David

    2008-01-01

    Municipal solid waste landfill leachate must be removed and treated to maintain landfill cover integrity and to prevent contamination of surface and ground waters. From 2003 to 2007, we studied an onsite disposal system in Ottawa County, Michigan, where leachate was spray irrigated on the vegetated landfill cover. We established six 20-m-diameter circular experimental plots on the landfill; three were spray irrigated as part of the operational system, and three remained as untreated control plots. We quantified the effects of leachate application on soil properties, soil solution chemistry, vegetative growth, and estimated solute leaching. The leachate had high mean levels of electrical conductivity (0.6-0.7 S m(-1)), Cl (760-900 mg L(-1)), and NH(4)-N (290-390 mg L(-1)) but was low in metals and volatile organic compounds. High rates of leachate application in 2003 (32 cm) increased soil electrical conductivity and NO(3)-N leaching, so a sequential rotation of spray areas was implemented to limit total leachate application to <9.6 cm yr(-1) per spray area. Concentrations of NO(3)-N and leaching losses remained higher on irrigated plots in subsequent years but were substantially reduced by spray area rotation. Leachate irrigation increased plant biomass but did not significantly affect soil metal concentrations, and plant metal concentrations remained within normal ranges. Rotating spray areas and timing irrigation to conform to seasonal capacities for evapotranspiration reduced the localized impacts of leachate application observed in 2003. Careful monitoring of undiluted leachate applications is required to avoid adverse impacts to vegetation or soils and elevated solute leaching losses.

  17. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  18. Coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTaggart, D.R.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The factors affecting successful coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid media were studied. Variables considered in this work were H/sup +/ concentration, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, duration of contact, and rate of feed solution addition. In all experiments, stock solutions of Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ and UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ were fed at a controlled rate into H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ solutions with constant stirring. Samples were taken as a function of time to follow the H/sup +/ concentration of the solution, uranium precipitation, thorium precipitation, precipitant weight/volume of solution, and crystalline structure and growth. The optimum conditions for maximum coprecipitation are low H/sup +/ concentration, high H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, and extended contact time between the solutions.

  19. 15N NMR spectroscopic investigation of nitrous and nitric acids in sulfuric acid solutions of varying acidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, G.K.S.; Heiliger, L.; Olah, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Both nitrous and nitric acids were studied in sulfuric acid solutions of varying acid strengths by 15 N NMR spectroscopy. The study gives new insights into the nature of intermediates present at different acid strengths. Furthermore, we have also discovered a novel redox reaction between NO 2 + and NO + ions involving the intermediacy of their respective acids. A mechanism is proposed to explain the observed results. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Precipitation behavior of uranium in multicomponent solution by oxalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Lee, W.K.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.

    1996-01-01

    A study on the precipitation of uranium by oxalic acid was carried out in a multicomponent solution. The precipitation method is usually applied to the treatment of radioactive waste and the recovery of uranium from a uranium-scrap contaminated with impurities. In these cases, the problem is how to increase the precipitation yield of target element and to prevent impurities from coprecipitation. The multicomponent solution in the present experiment was prepared by dissolving U, Nd, Cs and Sr in nitric acid. The effects of concentrations of oxalic acid and ascorbic acid on the precipitation yield and purity of uranium were observed. As results of the study, the maximum precipitation yield of uranium is revealed to be about 96.5% and the relative precipitation ratio of Nd, Cs and Sr versus uranium are discussed at the condition of the maximum precipitation yield of uranium, respectively. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. Process for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a method for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions whereby the previously oxided acid is treated with an organic solvent constituted by a mixture of dialkylphosphoric acid and trialkylphosphine oxide in solution in a non-reactive inert solvent so as to obtain de-uraniated phosphoric acid and an organic extract constituted by the solvent containing most of the uranium. The uranium is then separated from the extract as uranyl ammonium tricarbonate by reaction with ammonia and ammonium carbonate and the extract de-uraniated at the extraction stage is recycled. The extract is treated in a re-extraction apparatus comprising not less than two stages. The extract to be treated is injected at the top of the first stage. At the bottom of the first stage, ammonia is introduced counter current as gas or as an aqueous solution whilst controlling the pH of the first stage so as to keep it to 8.0 or 8.5 and at the bottom of the last stage an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution is injected in a quantity representing 50 to 80% of the stoichiometric quantity required to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and transform the uranium into uranyl ammonium tricarbonate [fr

  2. Ionizing radiation induced degradation of salicylic acid in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarrán, Guadalupe; Mendoza, Edith

    2018-06-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of salicylic acid (SA-) in aqueous solutions (1.0 and 0.1 mmol dm-3) saturated with N2O or air or without oxygen were studied. Irradiation was carried out using a cobalt-60 source. With a 1 mmol dm-3 solution saturated with N2O a seemingly total degradation occurred at about 18 kGy, although small quantities of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, catechol and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid were present at that dose at concentrations of 67, 22 and 6 μmol dm-3 respectively. Under air and when free oxygen, the three radiolytic products were present at 18.54 kGy while SA- was destroyed only to 90% and 62%, respectively. In the case of 0.1 mmol dm-3 SA- solutions, the acid was degraded at 3.5 kGy if the solution contained N2O, at 5.8 kGy in air and at 7 kGy without oxygen. The concentration of the radiolytic products increased with increasing dose and after a maximum they decreased. The oxidation was followed by measuring the chemical oxygen demand; the slopes were 0.48 and 0.11, 0.21 and 0.07, 0.15 and 0.03 mmol dm-3 kGy-1 for 1.0 and 0.10 mmol dm-3 solutions saturated with N2O or air or without oxygen, respectively.

  3. Effect of chloride in soil solution on the plant availability of biosolid-borne cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weggler, Karin; McLaughlin, Michael J; Graham, Robin D

    2004-01-01

    Increasing chloride (Cl) concentration in soil solution has been shown to increase cadmium (Cd) concentration in soil solution and Cd uptake by plants, when grown in phosphate fertilizer- or biosolid-amended soils. However, previous experiments did not distinguish between the effect of Cl on biosolid-borne Cd compared with soil-borne Cd inherited from previous fertilizer history. A factorial pot experiment was conducted with biosolid application rates of 0, 20, 40, and 80 g biosolids kg(-1) and Cl concentration in soil solution ranging from 1 to 160 mM Cl. The Cd uptake of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Halberd) was measured and major cations and anions in soil solution were determined. Cadmium speciation in soil solution was calculated using GEOCHEM-PC. The Cd concentration in plant shoots and soil solution increased with biosolid application rates up to 40 g kg(-1), but decreased slightly in the 80 g kg(-1) biosolid treatment. Across biosolid application rates, the Cd concentration in soil solution and plant shoots was positively correlated with the Cl concentration in soil solution. This suggests that biosolid-borne Cd is also mobilized by chloride ligands in soil solution. The soil solution CdCl+ activity correlated best with the Cd uptake of plants, although little of the variation in plant Cd concentrations was explained by activity of CdCl+ in higher sludge treatments. It was concluded that chlorocomplexation of Cd increased the phytoavailability of biosolid-borne Cd to a similar degree as soil (fertilizer) Cd. There was a nonlinear increase in plant uptake and solubility of Cd in biosolid-amended soils, with highest plant Cd found at the 40 g kg(-1) rate of biosolid application, and higher rates (80 g kg(-1)) producing lower plant Cd uptake and lower Cd solubility in soil. This is postulated to be a result of Cd retention by CaCO3 formed as a result of the high alkalinity induced by biosolid application.

  4. Multitracer studies on the effects of model acid rain on the adsorption of trace elements on soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.F.; Ambe, S.; Takematsu, N.; Ambe, F.

    2001-01-01

    Using a multitracer technique, the effects of acid rain pH on the adsorption of 15 trace elements on soil were studied. Kaolin, forest soil (original and with partially removed oxides), black soil (original and without organic matter) and Kureha soil (original, with partially removed oxides, and without organic matter) were employed as the adsorbents. Instead of H 2 SO 4 solution, HCl solution was selected as the model acid rain based on the results of adsorption experiments on kaolin. In general, the percentage adsorption of cationic elements on three original soils and kaolin increased with increasing pH. The adsorption of oxyanionic elements, As and Se, on three soils was high over the entire pH range studied, while that on kaolin was low and decreased with an increase in pH. The differences in the physical and chemical properties of soils were reflected on the adsorption. The organic matter in soil had positive effects on the extent of adsorption of most elements studied, while the oxides apparently showed positive effects only for Fe and Se adsorption. The results indicate that acid rain decreases the retention of cations in soil and that it increases or does not change the adsorption of anions. (orig.)

  5. Revegetation of Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) Producing Slope Surface Using Phosphate Microencapsulation and Artificial Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Gon

    2017-04-01

    Oxidation of sulfides produces acid rock drainage (ARD) upon their exposure to oxidation environment by construction and mining activities. The ARD causes the acidification and metal contamination of soil, surface water and groundwater, the damage of plant, the deterioration of landscape and the reduction of slope stability. The revegetation of slope surface is one of commonly adopted strategies to reduce erosion and to increase slope stability. However, the revegetation of the ARD producing slope surface is frequently failed due to its high acidity and toxic metal content. We developed a revegetation method consisting of microencapsualtion and artificial soil in the laboratory. The revegetation method was applied on the ARD producing slope on which the revegetation using soil coverage and seeding was failed and monitored the plant growth for one year. The phosphate solution was applied on sulfide containing rock to form stable Fe-phosphate mineral on the surface of sulfide, which worked as a physical barrier to prevent contacting oxidants such as oxygen and Fe3+ ion to the sulfide surface. After the microencapsulation, two artificial soil layers were constructed. The first layer containing organic matter, dolomite powder and soil was constructed at 2 cm thickness to neutralize the rising acidic capillary water from the subsurface and to remove the dissolved oxygen from the percolating rain water. Finally, the second layer containing seeds, organic matter, nutrients and soil was constructed at 3 cm thickness on the top. After application of the method, the pH of the soil below the artificial soil layer increased and the ARD production from the rock fragments reduced. The plant growth showed an ordinary state while the plant died two month after germination for the previous revegetation trial. No soil erosion occurred from the slope during the one year field test.

  6. Soil-soil solution distribution coefficient of soil organic matter is a key factor for that of radioiodide in surface and subsurface soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Yusuke; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Takeda, Akira; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the vertical distribution of the soil-soil-solution distribution coefficients (K d ) of 125 I, 137 Cs, and 85 Sr in organic-rich surface soil and organic-poor subsurface soil of a pasture and an urban forest near a spent-nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan. K d of 137 Cs was highly correlated with water-extractable K + . K d of 85 Sr was highly correlated with water-extractable Ca 2+ and SOC. K d of 125 I - was low in organic-rich surface soil, high slightly below the surface, and lowest in the deepest soil. This kinked distribution pattern differed from the gradual decrease of the other radionuclides. The thickness of the high- 125 I - K d middle layer (i.e., with high radioiodide retention ability) differed between sites. K d of 125 I - was significantly correlated with K d of soil organic carbon. Our results also showed that the layer thickness is controlled by the ratio of K d -OC between surface and subsurface soils. This finding suggests that the addition of SOC might prevent further radioiodide migration down the soil profile. As far as we know, this is the first report to show a strong correlation of a soil characteristic with K d of 125 I - . Further study is needed to clarify how radioiodide is retained and migrates in soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Soil Amendments on Microbial Resilience Capacity of Acid Soil Under Copper Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounissamy, Vassanda Coumar; Kundu, Samaresh; Selladurai, Rajendiran; Saha, Jayanta Kumar; Biswas, Ashish Kumar; Adhikari, Tapan; Patra, Ashok Kumar

    2017-11-01

    An incubation study was undertaken to study microbial resilience capacity of acid soil amended with farmyard manure (FYM), charcoal and lime under copper (Cu) perturbation. Copper stress significantly reduced enzymatic activities and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in soil. Percent reduction in microbial activity of soil due to Cu stress was 74.7% in dehydrogenase activity, 59.9% in MBC, 48.2% in alkaline phosphatase activity and 15.1% in acid phosphatase activity. Soil treated with FYM + charcoal showed highest resistance index for enzymatic activities and MBC. Similarly, the highest resilience index for acid phosphatase activity was observed in soil amended with FYM (0.40), whereas FYM + charcoal-treated soil showed the highest resilience indices for alkaline, dehydrogenase activity and MBC: 0.50, 0.22 and 0.25, respectively. This investigation showed that FYM and charcoal application, either alone or in combination, proved to be better than lime with respect to microbial functional resistance and resilience of acid soil under Cu perturbation.

  8. Simulated acid rain effects on soil chemistry and microbiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigliotti, C.; Falappi, D.; Farini, A.; Sorlini, C.; Milan Univ.; Molise Univ.

    1992-01-01

    A research study was carried out regarding the effects of artificial rains at different pH's (3.1, 4.0, 5.6) on soil samples from Appiano Gentile pinewood. Chemical parameters, biological activities and microbiological groups, particularly sensitive to possible variations in the presence of pH changes, were monitored after 2, 4 and 6 months of treatment of the soil on eluate obtained from treatment with artificial acid rains. The paper reports the results research

  9. TOLERANCE OF PEANUT GENOTYPES TO ACIDIC SOIL CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astanto Kasno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The acidic soil is generally less productive due to soil pH ranging from 3.1 to 5.0. However, it could be solved through soil amelioration, planting tolerant varieties to acidic soil condition, and a combination of both. Twenty peanut genotypes including two check varieties (Jerapah and Talam 1 were evaluated on dolomite-ameliorated and non ameliorated soil. In the greenhouse, the treatments were laid out in factorial design with four replications, while in the field using strip plot design with three replications. Assessment of tolerance was using Stressed Tolerance Index (STI according to Fernandez (1992. Results showed that dolomite application at dose equivalent to 0.5 x exchangeable Al was optimal in improving peanut growth, and peanut yield on acidic soil. Lines of GH3 (G/92088/92088-02-B-2-8-1 and GH 4 (G/92088/ 92088-02-B-2-8-2 genotypes had high STI with average yield of 2.47 tha-1 and 2.62 t ha-1 of dry pods and potential yield of 4.05 t ha-1 and 3.73 t ha-1 of dry pods, respectively as well as check varieties (Jerapah and Talam-1. It is concluded that peanut genotype of G/92088//92088-02-B-2-8-1 and G/92088//920 88- 02-B-2-8-2 were adaptable and tolerance to acidic, and tolerance of peanuts on acidic soil condition were probably controlled by the buffering mechanisms.

  10. Uptake of radiocaesium by lettuce crops: the effect of K in soil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waegeneers, N.; Camps I Vila, M.; Smolders, E.; Merckx, R.; Sauras, T.; Madoz-Escande, C.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of varying K supply on 137 Cs uptake by lettuce (Lactuca sativa, cv. Batavia, Gloire du Dauphine) was studied in solution culture, in a potted soil experiment and in a greenhouse lysimeter experiment under close-to-real conditions. Lettuce was grown for 13 days in nutrient solution spiked with 137 Cs. Treatments were four concentrations of potassium in solution (25, 50, 250, and 1000 μM). Yields were marginally affected by K supply. The 137 Cs concentration factor (CF, ml/g) decreased 66-fold in the shoot and 432-fold in the roots over the whole K concentration range. The decrease was most pronounced between 25 and 250 μM K. In a subsequent experiment, lettuce was grown for 20 days under the same climatic conditions in two sandy-foam soils (A, B) contaminated with 134 Cs. Both had similar characteristics but differed widely in K supply. Soil solution K concentrations were 100 μM (A) or 3000 μM (B). The radiocesium soil-to-plant Transfer Factor (TF, g plant dry weight / g soil) was 0.320 in soil A and 0.016 in soil B. The higher 137 Cs availability at the lower K supply (soil A) was contrasted by lower 137 Cs concentrations in soil solution of soil A than of soil B. Radiocesium transfer to lettuce grown to maturity was analysed on 5 different lysimeter soils under controlled climatic conditions. The soils were artificially contaminated with 137 Cs in 1994. The TF's varied between 0.032 and 0.191 and were not related to K concentrations in soil solution. The CF decreased about 100-fold with K concentrations increasing from 0.3 to 18 mM. Predictions of soil-to-plant transfer factors based on soil solution composition and nutrient solution results were qualitatively correct but underestimated the observed values

  11. Selective extraction of metals from acidic uranium(VI) solutions using neo-tridecano-hydroxamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardoncelli, F.; Grossi, G.

    1975-01-01

    According to this invention neo-alkyl-hydroxamic acids are employed as ion-exchanging agents in processes for liquid-liquid extraction with the aim of separating, purifying dissolved metals and of converting a metal salt solution into a solution of a salt of the same metal but with different anion. In particular it is an objective of this invention to provide a method whereby a molecular pure uranium solution is obtained by selective extraction from a uranium solution delivered by irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and containing plutonium, fission products and other unwanted metals, in which method neo-tridecane-hydroxamic acid is employed as ion exchanger. (Official Gazette)

  12. Microbiological aspects of determination of trichloroacetic acid in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matucha, M.; Rohlenová, J.; Forczek, S.T.; Gryndler, M.; Uhlířová, H.; Fuksová, K.; Schroder, P.

    2004-01-01

    Soils have been shown to possess a strong microbial trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-degrading activity. High TCA-degradation rate was also observed during soil extraction with water. For correct measurements of TCA levels in soil all TCA-degrading activities have to be inhibited immediately after sampling before analysis. We used rapid freezing of soil samples (optimally in liquid nitrogen) with subsequent storage and slow thawing before analysis as an efficient technique for suppressing the degradation. Frozen soil samples stored overnight at −20 °C and then thawed slowly exhibited very low residual TCA-degrading activity for several hours. Omitting the above procedure could lead to the confusing differences between the TCA levels previously reported in the literature

  13. Controls on soil solution nitrogen along an altitudinal gradient in the Scottish uplands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Blake, L; Helliwell, R C; Britton, A J; Gibbs, S; Coull, M C; Dawson, L

    2012-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition continues to threaten upland ecosystems, contributing to acidification, eutrophication and biodiversity loss. We present results from a monitoring study aimed at investigating the fate of this deposited N within a pristine catchment in the Cairngorm Mountains (Scotland). Six sites were established along an elevation gradient (486-908 m) spanning the key habitats of temperate maritime uplands. Bulk deposition chemistry, soil carbon content, soil solution chemistry, soil temperature and soil moisture content were monitored over a 5 year period. Results were used to assess spatial variability in soil solution N and to investigate the factors and processes driving this variability. Highest soil solution inorganic N concentrations were found in the alpine soils at the top of the hillslope. Soil carbon stock, soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and factors representing site hydrology were the best predictors of NO(3)(-) concentration, with highest concentrations at low productivity sites with low DOC and freely-draining soils. These factors act as proxies for changing net biological uptake and soil/water contact time, and therefore support the hypothesis that spatial variations in soil solution NO(3)(-) are controlled by habitat N retention capacity. Soil percent carbon was a better predictor of soil solution inorganic N concentration than mass of soil carbon. NH(4)(+) was less affected by soil hydrology than NO(3)(-) and showed the effects of net mineralization inputs, particularly at Racomitrium heath and peaty sites. Soil solution dissolved organic N concentration was strongly related to both DOC and temperature, with a stronger temperature effect at more productive sites. Due to the spatial heterogeneity in N leaching potential, a fine-scale approach to assessing surface water vulnerability to N leaching is recommended over the broad scale, critical loads approach currently in use, particularly for sensitive areas. Copyright © 2012

  14. Dependence of the concentrations of "1"3"7Cs and potassium in extracted soil solutions on soil humidity before centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prorok, V.V.; Datsenko, O.Yi.; Bulavyin, L.A.; Zlens'kij, S.Je.; Melnichenko, L.Yu.; Rozuvan, S.G.; Poperenko, L.V.; White, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Concentrations of 137Cs and potassium in solutions extracted by centrifugation from soils selected at some experimental sites in the 10-km Exclusion Zone of Chornobyl Nuclear Plant were determined. The results showed that for the majority of investigated soils, the concentration of 137Cs in soil solution depends on the humidity of the soil before centrifugation. It is possible to explain the dependence of the concentration of 137Cs in the soil solution on soil humidity from the dependence of the concentrations of molecules of different molecular-gravimetric fractions in soil solution on soil humidity. Considerable amount of 137Cs in soil solution is associated with these molecules, that is why the concentration of 137Cs in the extracted soil solution changes with the humidity of soil. These dependences differ between soils. For the majority of investigated soils the concentration of 137Cs in the extracted soil solution increases with increasing humidity of the soil. By contrast, soil humidity had no effect on the potassium concentration in the extracted soil solution for any soil investigated. It is concluded, that potassium is practically not associated with molecules of different molecular-gravimetric fractions in the extracted soil solutions

  15. Long-term stability of earthen materials in contact with acidic tailings solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Gee, G.W.

    1982-11-01

    The objectives of the studies documented in this report were to use experimental and geochemical computer modeling tools to assess the long-term environmental impact of leachate movement from acidic uranium mill tailings. Liner failure (i.e., an increase in the permeability of the liner material) was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 years. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The high clay materials tested appear suitable for lining tailings impoundment ponds. The decreases in permeability are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. In conclusion the same mineralogical changes and contaminant reactions predicted by geochemical modeling and observed in laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 4 year history of acid attack

  16. Copper Recovery from Polluted Soils Using Acidic Washing and Bioelectrochemical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Karlfeldt Fedje

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Excavation followed by landfilling is the most common method for treating soils contaminated by metals. However, as this solution is not sustainable, alternative techniques are required. Chemical soil washing is one such alternative. The aim of this experimental lab-scale study is to develop a remediation and metal recovery method for Cu contaminated sites. The method is based on the washing of soil or ash (combusted soil/bark with acidic waste liquids followed by electrolytic Cu recovery by means of bioelectrochemical systems (BES. The results demonstrate that a one- or two-step acidic leaching process followed by water washing removes >80 wt. % of the Cu. Copper with 99.7–99.9 wt. % purity was recovered from the acidic leachates using BES. In all experiments, electrical power was generated during the reduction of Cu. This clearly indicates that Cu can also be recovered from dilute solutions. Additionally, the method has the potential to wash co-pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and oxy-PAHs.

  17. Copper complexation by tannic acid in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraal, P.; Jansen, B.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Verstraten, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The speciation of titrated copper in a dissolved tannic acid (TA) solution with an initial concentration of 4 mmol organic carbon ((OC)/l was investigated in a nine-step titration experiment (Cu/oC molar ratio = 0.0030-0.0567). We differentiated between soluble and insoluble Cu species by 0.45 mu m

  18. Soil Chemistry Effect on Feasibility of Cr-decontamination by Acid-Washing

    OpenAIRE

    Isoyama, Masahiro; Wada, Shin-Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    Soil washing with sample acid jas been proven to be effective for removal of cationic heavy metals from contaminated soils. Since the obsorption of anitonic heavy metals is enhanced in acidic medium, the efficiency of acid-washing may not be guaranteed for soils that are doubly contaminated with cationic and anitonic heavy metals. To evaluate the efficiensy of acid-washing, nine soils are artifically contaminated with chromate and chromium was extracted with hydrochrolic acid of 0.5 mmol L[-1...

  19. Immobilization of citric acid solutions in portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Valdir M.; Rzyski, Barbara M.

    1997-01-01

    Decontamination processes by using citric acid on certain items used in the nuclear area, can result in large volumes of liquid wastes with low activity or effluents, contaminated with uranium and some elements dangerous to the environment. A great number of installations that have decontamination processes adopt the zero discharge philosophy. So, one of the forms to isolate the solutions is by reducing its volume through the evaporation process. The generated must can be neutralized and encapsulated or immobilized in Portland cement. This work propose a chemical technique to destroy the citric acid in the decontamination solutions instead of neutralization and, depending on the installation convenience, a direct cement immobilization of these solutions or of the evaporation mud. The results obtained in this work involve data about the workability, setting time and mechanical resistance, after 28 days of sealed cure, for samples with water-cement ratios of 4, 0.5 and 0.6, by weight. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs

  20. The dynamics of radionuclide behaviour in soil solution with special reference to the application of countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Lembrechts, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Any investigations into the effect of countermeasures on radionuclide transfer to plants should include a comprehensive chemical analysis of soil solution. This is because of the disturbances that soil-based countermeasures cause on soil:solution equilibria and radionuclide distribution between solid and liquid phases. As it is difficult to determine directly the effects of countermeasures under field conditions, it is recommended that laboratory-based studies be done first. These should include batch equilibrium experiments for soil:solution interactions, and hydroponic studies for solution:plant relationships. Speciation of radionuclides should form a fundamental part of both studies. (author)

  1. Behaviour of radioactive and stable isotopes of calcium in the soil-solution-plant system at different soil humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karavaeva, E.N.; Molchanova, I.V.

    1976-01-01

    The results of experiments performed to study the behaviour of radioactive and stable isotopes of Ca in soil - solution - plant system at different soil moistening are given. The experiments have been conducted in culture pans with two soils: soddy-meadow and soddy-podzolic differing in a number of physico-chemical properties. The solution of radioactive Ca( 45 CaCl 2 ) has been applied to soddy-meadow soil at the rate of 0.2 μcurie/kg, and to soddy-podzolic soil - at the rate of 0.1 μcurie/kg. The distribution and accumulation coefficients are estimated by the ratio to the total content of stable Ca and 45 Ca in soil. A direct relationship between distribution coefficients and the rate of soil moistening is observed. It has been established that 45 Ca and the natural stable isotopes of Ca applied to the soil differ in the type of distribution in soil - soil solution system and in accumulation by plants. However, a great similarity has been observed in behaviour of radioactive and stable isotopes of Ca depending on soil moistening

  2. Interactions of acidic solutions with sediments: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Serne, R.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Krupka, K.M.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology is presented for investigating the chemical interactions of acidic solutions with sediments. The MINTEQ geochemical computer code was used to predict solid-phase reactions that might occur when acidic solutions contact neutral sediments which, in turn, may control the concentrations of certain dissolved components. Results of X-ray diffraction analysis of laboratory samples of sediments that have been contacted with acidic uranium mill tailings solutions suggest gypsum and jarosite precipitated. These same mineralogical changes were identified in sediment samples collected from a drained uranium mill evaporation pond (Lucky Mc mine in Wyoming) with a 10-year history of acid attack. Geochemical modeling predicted that these same phases and several amorphous solids not identifiable by X-ray diffraction should have precipitated in the contacted sediments. An equilibrium conceptual model consisting of an assemblage of minerals and amorphous solid phases was then developed to represent a sediment column through which uranium mill tailings solutions were percolated. The MINTEQ code was used to predict effluent solution concentrations resulting from the reactions of the tailings solution with the assemblage of solid phases in the conceptual model. The conceptual model successfully predicted the concentrations of several of the macro-constituents (e.g., Ca, SO 4 , Al, Fe, and Mn), but was not successful in modeling the concentrations of trace elements. The lack of success in predicting the observed trace metal concentrations suggests that other mechanisms, such as adsorption, must be included in future models. The geochemical modeling methodology coupled with the laboratory and field studies should be applicable to a variety of waste disposal problems

  3. Chloroacetic acids - Degradation intermediates of organic matter in forest soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matucha, Miroslav; Gryndler, Milan; Schröder, P.; Forczek, Sándor; Uhlířová, H.; Fuksová, Květoslava; Rohlenová, Jana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2007), s. 382-385 ISSN 0038-0717 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/02/0874; GA ČR GA526/05/0636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : trichloroacetic acid * dichloroacetic acid * chlorination * soil organic matter Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.580, year: 2007

  4. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tao; Ying, Rongrong; Ye, Mao; Zhang, Shengtian; Li, Qun; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Yusuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils. PMID:26087302

  5. Deposition and conversion in soil of acids, acid-forming substances and nutrients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.

    1990-01-01

    Balancing of material depositions entries is the basis for their evaluation. The acid depositions must be put in relation to the acid neutralization capacity and to the buffer rate of the soil. Every 'excess' in depositons leads to an acid supply into the sub-soil and/or into the groundwater system. On the one hand, the nutrient depositions are interpreted in relation to the nutrient supplies of the soil and their availability to the plants; and on the other hand with a view to the nutrient depletion through the polants. Excesses can also lead to a (non-desirable) pollution of aquatic systems, or else to an enhanced nutrient supply in the soil. Balancing is therefore a necessary aid for the evaluation of material depositions from the atmosphere. (orig./EF) [de

  6. Effects of Land-Applied Ammonia Scrubber Solutions on Yield, Nitrogen Uptake, Soil Test Phosphorus, and Phosphorus Runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jerry W; Moore, Philip A; Li, Hong; Ashworth, Amanda J; Miles, Dana M

    2018-03-01

    Ammonia (NH) scrubbers reduce amounts of NH and dust released from animal rearing facilities while generating nitrogen (N)-rich solutions, which may be used as fertilizers. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various NH scrubber solutions on forage yields, N uptake, soil-test phosphorus (P), and P runoff. A small plot study was conducted using six treatments: (i) an unfertilized control, (ii) potassium bisulfate (KHSO) scrubber solution, (iii) aluminum sulfate [Al(SO) ⋅14HO, alum] scrubber solution, (iv) sodium bisulfate (NaHSO) scrubber solution, (v) sulfuric acid (HSO) scrubber solution, and (vi) ammonium nitrate (NHNO) fertilizer. The scrubber solutions were obtained from ARS Air Scrubbers attached to commercial broiler houses. All N sources were applied at a rate of 112 kg N ha. Plots were harvested approximately every 4 wk and soil-test P measurements were made, then a rainfall simulation study was conducted. Cumulative forage yields were greater ( scrubber solutions than for alum (6.7 Mg ha) or HSO (6.5 Mg ha) scrubber solutions or for NHNO (6.9 Mg ha). All N sources resulted in higher yields than the control (5.1 Mg ha). The additional potassium in the KHSO treatment likely resulted in higher yields. Although Mehlich-III-extractable P was not affected, water-extractable P in soil was lowered by the alum-based scrubber solution, which also resulted in lower P runoff. This study demonstrates that N captured using NH scrubbers is a viable N fertilizer. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Radiation-chemical oxidation of neptunium in perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilov, V.P.; Gusev, Yu.K.; Pikaev, A.K.; Stepanova, E.S.; Krot, N.N.

    1979-01-01

    The γ-radiation effect (at a dose rate of 5x10 16 eV/mlxs) on 1x10 -3 Np(6) and Np(5) perchloric acid solutions is studied. The output of Np(6) loss in aerated 0.001-0.005M HClO 4 solutions was 2.4 ions/100 eV. The output of Np(5) loss in solutions saturated with nitrous oxide was 2.1 ions/100 eV at pH-4. In aerated 0.1-1.0 M HClO 4 solutions in presence of XeO 4 the output of Np(5) loss grows from 6.6 to 13.5 ions/100 eV as (XeO 3 ) 0 increases from 1x10 -3 to 2x10 -2 M. Possible process mechanisms have been proposed

  8. Effect of pH value of applied solution on radioiodine sorption by soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabova, T.

    1976-01-01

    Sorption of radioiodine by soils was followed under static conditions at different pH values of the initial solution in five soil types. Sorption of radioiodine by soils is affected by the amount of the organic mass and by the pH of solutions. With the same pH, soils containing a higher amount of the organic mass absorb more radioiodine. The highest sorption percentage of 131 I - for all pH values was found in meadow chernozem soil and the lowest in the rendzina and in carboniferous meadow soils. The highest sorption of 131 I - for degraded chernozem, meadow chernozem soils and brown soil was recorded at pH 5 and for carboniferous meadow soil and rendzina at pH 7. (author)

  9. Exploring plant factors for increasing phosphorus utilization from rock phosphates and native soil phosphates in acidic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Guanglin; Xiong Liming

    2002-01-01

    Six plant species with contrasting capacity in utilizing rock phosphates were compared with regard to their responses to phosphorus starvation in hydroponic cultures. Radish, buckwheat and oil rapeseed are known to have strong ability to use rock phosphates while ryegrass, wheat and sesbania are less efficient. Whereas other plants acidified their culture solution under P starvation (-P), radish plants make alkaline the solution. When neutralizing the pH of the solutions cultured with plants under either -P or + P conditions, solutions with P starved buckwheat, rapeseed, and radish had a higher ability to solubilize Al and Fe phosphates than did those cultured with sesbania, ryegrass and wheat. Characterization of organic ligands in the solutions identified that citrate and malate were the major organic anions exuded by rapeseed and radish. Besides citrate and malate, buckwheat exuded a large amount of tartrate under P starvation. In contrast, ryegrass, wheat and sesbania secreted only a limited amount of oxalic acid, regardless of P status. Changes in activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, acid phosphatase, and nitrate reductase in these plants were also compared under P- sufficient or -deficient conditions. The results indicated that plant ability to use rock phosphates or soil phosphates is closely related to their responses toward P starvation. The diversity of P starvation responses was discussed in the context of co-evolution between plants and their environment. Approaches to use plant factors to enhance the effectiveness of rock phosphates were also discussed. (author)

  10. Changes in soil toxicity by phosphate-aided soil washing: effect of soil characteristics, chemical forms of arsenic, and cations in washing solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jho, Eun Hea; Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-01-01

    This study was set to investigate the changes in the toxicity of arsenic (As)-contaminated soils after washing with phosphate solutions. The soil samples collected from two locations (A: rice paddy and B: forest land) of a former smelter site were contaminated with a similar level of As. Soil washing (0.5 M phosphate solution for 2 h) removed 24.5% As, on average, in soil from both locations. Regardless of soil washing, Location A soil toxicities, determined using Microtox, were greater than that of Location B and this could be largely attributed to different soil particle size distribution. With soils from both locations, the changes in As chemical forms resulted in either similar or greater toxicities after washing. This emphasizes the importance of considering ecotoxicological aspects, which are likely to differ depending on soil particle size distribution and changes in As chemical forms, in addition to the total concentration based remedial goals, in producing ecotoxicologically-sound soils for reuse. In addition, calcium phosphate used as the washing solution seemed to contribute more on the toxic effects of the washed soils than potassium phosphate and ammonium phosphate. Therefore, it would be more appropriate to use potassium or ammonium phosphate than calcium phosphate for phosphate-aided soil washing of the As-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Colloid mobilization and heavy metal transport in the sampling of soil solution from Duckum soil in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seyong; Ko, Il-Won; Yoon, In-Ho; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2018-03-24

    Colloid mobilization is a significant process governing colloid-associated transport of heavy metals in subsurface environments. It has been studied for the last three decades to understand this process. However, colloid mobilization and heavy metal transport in soil solutions have rarely been studied using soils in South Korea. We investigated the colloid mobilization in a variety of flow rates during sampling soil solutions in sand columns. The colloid concentrations were increased at low flow rates and in saturated regimes. Colloid concentrations increased 1000-fold higher at pH 9.2 than at pH 7.3 in the absence of 10 mM NaCl solution. In addition, those were fourfold higher in the absence than in the presence of the NaCl solution at pH 9.2. It was suggested that the mobility of colloids should be enhanced in porous media under the basic conditions and the low ionic strength. In real field soils, the concentrations of As, Cr, and Pb in soil solutions increased with the increase in colloid concentrations at initial momentarily changed soil water pressure, whereas the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Al, and Co lagged behind the colloid release. Therefore, physicochemical changes and heavy metal characteristics have important implications for colloid-facilitated transport during sampling soil solutions.

  12. Soil Burial of Polylactic Acid/Paddy Straw Powder Biocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorulnajwa Diyana Yaacob

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the biodegradability of polylactic acid (PLA/paddy straw powder (PSP biocomposites. Environmental degradation was evaluated by composting the biocomposite samples into the soil. Different techniques, including mechanical tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, were used to obtain a view of the degradation that occurred during the soil burial of the biocomposites. Results of the mechanical tests showed that an increasing content of PSP in the biocomposites decreased the tensile strength and elongation at break (EB, while it increased the modulus of elasticity after six months of exposure. Scanning electron microscopy on the surface after soil burial showed that the filler was poorly wetted by the matrix. This explains the reduction in tensile strength and the elongation at break after soil burial. Differential scanning calorimetry results indicated that the crystallinity of the biocomposites increased with longer composting periods.

  13. Determination of free nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayankutty, P.C.; Ravi, S.; Nadkarni, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    Potentiometric titration of uranyl nitrate solution with sodium hydroxide exhibits two peaks. The first peak characterises the following reaction, UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )+NaOH Na[UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )(OH)]. This reaction, indicating the partial hydrolysis of uranyl oxalate complex, appears to be complete at pH9. If the titration is carried out to this end-point pH, the total alkali consumed can be equated to the sum of uranium content and the free acidity present in the sample volume. Based on this, a method was standardised to determine the free acidity in uranyl nitrate solution. The sample, taken in a solution of potassium oxalate previously adjusted to pH9, is titrated to this pH with standard sodium hydroxide. The free acidity in the sample can be computed by subtracting the alkali reacted with uranium from the total alkali consumed. Analyses of several synthetic samples containing uranium and nitric acid in a wide range of combinations indicate that the free acidity can be accurately determined by this method, if uranium concentration in the sample is known. The results are compared to those obtained by two other widely used methods, viz., (i) titration of pH7 in the presence of neutral potassium oxalate to suppress hydrolysis and (ii) separation of hydrolyzable ions on a cationic resin and alkali titration of the free acid released. The advantages of and the precision obtained with the present method over the above two methods are discussed. (author)

  14. Studies of the Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Liu Dejun; Yao Jun

    2010-01-01

    The oxidation state is an important aspect of the speciation of Tc in groundwater that contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl 3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg L -1 and the Tc (Ⅶ) concentration range is about 10 -8 mol l -1 . The radiocounting of 99 Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99 Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl 3 coagulation methods were carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (IPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (Ⅳ) and Tc (Ⅶ) for the availability of the LaCl 3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentrations are well agreement with the LaCl 3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (Ⅶ) is very stable in the Tc (Ⅶ)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (Ⅳ) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (Ⅶ) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That is means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  15. Studies of Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Liu Dejun; Yao Jun

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation state of Tc is an important aspect of the speciation in groundwater which contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl 3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg/L and the Tc (VII) concentration is about 10 -8 mol/L. The radiocounting of 99 Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99 Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl 3 coagulation method was carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (IV) and Tc (VII) for the availability of the LaCl 3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentration are well agreement with the LaCl 3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (VII) is very stable in the Tc (VII)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (IV) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (VII) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  16. The reducibility of sulphuric acid and sulphate in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1991-07-01

    In connection with the Swedish project for final storage of spent fuel elements it was necessary to assess whether dissolved sulphate can corrode the copper canister. A simple reaction between copper and sulphate is thermodynamically impossible, but copper can react to give copper sulphide if an additional electron donor such as iron(II) is available. The problem was extended to the more general question of the reducibility of sulphur(VI) in dilute aqueous solution. Chemical reduction of sulphate does not take place in dilute solution at temperatures below 100 o C. In experiments on the reduction of sulphates under hydrothermal conditions a reaction only takes place at temperatures above 275-300 o C. The oxidising action of sulphuric acid on metals becomes perceptible only at acid concentrations over 45-50%. In experiments on the cathodic reduction of 74% sulphuric acid the formation of hydrogen sulphide and elementary sulphur starts, depending on the current density, at 50-130 o C, and polarographic measurements suggest that the reducible species is not the hydrogen sulphate ion but molecular sulphuric acid. The resistance of copper to oxygen-free sulphuric acid up to a concentration of 60% is well-known. Numerous processes in industrial electrochemistry take place in sulphuric acid or sulphate electrolytes. The reversible metal/metal-sulphate electrodes of lead and cadmium are unstable relative to the corresponding metal sulphides. Nevertheless the reversible lead sulphate electrode does not fail from sulphide formation. All these facts confirm that sulphur(VI) in dilute solution is completely inert towards chemical reducing agents and also to cathodic reduction. Thus corrosion of copper by sulphate under final-storage conditions and in the absence of sulphate reducing bacteria can be almost certainly be ruled out. (author) 5 figs., 85 refs

  17. Chemical dosimetry by UV spectrophotometry of aqueous ascorbic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alian, A.; El-Assay, N.B.; Abdel-Rehim, F.; Amin, N.E.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Roushdy, H.

    1984-01-01

    The decrease in the ultraviolet absorption of aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid brought about by large doses of gamma radiation has been investigated as a means of developing a new chemical dosimeter. Because of spontaneous ring opening under various conditions after dissolution in water, some additives were examined as possible stabilizers against such denaturing of aqueous ascorbic acid. At an ascorbic acid concentration of 10 -4 M, either 1 to 2% glycine or 0.2 M NaCl was found to be a good stabilizer. A mechanism of radiation chemistry has been proposed based on hydroxyl radical and hydroxyl adduct intermediates, leading to dehydroascorbic acid through the ascorbate complex. The optimum dosimeter solution covers an absorbed dose range approx. 50 to 350 Gy, when measured at 264 nm wavelength. The G-values for dehydroascorbic acid production were determined to be 2.94 +- 0.33 and 2.43 +- 0.11 (100 eV) -1 , with glycine and NaCl used respectively as stabilizers. (author)

  18. Back to Acid Soil Fields: The Citrate Transporter SbMATE Is a Major Asset for Sustainable Grain Yield for Sorghum Cultivated on Acid Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Carvalho Jr

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity damages plant roots and limits crop production on acid soils, which comprise up to 50% of the world’s arable lands. A major Al tolerance locus on chromosome 3, AltSB, controls aluminum tolerance in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench] via SbMATE, an Al-activated plasma membrane transporter that mediates Al exclusion from sensitive regions in the root apex. As is the case with other known Al tolerance genes, SbMATE was cloned based on studies conducted under controlled environmental conditions, in nutrient solution. Therefore, its impact on grain yield on acid soils remains undetermined. To determine the real world impact of SbMATE, multi-trait quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping in hydroponics, and, in the field, revealed a large-effect QTL colocalized with the Al tolerance locus AltSB, where SbMATE lies, conferring a 0.6 ton ha–1 grain yield increase on acid soils. A second QTL for Al tolerance in hydroponics, where the positive allele was also donated by the Al tolerant parent, SC283, was found on chromosome 9, indicating the presence of distinct Al tolerance genes in the sorghum genome, or genes acting in the SbMATE pathway leading to Al-activated citrate release. There was no yield penalty for AltSB, consistent with the highly localized Al regulated SbMATE expression in the root tip, and Al-dependent transport activity. A female effect of 0.5 ton ha–1 independently demonstrated the effectiveness of AltSB in hybrids. Al tolerance conferred by AltSB is thus an indispensable asset for sorghum production and food security on acid soils, many of which are located in developing countries.

  19. Cs separation from nitric acid solutions of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckmann, K.; Pieronczyk, W.; Strnad, J.; Feldmaier, F.

    1989-01-01

    It was the objective of this study to selectively separate active caesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) from acid radioactive waste solutions (especially MAW and HAWC). The following 'strategy' was designed for a separation process: synthesis of reagents which are acid-resistant and selective for caesium; precipitation of Cs + and separation of the precipitates by filtration or centrifugation or precipitation of Cs + and separation of the precipitates by flotation; caesium separation by liquid-liquid extraction. As precipitating agents, sodium tetraphenylborate (kalignost) and several of its fluorine derivatives were examined. (orig./RB) [de

  20. Sorption of molybdenum by cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneva, N.K.; Oputina, A.G.; Ermolenko, I.N.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of molybdenum on cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions of ammonium molybdate depending on the phosphorus content in samples, concentration and pH of the solution, sorption time is studied. It is shown that a maximum molybdenum content on the cellulose samples with different phosphorus content is pointed out at an ammonium molybdate concentration 0.02 M. Saturation of the sorption curve is attained at molar ratio of adsrbed molybdenum to phosphorus 1:4. In case of small fillings the compound with molybdenum to phosphorus ratio 1:10 is formed

  1. Estimating the Soil Temperature Profile from a single Depth Observation: A simple Empirical Heatflow Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, T.R.H.; Owe, M.; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Kooi, H.

    2008-01-01

    Two field data sets are used to model near-surface soil temperature profiles in a bare soil. It is shown that the commonly used solutions to the heat flow equations by Van Wijk perform well when applied at deeper soil layers, but result in large errors when applied to near surface layers, where more

  2. Acidification of soil solution in a chestnut forest stand in southern Switzerland: are there signs of recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannatier, Elisabeth Graf; Luster, Jörg; Zimmermann, Stephan; Blaser, Peter

    2005-10-15

    In a previous study, a rapid acidification of soil solution was observed between 1987 and 1997 in a cryptopodzolic soil in southern Switzerland despite a reduction in acidic deposition. The molar ratio of base nutrient cations to aluminum (BC/Al) in the soil solution was used to assess acidification. The monitoring of the soil solution chemistry was continued at the same site between 1998 and 2003 to find out how long the delay in reaction to reduced deposition would last and whether the BC/Al ratios would recover. The reevaluation of all data collected during the 16-year observation period showed no clear improvement in the BC/Al ratios, except below the litter layer where the ratios greatly increased after 1998. Initial signs of recovery were also detected in the mineral horizons, the ratios stabilizing in the second part of the observation period. Sulfate concentrations decreased significantly below the litter mat in response to decreased S deposition. BC concentrations markedly declined below the litter layer and in the mineral horizons, which was attributed to the depletion of the BC exchangeable pool as a result of continued acidic deposition.

  3. Uncertainties associated with lacking data for predictions of solid-solution partitioning of metals in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, T.T. Yen; Hendriks, A. Jan

    2014-01-01

    Soil properties, i.e., pH and contents of soil organic matter (SOM), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), clay, oxides, and reactive metals, are required inputs to both mechanistic and empirical modeling in assessing metal solid-solution partitioning. Several of these properties are rarely measured in site-specific risk assessment. We compared the uncertainties induced by lacking data on these soil properties in estimating metal soil solution concentrations. The predictions by the Orchestra framework were more sensitive to lacking soil property data than the predictions by the transfer functions. The deviations between soil solution concentrations of Cd, Ni, Zn, Ba, and Co estimated with measured SOM and those estimated with generic SOM by the Orchestra framework were about 10 times larger than the deviations in the predictions by the transfer functions. High uncertainties were induced by lacking data in assessing solid-solution partitioning of oxy-anions like As, Mo, Sb, Se, and V. Deviations associated with lacking data in predicting soil solution concentrations of these metals by the Orchestra framework reached three-to-six orders of magnitude. The solid-solution partitioning of metal cations was strongly influenced by pH and contents of organic matter, oxides, and reactive metals. Deviations of more than two orders of magnitude were frequently observed between the estimates of soil solution concentrations with the generic values of these properties and the estimates based on the measured data. Reliable information on these properties is preferred to be included in the assessment by either the Orchestra framework or transfer functions. - Highlights: • Estimates of metal solid-solution partitioning sensitive to soil property data. • Uncertainty mainly due to lacking reactive metal contents, pH, and organic matter. • Soil solution concentrations of oxy-anions highly influenced by oxide contents. • Clay contents had least effects on solid-solution partitioning

  4. Uncertainties associated with lacking data for predictions of solid-solution partitioning of metals in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, T.T. Yen, E-mail: YenLe@science.ru.nl; Hendriks, A. Jan

    2014-08-15

    Soil properties, i.e., pH and contents of soil organic matter (SOM), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), clay, oxides, and reactive metals, are required inputs to both mechanistic and empirical modeling in assessing metal solid-solution partitioning. Several of these properties are rarely measured in site-specific risk assessment. We compared the uncertainties induced by lacking data on these soil properties in estimating metal soil solution concentrations. The predictions by the Orchestra framework were more sensitive to lacking soil property data than the predictions by the transfer functions. The deviations between soil solution concentrations of Cd, Ni, Zn, Ba, and Co estimated with measured SOM and those estimated with generic SOM by the Orchestra framework were about 10 times larger than the deviations in the predictions by the transfer functions. High uncertainties were induced by lacking data in assessing solid-solution partitioning of oxy-anions like As, Mo, Sb, Se, and V. Deviations associated with lacking data in predicting soil solution concentrations of these metals by the Orchestra framework reached three-to-six orders of magnitude. The solid-solution partitioning of metal cations was strongly influenced by pH and contents of organic matter, oxides, and reactive metals. Deviations of more than two orders of magnitude were frequently observed between the estimates of soil solution concentrations with the generic values of these properties and the estimates based on the measured data. Reliable information on these properties is preferred to be included in the assessment by either the Orchestra framework or transfer functions. - Highlights: • Estimates of metal solid-solution partitioning sensitive to soil property data. • Uncertainty mainly due to lacking reactive metal contents, pH, and organic matter. • Soil solution concentrations of oxy-anions highly influenced by oxide contents. • Clay contents had least effects on solid-solution partitioning

  5. Use of azeotropic distillation for isotopic analysis of deuterium in soil water and saturate saline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Antonio Vieira dos.

    1995-05-01

    The azeotropic distillation technique was adapted to extract soil water and saturate saline solution, which is similar to the sea water for the Isotopic Determination of Deuterium (D). A soil test was used to determine the precision and the nature of the methodology to extract soil water for stable isotopic analysis, using the azeotropic distillation and comparing with traditional methodology of heating under vacuum. This methodology has been very useful for several kinds of soil or saturate saline solution. The apparatus does not have a memory effect, and the chemical reagents do not affect the isotopic composition of soil water. (author). 43 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs

  6. A Novel Method for Fabricating Double Layers Porous Anodic Alumina in Phosphoric/Oxalic Acid Solution and Oxalic Acid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for fabricating ordered double layers porous anodic alumina (DL-PAA with controllable nanopore size was presented. Highly ordered large pore layer with interpore distance of 480 nm was fabricated in phosphoric acid solution with oxalic acid addition at the potential of 195 V and the small pore layer was fabricated in oxalic acid solution at the potential from 60 to 100 V. Experimental results show that the thickness of large pore layer is linearly correlative with anodizing time, and pore diameter is linearly correlative with pore widening time. When the anodizing potential in oxalic acid solution was adjusted from 60 to 100 V, the small pore layers with continuously tunable interpore distance from 142 to 241 nm and pore density from 1.94×109 to 4.89×109 cm−2 were obtained. And the interpore distance and the pore density of small pore layers are closely correlative with the anodizing potential. The fabricated DL-PAA templates can be widely utilized for fabrication of ordered nanomaterials, such as superhydrophobic or gecko-inspired adhesive materials and metal or semiconductor nanowires.

  7. Soil washing of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge using acids and ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid chelating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitipour, Saeid; Ahmadi, Soheil; Madadian, Edris; Ardestani, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of soil washing in the removal of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge samples collected from Pond 2 of the Tehran Oil Refinery was investigated. These metals are considered as hazardous substances for human health and the environment. The carcinogenicity of chromate dust has been established for a long time. Cadmium is also a potential environmental toxicant. This study was carried out by collecting sludge samples from different locations in Pond 2. Soil washing was conducted to treat the samples. Chemical agents, such as acetic acid, ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) and hydrochloric acid, were used as washing solutions to remove chromium and cadmium from sludge samples. The results of this study indicated that the highest removal efficiencies from the sludge samples were achieved using a 0.3 M HCl solution with 82.69% and 74.47% for chromium and cadmium, respectively. EDTA (0.1 M) in the best condition extracted 66.81% of cadmium and 72.52% of chromium from the sludges. The lowest efficiency values for the samples, however, were achieved using 3 M acetic acid with 41.7% and 46.96% removals for cadmium and chromium, respectively. The analysis of washed sludge indicated that the heavy metals removal decreased in the order of 3 M acetic acid < 0.1 M EDTA<0.3 M HCl, thus hydrochloric acid appears to offer a greater potential as a washing agent in remediating the sludge samples.

  8. New methods For Modeling Transport Of Water And Solutes In Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Per

    Recent models for water and solute transport in unsaturated soils have been mechanistically based but numerically very involved. This dissertation concerns the development of mechanistically-based but numerically simple models for calculating and analyzing transport of water and solutes in soil...

  9. Trends in soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations across European forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camino-Serrano, Marta; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Vicca, Sara; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Jonard, Mathieu; Ciais, Philippe; Guenet, Bertrand; Gielen, Bert; Peñuelas, Josep; Sardans, Jordi; Waldner, Peter; Sawicka, Kasia

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters is connected to DOC in soil solution through hydrological pathways. Therefore, it is expected that long-term dynamics of DOC in surface waters reflect DOC trends in soil solution. However, a multitude of site studies have failed so far to establish

  10. Trends in soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations across European forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camino-Serrano, M.; Graf Pannatier, E.; Vicca, S.; Luyssaert, S.; Jonard, M.; Ciais, P.; Guenet, B.; Gielen, B.; Peñuelas, J.; Sardans, J.; Waldner, P.; Etzold, S.; Cecchini, G.; Clarke, N.; Galić, Z.; Gandois, L.; Hansen, K.; Johnson, J.; Klinck, U.; Lachmanová, Z.; Lindroos, A.J.; Meesenburg, H.; Nieminen, T.M.; Sanders, T.G.M.; Sawicka, K.; Seidling, W.; Thimonier, A.; Vanguelova, E.; Verstraeten, A.; Vesterdal, L.; Janssens, I.A.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters is connected to DOC in soil solution through hydrological pathways. Therefore, it is expected that long-term dynamics of DOC in surface waters reflect DOC trends in soil solution. However, a multitude of site studies have failed so far to establish

  11. Pulse Radiolysis of Adrenaline in Acid Aqueous Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, Erling

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis of adrenaline in acid aqueous solutions (pH 1–3) was carried out. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenaline with H and OH were determined: k(H + adr.) = (0·9±0·1) × 109 dm3 mol−1s−1; k(OH + adr.) = (1·65±0·15) × 1010 dm3 mol−1s−1. The H-adduct of adrenaline has two λmax...

  12. Measurement of acidity and density of plutonium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Bowers, D.L.; Kemmerlin, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The solutions were analyzed for acidity and total Pu concentration at ambient temperature while the density was determined at 25, 35, 45, and 60 0 C. From least squares fitting, it was found that the density could be computed to within 1% of the experimental value using the equation D = 1 + 0.0477[H + ] - 4.25 x 10 -3 [H + ] 2 + 1.477 x 10 -3 [Pu] - (T - 25)/1000

  13. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    0 values of glycine, L-alanine, and L-valine in aqueous MgCl2⋅6H2O solutions at. 298⋅15 K in order to describe the temperature dependence behaviour of partial molar quantities. Group contributions to partial molar volumes have been determined for the amino acids. The trends of transfer volumes (∆Vφ. 0) have been ...

  14. Chemical composition of the humus layer, mineral soil and soil solution of 200 forest stands in the Netherlands in 1995

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeters, E.E.J.M.; Vries, de W.

    2001-01-01

    A nationwide assessment of the chemical composition of the soil solid phase and the soil solution in the humus layer and two mineral layers (0-10 cm and 10-30 cm) was made for 200 forest stands in the year 1995. The stands were part of the national forest inventory on vitality, included seven tree

  15. Bioavailability of phosphorus from composts and struvite in acid soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmo Horta

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to assess the type and fractions of phosphorus (P forms in composts and struvite and how these P forms affect the bioavailability of P in the soil. P fertilization was performed with compost from sewage sludge (CSS, compost from poultry litter (CPL and struvite (SV and compared with single superphosphate (SSP. P forms were quantified through a sequential fractionation scheme. The first extraction was performed with H2O, the second with 0.5 M NaHCO3, the third with 0.1 M NaOH and the fourth with 1 M HCl. The release of P over time, after soil P fertilization, was assessed by incubating the fertilizers with a low-P acid soil. P bioavailability was assessed through a micro-pot experiment with the incubated soils in a growth chamber using rye plants (Secale cereale L.. Inorganic P forms in the first two fractions represented ~50% (composts, 32% (SV and 86% (SSP of the total P; and in the HCl fraction, ~40% (composts, 26% (SV and 13% (SSP of the total P. Despite the variability of the P form fractions in the composts and struvite, the P release and bioavailability were similar among the fertilized treatments. The acidic nature of the soil, which improve solubility of Ca-P forms, and the high efficiency of rye, which favors P uptake, were factors that contributed to these results.

  16. Composition and properties of soil solution in the Podzolic soil of a green moss-spruce stand according to lysimeter data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shilova, E I; Korovkina, L V

    1964-01-01

    Lysimeter water from an acid Podzolic soil in a green moss - spruce stand always contained free CO/sub 2/ and bicarbonates. Titrable acidity (as a result of CO/sub 2/) showed the following averages by horizons for the period of observation: 0.86 meq/liter. (A/sub 0/A/sub 1/), 0.67 meq/liter (A/sub 2/), and 0.98 meq per liter (B). The corresponding alkalinities were: 0.69, 0.51, and 2.50 meq/liter. Bicarbonates were the principal mineral components of the soil solution. Their concentration in the litter (A/sub 0/A/sub 1/) was relatively low; it reached a minimum in the Podzolic horizon, and then increased sharply in the illuvial horizon. The seasonal dynamics of bicarbonates in the lower part of the profile were not related to changes in bicarbonate content in the upper horizons. It followed the cycle of plant activity. The autumn lysimeter water, formed by displacement of the upper soil solution, showed maximum concentration of bicarbonates. The spring lysimeter water, and partly the summer water, which form following the period of winter anabiosis, showed the lowest concentration. As the plants absorb water, the roots evolve carbon dioxide. The higher the summer temperature, the more bicarbonates accumulate in the soil.

  17. Labile rhizosphere soil solution fraction for prediction of bioavailability of heavy metals and rare earth elements to plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xiao-Quan; Wang, Zhongwen; Wang, Weisheng; Zhang, Shuzhen; Wen, Bei

    2003-02-01

    A labile rhizosphere soil solution fraction has been recommended to predict the bioavailability of heavy metals and rare earth elements to plants. This method used moist rhizosphere soil in combination with a mixture of 0.01 mol L(-1) of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) as extractant. The extracted soil solutions were fractionated into two colloidal fractions of soil solution fraction, F(lrss). For the soil solutions extracted with a mixture of LMWOAs the concentrations of heavy metals and rare earth elements in F(2) and F(3) were quite similar. However, the mean concentrations of Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, La, Ce, Pr, and Nd in F(lrss) accounted for 79.9%, 91.3%, 90.8%, 60.1%, 77.5%, 75.3%, 81.2%, 77.2%, 80.3%, and 79.5%, respectively, of their concentrations in F(2). In contrast, there were no differences in the extractable metal concentrations between the three fractions while the first step of the method recommended by the European Community of Reference (BCR), where 0.1 mol L(-1) acetic acid was used as an extractant. The single correlation analysis was made between metal concentrations in the different fractions of soil solutions and their concentrations in wheat. If the first step of BCR method was used there was no good correlation between heavy metals in soil pools and that in wheat shoots and roots. When LMWAOs were used a good correlation was obtained between the concentrations of heavy metals in soil pools and that in wheat roots, which followed a general order of r(1 kD, LMWOAs) >r(0.2 microm, LMWOAs) approximately r(0.45 microm, LMWOAs). In the case of rare earth elements the good correlation was obtained for both the wheat roots and shoots. Generally, the correlation coefficients obtained by LMWAOs were better than that obtained by the first step of BCR method. Therefore, LMWAOs and F(lrss) were strongly recommended to predict the bioavailability of metals in soil pools to plants.

  18. Effect of decreasing acidity on the extractability of inorganic soil phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helinä Hartikainen

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The extractability of P by the water and anion exchange resin methods and reactions of soil inorganic P were investigated with seven acid mineral soil samples incubated with KOH solutions of various concentrations. The results were compared with the analytical data obtained from three soil samples incubated in a prolonged liming experiment. The resin extraction method proved more effective than the water extraction method. The amounts of P desorbed by both methods seemed to increase exponentially as the pH in the soil suspensions rose. The factors involved were discussed. On the basis of fractionation analyses P reacting to changes in the pH and participating in desorption processes was supposed to originate from secondary NH4F and NaOH soluble reserves. In general, as the acidity decreased NH4F-P increased at the expense of NaOH-P. In heavily limed gyttja soil also H2SO4-P increased. This was possibly induced by the precipitation of mobilized P as a Ca compound. The significance of pH in the extractability of soil P seemed somewhat to lessen as the amount of secondary P increased. The results were in accordance with the conception that liming improves the availability of inorganic P to plants and reduces the need for P fertilization. However, increasing of the soil pH involves the risk that P is more easily desorbed to the recipient water by the eroded soil material carried into the watercourse. Therefore, intensive liming is not recommendable close to the shoreline. Further, it should be taken into account that liming of lakes may also result in eutrophication as desorption of sedimentary inorganic P is enhanced.

  19. Reclamation of cadmium-contaminated soil using dissolved organic matter solution originating from wine-processing waste sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cheng-Chung, E-mail: ccliu@niu.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan, 260, Taiwan (China); Chen, Guan-Bu [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan, 260, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Increases in acidity, washing frequency, and operational temperature enhance the Cd removal. ► Approximately 80% of Cd can be removed from the soil by dissolved organic matter (DOM) washing. ► The DOM washing can moderate the loss of soil fertility. ► The DOM washing will have a great improvement if we employ NaOH, KOH, Ca(OH){sub 2}, and Mg(OH){sub 2} to prepare the DOM solution together. -- Abstract: Soil washing using an acid solution is a common practice for removing heavy metals from contaminated soil in Taiwan. However, serious loss of nutrients from soil is a major drawback of the washing. Distillery sludge can be used to prepare a dissolved organic matter (DOM) solution by extracting its organic constituents with alkaline solutions. This study employed DOM solutions to remediate Cd-contaminated soil (with concentrations up to 21.5 mg kg{sup −1}) and determine the factors affecting removal of Cd, such as pH, initial concentration of DOM solution, temperature, and washing frequency. When washing with pH 3.0 and 1250 mg L{sup −1} DOM solution, about 80% and 81% of Cd were removed from the topsoil at 27 °C and subsoil at 40 °C, respectively. To summarize the changes in fertility during DOM washing with various pH solutions: the increase in organic matter content ranged from 7.7% to 23.7%; cation exchange capacity (CEC) ranged from 4.6% to 13.9%; available ammonium (N-NH{sub 4}) content ranged from 39.4% to 2175%; and available phosphorus content ranged from 34.5% to 182%. Exchangeable K, Ca, and Mg remained in the topsoil after DOM washing, with concentrations of 1.1, 2.4, and 1.5 times higher than those treated with HCl solution at the same pH, respectively.

  20. Plant adaptation to acid soils: the molecular basis for crop aluminum resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity on acid soils is a significant limitation to crop production worldwide, as approximately 50% of the world’s potentially arable soils are acidic. Because acid soils are such an important constraint to agriculture, understanding the mechanisms and genes conferring resistance to ...

  1. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε acidic media. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Validation of Transfer Functions Predicting Cd and Pb Free Metal Ion Activity in Soil Solution as a Function of Soil Characteristics and Reactive Metal Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pampura, T.; Groenenberg, J.E.; Lofts, S.; Priputina, I.

    2007-01-01

    According to recent insight, the toxicity of metals in soils is better related to the free metal ion (FMI) activity in the soil solution than to the total metal concentration in soil. However, the determination of FMI activities in soil solution is a difficult and time-consuming task. An alternative

  3. Investigation of the oxidation states of Pu isotopes in a hydrochloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.H. [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P. O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mhlee@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, J.Y.; Kim, W.H.; Jung, E.C.; Jee, K.Y. [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P. O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The characteristics of the oxidation states of Pu in a hydrochloric acid solution were investigated and the results were applied to a separating of Pu isotopes from IAEA reference soils. The oxidation states of Pu(III) and Pu(IV) were prepared by adding hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium nitrite to a Pu stock solution, respectively. Also, the oxidation state of Pu(VI) was adjusted with concentrated HNO{sub 3} and HClO{sub 4}. The stability of the various oxidation states of plutonium in a HCl solution with elapsed time after preparation were found to be in the following order: Pu(III){approx}Pu(VI)>Pu(IV)>Pu(V). The chemical recoveries of Pu(IV) in a 9 M HCl solution with an anion exchange resin were similar to those of Pu(VI). This method for the determination of Pu isotopes with an anion exchange resin in a 9 M HCl medium was applied to IAEA reference soils where the activity concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 238}Pu in IAEA-375 and IAEA-326 were consistent with the reference values reported by the IAEA.

  4. Soil knowledge for farmers, farmer knowledge for soil scientists : the case of acid sulphate soils in the Mekong delta, Viet Nam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensvoort, van M.E.F.

    1996-01-01


    Half the Mekong delta in Vietnam, i.e. around 2 million hectares, suffers soil related problems due to acid sulphate soils. These soils generate sulphuric acid due to the oxidation of pyrite after aeration. Pyrite is most easily formed in tidal swamps. Human interference through land

  5. Photometric estimation of plutonium in product solutions and acid waste solutions using flow injection analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhas, A.J.A.; Dharmapurikar, G.R.; Kumaraguru, K.; Vijayan, K.; Kapoor, S.C.; Ramanujam, A.

    1995-01-01

    Flow injection analysis technique is employed for the measurement of plutonium concentrations in product nitrate solutions by measuring the absorbance of Pu(III) at 565 nm and of Pu(IV) at 470 nm, using a Metrohm 662 photometer, with a pyrex glass tube of 2 nm (ID) inserted in the light path of the detector serving as a flow cell. The photometer detector never comes in contact with radioactive solution. In the case of acid waste solutions Pu is first purified by extraction chromatography with 2-ethyl hexyl hydrogen 2 ethyl hexyl phosphonate (KSM 17)- chromosorb and the Pu in the eluate in complexed with Arsenazo III followed by the measured of absorbance at 665 nm. Absorbance of reference solutions in the desired concentration ranges are measured to calibrate the system. The results obtained agree with the reference values within ±2.0%. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  6. An efficient method for estimating bioavailability of arsenic in soils: a comparison with acid leachates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, J.C.; Hertle, A.; Seawright, A.A. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane (Australia). National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology; Mcdougall, K.W. [Wollongbar Agricultural Institute (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    With the view of estimating bioavailability of metals from contaminated sites and risk assessment, a rat model is used for a comparative bioavailability test in which groups of rats were given via the oral route a slurry of arsenic contaminated soils, a solution of sodium arsenate or sodium arsenite, or calcium arsenite spiked wheat flour. Blood samples are collected 96 hours after dosing for the arsenic determination. The comparative bioavailability (CBA) is calculated from the ratio of arsenic results obtained from the soil group and arsenic control group dosed with sodium arsenate or arsenite. CBA results show a good correlation with 0.5 M HCl and 1.0 M HCl acid leachates. The rat model process to be a sensitive indicator using the blood for the study of bioavailability of arsenic in soils

  7. Kinetic study of adsorption and degradation of aniline, benzoic acid, phenol, and diuron in soil suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.H.; Lavy, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the effects of low temperature and accelerated soil-solution contact on soil adsorption of labile organic chemicals. The authors measured the kinetics of adsorption and degradation of 14 C-aniline, 14 C-benzoic acid, 14 C-phenol, and 14 C-diuron in the solution phase at 3 and 22 0 C. In the initial stages of reactions, the adsorption of all four chemicals was instantaneous at both temperatures under accelerated soil and solution mixing. A steady state was observed after the onset of equilibrium for the adsorption reaction for all compounds within 10 to 30 min. Its length varied according to the expected order of susceptibility to microbial degradation, i.e., diuron > aniline > phenol ≥ benzoate. It was apparent that the steady-state period without or in combination with low temperature could be advantageously used to obtain adsorption measurements in microbially active systems. A mechanistic sorption-catalyzed degradation model was evaluated to uncouple mathematically these processes. The model described satisfactorily the disappearance of labile chemicals in soil suspensions. Numerical analysis allowed the concurrent determination of adsorption, desorption, and biodegradation rate coefficients

  8. Removal of fission products from waste solutions using 16 different soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangash, M.A.; Hanif, J.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the nuclear sites use pits in the surrounding soils for the storage/disposal of low active waste (LAW) solutions. The characteristics of the soil if not suitable for the fixation or adsorption of the radioactive nuclides, may cause migration of these nuclides to hydrosphere. The phenomenon has the risk of radio toxic pollution for the living bodies therefore minerals composing the soil and their adsorption properties need to be investigated. For this purpose 16 different soil samples were collected from all over Pakistan. Mineralogical composition of the soils was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. It was found that most of the samples contained clay minerals, illite, kaolinite and montmorillonite. Studies for the removal of fission products like, /sup 137/Cs. /sup 60/Sr and activation product /sup 60/CO from solution were carried out on these samples. The sorption experiments were performed by batch technique using radioactive as tracers. Distribution co-efficient were determined by mixing he element solution at pH 3 with the soil at soil solution ratios of 1 to 20. It is revealed from the experimental data that efficient removal of fission products from solutions is achieved by soil samples containing clay mineral montmorillonite, followed by little and kaolinite. These soils thus can be effectively used for the disposal of low level radioactive waste solutions without causing any environmental hazard. (author)

  9. Ion leaching and soil solution acidification in a vadose zone under soil treated with sewage sludge for agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borba, Ricardo Perobelli; Ribeirinho, Victor Sanches; de Camargo, Otávio Antonio; de Andrade, Cristiano Alberto; Kira, Carmen Silvia; Coscione, Aline Reneé

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we performed monitoring of the soil solution (SS) over 10 years on a loamy/clayey-textured Dark Red Dystroferric Oxisol that received sewage sludge for agricultural purposes. The SS was obtained by lysimeters installed along the walls of a well at 1 m, 2 m, 3 m, 4 m and 5 m in depth. The major ions found in the SS were NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , Cl - , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Al 3+ , Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ , and the pH level ranged from 4 to 6.5 along the profile. Throughout the first three years of monitoring, the pH to a 3-m depth became more acidic, and in the last year, this trend reached 5 m. At the 5-m depth, the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.5 from the first to the last monitoring. The SS acidification was provoked by both nitrite oxidation and ion leaching. The leaching of H + or the possible ion exchange/desorption of H + due to the leached cations (Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ ) at the 4-m and 5-m depth caused the pH decrease. The ionic strength (IS) of the solution controlled the ion leaching. The sludge application increased the IS to 3 m, increasing the density of the soil charges and its ability to absorb ions. After the sludge application was completed, there was a decrease in IS of the SS as well as a decrease in ion absorption and retention abilities, which promoted leaching to greater depths. During the entire monitoring process, NO 3 - , Cd and Pb remained above the potability limit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of lime and wood ash on soil-solution chemistry, soil chemistry and nutritional status of a pine stand in northern Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Bernard; Rumpf, Sabine; Mindrup, Michael; Meiwes, Karl-Josef; Khanna, Partap K.

    2002-01-01

    Lime and wood ash may be useful to improve acidic forest soils. A field experiment was conducted in a pine stand on a sandy podzol at Fuhrberg, Germany, which involved an application of dolomitic lime (3 t/ha) with three replications or wood ash (4.8 t/ha) without replications on the forest floor. During the 2 yr study period, lime affected the soil solution composition only slightly. Ash had a marked effect on solution chemistry of the mineral soil at 10 cm and the pH values dropped temporarily from 3.7 to 3.1. Nineteen months after the treatments, exchangeable calcium in the organic layer and mineral soil increased by 222 (lime addition) or 411 kg/ha (ash addition) and exchangeable magnesium increased by 101 (lime addition) or 39 kg/ha (ash addition). After ash addition, no marked change in heavy metal content was found below 4 cm of the organic layer. In the ash treatment, the potassium concentration of the 1-yr-old pine needles increased from 5.6 to 5.9 g/kg. This study suggests that ash from untreated wood may be recommended for amelioration of forest soils

  11. Reaction Kinetics of Monomethylhydrazine With Nitrous Acid in Perchloric Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yan; Wang Hui; Pan Yongjun; Cong Haifeng; Jiao Haiyang; Jia Yongfen; Zheng Weifang

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) by nitrous acid was researched in perchloric acid solution with spectrophotometry. The rate equation has been determined as follows: -dc (HNO 2 ) /dt= kc (H + ) 0.9 c (MMH) 1.1 c (HNO 2 ), k is (46.0 ± 2.7) L 2 / (mol 2 · s) with the initial perchlorate concentration of 0.50 mol/L at the temperature of 4.5 degree C. The corresponding activation energy of the reaction is (42.4 ± 0.1) kJ/mol. The results indicate that oxidation of mono-methylhydrazine (MMH) by nitrous acid is fast. The higher concentration of MMH can accelerate the reduction process of nitrous acid. Higher acidity can also speed up the reduction of nitrous acid. (authors)

  12. Lead phytotoxicity in soils and nutrient solutions is related to lead induced phosphorus deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheyns, Karlien; Peeters, Sofie; Delcourt, Dorien; Smolders, Erik

    2012-01-01

    This study was set up to relate lead (Pb) bioavailability with its toxicity to plants in soils. Tomato and barley seedlings were grown in six different PbCl 2 spiked soils (pH: 4.7–7.4; eCEC: 4.2–41.7 cmol c /kg). Soils were leached and pH corrected after spiking to exclude confounding factors. Plant growth was halved at 1600–6500 mg Pb/kg soil for tomato and at 1900–8300 mg Pb/kg soil for barley. These soil Pb threshold were unrelated to soil pH, organic carbon, texture or eCEC and neither soil solution Pb nor Pb 2+ ion activity adequately explained Pb toxicity among soils. Shoot phosphorus (P) concentrations significantly decreased with increasing soil Pb concentrations. Tomato grown in hydroponics at either varying P supply or at increasing Pb (equal initial P) illustrated that shoot P explained growth response in both scenarios. The results suggest that Pb toxicity is partially related to Pb induced P deficiency, likely due to lead phosphate precipitation. - Highlights: ► Tomato and barley shoot growth was affected by Pb toxicity in six different soils. ► Soil properties did not explain differences in plant Pb toxicity among soils. ► Neither soil solution Pb nor Pb 2+ ion activity explained Pb toxicity among soils. ► Shoot phosphorus concentration decreased with increasing soil Pb concentrations. ► Lead induced a P deficiency in plants, likely due to lead phosphate precipitation. - Soil properties did not explain differences in plant lead toxicity among different soils. Shoot phosphorus concentration decreased with increasing soil lead concentrations.

  13. Trichloroacetic acid in Norway spruce/soil-system I. Biodegradation in soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matucha, Miroslav; Forczek, Sándor; Gryndler, Milan; Uhlířová, H.; Fuksová, K.; Schröder, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2003), s. 303-309 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/99/1465 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903; CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Microbial degradation * Trichloroacetic acid * Forest soil Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.904, year: 2003

  14. An approach using centrifugation for the extraction of the soil solution and its usefulness in studies of radionuclide speciation in soils - Approach using centrifugation for extraction of soil solution and its study for uranium speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Adriana S. [CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, 70040-020, Brasilia, Brazil, Proc.BEX 1958/13-5 (Brazil); Lozano, J.C.; Prieto, C. [Universidad de Salamanca, 37008, Salamanca (Spain); Blanco Rodriguez, P.; Vera Tome, F. [Universidad de Extremadura, 06006, Badajoz (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    The centrifugation technique is tested as a methodology for extraction of soil solution, for further characterization, in order to elucidate its contribution to the speciation of radionuclides, particularly uranium, in radioactively contaminated soils, as well as the determination of its availability for vegetation. Centrifugation of a previously saturated soil core provides the soil solution with a specific origin inside the soil sample. In such way that the different soil solution origin, associate to the effective pressure applied to the soil core, will reflect different distribution coefficients which affect the radionuclide availability definition. Speciation of radionuclides in the soil solution can be also conditioned by this water origin. The development of this methodology relating to technical challenges faces materials suitable for the centrifugation process, both in terms of mechanical properties and chemical inertness. This paper reports the preparation of ceramic pellets of perlite produced with the intention of replacing glass pellets, used inserts in support to soils coupled with centrifuges. The characterization of porosity and the test of its chemical inertness and mechanical strength to the centrifugation process have been performed. Porosity characterization is required to control the saturation gradient, which conditions the flow of water from the soil. Its mechanical adequacy was tested by subjecting the pellets to the centrifugation process and assessing its integrity end. Chemical inertia was measured by placing the tablets in aqueous solutions of known composition and then evaluating the presence or absence of elements in this solution, after on time of contact between them. (authors)

  15. Chemical dynamics of acidity and heavy metals in a mine water-polluted soil during decontamination using clean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A; Lin, C; Lu, W; Ma, Y; Bai, Y; Chen, H; Li, J

    2010-03-15

    A column leaching experiment was conducted to investigate the chemical dynamics of the percolating water and washed soil during decontamination of an acidic mine water-polluted soil. The results show that leaching of the contaminated soil with clean water rapidly reduced soluble acidity and ion concentrations in the soils. However, only soil column was eliminated after 30 leaching cycles. It is likely that the stored acidity continues to be released to the percolating water over a long period of time. During the column leaching, dissolved Cu and Pb were rapidly leached out, followed by mobilization of colloidal Cu and Pb from the exchangeable and the oxide-bound fractions as a result of reduced ionic strength in the soil solution. The soluble Fe contained in the soil was rare, probably because the soil pH was not sufficiently low; marked mobility of colloidal Fe took place after the ionic strength of the percolating water was weakened and the mobilized Fe was mainly derived from iron oxides. In contrast with Cu, Pb and Fe, the concentration of leachate Zn and Mn showed a continuously decreasing trend during the entire period of the experiment. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions : a small angle neutron scattering study

    OpenAIRE

    Moussaid , A.; Schosseler , F.; Munch , J.; Candau , S.

    1993-01-01

    The intensity scattered from polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions has been measured by small angle neutron scattering experiemnts. The influence of polymer concentration, ionization degree, temperature and salt content has been investigated. Results are in qualitative agreement with a model which predicts the existence of microphases in the unstable region of the phase diagram. Quantitative comparison with the theory is performed by fitting the theoretical structure factor to t...

  17. Detoxification of Fusaric Acid by the Soil Microbe Mucor rouxii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutcher, Frankie K; Puckhaber, Lorraine S; Bell, Alois A; Liu, Jinggao; Duke, Sara E; Stipanovic, Robert D; Nichols, Robert L

    2017-06-21

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum race 4 (VCG0114), which causes root rot and wilt of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum and G. barbadense), has been identified recently for the first time in the western hemisphere in certain fields in the San Joaquin Valley of California. This pathotype produces copious quantities of the plant toxin fusaric acid (5-butyl-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid) compared to other isolates of F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov) that are indigenous to the United States. Fusaric acid is toxic to cotton plants and may help the pathogen compete with other microbes in the soil. We found that a laboratory strain of the fungus Mucor rouxii converts fusaric acid into a newly identified compound, 8-hydroxyfusaric acid. The latter compound is significantly less phytotoxic to cotton than the parent compound. On the basis of bioassays of hydroxylated analogues of fusaric acid, hydroxylation of the butyl side chain of fusaric acid may affect a general detoxification of fusaric acid. Genes that control this hydroxylation may be useful in developing biocontrol agents to manage Fov.

  18. Association of radionuclides with different molecular size fractions in soil solution: implications for plant uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Shaw, S.; Salbu, B.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using hollow fibre ultrafiltration to determine the molecular size distribution of radionuclides in soil solution was investigated. The physical and chemical composition of soil plays a vital role in determining radionuclide uptake by plant roots. Soil solution samples were extracted from loam, peat and sand soils that had been artificially contaminated with 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239 Pu and 241 Am six years previously as part of a five-year lysimeter study on radionuclide uptake to crops. Ultrafiltration of soil solution was performed using hollow fibre cartridges with a nominal molecular weight cut off of 3 and 10 kD. The association of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239 Pu and 241 Am with different molecular size fractions of the soil solution is discussed in terms of radionuclide bioavailability to cabbage grown in the same three soils. 137 Cs and 90 Sr were present in low molecular weight forms and as such were mobile in soil and potentially available for uptake by the cabbage. In contrast, a large proportion (61-87%) of the 239 Pu and 241 Am were associated with colloidal and high molecular weight material and therefore less available for uptake by plant roots. The contribution from low molecular weight species of 239 Pu and 241 Am to the total activity in soil solution decreased in the order loam ≥ peat ≥ sand. Association of radionuclides with low molecular weight species of less than 3 kD did not, however, automatically imply availability to plants. (author)

  19. Calorimetric investigation of solution heat of rare earth sulfates in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, S.K.; Babkin, A.G.; Kessler, Yu.M.

    1978-01-01

    To determine the thermodynamic characteristics of sulfates of rare elements an adiabatic airtight calorimeter has been developed, enabling measurement of minor heat effects of processes in aggressive media with an absolute error of about 5x10 -3 cal, the temperature sensitivity being no less than 2x10 -5 C 0 . The calorimeter is schematically represented. Measured with the aid of the calorimeter was the heat of dissolution of TiOSO 4 x2H 2 O in chloric acid solutions

  20. Treatment of Simulated Soil Decontamination Waste Solution by Ferrocyanide-Anion Exchange Resin Beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Min Gil; Kim, Gye Nam; Jung, Chung Hun; Park, Jin Ho; Oh, Won Zin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Preparation of ferrocyanide-anion exchange resin and adsorption test of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion were performed. Adsorption capability of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion in the simulated citric acid based soil decontamination waste solution was 4 times greater than that of the commercial cation exchange resin. Adsorption equilibrium of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion reached within 360 minutes. Adsorption capability on the Cs{sup -} ion became to decrease above the necessary Co{sup 2-} ion concentration in the experimental range. Recycling test of the spent ion exchange resin by the successive application of hydrogen peroxide and hydrazine was also performed. It was found that desorption of Cs{sup -} ion from the resin occurred to satisfy the electroneutrality condition without any degradation of the resin.

  1. Effects of sodium hypochlorite and high pH buffer solution in electrokinetic soil treatment on soil chromium removal and the functional diversity of soil microbial community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cang Long; Zhou Dongmei; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.; Chen Haifeng

    2007-01-01

    Effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), applied as an oxidant in catholyte, and high pH buffer solution on soil Cr removal and the functional diversity of soil microbial community during enhanced electrokinetic treatments of a chromium (Cr) contaminated red soil are evaluated. Using pH control system to maintain high alkalinity of soil together with the use of NaClO increased the electrical conductivities of soil pore liquid and electroosmotic flux compared with the control (Exp-01). The pH control and NaClO improved the removal of Cr(VI) and total Cr from the soil. The highest removal percentages of soil Cr(VI) and total Cr were 96 and 72%, respectively, in Exp-04 when the pH value of the anolyte was controlled at 10 and NaClO was added in the catholyte. The alkaline soil environment and introduction of NaClO in the soil enhanced the desorption of Cr(VI) from the soil and promoted Cr(III) oxidation to mobile Cr(VI), respectively. However, the elevated pH and introduction of NaClO in the soil, which are necessary for improving the removal efficiency of soil Cr, resulted in a significantly adverse impact on the functional diversity of soil microbial community. It suggests that to assess the negative impact of extreme conditions for enhancing the extraction efficiencies of Cr on the soil properties and function is necessary

  2. Evaluation of bioavailable phosphorus in some acid soils of Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results are consistent with the numerous exchange sites located on the oxides of the LAX acid soils. In addition, the study showed that the r1/R parameter correlated significantly with Pmax derived from P sorption isotherms and the SPR, i.e., the amount of P sorbed at a concentration of 0.2 mg P 1-1. It was concluded ...

  3. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-05

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pHremoves iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Speciation of platinum(IV) in nitric acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, Danila; Tkachev, Sergey; Baidina, Iraida; Korenev, Sergey

    2013-09-16

    The speciation of platinum(IV) ions in nitric acid (6-15.8 M) solutions of H2[Pt(OH)6] has been studied by (195)Pt NMR and Raman spectroscopy. Series of aqua-hydroxo-nitrato complexes [Pt(L)(x)(NO3)(6-x)] (L = H2O or OH(-); x = 0, ..., 6) were found to exist in such solutions. The pair additivity model of chemical shifts and statistical theory were used to assign signals in NMR spectra to particular [Pt(L)(x)(NO3)(6-x)] species. Mononuclear hexanitratoplatinates(IV) have been isolated in solid state in substantial yield as pyridinium salt (PyH)2[Pt(NO3)6] and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Aging of the platinum nitric acid solutions for more than 5-6 h results in oligomerization of [Pt(L)(x)(NO3)(6-x)] species and the formation of oligonuclear aqua-hydroxo-nitrato complexes with OH(-) and NO3(-) bridging ligands. Oligomeric platinum(IV) complexes with two and four nuclei were unambiguously detected by NMR on (195)Pt -enriched samples. Oligomers with even higher nuclearity were also detected. Dimeric anions [Pt2(μ-OH)2(NO3)8](2-) have been isolated as single crystals of tetramethylammonium salt and characterized by X-ray diffraction.

  5. [Dissolved aluminum and organic carbon in soil solution under six tree stands in Lushan forest ecosystems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianfeng; Pan, Genxing; Shi, Shengli; Zhang, Lehua; Huang, Mingxing

    2003-10-01

    Different depths of soils under 6 tree stands in Lushan Botany Garden were sampled and water-digested at room temperature. The dissolved aluminum and organic carbon were then determined by colorimetry, using 8-hydroxylquilin and TOC Analyzer, respectively. The results indicated that even derived from a naturally identical soil type, the test soils exhibited a diverse solution chemistry, regarding with the Al speciation. The soil solutions under Japanese cedar, giant arborvitae and tea had lower pH values and higher contents of soluble aluminum than those under Giant dogwood, azalea and bamboo. Under giant arborvitae, the lowest pH and the highest content of total soluble aluminum and monomeric aluminum were found in soil solution. There was a significant correlation between soluble aluminum and DOC, which tended to depress the accumulation of toxic monomeric aluminum. The 6 tree stands could be grouped into 2 categories of solution chemistry, according to aluminum mobilization.

  6. A conceptual framework: redifining forests soil's critical acid loads under a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven G. McNulty; Johnny L. Boggs

    2010-01-01

    Federal agencies of several nations have or are currently developing guidelines for critical forest soil acid loads. These guidelines are used to establish regulations designed to maintain atmospheric acid inputs below levels shown to damage forests and streams. Traditionally, when the critical soil acid load exceeds the amount of acid that the ecosystem can absorb, it...

  7. [Effects of nitrogen deposition on the concentration and spectral characteristics of dissolved organic matter in soil solution in a young Cunninghamia lanceolata plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao Chun; Chen, Yue Min; Yuan, Shuo; Zheng, Wei; Si, You Tao; Yuan, Zhi Peng; Lin, Wei Sheng; Yang, Yu Sheng

    2017-01-01

    To study the effects of nitrogen deposition on the concentration and spectral characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the forest soil solution from the subtropical Cunninghamia lanceolata plantation, using negative pressure sampling method, the dynamics of DOM in soil solutions from 0-15 and 15-30 cm soil layer was monitored for two years and the spectroscopic features of DOM were analyzed. The results showed that nitrogen deposition significantly reduced the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and increased the aromatic index (AI) and the humic index (HIX), but had no significant effect on dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentration in both soil layers. There was obvious seasonal variation in DOM concentration of the soil solution, which was prominently higher in summer and autumn than in spring and winter.Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectrometry indicated that the DOM in forest soil solution had absorption peaks in the similar position of six regions, being the highest in wave number of 1145-1149 cm -1 . Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra indicated that DOM was mainly consisted of protein-like substances (Ex/Em=230 nm/300 nm) and microbial degradation products (Ex/Em=275 nm/300 nm). The availability of protein-like substances from 0-15 cm soil layer was reduced in the nitrogen treatments. Nitrogen deposition significantly reduced the concentration of DOC in soil solution, maybe largely by reducing soil pH, inhibiting soil carbon mineralization and stimulating plant growth. In particular, the decline of DOC concentration in the surface layer was due to the production inhibition of the protein-like substances and carboxylic acids. Short-term nitrogen deposition might be beneficial to the maintenance of soil fertility, while the long-term accumulation of nitrogen deposition might lead to the hard utilization of soil nutrients.

  8. Reaction of nitrous acid with U(IV) and nitric acid in 30% TBP-kerosene solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiangrong; Hu Jingxin; Huang Huaian; Qiu Xiaoxi

    1990-01-01

    Reaction of nitrous acid with U(IV) and nitric acid in 30% TBP-kerosene solution is investigated, the rate equations of oxidation of U(IV) by nitrous acid and that of nitrous acid reacting with nitric acid are obtained

  9. Extraction of americium from acid aqueous solutions by diethyl-2-hexyl-pyro-phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, Bernard

    1971-02-01

    After having outlined the interesting properties of americium and the difficulties of its recovery, the author reports the study of the mechanism of extraction of americium from acid aqueous solutions by using the diethyl-2hexyl-pyro-phosphoric acid. Several aspects are thus discussed: influence of concentration of H 2 DEHPP, influence of the acidity of the aqueous phase, saturation of extracting agent, influence of the diluting agent, complexing of americium, influence of other cations. In a second part, the author reports the application to the recovery of americium from effluents, and discusses the obtained results

  10. Structure of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions: a small angle neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussaid, A. (Lab. d' Ultrasons et de Dynamique des Fluides Complexes, Univ. Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Schosseler, F. (Lab. d' Ultrasons et de Dynamique des Fluides Complexes, Univ. Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Munch, J.P. (Lab. d' Ultrasons et de Dynamique des Fluides Complexes, Univ. Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Candau, S.J. (Lab. d' Ultrasons et de Dynamique des Fluides Complexes, Univ. Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France))

    1993-04-01

    The intensity scattered from polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions has been measured by small angle neutron scattering experiments. The influence of polymer concentration, ionization degree, temperature and salt content has been investigated. Results are in qualitative agreement with a model which predicts the existence of microphases in the unstable region of the phase diagram. Quantitative comparison with the theory is performed by fitting the theoretical structure factor to the experimental data. For a narrow range of ionization degrees nearly quantitative agreement with the theory is found for the polyacrylic acid system. (orig.).

  11. Structure of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions : a small angle neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaid, A.; Schosseler, F.; Munch, J. P.; Candau, S. J.

    1993-04-01

    The intensity scattered from polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions has been measured by small angle neutron scattering experiemnts. The influence of polymer concentration, ionization degree, temperature and salt content has been investigated. Results are in qualitative agreement with a model which predicts the existence of microphases in the unstable region of the phase diagram. Quantitative comparison with the theory is performed by fitting the theoretical structure factor to the experimental data. For a narrow range of ionizaiton degrees nearly quantitative agreement with the theory is found for the polyacrylic acide system.

  12. Soil conditions under a Fagus sylvatica CONECOFOR stand in Central Italy: an integrated assessment through combined solid phase and solution studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido SANESI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available As soil solution represents the major phase of soil chemical reactions, its study is a powerful tool for ecological investigations. Soil solution chemical composition gives a realistic idea about the soil chemical components immediately available in the environment, mainly in relation to the soil ecosystem reaction to the disturbance due to acidifying loads. Within the CONECOFOR Program, the monitoring of forest soil conditions was performed in a level II plot (ABR I, under a Fagus sylvatica (European beech stand, through the study of throughfall and soil solutions collected from depths ranging between the base of the litter layers and 90 cm. To be able to investigate solution contents of nutrients, acidifying agents and DOC throughout the profile, both zero tension and tension lysimeters were used. The first ones were inserted below the organic horizons, while tension lysimeters were placed within the mineral horizons at 15, 25, 55 and 90 cm depth. Sampled solutions were analyzed for Na, K, Ca, Mg, NH4, Cl, F, NO3, SO4, and DOC. The results evidence a clear seasonal pattern, mainly for macronutrients and inorganic N components. Acidic pulses were mostly evident below the organic horizons, in relation to strong nitric N releases from litter; these last were not always immediately neutralized by basic cations. Acid solutions leaving the organic horizons were invariably neutralized in the surface mineral horizons, within 15 cm depth. Temporal patterns of sulphate retention and release suggest that the soil has low retention capability for this anion. Such behaviour can be explained by the composition of the solid phase, where potential anion adsorbants appear strongly linked with organic matter in long residence time complexes. Sulphate and nitrate loading of this soil appear, anyway, to be mostly non-anthropogenic, but rather linked to natural mineralization pulses and, for sulphate, to aeolian solid transport from the south.

  13. Effect of aluminum, zinc, copper, and lead on the acid-base properties of water extracts from soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motuzova, G. V.; Makarychev, I. P.; Petrov, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    The potentiometric titration of water extracts from the upper horizons of taiga-zone soils by salt solutions of heavy metals (Pb, Cu, and Zn) showed that their addition is an additional source of the extract acidity because of the involvement of the metal ions in complexation with water-soluble organic substances (WSOSs). At the addition of 0.01 M water solutions of Al(NO3)3 to water extracts from soils, Al3+ ions are also involved in complexes with WSOSs, which is accompanied by stronger acidification of the extracts from the upper horizon of soddy soils (with a near-neutral reaction) than from the litter of bog-podzolic soil (with a strongly acid reaction). The effect of the Al3+ hydrolysis on the acidity of the extracts is insignificantly low in both cases. A quantitative relationship was revealed between the release of protons and the ratio of free Cu2+ ions to those complexed with WSOSs at the titration of water extracts from soils by a solution of copper salt.

  14. Rice straw incorporated just before soil flooding increases acetic acid formation and decreases available nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldir Knoblauch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of rice straw into the soil just before flooding for water-seeded rice can immobilize mineral nitrogen (N and lead to the production of acetic acid harmful to the rice seedlings, which negatively affects grain yield. This study aimed to evaluate the formation of organic acids and variation in pH and to quantify the mineral N concentration in the soil as a function of different times of incorporation of rice straw or of ashes from burning the straw before flooding. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse using an Inceptisol (Typic Haplaquept soil. The treatments were as follows: control (no straw or ash; incorporation of ashes from previous straw burning; rice straw incorporated to drained soil 60 days before flooding; straw incorporated 30 days before flooding; straw incorporated 15 days before flooding and straw incorporated on the day of flooding. Experimental units were plastic buckets with 6.0 kg of soil. The buckets remained flooded throughout the trial period without rice plants. Soil samples were collected every seven days, beginning one day before flooding until the 13th week of flooding for determination of mineral N- ammonium (NH4+ and nitrate (NO3-. Soil solution pH and concentration of organic acids (acetic, propionic and butyric were determined. All NO3- there was before flooding was lost in approximately two weeks of flooding, in all treatments. There was sigmoidal behavior for NH4+ formation in all treatments, i.e., ammonium ion concentration began to rise shortly after soil flooding, slightly decreased and then went up again. On the 91st day of flooding, the NH4+ concentrations in soil was 56 mg kg-1 in the control treatment, 72 mg kg-1 for the 60-day treatment, 73 mg kg-1 for the 30-day treatment and 53 mg kg-1 for the ash incorporation treatment. These ammonium concentrations correspond to 84, 108, 110 and 80 kg ha-1 of N-NH4+, respectively. When the straw was incorporated on the day of flooding or 15 days

  15. Quenching characteristics of bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, disodium salt in aqueous solution and copper sulfate plating solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Toshiaki; Hirakawa, Chieko; Takeshita, Michinori; Terasaki, Nao

    2018-04-01

    Bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, disodium salt (BCS) is generally used to detect Cu(I) through a color reaction. We newly found BCS fluorescence in the visible blue region in an aqueous solution. However, the fluorescence mechanism of BCS is not well known, so we should investigate its fundamental information. We confirmed that the characteristics of fluorescence are highly dependent on the molecular concentration and solvent properties. In particular, owing to the presence of the copper compound, the fluorescence intensity extremely decreases. By fluorescence quenching, we observed that a copper compound concentration of 10-6 mol/L or less could easily be measured in an aqueous solution. We also observed BCS fluorescence in copper sulfate plating solution and the possibility of detecting monovalent copper by fluorescence reabsorption.

  16. Removal of radioactive cesium from soil by ammonium citrate solution and ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Shunji; Kitakouji, Manabu; Taga, Atsushi; Ogata, Fumihiko; Ouchi, Hidekazu; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Inagaki, Masayo

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive cesium has strongly bound soil as time proceeded, which could not be cleaved in mild condition. We have found that serial treatment of ammonium citrate solution and ionic liquid removed radioactive cesium from soil effectively. The sequence of the treatment is crucial, since inverse serial treatment or mixture of two kinds of solution did not show such an effect, which suggested that ammonium citrate unlocked trapped cesium in soil and ionic liquid solved it. We also found that repeating serial treatment and prolonged treatment time additively removed cesium from soil. (author)

  17. Influence of the Amino Acid Sequence on Protein-Mineral Interactions in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, S. S.; Reardon, P. N.; Purvine, S.; Lipton, M. S.; Washton, N.; Kleber, M.

    2017-12-01

    The intimate associations between protein and mineral surfaces have profound impacts on nutrient cycling in soil. Proteins are an important source of organic C and N, and a subset of proteins, extracellular enzymes (EE), can catalyze the depolymerization of soil organic matter (SOM). Our goal was to determine how variation in the amino acid sequence could influence a protein's susceptibility to become chemically altered by mineral surfaces to infer the fate of adsorbed EE function in soil. We hypothesized that (1) addition of charged amino acids would enhance the adsorption onto oppositely charged mineral surfaces (2) addition of aromatic amino acids would increase adsorption onto zero charged surfaces (3) Increase adsorption of modified proteins would enhance their susceptibility to alterations by redox active minerals. To test these hypotheses, we generated three engineered proxies of a model protein Gb1 (IEP 4.0, 6.2 kDA) by inserting either negatively charged, positively charged or aromatic amino acids in the second loop. These modified proteins were allowed to interact with functionally different mineral surfaces (goethite, montmorillonite, kaolinite and birnessite) at pH 5 and 7. We used LC-MS/MS and solution-state Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence Spectroscopy NMR to observe modifications on engineered proteins as a consequence to mineral interactions. Preliminary results indicate that addition of any amino acids to a protein increase its susceptibility to fragmentation and oxidation by redox active mineral surfaces, and alter adsorption to the other mineral surfaces. This suggest that not all mineral surfaces in soil may act as sorbents for EEs and chemical modification of their structure should also be considered as an explanation for decrease in EE activity. Fragmentation of proteins by minerals can bypass the need to produce proteases, but microbial acquisition of other nutrients that require enzymes such as cellulases, ligninases or phosphatases

  18. Intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine against copper corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Daquan; Xie Bin; Gao Lixin; Cai Qirui; Joo, Hyung Goun; Lee, Kang Yong

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion protection of copper by glutamic acid, cysteine, glycine and their derivative (glutathione) in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The inhibition efficiency of the organic inhibitors on copper corrosion increases in the order: glutathione > cysteine > cysteine + glutamic acid + glycine > glutamic acid > glycine. Maximum inhibition efficiency for cysteine reaches about 92.9% at 15 mM concentration level. The glutathione can give 96.4% inhibition efficiency at a concentration of 10 mM. The molecular structure parameters were obtained by PM3 (Parametric Method 3) semi-empirical calculation. The intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine moieties in glutathione is attributed to the lower energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ) level and to the excess hetero-atom adsorption centers and the bigger coverage on the copper surface.

  19. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  20. Radiation chemistry of amino acids and peptides in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, M.G.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation chemistry relevant to radiation preservation of high protein foods is reviewed. Some conclusions concerning the chemistry of irradiated amino acids, peptides, and proteins have been derived from product analysis of γ-irradiated solutions while the main mechanistic considerations result from the chemistry and kinetics of free radical intermediates observed by pulse radiolysis. The precursors of chemistry in not too concentrated solutions ( - , OH, and H. Their reactivity with molecules and their preference for characteristic groups within the molecule are discussed. The reviewed reactions of the model systems are accountable for a variety of radiolytic products found in irradiated foods. From detailed understanding of radiation chemistry in aqueous and frozen systems formation of many classes of compounds can be predicted or entirely eliminated in order to corroborate and extend the conclusions reached from the animal feeding experiments concerning the formation of toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic compounds and/or reduction of the nutritional value of foods

  1. Cyclohexanone microfluidic extraction of radioactive perrhenate from acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmázio, Ilza [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oehlke, Elisabeth, E-mail: E.Oehlke@tudelft.nl [Section Radiation and Isotopes for Health, Department of Radiation Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have investigated the application of microfluidic devices in extraction processes. A potential use of microfluidic devices is in radionuclide generators based on solvent extraction, as the {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator. The aim of this work is to present the initial results of microfluidic solvent extraction of radioactive perrhenate. Aqueous solutions of ammonium perrhenate at 0.1 mg/mL (in water, HCl or sodium tungstate) were used as feed solution and cyclohexanone as extractant. As a first step, the fluid behaviour inside the glass microchannel was evaluated to reach laminar flow. The second step was the determination of extraction efficiency using thermal neutron activated perrhenate to produce feed solutions. The extraction conditions permitted liquid-liquid contact times as short as 0.5 s. Increasing of the contact time, resulted in a higher extraction efficiency of perrhenate, e.g. 14 % for 0.5 s and 32 % for 1.1 s using a 0.1 mol/L HCl feed solution. The extraction of perrhenate improved also when applying a feed solution with higher acidity, e.g. 52% for 1 mol/L HCl with contact time of 1.1 s. The influence of adding sodium tungstate to the feed solution was also examined. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first results related to perrhenate solvent extraction using a microfluidic device. The usefulness of microfluidic devices to screen extraction conditions was demonstrated making it possible to evaluate the effect of electrolytes on the perrhenate extraction process in a short time-frame. (author)

  2. Cyclohexanone microfluidic extraction of radioactive perrhenate from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmázio, Ilza; Oehlke, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the application of microfluidic devices in extraction processes. A potential use of microfluidic devices is in radionuclide generators based on solvent extraction, as the 188 W/ 188 Re generator. The aim of this work is to present the initial results of microfluidic solvent extraction of radioactive perrhenate. Aqueous solutions of ammonium perrhenate at 0.1 mg/mL (in water, HCl or sodium tungstate) were used as feed solution and cyclohexanone as extractant. As a first step, the fluid behaviour inside the glass microchannel was evaluated to reach laminar flow. The second step was the determination of extraction efficiency using thermal neutron activated perrhenate to produce feed solutions. The extraction conditions permitted liquid-liquid contact times as short as 0.5 s. Increasing of the contact time, resulted in a higher extraction efficiency of perrhenate, e.g. 14 % for 0.5 s and 32 % for 1.1 s using a 0.1 mol/L HCl feed solution. The extraction of perrhenate improved also when applying a feed solution with higher acidity, e.g. 52% for 1 mol/L HCl with contact time of 1.1 s. The influence of adding sodium tungstate to the feed solution was also examined. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first results related to perrhenate solvent extraction using a microfluidic device. The usefulness of microfluidic devices to screen extraction conditions was demonstrated making it possible to evaluate the effect of electrolytes on the perrhenate extraction process in a short time-frame. (author)

  3. Volumetric properties of aqueous solutions of glutaric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Hamo, Meyrav [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Apelblat, Alexander [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: apelblat@bgu.ac.il; Manzurola, Emanuel [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2007-07-15

    Densities of aqueous solutions with molalities up to 6 mol . kg{sup -1} were determined at 5 K temperature intervals, from T = 288.15 K to T = 333.15 K. Densities served to evaluate the apparent molar volumes, V {sub 2,{phi}}(m, T), the cubic expansion coefficients, {alpha}(m, T), and the changes of isobaric heat capacities with respect to pressure, ({partial_derivative}C {sub P}/{partial_derivative}P) {sub T,m}. They were qualitatively correlated with the changes in the structure of water when glutaric acid is dissolved in it.

  4. Volumetric properties of aqueous solutions of glutaric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hamo, Meyrav; Apelblat, Alexander; Manzurola, Emanuel

    2007-01-01

    Densities of aqueous solutions with molalities up to 6 mol . kg -1 were determined at 5 K temperature intervals, from T = 288.15 K to T = 333.15 K. Densities served to evaluate the apparent molar volumes, V 2,φ (m, T), the cubic expansion coefficients, α(m, T), and the changes of isobaric heat capacities with respect to pressure, (∂C P /∂P) T,m . They were qualitatively correlated with the changes in the structure of water when glutaric acid is dissolved in it

  5. Persistence of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in loess soil under different combinations of temperature, soil moisture and light/darkness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins Bento, Celia; Yang, Xiaomei; Gort, Gerrit; Xue, Sha; Dam, van Ruud; Zomer, Paul; Mol, Hans G.J.; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2016-01-01

    The dissipation kinetics of glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were studied in loess soil, under biotic and abiotic conditions, as affected by temperature, soil moisture (SM) and light/darkness. Nonsterile and sterile soil samples were spiked with 16 mg kg

  6. Effects of cadmium amendments on low-molecular-weight organic acid exudates in rhizosphere soils of tobacco and sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Neng; Wang, Ming Kuang; Chiu, Chih Yu; Chou, Shu-Yen

    2006-10-01

    To recognize physiological response of plants to cadmium (Cd) toxicity in rhizosphere of plants, the pot experiments were employed to investigate how low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) were exudated from tobacco and sunflower roots of Cd-amended soils. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of LMWOAs on uptake of Cd by tobacco and sunflower under pot experiments, thus comparing the ability of tobacco and sunflower for phytoremediation. Surface soils (0-20 cm) were collected from Taichung Experiment Station (TC) (silty loam). Cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) was amended into TC soil, giving Cd concentrations of 1, 5, 10 mg kg(-1) soil. Soils with different concentrations of Cd were put into 12 cm (i.d.) pots for incubation, and then 2-week-old tobacco and sunflower seedlings were transplanted into the pots. Tobacco and sunflower were grown in greenhouse for 50 days, respectively. The rhizosphere and bulk soils, and fresh plant tissues were collected after harvest. The Cd concentrations in the plant and transfer factor values in the sunflower were higher than that in the tobacco. No LMWOAs were detected by gas chromatograph in bulk soils, and low amounts of LMWOAs were found in uncontaminated rhizosphere soils. Acetic, lactic, glycolic, malic, maleic, and succinic acids were found in the tobacco and sunflower rhizosphere soils. Concentrations of LMWOAs increased with increasing amendment of Cd concentrations in tobacco and sunflower rhizosphere soils. Correlation coefficient (r) of concentrations of Cd amendment versus LMWOAs exudates of tobacco and sunflower were 0.85 and 0.98, respectively. These results suggest that the different levels of LMWOAs present in the rhizosphere soil play an important role in the solubilization of Cd that bound with soil particle into soil solution and then uptake by plants.

  7. Proportion of root-derived acid phosphomonoesterase in total soil acid phosphomonoesterase in different forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Holík

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme acid phosphomonoesterase (APM plays an important role in phosphorus mineralization in different type of terrestrial ecosystems. This enzyme is of great agronomic significance because it hydrolyses organic phosphorus to different forms of inorganic phosphorus which are assimilable by plants. APM may also indicate changes in the quantity and quality of phosphorylated substrates in soil and is a good indicator of its biological state as well as presence of pollutants. APM may be produced by plant roots and soil microorganisms and both of these sources may play different role in phosphorus mineralization in different ecosystems. The aim of this work was determine acid phosphomonoesterase (APM activity location in soil of different forest ecosystems. The APM activity location determination was performed on the basis of root-derived and soil-derived APM and expression of proportion of those root-derived in total soil APM up to 13 cm depth. The results of this preliminary study showed that root-derived APM formed 21–34 % of total soil APM in pine and oak forest.

  8. Remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with heavy metals by means of their leaching at acidic pH followed by the soil reclamation by means of neutralization and bacterial manure addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Some grey forest soils in Western Bulgaria are heavily polluted with heavy metals (copper, lead, and zinc), arsenic, and uranium due to the infiltration of acid mine drainage generated at the abandoned uranium mine Curilo. This paper presents some results from a study about soil remediation based on the contaminants leaching from the topsoil by means of irrigation with solutions containing sulphuric acid or its in situ generation by means of sulphur-oxidizing chemolithotrophic bacteria in or without the presence of finely cut straw. These methods were tested in large scale zero suction lysimeters. The approaches based on S° and finely cut straw addition was the most efficient amongst the tested methods and for seven months of soil remediation the concentration of all soil contaminants were decreased below the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC). Neutralization of the soil acidity was applied as a next stage of soil reclamation by adding CaCO3 and cow manure. As a result, soil pH increased from strongly acidic (2.36) to slightly acidic (6.15) which allowed subsequent addition of humic acids and bacterial manure to the topsoil. The soil habitat changed in this way facilitated the growth of microorganisms which restored the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and carbon to the levels typical for non-polluted grey forest soil.

  9. Response of three soil water sensors to variable solution electrical conductivity in different soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercial dielectric soil water sensors may improve management of irrigated agriculture by providing continuous field soil water information. Use of these sensors is partly limited by sensor sensitivity to variations in soil salinity and texture, which force expensive, time consuming, soil specific...

  10. Soil solution interactions may limit Pb remediation using P amendments in an urban soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead (Pb) contaminated soils are a potential exposure hazard to the public. Amending soils with phosphorus (P) may reduce Pb soil hazards. Soil from Cleveland, OH containing 726 ± 14 mg Pb kg-1 was amended in a laboratory study with bone meal and triple super phospha...

  11. EFFECTS OF ALKALINE SANDY LOAM ON SULFURIC SOIL ACIDITY AND SULFIDIC SOIL OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S. Michael

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available  In poor soils, addition of alkaline sandy loam containing an adequate proportion of sand, silt and clay would add value by improving the texture, structure and organic matter (OM for general use of the soils. In acid sulfate soils (ASS, addition of alkaline sandy would improve the texture and leach out salts as well as add a sufficient proportion of OM for vegetation establishment. In this study, addition of alkaline sandy loam into sulfuric soil effectively increased the pH, lowered the redox and reduced the sulfate content, the magnitude of the effects dependent on moisture content. Addition of alkaline sandy loam in combination with OM was highly effective than the effects of the lone alkaline sandy loam. When alkaline sandy was added alone or in combination with OM into sulfidic soil, the effects on pH and the redox were similar as in the sulfuric soil but the effect on sulfate content was variable. The effects under aerobic conditions were higher than under anaerobic conditions. The findings of this study have important implications for the general management of ASS where lime availability is a concern and its application is limited.International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-3, June-August 2015Page: 42-54

  12. Soil water status under perennial and annual pastures on an acid duplex soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heng, L.K.; White, R.E.; Chen, D.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive field study of soil water balance, nitrogen (N) cycling, pasture management and animal production was carried out on an acid duplex soil at Book Book near Wagga Wagga in southern New South Wales. The experiment, carried out over a 3-year period, tested the hypothesis that sown perennial grass pastures improve the sustainability of a grazing system through better use of water and N. The treatments were: annual pastures without lime (AP-), annual pastures with lime (AP+), perennial pastures without lime (PP-) and perennial pastures with lime (PP+). Soil water measurement was made using a neutron probe on one set of the treatments comprising four adjacent paddocks. Over three winter and spring periods, the results showed that perennial grass pastures, especially PP+, consistently extracted about 40 mm more soil water each year than did the annual grass pastures. As a result, surface runoff, sub-surface flow and deep drainage (percolation below 180 cm depth) were about 40 mm less from the perennial pastures. The soil water status of the four pasture treatments was simulated reasonably well using a simple soil water model. Together with the long-term simulation of deep drainage, using past meteorological records, it is shown that proper management of perennial pastures can reduce recharge to groundwater and make pastoral systems more sustainable in the high rainfall zone. However, to completely reduce recharge, more-deeply rooted plants or trees are needed. (author)

  13. [Evaluation of compounding EDTA and citric acid on remediation of heavy metals contaminated soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xue; Chen, Jia-Jun; Cai, Wen-Min

    2014-08-01

    As commonly used eluents, Na2EDTA (EDTA) and citric acid (CA) have been widely applied in remediation of soil contaminated by heavy metals. In order to evaluate the removal of arsenic, cadmium, copper, and lead in the contaminated soil collected in a chemical plant by compounding EDTA and CA, a series of stirring experiments were conducted. Furthermore, the changes in speciation distribution of heavy metals before and after washing were studied. The results showed that, adopting the optimal molar ratio of EDTA/CA (1:1), when the pH of the solution was 3, the stirring time was 30 min, the stirring rate was 150 r x min(-1) and the L/S was 5:1, the removal rates of arsenic, cadmium, copper and lead could reach 11.72%, 43.39%, 24.36% and 27.17%, respectively. And it was found that after washing, for arsenic and copper, the content of acid dissolved fraction rose which increased the percentage of available contents. Fe-Mn oxide fraction mainly contributed to the removal of copper. As for cadmium, the percentages of acid dissolved fraction, Fe-Mn oxide fraction and organic fraction also decreased. In practical projects, speciation changes would pose certain environmental risk after soil washing, which should be taken into consideration.

  14. Aluminium uptake and translocation in Al hyperaccumulator Rumex obtusifolius is affected by low-molecular-weight organic acids content and soil pH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislava Vondráčková

    Full Text Available High Al resistance of Rumex obtusifolius together with its ability to accumulate Al has never been studied in weakly acidic conditions (pH > 5.8 and is not sufficiently described in real soil conditions. The potential elucidation of the role of organic acids in plant can explain the Al tolerance mechanism.We established a pot experiment with R. obtusifolius planted in slightly acidic and alkaline soils. For the manipulation of Al availability, both soils were untreated and treated by lime and superphosphate. We determined mobile Al concentrations in soils and concentrations of Al and organic acids in organs.Al availability correlated positively to the extraction of organic acids (citric acid < oxalic acid in soils. Monovalent Al cations were the most abundant mobile Al forms with positive charge in soils. Liming and superphosphate application were ambiguous measures for changing Al mobility in soils. Elevated transport of total Al from belowground organs into leaves was recorded in both lime-treated soils and in superphosphate-treated alkaline soil as a result of sufficient amount of Ca available from soil solution as well as from superphosphate that can probably modify distribution of total Al in R. obtusifolius as a representative of "oxalate plants." The highest concentrations of Al and organic acids were recorded in the leaves, followed by the stem and belowground organ infusions.In alkaline soil, R. obtusifolius is an Al-hyperaccumulator with the highest concentrations of oxalate in leaves, of malate in stems, and of citrate in belowground organs. These organic acids form strong complexes with Al that can play a key role in internal Al tolerance but the used methods did not allow us to distinguish the proportion of total Al-organic complexes to the free organic acids.

  15. Al-Fe interactions and growth enhancement in Melastoma malabathricum and Miscanthus sinensis dominating acid sulphate soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshihiro; Jansen, Steven; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2006-12-01

    Plants growing in acid sulphate soils are subject to high levels of Al availability, which may have effects on the growth and distribution of these species. Although Fe availability is also high in acid sulphate soils, little is known about the effect of Fe on the growth of native plants in these soils. Two species dominating this soil type in Asia, viz. Melastoma malabathricum and Miscanthus sinensis were grown hydroponically in a nutrient solution with different concentrations of Al and Fe. Melastoma malabathricum is found to be sensitive to Fe (40 and 100 microm). Application of 500 microm Al, however, completely ameliorates Fe toxicity and is associated with a decrease of Fe concentration in shoots and roots. The primary reason for the Al-induced growth enhancement of M. malabathricum is considered to be the Al-induced reduction of toxic Fe accumulation in roots and shoots. Therefore, Al is nearly essential for M. malabathricum when growing in acid sulphate soils. In contrast, application of both Fe and Al does not reduce the growth of M. sinensis, and Al application does not result in lower shoot concentrations of Fe, suggesting that this grass species has developed different mechanisms for adaptation to acid sulphate soils.

  16. Processes for working-up an aqueous fluosilicic acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpha O. Toure

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous fluosilicic acid solutions were once considered to be only adverse by-products of phosphoric acid production, which required treatment to prevent ecosystem destruction when discharged into the sea. However, a range of chemicals can be generated by the transformation of this industrial waste product. Through experiments undertaken in the laboratory, we have shown the possibility of caustic soda production. Volumetric analysis showed caustic soda to be present as a 6%– 7%solution with yields of about 70% – 80%by weight. Two processes were investigated for the caustification of sodium fluoride, using different precipitates: sodium chloride and ethanol and are described by modelling caustification curves. The activation energies of precipitation determined by semi-empirical correlations showed that precipitation by ethanol (EA = 933.536 J/mol was more successful than precipitation by sodium chloride (EA = 7452.405 J/mol. Analyses performed on the precipitates highlighted compositions that are essential and useful constituents in the cement industry.

  17. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas using Amino Acid Salt Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    difficult. Amino acid salt solutions have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamine solutions. A number of advantages make amino acid salt solutions attractive solvents for CO2 capture from flue gas. In the present study CO2 absorption in aqueous solutions of 0.5 M potassium glycinate and 0.5 M...

  18. Impact of simulated acid rain on soil microbial community function in Masson pine seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The results obtained indicated that the higher acid load decreased the soil microbial activity and no effects on soil microbial diversity assessed by Biolog of potted Masson pine seedlings. Simulated acid rain also changed the metabolic capability of the soil microbial community.

  19. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup, Dan; Møldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical convection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were hereby reasonable well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer mass......Solute transport through the soil matrix is heterogeneous and greatly affected by soil texture, soil structure, and macropore networks. This study examined the relationship between tracer breakthrough characteristics, soil hydraulic properties, and basic soil properties. Hundred...... of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5 % and up to 50 % of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. The hereby predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points up to 50% of applied...

  20. Microbial reduction of ferric iron oxyhydroxides as a way for remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with toxic metals by infiltration of acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The abandoned uranium mine Curilo is a permanent source of acid mine drainage (AMD) which steadily contaminated grey forest soils in the area. As a result, the soil pH was highly acidic and the concentration of copper, lead, arsenic, and uranium in the topsoil was higher than the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC) for soils. The leaching test revealed that approximately half of each pollutant was presented as a reducible fraction as well as the ferric iron in horizon A was presented mainly as minerals with amorphous structure. So, the approach for remediation of the AMD-affected soils was based on the process of redoxolysis carried out by iron-reducing bacteria. Ferric iron hydroxides reduction and the heavy metals released into soil solutions was studied in the dependence on the source of organic (fresh or silage hay) which was used for growth and activity of soil microflora, initial soil pH (3.65; 4.2; and 5.1), and the ion content of irrigation solutions. The combination of limestone (2.0 g/ kg soil), silage addition (at rate of 45 g dry weight/ kg soil) in the beginning and reiterated at 6 month since the start of soil remediation, and periodical soil irrigation with slightly acidic solutions containing CaCl2 was sufficient the content of lead and arsenic in horizon A to be decreased to concentrations similar to the relevant MAC. The reducible, exchangeable, and carbonate mobile fractions were phases from which the pollutants was leached during the applied soil remediation. It determined the higher reduction of the pollutants bioavailability also as well as the process of ferric iron reduction was combined with neutralization of the soil acidity to pH (H2O) 6.2.

  1. Relationships between soil properties and community structure of soil macroinvertebrates in oak-history forests along an acidic deposition gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperman, R.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-02-01

    Soil macroinvertebrate communities were studied in ecologically analogous oak-hickory forests across a three-state atmospheric pollution gradient in Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. The goal was to investigate changes in the community structure of soil fauna in study sites receiving different amounts of acidic deposition for several decades and the possible relationships between these changes and physico-chemical properties of soil. The study revealed significant differences in the numbers of soil animals among the three study sites. The sharply differentiated pattern of soil macroinvertebrate fauna seems closely linked to soil chemistry. Significant correlations of the abundance of soil macroinvertebrates with soil parameters suggest that their populations could have been affected by acidic deposition in the region. Abundance of total soil macroinvertebrates decreased with the increased cumulative loading of acidic deposition. Among the groups most sensitive to deposition were: earthworms gastropods, dipteran larvae, termites, and predatory beetles. The results of the study support the hypothesis that chronic long-term acidic deposition could aversely affect the soil decomposer community which could cause lower organic matter turnover rates leading to an increase in soil organic matter content in high deposition sites.

  2. Double thermal transitions of type I collagen in acidic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Lingrong; Chen, Mingmao; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-01-01

    Contributed equally to this work. To further understand the origin of the double thermal transitions of collagen in acidic solution induced by heating, the denaturation of acidic soluble collagen was investigated by micro-differential scanning calorimeter (micro-DSC), circular dichroism (CD), dynamic laser light scattering (DLLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and two-dimensional (2D) synchronous fluorescence spectrum. Micro-DSC experiments revealed that the collagen exhibited double thermal transitions, which were located within 31-37 °C (minor thermal transition, T(s) ∼ 33 °C) and 37-55 °C (major thermal transition, T(m) ∼ 40 °C), respectively. The CD spectra suggested that the thermal denaturation of collagen resulted in transition from polyproline II type structure to unordered structure. The DLLS results showed that there were mainly two kinds of collagen fibrillar aggregates with different sizes in acidic solution and the larger fibrillar aggregates (T(p2) = 40 °C) had better heat resistance than the smaller one (T(p1) = 33 °C). TEM revealed that the depolymerization of collagen fibrils occurred and the periodic cross-striations of collagen gradually disappeared with increasing temperature. The 2D fluorescence correlation spectra were also applied to investigate the thermal responses of tyrosine and phenylalanine residues at the molecular level. Finally, we could draw the conclusion that (1) the minor thermal transition was mainly due to the defibrillation of the smaller collagen fibrillar aggregates and the unfolding of a little part of triple helices; (2) the major thermal transition primarily arose from the defibrillation of the larger collagen fibrillar aggregates and the complete denaturation of the majority part of triple helices.

  3. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahoranta, Sarita H., E-mail: sarita.ahoranta@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Kokko, Marika E., E-mail: marika.kokko@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Papirio, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.papirio@unicas.it [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Özkaya, Bestamin, E-mail: bozkaya@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Department of Environmental Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa Campus 34220, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Puhakka, Jaakko A., E-mail: jaakko.puhakka@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Continuous and rapid arsenic removal with biogenic jarosite was achieved at pH 3.0. • Arsenic removal was inefficient below pH 2.4 due to reduced Fe–As co-precipitation. • As(V) had better sorption characteristics than As(III). • Biogenic jarosite adsorbed arsenic more effectively than synthetic jarosite. - Abstract: Treatment of acidic solution containing 5 g/L of Fe(II) and 10 mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7 h, 96–98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28 mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH < 2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment.

  4. The effect of reduced atmospheric deposition on soil and soil solution chemistry at a site subjected to long-term acidification, Nacetín, Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulehle, Filip; Hofmeister, Jenýk; Cudlín, Pavel; Hruska, Jakub

    2006-11-01

    During the 1990s the emissions of SO(2) fell dramatically by about 90% in the Czech Republic; the measured throughfall deposition of sulphur to a spruce forest at Nacetín in the Ore Mts. decreased from almost 50 kg ha(-1) in 1994 to 15 kg ha(-1) in 2005. The throughfall flux of Ca decreased from 17 kg ha(-1) in 1994 to 9 kg ha(-1) in 2005; no change was observed for Mg. The deposition of nitrogen ranged between 15 and 30 kg ha(-1) with no statistically significant trend in the period 1994-2005. The desorption of previously stored sulphur and the decrease of Ca deposition are the main factors controlling the recovery of soil solution. The pH of the soil solution at a depth of 30 cm remains unchanged, and the Al concentration decreased from 320 micromol l(-1) in 1997 to 140 micromol l(-1) in 2005. The enhanced leaching of base cations relative to no acidified conditions has continued, although the Ca concentration decreased from 110 microeq l(-1) in 1997 to 25 microeq l(-1) in 2005 in the mineral soil solution at 30 cm depth. This dramatic change was not observed for Mg concentration in soil solution, because its deposition remained stable during the observed period. Similar patterns were observed in the deeper soil solution at 90 cm. The reduction in Ca availability resulted in lower uptake by tree assimilatory tissues, measured as concentration in needles. Since 2005, the leaching of nitrate observed in soil solution at 30 cm depth has disappeared. By 2003 a similar situation occurred at 90 cm. Higher incorporation into the trees after 1997 could be an important factor. With respect to the formerly high sulphur deposition and consequently released aluminium, which could have negatively influenced the biotic immobilization driven by microbes and fungi, the recovery may have positively impacted and therefore improved retention in the ecosystem during recent years. The delay in the successful retention of nitrogen in the ecosystem was probably caused by the high

  5. The photochemistry of neptunium in aqueous perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.A.; Toth, L.M.; Osborne, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    The photochemistry of neptunium ions in aqueous perchloric acid has been investigated using 254 and 300 nm UV radiation. In the absence of other reagents, Np(IV) and (V) oxidized to Np(VI), in a stepwise fashion, with individual quantum efficiencies for each step that vary from 0.02 to 0.004. Decreasing acid concentration favors the Np(IV) → Np(V) reaction whereas it hinders the Np(V) → Np(VI) photo-oxidation. When ethanol, acetaldehyde and other mild reducing agents are added to neptunium-perchloric acid solutions which are then photolyzed, the Np species are reduced to Np(III) in a stepwise fashion with individual quantum efficiencies that vary from 0.07 to 0.006. The overall photoredox reactions of neptunium are subject to competing secondary product reactions that become significant as the photolysis products accumulate. Absorption spectrophotometry was used to monitor the changes in Np oxidation states and reference spectra of the various Np oxidation states are given for 1.0 N HClO 4 . The Np species have absorption bands in the 300 to 1320 nm region that obey Beer's law only when they were properly resolved. (author)

  6. Toxic metabolities of disulfoton: behavior in bean-seedlings, in soil, and in nutrient solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, M.M. de

    1986-10-01

    The absorption, translocation and degradation in bean-seedlings of three toxic metabolites of the pesticide 14 C- disulfoton from nutrient solution or three different types of Brazilian soils is studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  7. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Plutonium (IV) is only marginally soluble in alkaline solution. Precipitation of plutonium using sodium or potassium hydroxide to neutralize acidic solutions produces a gelatinous solid that is difficult to filter and an endpoint that is difficult to control. If the pH of the solution is too high, additional species precipitate producing an increased volume of solids separated. The use of magnesium oxide as a reagent has advantages. It is added as a solid (volume of liquid waste produced is minimized), the pH is self-limiting (pH does not exceed about 8.5), and the solids precipitated are more granular (larger particle size) than those produced using KOH or NaOH. Following precipitation, the raffinate is expected to meet criteria for disposal to tank farms. The solid will be heated in a furnace to dry it and convert any hydroxide salts to the oxide form. The material will be cooled in a desiccator. The material is expected to meet vault storage criteria

  8. Relationship between metal speciation in soil solution and metal adsorption at the root surface of ryegrass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalis, E.J.J.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Town, R.M.; Unsworth, E.R.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2008-01-01

    Received for publication October 12, 2007. The total metal content of the soil or total metal concentration in the soil solution is not always a good indicator for metal availability to plants. Therefore, several speciation techniques have been developed that measure a defined fraction of the total

  9. Efficiency of sulfuric acid, mined gypsum, and two gypsum by-products in soil crusting prevention and sodic soil reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amezketa, E.; Aragues, R.; Gazol, R. [Gobierno Navarra, Pamplona (Spain). Agricultural Resources Evaluation Center

    2005-06-01

    We evaluated the efficiency of four amendments (sulfuric acid, mined-gypsum, and the by-products coal-gypsum and lacto-gypsum) in crusting prevention of two calcareous nonsodic and sodic soils and in sodic soil reclamation. Treatments for crust prevention consisted of surface-applied amendments at equivalent rates of 5 Mg pure-gypsum ha{sup -1}. Treatments for sodic soil reclamation consisted of surface-applied acid and soil-incorporated gypsums at rates of 1 pure-gypsum requirement. The efficiency of these amendments was evaluated by comparing the final infiltration rates (FIR) of the amended vs. the nonamended soils measured in disturbed-soil columns pounded with low-salinity irrigation water. Electrical conductivity (EC) and Na in the leachates of the sodic soil were measured. In the crusting prevention experiment, FIRs (mm h{sup -1) of the nonsodic soil were 21 (nonamended), 33 to 35 (gypsum materials), and 53 (sulfuric acid), whereas those for the sodic soil were 0 (nonamended), 9 (lacto-gypsum), 15 to 17 (coal- and mined-gypsum), and 21 (sulfuric acid). In the sodic-soil reclamation experiment, FIRs were 0 (nonamended), 8 to 9 (gypsum-materials), and 17 (sulfuric acid) mm h{sup -1}. All amendments were effective in crusting prevention and soil reclamation, but sulfuric acid was the most efficient due to the fastest EC and Na reductions in the leachates. The three gypsum-materials were equally effective in the reclamation process and in the nonsodic soil crusting-prevention, whereas lacto-gypsum was less efficient in the sodic-soil crusting-prevention.

  10. Behavior of copper in acidic sulfate solution: Comparison with acidic chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromans, D.; Silva, J.C. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The anodic polarization behavior of copper in a 0.1 M sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) + 1 M sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) solution (pH = 2.0) was studied at room temperature under quiescent and stirred conditions. The behavior was compared with aqueous equilibria via construction of a potential-vs-pH (E-pH) diagram for the copper-sulfate-water (Cu-SO{sub 4}{sup 2}-H{sub 2}O) system. Interpretation of the behavior was aided by comparison with aqueous equilibria and polarization studies of copper in a 0.2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) + 1 M sodium chloride (NaCl) solution(pH = 0.8). The initial anodic dissolution region in the acidic sulfate solution exhibited Tafel behavior with a slope consistent with formation of cupric ions (Cu{sup 2+}) whose rate of formation was charge-transfer controlled. At higher potentials, limiting current density (i{sub L}) behavior was observed under E-pH conditions that were consistent with formation of a film of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO{sub 4} {degree} 5H{sub 2}O). Comparison of experimental i{sub L} values with those predicted by mass transport-controlled processes, using estimates of the diffusion layer thickness obtained from the mass transfer-influenced region of apparent Tafel behavior in the acidic chloride solution, were in sufficient agreement to indicate i{sub L} was controlled by the rate of dissolution of the CuSO{sub 4} {degree} 5H{sub 2}O film via transport of Cu{sup 2+} from the film-electrolyte interface into the bulk solution.

  11. Transport and retention of biochar nanoparticles in a paddy soil under environmentally-relevant solution chemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Dengjun; Yang, Fan; Xu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Nan; Cao, Xinde

    2017-11-01

    Land application of biochar has been increasingly recommended as a powerful strategy for carbon sequestration and soil remediation. However, the biochar particles, especially those in the nanoscale range, may migrate or carry the inherent contaminants along the soil profile, posing a potential risk to the groundwater. This study investigated the transport and retention of wood chip-derived biochar nanoparticles (NPs) in water-saturated columns packed with a paddy soil. The environmentally-relevant soil solution chemistry including ionic strength (0.10-50 mM), electrolyte type (NaCl and CaCl 2 ), and natural organic matter (0-10 mg L -1 humic acid) were tested to elucidate their effects on the biochar NPs transport. Higher mobility of biochar NPs was observed in the soil at lower ionic strengths, with CaCl 2 electrolyte being more effective than NaCl in decreasing biochar NPs transport. The retained biochar NPs in NaCl was re-entrained (∼57.7%) upon lowering transient pore-water ionic strength, indicating that biochar NPs were reversibly retained in the secondary minimum. In contrast, negligible re-entrainment of biochar NPs occurred in CaCl 2 due to the primary minimum and/or particle aggregation. Humic acid increased the mobility of biochar NPs, likely due to enhanced electrosteric repulsive interactions. The transport behaviors of biochar NPs can be well interpreted by a two-site kinetic retention model that assumes reversible retention for one site, and irreversible retention for the other site. Our findings indicated that the transport of wood chip biochar NPs is significant in the paddy soil, highlighting the importance of understanding the mobility of biochar NPs in natural soils for accurately assessing their environmental impacts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P pH 6.70) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils, while the decomposition rate of straw in neutral soil was 17% and 16% (P < 0.05) lower than that in acid and alkaline soils, respectively.

  13. Analysis of perfluorinated carboxylic acids in soils II: optimization of chromatography and extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, John W; Henderson, W Matthew; Ellington, J Jackson; Jenkins, Thomas M; Evans, John J

    2008-02-15

    With the objective of detecting and quantitating low concentrations of perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in soils, we compared the analytical suitability of liquid chromatography columns containing three different stationary phases, two different liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) systems, and eight combinations of sample-extract pretreatments, extractions and cleanups on three test soils. For the columns and systems we tested, we achieved the greatest analytical sensitivity for PFCAs using a column with a C(18) stationary phase in a Waters LC/MS/MS. In this system we achieved an instrument detection limit for PFOA of 270 ag/microL, equating to about 14 fg of PFOA on-column. While an elementary acetonitrile/water extraction of soils recovers PFCAs effectively, natural soil organic matter also dissolved in the extracts commonly imparts significant noise that appears as broad, multi-nodal, asymmetric peaks that coelute with several PFCAs. The intensity and elution profile of this noise is highly variable among soils and it challenges detection of low concentrations of PFCAs by decreasing the signal-to-noise contrast. In an effort to decrease this background noise, we investigated several methods of pretreatment, extraction and cleanup, in a variety of combinations, that used alkaline and unbuffered water, acetonitrile, tetrabutylammonium hydrogen sulfate, methyl-tert-butyl ether, dispersed activated carbon and solid-phase extraction. For the combined objectives of complete recovery and minimization of background noise, we have chosen: (1) alkaline pretreatment; (2) extraction with acetonitrile/water; (3) evaporation to dryness; (4) reconstitution with tetrabutylammonium-hydrogen-sulfate ion-pairing solution; (5) ion-pair extraction to methyl-tert-butyl ether; (6) evaporation to dryness; (7) reconstitution with 60/40 acetonitrile/water (v/v); and (8) analysis by LC/MS/MS. Using this method, we

  14. Enhanced Soil Chemical Properties and Rice Yield in Acid Sulphate Soil by Application of Rice Straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nurzakiah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Swampland development such as acid sulphate soil for agricultural cultivation has various problem, including highsoil acidity, fluctuated and unpredictable water flooding and the presence of toxic elements such as Fe whichresulting in low crop yields. The research was conducted at the experimental station Belandean, Barito Kualaregency in dry season 2007. The objective of research was to study the effect of rice straw on the dynamic of soilpH, the concentration of iron and sulphate and yield on tidal land acid sulphate soil at two different water inletchannel. This research was designed in RCBD (Randomized Completely Block Design with five treatments (0, 2.5,5.0, 7.5 and 10 Mg ha-1 and four replications. Dolomite as much as 1 Mg ha-1 was also applied. This research wasdivided into two sub-units experiment i.e. two conditions of different water inlet channel. The first water channelswere placed with limestone and the second inlet was planted with Eleocharis dulcis. The results showed that (i ricestraw application did not affect the dynamic of soil pH, concentration of iron and sulphate, and (ii the highest yieldwas obtained with 7.5 Mg ha-1 of rice straw.

  15. Understanding and Enhancing Soil Biological Health: The Solution for Reversing Soil Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Michael Lehman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective is to provide an optimistic strategy for reversing soil degradation by increasing public and private research efforts to understand the role of soil biology, particularly microbiology, on the health of our world’s soils. We begin by defining soil quality/soil health (which we consider to be interchangeable terms, characterizing healthy soil resources, and relating the significance of soil health to agroecosystems and their functions. We examine how soil biology influences soil health and how biological properties and processes contribute to sustainability of agriculture and ecosystem services. We continue by examining what can be done to manipulate soil biology to: (i increase nutrient availability for production of high yielding, high quality crops; (ii protect crops from pests, pathogens, weeds; and (iii manage other factors limiting production, provision of ecosystem services, and resilience to stresses like droughts. Next we look to the future by asking what needs to be known about soil biology that is not currently recognized or fully understood and how these needs could be addressed using emerging research tools. We conclude, based on our perceptions of how new knowledge regarding soil biology will help make agriculture more sustainable and productive, by recommending research emphases that should receive first priority through enhanced public and private research in order to reverse the trajectory toward global soil degradation.

  16. PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS OF FACTORS DETERMINING PHOSPHATE ROCK DISSOLUTION ON ACID SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusdar Hilman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the agricultural soils in Indonesia are acidic and low in both total and available phosphorus which severely limits their potential for crops production. These problems can be corrected by application of chemical fertilizers. However, these fertilizers are expensive, and cheaper alternatives such as phosphate rock (PR have been considered. Several soil factors may influence the dissolution of PR in soils, including both chemical and physical properties. The study aimed to identify PR dissolution factors and evaluate their relative magnitude. The experiment was conducted in Soil Chemical Laboratory, Universiti Putra Malaysia and Indonesian Center for Agricultural Land Resources Research and Development from January to April 2002. The principal component analysis (PCA was used to characterize acid soils in an incubation system into a number of factors that may affect PR dissolution. Three major factors selected were soil texture, soil acidity, and fertilization. Using the scores of individual factors as independent variables, stepwise regression analysis was performed to derive a PR dissolution function. The factors influencing PR dissolution in order of importance were soil texture, soil acidity, then fertilization. Soil texture factors including clay content and organic C, and soil acidity factor such as P retention capacity interacted positively with P dissolution and promoted PR dissolution effectively. Soil texture factors, such as sand and silt content, soil acidity factors such as pH, and exchangeable Ca decreased PR dissolution.

  17. Changes in oxidative potential of soil and fly ash after reaction with gaseous nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ying; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Shafer, Martin M.; Rudich, Yinon; Pardo, Michal; Katra, Itzhak; Katoshevski, David; Schauer, James J.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of simulated atmospheric aging on the oxidative potential of inorganic aerosols comprised primarily of crustal materials. Four soil samples and one coal fly ash sample were artificially aged in the laboratory through exposure to the vapor from 15.8 M nitric acid solution for 24 h at room temperature. Native and acid-aged samples were analyzed with a cellular macrophage and acellular dithionthreitol assays to determine oxidative potential. Additionally, the samples were analyzed to determine the concentration of 50 elements, both total and the water-soluble fraction of these elements by Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (SF-ICMS) and crystalline mineral composition using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The results show that reactions with gaseous nitric acid increase the water-soluble fraction of many elements, including calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and lead. The mineral composition analysis documented that calcium-rich minerals present in the soils (e.g., calcite) are converted into different chemical forms, such as calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2). The nitric acid aging process, which can occur in the atmosphere, leads to a 200-600% increase in oxidative potential, as measured by cellular and acellular assays. This laboratory study demonstrates that the toxic effects of aged versus freshly emitted atmospheric dust may be quite different. In addition, the results suggest that mineralogical analysis of atmospheric dust may be useful in understanding its degree of aging.

  18. Study of solution speciation, soil retention and soil-plant transfer of zirconium; Etude de la speciation en solution, de la retention dans les sols et du transfert sol-plante du zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrand, E

    2005-12-15

    Within the framework of the risks prevention policy of Andra, the radioactive zirconium introduction ({sup 93}Zr and {sup 95}Zr) into the environment could be carried out starting from the nuclear waste whose storage is envisaged in deep geological layers. Thus, the goal of this study was to evaluate the parameters and phenomena influencing speciation (various chemical forms) and the soil-plant transfer of zirconium. Experiments of adsorption/desorption of zirconium with different ligands likely to be present in soils (goethite and humic acid) and with two soils, with contrasted characteristics, close to the underground research laboratory of Andra (Meuse) were carried out. These results of adsorption were then confronted with those obtained by the MUSIC and NICA-DONNAN models carried out using the computer code ECOSAT. Zr presents a strong affinity for the two types of soils and the soils constituents. Specific interactions of internal sphere type with the goethite were highlighted using the model. Soil-solution partition coefficients, or K{sub d}, values increase with pH and contact time. Various types of edible plants, pea (Pisum sativum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L cv. St Pierre) were cultivated in hydroponic conditions and in soils spiked with various sources of Zirconium. The maximum zirconium contents are mainly measured in the roots of the plants. The soil-plant transfer factors measured during these experiments show a weak bioavailability of zirconium. An influence of speciation on Zr bioavailability is however highlighted. Some chemical forms, such as oxychloride or acetate, are more easily mobilized than others by the plant. (author)

  19. Water solubilization and the dielectric permeability of isomolar solutions of oleic acid and triethanolamine soap of oleic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demchenko, P.A.; Novitskaya, L.D.

    The investigation of the dependence of water solubilization on the dielectric permeability of isomolar solutions of oleic acid and triethanolamine soap of oleic acid in benzene has shown that at certain acid additions, the solubilization effect can increase almost 6 times, as compared to the soap solution without acid additions. In some cases, electron donor-acceptor complexes are formed, which are more polar than the original components. This leads to a change in the molecular-disperse and micellar part of solution and affects significantly the structure and properties of micellar hydrocarbon solutions of surfactants.

  20. Dynamic chemical characteristics of soil solution after pig manure application: a column study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Dongmei; Sun, Lei; Li, Lianzhen; Zhang, Hailin

    2008-06-01

    When manures from intensive livestock operations are applied to agricultural or vegetable fields at a high rate, large amounts of salts and metals will be introduced into soils. Using a column leaching experiment, this study assessed the leaching potential of the downward movement of Cu and Zn as well as some salt ions after an intensive farm pig manure at rates of 0%, 5% and 10% (w/w) were applied to the top 20 cm of two different textured soils (G soil -sandy loam soil; H soil-silty clay loam soil), and investigated the growth of amaranth and Cu and Zn transfer from soil to amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor). Soil solutions were obtained at 20, 40 and 60 cm depth of the packed column and analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), dissolved organic matter (DOC) and Cu and Zn concentrations. The results indicated that application of pig manure containing Cu and Zn to sandy loam soil might cause higher leaching and uptake risk than silty clay loam soil, especially at high application rates. And manure amendment at 5% and 10% significantly decreased the biomass of amaranth, in which the salt impact rather than Cu and Zn toxicity from manures played more important role in amaranth growth. Thus the farmer should avoid application the high rate of pig manure containing metal and salt to soil at a time, especially in sandy soil.

  1. Effects of simulated acid rain on soil fauna community composition and their ecological niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Jiaen; Qin, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Acid rain is one of the severest environmental issues globally. Relative to other global changes (e.g., warming, elevated atmospheric [CO 2 ], and nitrogen deposition), however, acid rain has received less attention than its due. Soil fauna play important roles in multiple ecological processes, but how soil fauna community responds to acid rain remains less studied. This microcosm experiment was conducted using latosol with simulated acid rain (SAR) manipulations to observe potential changes in soil fauna community under acid rain stress. Four pH levels, i.e., pH 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5, and a neutral control of pH 7.0 were set according to the current pH condition and acidification trend of precipitation in southern China. As expected, we observed that the SAR treatments induced changes in soil fauna community composition and their ecological niches in the tested soil; the treatment effects tended to increase as acidity increased. This could be attributable to the environmental stresses (such as acidity, porosity and oxygen supply) induced by the SAR treatments. In addition to direct acidity effect, we propose that potential changes in permeability and movability of water and oxygen in soils induced by acid rain could also give rise to the observed shifts in soil fauna community composition. These are most likely indirect pathways of acid rain to affect belowground community. Moreover, we found that nematodes, the dominating soil fauna group in this study, moved downwards to mitigate the stress of acid rain. This is probably detrimental to soil fauna in the long term, due to the relatively severer soil conditions in the deep than surface soil layer. Our results suggest that acid rain could change soil fauna community and the vertical distribution of soil fauna groups, consequently changing the underground ecosystem functions such as organic matter decomposition and greenhouse gas emissions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Migration characteristics of cobalt-60 through sandy soil in high pH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    1992-01-01

    Migration characteristics of 60 Co through sandy soil in high pH solution has been investigated by both column and batch techniques. The association of 60 Co with the sandy soil and its components were studied by sequential extraction techniques. The concentration profile of 60 Co in the sandy soil column was composed of two exponential curves showing that 60 Co would consist of immobile and mobile fractions. The immobile 60 Co was retained by the sandy soil and was distributed near the top. Though the mobile 60 Co was little sorbed by soil and migrated through the soil column, maximum concentration of 60 Co in the effluents decreased slightly with increasing path length of the soil column. The sequential extraction of 60 Co from the sandy soil and from its components showed that 60 Co was sorbed by both manganese oxide and clay minerals. And manganese oxide is one of the responsible soil components for the observed decrease in the maximum concentration of 60 Co in the effluents. Although the content of manganese oxide in the sandy soil was 0.13%, manganese oxide is the important component to prevent from the migration of 60 Co in the high pH solution. (author)

  3. Declining acidic deposition begins reversal of forest-soil acidification in the northeastern U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory B. Lawrence; Paul W. Hazlett; Ivan J. Fernandez; Rock Ouimet; Scott W. Bailey; Walter C. Shortle; Kevin T. Smith; Michael R. Antidormi

    2015-01-01

    Decreasing trends in acidic deposition levels over the past several decades have led to partial chemical recovery of surface waters. However, depletion of soil Ca from acidic deposition has slowed surface water recovery and led to the impairment of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Nevertheless, documentation of acidic deposition effects on soils has been...

  4. Supplementing predictive mapping of acid sulfate soil occurrence with Vis-NIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beucher, Amélie; Peng, Yi; Knadel, Maria

    , including geology, landscape type and terrain parameters. Visible-Near-Infrared (Vis-NIR) spectroscopy constitutes a rapid and cheap alternative to soil analysis, and was successfully utilized for the prediction of soil chemical, physical and biological properties. In particular, the Vis-NIR spectra contain......Releasing acidity and metals into watercourses, acid sulfate soils represent a critical environmental problem worldwide. Identifying the spatial distribution of these soils enables to target the strategic areas for risk management. In Denmark, the occurrence of acid sulfate soils was first studied...... during the 1980’s through conventional mapping (i.e. soil sampling and the subsequent determination of pH at the time of sampling and after incubation, the pyrite content and the acid-neutralizing capacity). Since acid sulfate soils mostly occur in wetlands, the survey specifically targeted these areas...

  5. Prediction of the effects of soil-based countermeasures on soil solution chemistry of soils contaminated with radiocesium using the hydrogeochemical code PHREEQC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormann, Volker; Kirchner, Gerald

    2002-04-22

    For agriculturally used areas, which are contaminated by the debris from a nuclear accident, the use of chemical amendmends (e.g. potassium chloride and lime) is among the most common soil-based countermeasures. These countermeasures are intended to reduce the plant uptake of radionuclides (mainly 137Cs and 90Sr) by competitive inhibition by chemically similar ions. So far, the impacts of countermeasures on soil solution composition - and thus, their effectiveness - have almost exclusively been established experimentally, since they depend on mineral composition and chemical characteristics of the soil affected. In this study, which focuses on caesium contamination, the well-established code PHREEQC was used as a geochemical model to calculate the changes in the ionic compositions of soil solutions, which result from the application of potassium or ammonium in batch equilibrium experiments. The simple ion exchange model used by PHREEQC was improved by taking into account selective sorption of Cs+, NH4+ and K+ by clay minerals. Calculations were performed with three different initial soil solution compositions, corresponding to particular soil types (loam, sand, peat). For loamy and sandy soils, our calculational results agree well with experimental data reported by Nisbet (Effectiveness of soil-based countermeasures six months and one year after contamination of five diverse soil types with caesium-134 and strontium-90. Contract Report NRPB-M546, National Radiation Protection Board, Chilton, 1995.). For peat, discrepancies were found indicating that for organic soils a reliable set of exchange constants of the relevant cations still has to be determined experimentally. For cesium, however, these discrepancies almost disappeared if selective sites were assumed to be inaccessible. Additionally, results of sensitivity analyses are presented by which the influence of the main soil parameters on Cs+ concentrations in solution after soil treatment has been systematically

  6. Soil solution and extractable soil nitrogen response to climate change in two boreal forest ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Several studies show that increases in soil temperature result in higher N mineralization rates in soils. It is, however, unclear if additional N is taken up by the vegetation or accumulates in the soil. To address this question two small, forested catchments in southern Norway were experimentally

  7. Influence of ameliorating soil acidity with dolomite on the priming of soil C content and CO2 emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Wu, Lei; Peng, Qi-An; van Zwieten, Lukas; Chhajro, Muhammad Afzal; Wu, Yupeng; Lin, Shan; Ahmed, Muhammad Mahmood; Khalid, Muhammad Salman; Abid, Muhammad; Hu, Ronggui

    2017-04-01

    Lime or dolomite is commonly implemented to ameliorate soil acidity. However, the impact of dolomite on CO 2 emissions from acidic soils is largely unknown. A 53-day laboratory study was carried out to investigate CO 2 emissions by applying dolomite to an acidic Acrisol (rice-rapeseed rotation [RR soil]) and a Ferralsol (rice-fallow/flooded rotation [RF soil]). Dolomite was dosed at 0, 0.5, and 1.5 g 100 g -1 soil, herein referred to as CK, L, and H, respectively. The soil pH (H2O) increased from 5.25 to 7.03 and 7.62 in L and H treatments of the RR soil and from 5.52 to 7.27 and 7.77 in L and H treatments of the RF soil, respectively. Dolomite application significantly (p ≤ 0.001) increased CO 2 emissions in both RR and RF soils, with higher emissions in H as compared to L dose of dolomite. The cumulative CO 2 emissions with H dose of dolomite were greater 136% in the RR soil and 149% in the RF soil as compared to CK, respectively. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) increased and reached at 193 and 431 mg kg -1 in the RR soil and 244 and 481 mg kg -1 in the RF soil by H treatments. The NH 4 - -N and NO 3 - -N were also increased by dolomite application. The increase in C and N contents stimulated microbial activities and therefore higher respiration in dolomite-treated soil as compared to untreated. The results suggest that CO 2 release in dolomite-treated soils was due to the priming of soil C content rather than chemical reactions.

  8. Conductometric investigation of salt-free solutions of polyriboguanylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.G.; Davydova, O.V.; Kargov, S.I.

    1993-01-01

    Salt-free solutions of various ionic forms of polyriboguanylic acid (poly(G)) were studied by the methods of conductometry and spectroscopy of annular dichroism. The Manning approach was employed to calculate transport characteristics and structural parameters of poly(G) on the basis of spectra permit putting poly(G) salts in two groups: the first one comprising NH 4 + -, Rb + -, K + -, Na + -, the second one - Cs + -, and Li + -poly(G). The assumption is made that Li + and Cs + ions, bound with concrete groups of polyanion in a specific way, can promote formation of a stable structure different from the one observed in the presence of the first group counterions. 25 refs., 3 figs

  9. Speciation of mercury in soil and sediment by selective solvent and acid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Y. [Metara Inc., 1225 East Arques Ave, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Kingston, H.M.; Boylan, H.M.; Rahman, G.M.M.; Shah, S.; Richter, R.C.; Link, D.D.; Bhandari, S. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2003-02-01

    In order to characterize the mercury hazard in soil, a sequential extraction scheme has been developed to classify mercury species based on their environmental mobility and/or toxicity for either routine lab analysis or on-site screening purposes. The alkyl mercury species and soluble inorganic species that contribute to the major portion of potential mercury toxicity in the soil are extracted by an acidic ethanol solution (2% HCl+10% ethanol solution) from soil matrices as ''mobile and toxic'' species. A High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) system coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection has been developed to further resolve the species information into soluble inorganic species (Hg{sup 2+}), methylmercury(II) (MeHg{sup +}) and ethylmercury(II) (EtHg{sup +}) species. Alternatively, these species can be separated into ''soluble inorganic mercury'' and ''alkyl mercury'' sub-categories by Solid-Phase Extraction (SPE). A custom Sulfydryl Cotton Fiber (SCF) material is used as the solid phase medium. Optimization of the SCF SPE technique is discussed. Combined with a direct mercury analyzer (DMA-80), the SCF SPE technique is a promising candidate for on-site screening purposes. Following the ethanol extraction, the inorganic mercury species remaining in soil are further divided into ''semi-mobile'' and ''non-mobile'' sub-categories by sequential acid extractions. The ''semi-mobile'' mercury species include mainly elemental mercury (Hg) and mercury-metal amalgams. The non-mobile mercury species mainly include mercuric sulfide (HgS) and mercurous chloride (Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). (orig.)

  10. Bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenic species in solution culture and soil system: implications to remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolan, Nanthi; Mahimairaja, Santiago; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Seshadri, Balaji; Thangarajan, Ramya

    2015-06-01

    In this work, bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) species were compared between solution culture and soil system. Firstly, the adsorption of As(III) and As(V) was compared using a number of non-allophanic and allophanic soils. Secondly, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity were examined using germination, phytoavailability, earthworm, and soil microbial activity tests. Both As-spiked soils and As-contaminated sheep dip soils were used to test bioavailability and ecotoxicity. The sheep dip soil which contained predominantly As(V) species was subject to flooding to reduce As(V) to As(III) and then used along with the control treatment soil to compare the bioavailability between As species. Adsorption of As(V) was much higher than that of As(III), and the difference in adsorption between these two species was more pronounced in the allophanic than non-allophanic soils. In the solution culture, there was no significant difference in bioavailability and ecotoxicity, as measured by germination and phytoavailability tests, between these two As species. Whereas in the As-spiked soils, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity were higher for As(III) than As(V), and the difference was more pronounced in the allophanic than non-allophanic soils. Bioavailability of As increased with the flooding of the sheep dip soils which may be attributed to the reduction of As(V) to As(III) species. The results in this study have demonstrated that while in solution, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity do not vary between As(III) and As(V), in soils, the latter species is less bioavailable than the former species because As(V) is more strongly retained than As(III). Since the bioavailability and ecotoxicity of As depend on the nature of As species present in the environment, risk-based remediation approach should aim at controlling the dynamics of As transformation.

  11. Enhanced desorption of PCB and trace metal elements (Pb and Cu) from contaminated soils by saponin and EDDS mixed solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Menghua; Hu, Yuan; Sun, Qian; Wang, Linling; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the simultaneous desorption of trace metal elements and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) from mixed contaminated soil with a novel combination of biosurfactant saponin and biodegradable chelant S,S-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS). Results showed significant promotion and synergy on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption with the mixed solution of saponin and EDDS. The maximal desorption of Pb, Cu and PCB were achieved 99.8%, 85.7% and 45.7%, respectively, by addition of 10 mM EDDS and 3000 mg L −1 saponin. The marked interaction between EDDS and saponin contributed to the synergy performance. The sorption of EDDS and saponin on soil was inhibited by each other. EDDS could enhance the complexation of metals with the saponin micelles and the solubilization capabilities of saponin micelles for PCB. Our study suggests the combination of saponin and EDDS would be a promising alternative for remediation of co-contaminated soils caused by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) and metals. -- Highlights: ► A novel combination of biosurfactant saponin and EDDS was used to simultaneously remove mixed contaminations from soil. ► Significant synergy on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption were achieved with EDDS/saponin. ► The marked interaction between EDDS and saponin contributed to the synergy performance. -- Significant synergistic effect on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption were achieved with the mixed solution of saponin and EDDS

  12. Bioavailable concentrations of germanium and rare earth elements in soil as affected by low molecular weight organic acids and root exudates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs; Kummer, Nicolai-Alexeji; Heinemann, Ute; Tesch, Silke; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    Availability of elements in soil to plant is generally dependent on the solubility and mobility of elements in soil solution which is controlled by soil, elemental properties and plant-soil interactions. Low molecular organic acids or other root exudates may increase mobility and availability of certain elements for plants as an effect of lowering pH in the rhizosphere and complexation. However, these processes take place in a larger volume in soil, therefore to understand their nature, it is also important to know in which layers of the soil what factors modify these processes. In this work the influence of citric acid and root exudates of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) on bioavailable concentrations of germanium, lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium in soil solution and uptake in root and shoot of rape (Brassica napus L.), comfrey (Symphytum officinale L.), common millet (Panicum milliaceum L.) and oat (Avena sativa L.) was investigated. Two different pot experiments were conducted: (1) the mentioned plant species were treated with nutrient solutions containing various amount of citric acid; (2) white lupin was cultivated in mixed culture (0 % lupin, 33 % lupin) with oat (Avena sativa L.) and soil solution was obtained by plastic suction cups placed at various depths. As a result, addition of citric acid significantly increased germanium concentrations in plant tissue of comfrey and rape and increased translocation of germanium, lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium from root to shoot. The cultivation of white lupin in mixed culture with oat led to significantly higher concentrations of germanium and increasing concentrations of lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium in soil solution and aboveground plant tissue. In these pots concentrations of citric acid in soil solution were significantly higher than in the control. The results show, that low molecular organic acids exuded by plant roots are of great importance for the mobilization of germanium

  13. Aluminium Uptake and Translocation in Al Hyperaccumulator Rumex obtusifolius Is Affected by Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids Content and Soil pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondráčková, Stanislava; Száková, Jiřina; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Hejcman, Michal; Müllerová, Vladimíra; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims High Al resistance of Rumex obtusifolius together with its ability to accumulate Al has never been studied in weakly acidic conditions (pH > 5.8) and is not sufficiently described in real soil conditions. The potential elucidation of the role of organic acids in plant can explain the Al tolerance mechanism. Methods We established a pot experiment with R. obtusifolius planted in slightly acidic and alkaline soils. For the manipulation of Al availability, both soils were untreated and treated by lime and superphosphate. We determined mobile Al concentrations in soils and concentrations of Al and organic acids in organs. Results Al availability correlated positively to the extraction of organic acids (citric acid soil solution as well as from superphosphate that can probably modify distribution of total Al in R. obtusifolius as a representative of “oxalate plants.” The highest concentrations of Al and organic acids were recorded in the leaves, followed by the stem and belowground organ infusions. Conclusions In alkaline soil, R. obtusifolius is an Al-hyperaccumulator with the highest concentrations of oxalate in leaves, of malate in stems, and of citrate in belowground organs. These organic acids form strong complexes with Al that can play a key role in internal Al tolerance but the used methods did not allow us to distinguish the proportion of total Al-organic complexes to the free organic acids. PMID:25880431

  14. Differences in sorption behavior of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid on artificial soils as a function of soil pre-aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, Georg; Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H

    The sorption behavior of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) to three different artificial soil mixtures was investigated. Artificial soils serve as model systems for improving understanding of sorption phenomena. The soils consisted of quartz, ferrihydrite, illite, montmorillonite, and charcoal. In a previous study, several selected mixtures had been inoculated with organic matter, and microbial aging (incubation) had been performed for different periods of time (3, 12, and 18 months) before conducting the sorption experiments. The effect of this pre-incubation time on the sorption behavior was determined. Interaction of MCPA with soil surfaces was monitored by aqueous phase sorption experiments, using high-performance liquid chromatography/ultraviolet and in selected cases Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. The sorption behavior showed large differences between differently aged soils; Freundlich and linear sorption model fits (with sorption constants K f , 1/ n exponents, and K d values, respectively) were given for pH = 3 and the unbuffered pH of ∼7. The largest extent of sorption from diluted solutions was found on the surfaces with a pre-incubation time of 3 months. Sorption increased at acidic pH values. Regarding the influence of aging of artificial soils, the following conclusions were drawn: young artificial soils exhibit stronger sorption at lower concentrations, with a larger K f value than aged soils. A correlation with organic carbon content was not confirmed. Thus, the sorption characteristics of the soils are more influenced by the aging of the organic carbon than by the organic carbon content itself.

  15. Solubility of xenon in amino-acid solutions. II. Nine less-soluble amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennan, Richard P.; Himm, Jeffrey F.; Pollack, Gerald L.

    1988-05-01

    Ostwald solubility (L) of xenon gas, as the radioisotope 133Xe, has been measured as a function of solute concentration, at 25.0 °C, in aqueous solutions of nine amino acids. The amino-acid concentrations investigated covered much of their solubility ranges in water, viz., asparagine monohydrate (0-0.19 M), cysteine (0-1.16 M), glutamine (0-0.22 M), histidine (0-0.26 M), isoleucine (0-0.19 M), methionine (0-0.22 M), serine (0-0.38 M), threonine (0-1.4 M), and valine (0-0.34 M). We have previously reported solubility results for aqueous solutions of six other, generally more soluble, amino acids (alanine, arginine, glycine, hydroxyproline, lysine, and proline), of sucrose and sodium chloride. In general, L decreases approximately linearly with increasing solute concentration in these solutions. If we postulate that the observed decreases in gas solubility are due to hydration, the results under some assumptions can be used to calculate hydration numbers (H), i.e., the number of H2O molecules associated with each amino-acid solute molecule. The average values of hydration number (H¯) obtained at 25.0 °C are 15.3±1.5 for asparagine, 6.8±0.3 for cysteine, 11.5±1.1 for glutamine, 7.3±0.7 for histidine, 5.9±0.4 for isoleucine, 10.6±0.8 for methionine, 11.2±1.3 for serine, 7.7± 1.0 for threonine, and 6.6±0.6 for valine. We have also measured the temperature dependence of solubility L(T) from 5-40 °C for arginine, glycine, and proline, and obtained hydration numbers H¯(T) in this range. Between 25-40 °C, arginine has an H¯ near zero. This may be evidence for an attractive interaction between xenon and arginine molecules in aqueous solution.

  16. The role of organic acids exuded from roots in phosphorus nutrition and aluminium tolerance in acidic soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocking, P J; Randall, P J; Delhaize, E [CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra (Australia); Keerthisinghe, G [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2000-06-01

    Soil acidity is a major problem of large areas of arable land on a global scale. Many acid soils are low in plant-available phosphorus (P) or are highly P-fixing, resulting in poor plant growth. In addition, aluminium (Al) is soluble in acid soils in the toxic Al{sup 3+} form, which also reduces plant growth. There is considerable evidence that both P deficiency and exposure to Al{sup 3+} stimulate the efflux of organic acids from roots of a range of species. Organic acids such as citrate, malate and oxalate are able to desorb or solubilise fixed soil P, making it available for plant uptake. Organic acids also chelate Al{sup 3+} to render it non-toxic, and are, therefore, involved in Al tolerance mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the literature on the role of organic acids exuded from roots in improving plant P uptake and Al-tolerance in acid soils. Research is now attempting to understand how P deficiency or exposure to Al{sup 3+} activates or induces organic acid efflux at the molecular level, with the aim of improving P acquisition and Al tolerance by conventional plant breeding and by genetic engineering. At the agronomic level, it is desirable that existing crop and pasture plants with enhanced soil-P uptake and tolerance to Al due to organic acid exudation are integrated into farming systems. (author)

  17. The role of organic acids exuded from roots in phosphorus nutrition and aluminium tolerance in acidic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, P.J.; Randall, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Keerthisinghe, G.

    2000-01-01

    Soil acidity is a major problem of large areas of arable land on a global scale. Many acid soils are low in plant-available phosphorus (P) or are highly P-fixing, resulting in poor plant growth. In addition, aluminium (Al) is soluble in acid soils in the toxic Al 3+ form, which also reduces plant growth. There is considerable evidence that both P deficiency and exposure to Al 3+ stimulate the efflux of organic acids from roots of a range of species. Organic acids such as citrate, malate and oxalate are able to desorb or solubilise fixed soil P, making it available for plant uptake. Organic acids also chelate Al 3+ to render it non-toxic, and are, therefore, involved in Al tolerance mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the literature on the role of organic acids exuded from roots in improving plant P uptake and Al-tolerance in acid soils. Research is now attempting to understand how P deficiency or exposure to Al 3+ activates or induces organic acid efflux at the molecular level, with the aim of improving P acquisition and Al tolerance by conventional plant breeding and by genetic engineering. At the agronomic level, it is desirable that existing crop and pasture plants with enhanced soil-P uptake and tolerance to Al due to organic acid exudation are integrated into farming systems. (author)

  18. A new method for determining the bioavailability of radionuclides in the soil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouve, A.; Lejeune, M.; Rey, J.

    1999-01-01

    A new method for determining the pool of radionuclides in the soil solution, available for root uptake, has been compared to existing methods. The new method is based on extracting the soil solution at a soil moisture below saturation. It uses the soaking capacity of a polyacrylamide resin deposited on a cellulose acetate membrane laid on the soil surface. The new method exhibited the best reproductibility amongst the methods tested. It allowed us to extract more 134 Cs and a similar amount of 85 Sr relative to the other methods. The correlation between the observed ratio of radionuclide concentrations in soil and plants and the radionuclide concentration of the soil solution using the new method was better than using the existing methods. Using the measurement of 134 Cs and natural potassium in the soil solution by the new method, based on a multiple regression equation involving an exponential form, the uptake of 134 Cs by bean and wheat was predicted with a 0.9 determination coefficient. As far as the uptake of 85 Sr is considered, this method was not very successful since the equation with a linear form involved a large number of parameters. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Desorption of organophosphorous pesticides from soil with wastewater and surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Soriano, M. C.; Mingorance, M. D.; Pena, A.

    2009-01-01

    Surfactants can be introduced in the environment by wastewater discharge, point-charge pollution or deliberate action, e. g. to remediate contaminated soil or groundwater. The irrigation of soil with wastewater containing surfactants may modify pesticide desorption from soil, thus affecting their affecting their environmental fate. Desorption from soil of the plain of Granada (South-eastern Spain) of two organophosphorous pesticides, diazinon and dimethoate, differing in solubility and hydrophobicity, has been evaluated in the presence of different surfactant aqueous solutions and municipal wastewater. (Author)

  20. Relationship between metal speciation in soil solution and metal adsorption at the root surface of ryegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalis, Erwin J J; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Town, Raewyn M; Unsworth, Emily R; van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2008-01-01

    The total metal content of the soil or total metal concentration in the soil solution is not always a good indicator for metal availability to plants. Therefore, several speciation techniques have been developed that measure a defined fraction of the total metal concentration in the soil solution. In this study the Donnan Membrane Technique (DMT) was used to measure free metal ion concentrations in CaCl(2) extractions (to mimic the soil solution, and to work under standardized conditions) of 10 different soils, whereas diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) and scanning chronopotentiometry (SCP) were used to measure the sum of free and labile metal concentrations in the CaCl(2) extracts. The DGT device was also exposed directly to the (wetted) soil (soil-DGT). The metal concentrations measured with the speciation techniques are related to the metal adsorption at the root surface of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), to be able to subsequently predict metal uptake. In most cases the metal adsorption related pH-dependently to the metal concentrations measured by DMT, SCP, and DGT in the CaCl(2) extract. However, the relationship between metal adsorption at the root surface and the metal concentrations measured by the soil-DGT was not-or only slightly-pH dependent. The correlations between metal adsorption at the root surface and metal speciation detected by different speciation techniques allow discussion about rate limiting steps in biouptake and the contribution of metal complexes to metal bioavailability.

  1. Two Solutions of Soil Moisture Sensing with RFID for Landslide Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Francisco Pichorim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Two solutions for UHF RFID tags for soil moisture sensing were designed and are described in this paper. In the first, two conventional tags (standard transponders are employed: one, placed close to the soil surface, is the sensor tag, while the other, separated from the soil, is the reference for system calibration. By transmission power ramps, the tag’s turn-on power levels are measured and correlated with soil condition (dry or wet. In the second solution, the SL900A chip, which supports up to two external sensors and an internal temperature sensor, is used. An interdigital capacitive sensor was connected to the transponder chip and used for soil moisture measurement. In a novel design for an UHF RFID tag the sensor is placed below the soil surface, while the transponder and antenna are above the soil to improve communication. Both solutions are evaluated practically and results show the presence of water in soil can be remotely detected allowing for their application in landslide monitoring.

  2. Kinetics of aluminum and sulfate release from forest soil by mono- and diprotic aliphatic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A. Jr.; Zelazny, L.W. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA))

    1990-06-01

    A batch equilibration study evaluated the influence of naturally occurring low-molecular-weight mono- and diprotic aliphatic acids on the rate of Al and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} release in a Cecil soil (Typic Hapludult). The authors adjusted the pH of the organic acids (OAs) and of the soil suspension (3.8% w/w) to pH 4.0 and allowed them to equilibrate thermally before the experiment. After rapid addition of OAs to the soil suspension, they took solution samples at various time intervals and analyzed for Al, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and OA concentration. The initial concentration of OA in suspension was 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} mol liter{sup {minus}1}. Both Al and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} release followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, whereas OA adsorption obeyed simple first-order kinetics. The rate of Al release (k{sub 1}) was more rapid for the diprotic OA treatment (20.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} mol s{sup {minus}1}), as was SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} release (1.63 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} mol s{sup {minus}1}), compared to the monoprotic OA treatment. The rate of Al release varied inversely with OA chain length and the distance between -COOH functional groups. The addition of substituent -OH groups between the -COOH groups further reduced K{sub 1}. A similar trend was observed for the rate of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} release (k{sub 1}) into solution. Monoprotic OAs were more rapidly adsorbed to the particle surfaces than were diprotic OAs. The authors postulate that removal of Al and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} from solution occurs via selective mineral precipitation.

  3. Determination of the uranium concentration in soil solutions by the fission track registration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, G.P.

    1980-02-01

    The fission tracks registration technique was used to determine the uranium concentration in soil solutions. The Makrofol KG, a synthetic plastic manufactured by Bayer, was used as a detector and the wet method was applied. From the calibration curves obtained, it was possible to determine uranium concentrations in soil solutions, from 90 to 320 μg U/l, with an error between 9.4% and 4.0%, respectively. The method was applied to a few soil samples from Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais in Brazil. The uranium concentrations in the sample and residues were also determined by other methods to compare the results obtained; only one sample showed deviation from the results obtained by the fission tracks method. And this discrepancy was explained in a reasonable way. It was shown that the fission tracks technique can be used with sucess for application in soil solutions. (Author) [pt

  4. Field-scale evaluation of water fluxes and manure solution leaching in feedlot pen soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ana R; Maisonnave, Roberto; Massobrio, Marcelo J; Fabrizio de Iorio, Alicia R

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of beef cattle manure on feedlot pen surfaces generates large amounts of dissolved solutes that can be mobilized by water fluxes, affecting surface and groundwater quality. Our objective was to examine the long-term impacts of a beef cattle feeding operation on water fluxes and manure leaching in feedlot pens located on sandy loam soils of the subhumid Sandy Pampa region in Argentina. Bulk density, gravimetric moisture content, and chloride concentration were quantified. Rain simulation trials were performed to estimate infiltration and runoff rates. Using chloride ion as a tracer, profile analysis techniques were applied to estimate the soil moisture flux and manure conservative chemical components leaching rates. An organic stratum was found over the surface of the pen soil, separated from the underlying soil by a highly compacted thin layer (the manure-soil interface). The soil beneath the organic layer showed greater bulk density in the A horizon than in the control soil and had greater moisture content. Greater concentrations of chloride were found as a consequence of the partial sealing of the manure-soil interface. Surface runoff was the dominant process in the feedlot pen soil, whereas infiltration was the main process in control soil. Soil moisture flux beneath pens decreased substantially after 15 yr of activity. The estimated minimum leaching rate of chloride was 13 times faster than the estimated soil moisture flux. This difference suggests that chloride ions are not exclusively transported by advective flow under our conditions but also by solute diffusion and preferential flow. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. SOILSOLN: A Program for Teaching Equilibria Modeling of Soil Solution Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolt, Jeffrey D.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a computer program for use in teaching ion speciation in soil solutions. Provides information on the structure of the program, execution, and software specifications. The program estimates concentrations of ion pairs, hydrolytic species, metal-organic complexes, and free ions in solutions. (Author/RT)

  6. Effects of Temperature on Solute Transport Parameters in Differently-Textured Soils at Saturated Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, S.; Arihara, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Nishimura, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface warming driven by global warming, urban heat islands, and increasing use of shallow geothermal heating and cooling systems such as the ground source heat pump, potentially causes changes in subsurface mass transport. Therefore, understanding temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics is essential to accurately assess environmental risks due to increased subsurface temperature. In this study, one-dimensional solute transport experiments were conducted in soil columns under temperature control to investigate effects of temperature on solute transport parameters, such as solute dispersion and diffusion coefficients, hydraulic conductivity, and retardation factor. Toyoura sand, Kaolin clay, and intact loamy soils were used in the experiments. Intact loamy soils were taken during a deep well boring at the Arakawa Lowland in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In the transport experiments, the core sample with 5-cm diameter and 4-cm height was first isotropically consolidated, whereafter 0.01M KCl solution was injected to the sample from the bottom. The concentrations of K+ and Cl- in the effluents were analyzed by an ion chromatograph to obtain solute breakthrough curves. The solute transport parameters were calculated from the breakthrough curves. The experiments were conducted under different temperature conditions (15, 25, and 40 oC). The retardation factor for the intact loamy soils decreased with increasing temperature, while water permeability increased due to reduced viscosity of water at higher temperature. Opposite, the effect of temperature on solute dispersivity for the intact loamy soils was insignificant. The effects of soil texture on the temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics will be further investigated from comparison of results from differently-textured samples.

  7. Numerical modeling of solute transport in deformable unsaturated layered soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of soil stratification was studied through numerical investigation based on the coupled model of solute transport in deformable unsaturated soil. The theoretical model implied two-way coupled excess pore pressure and soil deformation based on Biot's consolidation theory as well as a one-way coupled volatile pollutant concentration field developed from the advection-diffusion theory. Embedded in the model, the degree of saturation, fluid compressibility, self-weight of the soil matrix, porosity variance, longitudinal dispersion, and linear sorption were computed. Based on simulation results of a proposed three-layer landfill model using the finite element method, the multi-layer effects are discussed with regard to the hydraulic conductivity, shear modulus, degree of saturation, molecular diffusion coefficient, and thickness of each layer. Generally speaking, contaminants spread faster in a stratified field with a soft and highly permeable top layer; soil parameters of the top layer are more critical than the lower layers but controlling soil thicknesses will alter the results. This numerical investigation showed noticeable impacts of stratified soil properties on solute migration results, demonstrating the importance of correctly modeling layered soil instead of simply assuming the averaged properties across the soil profile.

  8. Chemical composition of the humus layer, mineral soil and soil solution of 150 forest stands in the Netherlands in 1990

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Leeters, E.E.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    A nationwide assessment of the chemical composition of the humus layer, mineral topsoil (0-30 cm) and soil solution in both topsoil and subsoil (60-100 cm) was made for 150 forest stands in the year 1990. The stands, which were part of the national forest inventory on vitality, included seven tree

  9. Effect of solution composition on the adsorption and desorption of 137Cs on forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staunton, S.; Wells, C.; Shaw, G.

    2004-01-01

    There is ongoing debate as to the pertinence of measurements of soil-liquid distribution coefficients in dilute suspension to the understanding and the prediction of the mobility of radionuclides in soil. This debate is particularly active in the case of radiocaesium. Several factors could cause significant discrepancies between measured and effective in situ distributions of radiocaesium. 1. Differences in solution composition, notably ionic strength and concentration in cations such as potassium and ammonium; 2. Differences in soil:solution ratio; 3. Time dependent reactions; 4. Reversibility of the adsorption reaction; 5. Concentration dependence of adsorption. We have attempted to assess the importance of some of these factors by studying 137 Cs adsorption on soils sampled from different horizons of a forest soil. Kd was measured in suspension. Soil:solution ratio and initial 137 Cs concentration and concentration of potassium and stable Cs in solution were varied. Adsorption and desorption Kd values were measured under similar conditions and compared. Kd values were in the lower range of values reported in the literature (5-30 1/kg). Samples from surface layers showed no concentration dependence at trace additions of 137 Cs, whereas some decrease in Kd was observed with increasing 137 Cs concentration on the Ea horizon. Data obtained at different soil:solution ratios all fell on the same adsorption isotherms as those obtained by varying initial 137 Cs concentration. Stable caesium and, to a lesser extent, potassium inhibited 137 Cs adsorption. This effect was greater in the Ea horizon than the surface soils, probably due to the mineral content. For all samples the desorption Kd was greater than the adsorption Kd in the same solution, indicating a small but significant degree of irreversibility. (author)

  10. The treatments of soil Rirang by floatation and Acid leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosim-Affandi; Umar-Sarip; Alwi, Guswita; Sri-Sudaryanto

    2000-01-01

    The treatments of soil Rirang by floatation and acid leaching has been carried out to increase high uranium concentrates of materials, separating associated economical minerals and to reduce the gangue minerals which bothering at chemical processing. The physical treatment has been done by ore preparation and floatation using oleic acid and p ine oil , 20 % of pulp at pH 9, condition time at 5 minutes and collections of float fraction was 10 minutes. The chemical processing has been done by dynamic leaching using H 2 SO 4 100 kg/ton, MnO 2 20 kg/ton, 50 % of solid with ore size - 65 mesh, temperature at 80 o C and time of leaching was 8 hours. The result of experiments is as follows : Physical treatment by floatation shown that the concentrates of U increased at sink fraction by (1.5 - 2) times against feed sample for all the samples, and in the float fraction the recovery of molybdenite separation is 58 - 81 % and rare earths is 57 - 80 %. The result of dynamic leaching is 76 - 91 %, and recovery uranium increasing from 81.02 % (mixture samples soil before floatation) to 91.16 % ( mixture samples of float fraction)

  11. Uranium partitioning under acidic conditions in a sandy soil aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.H.; Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    The partitioning of uranium in an aquifer down gradient of two large mixed waste sites was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH redox potential and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation. This involved generation of field-derived, batch sorption, and reactive mineral surface sorption data. Field-derived distribution coefficients for uranium at these waste sites were found to vary between 0.40 and 15,000. Based on thermodynamic speciation modeling and a comparison of field and laboratory data, gibbsite is a potential reactive mineral surface present in modified soils at the sites. Uranium partitioning data are presented from field samples and laboratory studies of background soil and the mineral surface gibbsite. Mechanistic and empirical sorption models fit to the field-derived uranium partitioning data show an improvement of over two orders of magnitude, as measured by the normalized sum of errors squared, when compared with the single K d model used in previous risk work. Models fit to batch sorption data provided a better fit of sorbed uranium than do models fit to the field-derived data

  12. An investigation of inorganic antimony species and antimony associated with soil humic acid molar mass fractions in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steely, Sarah; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri; Xing Baoshan

    2007-01-01

    The presence of antimony compounds is often suspected in the soil of apple orchards contaminated with lead arsenate pesticide and in the soil of shooting ranges. Nitric acid (1 M) extractable Sb from the shooting range (8300 μg kg -1 ) and the apple orchard (69 μg kg -1 ) had considerably higher surface Sb levels than the control site ( -1 ), and Sb was confined to the top ∼30 cm soil layer. Sb(V) was the principal species in the shooting range and the apple orchard surface soils. Size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS) analysis of humic acids isolated from the two contaminated soils demonstrated that Sb has complexed to humic acid molar mass fractions. The results also indicate that humic acids have the ability to arrest the mobility of Sb through soils and would be beneficial in converting Sb(III) to a less toxic species, Sb(V), in contaminated areas. - The soil surface and depth distribution Sb(V) and Sb(III) species in a contaminated apple orchard and a shooting range, and the effect soil humic acids on inorganic antimony species is reported

  13. Uptake of ozone to mixed sodium bromide/ citric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tao; Steimle, Emilie; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Kato, Shunsuke; Lampimäki, Markus; Brown, Matthew; van Bokhoven, Jeroen; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Sea-salt solution - air interfaces play an important role in the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. The reaction of ozone (O3) with bromide is of interest in the context of formation of photolabile halogens (Br2, BrCl) in the marine boundary layer. Recent experiments have suggested that the bromide oxidation rate is related to the surface concentration of bromide [1] and inversely related to the gas phase concentration of O3, an indication for a precursor mediated reaction at the surface [2]. So far, the effect of organics (such as those occurring at the ocean surface or in marine aerosols) on the reaction of O3 with bromide aerosols has not been studied yet. In our study we investigate the uptake kinetics of O3 to a mixed solution of sodium bromide (NaBr) and citric acid (CA), which represents highly oxidized organic compounds present in the environment, with a well-established coated wall flow tube technique, which leads to exposure of the film to O3 allowing the heterogeneous reactions to take place and the loss of O3 being measured. The results indicate that the uptake of O3 to the films with the higher bromide concentrations (0.34M and 4M) is independent of the gas phase concentration and roughly consistent with uptake limited by reaction in the bulk. For the lower bromide concentration (84mM), however, we observe a trend of the uptake coefficient to decrease with increasing O3 concentration, indicating an increasing importance of a surface reaction. In an attempt to constrain the kinetic data, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to get insight into the surface composition of the aqueous solution - air interface. Previous XPS studies have shown that halide ion concentrations are enhanced at the aqueous solution air interface [3-4], which likely promotes the surface reactions of bromide or iodide with O3. A first XPS study of ternary solutions of KI with butanol indicated the importance of specific interactions of the cation with the alcohol

  14. Molybdenum (VI) binded to humic and nitrohumic acid models in aqueous solutions salicylic, 3-nitrosalicylic, 5-nitrosalicylic and 3,5 dinitrosalicylic acids, Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merce, Ana Lucia R.; Lopes, Priscilla P.; Mangricha, Antonio S.

    2006-01-01

    In this work electrochemical and Ultraviolet-Visible studies were performed in solutions of salicylic acid models of humic and nitrohumic acids, a laboratory artifact, and molybdenum in order to determine the affinity of these models towards the metal ion. Molybdenum, which plays a very important role in the soil chemistry, and together with humic substances, impart fertility to soil and water and is a key element in the activity of nitrogenase. The obtained results showed that at least one complexed species is present at the pH range of 6.3 to 8.0, even for the less basic chosen models, the nitrosalicylic acids. Previous study showed that phthalic and nitrophthalic, also humic and nitrohumic acids model compounds, presented complexed species with molybdenum only till pH 6.5. The calculated formation constants showed that the substitution of the nitro group in the orto position was less favoured than in the para substitution, probably due to a steric hindrance in the former, which was clearly seen in the double substituted salicylic nitro derivative. The cyclic voltammetry as well as the Ultraviolet-Visible obtained spectra were able to show that the chemistry of molybdenum in aqueous solutions as the pH is increased is very complex, and the molybdate stops acting as an anion only after pH around 4, when it finally becomes a cation MoO 2 2+ (M). (author)

  15. Molybdenum (VI binded to humic and nitrohumic acid models in aqueous solutions. Salicylic, 3-nitrosalicylic, 5-nitrosalicylic and 3,5 dinitrosalicylic acids: part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercê Ana Lucia R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work electrochemical and Ultraviolet-Visible studies were performed in solutions of salicylic acid models of humic and nitrohumic acids, a laboratory artifact, and molybdenum in order to determine the affinity of these models towards the metal ion. Molybdenum, which plays a very important role in the soil chemistry, and together with humic substances, impart fertility to soil and water and is a key element in the activity of nitrogenase. The obtained results showed that at least one complexed species is present at the pH range of 6.3 to 8.0, even for the less basic chosen models, the nitrosalicylic acids. Previous study showed that phthalic and nitrophthalic, also humic and nitrohumic acids model compounds, presented complexed species with molybdenum only till pH 6.5. The calculated formation constants showed that the substitution of the nitro group in the orto position was less favoured than in the para substitution, probably due to a steric hindrance in the former, which was clearly seen in the double substituted salicylic nitro derivative. The cyclic voltammetry as well as the Ultraviolet-Visible obtained spectra were able to show that the chemistry of molybdenum in aqueous solutions as the pH is increased is very complex, and the molybdate stops acting as an anion only after pH around 4, when it finally becomes a cation MoO2(2+ (M.

  16. Biochar immobilizes soil-borne arsenic but not cationic metals in the presence of low-molecular-weight organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alozie, Nneka; Heaney, Natalie; Lin, Chuxia

    2018-07-15

    A batch experiment was conducted to examine the effects of biochar on the behaviour of soil-borne arsenic and metals that were mobilized by three low-molecular-weight organic acids. In the presence of citric acid, oxalic acid and malic acid at a molar concentration of 0.01M, the surface of biochar was protonated, which disfavours adsorption of the cationic metals released from the soil by organic acid-driven mobilization. In contrast, the oxyanionic As species were re-immobilized by the protonated biochar effectively. Biochar could also immobilize oxyanionic Cr species but not cationic Cr species. The addition of biochar increased the level of metals in the solution due to the release of the biochar-borne metals under attack by LMWOAs via cation exchange. Biochar could also have the potential to enhance reductive dissolution of iron and manganese oxides in the soil, leading to enhanced release of trace elements bound to these oxides. The findings obtained from this study have implications for evaluating the role of biochar in immobilizing trace elements in rhizosphere. Adsorption of cationic heavy metals on biochar in the presence of LMWOAs is unlikely to be a mechanism responsible for the impeded uptake of heavy metals by plants growing in heavy metal-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of some soil amendments on soil properties and plant growth in Southern Thailand acid upland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onthong, C.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major factors limiting plant growth is acid soil. In general lime is used for soil amendment in acid soil. However, It has been reported that gypsum or phosphogypsum can be used for ameliorating soilacidity. Pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of lime, phosphogypsum and kieserite on soil properties and plant growth in Kho Hong soil series (coarse loamy, kaolinitic,isohyperthermic, TypicKandiudults which was considered as acid upland soil (pH 5.07. Sweet corn variety INSEE 2 was used as the test crop. The experiment was a completely randomized design with 4 replications and 19 treatments asfollow : unamended, application of hydrated lime and dolomite to raise soil pH at 5.5, application of hydrated lime and dolomite combined with phosphogypsum at the rate that can supply calcium 0.25, 0.50,0.75 and 1 time of both limes, application of hydrated lime and dolomite combined with kieserite at the rate 0.25, 0.50,0.75 and 1 times of sulfur requirement for corn (40 kg S ha-1. The result showed that shoot and root dry weights of corn were increased when lime materials, phosphogypsum and kieserite were applied and the drymatter weights were increased according to the increasing of phosphogypsum and kieserite. The maximum shoot dry weight (18.98 g pot-1 was obtained when 1 times of kieserite was supplied with dolomite and wassignificantly (P<0.01 higher than those of the unamended treatment, only hydrated lime and dolomite treatments, which had dry weights of 12.64, 15.18 and 15.67 g pot-1 respectively. Phosphorus and K uptakewere not significantly different in all treatments and the lowest uptake of N, Ca, Mg and S was obtained in the unamended treatment. The maximum uptake of N (512.10 mg pot-1 was found when 0.5 times ofphosphogypsum was applied together with dolomite. Calcium and Mg uptake was likely to increase according to the increasing rate of soil amendment application. Highest uptake of Ca (42.51 mg pot-1 was obtainedwhen

  18. Biological decomposition of aqueous solutions from soil cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniebusch, M.M.; Sekoulov, I.

    1993-01-01

    The biological cleaning of process water from soil cleaning and from contaminated groundwater required the development of new types of reaction systems. With the introduced membrane biofilm reactor, even substances difficult to decompose can be removed from contaminated water. Previous investigations of the elimination of pyrene in the presence of n-hexadecane show an optimum temperature at 30 C. An increase of scale is possible based on the invesstigations carried out on the aerobic biological decomposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (orig.) [de

  19. An Analytical Solution for Cylindrical Concrete Tank on Deformable Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirish Vichare

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical concrete tanks are commonly used in wastewater treatment plants. These are usually clarifier tanks. Design codes of practice provide methods to calculate design forces in the wall and raft of such tanks. These methods neglect self-weight of tank material and assume extreme, namely ‘fixed’ and ‘hinged’ conditions for the wall bottom. However, when founded on deformable soil, the actual condition at the wall bottom is neither fixed nor hinged. Further, the self-weight of the tank wall does affect the design forces. Thus, it is required to offer better insight of the combined effect of deformable soil and bottom raft stiffness on the design forces induced in such cylindrical concrete tanks. A systematic analytical method based on fundamental equations of shells is presented in this paper. Important observations on variation of design forces across the wall and the raft with different soil conditions are given. Set of commonly used tanks, are analysed using equations developed in the paper and are appended at the end.

  20. Study of reactive solutes transport and PAH migration in unsaturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujisaite, V.; Simonnot, M.O.; Gujisaite, V.; Morel, J.L.; Ouvrard, S.; Simonnot, M.O.; Gaudet, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental studies about solute transport in soil have most of the time been conducted under saturated conditions, whereas studies with unsaturated media are usually limited to hydrodynamic analysis. Those are mainly concerning the prediction of water flow, which is the main vector for the transport of contaminants in soil. Only a few studies have made the link between unsaturated flow and physical, chemical and biological interactions, which are controlling the availability of pollutants. However, the presence of a gaseous phase in soil can modify not only the movement of soil solution, but also chemical interactions and exchanges between soil aggregates and solution. Study of reactive solute transport in the vadose zone seems thus to be a necessary stage to predict contaminant fate in natural soils, for risk assessment as well as for the design of effective processes for the remediation of contaminated soils. This question is the main objective of the present work developed in the frame of our French Scientific Interest Group Industrial Wastelands called 'GISFI' (www.gisfi.prd.fr), based around a scientific and technological project dedicated to acquisition of knowledge for sustainable requalification of degraded sites polluted by past industrial activities. We will focus here on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which are among the most widely discussed environmental contaminants because of their toxicity for human health and ecosystems. They are present in large quantities in soils polluted by former industrial activities, especially in relation to the coal extraction, exploitation and treatment. An experimental system has been specifically designed at the laboratory scale to carry out experiments under controlled conditions, with an unsaturated steady-state flow. The first experiments are performed on model soils, in order to investigate unsaturated steady-state flow in relation to interactions mechanisms. We have thus chosen to use a sandy

  1. High-Yield Production of Levulinic Acid from Pretreated Cow Dung in Dilute Acid Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialei Su

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural waste cow dung was used as feedstock for the production of a high value–added chemical levulinic acid (LA in dilute acid aqueous solutions. A high LA yield of 338.9 g/kg was obtained from the pretreated cow dung, which was much higher than that obtained from the crude cow dung (135 g/kg, mainly attributed to the breakage of the lignin fraction in the lignocellulose structure of the cow dung by potassium hydroxide (KOH pretreatment, and thus enhanced the accessibility of cow dung to the acid sites in the catalytic reaction. Meanwhile, another value-added chemical formic acid could be obtained with a yield of ca. 160 g/kg in the process, implying a total production of ca. 500 g/kg yield for LA and formic acid from the pretreated cow dung with the proposed process. The developed process was shown to be tolerant to high initial substrate loading with a satisfied LA yield. This work provides a promising strategy for the value-increment utilization of liglocellulosic agricultural residues.

  2. Influence of acid rain and organic matter on the adsorption of trace elements on soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Ambe, S.; Takematsu, N.; Ambe, F.

    1998-01-01

    Acid rain has become one of the most serious environmental problems. Soil loses its buffering capacity by long exposure to acid rain, and the soil pH value decreases significantly. The acidification of the soil disturbs the adsorption equilibrium of many elements in the soil-water system. Soil is a very complex heterogeneous system, primarily consisting of clay minerals, hydrous oxides and polymeric organic substances, which possess their own characteristic element-adsorbing properties. On the other hand, the intrinsic properties of elements are reflected in their adsorption process as a matter of course. Therefore, both the effects of the pH of acid rain and that of the components of the soil on the adsorption of different elements should be studied when the adsorption process in acid soils is to be clarified. Although leaching of major cations in soil, such as Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ and Al 3+ , by acid rain, has been extensively studied, relatively little attention has been focused on trace elements which can also seriously affect the ecological system. We studied the acid rain effects on element adsorption by kaolin, forest soil, black soil, and also these soils with Fe- and Mn-oxides or organic matter selectively removed by using the radioactive multitracer technique. (author)

  3. Acid-base equilibrium in aqueous solutions of 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid as studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryff-Keller, A.; Kraska-Dziadecka, A.

    2011-12-01

    13C NMR spectra of 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid in aqueous solutions of various acidities and for various solute concentrations have been recorded and interpreted. The spectra recorded at pH = 2 and below contain the signals of the neutral solute molecule exclusively, while the ones recorded at pH = 7 and above only the signals of the appropriate anion, which has been confirmed by theoretical GIAO-DFT calculations. The signals in the spectra recorded for solutions of pH pH variation have been observed for the parent barbituric acid.

  4. Influence of soil water repellency on runoff and solute loss from New Zealand pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumar, P.; Müller, K.; Deurer, M.; van den Dijssel, C.; Mason, K.; Green, S.; Clothier, B. E.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) has been reported in New Zealand, but knowledge on its importance for the country's economy and environment is limited. Our recent survey on the occurrence of SWR under pasture across the North Island of New Zealand showed that most soils exhibited SWR when dry independent of climate but influenced by the soil order. SWR is discussed as an important soil surface condition enhancing run-off and the transfer of fertilizers and pesticides from agricultural land into waterways. So far, the impact of SWR on run-off has rarely been measured. We developed a laboratory-scale run-off measurement apparatus (ROMA) to quantify directly the impact of SWR on run-off from undisturbed soil slabs. We compared the run-off resulting from the run-on of water with that resulting from an ethanol (30% v/v) solution, which is a fully-wetting liquid even in severely hydrophobic soils. Thus, the experiments with the ethanol solution can be understood as a proxy measure of the wetting-up behaviour of hydrophilic soils. We conducted ROMA run-off experiments with air-dried soil slabs (460 mm long x 190 mm wide x 50 mm deep) collected from pastoral sites, representing three major soil orders in the North Island: Recent Soil (Fluvisol), Gley Soil (Gleysol), and Organic Soil (Histosol), with water followed by the ethanol solution at a run-on rate of 60 mm/h. Bromide was applied at 80 kg KBr/ha prior to the water experiments to assess potential solute losses via run-off. The air-dried soils had a high degree and persistence of SWR (contact angles, 97, 98 and 104° , and potential water drop penetration times, 42, 54 and 231 min for the Fluvisol, Gleysol and Histosol, respectively). Under identical soil and experimental conditions, water generated run-off from all soils, but in the experiments with the ethanol solution, the entire ethanol solution infiltrated into the soils. The ranking of the run-off coefficients of the soils directly reflected their ranking in

  5. Metrological assessment of TDR performance for measurement of potassium concentration in soil solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac de M. Ponciano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Despite the growing use of the time domain reflectometry (TDR technique to monitoring ions in the soil solution, there are few studies that provide insight into measurement error. To overcome this lack of information, a methodology, based on the central limit theorem error, was used to quantify the uncertainty associated with using the technique to estimate potassium ion concentration in two soil types. Mathematical models based on electrical conductivity and soil moisture derived from TDR readings were used to estimate potassium concentration, and the results were compared to potassium concentration determined by flame spectrophotometry. It was possible to correct for random and systematic errors associated with TDR readings, significantly increasing the accuracy of the potassium estimation methodology. However, a single TDR reading can lead to an error of up to ± 18.84 mg L-1 K+ in soil solution (0 to 3 dS m-1, with a 95.42% degree of confidence, for a loamy sand soil; and an error of up to ± 12.50 mg L-1 of K+ (0 to 2.5 dS m-1 in soil solution, with a 95.06% degree of confidence, for a sandy clay soil.

  6. Acute toxicity assessment of explosive-contaminated soil extracting solution by luminescent bacteria assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjie; Jiang, Zhenming; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Su, Hongping; Gao, Xuewen; Ye, Zhengfang

    2016-11-01

    Explosive-contaminated soil is harmful to people's health and the local ecosystem. The acute toxicity of its extracting solution was tested by bacterial luminescence assay using three kinds of luminescent bacteria to characterize the toxicity of the soil. An orthogonal test L 16 (4 5 ) was designed to optimize the soil extracting conditions. The optimum extracting conditions were obtained when the ultrasonic extraction time, ultrasonic extraction temperature, and the extraction repeat times were 6 h, 40 °C, and three, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed that the main components of the contaminated soil's extracting solution were 2,4-dinitrotoluene-3-sulfonate (2,4-DNT-3-SO 3 - ); 2,4-dinitrotoluene-5-sulfonate (2,4-DNT-5-SO 3 - ); and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT). Compared with Photobacterium phosphoreum and Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov. is more suitable for assessing the soil extracting solution's acute toxicity. Soil washing can remove most of the contaminants toxic to luminescent bacterium Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov., suggesting that it may be a potential effective remediation method for explosive-contaminated soil.

  7. Water, solute and heat transport in the soil: the Australian connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John

    2016-04-01

    The interest of Peter Raats in water, solute and heat transport in the soil has led to scientific and/or personal interactions with several Australian scientists such as John Philip, David Smiles, Greg Davis and John Knight. Along with John Philip and Robin Wooding, Peter was an early user of the Gardner (1958) linearised model of soil water flow, which brought him into competition with John Philip. I will discuss some of Peter's solutions relevant to infiltration from line and point sources, cavities and basins. A visit to Canberra, Australia in the early 1980s led to joint work on soil water flow, and on combined water and solute movement with David Smiles and others. In 1983 Peter was on the PhD committee for Greg Davis at the University of Wollongong, and some of the methods in his thesis 'Mathematical modelling of rate-limiting mechanisms of pyritic oxidation in overburden dumps' were later used by Peter's student Sjoerd van der Zee. David Smiles and Peter wrote a survey article 'Hydrology of swelling clay soils' in 2005. In the last decade Peter has been investigating the history of groundwater and vadose zone hydrology, and recently he and I have been bringing to light the largely forgotten work of Lewis Fry Richardson on finite difference solution of the heat equation, drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

  8. Analytical solution describing pesticide volatilization from soil affected by a change in surface condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, S R

    2009-01-01

    An analytical solution describing the fate and transport of pesticides applied to soils has been developed. Two pesticide application methods can be simulated: point-source applications, such as idealized shank or a hot-gas injection method, and a more realistic shank-source application method that includes a vertical pesticide distribution in the soil domain due to a soil fracture caused by a shank. The solutions allow determination of the volatilization rate and other information that could be important for understanding fumigant movement and in the development of regulatory permitting conditions. The solutions can be used to characterize differences in emissions relative to changes in the soil degradation rate, surface barrier conditions, application depth, and soil packing. In some cases, simple algebraic expressions are provided that can be used to obtain the total emissions and total soil degradation. The solutions provide a consistent methodology for determining the total emissions and can be used with other information, such as field and laboratory experimental data, to support the development of fumigant regulations. The uses of the models are illustrated by several examples.

  9. Improving the management of infertile acid soils in Southeast Asia: The approach of the IBSRAM Acid-Soils network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefroy, R.D.B.

    2000-01-01

    The IBSRAM ASIALAND Management of Acid Soils network aims to improve the understanding of the broad range of biophysical and socio-economic production limitations on infertile acid soils of Southeast Asia, and to lead to development and implementation of sustainable land-management strategies for these important marginal areas. The main activities of the network are in Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines, and Vietnam, with associated activity in Thailand, and minor involvement in Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, and Malaysia. The main experimental focus is through researcher-managed on-farm trials, to improve the management of phosphorus nutrition with inorganic and organic amendments. A generic design is used across the eight well characterised sites that form the core of the network. The results will be analysed across time and across sites. Improved methods for laboratory analyses, experimental management, socio-economic data collection, and data analysis and interpretation are critical components. Three important initiatives are associated with the core activities. These aim to establish a broader network on maintenance of quality laboratory analyses, to assess the potential for implementation of improved strategies through farmer-managed on-farm trials, and to improve our understanding of, and ways of estimating, nutrient budgets for diverse farming systems. (author)

  10. Optimization of radioactivation analysis for the determination of iodine, bromine, and chlorine contents in soils, plants, soil solutions and rain water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuita, Kouichi

    1983-01-01

    The conventional analytical procedures for iodine, bromine and chlorine in soils, plants, soil solutions and rain water, especially in the former two, have not been sufficient in their accuracy and sensitivity. With emphasis on the radioactivation analysis known to be a highly accurate analytical method, practical radioactivation procedures with high sensitivity, accurate and covenient, have been investigated for the determination of the three halogen elements in various soils and plants and of the three contained in extremely low concentrations in soil solutions and rain water. Consequently, the following methods were able to be established: (1) non-destructive radioactivation analysis without the chemical separation of bromine and chlorine in plants, soil solutions and rain water; (2) radioactivation analysis by group separating, simultaneous determination of iodine, bromine and chlorine in soils; (3) highsensitivity radioactivation analysis for iodine in plants, soil solutions and rain water. A manual for the analytical procedures was prepared accordingly. (Mori, K.)

  11. Effects of Pisha sandstone content on solute transport in a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Qing; Zheng, Jiyong; He, Honghua; Han, Fengpeng; Zhang, Xingchang

    2016-02-01

    In sandy soil, water, nutrients and even pollutants are easily leaching to deeper layers. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of Pisha sandstone on soil solute transport in a sandy soil. The miscible displacement technique was used to obtain breakthrough curves (BTCs) of Br(-) as an inert non-adsorbed tracer and Na(+) as an adsorbed tracer. The incorporation of Pisha sandstone into sandy soil was able to prevent the early breakthrough of both tracers by decreasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity compared to the controlled sandy soil column, and the impeding effects increased with Pisha sandstone content. The BTCs of Br(-) were accurately described by both the convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (T-R), and the T-R model fitted the experimental data slightly better than the CDE. The two-site nonequilibrium model (T-S) accurately fit the Na(+) transport data. Pisha sandstone impeded the breakthrough of Na(+) not only by decreasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity but also by increasing the adsorption capacity of the soil. The measured CEC values of Pisha sandstone were up to 11 times larger than those of the sandy soil. The retardation factors (R) determined by the T-S model increased with increasing Pisha sandstone content, and the partition coefficient (K(d)) showed a similar trend to R. According to the results of this study, Pisha sandstone can successfully impede solute transport in a sandy soil column. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

    1994-01-01

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO 3 reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min -1 at 110 C for an open ''vented'' system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min -1 in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols' (1.33E-3 min -1 ) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ''reacting'' 14.3M HNO 3 aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO 3 reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk

  13. Humic acid removal from aqueous solutions by peroxielectrocoagulation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Yazdanbakhsh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Natural organic matter is the cause of many problems associated with water treatment such as the presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs and membrane fouling during water filtration. In this study, the performance of the peroxi-electrocoagulation process (PEP was investigated for the removal of humic acids (HAs from aqueous solutions. Methods: PEP was carried out for the removal of HA using a plexiglas reactor with a volume of 2 L and fitted with iron electrodes and a direct current supply (DC. Samples were taken at various amounts of pH (2-4, current density (1 and 2A/cm2, hydrogen peroxide (50-150 mg/L and reaction time (5-20 minutes and then filtered to remove sludge formed during reaction. Finally, the HA concentration was measured by UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254. Results: Results indicated that increasing the concentration of H2O2 from 50 to 150 mg/L increased HA removal efficiency from 83% to 94.5%. The highest removal efficiency was observed at pH 3.0; by increasing the pH to the alkaline range, the efficiency of the process was reduced. It was found that HA removal efficiency was high in current density 1A/cm2. Increasing current density up to 1 A cm-2 caused a decrease in removal efficiency. Results of this study showed that under the optimum operating range for the process ([current density] = 1A/cm2, [hydrogen peroxide concentration] = 150 mg/L, [reaction time]= 20 minutes and [pH]= 3.0, HA removal efficiency reached 98%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that PEP has the potential to be utilized for cost-effective removal of HA from aqueous solutions.

  14. Fate of aliphatic compounds in nitric acid processing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.E.; Howerton, W.B.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of hyperazeotropic iodic acid-saturated nitric acid with short chain aliphatic iodides, nitrates, and acids was studied in order to determine the conditions for complete removal of organic materials from nitric acid systems. The aliphatic iodides are converted to the nitrates and the nitrates in strong HNO 3 are extensively converted into CO 2 and acids. The aliphatic acids are rather stable; acetic acid was unattacked by boiling in 20M HNO 3 and n-butyric acid was 80 percent unattacked. The dibasic acids oxalic and malonic are extensively attacked, but succinic acid is relatively stable. A wet oxidation method is successful in destroying acetic acid in 5 to 8M HNO 3 . (U.S.)

  15. Calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbanov, A.R.; Sharipov, D.Sh.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid. The calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid was carried out in order to determine the thermal effects of reactions. The results of interaction of Ba(OH) 4 ·8H 2 O with 5, 10, and 20% solution of hydrofluoric acid were considered.

  16. Organic radionuclide compounds in soil solutions and their role in elements absorption in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapkin, G.I.; Tikhomirov, F.A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of reference experiments with introduction of radioactive labels ( 35 S, 45 Ca, 59 Fe, 85 , 125 I) into 5 types of climatophytic soils by the method of radiogel-chromatography allow to ascertain that in soil solutions 59 Fe and 125 I incorporate completely and 35 S, 45 Ca and 85 Sr incorporate by 60-90 % into the composition of one of three fractions of organic compounds with molecular masses of 4x10 2 -6x10 4 . It is shown that significant variations between soils in the absorption of such radionuclides as 4 5 Ca, 58 Fe, 85 Sr and 125 I are celated to a different degree of their transport into soil solutions as well as to differencies in their distribution by molecular-mass fractions of water-soluble organic compounds

  17. Pulse radiolysis of pyridinecarboxylic acids in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solar, S.; Getoff, N.; Sehested, K.

    1991-01-01

    The reactivity of OH, e(aq)- and H radicals towards aqueous carboxypyridines: picolinic acid (2-pyridinecarboxylic acid), PA; isonicotinic acid (4-pyridinecarboxylic acid), i-NA; 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 2,6-PDCA; and 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 3,5-PDCA was investigated in the pH-range 1...... radical are: 20% for PA, 75% for i-NA, 60% for 2,6-PDCA and 25% for 3,5-PDCA (a yield of 50% has been found earlier for nicotinic acid, NA)....

  18. Extraction of soil solution by drainage centrifugation—effects of centrifugal force and time of centrifugation on soil moisture recovery and solute concentration in soil moisture of loess subsoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraters, D.; Boom, G.J.F.L.; Boumans, L.J.M.; Weerd, H. de; Wolters, M.

    2017-01-01

    The solute concentration in the subsoil beneath the root zone is an important parameter for leaching assessment. Drainage centrifugation is considered a simple and straightforward method of determining soil solution chemistry. Although several studies have been carried out to determine whether this

  19. Hydrogen oxidation on gold electrode in perchloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustersic, M.G.; Almeida, N.V.; Von Mengershausen, A.E. [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, 25 de Mayo N 384, 5730 Villa Mercedes, San Luis (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this research is to study the interface gold/perchloric acid solution in presence of hydrogen. The reactive is generated by H{sup +} ion reduction and by saturating the electrolyte with the gaseous H{sub 2}. No evidence of H{sub 2} dissociative adsorption is found. In special conditions, a strongly adsorbed layer is formed from the atoms diffusing from inside of the metal. The mass transport occurs in three ways: the diffusion of H atoms inwards, the diffusion of H atoms back to the surface and the dissolved H{sub 2} diffusion from the bulk electrolyte to the surface. When dissolved H{sub 2} reacts, the reaction is kinetically controlled when the H{sub 2} partial pressure is high, and it is diffusionally controlled when the reactive partial pressure is low. Above 0.7 V, (measured vs. RHE), the (100) plane surface reconstruction lifts, and the rate determining step is the H diffusion towards inside of the metal, and the current suddenly falls. The Hydrogen redox reaction on gold shows reversibility with respect to the potential when the reactives are the H diffusing outwards of the metal and the H{sup +} ion present in the electrolyte. However, the absolute current values of oxidation and reduction are different because the reactive sources are different. (author)

  20. Characteristics of alkali activated material (geopolymer) in sulfuric acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simatupang, Partogi H.

    2017-09-01

    Alkali Activated Material (AAM) or Geopolymer is a solid material which made by mixing rich silica alumina material with alkaline activator. AAM is a well known candidate to replace cement based material. Many researches have claimed that AAM has better durability compared to cement based material in agressive environment. However, there was rare paper presented the direct comparison of material characteristics between Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM in such aggresive environment. Because of that, this paper present material characteristics of Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM if the materials were immersed in 10% sulfuric acid solution for 65 days. Material characteristics evaluated were (1) weight loss, (2) mineral of the material which evaluated by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), (3) morphology and oxide compounds of material which evaluated by SEM/EDXA (Scanning Electron Microscopic/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analyzer) and (4) compound bond which evaluated by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red) Spectroscopy Testing. Alkali Activated Material used were Class F fly ash based AAM Mortar and Class C fly ash based AAM Mortar. The result is a quite difference of material characteristics between Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM.

  1. SFG study of platinum electrodes in perchloric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W. Q.; Pluchery, O.; Tadjeddine, A.

    2002-04-01

    Infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has been used to study the structure of water molecules (and/or its derivatives OH -, H 3O + etc.) at aqueous electrolyte/electrode interfaces. For Pt(1 1 0) and Pt(1 0 0) electrodes in 0.1 M perchloric acid solution, we did not observe any significant O-H stretching resonance. In striking contrast to the resonant SFG signal, the nonresonant SFG (NRSFG) signal varies sensitively with the applied electrochemical potential, indicating that the interaction of water molecules with platinum electrodes is relatively weak as compared to that of H + and ClO 4- ions. From changes in the NRSFG signal and on the basis of an ionic adsorption model, we can also deduce that the potential of zero charge of Pt(1 1 0) in 0.1 M HClO 4 should be located at about 0.22 V (vs. NHE). This value is in good agreement with that measured recently by electrochemical method.

  2. A new chemical system solution for acid gas removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, M.; Rolker, J.; Witthaut, D.; Schulze, S. [Evonik Industries AG, Hanau (Germany); Buchholz, S. [Evonik Industries AG, Marl (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    An energy-efficient absorbent formulation fors eparating acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2}, H2S) from gas streams such as natural gas, syngas or flue gas is important for a number of industrial applications. In many cases, a substantial share of their costs is driven by the operational expenditure (OPEX) of the CO{sub 2} separation unit. One possible strategy for reducing OPEX is the improvement of the absorbent performance. Although a number of absorbents for the separation of CO{sub 2} from gas streams exist, there is still a need to develop CO{sub 2} absorbents with an improved absorption performance, less corrosion and foaming, no nitrosamine formation, lower energy requirement and therefore less OPEX. This contribution aims at giving a brief state-of-the-art overview followed by an introduction and performance characterization of a new family of amine-based CO{sub 2} absorbents. High cyclic capacities in the range of 2.9 to 3.2 mol CO{sub 2} kg{sup -1} absorbent and low absorption enthalpies of about -30 kJ mol{sup -1} allow for significant savings in the regeneration energy of the new absorbent system. Calculations with the modified Kremser model indicate a reduction in the specific reboiler heat duty of 45 %. Moreover, the high-performance absorbents developed show much lower corrosion rates than state-of-the-art solutions that are currently employed. (orig.)

  3. Pulse radiolysis of adrenaline in acid aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, E.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis of adrenaline in acid aqueous solutions (pH 1 to 3) was carried out. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenaline with H and 0H were determined: k(H + adr.) = (0.9 +- 0.1) x 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ; k(0H + adr.) = (1.65 +- 0.15) x 10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . The H-adduct of adrenaline has two lambdasub(max), at 280 and 355 nm, with epsilon 280 = 420 m 2 mol -1 and epsilon 355 = 390 m 2 mol -1 , which disappears according to a first order reaction, k 1 = 1.4 x 10 3 s -1 . The spectra formed by 0H attack was assigned to the corresponding benzoxy radical with absorption maxima at 285 and 365 nm and epsilon 285 = 620 m 2 mol -1 and epsilon 365 = 105 m 2 mol -1 . Due to the overlapping of the intermediates, no decay kinetics could be obtained. (author)

  4. Hyaluronic acid solution injection for upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed conventional endoscopic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyung Hun

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be an additional endoscopic modality for controlling bleeding in difficult cases when other techniques have failed. We evaluated 12 cases in which we used hyaluronic acid solution injection for stopping bleeding. Immediately following hyaluronic acid solution injection, bleeding was controlled in 11 out of 12 cases. There was no clinical evidence of renewed bleeding in 11 cases during follow up.Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be a simple and efficient additional method for controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  5. Size and shape of soil humic acids estimated by viscosity and molecular weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahigashi, Masayuki; Sumida, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2005-04-15

    Ultrafiltration fractions of three soil humic acids were characterized by viscometry and high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) in order to estimate shapes and hydrodynamic sizes. Intrinsic viscosities under given solute/solvent/temperature conditions were obtained by extrapolating the concentration dependence of reduced viscosities to zero concentration. Molecular mass (weight average molecular weight (M (w)) and number average molecular weight (M (n))) and hydrodynamic radius (R(H)) were determined by HPSEC using pullulan as calibrant. Values of M (w) and M (n) ranged from 15 to 118 x 10(3) and from 9 to 50 x 10(3) (g mol(-1)), respectively. Polydispersity, as indicated by M (w)/M (n), increased with increasing filter size from 1.5 to 2.4. The hydrodynamic radii (R(H)) ranged between 2.2 and 6.4 nm. For each humic acid, M (w) and [eta] were related. Mark-Houwink coefficients calculated on the basis of the M (w)-[eta] relationships suggested restricted flexible chains for two of the humic acids and a branched structure for the third humic acid. Those structures probably behave as hydrated sphere colloids in a good solvent. Hydrodynamic radii of fractions calculated from [eta] using Einstein's equation, which is applicable to hydrated sphere colloids, ranged from 2.2 to 7.1 nm. These dimensions are fit to the size of nanospaces on and between clay minerals and micropores in soil particle aggregates. On the other hand, the good agreement of R(H) values obtained by applying Einstein's equation with those directly determined by HPSEC suggests that pullulan is a suitable calibrant for estimation of molecular mass and size of humic acids by HPSEC.

  6. A pulse radiolysis study of salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, Kamal; Mukherjee, T.

    2006-01-01

    Reactions of H, OH, e aq - and some one-electron oxidants have been studied with salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions. Rate constants for the reaction of e aq - with these compounds were of the order of 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and this reaction led to the formation of reducing radicals which could transfer electron to methyl viologen. Other one-electron reductants were not able to reduce these compounds. OH radicals reacted with these compounds by addition pathway with very high rate constants (>10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ) while O - radical anions could oxidize these molecules to give phenoxyl type of radicals. Amongst the one-electron oxidants, only N 3 radicals and SO 4 - radicals could oxidize salicylic acid while 5-sulpho-salicylic acid could be oxidized only by SO 4 - radicals indicating that while one-electron reduction potential for semi-oxidized SA may be o1 for N 3 ? radical), it is more than 1.33V vs. NHE for semi-oxidized SSA species

  7. How to Perform Precise Soil and Sediment Sampling? One solution: The Fine Increment Soil Collector (FISC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabit, L.; Toloza, A.; Meusburger, K.; Alewell, C.; Iurian, A-R.; Owens, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Soil and sediment related research for terrestrial agrienvironmental assessments requires accurate depth incremental sampling to perform detailed analysis of physical, geochemical and biological properties of soil and exposed sediment profiles. Existing equipment does not allow collecting soil/sediment increments at millimetre resolution. The Fine Increment Soil Collector (FISC), developed by the SWMCN Laboratory, allows much greater precision in incremental soil/sediment sampling. It facilitates the easy recovery of collected material by using a simple screw-thread extraction system (see Figure 1). The FISC has been designed specifically to enable standardized scientific investigation of shallow soil/sediment samples. In particular, applications have been developed in two IAEA Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs): CRP D1.20.11 on “Integrated Isotopic Approaches for an Area-wide Precision Conservation to Control the Impacts of Agricultural Practices on Land Degradation and Soil Erosion” and CRP D1.50.15 on “Response to Nuclear Emergencies Affecting Food and Agriculture.”

  8. How to Perform Precise Soil and Sediment Sampling? One solution: The Fine Increment Soil Collector (FISC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabit, L.; Toloza, A. [Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, IAEA, Seibersdorf (Austria); Meusburger, K.; Alewell, C. [Environmental Geosciences, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Iurian, A-R. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Owens, P. N. [Environmental Science Program and Quesnel River Research Centre, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Soil and sediment related research for terrestrial agrienvironmental assessments requires accurate depth incremental sampling to perform detailed analysis of physical, geochemical and biological properties of soil and exposed sediment profiles. Existing equipment does not allow collecting soil/sediment increments at millimetre resolution. The Fine Increment Soil Collector (FISC), developed by the SWMCN Laboratory, allows much greater precision in incremental soil/sediment sampling. It facilitates the easy recovery of collected material by using a simple screw-thread extraction system (see Figure 1). The FISC has been designed specifically to enable standardized scientific investigation of shallow soil/sediment samples. In particular, applications have been developed in two IAEA Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs): CRP D1.20.11 on “Integrated Isotopic Approaches for an Area-wide Precision Conservation to Control the Impacts of Agricultural Practices on Land Degradation and Soil Erosion” and CRP D1.50.15 on “Response to Nuclear Emergencies Affecting Food and Agriculture.”.

  9. Role of amino acid metabolites in the formation of soil organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1972-01-01

    Carbon-14 labelled cellulose or glucose were added to a medium loam and two sandy soils. The soils were incubated at 20°C for about 6 yr under laboratory conditions. Six to 12 per cent of the labelled carbon added to the soils was transformed into metabolites hydrolysable to amino acids during th...

  10. [Influence of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris on soil solution complexation capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Gharmali, A; Rada, A; el Meray, M; Nejmeddine, A

    2001-04-01

    Four soil samples highly contaminated with metals of urban and mine origin (SE1, SE2, SM1, SM2) and having different physico-chemical proprieties were selected to study copper complexation capacity (LT) of soil solution. The effect of Lumbricus terrestris on copper complexation capacity of soil solution was investigated on SE1 and SE2. The complexation capacity was estimated by amperometric titration of soil solution by copper. Free hydrated cation and labile complexes of copper were determined by DPASV. The results show that the copper complexation capacity variation depends on the physico-chemical characteristics of soils, particularly pH. Thus, the values of copper complexation capacity are 0; 0.6 x 10(-7); 1.8 x 10(-7) and 5.5 x 10(-7) mol l-1 respectively for SM2; SM1; SE1 and SE2 which are pH 5; 5.4; 6.5 and 7.4. Based on these results, the bioavailability levels of heavy metals show the following pool ranking: SM2 > SM1 > SE1 > SE2. The copper complexation capacity of soil solution increases with the soil disturbance by Lumbricus terrestris. This is more obvious when the time of disturbance by lumbrics is longer. Indeed, average values determined for 1 month and 3 months are 3.8 x 10(-7) and 7.8 x 10(-7) mol l-1 for SE1; 7.7 x 10(-7) and 15.2 x 10(-7) mol l-1 for SE2 respectively. It seems that the action of earthworm on soil can contribute to the decrease of bioavailability of heavy metals, particularly copper.

  11. The microbial communities and potential greenhouse gas production in boreal acid sulphate, non-acid sulphate, and reedy sulphidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimek, Miloslav; Virtanen, Seija; Simojoki, Asko; Chroňáková, Alica; Elhottová, Dana; Krištůfek, Václav; Yli-Halla, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Acid sulphate (AS) soils along the Baltic coasts contain significant amounts of organic carbon and nitrogen in their subsoils. The abundance, composition, and activity of microbial communities throughout the AS soil profile were analysed. The data from a drained AS soil were compared with those from a drained non-AS soil and a pristine wetland soil from the same region. Moreover, the potential production of methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide from the soils was determined under laboratory conditions. Direct microscopic counting, glucose-induced respiration (GIR), whole cell hybridisation, and extended phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis confirmed the presence of abundant microbial communities in the topsoil and also in the deepest Cg2 horizon of the AS soil. The patterns of microbial counts, biomass and activity in the profile of the AS soil and partly also in the non-AS soil therefore differed from the general tendency of gradual decreases in soil profiles. High respiration in the deepest Cg2 horizon of the AS soil (5.66 μg Cg(-1)h(-1), as compared to 2.71 μg Cg(-1)h(-1) in a top Ap horizon) is unusual but reasonable given the large amount of organic carbon in this horizon. Nitrous oxide production peaked in the BCgc horizon of the AS and in the BC horizon of the non-AS soil, but the peak value was ten-fold higher in the AS soil than in the non-AS soil (82.3 vs. 8.6 ng Ng(-1)d(-1)). The data suggest that boreal AS soils on the Baltic coast contain high microbial abundance and activity. This, together with the abundant carbon and total and mineral nitrogen in the deep layers of AS soils, may result in substantial gas production. Consequently, high GHG emissions could occur, for example, when the generally high water table is lowered because of arable farming. © 2013.

  12. Effects of meteorological models on the solution of the surface energy balance and soil temperature variations in bare soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hirotaka; Šimůnek, Jiri

    2009-07-01

    SummaryA complete evaluation of the soil thermal regime can be obtained by evaluating the movement of liquid water, water vapor, and thermal energy in the subsurface. Such an evaluation requires the simultaneous solution of the system of equations for the surface water and energy balance, and subsurface heat transport and water flow. When only daily climatic data is available, one needs not only to estimate diurnal cycles of climatic data, but to calculate the continuous values of various components in the energy balance equation, using different parameterization methods. The objective of this study is to quantify the impact of the choice of different estimation and parameterization methods, referred together to as meteorological models in this paper, on soil temperature predictions in bare soils. A variety of widely accepted meteorological models were tested on the dataset collected at a proposed low-level radioactive-waste disposal site in the Chihuahua Desert in West Texas. As the soil surface was kept bare during the study, no vegetation effects were evaluated. A coupled liquid water, water vapor, and heat transport model, implemented in the HYDRUS-1D program, was used to simulate diurnal and seasonal soil temperature changes in the engineered cover installed at the site. The modified version of HYDRUS provides a flexible means for using various types of information and different models to evaluate surface mass and energy balance. Different meteorological models were compared in terms of their prediction errors for soil temperatures at seven observation depths. The results obtained indicate that although many available meteorological models can be used to solve the energy balance equation at the soil-atmosphere interface in coupled water, vapor, and heat transport models, their impact on overall simulation results varies. For example, using daily average climatic data led to greater prediction errors, while relatively simple meteorological models may

  13. Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, Jason T; Soga, Kenichi; Banwart, Steven A; Whalley, W Richard; Ginn, Timothy R; Nelson, Douglas C; Mortensen, Brina M; Martinez, Brian C; Barkouki, Tammer

    2011-01-06

    Carbon sequestration, infrastructure rehabilitation, brownfields clean-up, hazardous waste disposal, water resources protection and global warming-these twenty-first century challenges can neither be solved by the high-energy consumptive practices that hallmark industry today, nor by minor tweaking or optimization of these processes. A more radical, holistic approach is required to develop the sustainable solutions society needs. Most of the above challenges occur within, are supported on, are enabled by or grown from soil. Soil, contrary to conventional civil engineering thought, is a living system host to multiple simultaneous processes. It is proposed herein that 'soil engineering in vivo', wherein the natural capacity of soil as a living ecosystem is used to provide multiple solutions simultaneously, may provide new, innovative, sustainable solutions to some of these great challenges of the twenty-first century. This requires a multi-disciplinary perspective that embraces the science of biology, chemistry and physics and applies this knowledge to provide multi-functional civil and environmental engineering designs for the soil environment. For example, can native soil bacterial species moderate the carbonate cycle in soils to simultaneously solidify liquefiable soil, immobilize reactive heavy metals and sequester carbon-effectively providing civil engineering functionality while clarifying the ground water and removing carbon from the atmosphere? Exploration of these ideas has begun in earnest in recent years. This paper explores the potential, challenges and opportunities of this new field, and highlights one biogeochemical function of soil that has shown promise and is developing rapidly as a new technology. The example is used to propose a generalized approach in which the potential of this new field can be fully realized.

  14. Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, Jason T.; Soga, Kenichi; Banwart, Steven A.; Whalley, W. Richard; Ginn, Timothy R.; Nelson, Douglas C.; Mortensen, Brina M.; Martinez, Brian C.; Barkouki, Tammer

    2011-01-01

    Carbon sequestration, infrastructure rehabilitation, brownfields clean-up, hazardous waste disposal, water resources protection and global warming—these twenty-first century challenges can neither be solved by the high-energy consumptive practices that hallmark industry today, nor by minor tweaking or optimization of these processes. A more radical, holistic approach is required to develop the sustainable solutions society needs. Most of the above challenges occur within, are supported on, are enabled by or grown from soil. Soil, contrary to conventional civil engineering thought, is a living system host to multiple simultaneous processes. It is proposed herein that ‘soil engineering in vivo’, wherein the natural capacity of soil as a living ecosystem is used to provide multiple solutions simultaneously, may provide new, innovative, sustainable solutions to some of these great challenges of the twenty-first century. This requires a multi-disciplinary perspective that embraces the science of biology, chemistry and physics and applies this knowledge to provide multi-functional civil and environmental engineering designs for the soil environment. For example, can native soil bacterial species moderate the carbonate cycle in soils to simultaneously solidify liquefiable soil, immobilize reactive heavy metals and sequester carbon—effectively providing civil engineering functionality while clarifying the ground water and removing carbon from the atmosphere? Exploration of these ideas has begun in earnest in recent years. This paper explores the potential, challenges and opportunities of this new field, and highlights one biogeochemical function of soil that has shown promise and is developing rapidly as a new technology. The example is used to propose a generalized approach in which the potential of this new field can be fully realized. PMID:20829246

  15. The potential of flow-through microdialysis for probing low-molecular weight organic anions in rhizosphere soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulyok, Michael; Miró, Manuel; Stingeder, Gerhard; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, flow-through microdialysis is presented as a novel analytical tool for automatic sampling of low molecular weight organic anions (LMWOA), such as oxalate and citrate, in solid samples of environmental concern. The microsampling methodology involves the implantation of dedicated capillary-type probes offering unrivalled spatial resolution (ca. 200μm) in definite soil sites. These passive samplers are aimed at monitoring local processes, such as the release of organic acids occurring in the rhizosphere environment, in nearly real-time. The influence of chemical and physical variables (composition and flow rate of the perfusion liquid, ionic strength and pH of the outer medium and presence of metal ions therein) was assessed in vitro using liquid-phase assays. On the other hand, the resistance of the external solid medium to mass transfer, and the actual applicability of in vivo calibration methods were investigated using quartz sand as an inert model soil. Microdialysers furnished with 3cm long semipermeable tubular membranes were perfused with 0.01M NaNO 3 at a flow rate of 2.0μl/min, yielding dialysis recoveries ≥45% for both assayed LMWOAs in simulated background soil electrolyte solutions, and ≥24% in the interstitial liquid of complex solid samples. Full knowledge of the fate of LMWOAs in soils was obtained through the application of stimulus-response approaches that mimic the discrete exudation pulses of roots. Highly time-resolved microdialysates were used to discern readily available species such as free carboxylic anions and LMW metal-organic acid complexes from adsorbed, precipitated or mineralised analyte species in a variety of soil samples containing variable amounts of organic matter, exchangeable cations and different levels of metal pollution.

  16. Tillage and water management for riceland productivity in acid sulfate soils of the Mekong delta, Vietnam.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minh, L.Q.; Tuong, T.P.; Mensvoort, van M.E.F.; Bouma, J.

    1997-01-01

    Acid sulfate soils are characterized by low pH and high concentrations of aluminum, sulfate, iron and hydrogen sulfide. Removal of at least part of these substances is a prerequisite for land use, at least in severely acid soils. In this study, the effectiveness of harrowing and flushing with

  17. Influence of Soil Humic and Fulvic Acid on the Activity and Stability of Lysozyme and Urease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yan; Tan, WenFeng; Koopal, Luuk K.; Wang, MingXia; Liu, Fan; Norde, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Humic substances (HS), including humic acids (HA) and fulvic acids (FA), are important components of soil systems. HS form strong complexes with oppositely charged proteins, which will lead to changes in the enzyme activity. The effect of soil HS on the activity and stability of two enzymes was

  18. Alleviating acid soil stress in cowpea with a local population of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alleviating acid soil stress in cowpea with a local population of arbuscular ... Roots of the cowpea lines were all heavily colonized by the fungi and their leaf P was ... Total dry weight of inoculated cowpea was not affected by soil acidity while it ...

  19. Characteristics of biomass ashes from different materials and their ameliorative effects on acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Renyong; Li, Jiuyu; Jiang, Jun; Mehmood, Khalid; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Renkou; Qian, Wei

    2017-05-01

    The chemical characteristics, element contents, mineral compositions, and the ameliorative effects on acid soils of five biomass ashes from different materials were analyzed. The chemical properties of the ashes varied depending on the source biomass material. An increase in the concrete shuttering contents in the biomass materials led to higher alkalinity, and higher Ca and Mg levels in biomass ashes, which made them particularly good at ameliorating effects on soil acidity. However, heavy metal contents, such as Cr, Cu, and Zn in the ashes, were relatively high. The incorporation of all ashes increased soil pH, exchangeable base cations, and available phosphorus, but decreased soil exchangeable acidity. The application of the ashes from biomass materials with a high concrete shuttering content increased the soil available heavy metal contents. Therefore, the biomass ashes from wood and crop residues with low concrete contents were the better acid soil amendments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Solute movement observation in the field soils by means of radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichner, L.

    1986-01-01

    The radioactive tracer method is discussed as applied to transfer velocity measurements of solutions in unsaturated soils, its applicability and the criteria for the choice of the tracer. The method is based on measurement of the radioactive tracer velocity in the field and on laboratory determination of the equilibrium distribution coefficients of the tracer and the solute in the same field soil. From these results and from the soil characteristics (porosity, bulk density) the solute transfer velocity in the field soil can be calculated. The results are presented of 131 I - velocity measurements in the loamy soil in the region of water source Cunovo near Bratislava, which equals 9.29x10 -9 m/s, and in the downstream slope of the earth dam Rozgrund near Banska Stiavnica where the velocity of 131 I - near the dam foot was found to be 2.03 - 2.86 times greater than near the top. Results are also presented of 131 I - , [ 60 Co-EDTA] - and 60 Co 2+ velocity measurements in clay-loam soil at the experimental field of the Research Institute of Irrigation in Most near Bratislava. The results are applicable to evaluation of surface damage to embankments and earth dams, to determination of the conservation zone around water sources, and the establishment of the level of ground water pollution from different sources (waste disposal, agriculture, etc.)

  1. How long does a phosphate ion remain in the solution of agricultural soils?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.L.; Sinaj, S.; Frossard, E.; Fardeau, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    This work was conducted to assess the influences of soil properties and agricultural practices on the mean residence time of phosphate ions in the soil solution (T m ). T m was measured with the isotopic exchange kinetics method on the surface horizon of 213 soils from Albania. Almost 90 per cent of the samples presented a T m value included between 10 4 and 10 -1 minute. T m depended primarily on the soil iron oxide content, and was only slightly affected by current farming practices. As a consequence T m could be inferred from the parent material of the soil. Taking into account this parameter could therefore help in a better management of fertilization. (author)

  2. How long does a phosphate ion remain in the solution of agricultural soils?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, J.L. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Physiologie Vegetale et Ecosystemes; Sinaj, S.; Frossard, E.; Fardeau, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    This work was conducted to assess the influences of soil properties and agricultural practices on the mean residence time of phosphate ions in the soil solution (T{sub m}). T{sub m} was measured with the isotopic exchange kinetics method on the surface horizon of 213 soils from Albania. Almost 90 per cent of the samples presented a T{sub m} value included between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup -1} minute. T{sub m} depended primarily on the soil iron oxide content, and was only slightly affected by current farming practices. As a consequence T{sub m} could be inferred from the parent material of the soil. Taking into account this parameter could therefore help in a better management of fertilization. (author). 5 refs.

  3. Applications of Fertilizer Cations Affect Cadmium and Zinc Concentrations in Soil Solutions and Uptake by Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, S. E.; Hamon, R. E.; McGrath, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study changes over time of Cd and Zn in soil solution and in plants. Radish was grown in a soil which had been contaminated with heavy metals prior to 1961. Constant amounts of a fertilizer solution (NH4N03, KN03) were added daily. Soil solution was obtained......-metal (Cd, Zn) ions in soil solutions and a decrease in soil pH, probably due to ion-exchange mechanisms and the dissolution of carbonates. Uptake of Cd and Zn into leaves was correlated with the mass flow of Cd (adjusted r2 = 0.798) and Zn (adjusted r2=0.859). Uptake of K, Ca and Mg by the plants...... at intervals by displacement with water. The cumulative additions of small amounts of fertilizers were made equal to the plants' requirements at the final harvest but were found to exceed them during most of the experiment. Excess fertilizers caused substantial increases of major (K, Ca, Mg) and heavy...

  4. Soil solution phosphorus turnover: derivation, interpretation, and insights from a global compilation of isotope exchange kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Julian; Jegminat, Jannes; McLaren, Timothy I.; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    The exchange rate of inorganic phosphorus (P) between the soil solution and solid phase, also known as soil solution P turnover, is essential for describing the kinetics of bioavailable P. While soil solution P turnover (Km) can be determined by tracing radioisotopes in a soil-solution system, few studies have done so. We believe that this is due to a lack of understanding on how to derive Km from isotopic exchange kinetic (IEK) experiments, a common form of radioisotope dilution study. Here, we provide a derivation of calculating Km using parameters obtained from IEK experiments. We then calculated Km for 217 soils from published IEK experiments in terrestrial ecosystems, and also that of 18 long-term P fertilizer field experiments. Analysis of the global compilation data set revealed a negative relationship between concentrations of soil solution P and Km. Furthermore, Km buffered isotopically exchangeable P in soils with low concentrations of soil solution P. This finding was supported by an analysis of long-term P fertilizer field experiments, which revealed a negative relationship between Km and phosphate-buffering capacity. Our study highlights the importance of calculating Km for understanding the kinetics of P between the soil solid and solution phases where it is bioavailable. We argue that our derivation can also be used to calculate soil solution turnover of other environmentally relevant and strongly sorbing elements that can be traced with radioisotopes, such as zinc, cadmium, nickel, arsenic, and uranium.

  5. Growing Gardens in Shrinking Cities: A Solution to the Soil Lead Problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Schwarz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As cities shrink, they often leave a patchwork of vacancy on the landscape. The maintenance of vacant lands and eventual transformation to sustainable land uses is a challenge all cities face, but one that is particularly pronounced in shrinking cities. Vacant lands can support sustainability initiatives, specifically the expansion of urban gardens and local food production. However, many shrinking cities are the same aging cities that have experienced the highest soil lead burdens from their industrial past as well as the historic use of lead-based paint and leaded gasoline. Elevated soil lead is often viewed as a barrier to urban agriculture and managing for multiple ecosystem services, including food production and reduced soil lead exposure, remains a challenge. In this paper, we argue that a shift in framing the soil lead and gardening issue from potential conflict to potential solution can advance both urban sustainability goals and support healthy gardening efforts. Urban gardening as a potential solution to the soil lead problem stems from investment in place and is realized through multiple activities, in particular (1 soil management, including soil testing and the addition of amendments, and (2 social network and community building that leverages resources and knowledge.

  6. Acid in perchloroethylene scrubber solutions used in HTGR fuel preparation processes. Analytical chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.A.

    1979-02-01

    Acids and corrosion products in used perchloroethylene scrubber solutions collected from HTGR fuel preparation processes have been analyzed by several analytical methods to determine the source and possible remedy of the corrosion caused by these solutions. Hydrochloric acid was found to be concentrated on the carbon particles suspended in perchloroethylene. Filtration of carbon from the scrubber solutions removed the acid corrosion source in the process equipment. Corrosion products chemisorbed on the carbon particles were identified. Filtered perchloroethylene from used scrubber solutions contained practically no acid. It is recommended that carbon particles be separated from the scrubber solutions immediately after the scrubbing process to remove the source of acid and that an inhibitor be used to prevent the hydrolysis of perchloroethylene and the formation of acids

  7. Investigations on the oxidation of nitric acid plutonium solutions with ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction of ozone with nitric acid Pu solutions was studied as a function of reaction time, acid concentration and Pu concentration. Strong nitric acid Pu solutions are important in nuclear fuel element production and reprocessing. The Pu must be converted into hexavalent Pu before precipitation from the homogeneous solution together with uranium-IV, ammonia and CO 2 in the form of ammonium uranyl/plutonyl carbonate (AUPuC). Formation of a solid phase during ozonation was observed for the first time. The proneness to solidification increases with incrasing plutonium concentrations and with decreasing acid concentrations. If the formation of a solid phase during ozonation of nitric acid Pu solutions cannot be prevented, the PU-IV oxidation process described is unsuitable for industrial purposes as Pu solutions in industrial processes have much higher concentrations than the solutions used in the present investigation. (orig./EF) [de

  8. Improving Phosphorus Availability in an Acid Soil Using Organic Amendments Produced from Agroindustrial Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Ch’ng, Huck Ywih; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Majid, Nik Muhamad Ab.

    2014-01-01

    In acid soils, soluble inorganic phosphorus is fixed by aluminium and iron. To overcome this problem, acid soils are limed to fix aluminium and iron but this practice is not economical. The practice is also not environmentally friendly. This study was conducted to improve phosphorus availability using organic amendments (biochar and compost produced from chicken litter and pineapple leaves, resp.) to fix aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus. Amending soil with biochar or compost or a mixt...

  9. Modified micro-diffusion method for 15N-enriched soil solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, M.

    2000-01-01

    The preparation of solutions for determination of 15 N/ 14 N isotope ratios is described, with special reference to dilute samples. A micro-diffusion method has been simplified to be more suitable for rapid isotope-ratio determination in soil solutions collected in tensionics. Ammonia expelled during micro-diffusion is captured on acidified filter discs fixed to the caps of gas-tight vials. The discs are transferred to tin capsules for shipment to the Soil Science Unit for 15 N-enrichment determination. (author)

  10. Fate of cadmium at the soil-solution interface: a thermodynamic study as influenced by varying pH at South 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Tanmoy; Paul, Ranjit Kumar; Das, Sampa; Das, Dilip K; Dutta, Amrit Kumar; Boruah, Romesh K

    2015-11-01

    A study on the sorption kinetics of Cd from soil solution to soils was conducted to assess the persistence of Cd in soil solution as it is related to the leaching, bioavailability, and potential toxicity of Cd. The kinetics of Cd sorption on two non-contaminated alkaline soils from Canning (22° 18' 48.02″ N and 88° 39' 29.0″ E) and Lakshmikantapur (22° 06' 16.61″ N and 88° 19' 08.66″ E) of South 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India, were studied using conventional batch experiment. The variable soil suspension parameters were pH (4.00, 6.00, 8.18, and 9.00), temperatures (308, 318, and 328 K) and Cd concentrations (5-100 mg L(-1)). The average rate coefficient (kavg) and half-life (t1/2) values indicate that the persistence of Cd in soil solution is influenced by both temperature and soil suspension pH. The concentration of Cd in soil solution decreases with increase of temperature; therefore, Cd sorption on the soil-solution interface is an endothermic one. Higher pH decreases the t 1/2 of Cd in soil solution, indicating that higher pH (alkaline) is not a serious concern in Cd toxicity than lower pH (acidic). Based on the energy of activation (Ea) values, Cd sorption in acidic pH (14.76±0.29 to 64.45±4.50 kJ mol(-1)) is a surface control phenomenon and in alkaline pH (9.33±0.09 to 44.60±2.01 kJ mol(-1)) is a diffusion control phenomenon The enthalpy of activation (ΔH∓) values were found to be between 7.28 and 61.73 kJ mol(-1). Additionally, higher positive energy of activation (ΔG∓) values (46.82±2.01 to 94.47±2.36 kJ mol(-1)) suggested that there is an energy barrier for product formation.

  11. Spectral characterization of the fluorescent components present in humic substances, fulvic acid and humic acid mixed with pure benzo(a)pyrene solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fallah, Rawa; Rouillon, Régis; Vouvé, Florence

    2018-06-01

    The fate of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), a ubiquitous contaminant reported to be persistent in the environment, is largely controlled by its interactions with the soil organic matter. In the present study, the spectral characteristics of fluorophores present in the physical fractions of the soil organic matter were investigated in the presence of pure BaP solution. After extraction of humic substances (HSs), and their fractionation into fluvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA), two fluorescent compounds (C1 and C2) were identified and characterized in each physical soil fraction, by means of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (FEEMs) and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC). Then, to each type of fraction having similar DOC content, was added an increasing volume of pure BaP solution in attempt to assess the behavior of BaP with the fluorophores present in each one. The application of FEEMs-PARAFAC method validated a three-component model that consisted of the two resulted fluorophores from HSs, FA and HA (C1 and C2) and a BaP-like fluorophore (C3). Spectral modifications were noted for components C2HSs (C2 in humic substances fraction) (λex/λem: 420/490-520 nm), C2FA (C2 in fulvic acid fraction) (λex/λem: 400/487(517) nm) and C1HA (C1 in humic acid fraction) (λex/λem: 350/452(520) nm). We explored the impact of increasing the volume of the added pure BaP solution on the scores of the fluorophores present in the soil fractions. It was found that the scores of C2HSs, C2FA, and C1HA increased when the volume of the added pure BaP solution increased. Superposition of the excitation spectra of these fluorophores with the emission spectrum of BaP showed significant overlaps that might explain the observed interactions between BaP and the fluorescent compounds present in SOM physical fractions.

  12. Dissolution of thorium/uranium mixed oxide in nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueiras, S.A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The dissolution process of thorium oxide and mixed uranium-thorium oxide is studied, as a step of the head-end of the fuel reprocessing. An extensive bibliography was analysed, concerning the main aspects of the system, specially the most important process variables. Proposed mechanisms and models for the thorium oxide dissolution are presented. The laboratory tests were performed in two phases: at first, powdered thoria was used as the material to be dissolved. The objective was to know how changes in he concentrations of the dissolvent solution components HNO 3 , HF and Al(NO 3 ) 3 affect the dissolution rate. The tests were planned according to the fractional factorial method. Thes results showed that it is advantageous to work with powdered material, since the reaction occurs rapidly. And, if the Thorex solution (HNO 3 13M, HF 0.05M and Al(NO 3 ) 3 0.10M) is a suitable dissolvent, it was verified that it is possible to reduce the concentration of either nitric or fluoridric acid, without reducing the reaction rate to an undesirable value. It was also observed significant interaction between the components of the dissolvent solution. In the second phase of the tests, (Th, 5%U)O 2 sintered pellets were used. The main goals were to know the pellets dissolution behaviour and to compare the results for different pellets among themselves. It was observed that the metallurgical history of the material strongly influences its dissolution, specially the density and the microstructure. It was also studied how the (Th,U)O 2 mass/Thorex solution volume ratio affects the time needed to obtain an 1 M Th/liter solution. The activation energy for the reaction was obtained. (Author) [pt

  13. Preparation of acid deficient solutions of uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate by steam denitration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Shigeru; Takahashi, Yoshihisa

    1996-01-01

    Acid deficient heavy metal (HM) nitrate solutions are often required in the internal gelation processes for nuclear fuel fabrication. The stoichiometric HM-nitrate solutions are needed in a sol-gel process for fuel fabrication. A method for preparing such nitrate solutions with a controlled molar ratio of nitrate/metal by denitration of acid-excess nitrate solutions was developed. The denitration was conducted by bubbling a nitrate solution with a mixture of steam+Ar. It was found that steam was more effective for the denitration than Ar. The acid deficient uranyl nitrate solution with nitrate/U=1.55 was yielded by steam bubbling, while not by only Ar bubbling. As for thorium nitrate, acid deficient solutions of nitrate/Th≥3.1 were obtained by steam bubbling. (author)

  14. Fitting maize into sustainable cropping systems on acid soils of the tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    One of the key elements of sustainable cropping systems is the integration of crops and/or crop cultivars with high tolerance of soil acidity and which make most efficient use of the nutrients supplied by soil and fertilizer. This paper is based mainly on on-going work within an EU-funded project combining basic research on plant adaptation mechanisms by plant physiologists, and field experimentation on acid soils in Brazil, Cameroon, Colombia and Guadeloupe by breeders, soil scientists and a agronomists. The results suggest that large genetic variability exists in adaptation of plants to acid soils. A range of morphological and physiological plant characteristics contribute to tolerance of acid soils, elucidation of which has contributed to the development of rapid techniques for screening for tolerance. Incorporation of acid-soil-tolerant species and cultivars into cropping systems contributes to improved nutrient efficiency overall, and thus reduces fertilizer needs. This may help to minimize maintenance applications of fertiliser through various pathways: (i) deeper root growth resulting in more-efficient uptake of nutrients from the sub-soil and less leaching, (ii) more biomass production resulting in less seepage and less leaching, with more intensive nutrient cycling, maintenance of higher soil organic-matter content, and, consequently, less erosion owing to better soil protection by vegetation and mulch. (author)

  15. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranova, Valerie; Rejsek, Klement; Formanek, Pavel

    2013-11-10

    Organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates represent important organic compounds in soil. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids play important roles in rhizosphere ecology, pedogenesis, food-web interactions, and decontamination of sites polluted by heavy metals and organic pollutants. Carbohydrates in soils can be used to estimate changes of soil organic matter due to management practices, whereas vitamins may play an important role in soil biological and biochemical processes. The aim of this work is to review current knowledge on aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil and to identify directions for future research. Assessments of organic acids (aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic) and carbohydrates, including their behaviour, have been reported in many works. However, knowledge on the occurrence and behaviour of D-enantiomers of organic acids, which may be abundant in soil, is currently lacking. Also, identification of the impact and mechanisms of environmental factors, such as soil water content, on carbohydrate status within soil organic matter remains to be determined. Finally, the occurrence of vitamins in soil and their role in biological and biochemical soil processes represent an important direction for future research.

  16. Aliphatic, Cyclic, and Aromatic Organic Acids, Vitamins, and Carbohydrates in Soil: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Vranova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates represent important organic compounds in soil. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids play important roles in rhizosphere ecology, pedogenesis, food-web interactions, and decontamination of sites polluted by heavy metals and organic pollutants. Carbohydrates in soils can be used to estimate changes of soil organic matter due to management practices, whereas vitamins may play an important role in soil biological and biochemical processes. The aim of this work is to review current knowledge on aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil and to identify directions for future research. Assessments of organic acids (aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic and carbohydrates, including their behaviour, have been reported in many works. However, knowledge on the occurrence and behaviour of D-enantiomers of organic acids, which may be abundant in soil, is currently lacking. Also, identification of the impact and mechanisms of environmental factors, such as soil water content, on carbohydrate status within soil organic matter remains to be determined. Finally, the occurrence of vitamins in soil and their role in biological and biochemical soil processes represent an important direction for future research.

  17. Aliphatic, Cyclic, and Aromatic Organic Acids, Vitamins, and Carbohydrates in Soil: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranova, Valerie; Rejsek, Klement; Formanek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates represent important organic compounds in soil. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids play important roles in rhizosphere ecology, pedogenesis, food-web interactions, and decontamination of sites polluted by heavy metals and organic pollutants. Carbohydrates in soils can be used to estimate changes of soil organic matter due to management practices, whereas vitamins may play an important role in soil biological and biochemical processes. The aim of this work is to review current knowledge on aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil and to identify directions for future research. Assessments of organic acids (aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic) and carbohydrates, including their behaviour, have been reported in many works. However, knowledge on the occurrence and behaviour of D-enantiomers of organic acids, which may be abundant in soil, is currently lacking. Also, identification of the impact and mechanisms of environmental factors, such as soil water content, on carbohydrate status within soil organic matter remains to be determined. Finally, the occurrence of vitamins in soil and their role in biological and biochemical soil processes represent an important direction for future research. PMID:24319374

  18. The microbial communities and potential greenhouse gas production in boreal acid sulphate, non-acid sulphate, and reedy sulphidic soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šimek, Miloslav, E-mail: misim@upb.cas.cz [Biology Centre AS CR, v. v. i., Institute of Soil Biology, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); University of South Bohemia, Faculty of Science, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Virtanen, Seija; Simojoki, Asko [Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Chroňáková, Alica; Elhottová, Dana; Krištůfek, Václav [Biology Centre AS CR, v. v. i., Institute of Soil Biology, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Yli-Halla, Markku [Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-01-01

    Acid sulphate (AS) soils along the Baltic coasts contain significant amounts of organic carbon and nitrogen in their subsoils. The abundance, composition, and activity of microbial communities throughout the AS soil profile were analysed. The data from a drained AS soil were compared with those from a drained non-AS soil and a pristine wetland soil from the same region. Moreover, the potential production of methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide from the soils was determined under laboratory conditions. Direct microscopic counting, glucose-induced respiration (GIR), whole cell hybridisation, and extended phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis confirmed the presence of abundant microbial communities in the topsoil and also in the deepest Cg2 horizon of the AS soil. The patterns of microbial counts, biomass and activity in the profile of the AS soil and partly also in the non-AS soil therefore differed from the general tendency of gradual decreases in soil profiles. High respiration in the deepest Cg2 horizon of the AS soil (5.66 μg C g{sup − 1} h{sup − 1}, as compared to 2.71 μg C g{sup − 1} h{sup − 1} in a top Ap horizon) is unusual but reasonable given the large amount of organic carbon in this horizon. Nitrous oxide production peaked in the BCgc horizon of the AS and in the BC horizon of the non-AS soil, but the peak value was ten-fold higher in the AS soil than in the non-AS soil (82.3 vs. 8.6 ng N g{sup − 1}d{sup − 1}). The data suggest that boreal AS soils on the Baltic coast contain high microbial abundance and activity. This, together with the abundant carbon and total and mineral nitrogen in the deep layers of AS soils, may result in substantial gas production. Consequently, high GHG emissions could occur, for example, when the generally high water table is lowered because of arable farming. - Highlights: •Boreal acid sulphate soils contain large amounts of organic C and N in subsoils. •Microbial communities throughout the acid

  19. Identifying sources of acidity and spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils in the Anglesea River catchment, southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa; Yau, Chin; Kennedy, David

    2015-04-01

    Globally, coastal and estuarine floodplains are frequently underlain by sulfidic sediments. When exposed to oxygen, sulfidic sediments oxidise to form acid sulfate soils, adversely impacting on floodplain health and adjacent aquatic ecoystems. In eastern Australia, our understanding of the formation of these coastal and estuarine floodplains, and hence, spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils, is relatively well established. These soils have largely formed as a result of sedimentation of coastal river valleys approximately 6000 years BP when sea levels were one to two metres higher. However, our understanding of the evolution of estuarine systems and acid sulfate soil formation, and hence, distribution, in southern Australia remains limited. The Anglesea River, in southern Australia, is subjected to frequent episodes of poor water quality and low pH resulting in closure of the river and, in extreme cases, large fish kill events. This region is heavily reliant on tourism and host to a number of iconic features, including the Great Ocean Road and Twelve Apostles. Poor water quality has been linked to acid leakage from mining activities and Tertiary-aged coal seams, peat swamps and acid sulfate soils in the region. However, our understanding of the sources of acidity and distribution of acid sulfate soils in this region remains poor. In this study, four sites on the Anglesea River floodplain were sampled, representative of the main vegetation communities. Peat swamps and intertidal marshes were both significant sources of acidity on the floodplain in the lower catchment. However, acid neutralising capacity provided by carbonate sands suggests that there are additional sources of acidity higher in the catchment. This pilot study has highlighted the complexity in the links between the floodplain, upper catchment and waterways with further research required to understand these links for targeted acid management strategies.

  20. [Effects of Citric Acid on Activation and Methylation of Mercury in the Soils of Water-Level-Fluctuating Zone of the Three Gorges.Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Cai-qing; Liang, Li; You, Rui; Deng, Han; Wang, Ding-yong

    2015-12-01

    To investigate effects of the main component of vegetation root exudates-citric acid on activation and methylation of mercury in the soil of water-level-fluctuating zone (WLFZ) of the Three Gorges Reservoir area, simulation experiments were conducted by extracting and cultivating soil with different concentrations of citric acid. The results showed that after adding citric acid, the total mercury content in leaching solution before reaching peak were higher than that of the control, and increased with the increase of citric acid concentrations. The maximum amount of mercury complexes increased initially and then reached plateaus with the percentage against the total mercury in soil of 1.03%, 1.67%, 1.99%, 2.47%, 2.68%, 2.73% and 2.73% for different citric acid concentrations (0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 8 mmol · L⁻¹). In addition, concentrations of methylmercury ( MeHg) in soil remained stable in the first 3 hours, and then increased accompanying with the increasing rate rising with the concentration of citric acid ( besides the control group) . This result indicated that citric acid probably could promote the transformation process from inorganic mercury to MeHg in soil. which increased with the concentration of citric acid.

  1. Separation of rare earths from solutions of phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    Rare earths are separated from 6M phosphoric acid by adsorption onto cation resin BIORAD AG50W-X8. The phosphoric acid is then washed from the column, and the rare earths are eluted with 4M hydrochloric acid

  2. Cadmium and zinc in soil solution extracts following the application of phosphate fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Raphaël; Grant, Cynthia; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated the solubility of cadmium and zinc in soils after the application of phosphate fertilizers containing those two metals. The solubility of cadmium and zinc was assessed by measuring their concentration in soil water extracts. Three monoammonium phosphate fertilizers containing various amounts of metals were applied on cultivated fields for 3 years at three different rates. In order to investigate the effects of long-term applications of fertilizers on the solubility of Cd and Zn, a similar design was used to apply contaminated fertilizers to soils in a laboratory experiment using a single fertilizer addition equivalent to 15 years of application. Phosphate fertilizers increased the concentration of Cd in soil extracts compared to control in 87% and 80% of the treatments in field and laboratory experiments respectively. Both increasing the rate of application and using fertilizer containing more Cd lead to higher Cd concentrations in extracts for the field and the laboratory experiments. The addition of the equivalent of 15 years of fertilizer application in the laboratory results in higher Cd concentration in extracts compared to the field experiment. For Zn, the fertilizer treatments enhanced the metal solution concentration in 83% of field treatments, but no significant correlations could be found between Zn inputs and its concentration in solution. In the laboratory, fertilizer additions increase the Zn concentrations in 53% of the treatments and decrease it in most of the other treatments. The decrease in Zn concentrations in the laboratory trial is attributed to the higher phosphate concentrations in the soil solution; which is presumed to have contributed to the precipitation of Zn-phosphates. For both trials, the metal concentrations in soil extracts cannot be related to the Zn concentration in the fertilizer or the rate of application. The high Zn to Cd ratio is presumably responsible for the Cd increase in the soil extracts due to

  3. Phosphorus fertility recapitalization of nutrient-depleted tropical acid soils with reactive phosphate rock: An assessment using the isotopic exchange technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fardeau, J.-C.; Zapata, F.

    2002-01-01

    A 'soil P fertility recapitalization' initiative utilizing large rates of phosphate rocks (PRs) was proposed to improve the soil P status and increase the sustainable food production in acid and P-deficient tropical soils. Two series of experiments were carried out using five tropical acid soils treated with heavy applications of Gafsa phosphate rock (GPR). In the first series, the soils were mixed with GPR at the following application rates: 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg P·kg -1 , and incubated for one month in moist conditions. In another series, 1000 mg P kg -1 applied as GPR was added to three soils and incubated for 1.5 month; thereafter 50 mg P kg -1 as triple superphosphate (TSP) were added. The 32 P isotopic exchange method was utilized to assess the contribution of GPR to the available soil P. Changes in amounts, E, of P transferred with time as phosphate ions from the soil particles to the soil solution as well as changes in pH, calcium and phosphate concentrations in soil suspensions were determined. It was found that: (i) the contribution of P from GPR to recapitalization of soil P fertility was mainly assessed by E pool size, pH, calcium and phosphate concentrations; other variables were not significant at the 0.1 level; (ii) heavy applications of GPR did not saturate all the P sorption sites, P freshly applied as water-soluble P was still sorbed; (iii) recapitalization of soil P fertility using GPR was partly obtained in some acid tropical soils; (iv) Upon dissolution, GPR provided calcium ions to crops and to soils, thus reducing Al toxicity, but its liming effect was limited. To explain these effects with heavy application rates of GPR, it was postulated that a coating of Al and Fe compounds is formed around PR particles with time, thus reducing further dissolution. (author)

  4. Characterization of the coal derived humic acids from Mukah, Sarawak as soil conditioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Sim Siong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, abundant coal resources were found in Sarawak and Sabah. The utilization of coal resources, to date, is emphasized on the energy productions. The non-energy utilization as soil conditioner is unexplored. Therefore, this study attempted to characterize the coal humic acids extracted from Mukah coal and to evaluate its properties as soil conditioner. The coal humic acids from the regenerated sample were also assessed. The results revealed that different extractants and concentrations influenced the properties of humic acids. The extraction with KOH at 0.5 mol L-1 produced humic acids with low ash content and high acidic functional groups, which are substantial as soil conditioner. However, the yield was low. Regeneration of coal sample with 10% nitric acids improved the yield to an average of 83.45%. The acidic functional groups of nitrohumic acids were improved with the ash content remained at a low level.

  5. Acid Solutions for Etching Corrosion-Resistant Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    New study characterized solutions for etching austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base alloys, and titanium alloys (annealed). Solutions recommended for use remove at least 0.4 mil of metal from surface in less than an hour. Solutions do not cause intergranular attack on metals for which they are effective, when used under specified conditions.

  6. Removal of heavy metals from polluted soil using the citric acid fermentation broth: a promising washing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjiao; Gao, Yuntao; Xiong, Huabin

    2017-04-01

    The citric acid fermentation broth was prepared and it was employed to washing remediation of heavy metal-polluted soil. A well-defined washing effect was obtained, the removal percentages using citric acid fermentation broth are that 48.2% for Pb, 30.6% for Cu, 43.7% for Cr, and 58.4% for Cd and higher than that using citric acid solution. The kinetics of heavy metals desorption can be described by the double constant equation and Elovich equation and is a heterogeneous diffusion process. The speciation analysis shows that the citric acid fermentation broth can effectively reduce bioavailability and environmental risk of heavy metals. Spectroscopy characteristics analysis suggests that the washing method has only a small effect on the mineral composition and does not destroy the framework of soil system. Therefore, the citric acid fermentation broth is a promising washing agent and possesses a potential practical application value in the field of remediation of soils with a good washing performance.

  7. Behaviour of Pu-IV with various ion exchangers in solutions containing nitric acid and oxalates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, E.; Ali, S.A.

    1982-02-01

    The distribution of Pu-IV on the ion exchangers Dowex 50W-X8, Dowex 1-X8 und Dowex Chelating Resin Al-X8 in the presence of various concentrations of nitric acid and oxalate were investigated. The results indicate that nitric acid and oxalic acid influence each other during complexation of Pu-IV with oxalate ions solutions containing nitric acid it is not possible to neglect the formation of Pu-IV nitrate complexes. The complex Pu(IV) (C 2 O 4 ) 3 2 - only is formed in solutions containing low nitric acid and high oxalic acid concentrations. The separation of Pu-IV in Dowex Chelating Resin from nitric acid solution in the presence of higher oxalate concentrations is possible, provided that the nitric acid concentration is lower than 0.25 molar [fr

  8. Efficacy of Fe(o,o-EDDHA) and Fe(o,p-EDDHA) isomers in supplying Fe to strategy I plants differs in nutrient solution and calcareous soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Carmen L; Romera, Francisco J; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael; Sariego, Cristina; Garcaí-Alonso, J Ignacio; Boned, Javier; Marti, Gabriel

    2008-11-26

    The FeEDDHA [iron(3+) ethylenediamine di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid] is one of the most efficient iron chelates employed in the correction of iron clorosis in calcareous soils. FeEDDHA presents different positional isomers: the ortho-ortho (o,o), the ortho-para (o,p), and the para-para (p,p). Of these isomers, the p,p cannot chelate Fe in soil solution in a wide range of pH values, while both o,o and o,p can. The objective of this work was to compare the efficiency of both isomers (o,o and o,p) to provide Fe to two Strategy I plants (tomato and peach) in nutrient solution (pH approximately 6.0), as well as in calcareous soil (pH approximately 8.4; CALCIXEREPT). For this, chelates of both o,o-EDDHA and o,p-EDDHA with 57Fe (a nonradioactive isotope of Fe) were used, where the 57Fe acts as a tracer. The results obtained showed that the o,o isomer is capable of providing sufficient Fe to plants in both nutrient solution and calcareous soil. However, the o,p isomer is capable of providing sufficient Fe to plants in nutrient solution but not in calcareous soil.

  9. Comparative radiosensitivity of amino acids during γ-radiolysis in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duzhenkova, N.A.; Savich, A.V.

    1977-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of amino acids contained in proteins has been compared. The γ-radiolysis of aqueous solutions of amino acids has studied over a wide range of concentrations in the presence of air, the dose rate being 60