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Sample records for acid protects human

  1. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, B. (Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (Unites States))

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  2. Potent protection of gallic acid against DNA oxidation: Results of human and animal experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferk, Franziska; Chakraborty, Asima [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Jaeger, Walter [Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Diagnostic, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Kundi, Michael [Institute of Environmental Health, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bichler, Julia; Misik, Miroslav [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Wagner, Karl-Heinz [Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Sagmeister, Sandra [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haidinger, Gerald [Department of Epidemiology, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hoelzl, Christine; Nersesyan, Armen [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Dusinska, Maria [Health Effect Laboratory, Center for Ecological Economics, Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Simic, Tatjana [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Knasmueller, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried.knasmueller@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-10-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) is a constituent of plant derived foods, beverages and herbal remedies. We investigated its DNA protective properties in a placebo controlled human intervention trial in single cell gel electrophoresis experiments. Supplementation of drinking water with GA (12.8 mg/person/d) for three days led to a significant reduction of DNA migration attributable to oxidised pyrimidines (endonuclease III sensitive sites) and oxidised purines (formamidopyrimidine glycosylase sensitive sites) in lymphocytes of healthy individuals by 75% and 64% respectively. Also DNA damage caused by treatment of the cells with reactive oxygen species (ROS) was reduced after GA consumption (by 41%). These effects were paralleled by an increase of the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathion-S-transferase-{pi}) and a decrease of intracellular ROS concentrations in lymphocytes, while no alterations of the total antioxidant capacity (TAC), of malondialdehyde levels in serum and of the urinary excretion of isoprostanes were found. Experiments with rats showed that GA reduces oxidatively damaged DNA in lymphocytes, liver, colon and lungs and protects these organs against {gamma}-irradiation-induced strand breaks and formation of oxidatively damaged DNA-bases. Furthermore, the number of radiation-induced preneoplastic hepatic foci was decreased by 43% after oral administration of the phenolic. Since we did not find alterations of the TAC in plasma and lipid peroxidation of cell membranes but intracellular effects it is likely that the antioxidant properties of GA seen in vivo are not due to direct scavenging of radicals but rather to indirect mechanisms (e.g. protection against ROS via activation of transcription factors). As the amount of GA used in the intervention trial is similar to the daily intake in Middle Europe (18 mg/person/day), our findings indicate that it may contribute to prevention of

  3. Potent protection of gallic acid against DNA oxidation: Results of human and animal experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) is a constituent of plant derived foods, beverages and herbal remedies. We investigated its DNA protective properties in a placebo controlled human intervention trial in single cell gel electrophoresis experiments. Supplementation of drinking water with GA (12.8 mg/person/d) for three days led to a significant reduction of DNA migration attributable to oxidised pyrimidines (endonuclease III sensitive sites) and oxidised purines (formamidopyrimidine glycosylase sensitive sites) in lymphocytes of healthy individuals by 75% and 64% respectively. Also DNA damage caused by treatment of the cells with reactive oxygen species (ROS) was reduced after GA consumption (by 41%). These effects were paralleled by an increase of the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathion-S-transferase-π) and a decrease of intracellular ROS concentrations in lymphocytes, while no alterations of the total antioxidant capacity (TAC), of malondialdehyde levels in serum and of the urinary excretion of isoprostanes were found. Experiments with rats showed that GA reduces oxidatively damaged DNA in lymphocytes, liver, colon and lungs and protects these organs against γ-irradiation-induced strand breaks and formation of oxidatively damaged DNA-bases. Furthermore, the number of radiation-induced preneoplastic hepatic foci was decreased by 43% after oral administration of the phenolic. Since we did not find alterations of the TAC in plasma and lipid peroxidation of cell membranes but intracellular effects it is likely that the antioxidant properties of GA seen in vivo are not due to direct scavenging of radicals but rather to indirect mechanisms (e.g. protection against ROS via activation of transcription factors). As the amount of GA used in the intervention trial is similar to the daily intake in Middle Europe (18 mg/person/day), our findings indicate that it may contribute to prevention of formation

  4. Protection of Salvianolic Acid B for Human Endothelial Cells Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jungang; ZHAO Guangrong; LIU Jinling; JI Xiangwu

    2009-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B(Sal B) is an active component of traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza and is used to treat vascular diseases. To better understand its mechanism, the antioxidant capacities of Sal B was evaluated with human endothelial cells under oxidative stress. Human endothelial cells were pretreated with Sal B for 12 h followed by hydrogen peroxide for another 12 h. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and concentration of glu-tathione were measured: Protective effect of Sal B on the endothelial cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced damage ' was observed, and ROS production in the cells was found significantly inhibited. Sal B remarkably enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT and GPX. Furthermore, Sal B up-regulated the intracellular glutathione concentration. The results indicate that Sal B protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress by improving the redox status of the cells through enhancing the antioxidant enzyme activities and increasing the reductive glutathione concentration after the oxidative challenge.

  5. Office for Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Office for Human Research Protections The Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) provides leadership in the protection of the rights, welfare, and wellbeing of human subjects involved in ...

  6. Lactic acid bacteria protect human intestinal epithelial cells from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affhan, S; Dachang, W; Xin, Y; Shang, D

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens that cause nosocomial and food-borne infections. They promote intestinal diseases. Gastrointestinal colonization by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa has rarely been researched. These organisms spread to extra gastrointestinal niches, resulting in increasingly progressive infections. Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive bacteria that produce lactic acid as the major end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. These bacteria inhibit pathogen colonization and modulate the host immune response. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus on enteric infections caused by the paradigmatic human pathogens S. aureus ATCC25923 and P. aeruginosa ATCC27853. The effect of whole cells and neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS) of the lactobacilli on LoVo human carcinoma enterocyte (ATCC CCL-229) infection was analyzed by co-exposure, pre-exposure, and post-exposure studies. Simultaneous application of whole cells and CFS of the lactobacilli significantly eradicated enterocyte infection (P 0.05). This result could be attributed to interference by extracellular polymeric substances and cell surface hydrophobicity, which resulted in the development of a pathogen that did not form colonies. Furthermore, results of the plate count and LIVE/ DEAD BacLight bacterial viability staining attributed this inhibition to a non-bacteriocin-like substance, which acted independently of organic acid and H2O2 production. Based on these results, the cell-free supernatant derived from lactobacilli was concluded to restrain the development of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa enteric infections. PMID:26681052

  7. Ashwagandha leaf derived withanone protects normal human cells against the toxicity of methoxyacetic acid, a major industrial metabolite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didik Priyandoko

    Full Text Available The present day lifestyle heavily depends on industrial chemicals in the form of agriculture, cosmetics, textiles and medical products. Since the toxicity of the industrial chemicals has been a concern to human health, the need for alternative non-toxic natural products or adjuvants that serve as antidotes are in high demand. We have investigated the effects of Ayurvedic herb Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera leaf extract on methoxyacetic acid (MAA induced toxicity. MAA is a major metabolite of ester phthalates that are commonly used in industry as gelling, viscosity and stabilizer reagents. We report that the MAA cause premature senescence of normal human cells by mechanisms that involve ROS generation, DNA and mitochondrial damage. Withanone protects cells from MAA-induced toxicity by suppressing the ROS levels, DNA and mitochondrial damage, and induction of cell defense signaling pathways including Nrf2 and proteasomal degradation. These findings warrant further basic and clinical studies that may promote the use of withanone as a health adjuvant in a variety of consumer products where the toxicity has been a concern because of the use of ester phthalates.

  8. Radio-protective effect of cinnamic acid, a phenolic phytochemical, on genomic instability induced by X-rays in human blood lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinkilic, Nilufer; Tüzün, Ece; Çetintaş, Sibel Kahraman; Vatan, Özgür; Yılmaz, Dilek; Çavaş, Tolga; Tunç, Sema; Özkan, Lütfi; Bilaloğlu, Rahmi

    2014-08-01

    The present study was designed to determine the protective activity of cinnamic acid against induction by X-rays of genomic instability in normal human blood lymphocytes. This radio-protective activity was assessed by use of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and the alkaline comet assay, with human blood lymphocytes isolated from two healthy donors. A Siemens Mevatron MD2 (Siemens AG, USA, 1994) linear accelerator was used for the irradiation with 1 or 2 Gy. Treatment of the lymphocytes with cinnamic acid prior to irradiation reduced the number of micronuclei when compared with that in control samples. Treatment with cinnamic acid without irradiation did not increase the number of micronuclei and did not show a cytostatic effect in the lymphocytes. The results of the alkaline comet assay revealed that cinnamic acid reduces the DNA damage induced by X-rays, showing a significant radio-protective effect. Cinnamic acid decreased the frequency of irradiation-induced micronuclei by 16-55% and reduced DNA breakage by 17-50%, as determined by the alkaline comet assay. Cinnamic acid may thus act as a radio-protective compound, and future studies may focus on elucidating the mechanism by which cinnamic acid offers radioprotection.

  9. Protective effects of non-mitogenic human acidic fibroblast growth factor on hydrogen peroxide-induced damage to cardiomyocytes in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo-Feng Lin; Xiao-Kun Li; Yuan Lin; Fan Wu; Li-Min Liang; Xiao-Bing Fu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the protective effect of non-mitogenic human acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF) on cardiac oxidative injury in vivo.METHODS: Ventricular cardiomyocytes were isolated from 1- to 3-d-old neonatal SD mice and cultured in Dulbecco's minimum essential medium supplemented with 15% fetal bovine serum under an atmosphere of 50 mL/L CO2-95% air at 37 ℃, as well as assessed by immunocytochemical assay. We constructed the cardiomyocyte injury model by exposure to a certain concentration of H2O2.Cellular viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity,leakage of maleic dialdehyde and anti-apoptosis effect were included to evaluate the cardiac protective effect of non-mitogenic human acidic FGF.RESULTS: Over 50% of the cardiomyocytes beat spontaneously on the 2nd d of culture and synchronously beat after being cultured for 3 d. Forty-eight hours after plating was completed, the purity of such cultures was 95% myocytes, assessed b,y an immunocytochemical assay. Cellular viability dramatically decreased with the increasing of the concentration of H2O2. Non-mitogenic human acidic FGF showed significant resistance to the toxic effect of H2O2, significantly increased the cellular viability as well as the activity of SOD, and dramatically decreased the leakage of maleic dialdehyde as well as the cellular apoptosis rate.CONCLUSION: Hydrogen peroxide shows strong cytotoxicity to the cultured cardiac myocytes, and non-mitogenic human acidic FGF shows strong cardio-protective effect when exposed to a certain concentration of H2O2.

  10. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid on High Glucose-Induced Protein Glycation, Lipid Peroxidation, and Membrane Ion Pump Activity in Human Erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerachat Sompong

    Full Text Available Ferulic acid (FA is the ubiquitous phytochemical phenolic derivative of cinnamic acid. Experimental studies in diabetic models demonstrate that FA possesses multiple mechanisms of action associated with anti-hyperglycemic activity. The mechanism by which FA prevents diabetes-associated vascular damages remains unknown. The aim of study was to investigate the protective effects of FA on protein glycation, lipid peroxidation, membrane ion pump activity, and phosphatidylserine exposure in high glucose-exposed human erythrocytes. Our results demonstrated that FA (10-100 μM significantly reduced the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c whereas 0.1-100 μM concentrations inhibited lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes exposed to 45 mM glucose. This was associated with increased glucose consumption. High glucose treatment also caused a significant reduction in Na+/K+-ATPase activity in the erythrocyte plasma membrane which could be reversed by FA. Furthermore, we found that FA (0.1-100 μM prevented high glucose-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism of FA for the prevention of vascular dysfunction associated with diabetes.

  11. Radiation protection of non-human species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of radiation on non-human species, both animals and plants, have long been investigated. In the disposal of radioactive wastes, the protection of non-human species has been investigated. Yet no radiation protection standard for exposure of animals and plants per se has been agreed. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has long taken the view that, if human beings are properly protected from radiation, other species will thereby be protected to the extent necessary for their preservation. However, the International Atomic Energy Agency has found it necessary to investigate the protection of non-human species where radioactivity is released to an environment unpopulated by human beings. It is proposed that the basis of such protection, and the knowledge of radiation effects on non-human species on which it is based, suggest a practical radiation protection standard for non-human species. (1 tab.)

  12. THIRD GENERATION HUMAN RIGHTS PROTECTION: INDIAN PRESPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Shankarlingamma Patil

    2015-01-01

    The Third Generation Human Rights is called collective rights. Third Generation human rights including Right to Clear Air, Right to Clean Water and Clean Environment Protection Right to development and protection the Wild Life animal bird Forest. Plants and Duties of wild life Advisory Board, prohibition of picking up rooting etc.

  13. Human Milk Glycoproteins Protect Infants Against Human Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bo; Newburg, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Breastfeeding protects the neonate against pathogen infection. Major mechanisms of protection include human milk glycoconjugates functioning as soluble receptor mimetics that inhibit pathogen binding to the mucosal cell surface, prebiotic stimulation of gut colonization by favorable microbiota, immunomodulation, and as a substrate for bacterial fermentation products in the gut. Human milk proteins are predominantly glycosylated, and some biological functions of these human milk glycoproteins ...

  14. AP-1 Inhibition by SR 11302 Protects Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells from Bile Acid-Induced Cytotoxicity by Restoring the NOS-3 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rubio, Sandra; Linares, Clara I.; Aguilar-Melero, Patricia; Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; Montero-Álvarez, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The harmful effects of bile acid accumulation occurring during cholestatic liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress increase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) expression decrease in liver cells. We have previously reported that glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA) down-regulates gene expression by increasing SP1 binding to the NOS-3 promoter in an oxidative stress dependent manner. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of transcription factor (TF) AP-1 on the NOS-3 deregulation during GCDCA-induced cholestasis. The cytotoxic response to GCDCA was characterized by 1) the increased expression and activation of TFs cJun and c-Fos; 2) a higher binding capability of these at position -666 of the NOS-3 promoter; 3) a decrease of the transcriptional activity of the promoter and the expression and activity of NOS-3; and 4) the expression increase of cyclin D1. Specific inhibition of AP-1 by the retinoid SR 11302 counteracted the cytotoxic effects induced by GCDCA while promoting NOS-3 expression recovery and cyclin D1 reduction. NOS activity inhibition by L-NAME inhibited the protective effect of SR 11302. Inducible NOS isoform was no detected in this experimental model of cholestasis. Our data provide direct evidence for the involvement of AP-1 in the NOS-3 expression regulation during cholestasis and define a critical role for NOS-3 in regulating the expression of cyclin D1 during the cell damage induced by bile acids. AP-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target in cholestatic liver diseases given its role as a transcriptional repressor of NOS-3. PMID:27490694

  15. China's Judicial Protection of Human Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN LIANG

    2007-01-01

    @@ China has devoted great efforts to improving judicial protection of human rights in the past 30 years.It has ratified the International Covenant on Economic,Social and Cultural Rights,signed but yet to ratify the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and become a state party to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel,Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.In March 2004,the 10th National People's Congress adopted at its second plenary session the amendments to the Constitution,writing "the state respects and protects human rights" into the Constitution,declaring that China will use legal means to protect and safeguard human rights.

  16. Constitutive Effects of Lead on Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Gene Battery and Protection by β-carotene and Ascorbic Acid in Human HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Wageh S; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is an environmental pollutant that can get entry into human body through contaminated foods, drinks, and inhaled air leading to severe biological consequences, and has been responsible for many deaths worldwide. The objectives of this study were 1st to investigate the modulatory effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of Pb on AhR gene battery, which is controlling xenobiotics metabolism. 2nd, trials to reduce Pb-induced adverse effects were done using some phytochemicals like β-carotene or ascorbic acid. Human hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines were exposed to a wide range of Pb concentrations varying from physiological to toxic levels (0 to 10 mg/L) for 24 h. High Pb concentrations (1 to 10 mg/L) significantly reduced phase I (CYP1A1 and 1A2) and phase II (UGT1A6 and NQO1) xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme mRNA expression in a mechanistic manner through the AhR regulation pathway. Additionally, these Pb concentrations induced oxidative stress in HepG2 cells in terms of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent phenomenon. Coexposure of HepG2 cells to physiological concentrations of some micronutrients, like β-carotene (10 μM) or ascorbic acid (0.1 mM), along with Pb (1 mg/L) for 24 h significantly reduced the levels of ROS production and recovered AhR mRNA expression into the normal levels. Thus, consumption of foods rich in these micronutrients may help to reduce the adverse effects of lead in areas with high levels of pollution.

  17. Acute, food-induced moderate elevation of plasma uric acid protects against hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress and increase in arterial stiffness in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Jonatan; Modun, Darko; Budimir, Danijela; Sutlovic, Davorka; Salamunic, Ilza; Zaja, Ivan; Boban, Mladen

    2009-11-01

    We examined the effects of acute, food-induced moderate increase of plasma uric acid (UA) on arterial stiffness and markers of oxidative damage in plasma in healthy males exposed to 100% normobaric oxygen. Acute elevation of plasma UA was induced by consumption of red wine, combination of ethanol and glycerol, or fructose. By using these beverages we were able to separate the effects of UA, wine polyphenols and ethanol. Water was used as a control beverage. Ten males randomly consumed test beverages in a cross-over design over the period of 4 weeks, one beverage per week. They breathed 100% O(2) between 60(th) and 90(th)min of the 4-h study protocol. Pulse wave augmentation index (AIx) at brachial and radial arteries, plasma antioxidant capacity (AOC), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) assessed by xylenol orange method, UA and blood ethanol concentrations were determined before and 60, 90, 120, 150 and 240 min after beverage consumption. Consumption of the beverages did not affect the AIx, TBARS or LOOH values during 60 min before exposure to hyperoxia, while AOC and plasma UA increased except in the water group. Significant increase of AIx, plasma TBARS and LOOH, which occurred during 30 min of hyperoxia in the water group, was largely prevented in the groups that consumed red wine, glycerol+ethanol or fructose. In contrast to chronic hyperuricemia, generally considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome, acute increase of UA acts protectively against hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress and related increase of arterial stiffness in large peripheral arteries. PMID:19457484

  18. Topical protection of human esophageal mucosal integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, P; Batista-Lima, F; Lee, C; Preston, S L; Dettmar, P; Sifrim, D

    2015-06-15

    Patients with nonerosive reflux disease exhibit impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, which may underlie enhanced reflux perception. In vitro topical application of an alginate solution can protect mucosal biopsies against acid-induced changes in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). We aimed to confirm this finding in a second model using 3D cell cultures and to assess prolonged protection in a biopsy model. We assessed the protective effect of a topically applied alginate solution 1 h after application. 3D cell cultures were grown by using an air-liquid interface and were studied in Ussing chambers. The apical surface was "protected" with 200 μl of either alginate or viscous control or was unprotected. The tissue was exposed to pH 3 + bile acid solution for 30 min and TER change was calculated. Distal esophageal mucosal biopsies were taken from 12 patients and studied in Ussing chambers. The biopsies were coated with either alginate or viscous control solution. The biopsies were then bathed in pH 7.4 solution for 1 h. The luminal chamber solution was replaced with pH 2 solution for 30 min. Percentage changes in TER were recorded. In five biopsies fluorescein-labeled alginate solution was used to allow immunohistological localization of the alginate after 1 h. In the cell culture model, alginate solution protected tissue against acid-induced change in TER. In biopsies, 60 min after protection with alginate solution, the acidic exposure caused a -8.3 ± 2.2% change in TER compared with -25.1 ± 4.5% change after protection with the viscous control (P < 0.05). Labeled alginate could be seen coating the luminal surface in all cases. In vitro, alginate solutions can adhere to the esophageal mucosa for up to 1 h and exert a topical protectant effect. Durable topical protectants can be further explored as first-line/add-on therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25907692

  19. G-CSF Protects Human Brain Vascular Endothelial Cells Injury Induced by High Glucose, Free Fatty Acids and Hypoxia through MAPK and Akt Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yinghong; Guo, Jingchun; Guo, Zhuangli; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yanyan; Tang, Yuping; Dong, Qiang; Hu, Renming

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to play a neuroprotective role in ischemic stroke by mobilizing bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), promoting angiogenesis, and inhibiting apoptosis. Impairments in mobilization and function of the BM-derived EPCs have previously been reported in animal and human studies of diabetes where there is both reduction in the levels of the BM-derived EPCs and its ability to promote angiogenesis. This is hypothesized to account for the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications such as stroke. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of G-CSF on diabetes-associated cerebral vascular defect. We observed that pretreatment of the cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs) with G-CSF largely prevented cell death induced by the combination stimulus with high glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) and hypoxia by increasing cell viability, decreasing apoptosis and caspase-3 activity. Cell ultrastructure measured by transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed that G-CSF treatment nicely reduced combination stimulus-induced cell apoptosis. The results from fluorescent probe Fluo-3/AM showed that G-CSF greatly suppressed the levels of intracellular calcium ions under combination stimulus. We also found that G-CSF enhanced the expression of cell cycle proteins such as human cell division cycle protein 14A (hCdc14A), cyclinB and cyclinE, inhibited p53 activity, and facilitated cell cycle progression following combination stimulus. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt, and deactivation of c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 were proved to be required for the pro-survival effects of G-CSF on HBVECs exposed to combination stimulus. Overall, G-CSF is capable of alleviating HBVECs injury triggered by the combination administration with high glucose, FFA and hypoxia involving the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and Akt signaling

  20. Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

  1. Salicylic acid protects the skin from UV damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammone, Thomas; Gan, David; Goyarts, Earl; Maes, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Aspirin(acetyl salicylate) has long been used as an analgesic. Salicylic acid has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. These activities include inhibiting activity of cox-1, cox-2, and NF-kb. In addition, salicylic acid has also been shown in some systems to induce Hsp70. We have demonstrated that salicylic acid inhibits UVB-induced sunburn cell formation, as well as increase the removal of UVB induced TT dimer formation in living skin equivalents. Given these protective properties of salicylic acid, we propose the use of salicylic acid as a topical therapeutic to protect the skin from sun damage.

  2. Protection of human umbilical vein endothelial cells by glycine and structurally similar amino acids against calcium and hydrogen peroxide-induced lethal cell injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberg, J M; Varani, J.; Johnson, K.J.; Roeser, N F; Dame, M K; Davis, J. A.; Venkatachalam, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with either the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, or ionomycin plus cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone had immediate severe depletion of adenosine triphosphate, (ATP) and increases of cytosolic free calcium (Caf) and then sustained lethal cell injury as manifested by release of lactate dehydrogenase and failure to exclude vital dyes within 15 minutes. Inclusion of glycine in the experimental medium prevented the enzyme leakage for at least 60 m...

  3. Criminal and Legal Aspects of Human Life Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Janule

    2013-01-01

    The promotion work "Criminal and Legal Aspects of Human Life Protection" is the first such volume complex theoretical and practical research in Latvia on the legal protection of human life. The main idea of the thesis is the human right for physical existence and human life protection by the Criminal Law. The central idea of the thesis is the human rights to the physical existence from the moment of conception and the life protection with criminally legal instruments, which, fi...

  4. Retinoic acid protects human breast cancer cells against etoposide-induced apoptosis by NF-kappaB-dependent but cIAP2-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gronemeyer Hinrich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinoids, through their cognate nuclear receptors, exert potent effects on cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis, and have significant promise for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. These ligands can determine the ultimate fate of target cells by stimulating or repressing gene expression directly, or indirectly through crosstalking with other signal transducers. Results Using different breast cancer cell models, we show here that depending on the cellular context retinoids can signal either towards cell death or cell survival. Indeed, retinoids can induce the expression of pro-apoptotic (i.e. TRAIL, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand, Apo2L/TNFSF10 and anti-apoptotic (i.e. cIAP2, inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2 genes. Promoter mapping, gel retardation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that retinoids induce the expression of this gene mainly through crosstalk with NF-kappaB. Supporting this crosstalk, the activation of NF-kappaB by retinoids in T47D cells antagonizes the apoptosis triggered by the chemotherapeutic drugs etoposide, camptothecin or doxorubicin. Notably apoptosis induced by death ligands (i.e. TRAIL or antiFAS is not antagonized by retinoids. That knockdown of cIAP2 expression by small interfering RNA does not alter the inhibition of etoposide-induced apoptosis by retinoids in T47D cells reveals that stimulation of cIAP2 expression is not the cause of their anti-apoptotic action. However, ectopic overexpression of a NF-kappaB repressor increases apoptosis by retinoids moderately and abrogates almost completely the retinoid-dependent inhibition of etoposide-induced apoptosis. Our data exclude cIAP2 and suggest that retinoids target other regulator(s of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway to induce resistance to etoposide on certain breast cancer cells. Conclusions This study shows an important role for the NF-kappaB pathway in retinoic acid signaling and retinoic acid-mediated resistance to

  5. Benzylidene Acetal Protecting Group as Carboxylic Acid Surrogate: Synthesis of Functionalized Uronic Acids and Sugar Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amit; Senthilkumar, Soundararasu; Baskaran, Sundarababu

    2016-01-18

    Direct oxidation of the 4,6-O-benzylidene acetal protecting group to C-6 carboxylic acid has been developed that provides an easy access to a wide range of biologically important and synthetically challenging uronic acid and sugar amino acid derivatives in good yields. The RuCl3 -NaIO4 -mediated oxidative cleavage method eliminates protection and deprotection steps and the reaction takes place under mild conditions. The dual role of the benzylidene acetal, as a protecting group and source of carboxylic acid, was exploited in the efficient synthesis of six-carbon sialic acid analogues and disaccharides bearing uronic acids, including glycosaminoglycan analogues. PMID:26572799

  6. Communist Party of China and Human Rights Protection for Criminals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN JIA; PEI JUNJIE

    2011-01-01

    Protection of criminals' human rights is an important issue that has received full attention at home and abroad.The Communlst Party of China (CPC) has always attached much importance to the protection of criminals' human rights.Since the founding of New China,the Party and the state have paid full attention to protecting the human rights of criminals.

  7. Human Ecology: Acid Rain and Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1983-01-01

    A connection between science and society can be seen in the human and ecological dimensions of one contemporary problem: acid rain. Introduces a human ecological theme and relationships between acid rain and public policy, considering scientific understanding and public awareness, scientific research and public policy, and national politics and…

  8. Radiation protection by ascorbic acid in sodium alginate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliste, A.J.; Mastro, N.L. Del [Center of Radiation Technology, IPEN/CNEN/SP, University City, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: ajaliste@ipen.br

    2004-07-01

    Alginates are gelling hydrocolloids extracted from brown seaweed used widely in the nourishing and pharmaceutical industries. As alginic acid gellification retard food entrance in the stomach alginate is an additive used in diets. The objective of this work was to study the protective action of the ascorbic acid in alginate solutions against the action of {sup 60} Co gamma radiation. One % (w/v) solutions of alginate had been used and concentrations of ascorbic acid varied from 0 to 2.5% (w/v). The solutions were irradiated with doses up to 10 kGy. Viscosity/dose relationship and the p H of the solutions at 25 Centigrade were determined. Ascorbic acid behaved as an antioxidant against radiation oxidative shock in this model system of an irradiated viscous solution. Besides its radiation protective role on alginate solutions ascorbic acid promoted a viscosity increase in the range of concentrations employed. (Author)

  9. Protective Effects of Triphala on Dermal Fibroblasts and Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Sandeep R; Sivaprakasam, Thiyagarajan O; Mishra, Abheepsa; Kumar, L M Sharath; Prakash, N S; Prabhu, Sunil; Ramakrishnan, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Human skin is body's vital organ constantly exposed to abiotic oxidative stress. This can have deleterious effects on skin such as darkening, skin damage, and aging. Plant-derived products having skin-protective effects are well-known traditionally. Triphala, a formulation of three fruit products, is one of the most important rasayana drugs used in Ayurveda. Several skin care products based on Triphala are available that claim its protective effects on facial skin. However, the skin protective effects of Triphala extract (TE) and its mechanistic action on skin cells have not been elucidated in vitro. Gallic acid, ellagic acid, and chebulinic acid were deduced by LC-MS as the major constituents of TE. The identified key compounds were docked with skin-related proteins to predict their binding affinity. The IC50 values for TE on human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were 204.90 ± 7.6 and 239.13 ± 4.3 μg/mL respectively. The antioxidant capacity of TE was 481.33 ± 1.5 mM Trolox equivalents in HaCaT cells. Triphala extract inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced RBC haemolysis (IC50 64.95 μg/mL), nitric oxide production by 48.62 ± 2.2%, and showed high reducing power activity. TE also rescued HDF from H2O2-induced damage; inhibited H2O2 induced cellular senescence and protected HDF from DNA damage. TE increased collagen-I, involucrin and filaggrin synthesis by 70.72 ± 2.3%, 67.61 ± 2.1% and 51.91 ± 3.5% in HDF or HaCaT cells respectively. TE also exhibited anti-tyrosinase and melanin inhibition properties in a dose-dependent manner. TE increased the mRNA expression of collagen-I, elastin, superoxide dismutase (SOD-2), aquaporin-3 (AQP-3), filaggrin, involucrin, transglutaminase in HDF or HaCaT cells, and decreased the mRNA levels of tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Thus, Triphala exhibits protective benefits on skin cells in vitro and can be used as a potential ingredient in skin care formulations. PMID:26731545

  10. Caffeine prevents protection in two human models of ischemic preconditioning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Zhou, Z.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Jaspers, R.A.; Ramakers, B.P.; Brouwer, R.M.H.J.; Boerman, O.C.; Steinmetz, N.; Smits, P.; Rongen, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied whether caffeine impairs protection by ischemic preconditioning (IP) in humans. BACKGROUND: Ischemic preconditioning is critically dependent on adenosine receptor stimulation. We hypothesize that the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine blocks the protective effect of IP. ME

  11. Protection of historical lead against acetic acid vapour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pecenová Z.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Historical lead artefacts (small figurines, appliques, bull (metal seal can be stored in depository and archives in inconvenient storage conditions. The wooden show-case or paper packagings release volatile organic compound to the air during their degradation. These acids, mainly acetic acid are very corrosive for lead. The thin layer of corrosion products which slows atmospheric corrosion is formed on lead surface in atmospheric condition. In presence of acetic acid vapour the voluminous corrosion products are formed and fall off the surface. These corrosion products do not have any protection ability. The lead could be protected against acid environment by layer of “metal soup” which is formed on surface after immersion in solution of salt of carboxylic acid for 24 hours. The solutions of acids (with vary long of carbon chain and their salts are examined. Longer carbon chain provides better efficiency convers layer. The disadvantages are low solubility of carboxylic acids in water and bad abrasion resistance of formed layer.

  12. Stearic acid protects primary cultured cortical neurons against oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-jian WANG; Cui-ling LIANG; Guang-mei LI; Cai-yi YU; Ming YIN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effects of stearic acid against oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. Methods: Cortical neurons were exposed to glutamate,hydrogen peroxide (H202), or NaN3 insult in the presence or absence of stearic acid. Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by MTT assay and LDH release. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes activity[superoxide dismutases (SOD),glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation in cultured cortical neurons were evaluated using commercial kits. {3-[1(p-chloro-benzyl)-5-(isopropyl)-3-t-butylthiondol-2-yl]-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid, Na}[MK886; 5 pmol/L; a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR)α], bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; 100 μmol/L; an antagonist of PPARγ), and cycloheximide (CHX; 30 μmol/L, an inhibitor of protein synthesis)were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by stearic acid.Western blotting was used to determine the PPARγ protein level in cortical neurons.Results: Stearic acid dose-dependently protected cortical neurons against glutamate or H202 injury and increased glutamate uptake in cultured neurons.This protection was concomitant to the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and to the promotion activity of Cu/Zn SOD and CAT in cultured cortical neurons. Its neuroprotective effects were completely blocked by BADGE and CHX. After incubation with H2O2 for 24 h, the expression of the PPARγ protein decreased significantly (P<0.05), and the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on the expression of PPARγ can be attenuated by stearic acid. Conclusion: Stearic acid can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by boosting the internal antioxidant enzymes.Its neuroprotective effect may be mainly mediated by the activation of PPARγ and new protein synthesis in cortical neurons.

  13. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Curt Einarsson; Ewa Ellis; Anna Abrahamsson; Bo-G6ran Ericzon; Ingemar Bj rkhem; Magnus Axelson

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate a culture system for bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells. METHODS Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-free William's E medium. The medium was collected and renewed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors in media were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS Cholic acid ( CA ) andchenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurine accounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. A third of CDCA was also conjugated with sulphuric acid. Dexamathasone and thyroid hormorm alone or in combination did not significantly effect bile acid formation. The addition of cyclosporin A (10 μmol/L) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%, respectively. CONCLUSION Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by converting cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells, which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium.

  14. 34 CFR 76.681 - Protection of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection of human subjects. 76.681 Section 76.681... Be Met by the State and Its Subgrantees? Other Requirements for Certain Programs § 76.681 Protection... or subgrantee shall protect the person from physical, psychological, or social injury resulting...

  15. Human physiology as the determining factor in protective clothing design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, Hein

    2014-01-01

    Protective clothing is designed to protect humans against risks like fire, chemicals or blunt impact. Although protect¡ve clothing diminishes the effects of external risks, it may hinder people in functioning and it may also introduce new (internal) risks. Manufacturers are often not aware of the se

  16. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Protects against Palmitic Acid-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction via Activation of the AMPK/eNOS Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Hsin Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that free fatty acids are associated with chronic inflammation, which may be involved in vascular injury. The intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA can decrease cardiovascular disease risks, but the protective mechanisms of EPA on endothelial cells remain unclear. In this study, primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs treated with palmitic acid (PA were used to explore the protective effects of EPA. The results revealed that EPA attenuated PA-induced cell death and activation of apoptosis-related proteins, such as caspase-3, p53 and Bax. Additionally, EPA reduced the PA-induced increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species, the activation of NADPH oxidase, and the upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. EPA also restored the PA-mediated reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation. Using AMPK siRNA and the specific inhibitor compound C, we found that EPA restored the PA-mediated inhibitions of eNOS and AKT activities via activation of AMPK. Furthermore, the NF-κB signals that are mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK were involved in protective effects of EPA. In summary, these results provide new insight into the possible molecular mechanisms by which EPA protects against atherogenesis via the AMPK/eNOS-related pathway.

  17. Neutron effects in humans: protection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Committee I of the International Commission on Radiological Protection has recommended that the Quality Factor for neutrons should be changed from 10 to 20. This article is an interesting recount of the tale of Q from the viewpoint of an observer which illustrates many of the problems that the selection of protection standards pose. 32 refs., 5 tabs

  18. Optical Properties of Linoleic Acid Protected Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Ratan Das; Nath, Siddartha S.; Ramendu Bhattacharjee

    2011-01-01

    Linoleic acid-protected gold nanoparticles have been synthesized through the chemical reduction of tetrachloroaurate ions by ethanol in presence of sodium linoleate. The structure of these nanoparticles is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, which shows that the Au nanoparticles are spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution which ranges from 8 to 15 nm. Colloidal dispersion of gold nanoparticles in cyclohexane exhibits absorption bands in the ultraviolet-visible ran...

  19. Optical Properties of Linoleic Acid Protected Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Ratan; Nath, Siddartha S.; Bhattacharjee, Ramendu

    2011-01-01

    Linoleic acid-protected gold nanoparticles have been synthesized through the chemical reduction of tetrachloroaurate ions by ethanol in presence of sodium linoleate. The structure of these nanoparticles is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, which shows that the Au nanoparticles are spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution which ranges from 8 to 15 nm. Colloidal dispersion of gold nanoparticles in cyclohexane exhibits absorption bands in the ultraviolet-visible rang...

  20. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. PMID:26796095

  1. Metformin protects rat hepatocytes against bile acid-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titia E Woudenberg-Vrenken

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metformin is used in the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus type II and improves liver function in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Metformin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, the cellular energy sensor that is sensitive to changes in the AMP/ATP-ratio. AMPK is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Both AMPK and mTOR are able to modulate cell death. AIM: To evaluate the effects of metformin on hepatocyte cell death. METHODS: Apoptotic cell death was induced in primary rat hepatocytes using either the bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA or TNFα in combination with actinomycin D (actD. AMPK, mTOR and phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K/Akt were inhibited using pharmacological inhibitors. Apoptosis and necrosis were quantified by caspase activation, acridine orange staining and Sytox green staining respectively. RESULTS: Metformin dose-dependently reduces GCDCA-induced apoptosis, even when added 2 hours after GCDCA, without increasing necrotic cell death. Metformin does not protect against TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis. The protective effect of metformin is dependent on an intact PI3-kinase/Akt pathway, but does not require AMPK/mTOR-signaling. Metformin does not inhibit NF-κB activation. CONCLUSION: Metformin protects against bile acid-induced apoptosis and could be considered in the treatment of chronic liver diseases accompanied by inflammation.

  2. Identification of T. gondii epitopes, adjuvants, & host genetic factors that influence protection of mice & humans

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Tze Guan; Mui, Ernest; Cong, Hua; Witola, William; Montpetit, Alexandre; Muench, Stephen P.; Sidney, John; Alexander, Jeff; Sette, Alessandro; Grigg, Michael; Maewal, Ajesh; McLeod, Rima

    2010-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that causes severe neurologic and ocular disease in immune-compromised and congenitally infected individuals. There is no vaccine protective against human toxoplasmosis. Herein, immunization of Ld mice with HF10 (HPGSVNEFDF) with palmitic acid moieties or a monophosphoryl lipid A derivative elicited potent IFN-γ production from Ld-restricted CD8+ T cells in vitro and protected mice. CD8+ T cell peptide epitopes from T. gondii dense granule protei...

  3. Cryptococcal 3-Hydroxy Fatty Acids Protect Cells Against Amoebal Phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Uju L; Ogundeji, Adepemi O; Mochochoko, Bonang M; Pohl, Carolina H; Albertyn, Jacobus; Swart, Chantel W; Allwood, J William; Southam, Andrew D; Dunn, Warwick B; May, Robin C; Sebolai, Olihile M

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on a 3-hydroxy fatty acid that is secreted via cryptococcal capsular protuberances - possibly to promote pathogenesis and survival. Thus, we investigated the role of this molecule in mediating the fate of Cryptococcus (C.) neoformans and the related species C. gattii when predated upon by amoebae. We show that this molecule protects cells against the phagocytic effects of amoebae. C. neoformans UOFS Y-1378 (which produces 3-hydroxy fatty acids) was less sensitive toward amoebae compared to C. neoformans LMPE 046 and C. gattii R265 (both do not produce 3-hydroxy fatty acids) and addition of 3-hydroxy fatty acids to C. neoformans LMPE 046 and C. gattii R265 culture media, causes these strains to become more resistant to amoebal predation. Conversely, addition of aspirin (a 3-hydroxy fatty acid inhibitor) to C. neoformans UOFS Y-1378 culture media made cells more susceptible to amoebae. Our data suggest that this molecule is secreted at a high enough concentration to effect intracellular signaling within amoeba, which in turn, promotes fungal survival.

  4. Cryptococcal 3-hydroxy fatty acids protect cells against amoebal phagocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uju Lynda Madu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported on a 3-hydroxy fatty acid that is secreted via cryptococcal capsular protuberances - possibly to promote pathogenesis and survival. Thus, we investigated the role of this molecule in mediating the fate of Cryptococcus (C. neoformans and the related species C. gattii when predated upon by amoebae. We show that this molecule protects cells against the phagocytic effects of amoebae. C. neoformans UOFS Y-1378 (which produces 3-hydroxy fatty acids was less sensitive towards amoebae compared to C. neoformans LMPE 046 and C. gattii R265 (both do not produce 3-hydroxy fatty acids and addition of 3-hydroxy fatty acids to C. neoformans LMPE 046 and C. gattii R265 culture media, causes these strains to become more resistant to amoebal predation. Conversely, addition of aspirin (a 3-hydroxy fatty acid inhibitor to C. neoformans UOFS Y-1378 culture media made cells more susceptible to amoebae. Our data suggest that this molecule is secreted at a high enough concentration to effect intracellular signalling within amoeba, which in turn, promotes fungal survival.

  5. Evaluation of salicylic acid fatty ester prodrugs for UV protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jong Seob; Balakrishnan, Prabagar; Oh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jung Sun; Jeon, Eun-Mi; Kim, Dae-Duk; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physicochemical properties and in vitro evaluation of fatty ester prodrugs of salicylic acid for ultraviolet (UV) protection. The physicochemical properties such as lipophilicity, chemical stability and enzymatic hydrolysis were investigated with the following fatty ester prodrugs of salicylic acid: octanoyl (C8SA), nonanoyl (C9SA), decanoyl (C10SA), lauroyl (C12SA), myristoyl (C14SA) and palmitoyl oxysalicylate (C16SA). Furthermore, their skin permeation and accumulation were evaluated using a combination of common permeation enhancing techniques such as the use of a lipophilic receptor solution, removal of stratum corneum and delipidization of skin. Their k' values were proportional to the degree of carbon-carbon saturation in the side chain. All these fatty esters were highly stable in 2-propanol, acetonitrile and glycerin, but unstable in methanol and ethanol. They were relatively unstable in liver and skin homogenates. In particular, C16SA was mostly hydrolyzed to its parent compound in hairless mouse liver and skin homogenates, suggesting that it might be converted to salicylic acid after its topical administration. In the skin permeation and accumulation study, C16SA showed the poorest permeation in all skins, suggesting that it could not be permeated in the skin. Furthermore, C14SA and C16SA were less accumulated in delipidized skin compared with normal skin or stripped skin, suggesting that these esters had relatively strong affinities for lipids compared with the other prodrugs in the skin. C16SA showed significantly higher dermal accumulation in all skins compared with its parent salicylic acid. Thus, the palmitoyl oxysalicylate (C16SA) might be a potential candidate for UV protection due to its absence of skin permeation, smaller uptake in the lipid phase and relatively lower skin accumulation.

  6. Chemical radiation protection in mammals and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and the present situation in experimental research with animals as well as in clinical application in the field of chemical radioprotection are described. The efficacy of radioprotective substances in the case of acute radiation death, of radiation-induced changes in various tissues and organs as well as in late effects are reported. The mechanisms of actions are discussed. By comparison of radiation reactions in protected and unprotected animals radioprotective factors can be determined. Such factors depend, among other parameters, on the kind of the radioprotective agent and its dose, on the radiation reaction, on the quality of radiation as well as on the radiation dose. Up to now thiophosphate WR 2721 proved to be the most efficient substance. It was observed that the application of this compound yielded a protection factor of up to 2.7 for the acute radiation death in mice. The disadvantage of radioprotective agents must be seen in their side effects. Despite this behaviour thiophosphate, amongst others, is being tested in clinical radiotherapy. In order to apply radioprotective substances in foreseen emergency or catastrophic situations a number of demands were postulated. As yet, none of the tested radioprotectors meet these demands. Therefore, NATO has refrained from keeping radioprotective agents in reserve up to now. On the other hand, the USSR has included the radioprotective agent cystamine in their civil defence protection kit. (orig.)

  7. 透明质酸对人骨关节炎软骨细胞保护机制的探讨%Protective effects and mechanism of hyaluronic acid on human osteoarthritis chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李化光; 刘华; 杨新明; 张林西

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the effects and mechanism of hyaluronic acid on human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Methods Mitochondrial activity was measured by methylthiazolyl tetrazolium test. Mitochondrial membrane protein (MMP) , apoptosis and [ Ca2+ ] I were measured by flow cytometry. Results Hyaluronic acid significantly increased MMP and mitochondrial activity, and decreased [Ca2+]I and apoptosis rate in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Conclusions Hyaluronic acid might inhibit the declines of MMP and mitochondrial activity, and has an inhibitory effect on osteoarthritis chondrocytes apoptosis. The mechanism might be related to inhibiting intracellular calcium overload.%目的:探讨透明质酸对人骨关节炎软骨细胞的作用机制.方法:应用细胞培养、四唑盐比色实验检测细胞线粒体活性,流式细胞术检测线粒体膜电位、细胞凋亡百分率和细胞内游离钙离子浓度.结果:透明质酸能明显提高人骨关节炎软骨细胞线粒体活性,抬高线粒体膜电位,降低细胞凋亡率和胞内游离钙浓度.结论:透明质酸可抑制人骨关节炎软骨细胞线粒体膜电位的降低,从而具有稳定线粒体膜电位的作用,抑制细胞凋亡的发生,这种作用可能与其能抑制软骨细胞内钙超载有关.

  8. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; Lafferty, Kevin D; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S; Hudson, Peter J; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Control of human infectious disease has been promoted as a valuable ecosystem service arising from the conservation of biodiversity. There are two commonly discussed mechanisms by which biodiversity loss could increase rates of infectious disease in a landscape. First, loss of competitors or predators could facilitate an increase in the abundance of competent reservoir hosts. Second, biodiversity loss could disproportionately affect non-competent, or less competent reservoir hosts, which would otherwise interfere with pathogen transmission to human populations by, for example, wasting the bites of infected vectors. A negative association between biodiversity and disease risk, sometimes called the "dilution effect hypothesis," has been supported for a few disease agents, suggests an exciting win-win outcome for the environment and society, and has become a pervasive topic in the disease ecology literature. Case studies have been assembled to argue that the dilution effect is general across disease agents. Less touted are examples in which elevated biodiversity does not affect or increases infectious disease risk for pathogens of public health concern. In order to assess the likely generality of the dilution effect, we review the association between biodiversity and public health across a broad variety of human disease agents. Overall, we hypothesize that conditions for the dilution effect are unlikely to be met for most important diseases of humans. Biodiversity probably has little net effect on most human infectious diseases but, when it does have an effect, observation and basic logic suggest that biodiversity will be more likely to increase than to decrease infectious disease risk.

  9. Erosion protection conferred by whole human saliva, dialysed saliva, and artificial saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Kozik, J.; Lussi, A.; Carvalho, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    During dental erosion, tooth minerals are dissolved, leading to a softening of the surface and consequently to irreversible surface loss. Components from human saliva form a pellicle on the tooth surface, providing some protection against erosion. To assess the effect of different components and compositions of saliva on the protective potential of the pellicle against enamel erosion, we prepared four different kinds of saliva: human whole stimulated saliva (HS), artificial saliva containing only ions (AS), human saliva dialysed against artificial saliva, containing salivary proteins and ions (HS/AS), and human saliva dialysed against deionised water, containing only salivary proteins but no ions (HS/DW). Enamel specimens underwent four cycles of immersion in either HS, AS, HS/AS, HS/DW, or a humid chamber (Ctrl), followed by erosion with citric acid. During the cycling process, the surface hardness and the calcium released from the surface of the specimens were measured. The different kinds of saliva provided different levels of protection, HS/DW exhibiting significantly better protection than all the other groups (p < 0.0001). Different components of saliva, therefore, have different effects on the protective properties of the pellicle and the right proportions of these components in saliva are critical for the ability to form a protective pellicle. PMID:27703230

  10. Erosion protection conferred by whole human saliva, dialysed saliva, and artificial saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Kozik, J.; Lussi, A.; Carvalho, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    During dental erosion, tooth minerals are dissolved, leading to a softening of the surface and consequently to irreversible surface loss. Components from human saliva form a pellicle on the tooth surface, providing some protection against erosion. To assess the effect of different components and compositions of saliva on the protective potential of the pellicle against enamel erosion, we prepared four different kinds of saliva: human whole stimulated saliva (HS), artificial saliva containing only ions (AS), human saliva dialysed against artificial saliva, containing salivary proteins and ions (HS/AS), and human saliva dialysed against deionised water, containing only salivary proteins but no ions (HS/DW). Enamel specimens underwent four cycles of immersion in either HS, AS, HS/AS, HS/DW, or a humid chamber (Ctrl), followed by erosion with citric acid. During the cycling process, the surface hardness and the calcium released from the surface of the specimens were measured. The different kinds of saliva provided different levels of protection, HS/DW exhibiting significantly better protection than all the other groups (p saliva, therefore, have different effects on the protective properties of the pellicle and the right proportions of these components in saliva are critical for the ability to form a protective pellicle.

  11. Optical Properties of Linoleic Acid Protected Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Linoleic acid-protected gold nanoparticles have been synthesized through the chemical reduction of tetrachloroaurate ions by ethanol in presence of sodium linoleate. The structure of these nanoparticles is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, which shows that the Au nanoparticles are spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution which ranges from 8 to 15 nm. Colloidal dispersion of gold nanoparticles in cyclohexane exhibits absorption bands in the ultraviolet-visible range due to surface plasmon resonance, with absorption maximum at 530 nm. Fluorescence spectra of gold nanoparticles also show an emission peak at 610 nm when illuminated at 450 nm. UV-Vis spectroscopy reveals that these nanoparticles remain stable for 10 days.

  12. Palmitic Acid in Early Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innis, Sheila M

    2016-09-01

    Palmitic acid (16:0) is a saturated fatty acid present in the diet and synthesized endogenously. Although often considered to have adverse effects on chronic disease in adults, 16:0 is an essential component of membrane, secretory, and transport lipids, with crucial roles in protein palmitoylation and signal molecules. At birth, the term infant is 13-15% body fat, with 45-50% 16:0, much of which is derived from endogenous synthesis in the fetus. After birth, the infant accumulates adipose tissue at high rates, reaching 25% body weight as fat by 4-5 months age. Over this time, human milk provides 10% dietary energy as 16:0, but in unusual triglycerides with 16:0 on the glycerol center carbon. This paper reviews the synthesis and oxidation of 16:0 and possible reasons why the infant is endowed with large amounts of fat and 16:0. The marked deviations in tissues with displacement of 16:0 that can occur in infants fed vegetable oil formulas is introduced. Assuming fetal fatty acid synthesis and the unusual delivery of 16:0 in human milk evolved to afford survival advantage to the neonate, it is timely to question if 16:0 is an essential component of tissue lipids whereby both deficiency and excess are detrimental. PMID:25764297

  13. Essential fatty acids and human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Ke, Der-Shin; Chen, Jen-Yin

    2009-12-01

    The human brain is nearly 60 percent fat. We've learned in recent years that fatty acids are among the most crucial molecules that determine your brain's integrity and ability to perform. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) are required for maintenance of optimal health but they can not synthesized by the body and must be obtained from dietary sources. Clinical observation studies has related imbalance dietary intake of fatty acids to impaired brain performance and diseases. Most of the brain growth is completed by 5-6 years of age. The EFAs, particularly the omega-3 fatty acids, are important for brain development during both the fetal and postnatal period. Dietary decosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is needed for the optimum functional maturation of the retina and visual cortex, with visual acuity and mental development seemingly improved by extra DHA. Beyond their important role in building the brain structure, EFAs, as messengers, are involved in the synthesis and functions of brain neurotransmitters, and in the molecules of the immune system. Neuronal membranes contain phospholipid pools that are the reservoirs for the synthesis of specific lipid messengers on neuronal stimulation or injury. These messengers in turn participate in signaling cascades that can either promote neuronal injury or neuroprotection. The goal of this review is to give a new understanding of how EFAs determine our brain's integrity and performance, and to recall the neuropsychiatric disorders that may be influenced by them. As we further unlock the mystery of how fatty acids affect the brain and better understand the brain's critical dependence on specific EFAs, correct intake of the appropriate diet or supplements becomes one of the tasks we undertake in pursuit of optimal wellness.

  14. Radiation protection with mesalamine (5-amino salicylic acid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation proctitis induced during the therapy of rectal and prostate cancers, and radiation injuries in general, are often the principal dose limiting factor limiting dose escalation for radiation therapy. Thus, there has been a continuous search for radioprotective agents, especially those that could selectively protect normal tissues, as opposed to the target cancer. 5-amino salicylic acid (5ASA) is in clinical use as Mesalamine for the local treatment of ulcerative proctitis. Inasmuch as other investigators have identified 5ASA as a free radical scavenger, we determined whether pretreatment with 5ASA could confer radiation protection. Materials and Methods: Adult male C57BL/6J mice obtained from Jackson Laboratories were employed for these studies. We determined LD50 for acute gastrointestinal death for young (≤ 10 weeks old, ≤ 25 gms body weight) and aged (≥ 1 year old, ≥ 35 gms body weight) animals exposed to single fractions (1 - 20 Gy) from three different radiation sources, Cs137, 270 KeV x-rays, and a 4 MeV linear accelerator. Experimental mice were pre- or post-treated with 5ASA in an acidified isotonic saline solution by oral, rectal, or intraperitoneal administration. Animals were housed, maintained by AAALAC standards and treated with antibiotics or acidified water post radiation exposure to control opportunistic infections. Animals were scored for death when moribund. Results: 5ASA was found to be radioprotective by oral, rectal or intraperitoneal administration when given 15 to 90 minutes prior to radiation exposure. Administration of drug following radiation exposure failed to confer radioprotection. We determined a dose effect for 5ASA with maximum tolerated dose of 200 mg/kg administered ip 30 minutes prior to 11 Gy whole body exposure. Dose modification and radioprotection by 5ASA were determined by LD50(6), LD50(30), or LD50(365). More recently, we determined that 5ASA conferred significant radioprotection to mice exposed to

  15. Planetary protection for humans in space: Mars and the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Catharine A.; Rummel, John D.

    When searching for life beyond Earth, the unique capabilities provided by human astronauts will only be advantageous if the biological contamination associated with human presence is monitored and minimized. Controlling biological contamination during planetary exploration is termed 'planetary protection,' and will be a critical element in the human exploration of other solar system bodies. To ensure the safety and health of the astronauts and the Earth, while preserving science value, planetary protection considerations must be incorporated from the earliest stages of mission planning and development. Issues of concern to planetary protection involve both 'forward contamination,' which is the contamination of other solar system bodies by Earth microbes and organic materials, and 'backward contamination,' which is the contamination of Earth systems by potential alien life. Forward contamination concerns include contamination that might invalidate current or future scientific exploration of a particular solar system body, and that may disrupt the planetary environment or a potential endogenous (alien) ecosystem. Backward contamination concerns include both immediate and long-term effects on the health of the astronaut explorers from possible biologically active materials encountered during exploration, as well as the possible contamination of the Earth. A number of national and international workshops held over the last seven years have generated a consensus regarding planetary protection policies and requirements for human missions to Mars, and a 2007 workshop held by NASA has considered the issues and benefits to planetary protection that might be offered by a return to the Moon. Conclusions from these workshops recognize that some degree of forward contamination associated with human astronaut explorers is inevitable. Nonetheless, the principles and policies of planetary protection, developed by COSPAR in conformance with the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, can and

  16. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Schnell

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenylsemicarbazone (EGA has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT. Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria.

  17. Ultraviolet-B Protective Effect of Flavonoids from Eugenia caryophylata on Human Dermal Fibroblast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Patwardhan, Juilee; Bhatt, Purvi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The exposure of skin to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiations leads to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage and can induce production of free radicals which imbalance the redox status of the cell and lead to increased oxidative stress. Clove has been traditionally used for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-viral, and antiseptic effects. Objective: To evaluate the UV-B protective activity of flavonoids from Eugenia caryophylata (clove) buds on human dermal fibroblast c...

  18. Ethics and data protection in human biomarker studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Casteleyn, Ludwine; Dumez, Birgit; Jamers, An; Van Damme, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Human biomarker studies in environmental health are essential tools to study the relationship between health and environment. The development of relevant research potential and the setup of bio-monitoring surveys should ultimately lead to a better understanding and prevention of environmentally induced adverse health effects. In this volume we review ethics and data protection in environmental health studies using human biomarkers. The question is raised whether study participants are adeq...

  19. Salvianolic acid B inhibits autophagy and protects starving cardiac myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao HAN; Jian-xun LIU; Xin-zhi LI

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective or lethal role of autophagy and the effects of Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on autophagy in starving myocytes.Methods: Cardiac myocytes were incubated under starvation conditions (GD) for O, 1, 2, 3, and 6 h. Autophagic flux in starving cells was measured via chloroquine (3 μmol/L). After myocytes were treated with Sat B (50 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of chloro-quine (3 μmol/L) under GD 3 h, the amount of LC3-11, the abundance of LC3-positive fluorescent dots in cells, cell viability and cellular ATP levels were determined using immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, MTT assay and luminometer, respectively. More-over, electron microscopy (EM) and immunofluorescent duel labeling of LC3 and Caspase-8 were used to examine the characteristics of autophagy and apoptosis.Results: Immunoblot analysis showed that the amount of LC3-11 in starving cells increased in a time-dependent manner accompanied by increased LC3-positive fluorescence and decreased cell viability and ATP content. Sal B (50 μmol/L) inhibited the increase in LC3-11, reduced the abundance of LC3 immunofluorescence and intensity of Caspase-8 fluorescence, and enhanced cellular viability and ATP levels in myocytes under GD 3 h, regardless of whether chloroquine was present.Conclusion: Autophagy induced by starvation for 3 h led to cell injury. Sal B protected starving cells by blocking the early stage of autophagic flux and inhibiting apoptosis that occurred during autophagy.

  20. 77 FR 37408 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human...; email address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a... as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the...

  1. 75 FR 37813 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ..., Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S...-8141; fax: 240-453-6909; e-mail address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the... as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the...

  2. Catalytic protection of stannous ion by ascorbic acid in diphosphonic acids solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuGuo-Zheng; LiuFei; 等

    1998-01-01

    The protective ability of ascorbic acid(Vc) on stannous ion and the influence of light irradiation on the stability of stannous ion in diphosphonate medium at pH=5 have been examined in order to attain minimal loss of stannous ion during the production of lyophilized radiopharmaceutical kits.The sum of stanous ion and Vc was determined with iodometric method.It was shown that the protective ability of Vc was still strong at Vc concentration much lower than that of stannous ion and the illumination by fluorescent lamp was unfavorable to the stability of stannous ion.The change of pH in the range 3-9 did not affect the action of Vc significantly.

  3. Pyridoxamine protects proteins from damage by hypohalous acids in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Hartman; Avance, Josh; Chetyrkin, Sergei; Darris, Carl; Rose, Kristie Lindsey; Sanchez, Otto A; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is characterized, in part, by activation of toxic oxidative and glycoxidative pathways that are triggered by persistent hyperglycemia and contribute to diabetic complications. Inhibition of these pathways may benefit diabetic patients by delaying the onset of complications. One such inhibitor, pyridoxamine (PM), had shown promise in clinical trials. However, the mechanism of PM action in vivo is not well understood. We have previously reported that hypohalous acids can cause disruption of the structure and function of renal collagen IV in experimental diabetes (K.L. Brown et al., Diabetes 64:2242-2253, 2015). In the present study, we demonstrate that PM can protect protein functionality from hypochlorous and hypobromous acid-derived damage via a rapid direct reaction with and detoxification of these hypohalous acids. We further demonstrate that PM treatment can ameliorate specific hypohalous acid-derived structural and functional damage to the renal collagen IV network in a diabetic animal model. These findings suggest a new mechanism of PM action in diabetes, namely sequestration of hypohalous acids, which may contribute to known therapeutic effects of PM in human diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Cyanide is a life-threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species. This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain barrier to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. Cyanide, a potential bioterrorist agent, can produce a chronic delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Here, cyanide poisoning treated with the proelectrophillic compound carnosic acid, results in reduced neuronal cell death in both in vitro and in vivo models through activation of the Nrf2/ARE transcriptional pathway. Carnosic acid is therefore a potential treatment for the toxic central nervous system (CNS) effects of cyanide poisoning. ARE, antioxidant responsive element; Nrf2 (NFE2L2, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2). PMID:25692407

  5. Salvianolic acid B protects endothelial cells from oxidant-mediated damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-jun

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective effects of Salvianolic acid B(Sal B) on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Sal B is considered as one of the most active anti-oxidant and the major pharmacological component of the herb, Salvia miltiorrhiza. Its beneficial effects include hepatoprotection, elicitation of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, lowering blood pressure in hypertension, inhibition of HIV-1 replication and suppressing inflammatory cytokine- stimulated endothelial adhesiveness to human monocytie cells by its strong antioxidant activities. Methods Treatment with H2O2 significantly decreased the cell viability and increased the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage that is an apoptotic feature. Pretreatment with Sal B prevented significantly from H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and other damages in a concentration-dependent manner. The mechanism of Sal B protection was studied with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer. Results Data base searching implicated glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a central regulator for ER stress, was up-regulated in Sal B-exposed HUVECs. After exposure to Sal B, the level of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) was raised, with a transient phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF2α). Knock-down of GRP78 by siRNA significantly reduced protective effects of Sal B. Conclusions These results suggest that Sal B-induced GRP78 upregulation via phosphorylation of eIF2α and resultant translation of ATF4. And up-regulation of ER chaperones induced by Sal B may play an important role in protecting human endothelial cells from oxidative stress-induced cellular damage.

  6. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protects human hepatocytes against apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilowski, Maren [Liver Regeneration Group, Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Kleespies, Axel [Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Toni, Enrico N. de [Department of Medicine II, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Donabauer, Barbara [Liver Regeneration Group, Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Jauch, Karl-Walter [Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Hengstler, Jan G. [Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Technical University, Dortmund (Germany); Thasler, Wolfgang E., E-mail: wolfgang.thasler@med.uni-muenchen.de [Liver Regeneration Group, Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALR decreases cytochrome c release from mitochondria. {yields} ALR protects hepatocytes against apoptosis induction by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. {yields} ALR exerts a liver-specific anti-apoptotic effect. {yields} A possible medical usage of ALR regarding protection of liver cells during apoptosis inducing therapies. -- Abstract: Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is known to support liver regeneration and to stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes. However, it is not known if ALR exerts anti-apoptotic effects in human hepatocytes and whether this protective effect is cell type specific. This is relevant, because compounds that protect the liver against apoptosis without undesired effects, such as protection of metastatic tumour cells, would be appreciated in several clinical settings. Primary human hepatocytes (phH) and organotypic cancer cell lines were exposed to different concentrations of apoptosis inducers (ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta}, actinomycin D) and cultured with or without recombinant human ALR (rhALR). Apoptosis was evaluated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and by FACS with propidium iodide (PI) staining. ALR significantly decreased apoptosis induced by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. Further, the anti-apoptotic effect of ALR was observed in primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells but not in bronchial (BC1), colonic (SW480), gastric (GC1) and pancreatic (L3.6PL) cell lines. Therefore, the hepatotrophic growth factor ALR acts in a liver specific manner with regards to both its mitogenic and its anti-apoptotic effect. Unlike the growth factors HGF and EGF, rhALR acts in a liver specific manner. Therefore, ALR is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a possible hepatoprotective factor in clinical settings.

  7. Planetary protection issues linked to human missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, A.

    According to United Nations Treaties and handled presently by the Committee of Space Research COSPAR the exploration of the Solar System has to comply with planetary protection requirements The goal of planetary protection is to protect celestial bodies from terrestrial contamination and also to protect the Earth environment from an eventual biocontamination carried by return samples or by space systems returning to the Earth Mars is presently one of the main target at exobiology point of view and a lot of missions are operating on travel or scheduled for its exploration Some of them include payload dedicated to the search of life or traces of life and one of the goals of these missions is also to prepare sample return missions with the ultimate objective to walk on Mars Robotic missions to Mars have to comply with planetary protection specifications well known presently and planetary protection programs are implemented with a very good reliability taking into account an experience of 40 years now For sample return missions a set of stringent requirements have been approved by the COSPAR and technical challenges have now to be won in order to preserve Earth biosphere from an eventual contamination risk Sending astronauts on Mars will gather all these constraints added with the human dimension of the mission The fact that the astronauts are huge contamination sources for Mars and that they are also potential carrier of a contamination risk back to Earth add also ethical considerations to be considered For the preparation of a such

  8. Planetary protection issues related to human missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, A.; Arnould, J.

    2008-09-01

    In accordance with the United Nations Outer Space Treaties [United Nations, Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, UN doc A/RES/34/68, resolution 38/68 of December 1979], currently maintained and promulgated by the Committee on Space Research [COSPAR Planetary Protection Panel, Planetary Protection Policy accepted by the COSPAR Council and Bureau, 20 October 2002, amended 24 March 2005, http://www.cosparhq.org/scistr/PPPolicy.htm], missions exploring the Solar system must meet planetary protection requirements. Planetary protection aims to protect celestial bodies from terrestrial contamination and to protect the Earth environment from potential biological contamination carried by returned samples or space systems that have been in contact with an extraterrestrial environment. From an exobiology perspective, Mars is one of the major targets, and several missions are currently in operation, in transit, or scheduled for its exploration. Some of them include payloads dedicated to the detection of life or traces of life. The next step, over the coming years, will be to return samples from Mars to Earth, with a view to increasing our knowledge in preparation for the first manned mission that is likely to take place within the next few decades. Robotic missions to Mars shall meet planetary protection specifications, currently well documented, and planetary protection programs are implemented in a very reliable manner given that experience in the field spans some 40 years. With regards to sample return missions, a set of stringent requirements has been approved by COSPAR [COSPAR Planetary Protection Panel, Planetary Protection Policy accepted by the COSPAR Council and Bureau, 20 October 2002, amended 24 March 2005, http://www.cosparhq.org/scistr/PPPolicy.htm], and technical challenges must now be overcome in order to preserve the Earth’s biosphere from any eventual contamination risk. In addition to the human dimension of

  9. Cleaning time and fate of phosphoric acid as conditioning agent on human dental enamel and dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the cleaning time and fate of phosphoric acid on human dental enamel and dentin have been investigated, using the radioactive tracer technique with 32P as an indicator of phosphorus. Twenty seconds were found to be sufficient for cleaning the enamel from phosphoric acid used for conditioning, and from formulations produced from its interaction with enamel. It was also found that dentin protection is necessary before conditioning with phosphoric acid due to the retention penetration of the latter through subsurface dentinal tubules. In addition, there seems to be an interaction between phosphoric acid and Ca(OH)2 leading to the formation of a sparingly soluble compound. (author)

  10. On the protective effect of omega-3 against propionic acid-induced neurotoxicity in rat pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Gezeery Amina R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds The investigation of the environmental contribution for developmental neurotoxicity is very important. Many environmental chemical exposures are now thought to contribute to the development of neurological disorders, especially in children. Results from animal studies may guide investigations of human populations toward identifying environmental contaminants and drugs that produce or protect from neurotoxicity and may help in the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. Objective To study the protective effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid on brain intoxication induced by propionic acid (PPA in rats. Methods 24 young male Western Albino rats were enrolled in the present study. They were grouped into three equal groups; oral buffered PPA-treated group given a nuerotoxic dose of 250 mg/Kg body weight/day for 3 days; omega-3 - protected group given a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight/day omega-3 orally daily for 5 days followed by PPA for 3 days, and a third group as control given only phosphate buffered saline. Tumor necrosis factor-α, caspase-3, interlukin-6, gamma amino-buteric acid (GABA, serotonin, dopamine and phospholipids were then assayed in the rats brain's tissue of different groups. Results The obtained data showed that PPA caused multiple signs of brain toxicity as measured by depletion of gamaaminobyteric acid (GABA, serotonin (5HT and dopamine (DA as three important neurotransmitters that reflect brain function. A high significant increase of interlukin-6 (Il-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α as excellent markers of proinflammation and caspase-3 as a proapotic marker were remarkably elevated in the intoxicated group of rats. Moreover, brain phospholipid profile was impaired in PPA-treated young rats recording lower levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, phosphatidylserine (PS and phosphatidylcholine (PC. Conclusions Omega-3 fatty acids showed a protective effects on PPA - induced changes in rats as

  11. Discussion on Human Dignity and Human Rights Protection from the Perspective of Peacekeeping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO XINMAN

    2012-01-01

    From an academic point of view,human dignity is the source of human fights,and has a orofound academic history.Since the end of World War Ⅱ,the issue of human fights has received great attention from the international community.So,human right theories,for which human dignity is the basic consideration,have developed continuously.In this era of advocating rights,human dignity and human fights protection are universal values and concepts,which were emphasized once again after World War Ⅱ.Moreover,human dignity was clearly identified as the basis of human rights at the system level.This paper begins by describing the relationship between human dignity and human rights.

  12. Salivary a-amylase protects enamel surface against acid induced softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazovic, Maja Bruvo; Moe, Dennis; Kirkeby, Svend;

    -TOF mass fingerprinting following trypsin digestion. Each persistent peak in the HPLC chromatograms was related to the protective effect against acid-induced enamel softening obtained by the corresponding saliva sample by multiple regression analysis. Results: One peak identified as a-amylase had...... an explanatory power of 39% in the analysis with high concentrations being most protective (pamylase on protective effect to 65...

  13. A simulated mucus layer protects Lactobacillus reuteri from the inhibitory effects of linoleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Weirdt, R; Coenen, E; Vlaeminck, B; Fievez, V; Van den Abbeele, P; Van de Wiele, T

    2013-12-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is a commensal, beneficial gut microbe that colonises the intestinal mucus layer, where it makes close contact with the human host and may significantly affect human health. Here, we investigated the capacity of linoleic acid (LA), the most common polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in a Western-style diet, to affect L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 prevalence and survival in a simulated mucus layer. Short-term (1 h) survival and mucin-agar adhesion assays of a log-phase L. reuteri suspension in intestinal water demonstrated that the simulated mucus layer protected L. reuteri against the inhibitory effects of LA by lowering its contact with the bacterial cell membrane. The protective effect of the simulated mucus layer was further evaluated using a more complex and dynamic model of the colon microbiota (SHIME®), in which L. reuteri survival was monitored during 6 days of daily exposure to LA in the absence (L-SHIME) and presence (M-SHIME) of a simulated mucus layer. After 6 days, luminal L- and M-SHIME L. reuteri plate counts had decreased by 3.1±0.5 and 2.6±0.9 log cfu/ml, respectively. Upon supplementation of 1.0 g/l LA, the decline in the luminal L. reuteri population started earlier than was observed for the control. In contrast, mucin-agar levels of L. reuteri (in the M-SHIME) remained unaffected throughout the experiment even in the presence of high concentrations of LA. Overall, the results of this study indicate the importance of the mucus layer as a protective environment for beneficial gut microbes to escape from stress by high loads of the antimicrobial PUFA LA to the colon, i.e. due to a Western-style diet. PMID:24311313

  14. People-oriented Development and Human Rights Protection for Criminals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YUQIAN

    2011-01-01

    @@ People-oriented development refers to the economic and social integrative development that regards human beings as the orientation and subject of economic and social development and considers the development of human beings the essence, objective, momentum and symbol of development.One of its important connotations is to protect human beings' rights and interests in all links and works of economic and social development.On December 10,2008, Hu Jintao, secretary general of the CPC Central Committee, clarified that "We will, as always, adhere to people-oriented principles in building a well-off society in an all-round way and accelerating the process of socialist modernization" in his letter to the China Society for Human Rights Studies.

  15. Basic Science Research and the Protection of Human Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiseman, Elisa

    2001-03-01

    Technological advances in basic biological research have been instrumental in recent biomedical discoveries, such as in the understanding and treatment of cancer, HIV/AIDS, and heart disease. However, many of these advances also raise several new ethical challenges. For example, genetic research may pose no physical risk beyond that of obtaining the initial blood sample, yet it can pose significant psychological and economic risks to research participants, such as stigmatization, discrimination in insurance and employment, invasion of privacy, or breach of confidentiality. These harms may occur even when investigators do not directly interact with the person whose DNA they are studying. Moreover, this type of basic research also raises broader questions, such as what is the definition of a human subject, and what kinds of expertise do Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) need to review the increasingly diverse types of research made possible by these advances in technology. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC), a presidentially appointed federal advisory committee, has addressed these and other ethical, scientific and policy issues that arise in basic science research involving human participants. Two of its six reports, in particular, have proposed recommendations in this regard. "Research Involving Human Biological Materials: Ethical and Policy Guidance" addresses the basic research use of human tissues, cells and DNA and the protection of human participants in this type of research. In "Ethical and Policy Issues in the Oversight of Human Research" NBAC proposes a definition of research involving human participants that would apply to all scientific disciplines, including physical, biological, and social sciences, as well as the humanities and related professions, such as business and law. Both of these reports make it clear that the protection of research participants is key to conducting ethically sound research. By ensuring that all participants in

  16. A Study of Electrochemical Protection of Carbon Steels in Sulfuric Acid Solutions - Electrochemical Protection Diagrams of Metals (1) -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical protection of carbon steels was studied in sulfuric acid solutions. The main results obtained are as follows: 1) Electrochemical protection diagrams of carbon steels in sulfuric acid solutions can be drawn with the data from Jeon's determination method of the optimum cathodic protection potential, the Tafel extrapolation and the characteristics of anodic polarization curves, and the diagram also represent various practical protection data. 2) Corrosion rates of carbon steels in the more concentration than 45% solutions are very low because they are on sulfaction or passivation in the solution, but the rates in the less concentration than the solutions are very high since they are on activation. 3) SS 41 steel is suitable in the more concentration than 45% solutions but SM 50 steel is relatively good in the less concentration than the solutions from the economical view

  17. Monitoring Homovanillic Acid and Vanillylmandelic Acid in Human Urine by Capillary Electrophoresis with Electrochemical Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A simple, rapid and low-cost method of separation and determination of homovanillic acid and vanillylmandelic acid in human urine was developed based on capillary zone electrophoresis / amperometric detection with high sensitivity and good resolution.

  18. The regulation of the intestinal mucin MUC2 expression by short chain fatty acids: implications for epithelial protection

    OpenAIRE

    Burger-van Paassen, Nanda; Vincent, Audrey; Puiman, Patrycja J; van der Sluis, Maria; Bouma, Janneke; Boehm, Günther; Van Goudoever, Johannes B; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Ingrid B Renes

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), fermentation products of bacteria, influence epithelial-specific gene expression. We hypothesize that SCFAs affect goblet cell-specific mucin MUC2 expression and thereby alter epithelial protection. Our aim was to study the mechanisms that regulate butyrate-mediated effects on MUC2 synthesis. Human goblet cell-like LS174T cells were treated with SCFAs, after which MUC2 mRNA levels and stability and MUC2 protein expression were analyzed. SCF...

  19. Bioavailability of flavonoids and cinnamic acids and their effect on plasma homocysteine in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Olthof, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants might prevent oxidative damage to tissues and therefore protect against cardiovascular disease and cancer. Dietary phenols are strong antioxidants in vitro but their role in vivo is uncertain. Furthermore, there are only limited data on their bioavailability in humans. The aim of this thesis was to investigate whether bioavailability data on flavonoids and cinnamic acids support the hypothesis that they can affect health in humans . Because the group of phenols in foods i...

  20. Acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen protect against oxidative neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, H; Maharaj, D S; Daya, S

    2006-09-01

    Due to the implication of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disorders we decided to investigate the antioxidant properties of acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen either alone or in combination. The thiobarbituric acid assay (TBA) and the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay were used to investigate quinolinic acid (QA)-induced: lipid peroxidation and superoxide anion generation in the rat hippocampus, in vivo. The study also shows, using cresyl violet staining, the preservation of structural integrity of neuronal cells following treatment with acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen in QA-lesioned rat hippocampus. Furthermore the study sought to determine whether these agents have any effect on endogenous (QA) formation. This study shows that acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen inhibit QA-induced superoxide anion generation, lipid peroxidation and cell damage, in vivo, in the rat hippocampus. In addition these agents inhibit the enzyme, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid oxygenase (3-HAO), responsible for the synthesis of endogenous QA.

  1. Protection of historical lead against acetic acid vapour

    OpenAIRE

    Pecenová Z.; Kouřil M.

    2016-01-01

    Historical lead artefacts (small figurines, appliques, bull (metal seal) can be stored in depository and archives in inconvenient storage conditions. The wooden show-case or paper packagings release volatile organic compound to the air during their degradation. These acids, mainly acetic acid are very corrosive for lead. The thin layer of corrosion products which slows atmospheric corrosion is formed on lead surface in atmospheric condition. In presence of acetic acid vapour the voluminous co...

  2. On the Principle of Presumption of Innocence from the Perspective of Human Rights Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU ZONGJIE

    2011-01-01

    @@ People pay more and more attention to human rights protection today.The human rights protection in the system of criminal procedure distinctly emphasizes the principle of presumptionof innocence (hereafter in this article referred to as the PPI).

  3. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids

    OpenAIRE

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Rodríguez, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver . Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and ...

  4. Bosphorus Double standards in European human rights protection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Kuhnert

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the main facts and findings of the Bosphorus judgment and analyses its legal assessment of the controversial question of the European Court of Human Rights’ (ECtHR jurisdiction to review EC law. A historic review of ECtHR case-law shows that – despite a rather inconsistent approach – Community acts have become subject to expanding judicial scrutiny by the Strasbourg Court. EU Member States can now be held responsible for (nearly all Community acts by the mere fact that they have implemented them. This creates a dilemma, as EU Member States have to comply with different obligations flowing from the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR and from Community law. Moreover, the question is highlighted whether, with this judgment, the ECtHR has acknowledged a double standard in human rights protection between EU Member States and non-EU Member States of the Council of Europe. It is argued in this contribution that after the geographic enlargement of Europe, the boundaries of human rights jurisdiction must also expand legally, providing the EU with consistency in its external human rights policy. Therefore, the accession of the EC and the EU to the ECHR seems inevitable.

  5. Protective effects of exogenous gangliosides on ROS-induced changes in human spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirjana Gavella; Vaskresenija Lipovac

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the available evidence on the efficacy of gangliosides to reduce the degree of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated damage.The antioxidative efficacy of exogenous gangliosides in protecting different cells encouraged us to examine their ability to protect human spermatozoa.Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids with strong amphiphilic character due to the bulky headgroup made of several sugar rings with sialic acid residues and the double-tailed hydrophobic lipid moiety.The amphiphilicity of gangliosides allows them to exist as micelles in aqueous media when they are present at a concentration above their critical micellar concentration.The protective effect of ganglioside micelles on spermatozoa is believed to stem from their ability to scavenge free radicals and prevent their damaging effects.In our study,we particularly focused our attention on the protective effect of ganglioside micelles on DNA in human spermatozoa exposed to cryopreservation.The results indicate that ganglioside micelles can modulate the hydrophobic properties of the sperm membrane to increase tolerance to DNA fragmentation,thus protecting the DNA from cryopreservation-induced damage.Further actions of ganglioside micelles,which were documented by biochemical and biophysical studies,included (i) the modulation of superoxide anion generation by increasing the diffusion barrier for membrane events responsible for signal translocation to the interior of the cell; (ii) the inhibition of iron-catalysed hydroxyl radical formation due to the iron chelation potential of gangliosides; and (iii) inhibition of hydrogen peroxide diffusion across the sperm membrane.

  6. Effects of Phenolic Acids on Growth and Activities of Membrane Protective Enzymes of Cucumber Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Feng-zhi; HUANG Cai-hong; ZHAO Feng-yan

    2002-01-01

    Two phenolic acids P-hydroxy benzoic acid and cinnamic acid were designated as four concentrations (0, 50μmol/L, 100μmol/L, 150μmol/L) to investigate the effects of phenoic acids on the growth and the activities of membrane protective enzymes of cucumber seedlings. The results showed that both phenolic acids inhibited the seedlings growth. The inhibitory effects were increased with the concentration of phenolic acids increasing and the time of treatment prolonging. Seedlings treated with A150 (P-hydroxy benzoic acid, 150μmol/L), B50 (cinnamic acid, 50 μmol/L), B100 (cinnamic acid,100μmol/L), B150 (cinnamic acid, 150μmol/L) showed significantly shorter in plant height , smaller in leaf area. and lighter in fresh weight. The inhibitory effect of cinnamic acid was comparatively stronger than that of P-hydroxy benzoic acid. For protective enzymes system, compared to control, the POD activity increased at all concentrations of P-hydroxy benzoic acid during the treatment but increased at first then decreased before increased again at last at all concentrations of cinnamic acid . In the case of CAT, its activity increased at first, then decreased, and increased again at lower concentrations of phenolic acids. However, at higher concentrations the activities decreased at first, then increased a little, decreased continuously at last. In addition, the treatments of phenolic acids led to an increase then a decreaseof SOD activity and an increase of MDA content in the seedlings. All above indicated the accumulating of free radicalsand destruction of protective enzymes at higher concentrations of phenolic acids.

  7. Multifaceted pathways protect human skin from UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vivek T; Ganju, Parul; Ramkumar, Amrita; Grover, Ritika; Gokhale, Rajesh S

    2014-07-01

    The recurrent interaction of skin with sunlight is an intrinsic constituent of human life, and exhibits both beneficial and detrimental effects. The apparent robust architectural framework of skin conceals remarkable mechanisms that operate at the interface between the surface and environment. In this Review, we discuss three distinct protective mechanisms and response pathways that safeguard skin from deleterious effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The unique stratified epithelial architecture of human skin along with the antioxidant-response pathways constitutes the important defense mechanisms against UV radiation. The intricate pigmentary system and its intersection with the immune-system cytokine axis delicately balance tissue homeostasis. We discuss the relationship among these networks in the context of an unusual depigmenting disorder, vitiligo. The elaborate tunable mechanisms, elegant multilayered architecture and evolutionary selection pressures involved in skin and sunlight interaction makes this a compelling model to understand biological complexity.

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated acid protects against indomethacin-induced gastric injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda-Peña, Elizabeth Arlen; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Chávez-Piña, Aracely Evangelina

    2012-12-15

    Previous studies have shown gastroprotective effect of fish oil in several experimental models. However, the mechanisms and active compounds underlying this effect are not fully understood. Fish oil has several components; among them, one of the most studied is docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is an omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid. The aim of this study was to examine the gastroprotective effect of DHA as a pure compound in a rat model of indomethacin-induced gastric injury as well as elucidate some of the mechanism(s) behind DHA's gastroprotective effect. Indomethacin was orally administered to induce an acute gastric injury (3, 10 and 30mg/kg). Omeprazol (a proton pump inhibitor, 30mg/kg, p.o.) and DHA (3, 10, 30mg/kg, p.o.) were gavaged 30 and 120min, respectively, before indomethacin insult (30mg/kg p.o.). Three hours after indomethacin administration, rats were sacrificed, gastric injury was evaluated by determining the total damaged area. A sample of gastric tissue was harvested and processed to quantify prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Indomethacin produced gastric injury in dose-dependent manner. DHA protected against indomethacin-induced gastric damage, and this effect was comparable with omeprazol's gastroprotective effect. DHA did not reverse the indomethacin-induced reduction of PGE(2) gastric levels. In contrast, DHA partially prevented the indomethacin-induced increase in LTB(4) gastric levels. This is the first report demonstrating DHA's gastroprotective effect as a pure compound. Furthermore, the results reveal that the gastroprotective effect is mediated by a decrease in gastric LTB(4) levels in indomethacin-induced gastric damage. PMID:23063544

  9. Retinol oxidation to retinoic acid in human thyroid glandular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibi, Gennaro; Gueli, Maria Concetta; Nicotra, Concetta M A; Cocciadiferro, Letizia; Carruba, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Retinoic acid is regarded as the retinol metabolite that controls proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) in retinoic acid biosynthesis in human thyroid glandular cells (HTGC). In particular, we observed that cellular retinoids binding proteins (CRBPs) are also implicated in the biosynthetic pathway leading to retinoic acid formation in primary cultures of HTGC, as we have already reported for human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). After partial protein purification, the enzyme responsible for retinoic acid biosynthesis was identified and quantified as XDH by immunoassay, by its ability to oxidize xanthine to uric acid and its sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of oxypurinol. The evidence of XDH-driven formation of retinoic acid in HTGC cultures further corroborates the potential role of XDH in retinoic acid biosynthesis in the epithelia. PMID:24506204

  10. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptaion and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced...

  11. A direct method for the synthesis of orthogonally protected furyl- and thienyl- amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Alex S; Caron, Laurent; Colgin, Neil; Cobb, Steven L

    2015-04-01

    The synthesis of unnatural amino acids plays a key part in expanding the potential application of peptide-based drugs and in the total synthesis of peptide natural products. Herein, we report a direct method for the synthesis of orthogonally protected 5-membered heteroaromatic amino acids.

  12. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  13. The protective effect of salicylic acid on lysozyme against riboflavin-mediated photooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Wang, Hongbao; Cheng, Lingli; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Mei; Wang, Shi-Long

    2011-06-01

    As a metabolite of aspirin in vivo, salicylic acid was proved to protect lysozyme from riboflavin-mediated photooxidation in this study. The antioxidative properties of salicylic acid were further studied by using time-resolved laser flash photolysis of 355 nm. It can quench the triplet state of riboflavin via electron transfer from salicylic acid to the triplet state of riboflavin with a reaction constant of 2.25 × 10 9 M -1 s -1. Mechanism of antioxidant activities of salicylic acid on lysozyme oxidation was discussed. Salicylic acid can serve as a potential antioxidant to quench the triplet state of riboflavin and reduce oxidative pressure.

  14. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M Verhaag

    Full Text Available Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis.To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions.HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1-50 μM of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h, menadione (50 μM, 6 h or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h. Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11 and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed.Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  15. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITINABSTRACT Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  16. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Gaforio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  17. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA) from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA) has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT). Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria. PMID:27428999

  18. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells Articlefrom Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA) from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA) has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT). Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria. PMID:27428999

  19. Protective effect of nicotinic acid amide on human umbilical cord mesen-chymal stem cells%尼克酰胺对人脐带间充质干细胞的保护效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓蕾; 陈智聪; 廖继东; 谷景义; 于波; 刘革修

    2015-01-01

    AIM:Toinvestigatetheeffectofnicotinicacidamide(NAA)ontheinfusiondamageofhuman umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells ( hUC-MSCs) under the condition of instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction ( IBMIR) .METHODS:Normal peripheral blood without anticoagulant at volume of 2.7 mL was mixed with 0.3 mL phys-iological saline (as blank group), CFSE labeled hUC-MSCs (1 ×106 cells in 0.3 mL as MSC group) and CFSE labeled hUC-MSCs (1 ×106 cells in 0.3 mL) preprocessed with NAA at concentration of 10 mmol/L for 24 h ( as MSC+NAA group) , respectively.The mixture was immediately injected into the improved Chandler Loop model, placed in 37℃water bath, and then started the peristaltic pump at the speed of 20 mL/min for 1 h.The number of CFSE labeled hUC-MSCs, platelets, white blood cells were counted and the concentration of complement C3a was measured before and after cycling, respectively.RESULTS: After 1 h circulation, the platelet dissipation rate were ( 29.96 ±10.88 )% in blank group, (77.76 ±19.29)% in MSC group all and (50.13 ±18.10)% in MSC +NAA group; and the leukocyte counts were (37.82 ±13.81)%in blank group, (64.57 ±17.08)% in MSC group and (41.52 ±17.26)% in MSC+NAA group. Compared with blank group, the differences of the dissipation rates in MSC group and MSC+NAA group all had statistical significance.The hUC-MSCs relative survival rate in MSC+NAA group was higher than that in MSC group.C3a concentra-tions in blank group, MSC group and MSC+NAA group were (206.27 ±58.10), (230.47 ±39.61) and (208.37 ± 40.66) μg/L, respectively.CONCLUSION:Co-circulating the mixture of hUC-MSCs with normal peripheral blood with-out anticoagulant in the improved Chandler Loop for 1 h depletes a large number of hUC-MSCs and blood components, and increases C3a, suggesting that this model can induce IBMIR.NAA has a protective effect on the hUC-MSCs in the infusion damage by inhibiting IBMIR, reducing the wastage of the blood components and enhancing the survival rate of

  20. Autoproteolytic Cleavage and Activation of Human Acid Ceramidase*

    OpenAIRE

    Shtraizent, Nataly; Eliyahu, Efrat; Park, Jae-Ho; He, Xingxuan; Shalgi, Ruth; Schuchman, Edward H.

    2008-01-01

    Herein we report the mechanism of human acid ceramidase (AC; N-acylsphingosine deacylase) cleavage and activation. A highly purified, recombinant human AC precursor underwent self-cleavage into α and β subunits, similar to other members of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. This reaction proceeded with first order kinetics, characteristic of self-cleavage. AC self-cleavage occurred most rapidly at acidic pH, but also at neutral pH. Site-directed mutagene...

  1. Photoprotective Activity of Vulpinic and Gyrophoric Acids Toward Ultraviolet B-Induced Damage in Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Mehmet; Türk, Ayşen; Candan, Mehmet; Tay, Turgay; Koparal, Ayşe Tansu

    2016-01-01

    Vulpinic and gyrophoric acids are known as ultraviolet filters for natural lichen populations because of their chemical structures. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no reference to their cosmetic potential for skin protection against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage and, consequently, we propose to highlight their photoprotective profiles in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Therefore, vulpinic acid and gyrophoric acid were isolated from acetone extracts of Letharia vulpina and Xanthoparmelia pokornyi, respectively. Their photoprotective activities on irradiated HaCaT cells and destructive effects on non-irradiated HaCaT cells were compared through in vitro experimentation: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays, 4',6-diamino-2-phenylindole and tetramethylrhodamine B isothiocyanate-phalloidin staining protocols. Both of the lichen substances effectively prevented cytotoxic, apoptotic and cytoskeleton alterative activities of 2.5 J/cm(2) UVB in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, vulpinic and gyrophoric acids showed no toxic, apoptotic or cytoskeleton alterative effects on non-irradiated HaCaT cells, except at high doses (≥400 μM) of gyrophoric acid. The findings suggest that vulpinic and gyrophoric acids can be promising cosmetic ingredients to photo-protect human skin cells and should therefore be further investigated by in vitro and in vivo multiple bioassays. PMID:26463741

  2. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease? Reply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S.; Hudson, Peter J.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2016-01-01

    The dilution effect is the sort of idea that everyone wants to be true. If nature protects humans against infectious disease, imagine the implications: nature's value could be tallied in terms of human suffering avoided. This makes a potent argument for conservation, convincing even to those who would otherwise be disinclined to support conservation initiatives. The appeal of the dilution effect has been recognized by others: “the desire to make the case for conservation has led to broad claims regarding the benefits of nature conservation for human health” (Bauch et al. 2015). Randolph and Dobson (2012) were among the first to critique these claims, making the case that promotion of conservation to reduce Lyme disease risk, although well intentioned, was flawed. Along with Randolph and Dobson's critique, there have been several calls for a more nuanced scientific assessment of the relationship between biodiversity and disease transmission (Dunn 2010, Salkeld et al. 2013, Wood and Lafferty 2013, Young et al. 2013). In response, supporters of the dilution effect have instead increased the scope of their generalizations with review papers, press releases, and, like Levi et al. (2015), letters. These responses have been successful; it is not uncommon to read papers that repeat the assertion that biodiversity generally interferes with disease transmission and that conservation will therefore generally benefit human health. Here, we explain how Levi et al. (2015) and other, similar commentaries use selective interpretation and shifting definitions to argue for the generality of the dilution effect hypothesis.

  3. Scutellaria radix Extract as a Natural UV Protectant for Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Jun Yup; Choi, Go Woon; An, Sang Mi; Kwak, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Hyeong-Ho; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Boo, Yong Chool

    2016-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces oxidative injury and inflammation in human skin. Scutellaria radix (SR, the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi) contains flavonoids with high UV absorptivity and antioxidant properties. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential use of SR extract as an additive in cosmetic products for UV protection. SR extract and its butanol (BuOH) fraction strongly absorbed UV radiation and displayed free radical scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radials and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radicals. They also attenuated the UV-induced death of HaCaT cells. Sunscreen creams, with or without supplementation of SR extract BuOH fraction, were tested in vivo in human trials to evaluate potential skin irritation and determine the sun protection factor (SPF). Both sunscreen creams induced no skin irritation. A sunscreen cream containing 24% ZnO showed an SPF value of 17.8, and it increased to 22.7 when supplemented with 5% SR extract BuOH fraction. This study suggests that SR-derived materials are useful as safe cosmetic additives that provide UV protection.

  4. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on UVR-related cancer risk in humans. An assessment of early genotoxic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhodes, L.E.; Shahbakhti, H.; Azurdia, R.M.; Moison, R.M.W.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Homburg, M.I.; Dean, M.P.; McArdle, F.; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G.M.J.; Epe, B.; Vink, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) protect against photocarcinogenesis in animals, but prospective human studies are scarce. The mechanism(s) underlying the photoprotection are uncertain, although ω-3 PUFAs may influence oxidative stress. We examined the effect of supplementatio

  5. Pantothenic acid and its derivatives protect Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyshenkov, V S; Rakowska, M; Moiseenok, A G; Wojtczak, L

    1995-12-01

    Preincubation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells at 22 or 32 degrees C, but not at 0 degree C, with pantothenic acid, 4'-phosphopantothenic acid, pantothenol, or pantethine reduced lipid peroxidation (measured by production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive compounds) induced by the Fenton reaction (Fe2+ + H2O2) and partly protected the plasma membrane against the leakiness to cytoplasmic proteins produced by the same reagent. Pantothenic acid and its derivatives did not inhibit (Fe2+ + H2O2)-induced peroxidation of phospholipid multilamellar vesicles, thus indicating that their effect on the cells was not due to the scavenging mechanism. Homopantothenic acid and its 4'-phosphate ester (which are not precursors of CoA) neither protected Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against lipid peroxidation nor prevented plasma membrane leakiness under the same conditions. Incubation of the cells with pantothenic acid, 4'-phosphopantothenic acid, pantothenol, or pantethine significantly increased the amount of cellular CoA and potentiated incorporation of added palmitate into phospholipids and cholesterol esters. It is concluded that pantothenic acid and its related compounds protect the plasma membrane of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against the damage by oxygen free radicals due to increasing cellular level of CoA. The latter compound may act by diminishing propagation of lipid peroxidation and promoting repair mechanisms, mainly the synthesis of phospholipids. PMID:8582649

  6. Protection of 2024-T3 aluminium alloy by corrosion resistant phytic acid conversion coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongwei; Han, En-Hou; Liu, Fuchun; Kallip, Silvar

    2013-09-01

    The corrosion protection properties of environmentally friendly phytic acid conversion coatings were studied on 2024-T3 aluminium alloy. The films were prepared under acidic conditions with various pH values and characterised by SEM, EDS, ATR-FTIR and electrochemical techniques. The results indicate that the conversion coatings obtained by immersing the alloy in phytic acid solutions at pH from 3 to 5.5 provide excellent corrosion resistance. ATR-FTIR confirms that the film is formed by deposition of reaction products between Al3+ and phosphate groups in phytic acid molecules. The conformation models of the deposition film are proposed.

  7. Solid-phase route to Fmoc-protected cationic amino acid building blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jacob Dahlqvist; Linderoth, Lars; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck;

    2012-01-01

    was developed. A versatile solid-phase protocol leading to selectively protected amino alcohol intermediates was followed by oxidation to yield the desired di- or polycationic amino acid building blocks in gram-scale amounts. The synthetic sequence comprises loading of (S)-1-(p-nosyl)aziridine-2-methanol onto......Diamino acids are commonly found in bioactive compounds, yet only few are commercially available as building blocks for solid-phase peptide synthesis. In the present work a convenient, inexpensive route to multiple-charged amino acid building blocks with varying degree of hydrophobicity...... blocks having an Fmoc/Boc protection scheme. This strategy facilitates incorporation of multiple positive charges into the building blocks provided that the corresponding partially protected di- or polyamines are available. An array of compounds covering a wide variety of ¿-aza substituted analogs...

  8. Fatty acid induced remodeling within the human liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashwani; Sharma, Amit

    2011-09-01

    We crystallized human liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) in apo, holo, and intermediate states of palmitic acid engagement. Structural snapshots of fatty acid recognition, entry, and docking within LFABP support a heads-in mechanism for ligand entry. Apo-LFABP undergoes structural remodeling, where the first palmitate ingress creates the atomic environment for placement of the second palmitate. These new mechanistic insights will facilitate development of pharmacological agents against LFABP. PMID:21757748

  9. Fatty Acid Induced Remodeling within the Human Liver Fatty Acid-binding Protein*

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ashwani; Sharma, Amit

    2011-01-01

    We crystallized human liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) in apo, holo, and intermediate states of palmitic acid engagement. Structural snapshots of fatty acid recognition, entry, and docking within LFABP support a heads-in mechanism for ligand entry. Apo-LFABP undergoes structural remodeling, where the first palmitate ingress creates the atomic environment for placement of the second palmitate. These new mechanistic insights will facilitate development of pharmacological agents against ...

  10. Effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and chitosan solutions on microhardness of the human radicular dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Vineeta Nikhil; Shikha Jaiswal; Parul Bansal; Rohit Arora; Shalya Raj; Pulkit Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and chitosan solutions on the microhardness of human radicular dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty dentin specimens were randomly divided into three groups of 10 specimens each according to the irrigant used: G1 - 1% phytic acid, G2 - 17% EDTA, and G3 - 0.2% chitosan. A standardized volume of each chelating solution was used for 3 min. Dentin microhardness was measured befo...

  11. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, April D. [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Novak, Petr [Biology Centre ASCR, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice 37001 (Czech Republic); Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Lu, Zhenqiang [The Arizona Statistical Consulting Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Cherrington, Nathan J., E-mail: cherrington@pharmacy.arizona.edu [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  12. Acetylsalicylic acid protects erectile function in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, G; Gonulalan, U; Kosan, M; Arioglu, E; Ozturk, B; Cetinkaya, M; Gur, S

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment on diabetes-induced erectile dysfunction. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups as follows: (i) control (C), (ii) diabetic (D), (iii) ASA-treated control (C+ASA) and (iv) ASA-treated diabetic (D+ASA) groups. In groups 2 and 4, diabetes was induced by injection of 35 mg kg(-1) streptozotocin. ASA (100 mg kg(-1) day(-1) , orally) was administrated to rats in groups 3 and 4 for 8 weeks. Both intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were measured in in vivo studies. In organ bath, the relaxation responses to acetylcholine (ACh), electrical field stimulation (EFS) and sodium nitroprusside were tested in corpus cavernosum (CC) strips. The mRNA expression for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) was calculated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction technique. In in vivo experiments, diabetic rats displayed reduced ICP/MAP values, which were normalised with ASA treatment. The relaxant response to high-dose ACh and EFS at low frequencies (1-8 Hz) in CC strips from the D+ASA group were significantly higher when compared to the D group. Treatment with ASA normalised the raised mRNA expressions of nNOS in diabetic penile tissues. ASA may be involved in mRNA of protein synthesis of NO released from nonadrenergic and noncholinergic cavernosal nerve in diabetes.

  13. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieko Iwao

    Full Text Available The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1 GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2 all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3 phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells.

  14. Cleavage and protection of locked nucleic acid-modified DNA by restriction endonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Wengel, Jesper;

    2012-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent nucleic acid analogues reported so far. We herein for the first time report cleavage by restriction endonuclease of LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. The experiments revealed that RsaI is an efficient enzyme capable of recognizing and cleaving...... LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. Furthermore, introduction of LNA nucleotides protects against cleavage by the restriction endonucleases PvuII, PstI, SacI, KpnI and EcoRI....

  15. Extracellular depolymerization of hyaluronic acid in cultured human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T.; Takagaki, K.; Kubo, K.; Morikawa, A.; Tamura, S.; Endo, M. (Hirosaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-10-15

    The chain length of ({sup 3}H)hyaluronic acid synthesized by cultivating human skin fibroblasts in the presence of ({sup 3}H)glucosamine was investigated. ({sup 3}H)Hyaluronic acid obtained from the matrix fraction was excluded from a Sepharose CL-2B column irrespective of the incubation period, whereas that from the medium was depolymerized into a constant chain length (Mr = 40,000). The reducing and non-reducing terminals of the depolymerized hyaluronic acid were N-acetylglucosamine and glucuronic acid, respectively. Prolonged incubation produced no oligosaccharides as shown by examination of hyaluronidase digests, suggesting the presence of a novel endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yanqiu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); College of Chemistry, Mudanjiang Normal University, Mudanjiang 157012 (China); Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan, Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Kan, Qiubin, E-mail: qkan@mail.jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  17. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Manon Buist-Homan; Martijn Koehorst; Groen, Albert K; Han Moshage; Klaas Nico Faber

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis. Aim To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes agai...

  18. Synthesis of protected (2S,4R)-2-amino-4-methyldecanoic acid, a proposed component of culicinins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Tian Tian Sun; Duo Mei; Jun Fei Wang; Ying Xia Li

    2008-01-01

    The protected (2S,4R)-2-amino-4-methyldecanoic acid, a proposed component of culicinins has been synthesized over 10 steps and in total 28% yields using Wittig reaction and Schollkopf amino acid synthesis as key steps.

  19. A mint purified extract protects human keratinocytes from short-term, chemically induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berselli, Patrizia Valeria Rita; Zava, Stefania; Montorfano, Gigliola; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Krzyzanowska, Justyna; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Berra, Bruno; Rizzo, Angela Maria

    2010-11-10

    Oxidative stress is strictly correlated to the pathogenesis of many diseases, and a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, or adequately integrated, is currently considered to be a protective and preventive factor. This study aimed to analyze the efficacy of a 1 h preincubation with the highest nontoxic dose of a characterized Mentha longifolia extract (80 μg/mL) in protecting human keratinocytes (NCTC2544) from chemically induced oxidative stress (500 μM H2O2 for 2, 16, and 24 h). As reference synthetic pure compounds rosmarinic acid (360.31 μg/mL), a major mint phenolic constituent, and resveratrol (31.95 mg/mL), a well-known antioxidant, were used. Cellular viability was significantly protected by mint, which limited protein and DNA damage, decreased lipid peroxidation, and preserved glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in the shorter phases of oxidative stress induction, in extents comparable to or better than those of pure compounds. These data suggest that mint use as only a flavoring has to be revised, taking into consideration its enrichment in foodstuff and cosmetics.

  20. 10 CFR 63.321 - Individual protection standard for human intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Postclosure Public Health and Environmental Standards Human Intrusion Standard § 63.321 Individual protection standard for human intrusion. (a) DOE...

  1. Photolabile protection for amino acids: studies on the release from novel benzoquinolone cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Andrea S C; Soares, Ana M S; Gonçalves, M Sameiro T; Costa, Susana P G

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis of a novel fused nitrogen heterocycle, benzoquinolone, for evaluation as a photocleavable protecting group is described for the first time by coupling to model amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine and glutamic acid). Conversion of the phenylalanine ester conjugate to the thionated derivative was accomplished by reaction with Lawesson's reagent. Photocleavage studies of the carbonyl and thiocarbonyl benzoquinolone conjugates in various solvents and at different wavelengths (300, 350 and 419 nm) showed that the most interesting result was obtained at 419 nm for the thioconjugate, revealing that the presence of the thiocarbonyl group clearly improved the photolysis rates, giving practicable irradiations times for the release of the amino acids (less than 1 min).

  2. Protection of Mice from Lethal Endotoxemia by Chimeric Human BPI-Fcγ1 Gene Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li; Jing Li; Zhe Lv; Xinghua Guo; Qinghua Chen; Qingli Kong; Yunqing An

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the potentiality of applying gene therapy to endotoxemia in high-risk patients, we investigated the effects of transferring an adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2)-mediated BPI-Fcγ1 gene on protecting mice from challenge of lethal endotoxin. The chimeric BPI-Fcγ1 gene consists of two parts, one encods functional N-terminus (1 to 199 amino acidic residues) of human BPI, which is a bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein,and the other encodes Fc segment of human immunoglobulin G1 (Fcγ1). Our results indicated that the target protein could be expressed and secreted into the serum of the gene-transferred mice. After lethal endotoxin challenge, the levels of endotoxin and TNF-α in the gene-transferred mice were decreased. The survival rate of the BPI-Fcγ1 gene-transferred mice was markedly increased. Our data suggest that AAV2-mediated chimeric BPI-Fcγ1 gene delivery can potentially be used clinically for the protection and treatment of endotoxemia and endotoxic shock in high-risk individuals.

  3. The role of lactoferrin binding protein B in mediating protection against human lactoferricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Livingstone, Margaret; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria that inhabit the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory and genitourinary tracts of mammals encounter an iron-deficient environment because of iron sequestration by the host iron-binding proteins transferrin and lactoferrin. Lactoferrin is also present in high concentrations at sites of inflammation where the cationic, antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin is produced by proteolysis of lactoferrin. Several Gram-negative pathogens express a lactoferrin receptor that enables the bacteria to use lactoferrin as an iron source. The receptor is composed of an integral membrane protein, lactoferrin binding protein A (LbpA), and a membrane-bound lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB). LbpA is essential for growth with lactoferrin as the sole iron source, whereas the role of LbpB in iron acquisition is not yet known. In this study, we demonstrate that LbpB from 2 different species is capable of providing protection against the killing activity of a human lactoferrin-derived peptide. We investigated the prevalence of lactoferrin receptors in bacteria and examined their sequence diversity. We propose that the protection against the cationic antimicrobial human lactoferrin-derived peptide is associated with clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the C-terminal lobe of LbpB that is a common feature of this protein. PMID:22332888

  4. Human milk oligosaccharides protect bladder epithelial cells against uropathogenic Escherichia coli invasion and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ann E; Autran, Chloe A; Espanola, Sophia D; Bode, Lars; Nizet, Victor

    2014-02-01

    The invasive pathogen uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Recurrent infection that can progress to life-threatening renal failure has remained as a serious global health concern in infants. UPEC adheres to and invades bladder epithelial cells to establish infection. Studies have detected the presence of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in urine of breast-fed, but not formula-fed, neonates. We investigated the mechanisms HMOs deploy to elicit protection in human bladder epithelial cells infected with UPEC CFT073, a prototypic urosepsis-associated strain. We found a significant reduction in UPEC internalization into HMO-pretreated epithelial cells without observing any significant effect in UPEC binding to these cells. This event coincides with a rapid decrease in host cell cytotoxicity, recognized by LIVE/DEAD staining and cell detachment, but independent of caspase-mediated or mitochondrial-mediated programmed cell death pathways. Further investigation revealed HMOs, and particularly the sialic acid-containing fraction, reduced UPEC-mediated MAPK and NF-κB activation. Collectively, our results indicate that HMOs can protect bladder epithelial cells from deleterious cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of UPEC infection, and may be one contributing mechanism underlying the epidemiological evidence of reduced UTI incidence in breast-fed infants.

  5. Can folic acid protect against congenital heart defects in Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Willemijn M.; Werler, Martha M.; Louik, Carol; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have suggested a protective effect of folic acid (FA) on congenital heart anomalies. Down syndrome (DS) infants are known to have a high frequency of heart anomalies. Not all children with DS suffer from heart anomalies, which raises the question whether maternal factors

  6. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K;

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...... amounts of GFA, up to 85 times the concentration in parietal grey substance of normal human brain. GFA was not found in neurinomas, meningiomas, adenomas of the hypophysis, or in a single case of metastasis of adenocarcinoma. Non-glial tumours of craniopharyngioma and haemangioblastoma were infiltrated by...

  7. Gastro protective properties of the novel prostone SPI-8811 against acid-injured porcine mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meghali Nighot; Adam Moeser; Ryuji Ueno; Anthony Blikslager

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the protective properties of novel prostone CIC-2 agonist SPI-8811 in porcine model of gastric acid injury.METHODS:Porcine gastric mucosa was mounted in Ussing chambers and injured by bathing mucosal tissues in an HCl Ringer's solution (pH =1.5) with or without SP1-8811 (1 μmol/L),cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitor (inhibitor 172,10 μmol/L,apical) and CIC-2 inhibitor ZnCl2,300 μmol/L,apical),on the apical surface of tissues.Transepithelial resistance and mucosal-to-serosal 3H-mannitol fluxes were measured over a 90-min period.Tissues were analyzed by morph metric techniques,Immunofluorescence and by western blots.RESULTS:Compared with control tissues,acid exposure decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER)and increased 3H-mannitol flux.Pretreatment of gastric mucosa with SPI-8811 was protective against acidinduced decreases in TER (TER,50 Ω.cm2 vs 100 Ω'cm2)and abolished increases in flux (3H-mannitol flux,0.10 μmol/L.cm2 vs 0.04 μmol/L.cm2).Evidence of histological damage in the presence of acid was markedly attenuated by SPI-0811.Immunofluorescence and western analysis for occludin revealed enhanced localization to the region of the tight junction (TJ) after treatment with SPI-8811.Pretreatment with the CIC-2 inhibitor ZnCl2,but not the selective CFTR inhibitor 172,attenuated SPI-8811-mediated mucosal protection,suggesting a role for CIC-2.Prostone may serve both protective and reparative roles in injured tissues.CONCLUSION:CIC-2 agonist SPI-8811 stimulated enhancement of mucosal barrier function by protecting TJ protein occludin in porcine gastric mucosa and thus protected the gastric acid injury in porcine stomach.

  8. The Environmental Right as a Human Right: Scientific Development and the Protection of Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN ZHONGLE

    2011-01-01

    @@ As environmental issues are attracting domestic and international attention,protection of environmental rights is becoming increasingly important in human rights affairs.Environmental protection involves economic development and social harmony, influences the maintenance and complete realization of people's rights to health, property and life, and is even related to the future existence of the whole human society.

  9. STATE OBLIGATION TO PROTECT : Unaccompanied children seeking asylum and the risk of human trafficking in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This thesis examines the Norwegian State obligations to protect unaccompanied children against human trafficking under international human rights law. The purpose with this study is to show that trafficking of children happens in Norway and to discuss whether more measures must be taken to provide a better protection for these children. The conclusion of this study is that the Norwegian Government should implement additional measures to provide better protection. Only, this way can Norway ...

  10. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing FENG; Lai-ji MA; Jin-jing YAO; Yun FANG; Yan-ai MEI; Shao-min WEI

    2013-01-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties;no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level.Therefore,the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide(H2O2).Kjeldahl determination,phenol-sulfuric acid method,and high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%,of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1301.01 Da.Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH)radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity.3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide(MTT)colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling(TUNEL)assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H2O2 in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis.Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H2O2,but application oat peptides with H2O2 at same time did not.Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H2O2-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase(SOD)and the inhibition of malondialdehyde(MDA).The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H2O2-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level.Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury.

  11. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present in Salvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study, in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 μg/mL. For in vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of regenerating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

  12. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Zhu; Lu Ding; Wen-feng Qiu; Hong-fu Wu; Rui Li

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present inSalvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study,in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 µg/mL. Forin vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of re-generating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

  13. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhe; Ding, Lu; Qiu, Wen-Feng; Wu, Hong-Fu; Li, Rui

    2016-03-01

    Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present in Salvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study, in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 μg/mL. For in vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of regenerating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. PMID:27127491

  14. Green Chemistry in Protected Horticulture: The Use of Peroxyacetic Acid as a Sustainable Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda Carrasco

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Global reduction of chemical deposition into the environment is necessary. In protected horticulture, different strategies with biodegradable products are used to control pathogens. This review presents the available tools, especially for the management of protected horticultural species, including vegetables and ornamental plants. An analysis of the potential for degradable products that control pathogens and also encourage other productive factors, such as oxygen in the root system, is presented. Biosecurity in fertigation management of protected horticulture is conducted by using peroxyacetic acid mixtures that serve three basic principles: first, the manufacture of these products does not involve polluting processes; second, they have the same function as other chemicals, and third, after use and management there is no toxic residue left in the environment. The sustainability of protected horticulture depends on the development and introduction of technologies for implementation in the field.

  15. Green Chemistry in Protected Horticulture: The Use of Peroxyacetic Acid as a Sustainable Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Gilda; Urrestarazu, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Global reduction of chemical deposition into the environment is necessary. In protected horticulture, different strategies with biodegradable products are used to control pathogens. This review presents the available tools, especially for the management of protected horticultural species, including vegetables and ornamental plants. An analysis of the potential for degradable products that control pathogens and also encourage other productive factors, such as oxygen in the root system, is presented. Biosecurity in fertigation management of protected horticulture is conducted by using peroxyacetic acid mixtures that serve three basic principles: first, the manufacture of these products does not involve polluting processes; second, they have the same function as other chemicals, and third, after use and management there is no toxic residue left in the environment. The sustainability of protected horticulture depends on the development and introduction of technologies for implementation in the field. PMID:20559497

  16. Green chemistry in protected horticulture: the use of peroxyacetic acid as a sustainable strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Gilda; Urrestarazu, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Global reduction of chemical deposition into the environment is necessary. In protected horticulture, different strategies with biodegradable products are used to control pathogens. This review presents the available tools, especially for the management of protected horticultural species, including vegetables and ornamental plants. An analysis of the potential for degradable products that control pathogens and also encourage other productive factors, such as oxygen in the root system, is presented. Biosecurity in fertigation management of protected horticulture is conducted by using peroxyacetic acid mixtures that serve three basic principles: first, the manufacture of these products does not involve polluting processes; second, they have the same function as other chemicals, and third, after use and management there is no toxic residue left in the environment. The sustainability of protected horticulture depends on the development and introduction of technologies for implementation in the field. PMID:20559497

  17. Kinetic characteristics of acidic and alkaline ceramidase in human epidermis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, E.; Uchida, Y.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Paepe, K. de; Vanhaecke, T.; Holleran, W.M.; Rogiers, V.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become evident that at least five ceramidase (CDase) isoforms are present in human epidermis, and that specifically acidic CDase (aCDase) and alkaline CDase (alkCDase) activities increase during keratinocyte differentiation, and thus might play a pivotal role(s) in permeability barri

  18. A dramatic effect of oxygen on protection of human cells against γ-radiation by lycopene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Fritz; Edge, Ruth; Truscott, Terence George; Witt, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Reducing radiation damage is important and dietary antioxidants that can protect cells from such damage are of value. Dietary lycopene, a carotenoid found in tomatoes, protects human lymphoid cell membranes from damage by γ-radiation. We report that such protective effects are remarkably reduced as the oxygen concentration increases - near zero at 100% oxygen from fivefold protection at 20% oxygen and, dramatically, from 50-fold protection at 0% oxygen. Such huge differences imply that under higher oxygen concentrations lycopene could lead to improved cancer therapy using γ-radiation. The cells are not efficiently protected from the superoxide radical by lycopene. Noncellular studies suggest molecular mechanisms for the oxygen effect. PMID:26991327

  19. Exogenous salicylic acid protects phospholipids against cadmium stress in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkadhi, Aïcha; De Haro, Antonio; Obregon, Sara; Chaïbi, Wided; Djebali, Wahbi

    2015-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) promotes plant defense responses against toxic metal stresses. The present study addressed the hypothesis that 8-h SA pretreatment, would alter membrane lipids in a way that would protect against Cd toxicity. Flax seeds were pre-soaked for 8h in SA (0, 250 and 1000µM) and then subjected, at seedling stage, to cadmium (Cd) stress. At 100µM CdCl2, significant decreases in the percentages of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and changes in their relative fatty acid composition were observed in Cd-treated roots in comparison with controls. However, in roots of 8-h SA pretreated plantlets, results showed that the amounts of PC and PE were significantly higher as compared to non-pretreated plantlets. Additionally, in both lipid classes, the proportion of linolenic acid (18:3) increased upon the pretreatment with SA. This resulted in a significant increase in the fatty acid unsaturation ratio of the root PC and PE classes. As the exogenous application of SA was found to be protective of flax lipid metabolism, the possible mechanisms of protection against Cd stress in flax roots were discussed.

  20. Punicic acid a conjugated linolenic acid inhibits TNFalpha-induced neutrophil hyperactivation and protects from experimental colon inflammation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Boussetta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutrophils play a major role in inflammation by releasing large amounts of ROS produced by NADPH-oxidase and myeloperoxidase (MPO. The proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha primes ROS production through phosphorylation of the NADPH-oxidase subunit p47phox on Ser345. Conventional anti-inflammatory therapies remain partially successful and may have side effects. Therefore, regulation of neutrophil activation by natural dietary components represents an alternative therapeutic strategy in inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of punicic acid, a conjugated linolenic fatty acid from pomegranate seed oil on TNFalpha-induced neutrophil hyperactivation in vitro and on colon inflammation in vivo. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed the effect of punicic acid on TNFalpha-induced neutrophil upregulation of ROS production in vitro and on TNBS-induced rat colon inflammation. Results show that punicic acid inhibited TNFalpha-induced priming of ROS production in vitro while preserving formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP-induced response. This effect was mediated by the inhibition of Ser345-p47phox phosphorylation and upstream kinase p38MAPK. Punicic acid also inhibited fMLP- and TNFalpha+fMLP-induced MPO extracellular release from neutrophils. In vivo experiments showed that punicic acid and pomegranate seed oil intake decreased neutrophil-activation and ROS/MPO-mediated tissue damage as measured by F2-isoprostane release and protected rats from TNBS-induced colon inflammation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data show that punicic acid exerts a potent anti-inflammatory effect through inhibition of TNFalpha-induced priming of NADPH oxidase by targeting the p38MAPKinase/Ser345-p47phox-axis and MPO release. This natural dietary compound may provide a novel alternative therapeutic strategy in inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases.

  1. NUTRITIONAL AND PROTECTIVE VALUES OF FISH – WITH EMPHSIS ON OMEGA-3 FATTY ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bogut

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the importance of fish as a life necessity in view of proteins, vitamins, micro and macro elements and in comparison with high valued necessities of warm-blooded animals (meat, milk and eggs. Most literature information is related to the chemical components of meat, nutritional and biological values. Numerous papers have shown the components of fatty acids in fats of the most important freshwater and sea fish. According the contents of FPA (eicosapentaen fatty acids, 20:5 3 and DHA (docosaheksacn fatty acids, 22:6 3 the meat of the silver carp (Hypophthalmichtis molitrix can be compared to that of the highest quality sea fish. In the last 20 years many authors mentioned the protective role of omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention of heart attack, stroke, artherosclerosis, high blood pressure, psoriasis, thrombosis and arthritis.

  2. Protection by pantethine, pantothenic acid and cystamine against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagiel-Ostaszewski, I; Lau-Cam, C A

    1990-02-01

    The daily ip administration of pantethine (500 mg/kg), pantothenic acid (100 mg/kg) or cystamine (50 mg/kg) for 5 days conferred significant protection against the hepatotoxic and peroxidative actions of a 0.5 mL/kg ip dose of CCl4 in rats. All three treatments lessened the increases in serum ALT and liver TBARS values, and the reductions in serum triglyceride levels, and prevented the development of hepatic steatosis caused by the halocarbon. Pantethine was found to offer the greatest protection. PMID:2333416

  3. An ascorbic acid-enriched tomato genotype to fight UVA-induced oxidative stress in normal human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruk, Ganna; Raiola, Assunta; Del Giudice, Rita; Barone, Amalia; Frusciante, Luigi; Rigano, Maria Manuela; Monti, Daria Maria

    2016-10-01

    UVA radiations contribute up to 95% of the total UV exposure and are known to induce cell damage, leading to apoptosis. Since the benefic effects of ascorbic acid on human health are well known, a new tomato genotype (named DHO4), highly rich in ascorbic acid, has been recently obtained. Here, we compared the effects of ascorbic acid and hydrophilic DHO4 extracts in protecting human keratinocytes exposed to UVA stress. Keratinocytes were pre-incubated with ascorbic acid or with extracts from the ascorbic acid enriched tomato genotype and irradiated with UVA light. Then, ROS production, intracellular GSH and lipid peroxidation levels were quantified. Western blots were carried out to evaluate mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade, activation of caspase-3 and inflammation levels. We demonstrated that ROS, GSH and lipid peroxidation levels were not altered in cell exposed to UVA stress when cells were pre-treated with ascorbic acid or with tomato extracts. In addition, no evidence of apoptosis and inflammation were observed in irradiated pre-treated cells. Altogether, we demonstrated the ability of an ascorbic acid enriched tomato genotype to counteract UVA-oxidative stress on human keratinocytes. This protective effect is due to the high concentration of vitamin C that acts as free radical scavenger. This novel tomato genotype may be used as genetic material in breeding schemes to produce improved varieties with higher antioxidant levels. PMID:27599115

  4. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Ying; NAITO, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intest...

  5. On the Logic Process of Human Rights Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU YEZHONG; YANG RONG

    2011-01-01

    @@ The values foundation of human rights originates from people's dignity, while the formation of people's dignity was closely related to certain social system and historical conditions.From this aspect, we can say that human rights has natural attribute and social attribute, of which, social attribute plays a decisive role on the values of human rights.

  6. Protecting Cell Walls from Binding Aluminum by Organic Acids Contributes to Aluminum Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Ying Li; Yue-Jiao Zhang; Yuan Zhou; Jian-Li Yang; Shao-Jian Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum-induced secretion of organic acids from the root apex has been demonstrated to be one major AI resistance mechanism in plants. However, whether the organic acid concentration is high enough to detoxify AI in the growth medium is frequently questioned. The genotypes of Al-resistant wheat, Cassia tora L. and buckwheat secrete malate, citrate and oxalate, respectively. In the present study we found that at a 35% inhibition of root elongation, the AI activities in the solution were 10, 20, and 50 μM with the corresponding malate, citrate, and oxalate exudation at the rates of 15, 20 and 21 nmol/cm2 per 12 h, respectively, for the above three plant species. When exogenous organic acids were added to ameliorate Al toxicity, twofold and eightfold higher oxalate and malate concentrations were required to produce the equal effect by citrate. After the root apical cell walls were isolated and preincubated in 1 mM malate, oxalate or citrate solution overnight, the total amount of AI adsorbed to the cell walls all decreased significantly to a similar level, implying that these organic acids own an equal ability to protect the cell walls from binding AI. These findings suggest that protection of cell walls from binding Al by organic acids may contribute significantly to AI resistance.

  7. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus

  8. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Z.Q. [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Greenberg, L. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ertl, H.C., E-mail: ertl@wistar.upenn.edu [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rupprecht, C.E. [The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, KS (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre (Saint Kitts and Nevis)

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  9. A Convenient, General Synthesis of 1,1-Dimethylallyl Esters as Protecting Groups for Carboxylic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Minoo; Lipton, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    Carboxylic acids were converted in high yield to their 1,1-dimethylallyl (DMA) esters in two steps. Palladium-catalyzed deprotection of DMA esters was shown to be compatible with tert-butyl, benzyl and Fmoc protecting groups, and Fmoc deprotection could be carried out selectively in the presence of DMA esters. DMA esters were also shown to be resistant to nucleophilic attack, suggesting that they will serve as alternatives to tert-butyl esters when acidic deprotection conditions need to be avoided. PMID:15816730

  10. A convenient, general synthesis of 1,1-dimethylallyl esters as protecting groups for carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Minoo; Lipton, Mark A

    2005-04-14

    [reaction: see text] Carboxylic acids were converted in high yield to their 1,1-dimethylallyl (DMA) esters in two steps. Palladium-catalyzed deprotection of DMA esters was shown to be compatible with tert-butyl, benzyl, and Fmoc protecting groups, and Fmoc deprotection could be carried out selectively in the presence of DMA esters. DMA esters were also shown to be resistant to nucleophilic attack, suggesting that they will serve as alternatives to tert-butyl esters when acidic deprotection conditions need to be avoided.

  11. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.peter@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Rehli, Michael, E-mail: michael.rehli@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Singer, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.singer@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Renner-Sattler, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.renner-sattler@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kreutz, Marina, E-mail: marina.kreutz@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  12. Legal actions against human trafficking : protecting the victim or the state

    OpenAIRE

    Åström, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on legal protection of victims of human trafficking in Sweden. Human trafficking involves the exploitation of often already vulnerable individuals and is a violation of their human rights. Human trafficking is also a threat to state security as a component of transnational organized crime and illegal migration, and has therefore long been a subject of international cooperation.      In this thesis international responses to human trafficking are categorized as being focuse...

  13. Modulation of human stratum corneum properties by salicylic acid and all-trans-retinoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Goffin, V; Piérard, G E

    1998-01-01

    Topical all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) has been reported to decrease the in vivo skin response to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). The converse was also shown with a synergistic effect of RA following prior applications of SLS. The reason for such effects is not clear. We employed measures of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), squamometry and sequential corneosurfametry to explore the protective activity of a 0.05% RA cream at the level of the stratum corneum. Nonionic oil-in-water emulsions with or without 5% salicylic acid (SA) served as test product references. Data indicated that the RA formulation was responsible for a stochastic impairment in the TEWL and for an increased intercorneocyte cohesion. SA and the unmedicated emulsion did not lead to similar TEWL changes. The squamometry test proved to be very sensitive to disclose the effects of SA and RA without, however, allowing to distinguish the difference in the physiological processes involved. The corneosurfametry bioassay did not show any protection or synergistic effect between RA or SA and SLS challenge on the stratum corneum. This is in contrast to a previous work showing a positive protective effect afforded by retinol against SLS. The combined effects of irritant compounds affecting the stratum corneum are complex. The precise reason for some of their biological consequences remains a conundrum. On balance, products such as SA and RA do not appear to afford protection or impairment to a surfactant challenge at the level of the stratum corneum.

  14. LEGAL PROTECTION AGAINST CHILDREN WHO ARE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN CIANJUR DISTRICT STUDIED BY HUMAN RIGHTS PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Henny Nuraeny; Tanti Kirana Utami

    2015-01-01

    Trafficking in persons is a modern form of slavery. The eradication of human trafficking has been on the agenda in law enforcement because of its effects can interfere with social welfare. One form of trafficking in persons who lately is rampant child trafficking. The problems that can be studied is how the perspective of Human Rights in providing protection to children who are victims of trafficking and whether the implementation of legal protection for child victims of trafficki...

  15. Fatty acid synthase cooperates with glyoxalase 1 to protect against sugar toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Garrido

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid (FA metabolism is deregulated in several human diseases including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Therefore, FA-metabolic enzymes are potential targets for drug therapy, although the consequence of these treatments must be precisely evaluated at the organismal and cellular levels. In healthy organism, synthesis of triacylglycerols (TAGs-composed of three FA units esterified to a glycerol backbone-is increased in response to dietary sugar. Saturation in the storage and synthesis capacity of TAGs is associated with type 2 diabetes progression. Sugar toxicity likely depends on advanced-glycation-end-products (AGEs that form through covalent bounding between amine groups and carbonyl groups of sugar or their derivatives α-oxoaldehydes. Methylglyoxal (MG is a highly reactive α-oxoaldehyde that is derived from glycolysis through a non-enzymatic reaction. Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1 works to neutralize MG, reducing its deleterious effects. Here, we have used the power of Drosophila genetics to generate Fatty acid synthase (FASN mutants, allowing us to investigate the consequence of this deficiency upon sugar-supplemented diets. We found that FASN mutants are lethal but can be rescued by an appropriate lipid diet. Rescued animals do not exhibit insulin resistance, are dramatically sensitive to dietary sugar and accumulate AGEs. We show that FASN and Glo1 cooperate at systemic and cell-autonomous levels to protect against sugar toxicity. We observed that the size of FASN mutant cells decreases as dietary sucrose increases. Genetic interactions at the cell-autonomous level, where glycolytic enzymes or Glo1 were manipulated in FASN mutant cells, revealed that this sugar-dependent size reduction is a direct consequence of MG-derived-AGE accumulation. In summary, our findings indicate that FASN is dispensable for cell growth if extracellular lipids are available. In contrast, FA-synthesis appears to be required to limit a cell

  16. Long-term protection of polyaspartic acid in experimental gentamicin nephrotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, S K; Kohlhepp, S. J.; Kohnen, P. W.; Gilbert, D N; Bennett, W M

    1991-01-01

    Polyaspartic Acid (PAA) protects the kidney from experimental gentamicin nephrotoxicity despite large increases in renal cortical gentamicin content. In these experiments, prominent cytoplasmic vacuoles were noted in all animals that received PAA with or without gentamicin. The present study showed that there were no renal structural or functional consequences of PAA given alone or with gentamicin for up to 14 days, followed by a 16-week washout period. Creatinine clearance was similar to tha...

  17. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA Signaling in Human and Ruminant Reproductive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Wocławek-Potocka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA through activating its G protein-coupled receptors (LPAR 1–6 exerts diverse cellular effects that in turn influence several physiological processes including reproductive function of the female. Studies in various species of animals and also in humans have identified important roles for the receptor-mediated LPA signaling in multiple aspects of human and animal reproductive tract function. These aspects range from ovarian and uterine function, estrous cycle regulation, early embryo development, embryo implantation, decidualization to pregnancy maintenance and parturition. LPA signaling can also have pathological consequences, influencing aspects of endometriosis and reproductive tissue associated tumors. The review describes recent progress in LPA signaling research relevant to human and ruminant reproduction, pointing at the cow as a relevant model to study LPA influence on the human reproductive performance.

  18. LEGAL PROTECTION AGAINST CHILDREN WHO ARE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN CIANJUR DISTRICT STUDIED BY HUMAN RIGHTS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henny Nuraeny

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking in persons is a modern form of slavery. The eradication of human trafficking has been on the agenda in law enforcement because of its effects can interfere with social welfare. One form of trafficking in persons who lately is rampant child trafficking. The problems that can be studied is how the perspective of Human Rights in providing protection to children who are victims of trafficking and whether the implementation of legal protection for child victims of trafficking in Cianjur is in line with the concept of human rights. This study uses normative juridical approach and specification of descriptive analysis. Results from this study is the protection of child victims of trafficking in persons has been referred to the concept of human rights which the regional government make policies on prevention of trafficking, rehabilitation, counseling and empowerment of victims of human trafficking.

  19. Gastroprotective Mechanisms of Action of Semisynthetic Carnosic Acid Derivatives in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Theoduloz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carnosic acid (CA and its semisynthetic derivatives display relevant gastroprotective effects on HCl/ethanol induced gastric lesions in mice. However, little is known on the mechanisms of action of the new compounds. The aim of the present work was to assess the gastroprotective action mechanisms of CA and its derivatives using human cell culture models. A human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5 were used to reveal the possible mechanisms involved. The ability of the compounds to protect cells against sodium taurocholate (NaT-induced damage, and to increase the cellular reduced glutathione (GSH and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 content was determined using AGS cells. Stimulation of cell proliferation was studied employing MRC-5 fibroblasts. Carnosic acid and its derivatives 10–18 raised GSH levels in AGS cells. While CA did not increase the PGE2 content in AGS cells, all derivatives significantly stimulated PGE2 synthesis, the best effect being found for the 12-O-indolebutyrylmethylcarnosate 13. A significant increase in MRC-5 fibroblast proliferation was observed for the derivatives 7 and 16–18. The antioxidant effect of the compounds was assessed by the inhibition of lipid peroxidation in human erythrocyte membranes, scavenging of superoxide anion and DPPH discoloration assay. The new CA derivatives showed gastroprotective effects by different mechanisms, including protection against cell damage induced by NaT, increase in GSH content, stimulation of PGE2 synthesis and cell proliferation.

  20. Radiation protection for human missions to the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection assessments are performed for advanced Lunar and Mars manned missions. The Langley cosmic ray transport code and the nucleon transport code are used to quantify the transport and attenuation of galactic cosmic rays and solar proton flares through various shielding media. Galactic cosmic radiation at solar maximum and minimum, as well as various flare scenarios are considered. Propagation data for water, aluminum, liquid hydrogen, lithium hydride, lead, and lunar and Martian regolith (soil) are included. Shield thickness and shield mass estimates required to maintain incurred doses below 30 day and annual limits (as set for Space Station Freedom and used as a guide for space exploration) are determined for simple geometry transfer vehicles. On the surface of Mars, dose estimates are presented for crews with their only protection being the carbon dioxide atmosphere and for crews protected by shielding provided by Martian regolith for a candidate habitat.

  1. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Attenuates the Oxidative Stress-Induced Decrease of CD33 Expression in Human Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Guzmán-Beltrán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs. Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H2O2 in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20 μM attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H2O2. These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs.

  2. Amino acids and metal ions protect endothelial cells from lethal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varani, J.; Ginsburg, I.; Johnson, K.J.; Gibbs, D.F.; Weinberg, J.M.; Ward, P.A. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Killing of rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells by activated neutrophils is dependent on generation of hydrogen peroxide and its conversion to a highly toxic radical (presumably the hydroxyl radical) in a ferrous iron-dependent reaction. Glycine (as well as several other amino acids) is capable of inhibiting endothelial cell killing in vitro by either activated neutrophils or reagent hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition of killing is enhanced in the presence of micromolar concentrations of manganous ion (Mn2+). The combined effects of glycine and Mn2+ require concomitant presence of bicarbonate ion and is inhibited by high phosphate levels. Glycine can also protect endothelial cells from lethal injury inducted by ionomycin. There appears to be no enhancement with Mn2+, however against this form of lethal injury. The protective effects of glycine, Mn2+ and bicarbonate ion against injury by hydrogen peroxide is associated with a direct disproportionation of the hydrogen peroxide to water with little generation of molecular oxygen. Either glycine or Mn2+ alone does not have this effect. In addition to protecting endothelial cells from hydrogen peroxide-mediated injury, glycine or MN2+ is almost completely protective. Additionally, treatment of rats with concentrations of EDTA that do not by themselves induce injury greatly accentuates lung injury induced by glucose oxidase. These findings suggest that circulating amino acids in combination with Mn2+ and bicarbonate ions may contribute to the normal anti-oxidant barrier. These findings may also form the basis for a possible new therapeutic approach to oxygen radical-mediated injury.

  3. Excretion of amino acids by humans during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    We measured the urine amino acid distribution patterns before, during and after space flight on the Space Shuttle. The urine samples were collected on two separate flights of the space shuttle. The first flight lasted 9.5 days and the second flight 15 days. Urine was collected continuously on 8 subjects for the period beginning 10 d before launch to 6 d after landing. Results: In contrast to the earlier Skylab missions where a pronounced amino aciduria was found, on shuttle the urinary amino acids showed little change with spaceflight except for a marked decrease in all of the amino acids on FD (flight day) 1 (pvaline on FD3 and FD4 (p<0.05). Conclusions: (i) Amino aciduria is not an inevitable consequence of space flight. (ii) The occurrence of amino aciduria, like muscle protein breakdown is a mission specific effect rather than part of the general human response to microgravity.

  4. Grapevine fruit extract protects against radiation-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human lymphocyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation (IR) causes oxidative stress through overwhelming generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the living cells leading the oxidative damage further to biomolecules. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) posses several bioactive phytochemicals and is the richest source of antioxidants. In this study, we investigated V. vinifera for its phytochemical content, enzymes profile and, ROS-and oxidant-scavenging activities. We have also studied the fruit extract of four different grapevine viz., Thompson seedless, Flame seedless, Kishmish chorni and Red globe for their radioprotective actions in human lymphocytes. The activities of ascorbic acid oxidase and catalase significantly (P < 0.01) differed among extracts within the same cultivar, while that of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase did not differ significantly. The superoxide radical-scavenging activity was higher in the seed as compared to the skin or pulp of the same cultivar. Pretreatment with grape extracts attenuated the oxidative stress induced by 4 Gy γ-radiation in human lymphocytes in vitro. Further, γ-radiation-induced increase in caspase 3/7 activity was significantly attenuated by grape extracts. These results suggest that grape extract serve as a potential source of natural antioxidants against the IR-induced oxidative stress and also inhibit apoptosis. Furthermore, the protective action of grape depends on the source of extract (seed, skin or pulp) and type of the cultivars. (author)

  5. Protective effects of gallic acid against spinal cord injury-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong Hong; Wang, Zao; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of gallic acid in oxidative stress induced during spinal cord injury (SCI). In order to measure oxidative stress, the levels of lipid peroxide, protein carbonyl, reactive oxygen species and nitrates/nitrites were determined. In addition, the antioxidant status during SCI injury and the protective role of gallic acid were investigated by determining glutathione levels as well as the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. Adenosine triphophatase (ATPase) enzyme activities were determined to evaluate the role of gallic acid in SCI-induced deregulation of the activity of enzymes involved in ion homeostasis. The levels of inflammatory markers such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB and cycloxygenase (COX)-2 were determined by western blot analysis. Treatment with gallic acid was observed to significantly mitigate SCI-induced oxidative stress and the inflammatory response by reducing the oxidative stress, decreasing the expression of NF-κB and COX-2 as well as increasing the antioxidant status of cells. In addition, gallic acid modulated the activity of ATPase enzymes. Thus the present study indicated that gallic acid may have a role as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent against SCI. PMID:25955644

  6. Stimulation of Melanogenesis by Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid in Human Melanoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takekoshi, Susumu; Nagata, Hidetaka; Kitatani, Kanae

    2014-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a lignan found in vegetables, fruits and legumin, has been shown to possess antineoplastic, antiviral and antioxidant characteristics. In this study, we examined the effect of NDGA on melanogenesis in human melanoma cells (HMVII). In vitro, NDGA does not alter mushroom tyrosinase activity. However, in NDGA-treated HMVII cells, cellular tyrosinase activity increased in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. The concomitant increases in melanin content in NDGA...

  7. A superactive insulin: [B10-aspartic acid]insulin(human).

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, G P; Burke, G. T.; Katsoyannis, P G

    1987-01-01

    The genetic basis for a case of familial hyperproinsulinemia has been elucidated recently. It involves a single point mutation in the proinsulin gene resulting in the substitution of aspartic acid for histidine-10 of the B chain of insulin. We have synthesized a human insulin analogue, [AspB10]insulin, corresponding to the mutant proinsulin and evaluated its biological activity. [AspB10]Insulin displayed a binding affinity to insulin receptors in rat liver plasma membranes that was 534 +/- 14...

  8. How Should Police Respect and Protect Human Rights?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XIUHONG

    2007-01-01

    @@ A11 people are equal before law and human rights must be respected and guaranteed.This is an established principle in China in bringing about a harmonious society. But how should police respect and ensure human rights in exercising their powers?

  9. Managing Human Activities in Antarctica : Should Wilderness Protection Count?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastmeijer, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Antarctica is often described as one of the world's last wildernesses. In harmony with this general perception, the wilderness values of Antarctica received legal status with the adoption of the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty. Article 3(1) of the Protocol obliges each C

  10. Space radiation protection: Human support thrust exploration technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Edmund J.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on space radiation protection are presented. For crew and practical missions, exploration requires effective, low-mass shielding and accurate estimates of space radiation exposure for lunar and Mars habitat shielding, manned space transfer vehicle, and strategies for minimizing exposure during extravehicular activity (EVA) and rover operations.

  11. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  12. In silico evidence for gluconeogenesis from fatty acids in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kaleta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The question whether fatty acids can be converted into glucose in humans has a long standing tradition in biochemistry, and the expected answer is "No". Using recent advances in Systems Biology in the form of large-scale metabolic reconstructions, we reassessed this question by performing a global investigation of a genome-scale human metabolic network, which had been reconstructed on the basis of experimental results. By elementary flux pattern analysis, we found numerous pathways on which gluconeogenesis from fatty acids is feasible in humans. On these pathways, four moles of acetyl-CoA are converted into one mole of glucose and two moles of CO₂. Analyzing the detected pathways in detail we found that their energetic requirements potentially limit their capacity. This study has many other biochemical implications: effect of starvation, sports physiology, practically carbohydrate-free diets of inuit, as well as survival of hibernating animals and embryos of egg-laying animals. Moreover, the energetic loss associated to the usage of gluconeogenesis from fatty acids can help explain the efficiency of carbohydrate reduced and ketogenic diets such as the Atkins diet.

  13. Retinoic acid response element in the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3: implications for regulation of retinoic acid synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Duester, G; Shean, M L; McBride, M S; Stewart, M J

    1991-01-01

    Retinoic acid regulation of one member of the human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family was demonstrated, suggesting that the retinol dehydrogenase function of ADH may play a regulatory role in the biosynthetic pathway for retinoic acid. Promoter activity of human ADH3, but not ADH1 or ADH2, was shown to be activated by retinoic acid in transient transfection assays of Hep3B human hepatoma cells. Deletion mapping experiments identified a region in the ADH3 promoter located between...

  14. Determination of tolerable fatty acids and cholera toxin concentrations using human intestinal epithelial cells and BALB/c mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamari, Farshad; Tychowski, Joanna; Lorentzen, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The positive role of fatty acids in the prevention and alleviation of non-human and human diseases have been and continue to be extensively documented. These roles include influences on infectious and non-infectious diseases including prevention of inflammation as well as mucosal immunity to infectious diseases. Cholera is an acute intestinal illness caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. It occurs in developing nations and if left untreated, can result in death. While vaccines for cholera exist, they are not always effective and other preventative methods are needed. We set out to determine tolerable concentrations of three fatty acids (oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids) and cholera toxin using mouse BALB/C macrophages and human intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. We solubilized the above fatty acids and used cell proliferation assays to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of the fatty acids that are not detrimental to human intestinal epithelial cell viability. We solubilized cholera toxin and used it in an assay to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of cholera toxin that do not statistically decrease cell viability in BALB/C macrophages. We found the optimum fatty acid concentrations to be between 1-5 ng/μl, and that for cholera toxin to be < 30 ng per treatment. This data may aid future studies that aim to find a protective mucosal role for fatty acids in prevention or alleviation of cholera infections. PMID:23748896

  15. Multilayer Polymeric Shielding to Protect Humans from Galactic Cosmic Radiation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Sub-topic X4.01, NASA has identified a need for advanced radiation-shielding materials and structures to protect humans from the hazards of galactic cosmic...

  16. 75 FR 7481 - Meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Menikoff, M.D., J.D., Director, Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D... who plan to attend the meeting and need special assistance, such as sign language interpretation...

  17. Protective Action of Resveratrol in Human Skin: Possible Involvement of Specific Receptor Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Bastianetto; Yvan Dumont; Albert Duranton; Freya Vercauteren; Lionel Breton; Rémi Quirion

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol with purported protecting action on various disorders associated with aging. It has been suggested that resveratrol could exert its protective action by acting on specific plasma membrane polyphenol binding sites (Han Y.S., et al. (2006) J Pharmacol Exp Ther 318:238-245). The purpose of this study was to investigate, in human skin, the possible existence of specific binding sites that mediate the protective action of resveratrol. METHODS A...

  18. English walnuts (Juglans regia L.) protect endogenous antioxidants in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellagic acid monomers, polymeric tannins and related phenolic compounds isolated from English walnuts (Juglans regia L.) have been reported to inhibit LDL oxidation ex vivo and decrease biomarkers of oxidative stress in animal models. To determine whether dietary and endogenous antioxidants are pres...

  19. ASPECTS OF THE EVOLUTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS PROTECTION IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLAE PURDĂ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human rights protection within the European Community and the European Union has developed judicially, the human rights being protected by the Community Courts as general principles of Community law. The Treaty of Maastricht and the Treaty of Amsterdam have codified the Community law within the area of human rights. The codification of European Union’s concept of human rights in a single document was realized by adopting the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, on 7 December 2000 in Nice, whose provisions acquired legally binding under the Treaty of Lisbon.

  20. Patents and the obligation to protect health: examining the significance of human rights considerations in the protection of pharmaceutical patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, Olasupo Ayodeji

    2014-06-01

    This article discusses the human right to health in the context of patent protection and access to medicines. It considers the limitations in international human rights law, especially in relation to socioeconomic rights, that make it difficult for the right to health to be a potent justification for derogation from trade or intellectual property agreements. It concludes by taking the view that while the right to health may be somewhat unenforceable in international law, its close association with enforceable rights such as the right to life can be a legitimate basis for making maximum use of the flexibilities in the international intellectual property regime to protect public health. The article takes the view that trade and intellectual property agreements must be interpreted in a way that endeavours as much as possible to resolve any seeming inconsistency with the right to health.

  1. Patents and the obligation to protect health: examining the significance of human rights considerations in the protection of pharmaceutical patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, Olasupo Ayodeji

    2014-06-01

    This article discusses the human right to health in the context of patent protection and access to medicines. It considers the limitations in international human rights law, especially in relation to socioeconomic rights, that make it difficult for the right to health to be a potent justification for derogation from trade or intellectual property agreements. It concludes by taking the view that while the right to health may be somewhat unenforceable in international law, its close association with enforceable rights such as the right to life can be a legitimate basis for making maximum use of the flexibilities in the international intellectual property regime to protect public health. The article takes the view that trade and intellectual property agreements must be interpreted in a way that endeavours as much as possible to resolve any seeming inconsistency with the right to health. PMID:25087369

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Individual Petition in Regional and Global Human Rights Protection Mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Israel de Jesus

    2004-01-01

    A comparison of the principal regional and global human rights protection mechanisms from the perspective of individuals who may wish to access them. This compares the structures, procedures, powers and rates of compliance with decisions of the European Court of Human Rights, Inter-American Human Rights bodies, African Commission on Human and People's Rights as well as the main UN Charter-based and treaty-based supervisory bodies.

  3. Strengthening the human rights framework to protect breastfeeding: a focus on CEDAW

    OpenAIRE

    Galtry, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Background There have been recent calls for increased recognition of breastfeeding as a human right. The United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, 1979 (CEDAW) is the core human rights treaty on women. CEDAW’s approach to breastfeeding is considered from an historical perspective. A comparison is drawn with breastfeeding protection previously outlined in the International Labour Organization’s Maternity Protection Convention, 1919 (ILO C3), and...

  4. Antibody protection reveals extended epitopes on the human TSH receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauf Latif

    Full Text Available Stimulating, and some blocking, antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR have conformation-dependent epitopes reported to involve primarily the leucine rich repeat region of the ectodomain (LRD. However, successful crystallization of TSHR residues 22-260 has omitted important extracellular non-LRD residues including the hinge region which connects the TSHR ectodomain to the transmembrane domain and which is involved in ligand induced signal transduction. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to determine if TSHR antibodies (TSHR-Abs have non-LRD binding sites outside the LRD. To obtain this information we employed the method of epitope protection in which we first protected TSHR residues 1-412 with intact TSHR antibodies and then enzymatically digested the unprotected residues. Those peptides remaining were subsequently delineated by mass spectrometry. Fourteen out of 23 of the reported stimulating monoclonal TSHR-Ab crystal contact residues were protected by this technique which may reflect the higher binding energies of certain residues detected in this approach. Comparing the protected epitopes of two stimulating TSHR-Abs we found both similarities and differences but both antibodies also contacted the hinge region and the amino terminus of the TSHR following the signal peptide and encompassing cysteine box 1 which has previously been shown to be important for TSH binding and activation. A monoclonal blocking TSHR antibody revealed a similar pattern of binding regions but the residues that it contacted on the LRD were again distinct. These data demonstrated that conformationally dependent TSHR-Abs had epitopes not confined to the LRDs but also incorporated epitopes not revealed in the available crystal structure. Furthermore, the data also indicated that in addition to overlapping contact regions within the LRD, there are unique epitope patterns for each of the antibodies which may contribute to their functional heterogeneity.

  5. Antibody protection reveals extended epitopes on the human TSH receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Rauf; Teixeira, Avelino; Michalek, Krzysztof; Ali, M Rejwan; Schlesinger, Max; Baliram, Ramkumarie; Morshed, Syed A; Davies, Terry F

    2012-01-01

    Stimulating, and some blocking, antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) have conformation-dependent epitopes reported to involve primarily the leucine rich repeat region of the ectodomain (LRD). However, successful crystallization of TSHR residues 22-260 has omitted important extracellular non-LRD residues including the hinge region which connects the TSHR ectodomain to the transmembrane domain and which is involved in ligand induced signal transduction. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to determine if TSHR antibodies (TSHR-Abs) have non-LRD binding sites outside the LRD. To obtain this information we employed the method of epitope protection in which we first protected TSHR residues 1-412 with intact TSHR antibodies and then enzymatically digested the unprotected residues. Those peptides remaining were subsequently delineated by mass spectrometry. Fourteen out of 23 of the reported stimulating monoclonal TSHR-Ab crystal contact residues were protected by this technique which may reflect the higher binding energies of certain residues detected in this approach. Comparing the protected epitopes of two stimulating TSHR-Abs we found both similarities and differences but both antibodies also contacted the hinge region and the amino terminus of the TSHR following the signal peptide and encompassing cysteine box 1 which has previously been shown to be important for TSH binding and activation. A monoclonal blocking TSHR antibody revealed a similar pattern of binding regions but the residues that it contacted on the LRD were again distinct. These data demonstrated that conformationally dependent TSHR-Abs had epitopes not confined to the LRDs but also incorporated epitopes not revealed in the available crystal structure. Furthermore, the data also indicated that in addition to overlapping contact regions within the LRD, there are unique epitope patterns for each of the antibodies which may contribute to their functional heterogeneity. PMID:22957097

  6. Effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and chitosan solutions on microhardness of the human radicular dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeta Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, and chitosan solutions on the microhardness of human radicular dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty dentin specimens were randomly divided into three groups of 10 specimens each according to the irrigant used: G1 - 1% phytic acid, G2 - 17% EDTA, and G3 - 0.2% chitosan. A standardized volume of each chelating solution was used for 3 min. Dentin microhardness was measured before and after application at the cervical, middle, and apical levels with a Vickers indenter under a 200-g load and a 10-s dwell time. The results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Student′s t test. Results: Microhardness of the radicular dentin varied at the cervical, middle, and apical levels. EDTA had the greatest overall effect, causing a sharp percentage reduction in dentin microhardness with a significant difference from phytic acid and chitosan (P = 0.002. However, phytic acid and chitosan differed insignificantly from each other (P = 0.887. Conclusion: All tested chelating solutions reduced microhardness of the radicular dentin layer at all the levels. However, reduction was least at the apical level. EDTA caused more reduction in dentin microhardness than chitosan while phytic acid reduced the least.

  7. Protective effects of Punica Granatum (L) and synthetic ellagic acid on radiation induced biochemical alterations in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations produce deleterious effects in the living organisms and the rapid technological advancement has increased human exposure to ionizing radiations enormously. Radiotherapy, which is a chief modality to treat cancer, faces a major drawback because it produces severe side effects developed due to damage to normal tissue by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent studies have indicated that some commonly used medicinal plants may be good sources of potent but non-toxic radioprotectors. The pomegranate, Punica granatum L., an ancient, mystical, and highly distinctive fruit, is the predominant member of the Punicaceae family. It is used in several systems of medicine for a variety of ailments. The objective of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of ethanolic extracts of pomegranate whole fruit (EPWF) and seeds (EPS) and Synthetic Ellagic acid (EA) against Electron beam radiation(EBR) induced biochemical alterations in Swiss albino mice. The extracts and synthetic compound were assessed for its radical scavenging property by DPPH radical scavenging and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assays. The animals were exposed to sub-lethal dose (6 Gy) of Electron Beam Radiation and then treated with 200 mg/kg body wt. of pomegranate extracts and synthetic ellagic acid for 15 consecutive days. The biochemical estimations were carried out in the liver homogenate of the sacrificed animals. Radiation induced depletion in the level of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were prevented significantly by EPWF, EPS and EA administration. Also there was significant reduction in the levels of membrane lipid peroxidation in the treated groups compared to irradiated control. The findings of our study indicate the protective efficacy of pomegranate extracts and synthetic ellagic acid on radiation induced biochemical changes in mice may be due to its free radical scavenging and increased antioxidant levels. (author)

  8. Valproic acid protects neurons and promotes neuronal regeneration after brachial plexus avulsion****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Li; Dianxiu Wu; Rui Li; Xiaojuan Zhu; Shusen Cui

    2013-01-01

    Valproic acid has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects and promote neurite outgrowth in several peripheral nerve injury models. However, whether valproic acid can exert its beneficial effect on neurons after brachial plexus avulsion injury is currently unknown. In this study, brachial plexus root avulsion models, established in Wistar rats, were administered daily with valproic acid dis-solved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) or normal water. On days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after avulsion injury, tissues of the C 5-T 1 spinal cord segments of the avulsion injured side were harvested to in-vestigate the expression of Bcl-2, c-Jun and growth associated protein 43 by real-time PCR and western blot assay. Results showed that valproic acid significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2 and growth associated protein 43, and reduced the c-Jun expression after brachial plexus avulsion. Our findings indicate that valproic acid can protect neurons in the spinal cord and enhance neuronal regeneration fol owing brachial plexus root avulsion.

  9. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria with potential protective culture characteristics from fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Nurul Huda; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are also known as beneficial microorganisms abundantly found in fermented food products. In this study, lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fresh cut fruits obtained from local markets. Throughout the isolation process from 11 samples of fruits, 225 presumptive lactic acid bacteria were isolated on MRS agar medium. After catalase and oxidase tests, 149 resulted to fit the characteristics of lactic acid bacteria. Further identification using Gram staining was conducted to identify the Gram positive bacteria. After this confirmation, the fermentation characteristics of these isolates were identified. It was found that 87 (58.4%) isolates were heterofermentative, while the rest of 62 (41.6%) are homofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Later, all these isolates were investigated for the ability to inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus using agar spot assay method. Seven (4.7%) isolates showed strong antagonistic capacity, while 127 (85.2%) and 8 (5.4%) isolates have medium and weak antagonistic capacity, respectively. The other 7 (4.7%) isolates indicated to have no antagonistic effect on S. aureus. Results support the potential of LAB isolated in this study which showed strong antagonistic activity against S. aureus may be manipulated to become protective cultures in food products. While the homofermentative or heterofermentative LAB can be utilized in fermentation of food and non-food products depending on the by-products required during the fermentation.

  10. The protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids on rat testicular tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Zararsız

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, the protective effect of omega-3 fatty acids on testicular tissue was aimed to investigate at biochemical levels.Materials and methods: Totally, 16 adult male Wistar rats were divided into two groups. Rats in Group I were used as control and only saline was given by intragastric gavage. Rats in Group II, 400 mg/kg dose ω-3 fatty acids were given daily by intragastric gavage. At the end of the six-week experimental period, all rats were killed by decapitation. The testicular tissue specimens taken from animals, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, malondialdehyde, enzyme activities were measured spectrophotometrically. In addition, blood testosterone levels were examined.Results: In our study, ω-3 fatty acids in rats were given a statistically significant increase in the levels of superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase a statistically significant decrease in malondialdehyde levels were determined when compared to control group. In addition, ω-3 fatty acids in rats given a statistically significant increase in blood testosterone levels were observed.Conclusion: We concluded that ω-3 fatty acid had favorable effects in rat testis tissue by preventing oxidative damage and increasing the level of testosterone.

  11. Protection of copper surface with phytic acid against corrosion in chloride solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peca, Dunja; Pihlar, Boris; Ingrid, Milošev

    2014-01-01

    Phytic acid (inositol hexaphosphate) was tested as a corrosion inhibitor for copper in 3% sodium chloride. Phytic acid is a natural compound derived from plants, it is not toxic and can be considered as a green inhibitor. Electrochemical methods of linear polarization and potentiodynamic polarization were used to study the electrochemical behaviour and evaluate the inhibition effectiveness. To obtain the optimal corrosion protection the following experimental conditions were investigated: effect of surface pre-treatment (abrasion and three procedures of surface roughening), pre-formation of the layer of phytic acid, time of immersion and concentration of phytic acid. To evaluate the surface pre-treatment procedures the surface roughness and contact angle were measured. Optimal conditions for formation of phytic layer were selected resulting in the inhibition effectiveness of nearly 80%. Morphology and composition of the layer were further studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The layer of phytic acid with thickness in the nanometer range homogeneously covers the copper surface. The obtained results show that this natural compound can be used as a mildly effective corrosion inhibitor for copper in chloride solution. PMID:25286201

  12. Dietary requirements of "nutritionally non-essential amino acids" by animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoyao; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Yang, Ying; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Bin; Wang, Junjun; Yin, Yulong

    2013-04-01

    Amino acids are necessary for the survival, growth, development, reproduction and health of all organisms. They were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or non-essential for mammals, birds and fish based on nitrogen balance or growth. It was assumed that all "non-essential amino acids (NEAA)" were synthesized sufficiently in the body to meet the needs for maximal growth and health. However, there has been no compelling experimental evidence to support this assumption over the past century. NEAA (e.g., glutamine, glutamate, proline, glycine and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, neurotransmission, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine to maintain its digestive function and protect its mucosal integrity. Therefore, based on new research findings, NEAA should be taken into consideration in revising the classical "ideal protein" concept and formulating balanced diets to improve protein accretion, food efficiency, and health in animals and humans.

  13. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R.; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is a life threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including...

  14. 5-Aminosalicylic acid protection against oxidative damage to synaptosomal membranes by alkoxyl radicals in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J; Lauderback, C; Butterfield, D A

    2001-01-01

    The antioxidant properties of 5-aminosalicylic acid in vitro were evaluated in a synaptosomal membrane system prepared from gerbil cortical synaptosomes using EPR spin labeling and spectroscopic techniques. MAL-6 (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-maleimidopiperidin-1-oxyl) and 5-NS (5-nitroxide stearate) spin labels were used to assess changes in protein oxidation and membrane lipid fluidity, respectively. Synaptosomal membranes were subjected to oxidative stress by incubation with 1 mM azo-bis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) or 1 mM 2,2'-azobis(amidino propane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) at 37 degrees C for 30 minutes. The EPR analyses of the samples showed significant oxidation of synaptosomal proteins and a decrease in membrane fluidity. 5-Aminosalicylic acid also was evaluated by means of FRAP (the ferric reducing ability of plasma) test as a potential antioxidant. 5-Aminosalicylic acid also showed protection against the oxidation in gerbil cortical synaptosomes system caused by AIBN and AAPH. These results are consistent with the notion of antioxidant protection against free radical induced oxidative stress in synaptosomal membrane system by this agent.

  15. Hydroxyapatite coatings for marble protection: Optimization of calcite covering and acid resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Gabriela; Sassoni, Enrico; Franzoni, Elisa; Scherer, George W.

    2016-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) has a much lower dissolution rate and solubility than calcite, especially in an acidic environment, so it has been proposed for the protection of marble against acidic rain corrosion. Promising results were obtained, but further optimization is necessary as the treated layer is often incomplete, cracked and/or porous. In this paper, several parameters were investigated to obtain a coherent, uncracked layer, and to avoid the formation of metastable, soluble phases instead of HAP: the role of the pH of the starting solution; the effect of organic and inorganic additions, and in particular that of ethanol, as it is reported to adsorb on calcite, hence possibly favoring the growth of the HAP layer. Finally, a double application of the treatment was tested. Results were compared to those obtained with ammonium oxalate treatment, widely investigated for marble protection. Results indicate that adding small amounts of ethanol to the formulation remarkably increases the acid resistance of treated samples, and yields better coverage of the surface without crack formation. The effectiveness of the treatment is further enhanced when a second treatment is applied. The efficacy of ethanol-doped DAP mixtures was found to be remarkably higher than that of ammonium oxalate based treatments.

  16. Human Anti-Oxidation Protein A1M—A Potential Kidney Protection Agent in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Ahlstedt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT has been in clinical use for 15 years to treat metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT is limited by reabsorption and retention of the administered radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the proximal tubule. Consequently, it is essential to develop and employ methods to protect the kidneys during PRRT. Today, infusion of positively charged amino acids is the standard method of kidney protection. Other methods, such as administration of amifostine, are still under evaluation and show promising results. α1-microglobulin (A1M is a reductase and radical scavenging protein ubiquitously present in plasma and extravascular tissue. Human A1M has antioxidation properties and has been shown to prevent radiation-induced in vitro cell damage and protect non-irradiated surrounding cells. It has recently been shown in mice that exogenously infused A1M and the somatostatin analogue octreotide are co-localized in proximal tubules of the kidney after intravenous infusion. In this review we describe the current situation of kidney protection during PRRT, discuss the necessity and implications of more precise dosimetry and present A1M as a new, potential candidate for renal protection during PRRT and related targeted radionuclide therapies.

  17. The Role of the Virtuous Investigator in Protecting Human Research Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Christine; Fauci, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    In his famous 1966 New England Journal of Medicine article, Henry Beecher concluded that a critical safeguard for protecting human participants, more reliable than informed consent, was the "presence of an intelligent, informed, conscientious, compassionate, responsible investigator." This article examines Beecher's appeal to reliance on the "virtuous" investigator in light of the critical role that investigators play in research ethics and the systems of research protections that have been developed since Beecher's writing. It addresses the extent to which research ethics rely on virtuous investigators; the meaning of virtuous, as distinct from compliance with the rules and regulations that guide ethical research; the particular virtues that it might be important for investigators to have; and the impact of the existing system of human subjects protections on the virtuous investigator. The virtuous investigator who is motivated to take ethical responsibilities seriously is an essential safeguard for the protection of human research participants and an important complement to the system of oversight protections. However, since the current human subjects protection system does not promote virtue or ethical resourcefulness by investigators, attention to enhancing a culture of professional responsibility might serve to forge a synergy between the protections afforded by the current oversight system and those provided by the virtuous investigator. PMID:27499489

  18. Coffee polyphenols protect human plasma from postprandial carbonyl modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, Roman; Gorelik, Shlomit; Harris, Raviv; Kohen, Ron; Kanner, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    The antioxidant capability of coffee polyphenols to inhibit red-meat lipid peroxidation in stomach medium and absorption into blood of malondialdehyde (MDA) in humans was studied. Roasted-ground coffee polyphenols that were found to inhibit lipid peroxidation in stomach medium are 2- to 5-fold more efficient antioxidant than those found in instant coffee. Human plasma from ten volunteers analyzed after a meal of red-meat cutlets (250 g) revealed a rapid accumulation of MDA. The accumulation of MDA in human plasma modified low-density lipoprotein is known to trigger atherogenesis. Consumption of 200 mL roasted coffee by ten volunteers during a meal of red-meat cutlets, resulted after 2 and 4 h in the inhibition by 80 and 50%, respectively, of postprandial plasma MDA absorption. The results obtained in vitro simulated stomach model on MDA accumulation were predictive for the amount of MDA absorbed into circulating human plasma, in vivo. Timing the consumption of coffee during the meals may make it a very active functional food.

  19. 77 FR 58383 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1101...: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a, Section 222 of.... Individuals who plan to attend the meeting and need special assistance, such as sign language...

  20. 75 FR 59264 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services... address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a, Section.... Individuals who plan to attend the meeting and need special assistance, such as sign language...

  1. Vanillin protects human keratinocyte stem cells against ultraviolet B irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jienny; Cho, Jae Youl; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Lee, Jongsung; Song, Jae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation is one of major factors which induce cellular damages in the epidermis. We investigated protective effects and mechanisms of vanillin, a main constituent of vanilla beans, against UVB-induced cellular damages in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC). Here, vanillin significantly attenuated UVB irradiation-induced cytotoxicity. The vanillin effects were also demonstrated by the results of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase and alkaline comet assays. In addition, vanillin induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Attempts to elucidate a possible mechanism underlying the vanillin-mediated effects revealed that vanillin significantly reduced UVB-induced phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), serine threonine kinase checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53), p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK), S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), and histone 2A family member X (H2A.X). UVB-induced activation of p53 luciferase reporter was also significantly inhibited by vanillin. In addition, while ATM inhibitor had no effect on the vanillin effects, mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) inhibitor significantly attenuated suppressive effects of vanillin on UVB-induced activation of p53 reporter in KSC. Taken together, these findings suggest that vanillin protects KSC from UVB irradiation and its effects may occur through the suppression of downstream step of MDM2 in UVB irradiation-induced p53 activation. PMID:24184596

  2. Vanillin protects human keratinocyte stem cells against ultraviolet B irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jienny; Cho, Jae Youl; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Lee, Jongsung; Song, Jae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation is one of major factors which induce cellular damages in the epidermis. We investigated protective effects and mechanisms of vanillin, a main constituent of vanilla beans, against UVB-induced cellular damages in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC). Here, vanillin significantly attenuated UVB irradiation-induced cytotoxicity. The vanillin effects were also demonstrated by the results of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase and alkaline comet assays. In addition, vanillin induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Attempts to elucidate a possible mechanism underlying the vanillin-mediated effects revealed that vanillin significantly reduced UVB-induced phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), serine threonine kinase checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53), p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK), S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), and histone 2A family member X (H2A.X). UVB-induced activation of p53 luciferase reporter was also significantly inhibited by vanillin. In addition, while ATM inhibitor had no effect on the vanillin effects, mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) inhibitor significantly attenuated suppressive effects of vanillin on UVB-induced activation of p53 reporter in KSC. Taken together, these findings suggest that vanillin protects KSC from UVB irradiation and its effects may occur through the suppression of downstream step of MDM2 in UVB irradiation-induced p53 activation.

  3. 77 FR 5012 - Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Health and Human Services and Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ....309(c) and 2.308(h)(2) will be shared with the Department of Human Services (HHS) and the U.S... AGENCY Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Health and Human Services and Department of... office of Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Biotechnology Regulatory Services (APHIS/BRS)...

  4. Radiosensitivity of Type E Botulinus Toxin and its Protection by Proteins, Nucleic Acids and some Related Substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three preparations of different purities of type E botulinus toxin containing toxicity or potential toxicity of about 50 000 LD50 per ml were irradiated with cobalt-60 in 0.05M acetate or 0.2M phosphate buffer, pH 6.0. The D values were about 2.1 Mrad for the cell suspension, about 0.21 Mrad for the cell extract and about 0.04 Mrad for the purified preparation. Tryptic activation did not change the radiosensitivity of the toxin except for the cell suspension. Serum albumin, casein, desoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid protected the purified and activated toxin against radiation detoxification; sugars or ascorbic acid showed little or no protection. The same extent of protection was afforded by sulphur-containing, aromatic or some heterocyclic amino acids and also by purines. Pre-irradiation of amino acid solutions with 7.7 Mrad did not appreciably change the protecting effect on type E toxin, except for the irradiated lysine which was shown to be protective in some experiments. Some amino acid derivatives, methionine sulphoxide, aminoethyl mercaptan, and cadaverine, were shown to be protective to different extents. (author)

  5. New methodologies of biological dosimetry applied to human protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry is a diagnostic methodology for the measurement of the individual dose absorbed in the case of accidental overexposition to ionizing radiation. It is demonstrated how in vitro radiobiological and chemobiological studies using cytogenetic methods (count of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei) on human lymphocytes from healthy subjects and individuals undergoing radiotherapy or chemotherapy, as well as on lymphocytes of mammals other than man (comparative cytogenetics), can help to increase the basic radiobiological and chemobiological scientific information. Such information gives a valid contribution to understanding of the action of ionizing radiation or of pharmaceuticals on cells and, in return, can be of value to human radioprotection and chemoprotection. Cytogenetic studies can be summerized as follows: a) biodosimetry (estimate of dose received after accidental events); b) individual radiosensitivity (level of individual response); c) clinical radiobiology and chemobiology (individual response to radiopharmaceuticals, to radiotherapy and to chemopharmaceuticals); d) comparative radiobiology (cytogenetic studies on species other than man); e) animal model in the environmental surveillance

  6. Nuclear Fragmentation Processes Relevant for Human Space Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for human space explorations such-as a moon base or a trip to Mars. Models have been developed in order to predict the radiation exposure to astronauts and to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials, and a key ingredient in these models is the physics of nuclear fragmentations. We have developed a semi-analytical method to determine which partial cross sections of nuclear fragmentations most affect the radiation dose behind shielding materials due to exposure to galactic cosmic rays. The cross sections thus determined will require more theoretical and/or experimental studies in order for us to better predict, reduce and mitigate the radiation exposure in human space explorations.

  7. Fatty Acid Synthase Cooperates with Glyoxalase 1 to Protect against Sugar Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Damien Garrido; Thomas Rubin; Mickael Poidevin; Brigitte Maroni; Arnaud Le Rouzic; Jean-Philippe Parvy; Jacques Montagne

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid (FA) metabolism is deregulated in several human diseases including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Therefore, FA-metabolic enzymes are potential targets for drug therapy, although the consequence of these treatments must be precisely evaluated at the organismal and cellular levels. In healthy organism, synthesis of triacylglycerols (TAGs)-composed of three FA units esterified to a glycerol backbone-is increased in response to dietary sugar. Saturation in the storag...

  8. Release of Propolis Phenolic Acids from Semisolid Formulations and Their Penetration into the Human Skin In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Modestas Žilius; Kristina Ramanauskienė; Vitalis Briedis

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidant and free radical scavenging effects are attributed to phenolic compounds present in propolis, and when delivered to the skin surface and following penetration into epidermis and dermis, they can contribute to skin protection from damaging action of free radicals that are formed under UV and premature skin aging. This study was designed to determine the penetration of phenolic acids and vanillin into the human skin in vitro from experimentally designed vehicles. Results of the stud...

  9. Antioxidative Peptides Derived from Enzyme Hydrolysis of Bone Collagen after Microwave Assisted Acid Pre-Treatment and Nitrogen Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Sun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the preparation method of antioxidant peptides by enzymatic hydrolysis of bone collagen after microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection. Phosphoric acid showed the highest ability of hydrolysis among the four other acids tested (hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and/or citric acid. The highest degree of hydrolysis (DH was 9.5% using 4 mol/L phosphoric acid with a ratio of 1:6 under a microwave intensity of 510 W for 240 s. Neutral proteinase gave higher DH among the four protease tested (Acid protease, neutral protease, Alcalase and papain, with an optimum condition of: (1 ratio of enzyme and substrate, 4760 U/g; (2 concentration of substrate, 4%; (3 reaction temperature, 55 °C and (4 pH 7.0. At 4 h, DH increased significantly (P < 0.01 under nitrogen protection compared with normal microwave assisted acid pre-treatment hydrolysis conditions. The antioxidant ability of the hydrolysate increased and reached its maximum value at 3 h; however DH decreased dramatically after 3 h. Microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection could be a quick preparatory method for hydrolyzing bone collagen.

  10. Human Monoclonal Anti-Protective Antigen Antibody Completely Protects Rabbits and Is Synergistic with Ciprofloxacin in Protecting Mice and Guinea Pigs against Inhalation Anthrax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W.; Comer, Jason E.; Noffsinger, David M.; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G.; Chatuev, Bagram M.; Chopra, Ashok K.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Kang, Angray S.; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Sircar, Jagadish

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of inhalation anthrax requires early and extended antibiotic therapy, and therefore, alternative treatment strategies are needed. We investigated whether a human monoclonal antibody (AVP-21D9) to protective antigen (PA) would protect mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits against anthrax. Control animals challenged with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores by the intranasal route died within 3 to 7 days. AVP-21D9 alone provided minimal protection against anthrax in the murine model, but its efficacy was notably better in guinea pigs. When Swiss-Webster mice, challenged with five 50% lethal doses (LD50s) of anthrax spores, were given a single 16.7-mg/kg of body weight AVP-21D9 antibody dose combined with ciprofloxacin (30 mg/kg/day for 6 days) 24 h after challenge, 100% of the mice were protected for more than 30 days, while ciprofloxacin or AVP-21D9 alone showed minimal protection. Similarly, when AVP-21D9 antibody (10 to 50 mg/kg) was combined with a low, nonprotective dose of ciprofloxacin (3.7 mg/kg/day) and administered to guinea pigs for 6 days, synergistic protection against anthrax was observed. In contrast, a single dose of AVP-21D9 antibody (1, 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg) but not 0.2 mg/kg alone completely protected rabbits against challenge with 100 LD50s of B. anthracis Ames spores, and 100% of the rabbits survived rechallenge. Further, administration of AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) to rabbits at 0, 6, and 12 h after challenge with anthrax spores resulted in 100% survival; however, delay of antibody treatment by 24 and 48 h reduced survival to 80% and 60%, respectively. Serological analysis of sera from various surviving animals 30 days postprimary infection showed development of a species-specific PA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody titer that correlated with protection against reinfection. Taken together, the effectiveness of human anti-PA antibody alone or in combination with low ciprofloxacin levels may provide the basis for an improved strategy for

  11. Priming for JA-dependent defenses using hexanoic acid is an effective mechanism to protect Arabidopsis against B. cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, Zhana; Vicedo, Begonya; Flors, Víctor; Camañes, Gemma; González-Bosch, Carmen; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2011-03-01

    Soil drench treatments with hexanoic acid can effectively protect Arabidopsis plants against Botrytis cinerea through a mechanism based on a stronger and faster accumulation of JA-dependent defenses. Plants impaired in ethylene, salicylic acid, abscisic acid or glutathion pathways showed intact protection by hexanoic acid upon B. cinerea infection. Accordingly, no significant changes in the SA marker gene PR-1 in either the SA or ABA hormone balance were observed in the infected and treated plants. In contrast, the JA signaling pathway showed dramatic changes after hexanoic acid treatment, mainly when the pathogen was present. The impaired JA mutants, jin1-2 and jar1, were unable to display hexanoic acid priming against the necrotroph. In addition, hexanoic acid-treated plants infected with B. cinerea showed priming in the expression of the PDF1.2, PR-4 and VSP1 genes implicated in the JA pathways. Moreover, JA and OPDA levels were primed at early stages by hexanoic acid. Treatments also stimulated increased callose accumulation in response to the pathogen. Although callose accumulation has proved an effective IR mechanism against B. cinerea, it is apparently not essential to express hexanoic acid-induced resistance (HxAc-IR) because the mutant pmr4.1 (callose synthesis defective mutant) is protected by treatment. We recently described how hexanoic acid treatments can protect tomato plants against B. cinerea by stimulating ABA-dependent callose deposition and by priming OPDA and JA-Ile production. We clearly demonstrate here that Hx-IR is a dependent plant species, since this acid protects Arabidopsis plants against the same necrotroph by priming JA-dependent defenses without enhancing callose accumulation.

  12. The Impacts of Macroergonomics on Environmental Protection and Human Performance in Power Plants

    OpenAIRE

    A Azadeh, J Nouri, I Mohammad Fam

    2005-01-01

    Human and his performance is a vital factor in protection of asset including environmental properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of total system design factors (TSD) on human performance in a power plant. The TSD factors are defined as design factors, which have impact on overall performance of the power plants in context of total human engineering or macroergonomics. The systems being studied are the control rooms and maintenance departments of a 2000 MW thermal ...

  13. Protective Effect of Boric Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage In Chinese Hamster Lung Fibroblast V79 Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SezenYılmaz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Many studies have been published on the antioxidative effects of boric acid (BA and sodium borates in in vitro studies. However, the boron (B concentrations tested in these in vitro studies have not been selected by taking into account the realistic blood B concentrations in humans due to the lack of comprehensive epidemiological studies. The recently published epidemiological studies on B exposure conducted in China and Turkey provided blood B concentrations for both humans in daily life and workers under extreme exposure conditions in occupational setting. The results of these studies have made it possible to test antioxidative effects of BA in in vitro studies within the concentration range relevant to humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of BA against oxidative DNA damage in V79 (Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells. The concentrations of BA tested for its protective effect was selected by taking the blood B concentrations into account reported in previously published epidemiological studies. Therefore, the concentrations of BA tested in this study represent the exposure levels for humans in both daily life and occupational settings. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, comet assay and neutral red uptake (NRU assay methods were used to determinacy to toxicity and genotoxicity of BA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Results: The results of the NRU assay showed that BA was not cytotoxic within the tested concentrations (3, 10, 30, 100 and 200 μM. These non-cytotoxic concentrations were used for comet assay. BA pre-treatment significantly reduced (P<0.05, one-way ANOVA the DNA damaging capacity of H2O2 at each tested BA concentrations in V79 cells. Conclusion: Consequently, pre-incubation of V79 cells with BA has significantly reduced the H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage in V79 cells. The protective effect of BA against oxidative DNA damage in V79 cells at 5, 10, 50, 100 and 200 μM (54

  14. Possible protective role of pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile in lithocholic acid-induced hepatotoxicity through enhanced hepatic lipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Masaaki; Nomoto, Masahiro; Sotodate, Fumiaki; Mizuki, Tomohiro; Hori, Wataru; Nagayasu, Miho; Yokokawa, Shinya; Ninomiya, Shin-ichi; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2010-06-25

    Lithocholic acid (LCA) feeding causes both liver parenchymal and cholestatic damages in experimental animals. Although pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN)-mediated protection against LCA-induced hepatocyte injury may be explained by induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, the protection from the delayed cholestasis remains incompletely understood. Thus, the PCN-mediated protective mechanism has been studied from the point of modification of lipid metabolism. At an early stage of LCA feeding, an imbalance of biliary bile acid and phospholipid excretion was observed. Co-treatment with PCN reversed the increase in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities and hepatic hydrophobic bile acid levels. LCA feeding decreased hepatic mRNA levels of several fatty acid- and phospholipid-related genes before elevation of serum ALT and ALP activities. On the other hand, PCN co-treatment reversed the decrease in the mRNA levels and hepatic levels of phospholipids, triglycerides and free fatty acids. PCN co-treatment also reversed the decrease in biliary phospholipid output in LCA-fed mice. Treatment with PCN alone increased hepatic phospholipid, triglyceride and free fatty acid concentrations. Hepatic fatty acid and phosphatidylcholine synthetic activities increased in mice treated with PCN alone or PCN and LCA, compared to control mice, whereas these activities decreased in LCA-fed mice. These results suggest the possibility that PCN-mediated stimulation of lipogenesis contributes to the protection from lithocholic acid-induced hepatotoxicity.

  15. Curcumin protects ANIT-induced cholestasis through signaling pathway of FXR-regulated bile acid and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Tang, Xiaowen; Ding, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Yang, Qiaoling; Gong, Junting; Wang, Guangyun; Wang, Zhengtao; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis is a clinically significant symptom and widely associated with liver diseases, however, there are very few effective therapies for cholestasis. Danning tablet (DNT, a Chinese patent medicine preparation) has been clinically used to treat human liver and gallbladder diseases for more than 20 years in China. However, which ingredients of DNT contributed to this beneficial effect and their mechanistic underpinnings have been largely unknown. In the present study, we discovered that DNT not only demonstrated greater benefits for cholecystitis patients after cholecystectomy surgery in clinic but also showed protective effect against alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced cholestasis model in rodent. Curcumin, one major compound derived from DNT, exerted the protective effect against cholestasis through farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which has been focused as potential therapeutic targets for treating cholestasis. The underlying mechanism of curcumin against cholestasis was restoring bile acid homeostasis and antagonizing inflammatory responses in a FXR-dependent manner and in turn contributed to overall cholestasis attenuation. Collectively, curcumin can be served as a potential treatment option for liver injury with cholestasis. PMID:27624003

  16. Inhibition of fungal spore adhesion by zosteric Acid as the basis for a novel, nontoxic crop protection technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Michele S; Callow, Maureen E; Perry, Ruth; Alberte, Randall S; Smith, Robert; Callow, James A

    2002-04-01

    ABSTRACT To explore the potential for nontoxic crop protection technologies based on the inhibition of fungal spore adhesion, we have tested the effect of synthetic zosteric acid (p-(sulfo-oxy) cinnamic acid), a naturally occurring phenolic acid in eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) plants, on spore adhesion and infection in two pathosystems: rice blast caused by Magnaporthe grisea and bean anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. We have shown that zosteric acid inhibits spore adhesion to model and host leaf surfaces and that any attached spores fail to develop appressoria, and consequently do not infect leaf cells. Low concentrations of zosteric acid that are effective in inhibiting adhesion are not toxic to either fungus or to the host. The inhibition of spore adhesion in the rice blast pathogen is fully reversible. On plants, zosteric acid reduced (rice) or delayed (bean) lesion development. These results suggest that there is potential for novel and environmentally benign crop protection technologies based on manipulating adhesion.

  17. Structure of the human 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene (HPD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awata, H.; Endo, F.; Matsuda, I. [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan)

    1994-10-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD) is an important enzyme in tyrosine catabolism in most organisms. The activity of this enzyme is expressed mainly in the liver and developmentally regulated in mammals, and a genetic deficiency in this enzyme in humans and mice leads to hereditary tyrosinemia type 3. Using human HPD cDNA as a probe, a chromosomal gene related to HPD was isolated from human gene libraries. The human HPD gene is over 30 kb long and is split into 14 exons. The extract sizes and boundaries of exon blocks were determined, and all of the splice donor and acceptor sites conformed to the GT/AG rule. Analysis of the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the gene suggests that expression of the gene is regulated by hepatocyte-specific and liver-enriched transcription factors, as well as by hormones. These features of the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene are similar to those of other genes that are specifically expressed in hepatocytes and that are developmentally regulated. 41 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A study of facial wrinkles improvement effect of veratric acid from cauliflower mushroom through photo-protective mechanisms against UVB irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Eun; Park, Ji-Eun; Jung, Eunsun; Ryu, Jahyun; Kim, Youn Joon; Youm, Jong-Kyung; Kang, Seunghyun

    2016-04-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is a primary cause of premature skin aging that is closely associated with the degradation of collagens caused by up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or a decrease in collagen synthesis. The phenolic veratric acid (VA, 3,4-dimethoxybenzoic acid) is one of the major benzoic acid derivatives from fruits, vegetables and medicinal mushrooms. VA has been reported to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and photo-protective effects. In this study, anti-photoaging effects were investigated through the photo-protective mechanisms of VA against UV irradiation in human dermal fibroblasts and the reconstructed human epidermal model. We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E) and immunohistochemistry assays. Finally, we further investigated the clinical effects of VA on facial wrinkle improvements in humans. Our results demonstrate that VA attenuated the expression of MMPs, increased cell proliferation, type Ι procollagen, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, and filaggrin against UV radiation; however, has no effect on improvement expressions of elastic fiber. In addition, treatment with cream containing VA improved facial wrinkles in a clinical trial. These findings indicate that VA improves wrinkle formation by modulating MMPs, collagens and epidermal layer integrity, suggesting its potential use in UV-induced premature skin aging. PMID:26914455

  19. Critical issues in connection with human missions to Mars: protection of and from the Martian environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.; Facius, R.; Reitz, G.; Rettberg, P.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Gerzer, R.

    2003-01-01

    Human missions to Mars are planned to happen within this century. Activities associated therewith will interact with the environment of Mars in two reciprocal ways: (i) the mission needs to be protected from the natural environmental elements that can be harmful to human health, the equipment or to their operations; (ii) the specific natural environment of Mars should be protected so that it retains its value for scientific and other purposes. The following environmental elements need to be considered in order to protect humans and the equipment on the planetary surface: (i) cosmic ionizing radiation, (ii) solar particle events; (iii) solar ultraviolet radiation; (iv) reduced gravity; (v) thin atmosphere; (vi) extremes in temperatures and their fluctuations; and (vii) surface dust. In order to protect the planetary environment, the requirements for planetary protection as adopted by COSPAR for lander missions need to be revised in view of human presence on the planet. Landers carrying equipment for exobiological investigations require special consideration to reduce contamination by terrestrial microorganisms and organic matter to the greatest feasible extent. Records of human activities on the planet's surface should be maintained in sufficient detail that future scientific experimenters can determine whether environmental modifications have resulted from explorations. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Superactive insulin: [B10-aspartic acid]insulin(human)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic basis for a case of familial hyperproinsulinemia has been elucidated recently. It involves a single point mutation in the proinsulin gene resulting in the substitution of aspartic acid for histidine-10 of the B chain of insulin. The authors have synthesized a human insulin analogue, [Asp/sup B10/] insulin, corresponding to the mutant proinsulin and evaluated its biological activity. [Asp/sup B10/] Insulin displayed a binding affinity to insulin receptors in rat liver plasma membranes that was 534 +- 146% relative to the natural hormone. In lipogenesis assays, the synthetic analogue exhibited a potency that was 435 +- 144% relative to insulin, which is statistically not different from its binding affinity. Reversed-phase HPLC indicated that the synthetic analogue is more apolar than natural insulin. They suggest that the observed properties reflect changes in the conformation of the analogue relative to natural insulin, which results in a stronger interaction with the insulin receptor. Thus, a single substitution of an amino acid residue of human insulin has resulted in a superactive hormone

  1. Superactive insulin: (B10-aspartic acid)insulin(human)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, G.P.; Burke, G.T.; Katsoyannis, P.G.

    1987-09-01

    The genetic basis for a case of familial hyperproinsulinemia has been elucidated recently. It involves a single point mutation in the proinsulin gene resulting in the substitution of aspartic acid for histidine-10 of the B chain of insulin. The authors have synthesized a human insulin analogue, (Asp/sup B10/) insulin, corresponding to the mutant proinsulin and evaluated its biological activity. (Asp/sup B10/) Insulin displayed a binding affinity to insulin receptors in rat liver plasma membranes that was 534 +- 146% relative to the natural hormone. In lipogenesis assays, the synthetic analogue exhibited a potency that was 435 +- 144% relative to insulin, which is statistically not different from its binding affinity. Reversed-phase HPLC indicated that the synthetic analogue is more apolar than natural insulin. They suggest that the observed properties reflect changes in the conformation of the analogue relative to natural insulin, which results in a stronger interaction with the insulin receptor. Thus, a single substitution of an amino acid residue of human insulin has resulted in a superactive hormone.

  2. Cyclic GMP protects human macrophages against peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Adriano G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO can be both pro- and anti-apoptotic in various cell types, including macrophages. This apparent paradox may result from the actions of NO-related species generated in the microenvironment of the cell, for example the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO-. In this study we have examined the ability of NO and ONOO- to evoke apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMϕ, and investigated whether preconditioning by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP is able to limit apoptosis in this cell type. Methods Characterisation of the NO-related species generated by (Z-1- [2-(2-aminoethyl-N-(2-ammonioethylamino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA/NO and 1,2,3,4-oxatriazolium, 5-amino-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-, chloride (GEA-3162 was performed by electrochemistry using an isolated NO electrode and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometry. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cultured to allow differentiation into MDMϕ. Resultant MDMϕ were treated for 24 h with DETA/NO (100 – 1000 μM or GEA-3162 (10 – 300 μM in the presence or absence of BAY 41–2272 (1 μM, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX; 1 μM, 1H- [1,2,4]oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 20 μM or 8-bromo-cGMP (1 mM. Apoptosis in MDMϕ was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of annexin V binding in combination with propidium iodide staining. Results Electrochemistry and EPR revealed that DETA/NO liberated free NO radical, whilst GEA-3162 concomitantly released NO and O2-, and is therefore a ONOO- generator. NO (DETA/NO had no effect on cell viability, but ONOO- (GEA-3162 caused a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis in MDMϕ. Preconditioning of MDMϕ with NO in combination with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, or the NO-independent stimulator of soluble guanylate cyclase, BAY 41–2272, significantly attenuated ONOO--induced apoptosis in a cGMP-dependent manner

  3. Chlorogenic acid protects d-galactose-induced liver and kidney injury via antioxidation and anti-inflammation effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Yu, Ying-Hua; Wang, Shu-Ting; Ren, Jing; Camer, Danielle; Hua, Yu-Zhou; Zhang, Qian; Huang, Jie; Xue, Dan-Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Liu, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Context Oxidative stress and inflammation are implicated in the aging process and its related hepatic and renal function decline. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet. Recently, CGA has shown in vivo and in vitro antioxidant properties. Objective The current study investigates the effects of protective effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) on d-galactose-induced liver and kidney injury. Materials and methods Hepatic and renal injuries were induced in a mouse model by subcutaneously injection of d-galactose (d-gal; 100 mg/kg) once a day for 8 consecutive weeks and orally administered simultaneously with CGA included in the food (200 mg/kg of diet). The liver and renal functions were examined. Histological analyses of liver and kidney were done by haematoxylin and eosin staining. The oxidative stress markers and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the liver and the kidney were measured. Results CGA significantly reduced the serum aminotransferase, serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels in d-gal mice (p <0.05). CGA also restored superoxide dismutase, catalase, and malondialdehyde levels and decreased glutathione content in the liver and kidney in d-gal mice (p <0.05). Improvements in liver and kidney were also noted in histopathological studies. CGA reduced tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) protein levels in the liver and kidney in d-gal mice (p <0.05). Discussion and conclusion These findings suggest that CGA attenuates d-gal-induced chronic liver and kidney injury and that this protection may be due to its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26810301

  4. Recombinant Human Prolactin Protects against Irradiation Induced Myelosuppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weici Zhang; Rui Sun; Jianhua Zhang; Jian Zhang; Zhigang Tian

    2005-01-01

    Prolactin is a multifunctional hormone that exerts many separate functions and acts as an important connection between the endocrine and immune systems. There are increasing researches implicating the role of prolactin in hematopoiesis. Enhanced erythropoiesis in pregnant women and direct erythropoietic effects in vitro of plasma either from pregnant or lactating mice have been reported. Furthermore, regression of erythroblastic leukemia has been observed in a significant number of rats after hypophysectomy. In this study, the effects of recombinant human prolactin (rhPRL) on hematopoiesis were assessed in irradiated mice. Mice were treated with rhPRL for five consecutive days after exposure to a lethal dose or a sub-dose irradiation. Prolonged survival rate and increased erythropoiesis were observed in the irradiation-induced myelosuppressive mice. It was concluded that rhPRL might act on erythropoiesis and could be a potential candidate for the treatment of irradiation-induced myelosuppresion in clinic. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  5. Synthesis of alkynes and alkynyl iodides bearing a protected amino alcohol moiety as functionalized amino acids precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AYED; Charfedinne; PICARD; Julien; LUBIN-GERMAIN; Nadège; UZIEL; Jacques; AUGE; Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid precursors in protected amino alcohol form are important synthons that can be used as building-blocks for the hemisynthesis of non-natural amino acids.Serine can be used as a common starting material for the synthesis of such compounds differently protected.Particularly,protected amino alcohols bearing an ethynyl and/or an iodoethynyl group can be used in cross-couplings,in 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions and/or in Nozaki-Hiyama-Kishi type reactions.We thus demonstrated that the efficiently protected amino alcohols derived from serine can be coupled to a sugar derivative by an indium mediated alkynylation reaction.The conditions of this coupling are compatible with such functionalized derivatives and allow envisaging an access to C-glycosylated amino acids.

  6. Imputing amino acid polymorphisms in human leukocyte antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Jia

    Full Text Available DNA sequence variation within human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes mediate susceptibility to a wide range of human diseases. The complex genetic structure of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC makes it difficult, however, to collect genotyping data in large cohorts. Long-range linkage disequilibrium between HLA loci and SNP markers across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC region offers an alternative approach through imputation to interrogate HLA variation in existing GWAS data sets. Here we describe a computational strategy, SNP2HLA, to impute classical alleles and amino acid polymorphisms at class I (HLA-A, -B, -C and class II (-DPA1, -DPB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, and -DRB1 loci. To characterize performance of SNP2HLA, we constructed two European ancestry reference panels, one based on data collected in HapMap-CEPH pedigrees (90 individuals and another based on data collected by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC, 5,225 individuals. We imputed HLA alleles in an independent data set from the British 1958 Birth Cohort (N = 918 with gold standard four-digit HLA types and SNPs genotyped using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K and Illumina Immunochip microarrays. We demonstrate that the sample size of the reference panel, rather than SNP density of the genotyping platform, is critical to achieve high imputation accuracy. Using the larger T1DGC reference panel, the average accuracy at four-digit resolution is 94.7% using the low-density Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K, and 96.7% using the high-density Illumina Immunochip. For amino acid polymorphisms within HLA genes, we achieve 98.6% and 99.3% accuracy using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K and Illumina Immunochip, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate how imputation and association testing at amino acid resolution can facilitate fine-mapping of primary MHC association signals, giving a specific example from type 1 diabetes.

  7. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  8. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder.

  9. Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity Experimental Model: Protective Merits of Natural Products and Plant Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Shafika Mohd Sairazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excitotoxicity is well recognized as a major pathological process of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS. In the animal models of neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity is commonly induced experimentally by chemical convulsants, particularly kainic acid (KA. KA-induced excitotoxicity in rodent models has been shown to result in seizures, behavioral changes, oxidative stress, glial activation, inflammatory mediator production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain upon KA administration. Recently, there is an emerging trend to search for natural sources to combat against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Natural products and plant extracts had attracted a considerable amount of attention because of their reported beneficial effects on the CNS, particularly their neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity. They provide significant reduction and/or protection against the development and progression of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. This indicates that natural products and plants extracts may be useful in protecting against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration. Thus, targeting of multiple pathways simultaneously may be the strategy to maximize the neuroprotection effect. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in KA-induced excitotoxicity and attempts to collate the various researches related to the protective effect of natural products and plant extracts in the KA model of neurodegeneration.

  10. Synergistic interactions between grafted hyaluronic acid and lubricin provide enhanced wear protection and lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saurabh; Banquy, Xavier; Zappone, Bruno; Greene, George W; Jay, Gregory D; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-05-13

    Normal (e.g., adhesion) and lateral (friction) forces were measured between physisorbed and chemically grafted layers of hyaluronic acid (HA), an anionic polyelectrolyte in the presence of lubricin (Lub), a mucinous glycoprotein, on mica surfaces using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). This work demonstrates that high friction coefficients between the surfaces do not necessarily correlate with surface damage and that chemically grafted HA acts synergistically with Lub to provide friction reduction and enhanced wear protection to the surfaces. Surface immobilization of HA by grafting is necessary for such wear protection. Increasing the concentration of Lub enhances the threshold load that a chemically grafted HA surface can be subjected to before the onset of wear. Addition of Lub does not have any beneficial effect if HA is physisorbed to the mica surfaces. Damage occurs at loads less than 1 mN regardless of the amount of Lub, indicating that the molecules in the bulk play little or no role in protecting the surfaces from damage. Lub penetrates into the chemically bound HA to form a visco-elastic gel that reduces the coefficient of friction as well as boosts the strength of the surface against abrasive wear (damage).

  11. Protection from psychosocial risks at work under the European Convention on Human Rights: is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychenko, Elena

    2016-09-01

    This paper argues the possibility of establishing common principles of protection from psychosocial risks (PSR) on the basis of the legal positions of the European Court of Human Rights (the Court) expressed in recent cases on degrading treatment and occupational health. The author focuses on the positive obligations of the States to ensure the protection of the right for life and of the right to respect for private life. The prohibition of degrading treatment in relations between private persons is also considered as relevant to the issue of the protection from PSR. Analyzing the Court's case law (judgments of the Court) we substantiate the possibility of claiming protection from PSR under the European Convention on Human Rights, namely, articles 2, 3 and 6, 8. PMID:27064417

  12. Protection from psychosocial risks at work under the European Convention on Human Rights: is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychenko, Elena

    2016-09-01

    This paper argues the possibility of establishing common principles of protection from psychosocial risks (PSR) on the basis of the legal positions of the European Court of Human Rights (the Court) expressed in recent cases on degrading treatment and occupational health. The author focuses on the positive obligations of the States to ensure the protection of the right for life and of the right to respect for private life. The prohibition of degrading treatment in relations between private persons is also considered as relevant to the issue of the protection from PSR. Analyzing the Court's case law (judgments of the Court) we substantiate the possibility of claiming protection from PSR under the European Convention on Human Rights, namely, articles 2, 3 and 6, 8.

  13. DNA-protective effects of sumach (Rhus coriaria L.), a common spice: Results of human and animal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Asima; Ferk, Franziska; Simic, Tatjana [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Brantner, Adelheid [Institute of Pharmacognosy, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 4/I, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Dusinska, Maria [Center for Ecological Economics, Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Instituttveien 18, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Kundi, Michael [Institute of Environmental Health, Center for Public Health, Medical Unviversity of Vienna (Austria); Hoelzl, Christine; Nersesyan, Armen [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Knasmueller, Siegfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: siegfried.knasmueller@meduniwien.ac.at

    2009-02-10

    Sumach (Rhus coriaria L.) is widely used as a spice. The aim of this study was the investigation of its DNA-protective effects in humans and animals. Prevention of the formation of strand breaks and oxidized DNA bases as well as the protection against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}- and ({+-})-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydro-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-induced DNA-damage were monitored in human lymphocytes in a placebo controlled trial (N = 8/group) with ethanolic extract of sumach (3.0 g/day, 3 days) in single cell gel electrophoresis assays. Furthermore, DNA-protective effects of sumach were monitored in different inner organs of rats under identical conditions. No alteration of DNA-migration was detectable in human lymphocytes under standard conditions, but a decrease of the tail-lengths due to formation of oxidized purines and pyrimidines (52% and 36%) was found with lesion-specific enzymes. Also damage caused by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and BPDE was significantly reduced by 30% and 69%, respectively. The later effect may be due to induction of glutathione S-transferase (GST). After the intervention, the overall GST (CDNB) activity in plasma was increased by 40%, GST-{alpha} by 52% and GST-{pi} by 26% (ELISA). The antioxidant effects of extract are probably due to scavenging which was observed in in vitro experiments, which also indicated that gallic acid is the active principle of sumach. The animal experiments showed that sumach also causes protection in inner organs. Supplementation of the drinking water (0.02 g/kg per animal) decreased the formation of oxidized DNA bases in colon, liver, lung and lymphocytes; also after {gamma}-irradiation pronounced effects were seen.

  14. Assessment of human exposure effects of nitrous acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, T.R.; Kjaergaard, S.K. (University of Aarhus. Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (Denmark)); Brauer, M. (Harvard School of Public Health. Department of Environmental Health, Exposure Assessment and Engineering Program (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The study aimed at an estimation of the relative contribution of nitrous acid to measurable human exposure effects in relation to indoor environments with unvented gas combustion. Fifteen medically examined totally healthy non-smoker adults aged between 22 and 57 years were exposed in a double-blind, balanced design (3x3 latin square) to clean air and nitrous acid (HONO) concentration in an empty 74 m[sup 3] climate chamber. 3 teams of 5 subjects each were randomly exposed and the latin square was selected at random. Each exposure period was 3.5 hours and preceded by a 1 hour base-line pre-exposure measurement period. After 1 hr 40 minutes the subjects exercised for ten minutes on bicycle ergometers in order to increase the uptake of HONO by increasing ventilatory rate 3-4 fold. Workloads were calculated individually and ranged from 21800-34600 kpm/h. During the 10 minutes the test subjects were mouth-breathing to encourage deeper penetration of nitrous acid in the respiratory system so as to induce a mild cooling which would increase their responsiveness to irritants. The amount of deliverable H[sup +] was estimated at 16.350 nmoles with exposure to 395 ppb HONO with subjects breathing at the rate of 5 L min[sup -1]. It was assumed that HONO is efficiently absorbed into the respiratory system. Details are given of the results. Findings were highly variable, largely negative effects of exposure to nitrous acid which appear similiar to results seen in nitrogen dioxide exposure studies. It is concluded to be unlikely that HONO exposures alone can be responsible for exposure misclassification in NO[sub 2] exposure studies. (AB) (52 refs.).

  15. Assessment of human exposure effects of nitrous acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, T.R.; Kjaergaard, S.K. [University of Aarhus. Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (Denmark); Brauer, M. [Harvard School of Public Health. Department of Environmental Health, Exposure Assessment and Engineering Program (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The study aimed at an estimation of the relative contribution of nitrous acid to measurable human exposure effects in relation to indoor environments with unvented gas combustion. Fifteen medically examined totally healthy non-smoker adults aged between 22 and 57 years were exposed in a double-blind, balanced design (3x3 latin square) to clean air and nitrous acid (HONO) concentration in an empty 74 m{sup 3} climate chamber. 3 teams of 5 subjects each were randomly exposed and the latin square was selected at random. Each exposure period was 3.5 hours and preceded by a 1 hour base-line pre-exposure measurement period. After 1 hr 40 minutes the subjects exercised for ten minutes on bicycle ergometers in order to increase the uptake of HONO by increasing ventilatory rate 3-4 fold. Workloads were calculated individually and ranged from 21800-34600 kpm/h. During the 10 minutes the test subjects were mouth-breathing to encourage deeper penetration of nitrous acid in the respiratory system so as to induce a mild cooling which would increase their responsiveness to irritants. The amount of deliverable H{sup +} was estimated at 16.350 nmoles with exposure to 395 ppb HONO with subjects breathing at the rate of 5 L min{sup -1}. It was assumed that HONO is efficiently absorbed into the respiratory system. Details are given of the results. Findings were highly variable, largely negative effects of exposure to nitrous acid which appear similiar to results seen in nitrogen dioxide exposure studies. It is concluded to be unlikely that HONO exposures alone can be responsible for exposure misclassification in NO{sub 2} exposure studies. (AB) (52 refs.).

  16. Dynamics of human whole body amino acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of regulation of the nitrogen metabolism in humans under various nutritional and physiological states was examined using stable isotopes. In the simultaneous continuous infusion of 1- [13] - leucine and α- [15N]- lysine, their fluxed decreased when individuals received lower protein intake. The rates of oxidation and incorporation into body proteins of leucine changed in parallel with the protein intake. Such effects of diet on whole body leucine kinetics were modified by the energy state and dietary energy level. The nitrogen balance was also improved by an excess level of dietary energy. When the intake of dietary protein was lowered below the maintenance level, the whole body flux and de novo synthesis of glycine were lowered, but alanine synthesis was clearly increased. The intravenous infusion of glucose at 4 mg/kg.min, which causes increase in excess blood sugar and plasma insulin, increased the alanine flux, but had no effect on the glycine flux. The rate of albumin synthesis, determined by giving 15N-glycine orally every 3 hr, decreased with the lowered intake of dietary protein in young men, but not in elderly men. This explains why the serum albumin synthesis increases with the increase in the intake of dietary protein in young men, but not in elderly men. The rate of whole body protein synthesis in young men receiving the L-amino acid diets providing with the required intake of specific amino acid was much lower than that in the men receiving the diets providing with generous intake of specific amino acid. Thus the control mechanism to maintain the homeostasis of body nitrogen and amino acids is related in some unknown way to the nutritional requirement of the hosts. (Kaihara, S.)

  17. Expression of retinoic acid receptors in human endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Kojiro; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Tamura, Mitsutoshi; Niikura, Hitoshi; Takano, Tadao; Yoshinaga, Kohsuke; Nagase, Satoru; Suzuki, Takashi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyo; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-02-01

    The retinoids (vitamin A and its biologically active derivatives) are essential for the health and survival of the individual. Several studies have reported a strong rationale for the use of retinoids in cancer treatment and chemoprevention. It has been discovered that expression of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta is frequently silenced in epithelial carcinogenesis, which has led to the hypothesis that RAR beta could act as a tumor suppressor. However, the status of RAR beta in human endometrial carcinoma has not been examined. In the present study, we initially studied the effects of retinoic acid on cell proliferation and the expression of RAR alpha, RAR beta, and RAR gamma using AM580 (a RAR-specific agonist) in the Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line. We also examined the expression of RAR in human eutopic endometrium (30 cases), endometrial hyperplasia (28 cases), and endometrial carcinoma (103 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Finally, we correlated these findings with the clinicopathological parameters. In vitro, cell growth was inhibited and RAR beta and RAR gamma mRNA was significantly induced by AM580, compared with vehicle controls, whereas RAR alpha mRNA was significantly attenuated by AM580, compared with vehicle. RAR beta was detected predominantly in endometrial hyperplasia, compared with endometrial carcinoma. No statistically significant correlation was obtained between the expression of any other RAR subtypes and clinicopathological parameters in human endometrial carcinoma. The results of our study demonstrate that AM580 inhibits cell growth and induces RAR beta mRNA expression in the Ishikawa cell line, and the expression level of RAR beta in endometrial carcinoma is significantly lower than that in endometrial hyperplasia. AM580 might therefore be considered as a potential treatment for endometrial carcinoma.

  18. Refugees and Human Rights: The Future of International Protection in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The global refugee crisis is raising profound questions for the future of international protection. This article, based on a talk given as part of Refugee Week 2015, offers reflections on the current debate. The need to internationalise the conversation is underlined. Although no one state can resolve the problems of the world, it is precisely in the response to the plight of the forcibly displaced that commitments to human rights and refugee protection are tested in practical terms. This art...

  19. Advanced UV Absorbers for the Protection of Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüglin, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The increasing awareness of the damaging effects of UV radiation to human skin triggered the market introduction of new cosmetic UV absorbers. This article summarizes the outcome of a multi-year research program, in which the author contributed to the development of different new UV filters. First of all, the molecular design and the basic properties of bis-ethylhexyloxyphenol methoxyphenyl triazine (BEMT) will be presented. This oil-soluble filter, which today is widely used in both beach products and skin care products, exhibits inherent photostability and strong broad-spectrum UV-A+B absorbance. Based on the concept of micronized organic UV absorbers, the UV-B filter tris biphenyl triazine (TBPT) will be introduced. At present TBPT exhibits the highest efficacy of all cosmetic UV absorbers in the market (measured by area under the UV spectrum). Finally, the concept of liposomogenic UV absorbers will be featured. This approach was developed to create water-resistant UV filters, as liposomogenic structures are thought to integrate into the lipids of the horny layer. Due to prohibitively high costs, this technology did not result in a commercial product so far. PMID:27561611

  20. Protective effect of arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahua; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C

    2008-02-01

    Arsenic, a notoriously poisonous metalloid, is ubiquitous in the environment, and it affects nearly all organ systems of animals including humans. The present study was designed to investigate the preventive role of a triterpenoid saponin, arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced oxidative damage in murine brain. Sodium arsenite was selected as a source of arsenic for this study. The free-radical-scavenging activity and the in vivo antioxidant power of arjunolic acid were determined from its 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay, respectively. Oral administration of sodium arsenite at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days significantly decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase, the level of cellular metabolites, reduced glutathione, total thiols and increased the level of oxidized glutathione. In addition, it enhanced the levels of lipid peroxidation end products and protein carbonyl content. Treatment with arjunolic acid at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days prior to arsenic administration almost normalized above indices. Histological findings due to arsenic intoxication and arjunolic acid treatment supported the other biochemical changes in murine brains. Results of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assays clearly showed the in vitro radical scavenging as well as the in vivo antioxidant power of arjunolic acid, respectively. The effect of a well-established antioxidant, vitamin C, has been included in the study as a positive control. Combining all, results suggest that arjunolic acid possessed the ability to ameliorate arsenic-induced oxidative insult in murine brain and is probably due to its antioxidant activity.

  1. Arsenic-induced oxidative myocardial injury: protective role of arjunolic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, Prasenjit; Sinha, Mahua; Sil, Parames C. [Bose Institute, Department of Chemistry, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2008-03-15

    Arsenic, one of the most harmful metalloids, is ubiquitous in the environment. The present study has been carried out to investigate the protective role of a triterpenoid saponin, arjunolic acid (AA) against arsenic-induced cardiac oxidative damage. In the study, NaAsO{sub 2} was chosen as the source of arsenic. The free radical scavenging activity and the effect of AA on the intracellular antioxidant power were determined from its 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay, respectively. Oral administration of NaAsO{sub 2} at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days caused significant accumulation of arsenic in cardiac tissues of the experimental mice in association with the reduction in cardiac antioxidant enzymes activities, namely superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase. Arsenic intoxication also decreased the cardiac glutathione (GSH) and total thiol contents and increased the levels of oxidized glutathione (GSSG), lipid peroxidation end products and protein carbonyl content. Treatment with AA at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days prior to NaAsO{sub 2} intoxication protected the cardiac tissue from arsenic-induced oxidative impairment. In addition to oxidative stress, arsenic administration increased total cholesterol level as well as the reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in the sera of the experimental mice. AA pretreatment, however, could prevent this hyperlipidemia. Histological studies on the ultrastructural changes in cardiac tissue supported the protective activity of AA also. Combining all, results suggest that AA could protect cardiac tissues against arsenic-induced oxidative stress probably due to its antioxidant property. (orig.)

  2. Protection of Human Beings Trafficked for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascalev, Assya; Van Assche, Kristof; Sándor, Judit; Codreanu, Natalia; Naqvi, Anwar; Gunnarson, Martin; Frunza, Mihaela; Yankov, Jordan

    2016-02-01

    This report presents a comprehensive set of recommendations for protection of human beings who are trafficked for the purpose of organ removal or are targeted for such trafficking. Developed by an interdisciplinary group of international experts under the auspices of the project Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal (also known as the HOTT project), these recommendations are grounded in the view that an individual who parts with an organ for money within an illegal scheme is ipso facto a victim and that the crime of trafficking in human beings for the purpose of organ removal (THBOR) intersects with the crime of trafficking in organs. Consequently, the protection of victims should be a priority for all actors involved in antitrafficking activities: those combating organ-related crimes, such as health organizations and survivor support services, and those combating trafficking in human beings, such as the criminal justice sectors. Taking into account the special characteristics of THBOR, the authors identify 5 key stakeholders in the protection of human beings trafficked for organ removal or targeted for such trafficking: states, law enforcement agencies and judiciary, nongovernmental organizations working in the areas of human rights and antitrafficking, transplant centers and health professionals involved in transplant medicine, and oversight bodies. For each stakeholder, the authors identify key areas of concern and concrete measures to identify and protect the victims of THBOR. The aim of the recommendations is to contribute to the development of a nonlegislative response to THBOR, to promote the exchange of knowledge and best practices in the area of victim protection, and to facilitate the development of a policy-driven action plan for the protection of THBOR victims in the European Union and worldwide. PMID:27500252

  3. Radiation Protection Challenges for a Human Mission to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, C. J.; Hassler, D.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    A human mission to Mars presents many challenges, not least of which is the radiation exposure that crew members will certainly receive in all phases of the journey, but most critically during the transits to and from Mars. Measurements from the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) aboard the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover, made both in flight and on the surface of Mars, confirm previous estimates that crew members under reasonable shielding would receive a dose equivalent of about 1 Sievert on a 1000-day mission. In standard radiation biology, an acute exposure to 1 Sievert would be expected to increase lifetime fatal cancer risk by about 5%. This is well beyond the currently allowed 3% risk increase limit used by NASA and JAXA. Perhaps more significantly, the nature of exposure in space differs greatly from the terrestrial exposures that lead to the 5% estimate -- in space, the exposure is received at a very low dose rate, and includes a significant component from heavy ions in the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs). Acute exposures to Solar Energetic Particles are also possible, but the generally lower energies of SEPs (kinetic energies typically below 100 MeV/nuc) mean that modest amounts of shielding are effective against them. Thus the greater concern for long-duration deep-space missions is the GCR exposure. In this presentation, I will briefly review the MSL-RAD data and discuss current approaches to radiation risk estimation, including the NASA limit of 3% at the 95% confidence level. Recent results from the NASA radiation biology program indicate that cancer may not be the only risk that needs to be considered, with emerging concerns about cardiovascular and central nervous system health. These health effects are not accounted for in the current methodology and could potentially be threatening to mission success if they manifest in the course of the mission, rather than appearing many years after the exposure as radiation-induced cancer typically does.

  4. In Vivo Curative and Protective Potential of Orally Administered 5-Aminolevulinic Acid plus Ferrous Ion against Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeo; Hikosaka, Kenji; Balogun, Emmanuel O.; Komatsuya, Keisuke; Niikura, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Fumie; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Tanaka, Tohru; Nakajima, Motowo

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid present in diverse organisms and a precursor of heme biosynthesis. ALA is commercially available as a component of cosmetics, dietary supplements, and pharmaceuticals for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent reports demonstrated that the combination of ALA and ferrous ion (Fe2+) inhibits the in vitro growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To further explore the potential application of ALA and ferrous ion as a combined antimalarial drug for treatment of human malaria, we conducted an in vivo efficacy evaluation. Female C57BL/6J mice were infected with the lethal strain of rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XL and orally administered ALA plus sodium ferrous citrate (ALA/SFC) as a once-daily treatment. Parasitemia was monitored in the infected mice, and elimination of the parasites was confirmed using diagnostic PCR. Treatment of P. yoelii 17XL-infected mice with ALA/SFC provided curative efficacy in 60% of the mice treated with ALA/SFC at 600/300 mg/kg of body weight; no mice survived when treated with vehicle alone. Interestingly, the cured mice were protected from homologous rechallenge, even when reinfection was attempted more than 230 days after the initial recovery, indicating long-lasting resistance to reinfection with the same parasite. Moreover, parasite-specific antibodies against reported vaccine candidate antigens were found and persisted in the sera of the cured mice. These findings provide clear evidence that ALA/SFC is effective in an experimental animal model of malaria and may facilitate the development of a new class of antimalarial drug. PMID:26324278

  5. A humanized anti-M2 scFv shows protective in vitro activity against influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Velappan, Nileena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmidt, Jurgen G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    M2 is one of the most conserved influenza proteins, and has been widely prospected as a potential universal vaccine target, with protection predominantly mediated by antibodies. In this paper we describe the creation of a humanized single chain Fv from 14C2, a potent monoclonal antibody against M2. We show that the humanized scFv demonstrates similar activity to the parental mAb: it is able to recognize M2 in its native context on cell surfaces and is able to show protective in vitro activity against influenza, and so represents a potential lead antibody candidate for universal prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in influenza.

  6. Influence of acid and bile acid on ERK activity, PPARY expression and cell proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Ru Jiang; Jun Gong; Zhen-Ni Zhang; Zhe Qiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of acid and bile acid exposure on cell proliferation and the expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor Y (PPARy) in normal human esophageal epithelial cells in vitro.METHODS: In vitro cultured normal human esophageal epithelial cells were exposed to acidic media (pH 4.0-6.5), media containing different bile acid (250 μmol/L), media containing acid and bile acid, respectively.Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT and flow cytometry. The expressions of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and PPARy protein were determined by the immunoblotting technique.RESULTS: Acid-exposed (3 min) esophageal cells exhibited a significant increase in proliferation ratio,S phase of the cell cycle (P<0.05) and the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. When the acid-exposure period exceeded 6 min, we observed a decrease in proliferation ratio and S phase of the cell cycle, with an increased apoptosis ratio (P<0.05). Bile acid exposure (3-12 min) also produced an increase in proliferation ratio, S phase of the cell cycle (P<0.05)and phosphorylated ERK1/2 expression. On the contrary,deoxycholic acid (DCA) exposure (>20 min) decreased proliferation ratio. Compared with bile acid exposure (pH 7.4), bile acid exposure (pH 6.5, 4) significantly decreased proliferation ratio (P<0.05). There was no expression of PPARY in normal human esophageal epithelial cells.CONCLUSION: The rapid stimuli of acid or bile acid increase proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells by activating the ERK pathway.

  7. Thioacetic acid/NaSH-mediated synthesis of N-protected amino thioacids and their utility in peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Sachitanand M; Gopi, Hosahudya N

    2014-03-21

    Thioacids are recently gaining momentum due to their versatile reactivity. The reactivity of thioacids has been widely explored in the selective amide/peptide bond formation. Thioacids are generally synthesized from the reaction between activated carboxylic acids such as acid chlorides, active esters, etc., and Na2S, H2S, or NaSH. We sought to investigate whether the versatile reactivity of the thioacids can be tuned for the conversion of carboxylic acids into corresponding thioacids in the presence of NaSH. Herein, we report that thioacetic acid- and NaSH-mediated synthesis of N-protected amino thioacids from the corresponding N-protected amino acids, oxidative dimerization of thioacids, crystal conformations of thioacid oxidative dimers, and the utility of thioacids and oxidative dimers in peptide synthesis. Our results suggest that peptides can be synthesized without using standard coupling agents.

  8. Human-specific derived alleles of CD33 and other genes protect against postreproductive cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Flavio; Springer, Stevan A; Altheide, Tasha K; Varki, Nissi M; Gagneux, Pascal; Varki, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    The individuals of most vertebrate species die when they can no longer reproduce. Humans are a rare exception, having evolved a prolonged postreproductive lifespan. Elders contribute to cooperative offspring care, assist in foraging, and communicate important ecological and cultural knowledge, increasing the survival of younger individuals. Age-related deterioration of cognitive capacity in humans compromises these benefits and also burdens the group with socially costly members. We investigated the contribution of the immunoregulatory receptor CD33 to a uniquely human postreproductive disease, Alzheimer's dementia. Surprisingly, even though selection at advanced age is expected to be weak, a CD33 allele protective against Alzheimer's disease is derived and unique to humans and favors a functional molecular state of CD33 resembling that of the chimpanzee. Thus, derived alleles may be compensatory and restore interactions altered as a consequence of human-specific brain evolution. We found several other examples of derived alleles at other human loci that protect against age-related cognitive deterioration arising from neurodegenerative disease or cerebrovascular insufficiency. Selection by inclusive fitness may be strong enough to favor alleles protecting specifically against cognitive decline in postreproductive humans. Such selection would operate by maximizing the contributions of postreproductive individuals to the fitness of younger kin. PMID:26621708

  9. A novel human IgA monoclonal antibody protects against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Sucharitha; Reljic, Rajko; Lewis, Melanie J; Pleass, Richard J; McIntosh, Richard; van Kooten, Cees; van Egmond, Marjolein; Challacombe, Stephen; Woof, Jenny M; Ivanyi, Juraj

    2011-03-01

    Abs have been shown to be protective in passive immunotherapy of tuberculous infection using mouse experimental models. In this study, we report on the properties of a novel human IgA1, constructed using a single-chain variable fragment clone (2E9), selected from an Ab phage library. The purified Ab monomer revealed high binding affinities for the mycobacterial α-crystallin Ag and for the human FcαRI (CD89) IgA receptor. Intranasal inoculations with 2E9IgA1 and recombinant mouse IFN-γ significantly inhibited pulmonary H37Rv infection in mice transgenic for human CD89 but not in CD89-negative littermate controls, suggesting that binding to CD89 was necessary for the IgA-imparted passive protection. 2E9IgA1 added to human whole-blood or monocyte cultures inhibited luciferase-tagged H37Rv infection although not for all tested blood donors. Inhibition by 2E9IgA1 was synergistic with human rIFN-γ in cultures of purified human monocytes but not in whole-blood cultures. The demonstration of the mandatory role of FcαRI (CD89) for human IgA-mediated protection is important for understanding of the mechanisms involved and also for translation of this approach toward development of passive immunotherapy of tuberculosis. PMID:21257971

  10. Characterization of acid sphingomyelinase activity in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Mühle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM is involved in the regulation of cell fate and signaling via hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to form ceramide. While increased activity of the lysosomal form has been associated with various pathological conditions, there are few studies on secretory ASM limited only to cell models, plasma or serum. METHODS: An optimized assay based on a fluorescent substrate was applied to measure the ASM activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF collected from mice and from 42 patients who were classified as controls based on normal routine CSF values. RESULTS: We have detected ASM activity in human CSF, established a sensitive quantitative assay and characterized the enzyme's properties. The enzyme resembles plasmatic ASM including protein stability and Zn(2+-dependence but the assays differ considerably in the optimal detergent concentration. Significantly increased activities in the CSF of ASM transgenic mice and undetectable levels in ASM knock-out mice prove that the measured ASM activity originates from the ASM-encoding gene SMPD1. CSF localized ASM activities were comparable to corresponding serum ASM levels at their respective optimal reaction conditions, but no correlation was observed. The large variance in ASM activity was independent of sex, age or analyzed routine CSF parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Human and mouse CSF contain detectable levels of secretory ASM, which are unrelated to serum ASM activities. Further investigations in humans and in animal models will help to elucidate the role of this enzyme in human disease and to assess its value as a potential biomarker for disease type, severity, progress or therapeutic success.

  11. Global Relationships Among Human Resource Consumption, Threatened Species, and Habitat Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, C.; Ricketts, T.; Lamoreux, J.; Hoekstra, J.; Imhoff, M.; Wettengel, W.; Bounoua, L.; Boucher, T.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we analyze the correlations among resource consumption, threatened species, and protected areas to determine if threatened species tend to occur in areas of high (or low) human activity and habitat protection. We used terrestrial ecoregions of the world as our units of analysis. For each ecoregion we collated data on resource consumption, number of threatened species, and percent of land in protected areas. We performed pair-wise Pearson's correlations among the three measures at a global scale and within each of six biogeographic realms. We also identified a subset of ecoregions, where low protection and high resource consumption coincide with high numbers of threatened species. Globally, the correlation between resource consumption and number of threatened species was positive and significant, the relationship between resource consumption and percent protection was negative and significant, and the relationship between percent protection and number of threatened species was not significant. The correlation between resource consumption and threatened species was significant among all realms, with the exception of the Indo-Malay realm. In contrast, only the Nearctic and Palearctic realms showed a significant (negative) correlation between resource consumption and protection. While the global relationship between protection and number of threatened species was not significant, both the Nearctic and Palearctic realms demonstrated a significant negative correlation. We identified 23 ecoregions to conserve threatened species in areas of high resource consumption and minimal protection. They include eastern China, and many coastal areas throughout Asia and South America. Threatened species are often found in areas that have high resource consumption, whereas protected areas have been preferentially located in the least populated areas. This pattern reflects a tendency to establish protected areas in regions with lower competing demands for land use. Our

  12. Study of radio-protective effects of ascorbic acid in rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential radio-protective effects of different ascorbic acid concentrations (vitamin C) in rats before whole body irradiation with total dose of 7 Gy (60Co source) using two different dose rates of 1 and 0.55 Gy.min-1 by increasing percent of surviving. In the first group (1 Gy/m); rats were administered four different concentrations of ascorbic acid (7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg b wt ) in drinking water for 30 days before irradiation starting from the ablactation which considered as day 0. Whereas, in the second group (0.55 Gy/m); rats were administered six different concentrations of ascorbic acid (1, 5, 7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg b wt) before irradiation with total dose 7 Gy (60Co source). The results have showed that the ascorbic acid enhance the 30-day survival of irradiated rats in 1 and 0.55 Gy/m groups, compared to the control group. The mean cumulated probability of survival of rats (1 Gy/m group) was 66%± 6 (Mean± S.E), 69%± 5, 52%± 9 and 51%± 9 in groups of rats which administered 7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg, respectively, versus 41%± 9 in control group for 14 days. While, it was 90%± 2, 90%± 2, 88%± 2, 94%± 1, 84%± 3 and 78%± 3 in groups of rats which administered 1, 5, 7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg respectively, versus 52%± 6 in control group for 30 days. Our data, also, indicated that all ascorbic acid concentrations in both groups had significant reduction in mortality and increasing percent of surviving compared to the control groups. We conclude that all ascorbic acid concentrations which used in both groups (1 and 0.55 Gy/m), had radioprotective effects in rats when administrated before irradiations, and this role was more effective against lower dose rate of radiation exposure. (author)

  13. Protective effect of all-trans retinoic acid on injury of human immortalized hepatocytes induced by sodium arsenite%全反式维甲酸对亚砷酸钠致人肝细胞损伤保护性作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙惠昕; 胡新欣; 张微; 高彦辉; 孙殿军

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察全反式维甲酸(ATRA)对亚砷酸钠致人肝细胞系(HHL)-5细胞损伤的保护性作用,探讨可能机制.方法 采用细胞培养方法,体外培养HHL-5细胞48 h后进行实验,实验分为4组:正常组、ATRA组、亚砷酸钠组、ATRA+亚砷酸钠组.用细胞增殖实验(WST)观察HHL-5细胞的活力;生物化学方法测定各组HHL-5细胞内超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、谷胱甘肤过氧化物酶(GSH-Px)的活力及丙二醛(MDA)的含量和细胞培养液中谷草转氨酶(AST)的活力;透射电镜观察各组细胞超微结构的变化.结果 亚砷酸钠组HHL-5细胞活力(0.57±0.02)与正常组(0.70±0.01)比较,差异有统计学意义(P< 0.05);SOD、GSH-Px、MDA、AST [(153.84±2.35 )U/mg Prot、(0.08±0.02)U/mg Prot、(4.15±0.50)nmol/mg Prot、(265.43±4.62)×103 U/L]与正常组[(237.41±18.30) U/mg Prot、(0.93±0.02)U/mg Prot、(2.26±0.40)nmol/mg Prot、(177±9.85)×103 U/L]比较,差异有统计学意义(P均.<0.05).ATRA+亚砷酸钠组HHL-5细胞活力(0.65±0.04)与亚砷酸钠组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);SOD、GSH-Px、MDA、AST[(286.85±3.39)U/mg Prot、(0.56±0.09)U/mg Prot、(3.36±0.37)nmol/mg Prot、(220.02±1.07)×103 U/L]与亚砷酸钠组比较,差异有统计学意义(P均< 0.05).电镜结果显示,亚砷酸钠组同正常组及ATRA组比较,细胞表面微绒毛减少,双层核膜结构不清,胞质内可见空泡样变,肝糖原凝集;ATRA+亚砷酸钠组上述损伤程度减轻.结论 ATRA通过提高HHL-5细胞内抗氧化酶的活力,清除或者减少氧自由基对细胞的损伤,从而发挥保护作用.%Objective To investigate the protective effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on injury of human immortalized hepatocytes (HHL-5 cells ) induced by sodium arsenite and possible mechanisms.Methods After cultured for 48 h,HHL-5 cells were divided into four groups:normal group,ATRA group,sodium arsenite group and ATRA + sodium arsenite group.HHL-5 cell viability

  14. A synergistic combination of tetraethylorthosilicate and multiphosphonic acid offers excellent corrosion protection to AA1100 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmoro, Viviane [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500 - CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Departament d’Enginyeria Química, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Center for Research in Nano-Engineering (CRnE), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Campus Sud, Edifici C’, C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Santos, João H.Z. dos [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500 - CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Armelin, Elaine, E-mail: elaine.armelin@upc.edu [Departament d’Enginyeria Química, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Center for Research in Nano-Engineering (CRnE), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Campus Sud, Edifici C’, C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Alemán, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.aleman@upc.edu [Departament d’Enginyeria Química, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Center for Research in Nano-Engineering (CRnE), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Campus Sud, Edifici C’, C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); and others

    2013-05-15

    This work describes a new mechanism for the incorporation of organophosphonic acid into silane self-assembly monolayers, which has been used to protect AA1100 aluminum alloy. The protection improvement has been attributed to the fact that phosphonic structures promote the formation of strongly bonded and densely packed monolayer films, which show higher surface coverage and better adhesion than conventional silane systems. In order to evaluate the linking chemistry offered by phosphonic groups, two functionalized organophosphonic groups have been employed, 1,2-diaminoethanetetrakis methylenephosphonic acid (EDTPO) and aminotrimethylenephosphonic acid (ATMP), and combined with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) films prepared by sol–gel synthesis. Results suggest that phosphonic acids may interact with the surface through a monodentate and bidentate coordination mode and, in addition, form one or more strong and stable linkages with silicon through non-hydrolysable bonds. Therefore, the incorporation of a very low concentration of phosphonic acids on TEOS solutions favors the complete coverage of the aluminum substrate during the silanization process, which is not possible using TEOS alone. The linking capacity of phosphonic acid has been investigated by FTIR-RA spectroscopy, SEM and EDX analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and quantum mechanical calculations. Finally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been used to study the corrosion protection revealing that EDTPO-containing films afforded more protection to the AA1100 substrate than ATMP-containing films.

  15. Effects of Salvianolic Acid B on Protein Expression in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsong-Min Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acid B (Sal B, a pure water-soluble compound extracted from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae, has been reported to possess potential cardioprotective efficacy. To identify proteins or pathways by which Sal B might exert its protective activities on the cardiovascular system, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based comparative proteomics was performed, and proteins altered in their expression level after Sal B treatment were identified by MALDI-TOF MS/MS. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were incubated at Sal B concentrations that can be reached in human plasma by pharmacological intervention. Results indicated that caldesmon, an actin-stabilizing protein, was downregulated in Sal B-exposed HUVECs. Proteins that showed increased expression levels upon Sal B treatment were vimentin, T-complex protein 1, protein disulfide isomerase, tropomyosin alpha, heat shock protein beta-1, UBX domain-containing protein 1, alpha enolase, and peroxiredoxin-2. Additionally, Sal B leads to increased phosphorylation of nucleophosmin in a dose-dependent manner and promotes proliferation of HUVECs. We found that Sal B exhibited a coordinated regulation of enzymes and proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, oxidative stress, and cell growth. Our investigation would provide understanding to the endothelium protection information of Sal B.

  16. Clastogenic effect of atranorin, evernic acid, and usnic acid on human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Gordana S; Stanković, Miroslava; Stojanović, Igor Z; Palić, Ivan; Milovanović, Vesna; Rancić, Sofija

    2014-04-01

    Three lichen secondary metabolites atranorin (1), evernic acid (2), and usnic acid (3), were evaluated for their in vitro clastogenic and antiproliferative effects on human lymphocytes using the cytochalasin-B blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay at concentrations of 2 microg/mL, 4 microg/mL and 6 microg/mL of final culture solution. The frequency of micronucleus (MN) was scored in binucleated cells, and cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI) was calculated. Among the tested compounds, 3 exhibited the most prominent effect decreasing the frequency of MN in the range of 42.5% - 48.9%, that is about double of the positive control amifostin WR-2721 that reduces MN frequency for 22.0%. The effect of evernic acid was approximately equal to action of amifostin (23.2% -32.9%). Atranorin at concentrations of 2 microg/mL and 4 microg/mL decreasing the frequency of MN only for 11.1% and 1.8%, while in concentration of 6 microg/mL increases the frequency of MN for 9.6 %. The comparable CBPI values of the investigated compounds and control suggested that they did not show a statistically significant inhibitory effect on lymphocyte cell proliferation at applied concentrations. PMID:24868868

  17. Protection of ultrastructure in chilling-stressed banana leaves by salicylic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Guo-zhang; WANG Zheng-xun; XIA Kuai-fei; SUN Gu-chou

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Chilling tolerance of salicylic acid (SA) in banana seedlings (Musa acuminata cv., Williams 8818) was investigated by changes in ultrastructure in this study. Methods: Light and electron microscope observation. Results: Pretreatment with 0.5 mmol/L SA under normal growth conditions (30/22 ℃) by foliar spray and root irrigation resulted in many changes in ultrastructure of banana cells, such as cells separation from palisade parenchymas, the appearance of crevices in cell walls, the swelling of grana and stromal thylakoids, and a reduction in the number of starch granules. These results implied that SA treatment at 30/22 ℃ could be a type of stress. During 3 d of exposure to 7 ℃ chilling stress under low light, however, cell ultrastructure of SA-pretreated banana seedlings showed less deterioration than those of control seedlings (distilled water-pretreated). Conclusion:SA could provide some protection for cell structure of chilling-stressed banana seedling.

  18. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  19. Kinetics of fatty acid binding ability of glycated human serum albumin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eiji Yamazaki; Minoru Inagaki; Osamu Kurita; Tetsuji Inoue

    2005-09-01

    Kinetics of fatty acid binding ability of glycated human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated by fluorescent displacement technique with 1-anilino-8-naphtharene sulphonic acid (ANS method), and photometric detection of nonesterified-fatty-acid (NEFA method). Changing of binding affinities of glycated HSA toward oleic acid, linoleic acid, lauric acid, and caproic acid, were not observed by the ANS method. However, decreases of binding capacities after 55 days glycation were confirmed by the NEFA method in comparison to control HSA. The decrease in binding affinities was: oleic acid (84%), linoleic acid (84%), lauric acid (87%), and caproic acid (90%), respectively. The decreases were consistent with decrease of the intact lysine residues in glycated HSA. The present observation indicates that HSA promptly loses its binding ability to fatty acid as soon as the lysine residues at fatty acid binding sites are glycated.

  20. The protection of the accused in international criminal law according to the Human Rights Law Standard

    OpenAIRE

    Karolina Kremens

    2011-01-01

    The presented paper discusses the influence of international human rights law on international criminal law. It tries to give an answer to the question of whether rules protecting the accused in international criminal proceedings meet the human rights law standard provided by international declarations and covenants. Meaning, if the proceedings before the International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and International Criminal ...

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid provides protective mechanism in bilaterally MPTP-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Hacioglu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, a major polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA in the phospholipid fraction of the brain, is essential for normal cellular function. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD often exhibit significant declines in PUFAs. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of DHA supplementation in an experimental rat model of PD created with ‘1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine’ (MPTP. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: (1 Control; (2 DHA-treated; (3 MPTP-induced; and (4 MPTP-induced + DHA-treated. Motor activity was investigated using the ‘vertical pole’ and ‘vertical wire’ tests. The dopaminergic lesion was determined by immunohistochemical analysis for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-immunopositive cells in substantia nigra (SN. Immunoreactivities of Bcl-2, Akt and phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt in SN were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. MPTP-induced animals exhibited decreased locomotor activity, motor coordination and loss of equilibrium. Diminished Parkinsonism symptoms and decreased dopaminergic neuron death were detected in the MPTP-induced + DHA-treated group compared to the MPTP-induced group. Moderate decreases in Akt staining were found in the MPTP-induced and MPTP-induced + DHA-treated groups compared to controls. p-Akt immunoreactivity decreased dramatically in the MPTP-induced group compared to the control; however, it was increased in the MPTP-induced + DHA-treated group compared to the MPTP-induced group. The staining intensity for Bcl-2 decreased prominently in the MPTP-induced group compared to the control, while it was stronger in the MPTP-induced + DHA-treated group compared to the MPTP-induced group. In conclusion, DHA significantly protects dopaminergic neurons against cell death in an experimental PD model. Akt/p-Akt and Bcl-2 pathways are related to this protective effect of DHA in experimental PD.

  2. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  3. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  4. Humic acids reduce the genotoxicity of mitomycin C in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, G; Loffredo, E; Senesi, N; Marcos, R

    2006-01-31

    The antimutagenic/desmutagenic activity of a leonardite humic acid (LHA) and a soil humic acid (SHA) was studied in the cultured human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 treated with mitomycin C (MMC) as reference mutagen by evaluating the induction of micronuclei (MN). Two different concentrations of HA were used, 2.5 and 10 microg/ml, in three different treatments: (1) HA alone (genotoxic test); (2) HA after 2-h pre-incubation with 0.3 microM of MMC (desmutagenic test) and (3) combinations of HA and MMC at 0.3 microM without pre-incubation (antimutagenic test). Neither of the HA used alone did produce genotoxic effects, but both HAs reduced significantly the frequencies of MN induced by MMC, especially in the desmutagenic test. A slight cell-protective effect against the cytotoxicity of MMC was also exhibited by the two HAs in the desmutagenic test. The LHA showed a desmutagenic/antimutagenic activity that was more pronounced than that of SHA, which is possibly related to the higher carboxylic group content and lower phenolic group content of LHA. These results confirm the antigenotoxic action exerted by HAs in human cells, similarly to what has been previously observed in various plant species. PMID:16386451

  5. Traumatic Acid Reduces Oxidative Stress and Enhances Collagen Biosynthesis in Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Pankiewicz, Walentyn; Czerpak, Romuald

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic acid (TA) is a plant hormone (cytokinin) that in terms of chemical structure belongs to the group of fatty acids derivatives. It was isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris. TA activity and its influence on human cells and organism has not previously been the subject of research. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of TA on collagen content and basic oxidative stress parameters, such as antioxidative enzyme activity, reduced glutathione, thiol group content, and lipid peroxidation in physiological conditions. The results show a stimulatory effect of TA on tested parameters. TA caused a decrease in membrane phospholipid peroxidation and exhibited protective properties against ROS production. It also increases protein and collagen biosynthesis and its secretion into the culture medium. The present findings reveal that TA exhibits multiple and complex activity in fibroblast cells in vitro. TA, with its activity similar to unsaturated fatty acids, shows antioxidant and stimulatory effects on collagen biosynthesis. It is a potentially powerful agent with applications in the treatment of many skin diseases connected with oxidative stress and collagen biosynthesis disorders. PMID:27423205

  6. Unsaturated fatty acids prevent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'homme, Laurent; Esser, Nathalie; Riva, Laura; Scheen, André; Paquot, Nicolas; Piette, Jacques; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in many obesity-associated diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and gouty arthritis, through its ability to induce interleukin (IL)-1β release. The molecular link between obesity and inflammasome activation is still unclear, but free fatty acids have been proposed as one triggering event. Here we reported opposite effects of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) compared with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) on NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages. Palmitate and stearate, both SFAs, triggered IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1/ASC/NLRP3-dependent pathway. Unlike SFAs, the UFAs oleate and linoleate did not lead to IL-1β secretion. In addition, they totally prevented the IL-1β release induced by SFAs and, with less efficiency, by a broad range of NLRP3 inducers, including nigericin, alum, and monosodium urate. UFAs did not affect the transcriptional effect of SFAs, suggesting a specific effect on the NLRP3 activation. These results provide a new anti-inflammatory mechanism of UFAs by preventing the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1β processing. By this way, UFAs might play a protective role in NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:24006511

  7. Alpha-lipoic acid protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury by inhibiting autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xueming; Chen, Aihua, E-mail: aihuachen2012@sina.com; Yang, Pingzhen; Song, Xudong; Liu, Yingfeng; Li, Zhiliang; Wang, Xianbao; Wang, Lizi; Li, Yunpeng

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •We observed the cell viability and death subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •We observed the degree of autophagy subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival. •LA inhibited the autophagy in parallel to the decreased total cell death. •We concluded that LA protected cardiomyocytes against H/R by inhibiting autophagy. -- Abstract: Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) is an important in vitro model for exploring the molecular mechanisms and functions of autophagy during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) plays an important role in the etiology of cardiovascular disease. Autophagy is widely implicated in myocardial I/R injury. We assessed the degree of autophagy by pretreatment with LA exposed to H/R in H9c2 cell based on the expression levels of Beclin-1, LC3II/LC3I, and green fluorescent protein-labeled LC3 fusion proteins. Autophagic vacuoles were confirmed in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R using transmission electron microscopy. Our findings indicated that pretreatment with LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival and decreased total cell death in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R. We conclude that LA protects cardiomyocytes against H/R injury by inhibiting autophagy.

  8. Effects of whole linseed and rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid enriched diets on beef quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, M; Olleta, J L; Sañudo, C; Albertí, P; Panea, B; Pérez-Juan, M; Realini, C E; Campo, M M

    2016-04-01

    Instrumental assessments and sensory tests were performed to evaluate the effects of diet and postmortem ageing time (1, 7 and 21 days) on beef quality. A total of 48 Friesian calves were randomly allocated to four dietary treatments: control, whole linseed (10% linseed), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (2% protected CLA), and whole linseed+CLA (10% linseed and 2% protected CLA). Animals were slaughtered at 458±16.6 kg live weight and 11 months of age. Ageing was more significant than diet on most instrumental parameters. Meat from linseed enriched diets had greater drip loss (P⩽0.001) and intramuscular fat (P⩽0.01) than meat from animals fed CLA. Beef aged for 7 and 21 days had lower cooking losses (P⩽0.01) and shear force (P⩽0.001) than beef aged for 1 day. Lightness was affected only by display time. The addition of CLA in the diet increased hue and yellowness, whereas the inclusion of linseed decreased these values, as well as increased redness. Linseed in the diet decreased fat odour (P⩽0.05), but increased beef (P⩽0.01) and liver (P⩽0.05) flavours. Meat aged for 21 days was significantly more rancid (P⩽0.001), even under vacuum storage. Several organoleptic properties were improved with the inclusion of linseed in the diet, whereas they remained unaffected by the inclusion of CLA. PMID:26592312

  9. Protective effect of vitamin E on sperm motility and oxidative stress in valproic acid treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourique, Giovana M; Saccol, Etiane M H; Pês, Tanise S; Glanzner, Werner G; Schiefelbein, Sun Hee; Woehl, Viviane M; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Pavanato, Maria A; Gonçalves, Paulo B D; Barreto, Kátia P

    2016-09-01

    Long-term administration of valproic acid (VPA) is known to promote reproductive impairment mediated by increase in testicular oxidative stress. Vitamin E (VitE) is a lipophilic antioxidant known to be essential for mammalian spermatogenesis. However, the capacity of this vitamin to abrogate the VPA-mediated oxidative stress has not yet been assessed. In the current study, we evaluated the protective effect of VitE on functional abnormalities related to VPA-induced oxidative stress in the male reproductive system. VPA (400 mg kg(-1)) was administered by gavage and VitE (50 mg kg(-1)) intraperitoneally to male Wistar rats for 28 days. Analysis of spermatozoa from the cauda epididymides was performed. The testes and epididymides were collected for measurement of oxidative stress biomarkers. Treatment with VPA induced a decrease in sperm motility accompanied by an increase in oxidative damage to lipids and proteins, depletion of reduced glutathione and a decrease in total reactive antioxidant potential on testes and epididymides. Co-administration of VitE restored the antioxidant potential and prevented oxidative damage on testes and epididymides, restoring sperm motility. Thus, VitE protects the reproductive system from the VPA-induced damage, suggesting that it may be a useful compound to minimize the reproductive impairment in patients requiring long-term treatment with VPA. PMID:27424124

  10. Fine pathogen discrimination within the APL1 gene family protects Anopheles gambiae against human and rodent malaria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mitri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetically controlled resistance of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium falciparum is a common trait in the natural population, and a cluster of natural resistance loci were mapped to the Plasmodium-Resistance Island (PRI of the A. gambiae genome. The APL1 family of leucine-rich repeat (LRR proteins was highlighted by candidate gene studies in the PRI, and is comprised of paralogs APL1A, APL1B and APL1C that share > or =50% amino acid identity. Here, we present a functional analysis of the joint response of APL1 family members during mosquito infection with human and rodent Plasmodium species. Only paralog APL1A protected A. gambiae against infection with the human malaria parasite P. falciparum from both the field population and in vitro culture. In contrast, only paralog APL1C protected against the rodent malaria parasites P. berghei and P. yoelii. We show that anti-P. falciparum protection is mediated by the Imd/Rel2 pathway, while protection against P. berghei infection was shown to require Toll/Rel1 signaling. Further, only the short Rel2-S isoform and not the long Rel2-F isoform of Rel2 confers protection against P. falciparum. Protection correlates with the transcriptional regulation of APL1A by Rel2-S but not Rel2-F, suggesting that the Rel2-S anti-parasite phenotype results at least in part from its transcriptional control over APL1A. These results indicate that distinct members of the APL1 gene family display a mutually exclusive protective effect against different classes of Plasmodium parasites. It appears that a gene-for-pathogen-class system orients the appropriate host defenses against distinct categories of similar pathogens. It is known that insect innate immune pathways can distinguish between grossly different microbes such as Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, or fungi, but the function of the APL1 paralogs reveals that mosquito innate immunity possesses a more fine-grained capacity to distinguish between

  11. A novel therapeutic strategy for experimental stroke using docosahexaenoic acid complexed to human albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belayev Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite tremendous efforts in ischemic stroke research and significant improvements in patient care within the last decade, therapy is still insufficient. There is a compelling, urgent need for safe and effective neuroprotective strategies to limit brain injury, facilitate brain repair, and improve functional outcome. Recently, we reported that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6, n-3 complexed to human albumin (DHA-Alb is highly neuroprotective after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo in young rats. This review highlights the potency of DHA-Alb therapy in permanent MCAo and aged rats and whether protection persists with chronic survival. We discovered that a novel therapy with DHA-Alb improved behavioral outcomes accompanied by attenuation of lesion volumes even when animals were allowed to survive three weeks after experimental stroke. This treatment might provide the basis for future therapeutics for patients suffering from ischemic stroke.

  12. Endurance exercise increases skeletal muscle kynurenine aminotransferases and plasma kynurenic acid in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlittler, Maja; Goiny, Michel; Agudelo, Leandro Z; Venckunas, Tomas; Brazaitis, Marius; Skurvydas, Albertas; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Ruas, Jorge L; Erhardt, Sophie; Westerblad, Håkan; Andersson, Daniel C

    2016-05-15

    Physical exercise has emerged as an alternative treatment for patients with depressive disorder. Recent animal studies show that exercise protects from depression by increased skeletal muscle kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) expression which shifts the kynurenine metabolism away from the neurotoxic kynurenine (KYN) to the production of kynurenic acid (KYNA). In the present study, we investigated the effect of exercise on kynurenine metabolism in humans. KAT gene and protein expression was increased in the muscles of endurance-trained subjects compared with untrained subjects. Endurance exercise caused an increase in plasma KYNA within the first hour after exercise. In contrast, a bout of high-intensity eccentric exercise did not lead to increased plasma KYNA concentration. Our results show that regular endurance exercise causes adaptations in kynurenine metabolism which can have implications for exercise recommendations for patients with depressive disorder. PMID:27030575

  13. 76 FR 11248 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ...: Jerry Menikoff, M.D., J.D., Director, Office for Human Research Protections, or Julia Gorey, J.D..., Rockville, Maryland 20852; 240-453-6900, fax: 240-453-6909; e-mail address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov... as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the...

  14. 76 FR 58006 - Meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human...-mail address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a... who plan to attend the meeting and need special assistance, such as sign language interpretation...

  15. 76 FR 37354 - Meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human...-mail address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a... sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the designated...

  16. 78 FR 12061 - Meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human...; email address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a.... Individuals who plan to attend the meeting and need special assistance, such as sign language...

  17. About the role of human factors in the building of physical protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human factors have a special role in creating a strong, effective system of physical protection directed against theft or unauthorized movement of nuclear and other radioactive materials and against sabotage of nuclear facilities. To bring the physical protection of existing nuclear facilities up to present-day requirements, procedural measures are needed such as access controls and background checks on personnel with access. The state of security of nuclear facilities is completely dependent upon human actions, both those with criminal intentions and those standing in their path. Political, socio-economic, spiritual and other factors are outside of the operator's control. Threat assessment must rely on postulated scenarios for terrorist actions. The difficulty of both forecasting and defending against all possible threats is reflected in the fact that different countries take different approaches in protection of nuclear reactors. There is a need to obtain objective information on terrorist intentions and on the reality of threats. (author)

  18. Phenylbutyric acid protects against spatial memory deficits in a model of repeated electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhao-Hui; Kang, Xiang; Yang, Liu; Niu, Yi; Lu, Ye; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Tian, Qing; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2014-05-01

    Repeated electroconvulsive therapy (rECT) is widely applied in the treatment of refractory depression. Among the side effects of rECT, memory impairment is noticeable and needs effective protection. In this study, by employing a recognized repeated electroconvulsive shock (rECS) rat model, we found that rECS induced the significant spatial memory retention deficits with the simultaneous decreases in long-term potential (LTP), enhanced excitable postsynaptic potentials (EPSP), population spike (PS) and input/output curve in perforant pathway-dentate gyrus (PP-DG), but had no obvious neuron loss or dentritic spine loss in the brain by Nissle or Golgi stainings. Furthermore, the increased synaptic proteins of NR2A/B, PSD93, PSD95, the immediate early gene c-Fos and CREB protein were detected in hippocampus of rECS rats. rECS was also found to cause enhanced axon reorganization in DG region of hippocampus by Timm staining. Intraperitoneal injection of phenylbutyric acid (PBA), an aromatic short chain fatty acid acting as a molecule chaperon, could prevent rats from the rECS-induced memory deficits and synaptic potential enhancement by decreasing the levels of the abnormally increased memory-associated proteins and enhanced axon reorganization in hippocampus. Our data suggested that PBA might be potentially used to attenuate the rECS-induced memory impairment. PMID:24712645

  19. Protective role of metallothionein (Ⅰ/Ⅱ) against pathological damage and apoptosis induced by dimethylarsinic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Jia; Yi-Qun Gu; Kung-Tung Chen; You-Yong Lu; Lei Yan; Jian-Ling Wang; Ya-Ping Su; J. C. Gaston Wu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To better clarify the main target organs of dimethylarsinic acid toxicity and the role of metallothionein (MTs) in modifying dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA) toxicity.METHODS: MT-Ⅰ/Ⅱ null (MT-/-) mice and the corresponding wild-type mice (MT+/+), six in each group, were exposed to DMAA (0-750 mg/kg body weight) by a single oral injection.Twenty four hours later, the lungs, livers and kidneys were collected and undergone pathological analysis, induction of apoptotic cells as determined by TUNEL and MT concentration was detected by radio-immunoassay.RESULTS: Remarkable pathological lesions were observed at the doses ranging from 350 to 750 mg/kg body weight in the lungs, livers and kidneys and MT+/+ mice exhibited a relatively slight destruction when compared with that in dose matched MT-/- mice. The number of apoptotic cells was increased in a dose dependent manner in the lungs and livers in both types of mice. DMAA produced more necrotic cells rather than apoptotic cells at the highest dose of 750 mg/kg,however, no significant increase was observed in the kidney.Hepatic MT level in MT+/+ mice was significantly increased by DMAA in a dose-dependent manner and there was nodetectable amount of hepatic MT in untreated MT-/- mice.CONCLUSION: DMAA treatment can lead to the induction of apoptosis and pathological damage in both types of mice.MT exhibits a protective effect against DMAA toxicity.

  20. Evaluation of a sunscreen photoprotective effect by ascorbic acid assessment in human dermis using microdialysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, Nathalie; Mac-Mary, Sophie; Muret, Patrice; Makki, Safwat; Aubin, Francois; Kantelip, Jean-Pierre; Heusèle, Catherine; S, Schnebert; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation causes adverse effects like sunburn, photosensitivity reactions or immunologic suppression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the photo-protective outcome of a sunscreen cream (SPF8) by the determination of erythema indexes and the assessment of ascorbic acid and its metabolites in human dermis. These substances were used as markers of oxidative effect. Eight healthy female subjects were enrolled in this study. Two abdominal areas were exposed to solar simulated irradiation with three minimal erythema dose, one with SPF8 application and the other site without SPF8 application. Two other areas were used as control, one without SPF8 application and the other site after SPF8 application. Ascorbic acid and its metabolites (dehydroascorbic acid, threonic acid, oxalic acid and xylose) were collected from human dermis by microdialysis and assessed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Irradiated site without sunscreen application had significantly demonstrated lower dermis ascorbic acid concentrations and a higher erythema index than the three other sites (P creams against undesirable UV effects. PMID:15740589

  1. Spotted hyaena space use in relation to human infrastructure inside a protected area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Lydia E.; Cameron, Elissa Z.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing human population growth has led to elevated levels of human-carnivore conflict. However, some carnivore populations have adapted to urban environments and the resources they supply. Such associations may influence carnivore ecology, behaviour and life-history. Pockets of urbanisation sometimes occur within protected areas, so that anthropogenic influences on carnivore biology are not necessarily confined to unprotected areas. In this study we evaluated associations between human infrastructure and related activity and space use of spotted hyaenas within one of the largest protected areas in South Africa, the Kruger National Park. Home range size was smaller for the dominant female of a clan living in close proximity to humans than that of the dominant female of a clan without direct access to human infrastructure. The home range including human infrastructure was also used less evenly during the night, presumably when the animals were active. Within this home range, a village area was preferred during the night, when the least modified areas within the village were preferred and administration and highly modified areas were avoided. During the day, however, there were no preference or avoidance of the village area, but all habitats except unmodified habitats within the village area were avoided. We suggest that human infrastructure and associated activity influenced hyaena space use, primarily through alterations in the spatial distribution of food. However, these effects may have been indirectly caused by habitat modification that generated favourable hunting habitat rather than a direct effect caused by access to human food such as garbage. Because of the often pivotal effects of apex predators in terrestrial ecosystems, we encourage further work aimed to quantify how human presence influences large carnivores and associated ecosystem processes within protected areas. PMID:27781175

  2. Development of antibodies to protective antigen and lethal factor components of anthrax toxin in humans and guinea pigs and their relevance to protective immunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Turnbull, P. C.; Broster, M G; Carman, J A; Manchee, R J; Melling, J

    1986-01-01

    A competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect antibodies in serum to the protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF) components of anthrax toxin. Current human vaccination schedules with an acellular vaccine induce predictable and lasting antibody titers to PA and, when present in the vaccine, to LF. Live spore vaccine administered to guinea pigs in a single dose conferred significantly better protection than the human vaccines (P less than 0.00...

  3. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the "next-generation" recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design. PMID:25787135

  4. Protection of rabbits and immunodeficient mice against lethal poxvirus infections by human monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Crickard

    Full Text Available Smallpox (variola virus is a bioweapon concern. Monkeypox is a growing zoonotic poxvirus threat. These problems have resulted in extensive efforts to develop potential therapeutics that can prevent or treat potentially lethal poxvirus infections in humans. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against smallpox are a conservative approach to this problem, as the licensed human smallpox vaccine (vaccinia virus, VACV primarily works on the basis of protective antibody responses against smallpox. Fully human mAbs (hmAbs against vaccinia H3 (H3L and B5 (B5R, targeting both the mature virion (MV and extracellular enveloped virion (EV forms, have been developed as potential therapeutics for use in humans. Post-exposure prophylaxis was assessed in both murine and rabbit animal models. Therapeutic efficacy of the mAbs was assessed in three good laboratory practices (GLP studies examining severe combined immunodeficiency mice (SCID given a lethal VACV infection. Pre-exposure combination hmAb therapy provided significantly better protection against disease and death than either single hmAb or vaccinia immune globulin (VIG. Post-exposure combination mAb therapy provided significant protection against disease and death, and appeared to fully cure the VACV infection in ≥50% of SCID mice. Therapeutic efficacy was then assessed in two rabbit studies examining post-exposure hmAb prophylaxis against rabbitpox (RPXV. In the first study, rabbits were infected with RPVX and then provided hmAbs at 48 hrs post-infection, or 1 hr and 72 hrs post-infection. Rabbits in both groups receiving hmAbs were 100% protected from death. In the second rabbitpox study, 100% of animal treated with combination hmAb therapy and 100% of animals treated with anti-B5 hmAb were protected. These findings suggest that combination hmAb treatment may be effective at controlling smallpox disease in immunocompetent or immunodeficient humans.

  5. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  6. Proactive Integration of Planetary Protection Needs Into Early Design Phases of Human Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Margaret; Conley, Catharine

    Planetary protection (PP) policies established by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) of the International Council for Science have been in force effectively for five decades, ensuring responsible exploration and the integrity of science activities, for both human and robotic missions in the Solar System beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). At present, operations on most bodies in the solar system are not constrained by planetary protection considerations because they cannot be contaminated by Earth life in ways that impact future space exploration. However, operations on Mars, Europa, and Enceladus, which represent locations with biological potential, are subject to strict planetary protection constraints for missions of all types because they can potentially be contaminated by organisms brought from Earth. Forward contamination control for robotic missions is generally accomplished through a combination of activities that reduce the bioload of microbial hitchhikers on outbound spacecraft prior to launch. Back contamination control for recent robotic missions has chiefly been accomplished by selecting sample-return targets that have little or no potential for extant life (e.g., cometary particles returned by Stardust mission). In the post-Apollo era, no human missions have had to deal with planetary protection constraints because they have never left Earth orbit. Future human missions to Mars, for example, will experience many of the challenges faced by the Apollo lunar missions, with the added possibility that astronauts on Mars may encounter habitable environments in their exploration or activities. Current COSPAR PP Principles indicate that safeguarding the Earth from potential back contamination is the highest planetary protection priority in Mars exploration. While guidelines for planetary protection controls on human missions to Mars have been established by COSPAR, detailed engineering constraints and processes for implementation of these guidelines have not

  7. Probucol increases striatal glutathione peroxidase activity and protects against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced pro-oxidative damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Dirleise; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Hartwig, Juliana Montagna; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Zimmermann, Luciana Teixeira; Hort, Mariana Appel; Farina, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by symptoms attributable to the death of striatal and cortical neurons. The molecular mechanisms mediating neuronal death in HD involve oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, in rodents has been proposed as a useful experimental model of HD. This study evaluated the effects of probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on the biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress, as well as on the behavioral parameters related to motor function in an in vivo HD model based on 3-NP intoxication in rats. Animals were treated with 3.5 mg/kg of probucol in drinking water daily for 2 months and, subsequently, received 3-NP (25 mg/kg i.p.) once a day for 6 days. At the end of the treatments, 3-NP-treated animals showed a significant decrease in body weight, which corresponded with impairment on motor ability, inhibition of mitochondrial complex II activity and oxidative stress in the striatum. Probucol, which did not rescue complex II inhibition, protected against behavioral and striatal biochemical changes induced by 3-NP, attenuating 3-NP-induced motor impairments and striatal oxidative stress. Importantly, probucol was able to increase activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an enzyme important in mediating the detoxification of peroxides in the central nervous system. The major finding of this study was that probucol protected against 3-NP-induced behavioral and striatal biochemical changes without affecting 3-NP-induced mitochondrial complex II inhibition, indicating that long-term probucol treatment resulted in an increased resistance against neurotoxic events (i.e., increased oxidative damage) secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction. These data appeared to be of great relevance when

  8. Folic acid protects against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui-hua; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cai-Ling

    2015-11-05

    As a nutritional factor, folic acid can prevent cardiac and neural defects during embryo development. Our previous study showed that arsenic impairs embryo development by down-regulating Dvr1/GDF1 expression in zebrafish. Here, we investigated whether folic acid could protect against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity. We found that folic acid supplementation increases hatching and survival rates, decreases malformation rate and ameliorates abnormal cardiac and neural development of zebrafish embryos exposed to arsenite. Both real-time PCR analysis and whole in-mount hybridization showed that folic acid significantly rescued the decrease in Dvr1 expression caused by arsenite. Subsequently, our data demonstrated that arsenite significantly decreased cell viability and GDF1 mRNA and protein levels in HEK293ET cells, while folic acid reversed these effects. Folic acid attenuated the increase in subcellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and oxidative adaptor p66Shc protein expression in parallel with the changes in GDF1 expression and cell viability. P66Shc knockdown significantly inhibited the production of ROS and the down-regulation of GDF1 induced by arsenite. Our data demonstrated that folic acid supplementation protected against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1/GDF1, and folic acid enhanced the expression of GDF1 by decreasing p66Shc expression and subcellular ROS levels.

  9. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are potent openers of human M-channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liin, Sara I; Karlsson, Urban; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth;

    2016-01-01

    threshold current to evoke action potentials in dorsal root ganglion neurons. The polyunsaturated fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid, α-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid facilitated opening of the human M-channel, comprised of the heteromeric human KV 7.2/3 channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes, by...... shifting the conductance-versus-voltage curve towards more negative voltages (by -7.4 to -11.3 mV by 70 μM). Uncharged docosahexaenoic acid methyl ester and monounsaturated oleic acid did not facilitate opening of the human KV 7.2/3 channel. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that circulating...... polyunsaturated fatty acids, with a minimum requirement of multiple double bonds and a charged carboxyl group, dampen excitability by opening neuronal M-channels. Collectively, our data bring light to the molecular targets of polyunsaturated fatty acids and thus a possible mechanism by which polyunsaturated fatty...

  10. Review (laws for compliance and human rights multi-level protection in Inter-American Human Rights System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Torres Zúñiga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses diverse perspectives concerning relationship between reviewing (laws for compliance and the process of putting international law of human rights on a constitutional footing. Therefore, a parallel is established between reviewing (laws for compliance and constitutional review (laws in order to outline features and application impact of this research. The design of a multi-level protection system for fundamental rights in Latin America is also discussed in this article.

  11. Glucosamine increases hyaluronic acid production in human osteoarthritic synovium explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uitterlinden EJ

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucosamine (GlcN used by patients with osteoarthritis was demonstrated to reduce pain, but the working mechanism is still not clear. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA is also described to reduce pain in osteoarthritis. The synthesis of HA requires GlcN as one of its main building blocks. We therefore hypothesized that addition of GlcN might increase HA production by synovium tissue. Methods Human osteoarthritic synovium explants were obtained at total knee surgery and pre-cultured for 1 day. The experimental conditions consisted of a 2 days continuation of the culture with addition of N-Acetyl-glucosamine (GlcN-Ac; 5 mM, glucosamine-hydrochloride (GlcN-HCl; 0.5 and 5 mM, glucose (Gluc; 0.5 and 5 mM. Hereafter HA production was measured in culture medium supernatant using an enzyme-linked binding protein assay. Real time RT-PCR was performed for hyaluronic acid synthase (HAS 1, 2 and 3 on RNA isolated from the explants. Results 0.5 mM and 5 mM GlcN-HCl significantly increased HA production compared to control (approximately 2 – 4-fold, whereas GlcN-Ac had no significant effect. Addition of 5 mM Gluc also increased HA production (approximately 2-fold, but 0.5 mM Gluc did not. Gene expression of the HA forming enzymes HAS 1, 2 and 3 was not altered by the addition of GlcN or Gluc. Conclusion Our data suggest that exogenous GlcN can increase HA production by synovium tissue and is more effective at lower concentrations than Gluc. This might indicate that GlcN exerts its potential analgesic properties through stimulation of synovial HA production.

  12. Identification of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl in human adipose tissue and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledzinski, Tomasz; Mika, Adriana; Stepnowski, Piotr; Proczko-Markuszewska, Monika; Kaska, Lukasz; Stefaniak, Tomasz; Swierczynski, Julian

    2013-08-01

    Fatty acids containing a cyclopropane ring in their structure (cyclopropane FA) have been found in a wide variety of bacteria, a number of protozoa, and Myriapoda. Little is known about cyclopropane FA in mammal, especially in human tissues. The present study deals with the identification of cyclopropane FA in adipose tissue and serum of humans and rats. Fatty acids extracted from the adipose tissue and serum obtained from obese women during bariatric surgery were methylated and analyzed on GC-MS. We have identified: cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl, cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-octyl, cyclopropanenonanoic acid, and 2-[[2-[(2-ethylcyclopropyl)methyl]cyclopropyl]methyl] acid in human adipose tissue. We confirmed the presence of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl by derivatization of FA extracted from human adipose tissue to picolinyl esters. Cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl was the main cyclopropane FA (approximately 0.4 % of total fatty acids in human adipose tissue, and about 0.2 % of total fatty acids in the serum). In adipose tissue cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl was found mainly in triacylglycerols, whereas in serum in phospholipids and triacylglycerols. The cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl has also been found in serum, and adipose tissue of rats in amounts comparable to humans. The content of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl decreased in adipose tissue of rats maintained on a restricted diet for 1 month. In conclusion, we demonstrated that cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl is present in human adipose tissue and serum. Adipose tissue cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl is stored mainly in triacylglycerols and the storage of this cyclopropane FA is affected by food restriction.

  13. Biochemical study on the protective role of folic acid in rabbits treated with chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Demerdash, Fatma M; Yousef, Mokhtar I; Elaswad, Fathia A M

    2006-01-01

    biochemical parameters. In conclusion, folic acid could be effective in the protection of chromium-induced toxicity.

  14. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Mellors, J.W. [ed.] [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Jeang, K.T. [ed.] [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Molecular Virology Section; Wain-Hobson, S. [Pasteur Inst., Paris (France)] [ed.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  15. Endothelial Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Polyglycolic Acid/Polylactic Acid Mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng; Gu, Yunpeng; Liu, Zhenjun; Qi, Yue; Ma, Gui E; Kang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC) is considered as a cell source potentially useful for angiogenesis in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This study investigated the growth and endothelial differentiation of human ADSCs on polyglycolic acid/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) mesh compared to 2D plastic. Cell adhesion, viability, and distribution of hADSCs on PGA/PLA mesh were observed by CM-Dil labeling, live/dead staining, and SEM examination while endothelial differentiation was evaluated by flow cytometry, Ac-LDL/UEA-1 uptake assay, immunofluorescence stainings, and gene expression analysis of endothelial related markers. Results showed hADSCs gained a mature endothelial phenotype with a positive ratio of 21.4 ± 3.7% for CD31+/CD34- when induced in 3D mesh after 21 days, which was further verified by the expressions of a comprehensive range of endothelial related markers, whereas hADSCs in 2D induced and 2D/3D noninduced groups all failed to differentiate into endothelial cells. Moreover, compared to 2D groups, the expression for α-SMA was markedly suppressed in 3D cultured hADSCs. This study first demonstrated the endothelial differentiation of hADSCs on the PGA/PLA mesh and pointed out the synergistic effect of PGA/PLA 3D culture and growth factors on the acquisition of mature characteristic endothelial phenotype. We believed this study would be the initial step towards the generation of prevascularized tissue engineered constructs.

  16. Sialic acid content in human saliva and anti-influenza activity against human and avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2016-03-01

    It was shown previously that human saliva has higher antiviral activity against human influenza viruses than against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, and that the major anti-influenza activity was associated with sialic-acid-containing molecules. To further characterize the differential susceptibility to saliva among influenza viruses, seasonal influenza A and B virus, pandemic H1N1 virus, and 15 subtypes of avian influenza virus were tested for their susceptibility to human and chicken saliva. Human saliva showed higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) titers against seasonal influenza A virus and the pandemic H1N1 viruses than against influenza B virus and most avian influenza viruses, except for H9N2 and H12N9 avian influenza viruses, which showed high HI and NT titers. To understand the nature of sialic-acid-containing anti-influenza factors in human saliva, α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid was measured in human saliva samples using a lectin binding and dot blot assay. α2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be more abundant than α2,3-linked sialic acid, and a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus bound more efficiently to human saliva than an H5N1 virus in a dot blot analysis. These data indicated that human saliva contains the sialic acid type corresponding to the binding preference of seasonal influenza viruses.

  17. Protection of human research participants: accreditation of programmes in the Indian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Neelambari; Nigar, Shagoofa; Das, Soma; Divate, Uma; Divate, Pathik

    2014-01-01

    The recent negative media reports on the status of participants in clinical trials in India, together with the concerns expressed by the regulatory bodies, have raised questions regarding India's credibility in the conduct of clinical research. Even though the regulations require the registration of trials with the Clinical Trial Registry-India and despite the recently mandated registration of ethics committees (ECs) with the Drugs Controller General of India, the lack of governmental audit and accreditation procedures and bodies has resulted in inadequate protection of human participants in clinical research. Institutions and research sites would benefit by implementing a human research protection programme, which would safeguard the rights, safety and wellbeing of participants in clinical trials, in addition to improving the processes and procedures for the conduct of the trial. The Jehangir Clinical Development Centre, Pune has received accreditation from the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programme (AAHRPP). A unique feature of the AAHRPP is the integrative nature of the programme, wherein the sponsors of the trial, investigators, EC members and institution work towards the common goal of protecting research participants. Here, we discuss the improvement needed in the quality standards of institutions for them to be able to meet the requirements of the AAHRPP. We also suggest the need for a governmental accreditation body, which will be required for the future promotion of and improvement in the standards for clinical practice in India. PMID:24509113

  18. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to hyaluronic acid and protection of the skin against dehydration pursuant to Article 13(5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Following an application from Nutrilinks Sarl, submitted for authorisation of a health claim pursuant to Article 13(5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Belgium, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to hyaluronic acid and protection of the skin against dehydration. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim, hyaluronic acid, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect, protection of the skin against dehydration, is a beneficial physiological effect. The target population proposed by the applicant is the general population. No human studies have been provided from which conclusions could be drawn for the scientific substantiation of the claim. A cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of hyaluronic acid and protection of the skin against dehydration.

  19. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Xiao

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  20. Human Skeletal Muscle Protein Metabolism Responses to Amino Acid Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Phillips, Bethan E; Lund, Jonathan N; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Healthy individuals maintain remarkably constant skeletal muscle mass across much of adult life, suggesting the existence of robust homeostatic mechanisms. Muscle exists in dynamic equilibrium whereby the influx of amino acids (AAs) and the resulting increases in muscle protein synthesis (MPS) associated with the intake of dietary proteins cancel out the efflux of AAs from muscle protein breakdown that occurs between meals. Dysregulated proteostasis is evident with aging, especially beyond the sixth decade of life. Women and men aged 75 y lose muscle mass at a rate of ∼0.7% and 1%/y, respectively (sarcopenia), and lose strength 2- to 5-fold faster (dynapenia) as muscle "quality" decreases. Factors contributing to the disruption of an otherwise robust proteostatic system represent targets for potential therapies that promote healthy aging. Understanding age-related impairments in anabolic responses to AAs and identifying strategies to mitigate these factors constitute major areas of interest. Numerous studies have aimed to identify 1) the influence of distinct protein sources on absorption kinetics and muscle anabolism, 2) the latency and time course of MPS responses to protein/AAs, 3) the impacts of protein/AA intake on muscle microvascular recruitment, and 4) the role of certain AAs (e.g., leucine) as signaling molecules, which are able to trigger anabolic pathways in tissues. This review aims to discuss these 4 issues listed, to provide historical and modern perspectives of AAs as modulators of human skeletal muscle protein metabolism, to describe how advances in stable isotope/mass spectrometric approaches and instrumentation have underpinned these advances, and to highlight relevant differences between young adults and older individuals. Whenever possible, observations are based on human studies, with additional consideration of relevant nonhuman studies. PMID:27422520

  1. Protecting Children Victims of Crimes of Human Trafficking in the EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora-Ioana Balan-Rusu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the paper there were examined the main provisions of the European legislative act framework in the domain of protecting children victims of human trafficking offenses, with some critical remarks. The paper can be useful to the European and Romanian legislator, practitioners and academics in the field. The novelty consists of analyzing the provisions of the European legislative act, focusing on the practical ways provided for the protection of children victims of this kind of crime, and the formulated critical remarks.

  2. Fatty acid composition of human milk and infant formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivančica Delaš

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate fatty acid composition of membrane lipids is necessary for structure and function of the developing nervous system. Rapid synthesis of brain tissue occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy and the early postnatal weeks. This synthesis of brain structure involves the formation of complex lipids, many of which contain significant quantities of essential fatty acids and their higher homologs. This study was undertaken to elucidate how fatty acid compositions of available diets for infants meet the requirements for essential fatty acids. Samples of infant formulas, present on the market, as well as milk samples obtained from breast feeding mothers, were extracted by chloroform : methanol mixtures in order to obtain total lipids. Fatty acid methyl esters were prepared and fatty acid composition was revealed by gas chromatography. Special interest was directed to the content of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The results have shown that infant formulas, designed to substitute mothers’ breast milk, contain medium chain fatty acids (C 10:0, C 12:0, along with the other saturated fatty acids, in the amounts acceptable for infants’ energy consumption. Although linoleic acid (C18:2, n-6 was present at the level expected to cover needs for essential fatty acids, most of the tested products did not contain sufficient amounts of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, despite the fact that these fatty acids are necessary for undisturbed brain development, ignoring the strong recommendations that they should be used as a supplement in infants’ food.

  3. PKCa Agonists Enhance the Protective Effect of Hyaluronic Acid on Nitric Oxide-Induced Apoptosis of Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-lin Zhou

    2013-12-01

    The results may be showed that PKCa regulate the expresion of caspase-3, which contribute to the apoptosis of chondrocytes induced by NO. PKC α agonists enhance the protective effect of hyaluronic acid on nitric oxide-induced articular chondrocytes apoptosis.

  4. Aldehyde Selective Wacker Oxidations of Phthalimide Protected Allylic Amines : A New Catalytic Route to beta(3)-Amino Acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiner, Barbara; Baeza Garcia, Alejandro; Jerphagnon, Thomas; Feringa, Ben L.

    2009-01-01

    A new method for the synthesis of B-3-amino acids is presented. Phthalimide protected allylic amines are oxidized under Wacker conditions selectively to aldehydes using PdCl2 and CuCl or Pd(MeCN)(2)Cl(NO2) and CuCl2 as complementary catalyst systems. The aldehydes are produced in excellent yields an

  5. Exogenous alpha-1-acid glycoprotein protects against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury by inhibition of inflammation and apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, B; Walter, SJ; Wolfs, TGAM; Hochepied, T; Rabina, J; Heeringa, P; Parkkinen, J; Libert, C; Buurman, WA

    2004-01-01

    Background. Although ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury represents a major problem in posttransplant organ failure, effective treatment is not available. The acute phase protein a-l-acid glycoprotein (AGP) has been shown to be protective against experimental I/R injury. The effects of AGP are thought

  6. Protective Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Molecular Behavior Changes of Hemoglobin Induced by Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nahed S.; Abou Aiad, T. H. M.

    With the use of electricity and industrialization of societies, humans are commonly exposed to static magnetic field induced by electric currents. The putative mechanisms by which Static Magnetic Field (SMF) may affect biological systems is that of increasing free radical life span in organisms. To test this hypothesis, we investigate the effect of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) treatment on the changes in the molecular behavior of hemoglobin as a result of exposure of the animals to magnetic field in the occupation levels. By measuring the relative permittivity, dielectric loss, relaxation time, conductivity, radius and diffusion coefficient of aqueous solutions of hemoglobin. These measurements were calculated in the frequency range of (100 Hz-100 kHz) to give more information about molecular behavior. Twenty four male albino rats were equally divided into four groups 1, 2, 3 and 4. Animals of group 1, were used as control, animals of group 2, were exposed to (0.2T) magnetic field and that of group 3, 4, were treated with Ascorbic Acid by two doses group 3 (20 mg kg-1 body weight), group 4 (50 mg kg-1 body weight) orally half hour before exposure to magnetic field. The sub chronic exposure expanded (1 h day-1) for 30 consecutive days. The results indicated that exposure of animals to magnetic field resulted in changes in the molecular behavior of hemoglobin molecule while treatment with ascorbic acid afforded comparatively more significant amelioration in these molecular changes, via decreasing the radical pair interaction of magnetic field with biological molecules.

  7. Hydrogenation Alternatives - Effects of Trans-Fatty-Acids and Stearic-Acid Versus Linoleic-Acid on Serum-Lipids and Lipoproteins in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of linoleic acid (cis,cis-C18:2(n-6)) and its hydrogenation products elaidic (trans-C18:1(n-9)) and stearic acid (C18:0) on serum lipoprotein levels in humans.Twenty-six men and 30 women, all nor

  8. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds.

  9. Patterns of amino acid metabolism by proliferating human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera, G.A.; Schop, D.; Spitters, T.W.; Dijkhuizen, R.; Bracke, M.; Bruijn, J.D.; Martens, D.E.; Karperien, M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of stem cells have not been determined; in particular, the amino acid metabolism of stem cells is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the amino acid metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), with focus on two questions: Which amino acids are consume

  10. The stereospecific triacylglycerol structures and fatty acid profiles of human milk and infant formulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straarup, Ellen Marie; Lauritzen, L.; Færk, Jan;

    2006-01-01

    Background: The stereospecific structures of the triacylglycerol molecules in human milk differ from that of cow's milk and vegetable oils, which are the fat sources used in infant formula. In human milk, palmitic acid (16:0) is predominantly esterified in the sn2 position, whereas vegetable oils...... the triacylglycerol structures and fatty acid profiles of fats from 28 infant formulas or formulas for special indications available in the Danish market from 1999 to 2003. Results: The total fatty acid compositions of the formulas showed a 16:0 content almost similar to human milk, whereas the content in the sn2......-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) were present in all preterm formulas, but only in 3 of the term formulas. Conclusion: We found that most of the examined infant formulas, both preterm and term as well as special formulas, had stereospecific structures and fatty acid profiles...

  11. Hemagglutinin amino acids related to receptor specificity could affect the protection efficacy of H5N1 and H7N9 avian influenza virus vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lili; Bao, Linlin; Lau, Siu-Ying; Wu, Wai-Lan; Yuan, Jing; Gu, Songzhi; Li, Fengdi; Lv, Qi; Xu, Yanfeng; Pushko, Peter; Chen, Honglin; Qin, Chuan

    2016-05-17

    The continuous and sporadic human transmission of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses illustrates the urgent need for efficacious vaccines. However, all tested vaccines for the H5N1 and H7N9 viruses appear to be poorly immunogenic in mammals. In this study, a series of vaccines was produced using reverse genetic techniques that possess HA and NA genes from the H5N1 virus in the genetic background of the high-yield strain A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). Meanwhile, a group of H7N9 VLP vaccines that contain HA from H7N9 and NA and M1 from A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) was also produced. The HA amino acids of both the H5N1 and H7N9 vaccines differed at residues 226 and 228, both of which are critical for receptor specificity for an avian or mammalian host. Mice received two doses (3μg of HA each) of each vaccine and were challenged with lethal doses of wild type H5N1 or H7N9 viruses. The results showed that a recombinant H5N1 vaccine in which the HA amino acid G228 (avian specificity) was converted to S228 (mammalian specificity) resulted in higher HI titers, a lower viral titer in the lungs, and 100% protection in mice. However, a H7N9 VLP vaccine that contains L226 (mammalian specificity) and G228 (avian specificity) in HA showed better immunogenicity and protection efficacy in mice than VLP containing HA with either L226+S228 or Q226+S228. This observation indicated that specific HA residues could enhance a vaccine's protection efficacy and HA glycoproteins with both avian-type and human-type receptor specificities may produce better pandemic influenza vaccines for humans. PMID:27083426

  12. Protective Role of Alpha Lipoic Acid Against Disorders Induced by Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation interacts with living cells, causing a variety of biochemical changes depending on exposed and absorbed doses, duration of exposure, interval after exposure and susceptibility of tissues to ionizing radiation. So, it may increase the oxidative stress and damage of body organs. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA-also known as thioctic acid) appears to be readily absorbed from an oral dose and converts easily to its reduced form, dihydro lipoic acid (DHLA), in many tissues of the body. ALA can neutralize free radicals in both fatty and watery regions of cells. The present study has been designed to evaluate the possible efficiency of ALA as antioxidant and radio-protector against radiation induced oxidative stress in different organs (liver, kidney and heart) in rats through estimation of the activity of markers of serum liver, kidney and heart function, in addition to the histopathological differentiation of these organs by light and electron microscope. Five equal groups were conducted for the study: control, ALA (30 mg/kg body wt), irradiated (each rat was exposed to 6 Gy as a fractionated dose of gamma (γ) radiation), irradiated plus ALA (each rat received ALA for 9 days simultaneously during exposure) and ALA plus irradiation plus ALA groups (each rat received ALA for a week pre-exposure plus 9 days during exposure). Radiation doses were fractionated dose levels of 2 Gy each 3 days to reach accumulative dose of 6 Gy. After 3 days of each exposure rats were sacrificed, except, those left for recovery test one month after last exposure. The results revealed that whole body γ-irradiation of rats induces oxidative stress in liver, kidney and heart obviously manifested by significant elevation in alanine and aspartate transaminase ( ALT and AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), urea, creatinine and creatine kinase (CK-MB). ALA treated-irradiated rats showed lower significantly values indicating remarkable improvement in all measured parameters and

  13. Protective effects of vitamin B12, ginseng saponin, and folic acid against murine fetal deformities caused by hyperthermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李荷莲; 王博蔚; 赵丹; 韩丽英

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective effects of vitamin B12, ginseng saponin, and folic acid on mouse embryos subjected to high heat.Methods Mice were used for the experiment.Results After exposure of pregnant mice to high heat, the rates of teratism, stillbirth, and fetal absorption were markedly lower in mice treated with ginseng saponin and folic acid following heat exposure than in untreated mice. There were no significant differences in these rates when comparing mice treated with vitamin B12 with the untreated mice.Conclusions Ginseng saponin and folic acid can lessen injuries to murine embryos caused by high heat, while vitamin B12 has little protective effect against high temperature except for promoting overall embryonic growth.

  14. Sex-Specific Protection of Osteoarthritis by Deleting Cartilage Acid Protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianpeng Ge

    Full Text Available Cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1 was recently identified as an elevated protein in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis (OA by a proteomic analysis. This gene is also upregulated in both human and mouse OA by transcriptomic analysis. The objective of this study was to characterize the expression and function of CRTAC1 in OA. Here, we first confirm the increase of CRTAC1 in cartilage biopsies from OA patients undergoing joint replacement by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we report that proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha upregulate CRTAC1 expression in primary human articular chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Genetic deletion of Crtac1 in mice significantly inhibited cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and gait abnormalities of post-traumatic OA in female, but not male, animals undergoing the destabilization of medial meniscus (DMM surgery. Taken together, CRTAC1 is upregulated in the osteoarthritic joint and directly induced in chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts by pro-inflammatory cytokines. This molecule is necessary for the progression of OA in female mice after DMM surgery and thus represents a potential therapy for this prevalent disease, especially for women who demonstrate higher rates and more severe OA.

  15. Acidic HEPES-KH Reperfusion Enhances Myocardial Protection in Immature Rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙忠东; 杨辰垣; 邢建洲; 陈涛; 董念国; 罗军

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To study the effects of different pH HEPES-KH reperfusate solution on immature myocardial protection, isolated perfused Langendorff model from immature rabbit hearts were developed formed. Control group (C) was perfused only with pH 7. 4 HEPES-KH solution for 90 min. Is chemia/reperfusion group (group I/R) was perfused with pH 7. 4 HEPES-KH solution before is chemia or after ischemia. Experimental group (group E), after ischemia, was perfused with pH 6.8,pH 7. 1 and pH7.4 HEPES-KH solutions for 5 min, 5 min, and 20 min, respectively. The left ven tricular function recovery, MWC, LDH and CK leakage, MDA, ATP content, and SOD activity were determined. Our results showed that the left ventricular function recovery, ATP content and SOD activity in group E were higher than those of group I/R (P<0. 05). MWC, MDA content,LDH and CK leakage in group E were lower than those of group I/R (P<0. 05). These findings suggested that pH paradox might be one of important mechanisms for immature myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury, and acidic perfusate, at the beginning of reperfusion, might attenuate pH paradox and ameliorate functional recovery in isolated perfused immature rabbit hearts.

  16. Protective effect of alpha-lipoic acid on cypermethrin-induced oxidative stress in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignini, F; Nasuti, C; Fedeli, D; Mattioli, L; Cosenza, M; Artico, M; Gabbianelli, R

    2013-01-01

    Cypermethrin (CY), a class II pyrethroid pesticide, is globally used to control insects in the household and in agriculture. Despite beneficial roles, its uncontrolled and repetitive application leads to unintended effects in non-target organisms. In light of the relevant anti-oxidant properties of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), in the work described herein we tested the effect of a commercially available ALA formulation on cypermethrin CY)-induced oxidative stress in Wistar rats. The rats were orally administered with 53.14 mg/kg of ALA and 35.71 mg/kg of CY for 60 days. The treatment with CY did not induce changes in either locomotor activities or in body weight. Differences were observed on superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and lipid peroxidation that were re-established by ALA treatment at similar levels of the placebo group. Furthermore, ALA formulation increased glutathione (GSH) level and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Because of the widespread use of CY, higher amounts of pesticide residues are present in food, and a diet supplementation with ALA could be an active free radical scavenger protecting against diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  17. Salidroside protects against kainic acid-induced status epilepticus via suppressing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Pei-Pei; Zhen, Jun-Li; Cai, Yun-Lei; Wang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous mechanisms by which the brain generates seizures. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE). Salidroside (SDS) extracted from Rhodiola rosea L. shows multiple bioactive properties, such as neuroprotection and antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo. This study explored the role of SDS in kainic acid (KA)-induced SE and investigated the underlying mechanism. Latency to SE increased in the SDS-pretreated mice compared to the KA group, while the percentage of incidence of SE was significantly reduced. These results suggested that pretreatment with SDS not only delayed SE, but it also decreased the incidence of SE induced by KA. KA increased MDA level and reduced the production of SOD and GSH at multiple timepoints after KA administration. SDS inhibited the change of MDA, SOD and GSH induced by KA prior to SE onset, indicating that SDS protects against KA-induced SE via suppressing oxidative stress. Based on these results, we investigated the possible molecular mechanism of SDS. Pretreatment with SDS reversed the KA-induced decrease in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK); increased the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity in KA-treated mice, which had no demonstrable effect on SIRT1 mRNA and protein; and suppressed the KA-induced increase in Ace-FoxO1. These results showed that AMPK/SIRT1/FoxO1 signaling is possibly the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by SDS.

  18. Protective role of miR-23b-3p in kainic acid-induced seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lianbo; Yao, Yi; Fu, Huajun; Li, Zhenghui; Wang, Fengpeng; Zhang, Xiaobin; He, Wencan; Zheng, Weihong; Zhang, Yunwu; Zheng, Honghua

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs has been proposed to contribute toward epilepsy. The miRNA miR-23b-3p has been found to protect against neuronal apoptosis and the production of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we assessed the potential role of miR-23b-3p in the kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure model. We found that miR-23b-3p levels were significantly decreased in the brain cortex of mice and in cultured mouse primary neurons treated with KA. Importantly, supplement of miR-23b-3p agomir by an intacerebroventricular injection alleviated seizure behaviors and abnormal cortical electroencephalogram recordings in KA-treated mice. Together, these results indicate that miR-23b-3p plays a crucial role in suppressing seizure formation in experimental models of epilepsy and that miR-23b-3p supplement may be a potential anabolic strategy for ameliorating seizure. PMID:27232518

  19. The in vitro protective effect of salicylic acid against paclitaxel and cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Damla; Hacımuftuoglu, Ahmet; Tatar, Abdulgani; Turkez, Hasan; Togar, Basak

    2016-08-01

    Paclitaxel (PAC) and cisplatin (CIS) are two established chemotherapeutic drugs used in combination for the treatment of various solid tumors. However, the usage of PAC and CIS are limited because of the incidence of their moderate or severe neurotoxic side effects. In this study, we aimed to assess the protective role of salicylic acid (SA) against neurotoxicity caused by PAC and CIS. For this purpose, newborn Sprague Dawley rats were decapitated in sterile atmosphere and primary cortex neuron cultures were established. On the 10th day SA was added into culture plates. PAC and CIS were added on the 12th day. The cytotoxicity was determined by using the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. Oxidative alterations were assessed using total antioxidant capacity and total oxidative stress assays in rat primary neuron cell cultures. It was shown that both concentrations of PAC and CIS treatments caused neurotoxicity. Although SA decreased the neurotoxicity by CIS and PAC, it was more effective against the toxicity caused by CIS rather than the toxicity caused by PAC. In conclusion it was clearly revealed that SA decreased the neurotoxic effect of CIS and PAC in vitro. PMID:26199062

  20. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Promotes Process Outgrowth in Neural Cells and Exerts Protective Effects against Tropodithietic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Wichmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment harbors a plethora of bioactive substances, including drug candidates of potential value in the field of neuroscience. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP, produced by several algae, corals and higher plants, on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a and OLN-93 cells as model system for nerve cells and glia, respectively. Additionally, the protective capabilities of DMSP were assessed in cells treated with tropodithietic acid (TDA, a marine metabolite produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria. Both cell lines, N2a and OLN-93, have previously been shown to be a sensitive target for the action of TDA, and cytotoxic effects of TDA have been connected to the induction of oxidative stress. Our data shows that DMSP promotes process outgrowth and microtubule reorganization and bundling, accompanied by an increase in alpha-tubulin acetylation. Furthermore, DMSP was able to prevent the cytotoxic effects exerted by TDA, including the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of heat shock protein Hsp32 and activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2. Our study points to the conclusion that DMSP provides an antioxidant defense, not only in algae but also in mammalian neural cells.

  1. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Promotes Process Outgrowth in Neural Cells and Exerts Protective Effects against Tropodithietic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Heidi; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment harbors a plethora of bioactive substances, including drug candidates of potential value in the field of neuroscience. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), produced by several algae, corals and higher plants, on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a and OLN-93 cells as model system for nerve cells and glia, respectively. Additionally, the protective capabilities of DMSP were assessed in cells treated with tropodithietic acid (TDA), a marine metabolite produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria. Both cell lines, N2a and OLN-93, have previously been shown to be a sensitive target for the action of TDA, and cytotoxic effects of TDA have been connected to the induction of oxidative stress. Our data shows that DMSP promotes process outgrowth and microtubule reorganization and bundling, accompanied by an increase in alpha-tubulin acetylation. Furthermore, DMSP was able to prevent the cytotoxic effects exerted by TDA, including the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of heat shock protein Hsp32 and activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Our study points to the conclusion that DMSP provides an antioxidant defense, not only in algae but also in mammalian neural cells. PMID:27164116

  2. Novel long chain fatty acid derivatives of quercetin-3-O-glucoside reduce cytotoxicity induced by cigarette smoke toxicants in human fetal lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnakulasuriya, Sumudu N; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2016-06-15

    Smoking has become a global health concern due to its association with many disease conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and cancer. Flavonoids are plant polyphenolic compounds, studied extensively for their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G) is a flavonoid which is widely found in plants. Six novel long chain fatty acid [stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] derivatives of Q3G were evaluated for their potential in protecting human lung fibroblasts against cytotoxicity induced by selected cigarette smoke toxicants: 4-(methylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone (NNK), benzo-α-pyrene (BaP), nicotine and chromium (Cr[VI]). Nicotine and Cr[VI] induced toxicity in fibroblasts and reduced the percentage of viable cells, while BaP and NNK did not affect cell viability. The fatty acid derivatives of Q3G provided protection against nicotine- and Cr[VI]-induced cell death and membrane lipid peroxidation. Based on the evaluation of inflammatory markers of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the fatty acid derivatives of Q3G were found to be effective in lowering the inflammatory response. Overall, these novel fatty acid esters of Q3G warrant further investigation as potential cytoprotective agents. PMID:27071958

  3. Bridging non-human primate correlates of protection to reassess the Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed booster schedule in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Jarad M; Chen, Ligong; Dalton, Shannon; Niemuth, Nancy A; Sabourin, Carol L; Quinn, Conrad P

    2015-07-17

    Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA, BioThrax) is approved for use in humans as a priming series of 3 intramuscular (i.m.) injections (0, 1, 6 months; 3-IM) with boosters at 12 and 18 months, and annually thereafter for those at continued risk of infection. A reduction in AVA booster frequency would lessen the burden of vaccination, reduce the cumulative frequency of vaccine associated adverse events and potentially expand vaccine coverage by requiring fewer doses per schedule. Because human inhalation anthrax studies are neither feasible nor ethical, AVA efficacy estimates are determined using cross-species bridging of immune correlates of protection (COP) identified in animal models. We have previously reported that the AVA 3-IM priming series provided high levels of protection in non-human primates (NHP) against inhalation anthrax for up to 4 years after the first vaccination. Penalized logistic regressions of those NHP immunological data identified that anti-protective antigen (anti-PA) IgG concentration measured just prior to infectious challenge was the most accurate single COP. In the present analysis, cross-species logistic regression models of this COP were used to predict probability of survival during a 43 month study in humans receiving the current 3-dose priming and 4 boosters (12, 18, 30 and 42 months; 7-IM) and reduced schedules with boosters at months 18 and 42 only (5-IM), or at month 42 only (4-IM). All models predicted high survival probabilities for the reduced schedules from 7 to 43 months. The predicted survival probabilities for the reduced schedules were 86.8% (4-IM) and 95.8% (5-IM) at month 42 when antibody levels were lowest. The data indicated that 4-IM and 5-IM are both viable alternatives to the current AVA pre-exposure prophylaxis schedule. PMID:26072016

  4. Specific interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid with the human immunodeficiency virus/CD4 cell receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schols, D.; Baba, M.; Pauwels, R.; Desmyter, J.; De Clercq, E. (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium))

    1989-05-01

    The triphenylmethane derivative aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), but not aurin, selectively prevented the binding of OKT4A/Leu-3a monoclonal antibody (mAb) and, to a lesser extent, OKT4 mAb to the CD4 cell receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The effect was seen within 1 min at an ATA concentration of 10 {mu}M in various T4{sup +} cells (MT-4, U-937, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and monocytes). It was dose-dependent and reversible. ATA prevented the attachment of radiolabeled HIV-1 particles to MT-4 cells, which could be expected as the result of its specific binding to the HIV/CD4 receptor. Other HIV inhibitors such as suramin, fuchsin acid, azidothymidine, dextran sulfate, heparin, and pentosan polysulfate did not affect OKT4A/Leu-3a mAb binding to the CD4 receptor, although the sulfated polysaccharides suppressed HIV-1 adsorption to the cells at concentrations required for complete protection against HIV-1 cytopathogenicity. Thus, ATA is a selective marker molecule for the CD4 receptor. ATA also interfered with the staining of membrane-associated HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 by a mAb against it. These unusual properties of a small molecule of nonimmunological origin may have important implications for the study of CD4/HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and possibly treatment.

  5. The Impacts of Macroergonomics on Environmental Protection and Human Performance in Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Azadeh, J Nouri, I Mohammad Fam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and his performance is a vital factor in protection of asset including environmental properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of total system design factors (TSD on human performance in a power plant. The TSD factors are defined as design factors, which have impact on overall performance of the power plants in context of total human engineering or macroergonomics. The systems being studied are the control rooms and maintenance departments of a 2000 MW thermal power plant. To achieve the above objective, the TSD factors were addressed and assessed through a detailed questionnaire. The relationships between TSD factors and human performance were then examined through non-parametric correlation analysis (Kramer’s Phi and Kruskal-Wallis test of means. The results of this study show that the macroergonomic factors such as organizational and safety procedures, teamwork, self-organization, job design and information exchange, influence human performance in the power plant. The findings also suggest that the selected macroergonomic factors are correlated to human performance and must be considered, designed and tested concurrently with the engineering factors at the design phase of the system developmental cycle. Consequently, total system’s faults and organizational errors are reduced to an acceptable level and human performance is significantly increased. The main goal in such program is customer's satisfaction (Internal customers. However, more elaboration on the scientific tools for implementation of TDS factors in context of human performance is also under investigation.

  6. Legal protection in psychiatry. The jurisprudence of the organs of the European convention of human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougin, A

    1998-01-01

    The European Convention of Human Rights recognises a certain number of rights and freedoms for persons within States' jurisdiction. For those confined in psychiatric hospitals, this legal protection concerns first of all the lawfulness of deprivation of liberty, which must conform to the conditions laid down by the Convention as interpreted by the case-law of the Convention organs (the Commission and Court of Human Rights). The Convention also guarantees to person deprived of their liberty further rights: the right to information, the right to appear before a court, the right to compensation and also the right to the respect of privacy and correspondence.

  7. The evolution of the Constitutional Protection of Women’s Human Rights in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra MORENO FLÓREZ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Human rights were first acknowledged in Colombia in the 1991 Constitution, bringing up a catalogue of specific rights in favour of the female population whose implementation has been possible thanks to the Constitutional Court’s decisive compromise on the struggle against gender discrimination. This way, since the incorporation of the gender perspective in the Colombian Law, great progress has been obtained in the effectiveness of the constitutional normative framework and in the consequent effective protection of women’s human rights in legally relevant different ambits of life.

  8. Report on the COSPAR Workshop on Refining Planetary Protection Requirements for Human Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, James Andrew; Rummel, John; Conley, Catharine; Race, Margaret; Kminek, Gerhard; Siegel, Bette

    2016-07-01

    A human mission to Mars has been the driving long-term goal for the development of the Global Exploration Roadmap by the International Space Exploration Coordination Group. Additionally, multiple national space agencies and commercial organizations have published similar plans and aspirations for human missions beyond LEO. The current COSPAR planetary protection "Guidelines for Human Missions to Mars" were developed in a series of workshops in the early 2000s and adopted into COSPAR policy at the Montreal Assembly in 2008. With changes and maturation in mission architecture concepts and hardware capabilities, the holding of a workshop provided an opportunity for timely review of these guidelines and their interpretation within current frameworks provided by ISECG and others. The COSPAR Workshop on Refining Planetary Protection Requirements for Human Missions was held in the US in spring 2016 to evaluate recent efforts and activities in the context of current COSPAR policy, as well as collect inputs from the various organizations considering crewed exploration missions to Mars and precursor robotic missions focused on surface material properties and environmental challenges. The workshop also considered potential updates to the COSPAR policy for human missions across a range of planetary destinations. This paper will report on those deliberations.

  9. When does quality improvement count as research? Human subject protection and theories of knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    LYNN, J

    2004-01-01

    

 The publication of insights from a quality improvement project recently precipitated a ruling by the lead federal regulatory agency that regulations providing protection for human subjects of research should apply. The required research review process did not match the rapid changes, small samples, limited documentation, clinician management, and type of information commonly used in quality improvement. Yet quality improvement can risk harm to patients, so some review might be in order. Th...

  10. In vitro protection of human lymphocytes from toxic effects of chlorpyrifos by selenium-enriched medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Asadi, Hamidreza; Baeeri, Maryam; Pedram, Sahar; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Chlorpyrifos (CP) is a broad-spectrum organophosphorus pesticide used extensively in agricultural and domestic pest control, accounting for 50% of the global insecticidal use. In the present study, protective effects of two selenium-enriched strong antioxidative medicines IMOD and Angipars were examined in human lymphocytes treated with CP in vitro. Materials and Methods: Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 12 µg/ml CP either alone or in combination with effective doses (ED50) ...

  11. The environmental protection in the jurisprudence of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio de Oliveira Mazzuoli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the interconnections between environmental issues and the protection of human rights, in a process that began in the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment (Stockholm, 1972 and has been developed by the greening of the regional human rights systems. In the Inter-American system the article 11 of the Additional Protocol to the American Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights of 1988 — the Protocol of San Salvador — guarantees the right to a healthy environment. However the American Convention (on its arts. 3-25, 44-51 and 61-69 and its Additional Protocol (on its arts. 8, 13 and 19.6 only allow the submission of individual petitions to the Inter-American Commission and the possible acting of the Inter-American Court, in complaints containing alleged violations of civil and political rights, trade union rights and the right to education. Despite the lack of devices that are capable to ensure an effective protection to the right to a healthy environment, by itself, the Inter-American Court has demonstrated the greening of the human rights, which means, in other words, that it is quite possible to protect environmental issues by the demonstration of its interconnections with civil and political rights that are directly protected by the inter-American system. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the contributions of the jurisprudence of the Inter-American Court in the strengthening of the civil and political rights in cases related to environmental issues.

  12. Protective effect of selenium and zinc on UV-A damage in human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet A radiation participates in cytotoxicity and carcinogensis of the skin by a mechanism involving the generation of reactive oxygen species. Endogenous antiradical defense systems utilize metalloenzymes including Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase and Cu and Zn superoxide dismutase. The aim of the present work was to determine the protective effect of two trace elements, Se and Zn, on cultured human diploid fibroblasts exposed to UV-A radiation (broad-spectrum source with a maximum intensity at 375 nm). (Author)

  13. Redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles protect human dermal fibroblasts from PQ-induced damage

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia von Montfort; Lirija Alili; Sarah Teuber-Hanselmann; Peter Brenneisen

    2014-01-01

    Recently, it has been published that cerium (Ce) oxide nanoparticles (CNP; nanoceria) are able to downregulate tumor invasion in cancer cell lines. Redox-active CNP exhibit both selective pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties, the first being responsible for impairment of tumor growth and invasion. A non-toxic and even protective effect of CNP in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) has already been observed. However, the effect on important parameters such as cell death, proliferation and red...

  14. Protected areas as biodiversity benchmarks for human impact: agriculture and the Serengeti avifauna.

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, A R E; Mduma, Simon A. R.; Arcese, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Protected areas as biodiversity benchmarks allow a separation of the direct effects of human impact on biodiversity loss from those of other environmental changes. We illustrate the use of ecological baselines with a case from the Serengeti ecosystem, Tanzania. We document a substantial but previously unnoted loss of bird diversity in agriculture detected by reference to the immediately adjacent native vegetation in Serengeti. The abundance of species found in agriculture was only 28% of that...

  15. Endothelial Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Polyglycolic Acid/Polylactic Acid Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC is considered as a cell source potentially useful for angiogenesis in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This study investigated the growth and endothelial differentiation of human ADSCs on polyglycolic acid/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA mesh compared to 2D plastic. Cell adhesion, viability, and distribution of hADSCs on PGA/PLA mesh were observed by CM-Dil labeling, live/dead staining, and SEM examination while endothelial differentiation was evaluated by flow cytometry, Ac-LDL/UEA-1 uptake assay, immunofluorescence stainings, and gene expression analysis of endothelial related markers. Results showed hADSCs gained a mature endothelial phenotype with a positive ratio of 21.4 ± 3.7% for CD31+/CD34− when induced in 3D mesh after 21 days, which was further verified by the expressions of a comprehensive range of endothelial related markers, whereas hADSCs in 2D induced and 2D/3D noninduced groups all failed to differentiate into endothelial cells. Moreover, compared to 2D groups, the expression for α-SMA was markedly suppressed in 3D cultured hADSCs. This study first demonstrated the endothelial differentiation of hADSCs on the PGA/PLA mesh and pointed out the synergistic effect of PGA/PLA 3D culture and growth factors on the acquisition of mature characteristic endothelial phenotype. We believed this study would be the initial step towards the generation of prevascularized tissue engineered constructs.

  16. Release of Propolis Phenolic Acids from Semisolid Formulations and Their Penetration into the Human Skin In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modestas Žilius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant and free radical scavenging effects are attributed to phenolic compounds present in propolis, and when delivered to the skin surface and following penetration into epidermis and dermis, they can contribute to skin protection from damaging action of free radicals that are formed under UV and premature skin aging. This study was designed to determine the penetration of phenolic acids and vanillin into the human skin in vitro from experimentally designed vehicles. Results of the study demonstrated the ability of propolis phenolic acids (vanillic, coumaric, caffeic, and ferulic acids and vanillin to penetrate into skin epidermis and dermis. The rate of penetration and distribution is affected both by physicochemical characteristics of active substances and physical structure and chemical composition of semisolid vehicle. Vanillin and vanillic acid demonstrated relatively high penetration through epidermis into dermis where these compounds were concentrated, coumaric and ferulic acids were uniformly distributed between epidermis and dermis, and caffeic acid slowly penetrated into epidermis and was not determined in dermis. Further studies are deemed relevant for the development of semisolid topically applied systems designed for efficient delivery of propolis antioxidants into the skin.

  17. Acid adaptation induces cross-protection against environmental stresses in Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Leyer, G J; Johnson, E A

    1993-01-01

    The relationship of acid adaptation to tolerance of other environmental stresses was examined in Salmonella typhimurium. S. typhimurium was adapted to acid by exposing the cells to mildly acidic conditions (pH 5.8) for one to two cell doublings. Acid-adapted cells were found to have increased tolerance towards various stresses including heat, salt, an activated lactoperoxidase system, and the surface-active agents crystal violet and polymyxin B. Acid adaptation increased cell surface hydropho...

  18. CORROSION IN ACIDIC BEVERAGES AND RECOVERY OF MICROHARDNESS OF HUMAN TEETH ENAMEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Gaalova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied the influence of corrosion in acidic beverages (white wine, pH~3.5 on micromechanical properties of human teeth. Simultaneously, the effect of fluorine-containing mouthwash (pH~4.4 and of artificial saliva (pH~5.3 in terms of their protective action against corrosion, and the recovery of mechanical properties through fluoridation and re-calcification was studied. The influence of the solutions on Vickers hardness of dental enamel was monitored on the basis of results from the corrosion tests carried out under quasi-dynamic conditions. The tests were performed at the temperature corresponding to the temperature of human body (37°C. The measurements confirmed a significant deterioration of microhardness with prolonged exposure to white wine. The Vickers hardness decreased from 347 HV0.2 in un-corroded specimens to 186 HV0.2 in samples corroded for 60 minutes in white wine. A recovery of Vickers hardness was observed after 60 minutes exposition time in the fluoridation solution, with the increase from 186 to 372 HV0.2. Similar effect was observed in the artificial saliva solution, with observed hardness increase from 186 to 320 HV0.2. Healing of corrosion-induced defects by the action of both solutions was observed by SEM, and associated with observed increase of hardness

  19. Principles of human rights protection in foreign and home legal policy of the Russian state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anokhin Yu.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The principles of state protection of human rights are stated to be important. The principles of human rights policy being a system are conditional on main state goals and objectives, that is ensuring legal safety and unhindered development of an individual and society. This system is argued to be two-component and to include the principles of government mechanism’s construction and activity and general human rights principles. The principles which are not fixed in the legislation are also of great importance. The legislative fixing of principles of civil servants’ activity concerning the human rights is positively estimated by the authors, notably the priority of rights and freedoms of man and citizen; professionalism and competence of civil servants; availability of information on civil service; cooperation with public associations and citizens; security of civil servants against illegal intrusion into their activity. The facts of departure from impartial justice and disrespectful attitude of law enforcement officers to citizens are stated to be wide-spread. The authors prove the necessity to intensify the control of public authorities’ and officials’ activity, to create conditions of its full transparency for the public. The principles of state protection of human rights are ruling principles of public authority’s organization and activity, stating its essence, social function and orientation on setting high level of legal security of man and citizen, fixed in the international agreements and national legislation. It is proposed to reconsider the principles of Russia’s functioning in the sphere of protecting the rights of citizens and proprietors residing abroad.

  20. Beef conjugated linoleic acid isomers reduce human cancer cell growth even when associated with other beef fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    De La Torre, Anne; Debiton, Eric; Juaneda, Pierre; Durand, Denis; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Barthomeuf, Chantal; Bauchart, Dominique; Gruffat, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Although many data are available concerning anticarcinogenic effects of industrial conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), few studies have reported the antitumour properties of CLA mixtures originating from ruminant products. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antiproliferative effects of beef CLA mixtures on breast, lung, colon, melanoma and ovarian human cancer cell lines. For this purpose, four fatty acid (FA) extracts prepared from beef lipid and varying in their CLA co...

  1. Ellagic acid protects endothelial cells from oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptosis by modulating the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endothelial apoptosis is a driving force in atherosclerosis development. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) promotes inflammatory and thrombotic processes and is highly atherogenic, as it stimulates macrophage cholesterol accumulation and foam cell formation. Previous studies have shown that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide (PI3K/Akt/eNOS/NO) pathway is involved in oxLDL-induced endothelial apoptosis. Ellagic acid, a natural polyphenol found in berries and nuts, has in recent years been the subject of intense research within the fields of cancer and inflammation. However, its protective effects against oxLDL-induced injury in vascular endothelial cells have not been clarified. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effect of ellagic acid in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to oxLDL and explored the possible mechanisms. Our results showed that pretreatment with ellagic acid (5-20 μM) significantly attenuated oxLDL-induced cytotoxicity, apoptotic features, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, the anti-apoptotic effect of ellagic acid was partially inhibited by a PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) and a specific eNOS inhibitor (cavtratin) but not by an ERK inhibitor (PD98059). In exploring the underlying mechanisms of ellagic acid action, we found that oxLDL decreased Akt and eNOS phosphorylation, which in turn activated NF-κB and downstream pro-apoptotic signaling events including calcium accumulation, destabilization of mitochondrial permeability, and disruption of the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Those alterations induced by oxLDL, however, were attenuated by pretreatment with ellagic acid. The inhibition of oxLDL-induced endothelial apoptosis by ellagic acid is due at least in part to its anti-oxidant activity and its ability to modulate the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway.

  2. Protective activity of butyrate on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in isolated human colonocytes and HT29 tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosignoli, P; Fabiani, R; De Bartolomeo, A; Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Pelli, M A; Morozzi, G

    2001-10-01

    Epidemiological studies support the involvement of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in colon physiology and the protective role of butyrate on colon carcinogenesis. Among the possible mechanisms by which butyrate may exert its anti-carcinogenicity an antioxidant activity has been recently suggested. We investigated the effects of butyrate and mixtures of SCFA (butyrate, propionate and acetate) on DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated human colonocytes and in two human colon tumour cell lines (HT29 and HT29 19A). Human colonocytes were isolated from endoscopically obtained samples and the DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage in normal colonocytes in a dose-dependent manner which was statistically significant at concentrations over 10 microM. At 15 microM H(2)O(2) DNA damage in HT29 and HT29 19A cells was significantly lower than that observed in normal colonocytes (P < 0.01). Pre-incubation of the cells with physiological concentrations of butyrate (6.25 and 12.5 mM) reduced H(2)O(2) (15 microM) induced damage by 33 and 51% in human colonocytes, 45 and 75% in HT29 and 30 and 80% in HT29 19A, respectively. Treatment of cells with a mixture of 25 mM acetate + 10.4 mM propionate + 6.25 mM butyrate did not induce DNA damage, while a mixture of 50 mM acetate + 20.8 mM propionate + 12.5 mM butyrate was weakly genotoxic only towards normal colonocytes. However, both mixtures were able to reduce the H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by about 50% in all cell types. The reported protective effect of butyrate might be important in pathogenetic mechanisms mediated by reactive oxygen species, and aids understanding of the apparent protection toward colorectal cancer exerted by dietary fibres, which enhance the butyrate bioavailability in the colonic mucosa. PMID:11577008

  3. Alkali production associated with malolactic fermentation by oral streptococci and protection against acid, oxidative, or starvation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiangyun; Baldeck, Jeremiah D; Nguyen, Phuong T M; Quivey, Robert G; Marquis, Robert E

    2010-07-01

    Alkali production by oral streptococci is considered important for dental plaque ecology and caries moderation. Recently, malolactic fermentation (MLF) was identified as a major system for alkali production by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans. Our major objectives in the work described in this paper were to further define the physiology and genetics of MLF of oral streptococci and its roles in protection against metabolic stress damage. L-Malic acid was rapidly fermented to L-lactic acid and CO(2) by induced cells of wild-type S. mutans, but not by deletion mutants for mleS (malolactic enzyme) or mleP (malate permease). Mutants for mleR (the contiguous regulator gene) had intermediate capacities for MLF. Loss of capacity to catalyze MLF resulted in loss of capacity for protection against lethal acidification. MLF was also found to be protective against oxidative and starvation damage. The capacity of S. mutans to produce alkali from malate was greater than its capacity to produce acid from glycolysis at low pH values of 4 or 5. MLF acted additively with the arginine deiminase system for alkali production by Streptococcus sanguinis, but not with urease of Streptococcus salivarius. Malolactic fermentation is clearly a major process for alkali generation by oral streptococci and for protection against environmental stresses.

  4. Footprints of Urban Micro-Pollution in Protected Areas: Investigating the Longitudinal Distribution of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Wildlife Preserves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio A Rodriguez-Jorquera

    Full Text Available Current approaches to protect biodiversity by establishing protected areas usually gloss over water pollution as a threat. Our objective was to determine the longitudinal and seasonal distribution of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs in water column and sediments from a wastewater dominated stream that enters preservation areas. Water samples were collected along the longitudinal section (six sites, 1000 m away from each other of the stream during the dry and wet seasons. Sediments were collected from three sites along the stream from three depths. Water and sediments were analyzed for PFAAs using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Eleven PFAAs with 5 to 14 carbon atoms were detected in the water column at all sampling points, with a minor reduction at the last point suggesting a dilution effect. The most detected PFAAs was PFOS, followed by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, and perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA. Seasonal differences in PFAAs concentrations suggested contribution of stormwater runoff during the wet season. All analyzed PFAAs in sediments were under the limit of quantification, likely due to the high proportion of sand and low organic matter. However, high concentrations of PFAAs were detected in the water column inside the protected areas, which includes PFOS in concentrations considered not safe for avian wildlife. Water samples appear to be more relevant than sediments to determine PFAAs micro-pollution in water bodies with sandy sediments. Inclusion of a management plans on micro-pollution research, monitoring, and mitigation is recommended for protected areas.

  5. Milk Chemical Composition of Dairy Cows Fed Rations Containing Protected Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Fermented Rice Bran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudibya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted to investigate the effect of ration containing protected omega-3 and fermented rice bran on chemical composition of dairy milk. The research employed 10 female PFH dairy cows of 2-4 years old with body weight 300-375 kg. The research was assigned in randomized complete block design. The treatment consisted of P0= control ration, P1= P0 + 20% fermented rice bran, P2= P1 + 4% soya bean oil, P3= P1 + 4% protected tuna fish oil and P4= P1 + 4% protected lemuru fish oil. The results showed that the effects of fish oil supplementation in the rations significantly (P<0.01 decreased feed consumption, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, lipids, and saturated fatty acids. Meanwhile, it increased milk production, content of high density lipoprotein, omega-3, omega-6 and unsaturated fatty acids in the dairy cows milk. It is concluded that the inclusion of 4% protected fish oil in the rations can produce healthy milk by decreasing milk cholesterol and increasing omega-3 fatty acids content.

  6. Mechanism of protection of adenosine from sulphate radical anion and repair of adenosine radicals by caffeic acid in aqueous solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sudha Swaraga; L Charitha; M Adinarayana

    2005-07-01

    The photooxidation of adenosine in presence of peroxydisulphate (PDS) has been studied by spectrophotometrically measuring the absorbance of adenosine at 260 nm. The rates of oxidation of adenosine by sulphate radical anion have been determined in the presence of different concentrations of caffeic acid. Increase in [caffeic acid] is found to decrease the rate of oxidation of adenosine suggesting that caffeic acid acts as an efficient scavenger of $SO_{4}^{\\bullet-}$ and protects adenosine from it. Sulphate radical anion competes for adenosine as well as for caffeic acid. The quantum yields of photooxidation of adenosine have been calculated from the rates of oxidation of adenosine and the light intensity absorbed by PDS at 254 nm, the wavelength at which PDS is activated to sulphate radical anion. From the results of experimentally determined quantum yields (exptl) and the quantum yields calculated (cal) assuming caffeic acid acting only as a scavenger of $SO_{4}^{\\bullet-}$ show that exptl values are lower than cal values. The ' values, which are experimentally found quantum yield values at each caffeic acid concentration and corrected for $SO_{4}^{\\bullet-}$ scavenging by caffeic acid, are also found to be greater than exptl values. These observations suggest that the transient adenosine radicals are repaired by caffeic acid in addition to scavenging of sulphate radical anions.

  7. Loss of N-glycolylneuraminic acid in humans: Mechanisms, consequences, and implications for hominid evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varki, A

    2001-01-01

    The surface of all mammalian cells is covered with a dense and complex array of sugar chains, which are frequently terminated by members of a family of molecules called sialic acids. One particular sialic acid called N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) is widely expressed on most mammalian tissues, but is not easily detectable on human cells. In fact, it provokes an immune response in adult humans. The human deficiency of Neu5Gc is explained by an inactivating mutation in the gene encoding CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in generating Neu5Gc in cells of other mammals. This deficiency also results in an excess of the precursor sialic acid N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) in humans. This mutation appears universal to modern humans, occurred sometime after our last common ancestor with the great apes, and happens to be one of the first known human-great ape genetic differences with an obvious biochemical readout. While the original selection mechanisms and major biological consequences of this human-specific mutation remain uncertain, several interesting clues are currently being pursued. First, there is evidence that the human condition can explain differences in susceptibility or resistance to certain microbial pathogens. Second, the functions of some endogenous receptors for sialic acids in the immune system may be altered by this difference. Third, despite the lack of any obvious alternate pathway for synthesis, Neu5Gc has been reported in human tumors and possibly in human fetal tissues, and traces have even been detected in normal human tissues. One possible explanation is that this represents accumulation of Neu5Gc from dietary sources of animal origin. Finally, a markedly reduced expression of hydroxylase in the brains of other mammals raises the possibility that the human-specific mutation of this enzyme could have played a role in human brain evolution.

  8. The importance of human FcgammaRI in mediating protection to malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S McIntosh

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The success of passive immunization suggests that antibody-based therapies will be effective at controlling malaria. We describe the development of fully human antibodies specific for Plasmodium falciparum by antibody repertoire cloning from phage display libraries generated from immune Gambian adults. Although these novel reagents bind with strong affinity to malaria parasites, it remains unclear if in vitro assays are predictive of functional immunity in humans, due to the lack of suitable animal models permissive for P. falciparum. A potentially useful solution described herein allows the antimalarial efficacy of human antibodies to be determined using rodent malaria parasites transgenic for P. falciparum antigens in mice also transgenic for human Fc-receptors. These human IgG1s cured animals of an otherwise lethal malaria infection, and protection was crucially dependent on human FcgammaRI. This important finding documents the capacity of FcgammaRI to mediate potent antimalaria immunity and supports the development of FcgammaRI-directed therapy for human malaria.

  9. Co-treatment with conjugated linoleic acid and nitrite protects against myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natia Qipshidze-Kelm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the CDC, the most common type of heart disease is coronary artery disease, which commonly leads to myocardial infarction (MI. Therapeutic approaches to lessen the resulting cardiovascular injury associated with MI are limited. Recently, MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to act as negative regulators of gene expression by inhibiting mRNA translation and/or stimulating mRNA degradation. A single miRNA can modulate physiological or disease phenotypes by regulating whole functional systems. Importantly, miRNAs can regulate cardiac function, thereby modulating heart muscle contraction, heart growth and morphogenesis. MicroRNA-499 (miRNA-499 is a cardiac-specific miRNA that when elevated causes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, in turn preventing cardiac dysfunction during MI. Previous studies revealed that combination treatment with conjugated linoleic acid (cLA and nitrite preserved cardiovascular function in mice. Therefore, it was hypothesized that cLA and nitrite may regulate miRNA-499, thus providing cardiac protection during MI. To test this hypothesis, 12-week old mice were treated with cLA (10 mg/kg/d-via osmotic mini-pump or cLA and nitrite (50 ppm-drinking water 3 days prior to MI (ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Echocardiography and pressure–volume (PV-loop analysis revealed that cLA and nitrite-treated MI mice had improved heart function (10 days following MI compared to untreated MI mice. Treatment with cLA and nitrite significantly induced levels of miRNA-499 compared to untreated MI mice. In addition, treatment with cLA and nitrite abolished MI-induced protein expression of p53 and dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP-1. Moreover, the antioxidant enzyme expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 was elevated in MI mice treated with cLA and nitrite compared to untreated MI mice. Confocal imaging on heart tissue confirmed expression the levels of HO-1 and p53. Taken together, these results suggest that therapeutic

  10. Nutraceutical Improvement Increases the Protective Activity of Broccoli Sprout Juice in a Human Intestinal Cell Model of Gut Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruzza, Simonetta; Natella, Fausta; Ranaldi, Giulia; Murgia, Chiara; Rossi, Carlotta; Trošt, Kajetan; Mattivi, Fulvio; Nardini, Mirella; Maldini, Mariateresa; Giusti, Anna Maria; Moneta, Elisabetta; Scaccini, Cristina; Sambuy, Yula; Morelli, Giorgio; Baima, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Benefits to health from a high consumption of fruits and vegetables are well established and have been attributed to bioactive secondary metabolites present in edible plants. However, the effects of specific health-related phytochemicals within a complex food matrix are difficult to assess. In an attempt to address this problem, we have used elicitation to improve the nutraceutical content of seedlings of Brassica oleracea grown under controlled conditions. Analysis, by LC-MS, of the glucosinolate, isothiocyanate and phenolic compound content of juices obtained from sprouts indicated that elicitation induces an enrichment of several phenolics, particularly of the anthocyanin fraction. To test the biological activity of basal and enriched juices we took advantage of a recently developed in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium. Both sprouts’ juices protected intestinal barrier integrity in Caco-2 cells exposed to tumor necrosis factor α under marginal zinc deprivation, with the enriched juice showing higher protection. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that the extent of rescue from stress-induced epithelial dysfunction correlated with the composition in bioactive molecules of the juices and, in particular, with a group of phenolic compounds, including several anthocyanins, quercetin-3-Glc, cryptochlorogenic, neochlorogenic and cinnamic acids. PMID:27529258

  11. Nutraceutical Improvement Increases the Protective Activity of Broccoli Sprout Juice in a Human Intestinal Cell Model of Gut Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruzza, Simonetta; Natella, Fausta; Ranaldi, Giulia; Murgia, Chiara; Rossi, Carlotta; Trošt, Kajetan; Mattivi, Fulvio; Nardini, Mirella; Maldini, Mariateresa; Giusti, Anna Maria; Moneta, Elisabetta; Scaccini, Cristina; Sambuy, Yula; Morelli, Giorgio; Baima, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Benefits to health from a high consumption of fruits and vegetables are well established and have been attributed to bioactive secondary metabolites present in edible plants. However, the effects of specific health-related phytochemicals within a complex food matrix are difficult to assess. In an attempt to address this problem, we have used elicitation to improve the nutraceutical content of seedlings of Brassica oleracea grown under controlled conditions. Analysis, by LC-MS, of the glucosinolate, isothiocyanate and phenolic compound content of juices obtained from sprouts indicated that elicitation induces an enrichment of several phenolics, particularly of the anthocyanin fraction. To test the biological activity of basal and enriched juices we took advantage of a recently developed in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium. Both sprouts' juices protected intestinal barrier integrity in Caco-2 cells exposed to tumor necrosis factor α under marginal zinc deprivation, with the enriched juice showing higher protection. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that the extent of rescue from stress-induced epithelial dysfunction correlated with the composition in bioactive molecules of the juices and, in particular, with a group of phenolic compounds, including several anthocyanins, quercetin-3-Glc, cryptochlorogenic, neochlorogenic and cinnamic acids. PMID:27529258

  12. Control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh cheese using protective lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, M C; Silva, C C G; Ribeiro, S C; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Rosa, H J D

    2014-11-17

    In the past years, there has been a particular focus on the application of bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in controlling the growth of pathogenic bacteria in foods. The aim of this study was to select LAB strains with antimicrobial activity, previously isolated from a traditional Azorean artisanal cheese (Pico cheese), in order to identify those with the greatest potential in reducing Listeria monocytogenes in fresh cheese. Eight bacteriocin producer strains identified as Lactococcus lactis (1) and Enterococcus faecalis (7) were tested. In general, the bacteriocin-producing strains presented a moderate growth in fresh cheese at refrigeration temperatures (4 °C), increasing one log count in three days. They exhibited slow acidification capacity, despite the increased production of lactic acid displayed by some strains after 24h. Bacteriocin activity was only detected in the whey of fresh cheese inoculated with two Enterococcus strains, but all cheeses made with bacteriocin-producing strains inhibited L. monocytogenes growth in the agar diffusion bioassay. No significant differences were found in overall sensory evaluation made by a non-trained panel of 50-52 tasters using the isolates as adjunct culture in fresh cheese, with the exception of one Enterococcus strain. To test the effect of in situ bacteriocin production against L. monocytogenes, fresh cheese was made from pasteurized cows' milk inoculated with bacteriocin-producing LAB and artificially contaminated with approximately 10(6) CFU/mL of L. monocytogenes. The numbers of L. monocytogenes were monitored during storage of fresh cheese at refrigeration temperature (4 °C) for up to 15 days. All strains controlled the growth of L. monocytogenes, although some Enterococcus were more effective in reducing the pathogen counts. After 7 days, this reduction was of approximately 4 log units compared to the positive control. In comparison, an increase of 4 log CFU/mL in pathogen numbers was

  13. RESEARCH OF UV-PROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF FERULIC ACID AS PART OF OINTMENT COMPOSITIONS WITH DIFFERENT PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Abisalova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetics with the ability to neutralize harmful influence of ultraviolet rays on skin are quite in demand. UV filters in creams composition are divided into two groups: physical and chemical. Antioxidants are used as chemical UV filters. The article presents the results of ferulic acid testing as UV filter in ointment bases with lipophile, hydrophile and lipophilic and hydrophilic properties. The dependence of ferulic acid efficiency from the base type where it was applied was established. The results received are correlated with data about release rate of ferulic acid received in vitro. Ointment bases with such emulsifiers as cetyl alcohol, base emulsifier and Olivem 1000 have the most signified UV protective effect of ferulic acid.

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Long-Chain Fatty Acids on Biogas Production and the Protective Effect of Membrane Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasa, Kris Triwulan; Westman, Supansa Y.; Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur; Niklasson, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of lipid-containing wastes for biogas production is often hampered by the inhibitory effect of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). In this study, the inhibitory effects of LCFAs (palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid) on biogas production as well as the protective effect of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) against LCFAs were examined in thermophilic batch digesters. The results showed that palmitic and oleic acid with concentrations of 3.0 and 4.5 g/L resulted in >50% inhibition on the biogas production, while stearic acid had an even stronger inhibitory effect. The encased cells in the MBR system were able to perform better in the presence of LCFAs. This system exhibited a significantly lower percentage of inhibition than the free cell system, not reaching over 50% at any LCFA concentration tested. PMID:27699172

  15. Protective effects of ferulic acid in amyloid precursor protein plus presenilin-1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ji-Jing; Jung, Jun-Sub; Kim, Taek-Keun; Hasan, Ashraful; Hong, Chang-Won; Nam, Ju-Suk; Song, Dong-Keun

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the protective effects of long-term administration of ferulic acid against the in vivo toxicity of β-amyloid peptide administered intracerebroventricularly in mice. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ferulic acid in transgenic amyloid precursor protein (APP)swe/presenilin 1 (PS1)dE9 (APP/PS1) mouse model of Alzheimer disease (AD). Chronic (for 6 months from the age of 6 to 12 months) oral administration of ferulic acid at a dose of 5.3 mg/kg/day significantly enhanced the performance in novel-object recognition task, and reduced amyloid deposition and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) levels in the frontal cortex. These results suggest that ferulic acid at a certain dosage could be useful for prevention and treatment of AD.

  16. Withaferin A protects against palmitic acid-induced endothelial insulin resistance and dysfunction through suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Kalaivani Batumalaie; Muhammad Arif Amin; Dharmani Devi Murugan; Munavvar Zubaid Abdul Sattar; Nor Azizan Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways via reactive oxygen species (ROS) by free fatty acids (FFA) in obesity gives rise to insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Withaferin A (WA), possesses both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and therefore would be a good strategy to suppress palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and hence, insulin resistance and dysfunction in the endothelium. Effect of WA on PA-induced insulin resistance in human umbilical vein e...

  17. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection.

  18. α-Tocopherol/Gallic Acid Cooperation in the Protection of Galactolipids Against Ozone-Induced Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolphi-Skórska, Elżbieta; Filek, Maria; Zembala, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The protective ability of α-tocopherol (TOH) and gallic acid (GA) acting simultaneously at the moment of oxidizer application was evaluated by determination of galactolipid layers' oxidation degree. Addition of GA resulted in a significant decrease of ozone-derived radicals shifting the threshold of lipid sensitivity by an amount approximately corresponding to the GA intake in bulk reaction with ozone. TOH presence in lipid layers results in a change of the role of GA which additionally may be involved in the reduction of tocopheroxyl radical formed during oxidation. This leads to a decrease in effectiveness of GA in diminishing the amount of ozone radicals. Such an effect was not observed for mixed layers containing galactolipid and pre-oxidized tocopherol where the ozone threshold level was associated with a stoichiometry of GA + O3 reaction. It was concluded that probably subsequent transformations of tocopheroxyl radical to less reactive forms prevent its reaction with GA the entire quantity of which is used for radicals scavenging. This result shows the role of time parameter in systems where substrates are engaged in various reactions taking place simultaneously. The inactivation of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical by studied antioxidants in homogeneous system confirmed observations made on the basis of lipid layer properties indicating their antagonistic action (at least at studied conditions). Formation of layers in post-oxidation situation did not depend whether tocopherol was oxidized during oxidation of lipid/tocopherol mixture or was introduced as pre-oxidized. This may be interpreted as indication that products of tocopherol oxidation may stabilize lipid layers.

  19. Determination of total L-Ascorbic Acid by high performance liquid chromatography in human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oveisi MR

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The total vitamin C content in human plasma is widely accepted as an indicator of the tissue status of vitamin C. A liquid chromatography method with ultraviolet detector (264 nm for measuring ascorbic acid in human plasma was developed. A C18 reversed-phase column and cetrimide as an ion-pairing agent was employed. Ascorbic acid (AA was measured after reducing L-dehydroascorbic acid to L-ascorbic acid with dithiothreitol. The stability of the ascorbic acid in plasma, metaphosphoric acid and trichloroacetic acid was also evaluated. The analytical parameters, including linearity (1-60 µg/ml, accuracy (98.98%, repeatability (2.8% and reproducibility (7.2%, showed that the method is reliable for measuring the total vitamin C content in plasma.

  20. Incretin effect after oral amino Acid ingestion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Ola; Pacini, Giovanni; Tura, Andrea;

    2015-01-01

    is also present after amino acid ingestion is not known. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to explore insulin secretion and incretin hormones after oral and iv amino acid administration at matched total amino acid concentrations in healthy subjects. DESIGN: An amino acid mixture (Vaminolac......CONTEXT: The incretin effect is the augmented insulin secretion by oral vs iv glucose at matching glucose levels. We previously demonstrated an augmented insulin secretion when fat is given orally rather than iv, suggesting an incretin effect also after fat. However, whether an incretin effect......) was administered orally or iv at a rate resulting in matching total amino acid concentrations to 12 male volunteers with age 22.5 ± 1.4 years and a body mass index 22.4 ± 1.4 kg/m(2), who had no history of diabetes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Main outcome measures were area under the 120-minute curve for insulin, C...

  1. Aromatic hydroxylation of salicylic acid and aspirin by human cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojić, Mirza; Sedgeman, Carl A; Nagy, Leslie D; Guengerich, F Peter

    2015-06-20

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a well-known and widely-used analgesic. It is rapidly deacetylated to salicylic acid, which forms two hippuric acids-salicyluric acid and gentisuric acid-and two glucuronides. The oxidation of aspirin and salicylic acid has been reported with human liver microsomes, but data on individual cytochromes P450 involved in oxidation is lacking. In this study we monitored oxidation of these compounds by human liver microsomes and cytochrome P450 (P450) using UPLC with fluorescence detection. Microsomal oxidation of salicylic acid was much faster than aspirin. The two oxidation products were 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid, documented by its UV and mass spectrum) and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Formation of neither product was inhibited by desferrioxamine, suggesting a lack of contribution of oxygen radicals under these conditions. Although more liphophilic, aspirin was oxidized less efficiently, primarily to the 2,5-dihydroxy product. Recombinant human P450s 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4 all catalyzed the 5-hydroxylation of salicylic acid. Inhibitor studies with human liver microsomes indicated that all six of the previously mentioned P450s could contribute to both the 5- and 3-hydroxylation of salicylic acid and that P450s 2A6 and 2B6 have contributions to 5-hydroxylation. Inhibitor studies indicated that the major human P450 involved in both 3- and 5-hydroxylation of salicylic acid is P450 2E1.

  2. Protection of the human race against natural hazards (asteroids, comets, volcanoes, earthquakes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph V.

    1985-10-01

    Although we justifiably worry about the danger of nuclear war to civilization, and perhaps even to survival of the human race, we tend to consider natural hazards (e.g., comets, asteroids, volcanoes, earthquakes) as unavoidable acts of God. In any human lifetime, a truly catastrophic natural event is very unlikely, but ultimately one will occur. For the first time in human history we have sufficient technical skills to begin protection of Earth from some natural hazards. We could decide collectively throughout the world to reassign resources: in particular, reduction of nuclear and conventional weapons to a less dangerous level would allow concomitant increase of international programs for detection and prevention of natural hazards. Worldwide cooperation to mitigate natural hazards might help psychologically to lead us away from the divisive bickering that triggers wars. Future generations could hail us as pioneers of peace and safety rather than curse us as agents of death and destruction.

  3. A mutation in human CMP-sialic acid hydroxylase occurred after the Homo-Pan divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Hsun-Hua; Takematsu, Hiromu; Diaz, Sandra; Iber, Jane; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Wright, Kerry L.; Muchmore, Elaine A; Nelson, David L.; Warren, Stephen T.; Varki, Ajit

    1998-01-01

    Sialic acids are important cell-surface molecules of animals in the deuterostome lineage. Although humans do not express easily detectable amounts of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc, a hydroxylated form of the common sialic acid N-acetylneuraminic acid, Neu5Ac), it is a major component in great ape tissues, except in the brain. This difference correlates with lack of the hydroxylase activity that converts CMP-Neu5Ac to CMP-Neu5Gc. Here we report cloning of human and chimpanzee hydroxylase c...

  4. Protective effect of naringin on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced neurodegeneration through the modulation of matrix metalloproteinases and glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Kulasekaran; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2016-01-01

    Naringin (4',5,7-trihydroxy-flavonone-7-rhamnoglucoside), a flavonone present in grapefruit, has recently been reported to protect against neurodegeration, induced with 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. This study used a rat model of 3-NP-induced neurodegeneration to investigate the neuroprotective effects of naringin exerted by modulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Neurodegeneration was induced with 3-NP (10 mg/kg body mass, by intraperitoneal injection) once a day for 2 weeks, and induced rats were treated with naringin (80 mg/kg body mass, by oral gavage, once a day for 2 weeks). Naringin ameliorated the motor abnormalities caused by 3-NP, and reduced blood-brain barrier dysfunction by decreasing the expression of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, along with increasing the expression of the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases 1 and 2 in 3-NP-induced rats. Further, naringin reduced 3-NP-induced neuroinflammation by decreasing the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Thus, naringin exerts protective effects against 3-NP-induced neurodegeneration by ameliorating the expressions of matrix metalloproteinases and glial fibrillary acidic protein. PMID:26544788

  5. Increased production of omega-3 fatty acids protects retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shanshan; Shi, Zhe; Su, Huanxing; So, Kwok-Fai; Cui, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Injury to the central nervous system causes progressive degeneration of injured axons, leading to loss of the neuronal bodies. Neuronal survival after injury is a prerequisite for successful regeneration of injured axons. In this study, we investigated the effects of increased production of omega-3 fatty acids and elevation of cAMP on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axonal regeneration after optic nerve (ON) crush injury in adult mice. We found that increased production of omega-3 fatty acids in mice enhanced RGC survival, but not axonal regeneration, over a period of 3 weeks after ON injury. cAMP elevation promoted RGC survival in wild type mice, but no significant difference in cell survival was seen in mice over-producing omega-3 fatty acids and receiving intravitreal injections of CPT-cAMP, suggesting that cAMP elevation protects RGCs after injury but does not potentiate the actions of the omega-3 fatty acids. The observed omega-3 fatty acid-mediated neuroprotection is likely achieved partially through ERK1/2 signaling as inhibition of this pathway by PD98059 hindered, but did not completely block, RGC protection. Our study thus enhances our current understanding of neural repair after CNS injury, including the visual system.

  6. Ferulic acid renders protection to HEK293 cells against oxidative damage and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yuan-Yuan; Guo, Jia; Majeed, Hamid; Zhu, Ke-Xue; Guo, Xiao-Na; Peng, Wei; Zhou, Hui-Ming

    2015-08-01

    The application of antioxidants has been considered as an important and effective approach against conditions in which oxidative stress occurs. Especially, ferulic acid (FA) is an important antioxidant which exerts potency against cellular damage in the presence of oxidants. In the current study, the resistance effect of FA on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-stressed human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293) in vitro was investigated. FA (1 mM) increased HEK293 cells' viability and significantly reduced H2O2-induced cellular apoptosis, which was confirmed with flow cytometry and morphological results. Cell cycle analysis indicated low percentage of sub-G0 population of FA-treated HEK293 cells that confirmed its resistance effect. The FA-treated HEK293 cells followed by H2O2 exposure resulted in decreased ROS levels compared to control (H2O2-treated only). The results indicated that pretreatment of FA on cell prior to H2O2 exposure could significantly improve cell survival and increase catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. On the other hand, reduction in the levels of MDA and ROS was obvious. It can be concluded that FA may protect HEK293 cells from injury induced by H2O2 through regulation of intracellular antioxidant enzyme activities and cell cycle distribution. The reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential was also inhibited by FA treatment. These results suggested the importance of naturally occurring antioxidants such as FA in therapeutic intervention methodology against oxidative stress-related diseases.

  7. Associations of in Utero Exposure to Perfluorinated Alkyl Acids with Human Semen Quality and Reproductive Hormones in Adult Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested, Anne; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Olsen, Sjurdur Frodi;

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs), persistent chemicals with unique water-, dirt-, and oil-repellent properties, are suspected of having endocrine-disrupting activity. The PFAA compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are found globally in humans; because...

  8. Induction of pluripotent protective immunity following immunisation with a chimeric vaccine against human cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhong

    Full Text Available Based on the life-time cost to the health care system, the Institute of Medicine has assigned the highest priority for a vaccine to control human cytomegalovirus (HCMV disease in transplant patients and new born babies. In spite of numerous attempts successful licensure of a HCMV vaccine formulation remains elusive. Here we have developed a novel chimeric vaccine strategy based on a replication-deficient adenovirus which encodes the extracellular domain of gB protein and multiple HLA class I & II-restricted CTL epitopes from HCMV as a contiguous polypeptide. Immunisation with this chimeric vaccine consistently generated strong HCMV-specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells which co-expressed IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, while the humoral response induced by this vaccine showed strong virus neutralizing capacity. More importantly, immunization with adenoviral chimeric vaccine also afforded protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding HCMV antigens and this protection was associated with the induction of a pluripotent antigen-specific cellular and antibody response. Furthermore, in vitro stimulation with this adenoviral chimeric vaccine rapidly expanded multiple antigen-specific human CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells from healthy virus carriers. These studies demonstrate that the adenovirus chimeric HCMV vaccine provides an excellent platform for reconstituting protective immunity to prevent HCMV diseases in different clinical settings.

  9. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides protected human retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative stressinduced apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian; Liu; Wei; Lao; Qing-Shan; Ji; Zhi-Hao; Yang; Guo-Cheng; Yu; Jing-Xiang; Zhong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effect and its mechanism of lycium barbarum polysaccharides(LBP)against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.METHODS: ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines, were exposed to different concentrations of H2O2 for 24h, then cell viability was measured by Cell Counting Kit-8(CCK-8) assay to get the properly concentration of H2O2 which can induce half apoptosis of APRE-19. With different concentrations of LBP pretreatment, the ARPE-19 cells were then exposed to appropriate concentration of H2O2, cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric analysis. Expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax were measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) technique.RSULTS: LBP significantly reduced the H2O2-induced ARPE-19 cells’ apoptosis. LBP inhibited the H2O2-induced down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax.CONCLUSION: LBP could protect ARPE-19 cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis. The Bcl-2 family had relationship with the protective effects of LBP.

  10. Pd-Catalyzed Coupling of γ-C(sp(3))-H Bonds of Oxalyl Amide-Protected Amino Acids with Heteroaryl and Aryl Iodides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Zheng, Yongxiang; Wang, Chao; Zhu, Yan; Huang, Zhi-Bin; Shi, Da-Qing; Zeng, Runsheng; Zhao, Yingsheng

    2016-07-01

    Pd-catalyzed regioselective coupling of γ-C(sp(3))-H bonds of oxalyl amide-protected amino acids with heteroaryl and aryl iodides is reported. A wide variety of iodides are tolerated, giving the corresponding products in moderate to good yields. Various oxalyl amide-protected amino acids were compatible in this C-H transformation, thus representing a practical method for constructing non-natural amino acid derivatives. PMID:27286881

  11. Proteomic analysis of pure human airway gland mucus reveals a large component of protective proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Soo Joo

    Full Text Available Airway submucosal glands contribute to innate immunity and protect the lungs by secreting mucus, which is required for mucociliary clearance and which also contains antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proteolytic and anti-oxidant proteins. We stimulated glands in tracheal trimmings from three lung donors and collected droplets of uncontaminated mucus as they formed at the gland orifices under an oil layer. We analyzed the mucus using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Analysis identified 5486 peptides and 441 proteins from across the 3 samples (269-319 proteins per subject. We focused on 269 proteins common to at least 2 0f 3 subjects, of which 102 (38% had protective or innate immunity functions. While many of these have long been known to play such roles, for many others their cellular protective functions have only recently been appreciated in addition to their well-studied biologic functions (e.g. annexins, apolipoproteins, gelsolin, hemoglobin, histones, keratins, and lumican. A minority of the identified proteins are known to be secreted via conventional exocytosis, suggesting that glandular secretion occurs via multiple mechanisms. Two of the observed protective proteins, major vault protein and prohibitin, have not been observed in fluid from human epithelial cultures or in fluid from nasal or bronchoalveolar lavage. Further proteomic analysis of pure gland mucus may help clarify how healthy airways maintain a sterile environment.

  12. Physiological and transcriptional responses and cross protection of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 under acid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Renhui; Pan, Mingfang; Wan, Cuixiang; Shah, Nagendra P; Tao, Xueying; Wei, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Acid tolerance responses (ATR) in Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 were investigated at physiological and molecular levels. A comparison of composition of cell membrane fatty acids (CMFA) between acid-challenged and unchallenged cells showed that acid adaptation evoked a significantly higher percentage of saturated fatty acids and cyclopropane fatty acids in acid-challenged than in unchallenged cells. In addition, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR analysis in acid-adapted cells at different pH values (ranging from 3.0 to 4.0) indicated that several genes were differently regulated, including those related to proton pumps, amino acid metabolism, sugar metabolism, and class I and class III stress response pathways. Expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and production of alkali was significantly upregulated. Upon exposure to pH 4.5 for 2 h, a higher survival rate (higher viable cell count) of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 was achieved following an additional challenge to 40 mM hydrogen peroxide for 60 min, but no difference in survival rate of cells was found with further challenge to heat, ethanol, or salt. Therefore, we concluded that the physiological and metabolic changes of acid-treated cells of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 help the cells resist damage caused by acid, and further initiated global response signals to bring the whole cell into a state of defense to other stress factors, especially hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Protective colloids and polylactic acid co-affecting the polymorphic crystal forms and crystallinity of indomethacin encapsulated in microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S Y; Chen, K S; Teng, H H

    1999-01-01

    The co-effect of protective colloids and polylactic acid (PLA) on the polymorphic crystal forms and crystallinity of indomethacin (IMC) in IMC-loaded PLA microspheres was investigated with differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffractometry, to evaluate the polymorphic crystal forms and crystallinity of IMC encapsulated in PLA microspheres. The surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), was also used as a dispersing agent. The results indicate that the polymorphism and crystallinity of IMC encapsulated in IMC-loaded PLA microspheres was dependent on the type of protective colloid and PLA used. The amorphous state and alpha-form of IMC were found in the IMC-loaded PLA microspheres prepared using polysaccharide (pectin or beta-cyclodextrin) as a protective colloid or SDS as a dispersing agent. However, the amorphous and methylene chloride solvate of IMC seemed to exist in the IMC-loaded PLA microspheres prepared with the proteins (gelatin or albumin), synthetic cellulose derivative (methyl cellulose or hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose) or the synthetic nonionic polymer (polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl pyrrolidone or biosoluble polymer) as a protective colloid. PLA was found to express a certain crystallinity in microspheres and not be affected by the protective colloids, but it played a more important role in influencing the crystallization of IMC during microencapsulation than the protective colloids. No interaction occurred in the physical mixture of IMC and PLA, nor in the IMC-loaded PLA microspheres.

  14. Redox Cycles of Caffeic Acid, alpha-Tocopherol, and Ascorbate: Implications for Protection of Low-Density Lipoproteins Against Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Laranjinha, João; Cadenas, Enrique

    1999-01-01

    This study addresses the dynamic interactions among alpha-tocopherol, caffeic acid, and ascorbate in terms of a sequence of redox cycles aimed at accomplishing optimal synergistic antioxidant protection. Several experimental models were designed to examine these interactions: UV irradiation of alpha-tocopherol-containing sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles, one-electron oxidations catalyzed by the hypervalent state of myoglobin, ferrylmyoglobin, and autoxidation at appropriate pHs. These models w...

  15. A natural protecting group strategy to carry an amino acid starter unit in the biosynthesis of macrolactam polyketide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2011-11-16

    Macrolactam antibiotics are an important class of macrocyclic polyketides that contain a unique nitrogen-containing starter unit. In the present study, a set of starter biosynthetic enzymes in the macrolactam antibiotic vicenistatin was characterized. We found that the protection-deprotection strategy of the aminoacyl-ACP intermediate was critical in this system. On the basis of bioinformatics, the described pathway is also proposed as a common method for carrying amino acids in the biosynthesis of other macrolactam antibiotics. PMID:22010945

  16. Effects of supplementation with protected polyunsaturated fatty acids on productive and hormonal parameters of embryo recipient heifers

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Camilo Angel Cardona; Harold Ospina Patino; Mônica Marcela Ramirez Hernandez; Carolina Heller Pereira; Kendall Swanson

    2016-01-01

    Supplementation with protected polyunsaturated fatty acids (PPUFA) has positive effects on cow reproduction. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding a source of PPUFA to energy supplements for embryo recipient heifers on productive performance and plasma concentrations of progesterone, cholesterol and insulin. For this purpose, 44 Angus x Hereford embryo recipient heifers (average body weight = 385 kg) raised on pasture were studied in a completely randomized de...

  17. Delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR in glutamate stimulated neurons allows late protection by 9-cis retinoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathisen, Gro H.; Fallgren, Asa B.; Strom, Bjorn O.; Boldingh Debernard, Karen A.; Mohebi, Beata U. [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Paulsen, Ragnhild E., E-mail: r.e.paulsen@farmasi.uio.no [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} NGFI-B and RXR translocate out of the nucleus after glutamate treatment. {yields} Arresting NGFI-B/RXR in the nucleus protects neurons from excitotoxicity. {yields} Late protection by 9-cis RA is possible due to a delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR. -- Abstract: Nuclear receptor and apoptosis inducer NGFI-B translocates out of the nucleus as a heterodimer with RXR in response to different apoptosis stimuli, and therefore represents a potential pharmacological target. We found that the cytosolic levels of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha} were increased in cultures of cerebellar granule neurons 2 h after treatment with glutamate (excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, involved in stroke). To find a time-window for potential intervention the neurons were transfected with gfp-tagged expressor plasmids for NGFI-B and RXR. The default localization of NGFI-Bgfp and RXRgfp was nuclear, however, translocation out of the nucleus was observed 2-3 h after glutamate treatment. We therefore hypothesized that the time-window between treatment and translocation would allow late protection against neuronal death. The RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid was used to arrest NGFI-B and RXR in the nucleus. Addition of 9-cis retinoic acid 1 h after treatment with glutamate reduced the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha}, the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-Bgfp observed in live neurons, as well as the neuronal death. However, the reduced translocation and the reduced cell death were not observed when 9-cis retinoic acid was added after 3 h. Thus, late protection from glutamate induced death by addition of 9-cis retinoic acid is possible in a time-window after apoptosis induction.

  18. Possible Causes of Ileal Injury in Two Models of Microbial Sepsis and Protective Effect of Phytic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Rasha Rashad Ahmed; Hossam Ebaid

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sepsis related-multiple organ dysfunction is associatedwith ileum injury. We aimed to determine the causes ofileal injury in two models of microbial sepsis resulted from infectionwith Aeromonas hydrophila or its endotoxin. We alsoevaluated the protective effect of phytic acid.Methods: Thin sections of ileum from 60 Swiss male mice incontrol, bacteria-infected or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) andbacteria-infected or LPS-infected co-administered with phyticacid were subjected to histopa...

  19. Formation of a protection film on the human skin by microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser scanning microscopy and tape stripping, in combination with optical methods, were used to analyze the distribution and penetration of a barrier cream into the horny layer (stratum corneum) of the human skin under in vivo conditions. The barrier cream contained microparticles of 10 – 100 μm loaded with antioxidant substances. The cream was designed for protection of the skin surface against the destructive action of free radicals, produced by systemically applied chemotherapeutic agents reaching the skin surface via the sweat. Both methods were able to demonstrate that the barrier cream was distributed homogeneously on the skin surface forming a protection film. A penetration into deeper parts of the stratum corneum (SC) was not observed

  20. Structural and molecular basis for Ebola virus neutralization by protective human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misasi, John; Gilman, Morgan S A; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Gui, Miao; Cagigi, Alberto; Mulangu, Sabue; Corti, Davide; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Cunningham, James; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean Jacques; Baxa, Ulrich; Graham, Barney S; Xiang, Ye; Sullivan, Nancy J; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-03-18

    Ebola virus causes hemorrhagic fever with a high case fatality rate for which there is no approved therapy. Two human monoclonal antibodies, mAb100 and mAb114, in combination, protect nonhuman primates against all signs of Ebola virus disease, including viremia. Here, we demonstrate that mAb100 recognizes the base of the Ebola virus glycoprotein (GP) trimer, occludes access to the cathepsin-cleavage loop, and prevents the proteolytic cleavage of GP that is required for virus entry. We show that mAb114 interacts with the glycan cap and inner chalice of GP, remains associated after proteolytic removal of the glycan cap, and inhibits binding of cleaved GP to its receptor. These results define the basis of neutralization for two protective antibodies and may facilitate development of therapies and vaccines.

  1. Acid-base homeostasis in the human system

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Acid-base regulation is a cooperative phenomena in vivo with body fluids, extracellular and intracellular buffers, lungs, and kidneys all playing important roles. The present account is much too brief to be considered a review of present knowledge of these regulatory systems, and should be viewed, instead, as a guide to the elements necessary to construct a simple model of the mutual interactions of the acid-base regulatory systems of the body.

  2. Possible Role of DNA Polymerase beta in Protecting Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Against Cytotoxicity of Hydroquinone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DA-LIN HU; JIAN-PING YANG; DAO-KUI FANG; YAN SHA; XIAO-ZHI TU; ZHI-XIONG ZHUANG; HUAN-WEN TANG; HAI-RONG LIANG; DONG-SHENG TANG; YI-MING LIU; WEI-DONG JI; JIAN-HUI YUAN; YUN HE; ZHENG-YU ZHU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explore the toxicological mechanism of hydroquinone in human bronchial epithelial cells and to investigate whether DNA polymerase beta is involved in protecting cells from damage caused by hydroquinone. Methods DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line was established via RNA interference as an experimental group. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells and cells transfected with the empty vector of pEGFP-Cl were used as controls. Cells were treated with different concentrations of hydroquinone (ranged from 10 μmol/L to 120 μmol/L) for 4 hours. MTT assay and Comet assay [single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)] were performed respectively to detect the toxicity of hydroquinone. Results MTT assay showed that DNA polymerase beta knock-down cells treated with different concentrations of hydroquinone had a lower absorbance value at 490 nm than the control cells in a dose-dependant manner. Comet assay revealed that different concentrations of hydroquinone caused more severe DNA damage in DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line than in control cells and there was no significant difference in the two control groups. Conclusions Hydroquinone has significant toxicity to human bronchial epithelial cells and causes DNA damage. DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line appears more sensitive to hydroquinone than the control cells. The results suggest that DNA polymerase beta is involved in protecting cells from damage caused by hydroquinone.

  3. Contribution of the police negotiating team to the protection of human rights in specific security situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subošić Dane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Legal right of police to use force, especially firearms, makes modern police mission seem inconsistent: in order to protect the rights of one, the police must limit the rights of others, which raises the question of optimal measures between these opposites. The most dangerous is the police action which encroaches on the right to life, thus indirectly interfering in other human rights. This applies equally to both citizens and the offenders. In an effort to minimize the possibility of eroding the right to life, the modern police forces have developed mechanisms of so-called police negotiating. Respecting the principles of legality, humanity and expertise, members of the of specialized police units engage in negotiations with the most dangerous criminals in order to prevent them in further criminal intent on one hand and in order to solve the crisis without the use of police force, on the other. In addition a notable involvement of police negotiators in prevention of suicide attempts has been observed. In this regard, the paper explores the contribution of the negotiating team of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Republic of Serbia to the protection of human rights in Serbia in the period 2005. - 2010.

  4. The cellular protective effects of rosmarinic acid: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Daglia, Maria; Tundis, Rosa; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) is one of the most common household herbs, used as spices in a variety of foods, and employed in traditional medicine for its healing properties. Rosemary is a rich source of active antioxidant constituents such as phenolic diterpenes, flavonoids and phenolic acids. Caffeic acid and rosmarinic acid are the most important bioactive constituents. Rosmarinic acid is the ester of caffeic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid and is widely identified in different plant species. Chemical structure of rosmarinic acid contains two phenolic rings: one of them is derived from phenylalanine via caffeic acid and the other from tyrosine via dihydroxyphenyl-lactic acid. Its large-scale production is obtained from plant cell cultures of Coleus blumei Benth. It is easily absorbed through gastrointestinal tract as well as the skin. Rosmarinic acid is one of the most important and well known natural antioxidant compounds, which possesses neuroprotective effects in different models of neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, as well as chemicalinduced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress. Therefore, in present review, we aim to discuss about chemistry, sources, biotechnological production and neuroprotective actions of rosmarinic acid with emphasis on its possible molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection. PMID:25578431

  5. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  6. Modulation of human erythrocyte shape and fatty acids by diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, H G; Hill, R; Pencharz, P; Kuksis, A

    1986-08-21

    A semi-synthetic diet (Vivonex) was administered via nasogastric tube to three cystic fibrosis patients with pancreatic exocrine deficiency for 14 days to gain weight. Dietary essential fatty acids were provided as safflower oil, which constituted 1.3% of total calories. Plasma and red blood cells were analyzed for the content and composition of lipids at the start of the diet and at days 7 and 14 of the dietary period, and the results were correlated with the morphology of the cells. Feeding Vivonex to the patients led to an essential fatty acid deficiency, which was manifested in a 50% decrease in the linoleic acid content of the phosphatidylcholine of plasma and red blood cells at days 7 and 14 and in a 20% decrease in the linoleic acid content of red cell phosphatidylethanolamine at day 14. There was no significant alteration in the levels or composition of the other phospholipid classes and in the free cholesterol/phospholipid ratio. The decrease in the linoleic acid content of the erythrocytes was accompanied by a dramatic increase in the proportion of cells as echinocytes. We conclude that restricted linoleic acid availability in cystic fibrosis patients causes a change in red blood cell shape either directly by decreasing the linoleoylphosphatidylcholine content of the membrane or indirectly by affecting enzyme activity. PMID:3741859

  7. Sensitive and specific detection of the non-human sialic Acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid in human tissues and biotherapeutic products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra L Diaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Humans are genetically defective in synthesizing the common mammalian sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc, but can metabolically incorporate it from dietary sources (particularly red meat and milk into glycoproteins and glycolipids of human tumors, fetuses and some normal tissues. Metabolic incorporation of Neu5Gc from animal-derived cells and medium components also results in variable contamination of molecules and cells intended for human therapies. These Neu5Gc-incorporation phenomena are practically significant, because normal humans can have high levels of circulating anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. Thus, there is need for the sensitive and specific detection of Neu5Gc in human tissues and biotherapeutic products. Unlike monoclonal antibodies that recognize Neu5Gc only in the context of underlying structures, chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY polyclonal antibodies can recognize Neu5Gc in broader contexts. However, prior preparations of such antibodies (including our own suffered from some non-specificity, as well as some cross-reactivity with the human sialic acid N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed a novel affinity method utilizing sequential columns of immobilized human and chimpanzee serum sialoglycoproteins, followed by specific elution from the latter column by free Neu5Gc. The resulting mono-specific antibody shows no staining in tissues or cells from mice with a human-like defect in Neu5Gc production. It allows sensitive and specific detection of Neu5Gc in all underlying glycan structural contexts studied, and is applicable to immunohistochemical, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, Western blot and flow cytometry analyses. Non-immune chicken IgY is used as a reliable negative control. We show that these approaches allow sensitive detection of Neu5Gc in human tissue samples and in some biotherapeutic products, and finally show an example of how Neu5Gc might be eliminated

  8. Protective action of resveratrol in human skin: possible involvement of specific receptor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Bastianetto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol with purported protecting action on various disorders associated with aging. It has been suggested that resveratrol could exert its protective action by acting on specific plasma membrane polyphenol binding sites (Han Y.S., et al. (2006 J Pharmacol Exp Ther 318:238-245. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in human skin, the possible existence of specific binding sites that mediate the protective action of resveratrol. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using human skin tissue, we report here the presence of specific [(3H]-resveratrol binding sites (K(D  =  180 nM that are mainly located in the epidermis. Exposure of HaCaT cells to the nitric oxide free radical donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 0.3-3 mM resulted in cell death which was reduced by resveratrol (EC(50  =  14.7 µM, and to a much lesser extent by the resveratrol analogue piceatannol (EC(50  =  95 µM and epigallocatechin gallate (EC(50  =  200 µM, a green-tea derived polyphenol. The protective action of resveratrol likely relates to its anti-apoptotic effect since at the same range of concentration it was able to reduce both the number of apoptotic cells as well as mitochondrial apoptotic events triggered by SNP. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these findings suggest that resveratrol, by acting on specific polyphenol binding sites in epidermis, may be useful to prevent skin disorders associated with aging.

  9. Dynamic simulation and finite element analysis of the human mandible injury protected by polyvinyl alcohol sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been intensive efforts to find a suitable kinetic energy absorbing material for helmet and bulletproof vest design. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge is currently in extensive use as scaffolding material for tissue engineering applications. PVA can also be employed instead of commonly use kinetic energy absorbing materials to increase the kinetic energy absorption capacity of current helmet and bulletproof vest materials owing to its excellent mechanical properties. In this study, a combined hexahedral finite element (FE) model is established to determine the potential protection ability of PVA sponge in controlling the level of injury for gunshot wounds to the human mandible. Digital computed tomography data for the human mandible are used to establish a three-dimensional FE model of the human mandible. The mechanism by which a gunshot injures the protected mandible by PVA sponge is dynamically simulated using the LS-DYNA code under two different shot angles. The stress distributions in different parts of the mandible and sponge after injury are also simulated. The modeling results regardless of shot angle reveal that the substantial amount of kinetic energy of the steel ball (67%) is absorbed by the PVA sponge and, consequently, injury severity of the mandible is significantly decreased. The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. The results suggest the application of the PVA sponge as an alternative reinforcement material in helmet and bulletproof vest design to absorb most of the impact energy and reduce the transmitted load. - Highlights: • The ability of PVA sponge to control the injury to the human mandible is computed. • A hexahedral FE model for gunshot wounds to the human mandible is established. • The kinetic energy and injury severity of the mandible is minimized by the sponge. • The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. • PVA suggests as an alternative

  10. The Protective Effect of Ascorbic Acid and Thiamine Supplementation against Damage Caused by Lead in the Testes of Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang SHAN; Tian TANG; Xiaobin ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Lead is a ubiquitous environmental and industrial pollutant that may have toxic effects on the male.Vitamins may protect against toxic effects of lead in the liver and reproductive system,which is confirmed by our initial research.The aim of this study was to further investigate the protec-tive effects of vitamins (ascorbic acid combined with thiamine) on lead acetate (Pb)-induced repro-ductive toxicities in mice and study the possible mechanisms underlying these effects.Forty-five male mice were randomly divided into 3 groups,15 mice in each and received daily intragastric ad-ministration with control,Pb (20 mg/kg),and Pb+vitamins (ascorbic acid of 420 mg/kg+thiamine of 30 mg/kg) for 6 weeks,respectively.The Pb-treated animals showed significant decreases in the epididymal sperm count and motility compared to the control group,while the Pb+vitamins group had significant increases for these variables.Moreover,an increasing apoptosis of germinal cells in-duced by Pb was reduced by vitamin treatment.Pb induced the activation of Caspase-3,Fas/Fas-L and Bcl-2 with elevated levels,and the adaptor protein primarily regulated signaling through Fas and required for Fas-induced apoptosis.In conclusion,ascorbic acid combined with thiamine exhibited protective effect on reproductive system by inhibiting Pb-induced excessive cell apoptosis.

  11. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Fatty Acid Binding Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jun; Lücke, Christian; Chen, Zhongjing; Qiao, Ye; Klimtchuk, Elena; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a cytosolic protein most abundant in liver, is associated with intracellular transport of fatty acids, nuclear signaling, and regulation of intracellular lipolysis. Among the members of the intracellular lipid binding protein family, L-FABP is of particular interest as it can i), bind two fatty acid molecules simultaneously and ii), accommodate a variety of bulkier physiological ligands such as bilirubin and fatty acyl CoA. To better understand the p...

  12. Are research subjects adequately protected? A review and discussion of studies conducted by the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Nancy E; Sugarman, Jeremy

    1996-09-01

    In light of information uncovered about human radiation experiments conducted during the Cold War, an important charge for the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was to assess the current state of protections for human research subjects. This assessment was designed to enhance the Committee's ability to make informed recommendations for the improvement of future policies and practices for the protection of research subjects. The Committee's examination of current protections revealed great improvement over those from the past, yet some problems remain. Although the data collected by the Committee highlight specific areas in need of attention, the Committee's work should be viewed in part as the beginning of a series of ongoing assessments of the adequacy and effectiveness of the protections afforded to human subjects.

  13. Privacy as human flourishing: could a shift towards virtue ethics strengthen privacy protection in the age of Big Data?

    OpenAIRE

    van der Sloot, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Privacy is commonly seen as an instrumental value in relation to negative freedom, human dignity and personal autonomy. Article 8 ECHR, protecting the right to privacy, was originally coined as a doctrine protecting the negative freedom of citizens in vertical relations, that is between citizen and state. Over the years, the Court has extended privacy protection to horizontal relations and has gradually accepted that individual autonomy is an equally important value underlying the right to pr...

  14. Special procedural measures and the protection of human rights General report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A.E. Vervaele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the general report is to conduct a comparative analysis of the national reports in order to trace transformation processes in domestic criminal justice systems, in particular criminal process, as special procedural measures are introduced to deal with terrorism and organised crime, and to map whether this has led countries to depart from their own fundamental rules, procedures, principles and applicable human rights standards. Starting from the premise that the integrated system of criminal law has three dimensions – the protection of individuals (the shield dimension, the provision of instruments of law enforcement (the sword dimension, and of checks and balances/trias politica (the constitutional dimension – the report provides a comprehensive overview of interrelated transformations, mostly in the pre-trial setting, that have affected all three in three waves of ‘war’ (on drugs, organised crime and terrorism. In many countries, procedural guarantees and principles that protect against the infringement of fair trial rights are considered a burden to the efficiency of serious crime enforcement. These reforms have resulted in a clear expansion of the punitive state and a blurring of classic distinctions, and do not favour the rule of law. The focus on public security and preventive coercive investigation undermines the criminal justice system. With the criminal justice system increasingly used as an instrument to regulate the present and/or the future rather than to punish past behaviour, and a criminal process in which pre-trial investigation is not about truth-finding related to committed crime, but about the construction and de-construction of social dangerousness, the interests of national security may be said to be prevailing over justice and to be threatening due process and the protection of human rights – notwithstanding that general principles of criminal procedure seem to have become more important in the reporting

  15. Towards modelling flood protection investment as a coupled human and natural system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. O'Connell

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to a number of recent high profile flood events and the apparent threat from global warming, governments and their agencies are under pressure to make proactive investments to protect people living in floodplains. However, adopting a proactive approach as a universal strategy is not affordable. It has been argued that delaying expensive and essentially irreversible capital decisions could be a prudent strategy in situations with high future uncertainty. This paper firstly uses Monte Carlo simulation to explore the performance of proactive and reactive investment strategies using a rational cost-benefit approach in a natural system with varying levels of persistence/interannual variability in Annual Maximum Floods. It is found that, as persistence increases, there is a change in investment strategy optimality from proactive to reactive. This could have implications for investment strategies under the increasingly variable climate that is expected with global warming. As part of the emerging holistic approaches to flood risk management, there is increasing emphasis on stakeholder participation in determining where and when flood protection investments are made, and so flood risk management is becoming more people-centred. As a consequence, multiple actors are involved in the decision-making process, and the social sciences are assuming an increasingly important role in flood risk management. There is a need for modelling approaches which can couple the natural and human system elements. It is proposed that Coupled Human and Natural System (CHANS modelling could play an important role in understanding the motivations, actions and influence of citizens and institutions and how these impact on the effective delivery of flood protection investment. A framework for using Agent Based Modelling of human activities leading to flood investments is outlined, and some of the challenges associated with implementation are discussed.

  16. Towards modelling flood protection investment as a coupled human and natural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, P. E.; O'Donnell, G.

    2014-01-01

    Due to a number of recent high-profile flood events and the apparent threat from global warming, governments and their agencies are under pressure to make proactive investments to protect people living in floodplains. However, adopting a proactive approach as a universal strategy is not affordable. It has been argued that delaying expensive and essentially irreversible capital decisions could be a prudent strategy in situations with high future uncertainty. This paper firstly uses Monte Carlo simulation to explore the performance of proactive and reactive investment strategies using a rational cost-benefit approach in a natural system with varying levels of persistence/interannual variability in annual maximum floods. It is found that, as persistence increases, there is a change in investment strategy optimality from proactive to reactive. This could have implications for investment strategies under the increasingly variable climate that is expected with global warming. As part of the emerging holistic approaches to flood risk management, there is increasing emphasis on stakeholder participation in determining where and when flood protection investments are made, and so flood risk management is becoming more people-centred. As a consequence, multiple actors are involved in the decision-making process, and the social sciences are assuming an increasingly important role in flood risk management. There is a need for modelling approaches which can couple the natural and human system elements. It is proposed that coupled human and natural system (CHANS) modelling could play an important role in understanding the motivations, actions and influence of citizens and institutions and how these impact on the effective delivery of flood protection investment. A framework for using agent-based modelling of human activities leading to flood investments is outlined, and some of the challenges associated with implementation are discussed.

  17. Dietary (n-3)-fatty acids, prostaglandins, and prolonged gestation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Olsen, S.F.

    1988-01-01

    Prostaglandins, especially prostaglandin F2 alpha, are important regulators in the onset and maintenance of parturition in humans. Inhibition of prostaglandin formation by drugs can prolong gestation in humans. High dietary intake of long chain (n-3)-fatty acids can inhibit formation of many...... arachidonic acid-derived prostaglandins as well as stimulate formation of eicosapentaenoic acid-derived prostaglandins. The latter ones often have lower biological activity than the former ones. The effect of (n-3)-fatty acids on prostaglandin formation has been shown by analysis of prostaglandin metabolites...... in human urine. Very little is known about the tissue origin as well as the physiologicalfunctions of those prostaglandins, the metabolites of which are quantitated in urine from non-pregnant humans. In pregnant women the increased amount of prostaglandin F2 alpha-metabolites in urine, plasma and amniotic...

  18. Privacy as human flourishing: could a shift towards virtue ethics strengthen privacy protection in the age of Big Data?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Sloot

    2014-01-01

    Privacy is commonly seen as an instrumental value in relation to negative freedom, human dignity and personal autonomy. Article 8 ECHR, protecting the right to privacy, was originally coined as a doctrine protecting the negative freedom of citizens in vertical relations, that is between citizen and

  19. Protective Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester in Rat Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul Uzar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Because oxidative stress is related to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, modulation of oxygen free radical production may represent a new approach to the management of cerebral I/R. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE has been determined to have neuroprotective, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic activities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CAPE has a protective effect on cerebral I/R damage, and to determine the possible effects of CAPE on total antioxidant/oxidant status. METHODS: A total of 30 rats were randomly divided into three groups as control group, I/R group, and I/R + CAPE. Total oxidant status (TOS, total antioxidant status (TAS and oxidative stress index (OSI levels and histopathological cellular structures were evaluated in cerebral tissues obtained after the experiment procedure in all groups. RESULTS: In the brain tissue, TOS and OSI levels were found to be significantly increased in the I/R group compared to the controls (p= 0.023, p= 0.001, respectively. Significantly decreased TAS levels were found in the I/R group compared to the controls (p= 0.001. CAPE treatment prevented the increase in TOS and OSI that is produced by cerebral I/R (p= 0.041, p= 0.001, respectively. TAS was found to be increased in the CAPE + I/R group compared with the I/R group (p= 0.002. In the I/R group, the brain sections showed findings of cerebral I/R damage including inflammation, vascular congestion and necrosis (for both variables, p= 0.001. These histopathological cerebral damage findings were found to be significantly reduced in the CAPE + I/R group compared to the I/R group (for both parameters, p< 0.05. CONCLUSION: In this study, it was found that oxidative stress had an important role in the pathogenesis of cerebral I/R damage, and histopathological and biochemical evaluations showed significantly decreased I/R damage following CAPE treatment in rats.

  20. Phenylbutyric acid protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent report showed that the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling was activated in the pathogenesis of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic fibrosis. Phenylbutyric acid (PBA) is a well-known chemical chaperone that inhibits endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PBA on CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice. All mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with CCl4 (0.15 ml/kg BW, twice per week) for 8 weeks. In CCl4 + PBA group, mice were i.p. injected with PBA (150 mg/kg, twice per day) from the beginning of CCl4 injection to the end. As expected, PBA significantly attenuated CCl4-induced hepatic ER stress and UPR activation. Although PBA alleviated, only to a less extent, hepatic necrosis, it obviously inhibited CCl4-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Moreover, PBA inhibited CCl4-induced hepatic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 translocation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Interestingly, CCl4-induced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker for the initiation phase of HSC activation, was significantly attenuated in mice pretreated with PBA. Correspondingly, CCl4-induced hepatic collagen (Col)1α1 and Col1α2, markers for the perpetuation phase of HSC activation, were inhibited in PBA-treated mice. Importantly, CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis, as determined using Sirius red staining, was obviously attenuated by PBA. In conclusion, PBA prevents CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis through inhibiting hepatic inflammatory response and HSC activation. Highlights: ► CCl4 induces hepatic ER stress, inflammation, HSC activation and hepatic fibrosis. ► PBA alleviates CCl4-induced hepatic ER stress and UPR signaling activation. ► PBA inhibits CCl4-induced hepatic NF-κB activation and ERK and JNK phosphorylation. ► PBA effectively protects

  1. Phenylbutyric acid protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrogenesis in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian-Qing [School of Pharmacy, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China); Second Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230601 (China); Chen, Xi [First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230022 (China); Zhang, Cheng [Department of Toxicology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China); Tao, Li [First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230022 (China); Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian [Department of Toxicology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China); Xu, Yuan-Bao [Department of Toxicology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China); First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230022 (China); Wang, Hua [Department of Toxicology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China); Li, Jun, E-mail: lijun@ahmu.edu.cn [School of Pharmacy, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China); Xu, De-Xiang, E-mail: xudex@126.com [Department of Toxicology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China)

    2013-01-15

    A recent report showed that the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling was activated in the pathogenesis of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced hepatic fibrosis. Phenylbutyric acid (PBA) is a well-known chemical chaperone that inhibits endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PBA on CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice. All mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with CCl{sub 4} (0.15 ml/kg BW, twice per week) for 8 weeks. In CCl{sub 4} + PBA group, mice were i.p. injected with PBA (150 mg/kg, twice per day) from the beginning of CCl{sub 4} injection to the end. As expected, PBA significantly attenuated CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic ER stress and UPR activation. Although PBA alleviated, only to a less extent, hepatic necrosis, it obviously inhibited CCl{sub 4}-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Moreover, PBA inhibited CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 translocation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Interestingly, CCl{sub 4}-induced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker for the initiation phase of HSC activation, was significantly attenuated in mice pretreated with PBA. Correspondingly, CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic collagen (Col)1α1 and Col1α2, markers for the perpetuation phase of HSC activation, were inhibited in PBA-treated mice. Importantly, CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic fibrosis, as determined using Sirius red staining, was obviously attenuated by PBA. In conclusion, PBA prevents CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic fibrosis through inhibiting hepatic inflammatory response and HSC activation. Highlights: ► CCl{sub 4} induces hepatic ER stress, inflammation, HSC activation and hepatic fibrosis. ► PBA alleviates CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic ER stress and UPR signaling activation. ► PBA inhibits CCl{sub 4}-induced

  2. Multinational Mining Corporations, State Regulation and Human Rights Protection in Tanzania : Invoking Command and Control Instruments Towards Effective Corporate Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Mpelumbe, Dunford

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the role of the state in the protection of human rights in the context of multinational corporations and globalisation in Tanzania.The main arguement of the study is that the state is the single most important actor for the protection of human rights and for the regulation of multinational mining corporations that operate within its jurisdiction based on its various relevant laws,policies and regulations and other international regulatory frameworks. The study relied o...

  3. Cholesterol Assimilation by Lactic Acid Bacteria and Bifidobacteria Isolated from the Human Gut

    OpenAIRE

    Dora I A Pereira; Gibson, Glenn R.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of human gut-derived lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria on cholesterol levels in vitro. Continuous cultures inoculated with fecal material from healthy human volunteers with media supplemented with cholesterol and bile acids were used to enrich for potential cholesterol assimilators among the indigenous bacterial populations. Seven potential probiotics were found: Lactobacillus fermentum strains F53 and KC5b, Bifidobacterium infantis...

  4. Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Humans: Regulation of Adiposity and Insulin Sensitivity1,2

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J. Mark; McIntosh, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers, a group of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid [18:2(n-6)], have been studied extensively due to their ability to modulate cancer, atherosclerosis, obesity, immune function and diabetes in a variety of experimental models. The purpose of this review was to examine CLA’s isomer-specific regulation of adiposity and insulin sensitivity in humans and in cultures of human adipocytes. It has been clearly demonstrated that specific CLA isomers or...

  5. The bile acid sensor FXR protects against dyslipidemia and aortic plaques development induced by the HIV protease inhibitor ritonavir in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mencarelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related morbidity and mortality rates in patients treated with a combination of high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART have declined, significant metabolic/vascular adverse effects associated with the long term use of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs have emerged as a significant side effect. Here we illustrate that targeting the bile acid sensor farnesoid X receptor (FXR protects against dyslipidemia and vascular injury induced HIV-PIs in rodents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Administration of the HIV PI ritonavir to wild type mice increased plasma triacylglycerols and cholesterol levels and this effect was exacerbated by dosing ritonavir to mice harbouring a disrupted FXR. Dyslipidemia induced by ritonavir associated with a shift in the liver expression of signature genes, Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP-1 and fatty acid synthase. Treating wild type mice with the FXR agonist (chenodeoxycholic acid, CDCA protected against development of dyslipidemia induced by ritonavir. Administration of ritonavir to ApoE(-/- mice, a strain that develop spontaneously atherosclerosis, increased the extent of aortic plaques without worsening the dyslipidemia. Treating these mice with CDCA reduced the extent of aortic plaques by 70% without changing plasma lipoproteins or the liver expression of signature genes. A beneficial effect on aortic plaques was also obtained by treating ApoE(-/- mice with gemfibrozil, a PPARα agonist. FXR activation counter-regulated induction of expression/activity of CD36 caused by HIV-PIs in circulating monocytes and aortic plaques. In macrophages cell lines, CDCA attenuated CD36 induction and uptake of acetylated LDL caused by ritonavir. Natural and synthetic FXR ligands reduced the nuclear translocation of SREBP1c caused by ritonavir. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Activation of the bile acid sensor FXR protects against dyslipidemia and atherosclerotic caused by

  6. Effects of inhaled acid aerosols on lung mechanics: an analysis of human exposure studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Utell, M J

    1985-01-01

    There exist significant gaps in our understanding of human health effects from inhalation of pollutants associated with acid precipitation. Controlled clinical studies examine effects of criteria pollutants almost exclusively by assessing changes in lung mechanics. One constituent of acid precipitation, sulfuric acid aerosols, has been shown to induce bronchoconstriction in exercising extrinsic asthmatics at near ambient levels. These asthmatics may be an order of magnitude more sensitive to ...

  7. Growth inhibition of Streptococcus mutans by cellular extracts of human intestinal lactic acid bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishihara, K; Miyakawa, H; Hasegawa, A.; Takazoe, I; Kawai, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro growth of Streptococcus mutans was completely inhibited by water-soluble extracts from cells of various intestinal lactic acid bacteria identified as Streptococcus faecium, Streptococcus equinus, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Lactobacillus salivarius. The growth inhibition was dependent on the concentrations of the extracts. In contrast, the extracts did not inhibit the growth of the major indigenous intestinal lactic acid bacteria isolated from humans. These lactic acid bacteria ...

  8. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  9. About role of human factors in the building of physical protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our opinion, our contribution to the fight against the illicit turnover has to be focused on ensuring the safe keeping and integrity of nuclear material and radiation sources and on creating powerful and highly efficient physical protection systems. A special role in establishing the physical protection system (at all levels) pertains to the human factor. The nuclear energy sector security (as well as of other national industry sectors) is based on the people: developers, personnel, different level management responsible for decision-making process, the representative of regulatory, controlling and legal structures, and therefore, in general, the role of the human factor can be considered to be significant. After having analyzed, even in a general way, the status of the affairs we can see: 1) the stage of designing and development of facilities is actually completed; 2) the existing concept of protection does not meet current requirements of the physical protection; 3) the next period is the operation when it is necessary to adapt with using capabilities available to the today requirements and to establish conditions under which the human factor could compensate technical backwardness; 4) the final stage is the ChNPP decommissioning, the Object Shelter problem. It is obvious that the ChNPP decommissioning process will increase acuteness of the problem related to the physical protection of this facility. The operative situation while being formed during the physical protection ensuring, first of all, is affected by the following factors: 1) political factors: changes in the geopolitical situation caused by fundamental changes, formation of a national state based on a principle of democracy and law, etc.; 2) social and economic factors: difficulties originated during the period of transition towards the market economy, decrease in the standard of living; increase in the crime rate and criminalization of social relations and others; 3) spiritual wealth and cultural

  10. Trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid decreases de novo lipid synthesis in human adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obsen, Thomas; Faergeman, Nils J; Chung, Soonkyu;

    2012-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces adiposity in vivo. However, mechanisms mediating these changes are unclear. Therefore, we treated cultures of human adipocytes with trans-10, cis-12 (10,12) CLA, cis-9, trans-11 (9,11) CLA or other trans fatty acids (FA), and measured indices of lipid...

  11. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M;

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250-555 p...

  12. Bioavailability of folic acid from fortified pasteurised and UHT-treated milk in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, R.J. de; Verwei, M.; West, C.E.; Vliet, T. van; Siebelink, E.; Berg, H. van den; Castenmiller, J.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether milk fortified with folic acid enhances the folate status of humans and whether the presence of folate-binding proteins (FBP) in pasteurised milk affects the bioavailability of folic acid from fortified milk. In untreated and pasteurised mi

  13. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  14. Conjugated linoleic acid as a potential protective factor in prevention of breast cancer 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Białek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers are the second leading cause of deaths in Poland, among both women and men. Breast cancer is the malignancy most frequently diagnosed in women. In 2008 mammary cancer was diagnosed in up to 14 500 patients. It is also the second most common cause of cancer deaths among women in our country. Although the etiology of most cases of this disease is not known, risk factors include a variety of nutritional factors. The amount of fat consumed in the diet and the quantity and quality of fatty acids are especially crucial. Among fatty acids to which great importance in modification of cancer risk is attributed are conjugated linoleic acid. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA are a group of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid, with a conjugated double bond system in the carbon chain. The main natural source of them is milk and dairy products and meat of different species of ruminants, in which cis-9, trans-11 octadecadienoic acid (rumenic acid occurs in the largest quantities, constituting over 90�0of the total pool of CLA. Another important isomer is trans-10, cis-12 octadecadienoic acid, which occurs with rumenic acid in dietary supplements, usually in the ratio 1:1. Surveys conducted show their possible health promoting effects in obesity, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, diabetes, insulin resistance, inflammation, and various types of cancer, especially breast cancer. 

  15. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the “next-generation” recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA...

  16. Nicotinic acid receptor abnormalities in human skin cancer: implications for a role in epidermal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yira Bermudez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic UV skin exposure leads to epidermal differentiation defects in humans that can be largely restored by pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid. Nicotinic acid has been identified as a ligand for the human G-protein-coupled receptors GPR109A and GPR109B that signal through G(i-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. We have examined the expression, cellular distribution, and functionality of GPR109A/B in human skin and skin derived epidermal cells. RESULTS: Nicotinic acid increases epidermal differentiation in photodamaged human skin as judged by the terminal differentiation markers caspase 14 and filaggrin. Both GPR109A and GPR109B genes are transcribed in human skin and in epidermal keratinocytes, but expression in dermal fibroblasts is below limits of detection. Receptor transcripts are greatly over-expressed in squamous cell cancers. Receptor protein in normal skin is prominent from the basal through granular layers of the epidermis, with cellular localization more dispersive in the basal layer but predominantly localized at the plasma membrane in more differentiated epidermal layers. In normal human primary and immortalized keratinocytes, nicotinic acid receptors show plasma membrane localization and functional G(i-mediated signaling. In contrast, in a squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line, receptor protein shows a more diffuse cellular localization and the receptors are nearly non-functional. CONCLUSIONS: The results of these studies justify future genetic and pharmacological intervention studies to define possible specific role(s of nicotinic acid receptors in human skin homeostasis.

  17. pH-Independent Charge Resonance Mechanism for UV Protective Functions of Shinorine and Related Mycosporine-like Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Jun; Yamamoto, Shogo; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Nishijima, Masaki; Mori, Tadashi

    2015-12-24

    The UV-protective ability of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) has been well documented and is believed to serve as a protecting agent for marine organisms from solar radiation. However, the effective UV absorption by MAAs has not been well correlated to MAA (neutral) structures. In this study, the origin of UV-protecting ability of MAAs was elucidated by experimental and theoretical spectroscopic investigations. The absorption maxima of mycosporine-glycine and shinorine in the UVA region were practically unaffected over a wide range of pH 4-10 and only slightly blue-shifted at pH 1-2. It was revealed that the zwitterionic nature of the amino acid residue facilitates the protonation to the chromophoric 3-aminocyclohexenone and 1-amino-3-iminocyclohexene moieties and the operation of the charge resonance in the protonated species well accounts for their allowed low-energy transitions in the UVA region. The RI-CC2/TZVP calculations on model systems in their protonated forms well reproduced the observed transition energies and oscillator strengths of MAAs, only with insignificant systematic overestimations of the both values. The slight hypsochromic shifts at pH 1-2 were explained by (partial) protonation to a carboxylate anion in the amino acid residue, as confirmed by theory. Fluorescence spectral investigations of shinorine were also performed for the first time in water to confirm the effective nonradiative deactivation. Consequently, this study unequivocally demonstrated that the 3-aminocyclohexenone as well as 1-amino-3-iminocyclohexene moieties, which are readily protonated at a wide range of pH, are responsible for the UV-protective ability of aqueous solution of MAAs. PMID:26625701

  18. pH-Independent Charge Resonance Mechanism for UV Protective Functions of Shinorine and Related Mycosporine-like Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Jun; Yamamoto, Shogo; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Nishijima, Masaki; Mori, Tadashi

    2015-12-24

    The UV-protective ability of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) has been well documented and is believed to serve as a protecting agent for marine organisms from solar radiation. However, the effective UV absorption by MAAs has not been well correlated to MAA (neutral) structures. In this study, the origin of UV-protecting ability of MAAs was elucidated by experimental and theoretical spectroscopic investigations. The absorption maxima of mycosporine-glycine and shinorine in the UVA region were practically unaffected over a wide range of pH 4-10 and only slightly blue-shifted at pH 1-2. It was revealed that the zwitterionic nature of the amino acid residue facilitates the protonation to the chromophoric 3-aminocyclohexenone and 1-amino-3-iminocyclohexene moieties and the operation of the charge resonance in the protonated species well accounts for their allowed low-energy transitions in the UVA region. The RI-CC2/TZVP calculations on model systems in their protonated forms well reproduced the observed transition energies and oscillator strengths of MAAs, only with insignificant systematic overestimations of the both values. The slight hypsochromic shifts at pH 1-2 were explained by (partial) protonation to a carboxylate anion in the amino acid residue, as confirmed by theory. Fluorescence spectral investigations of shinorine were also performed for the first time in water to confirm the effective nonradiative deactivation. Consequently, this study unequivocally demonstrated that the 3-aminocyclohexenone as well as 1-amino-3-iminocyclohexene moieties, which are readily protonated at a wide range of pH, are responsible for the UV-protective ability of aqueous solution of MAAs.

  19. Uses of the cost of human life in protection against ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of radiation protection is based on the assumption that there is no safe level of exposure. Rathier, the risk (e.g. probability of induction of fatal cancers) is assumed to decrease in a linear way with the dose (measured by the effective dose in Sievert: Sv). Therefore, regulations state that all doses must be kept As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) ranges among the methods that allow identification of an 'optimum' protection level, balancing the risk reduction against the costs. That can be derived from exposure, expressed as a 'collective dose', with the help of the dose exposure relationship (100 Person-Sievert leads to 5 lethal cancers plus 2.2' equivalent lethal cancers 'due to non fatal cancers and heredity effect). Thus the 'Value of the Collective Dose', the usual parameter in decision making, is assigned a monetary value, and it is linked to the 'Value of Human Life'. Nevertheless, Cost Benefit Analysis is not the only possible method and pricing the Person-Sievert is therefore not necessary. Traditional pragmatic approaches and engineering judgement can be used. At present there is a development within Europe of CBA in radiation protection and 'Value of Person-Sievert' is put forward. A study was conducted in order better to understand what figures are cited, in which conditions those figures are really used, and what perspectives may be offered. (authors)

  20. Today's ``safe" radiofrequency (RF) exposure limits DON'T protect human health near transmitters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2005-03-01

    Maxwell's theory implies that electromagnetic (EM) radiation carries both energy and momentum. ``The momentum may have both linear and angular contributions; angular momentum [AM] has a spin part associated with polarization and an orbital part associated with spatial distribution. Any interaction between radiation and matter is inevitably accompanied by an exchange of momentum. This often has mechanical consequences ..."^2 Voluntary consensus standards [ANSI C95; NCRP; INCIRP] protect human health from most thermal [energy transfer] effects, but no standards yet exist to protect health against athermal [momentum transfer] effects, though laboratory transfer of spin AM was reported by 1935^3 and of orbital AM by 1992^2 for an optical vortex [tip of Poynting vector (PV) traces a helix about the beam axis]. In the far field of a dipole RF transmitter, radiation is linearly polarized (minimal spin AM) and locally approximated by a plane wave (zero orbital AM), but in the near field the orbital AM is non-zero [tip of PV traces an ellipse^4 in air] implying an athermal hazard [e.g., brain tumors in cellular phone users] against which no standard now in use anywhere in the world protects! ^2 L. Allen et al. Phys. Rev. A 45:8185-9(1992). ^3 R.A. Beth, Phys. Rev. 48:471(1935); 50:115-25 (1936). ^4 F. Landstorfer, Archiv für Elektronik und übertragungstechnik 26:189-96(1972) [in German].

  1. Glucosamine increases hyaluronic acid production in human osteoarthritic synovium explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uitterlinden (Elian); C.F. Verkoelen; S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); H. Jahr (Holger); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); J.L.M. Koevoet (Wendy)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Glucosamine (GlcN) used by patients with osteoarthritis was demonstrated to reduce pain, but the working mechanism is still not clear. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) is also described to reduce pain in osteoarthritis. The synthesis of HA requires GlcN as one o

  2. A nucleic acid dependent chemical photocatalysis in live human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arian, Dumitru; Cló, Emiliano; Gothelf, Kurt V;

    2010-01-01

    Only two nucleic acid directed chemical reactions that are compatible with live cells have been reported to date. Neither of these processes generate toxic species from nontoxic starting materials. Reactions of the latter type could be applied as gene-specific drugs, for example, in the treatment...

  3. Sunscreens: topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against harmful effects of solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review deals with topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against the harmful effects of solar radiation. Two concerns about the deleterious effects of sun exposure involve: (1) acute effects (e.g., sunburn and drug-induced phototoxicity) and (2) potential long-term risks of repeated sun exposures leading to development of solar elastosis, keratoses, induction of both nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer, and alteration of immune responses and functions. Action spectra of normal and abnormal reactions of human skin to acute and chronic effects of solar radiation are presented with a view to helping the physician prescribe the appropriate sunscreens. Factors that influence acute effects of sunburn are reviewed. Various artificial methods effective in minimizing or preventing harmful effects of solar radiation, both in normal individuals and in patients with photosensitivity-related problems, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the commercially available chemical sunscreens and their properties. Sun protection factor (SPF) values of several brand-name formulations determined with a solar simulator under indoor conditions (laboratory) and with solar radiation under natural, field conditions are presented. Factors responsible for variations of SPF values observed under indoor and outdoor conditions are reviewed. Systemic photoprotective agents and their limitations are outlined. The photobiology of melanin pigmentation (the tanning reaction) is briefly discussed, with emphasis on the dangers of using quick-tanning lotions for stimulation of the tanning reaction

  4. Protecting human security: proposals for the G7 Ise-Shima Summit in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-21

    In today's highly globalised world, protecting human security is a core challenge for political leaders who are simultaneously dealing with terrorism, refugee and migration crises, disease epidemics, and climate change. Promoting universal health coverage (UHC) will help prevent another disease outbreak similar to the recent Ebola outbreak in west Africa, and create robust health systems, capable of withstanding future shocks. Robust health systems, in turn, are the prerequisites for achieving UHC. We propose three areas for global health action by the G7 countries at their meeting in Japan in May, 2016, to protect human security around the world: restructuring of the global health architecture so that it enables preparedness and responses to health emergencies; development of platforms to share best practices and harness shared learning about the resilience and sustainability of health systems; and strengthening of coordination and financing for research and development and system innovations for global health security. Rather than creating new funding or organisations, global leaders should reorganise current financing structures and institutions so that they work more effectively and efficiently. By making smart investments, countries will improve their capacity to monitor, track, review, and assess health system performance and accountability, and thereby be better prepared for future global health shocks. PMID:27301827

  5. Preparation and Evaluation of Human-Murine Chimeric Antibody against Protective Antigen of Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Hao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to develop a human/murine chimeric Fab antibody which neutralizes the anthrax toxin, protective antigen (PA. The chimeric Fab was constructed using variable regions of murine anti-PA monoclonal antibody in combination with constant regions of human IgG. The chimeric PA6-Fab was expressed in E. coli. BL21 and evaluated by ELISA and co-immunoprecipitation- mass spectra. The potency of PA6-Fab to neutralize LeTx was examined in J774A.1 cell viability in vitro and in Fisher 344 rats in vivo. The PA6-Fab did not have domain similarity corresponding to the current anti PA mAbs, but specifically bound to anthrax PA at an affinity of 1.76 nM, and was able to neutralize LeTx in vitro and protected 56.9% cells at 20 μg/mL against anthrax LeTx. One hundred μg PA6-Fab could neutralize 300 μg LeTx in vivo. The PA6-Fab has potential as a therapeutic mAb for treatment of anthrax.

  6. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. ► TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. ► BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  7. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetto de Farias, Caroline [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Heinen, Tiago Elias; Pereira dos Santos, Rafael [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Abujamra, Ana Lucia [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Schwartsmann, Gilberto [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  8. 2-substituted thiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acids as prodrugs of L-cysteine. Protection of mice against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, H.T.; Goon, D.J.; Muldoon, W.P.; Zera, R.T.

    1984-05-01

    A number of 2-alkyl- and 2-aryl-substituted thiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acids were evaluated for their protective effect against hepatotoxic deaths produced in mice by LD/sub 90/ doses of acetaminophen. 2(RS)-Methyl-, 2(RS)-n-propyl-, and 2(RS)-n- pentylthiazolidine -4(R)-carboxylic acids (compounds 1b,d,e, respectively) were nearly equipotent in their protective effect based on the number of surviving animals at 48 h as well as by histological criteria. 2(RS)-Ethyl-, 2(RS)-phenyl-, and 2(RS)-(4-pyridyl)thiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acids (compounds 1c,f,g) were less protective. The enantiomer of 1b, viz., 2(RS)- methylthiazolidine -4(S)-carboxylic acid (2b), was totally ineffective in this regard. Thiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (1a), but not its enantiomer, 2a, was a good substrate for a solubilized preparation of rat liver mitochondrial proline oxidase (K/sub m/ 1.1 x 10(-4) M; V/sub max/ . 5.4 mumol min-1 (mg of protein)-1). Compound 1b was not a substrate for proline oxidase but dissociated to L-cysteine in this system. At physiological pH and temperature, the hydrogens on the methyl group of 1b underwent deuterium exchange with solvent D/sub 2/O (k1 . 2.5 X 10(-5) s), suggesting that opening of the thiazolidine ring must have taken place. Indeed, 1b labeled with /sup 14/C in the 2 and methyl positions was rapidly metabolized by the rat to produce /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, 80% of the dose being excreted in this form in the expired air after 24 h. It is suggested that these 2-substituted thiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acids are prodrugs of L-cysteine that liberate this sulfhydryl amino acid in vivo by nonenzymatic ring opening, followed by solvolysis.

  9. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → PPARα activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. → PPARα activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. → PPARα activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. → PPARα activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPARα in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPARα using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPARα by GW7647, a potent PPARα agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPARγ, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPARα activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPARγ is activated. On the other hand, PPARα activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPARα-dependent manner. Moreover, PPARα activation increased the production of CO2 and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPARα stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPARα agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected effects of PPARα activation are very valuable for managing diabetic conditions accompanied by obesity, because PPAR

  10. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activities of Amides of Chiral Benzyl Ethers of N-Boc Protected Aminols of L-amino acids with Succinic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research work presented in this article describes a synthesis of chiral amides. Chiral benzyl ethers of N-Boc protected aminols reacted with succinic acid using 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine (TCT) as a coupling agent producing chiral amides in high yields. The synthetic amides were investigated for their antifungal and antibacterial activities against different bacterial and fungal strains. All the compounds showed excellent zone of inhibition against the three tested bacterial strains and good to moderate activity against one fungal strain. (author)

  11. The Australian joint inquiry into the Protection of Human Genetic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrot, David

    2003-04-01

    The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) and the Australian Health Ethics Committee are currently engaged in an inquiry into the Protection of Human Genetic Information. In particular, the Attorney-General and the Minister for Health and Ageing have asked us to focus, in relation to human genetic information and tissue samples, on how best to ensure world's best practice in relation to: privacy protection; protection against unlawful discrimination; and the maintenance of high ethical standards in medical research and clinical practice. While initial concerns and controversies have related mainly to aspects of medical research (e.g. consent; re-use of samples) and access to private insurance coverage, relevant issues arise in a wide variety of contexts, including: employment; medical practice; tissue banks and genetic databases; health administration; superannuation; access to government services (e.g. schools, nursing homes); law enforcement; and use by government authorities (e.g. for immigration purposes) or other bodies (e.g. by sports associations). Under the Australian federal system, it is also the case that laws and practices may vary across states and territories. For example, neonatal genetic testing is standard, but storage and retention policies for the resulting 'Guthrie cards' differ markedly. Similarly, some states have developed highly linked health information systems (e.g. incorporating hospitals, doctors' offices and public records), while others discourage such linkages owing to concerns about privacy. The challenge for Australia is to develop policies, standards and practices that promote the intelligent use of genetic information, while providing a level of security with which the community feels comfortable. The inquiry is presently reviewing the adequacy of existing laws and regulatory mechanisms, but recognizes that it will be even more important to develop a broad mix of strategies, such as community and professional education, and the

  12. About role of human factors in the building of physical protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A special role in establishing the physical protection system (at all levels) pertains to the human factor. It is necessary to specify a place of this matter within the overall security system. The nuclear energy sector security (as well as of other national industry sectors) is based on the people: developers, personnel, different level management responsible for decision-making process, the representative of regulatory, controlling and legal structures, and therefore, in general, the rote of the human factor can be considered to be significant. The operative situation while being formed during the physical protection ensuring, first of all, is affected by the following factors: political, social and economic, spiritual wealth and cultural factors and etc. In addition, a new problem suddenly appeared related to the safety and security of the energy complex, that is: uncontrolled processes such as: non-payment, debts on salary for several month period; all this factors effect negatively the level of safety and security. In this clear, that in such a difficult situation the role of an individual is increasing. Ignorance of the above factors or their non-objective (incomplete, partial ignorance) accounting (consideration) finally can lead to the negative and irremediable consequences. Thus, the content and the extent of the security of a society, in general, and every person, in particular, directly depend on the functioning of all society's structure, and, first of all, on the economic, social, political and legal structures. As a result, the physical protection system acquires a complex or comprehensive structure and I shall describe its specifics in the paper. (author)

  13. Cytotoxicity towards human endothelial cells, induced by neutrophil myeloperoxidase: protection by ceftazidime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mathy-Hartert

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of the antibiotic ceftazidime (CAZ on the cytolytic action of the neutrophil myeloperoxidase–hydrogen peroxide–chloride anion system (MPO/H2O2/Cl−. In this system, myeloperoxidase catalyses the conversion of H2O2 and CI− to the cytotoxic agent HOCl. Stimulated neutrophils can release MPO into the extracellular environment and then may cause tissue injury through direct endothelial cells lysis. We showed that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC were capable of taking up active MPO. In presence of H2O2 (10−4 M, this uptake was accompanied by cell lysis. The cytolysis was estimated by the release of 51Cr from HUVEC and expressed as an index of cytotoxicity (IC. Dose dependent protection was obtained for CAZ concentrations ranging from 10−5 to 10−3 M;this can be attributed to inactivation of HOCl by the drug. This protection is comparable to that obtained with methionine and histidine, both of which are known to neutralize HOCl. This protection by CAZ could also be attributed to inactivation of H2O2, but when cytolysis was achieved with H2O2 or O2− generating enzymatic systems, no protection by CAZ was observed. Moreover, the peroxidation activity of MPO (action on H2O2 was not affected by CAZ, while CAZ prevented the chlorination activity of MPO (chlorination of monochlorodimedon. So, we concluded that CAZ acts via HOCl inactivation. These antioxidant properties of CAZ may be clinically useful in pathological situations where excessive activation of neutrophils occurs, such as in sepsis.

  14. Flood Protection Decision Making Within a Coupled Human and Natural System

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Greg; O'Connell, Enda

    2013-04-01

    Due to the perceived threat from climate change, prediction under changing climatic and hydrological conditions has become a dominant theme of hydrological research. Much of this research has been climate model-centric, in which GCM/RCM climate projections have been used to drive hydrological system models to explore potential impacts that should inform adaptation decision-making. However, adaptation fundamentally involves how humans may respond to increasing flood and drought hazards by changing their strategies, activities and behaviours which are coupled in complex ways to the natural systems within which they live and work. Humans are major agents of change in hydrological systems, and representing human activities and behaviours in coupled human and natural hydrological system models is needed to gain insight into the complex interactions that take place, and to inform adaptation decision-making. Governments and their agencies are under pressure to make proactive investments to protect people living in floodplains from the perceived increasing flood hazard. However, adopting this as a universal strategy everywhere is not affordable, particularly in times of economic stringency and given uncertainty about future climatic conditions. It has been suggested that the assumption of stationarity, which has traditionally been invoked in making hydrological risk assessments, is no longer tenable. However, before the assumption of hydrologic nonstationarity is accepted, the ability to cope with the uncertain impacts of global warming on water management via the operational assumption of hydrologic stationarity should be carefully examined. Much can be learned by focussing on natural climate variability and its inherent changes in assessing alternative adaptation strategies. A stationary stochastic multisite flood hazard model has been developed that can exhibit increasing variability/persistence in annual maximum floods, starting with the traditional assumption of

  15. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin. Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  16. Plasma bile acids are not associated with energy metabolism in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brufau, Gemma; Bahr, Matthias J.; Staels, Bart; Claudel, Thierry; Ockenga, Johann; Boker, Klaus H. W.; Murphy, Elizabeth J.; Prado, Kris; Stellaard, Frans; Manns, Michael P.; Kuipers, Folkert; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) have recently been shown to increase energy expenditure in mice, but this concept has not been tested in humans. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between plasma BA levels and energy expenditure in humans. Type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients (n = 12) and gender, age and BMI-mat

  17. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Protect Renal Functions by Increasing Docosahexaenoic Acid-Derived Metabolite Levels in SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr Rats, a Metabolic Syndrome Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Katakura

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA protect against diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of highly purified DHA and EPA or EPA only administration on renal function and renal eicosanoid and docosanoid levels in an animal model of metabolic syndrome, SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr (SHRcp rats. Male SHRcp rats were divided into 3 groups. Control (5% arabic gum, TAK-085 (300 mg/kg/day, containing 467 mg/g EPA and 365 mg/g DHA, or EPA (300 mg/kg/day was orally administered for 20 weeks. The urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in other groups. The glomerular sclerosis score in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in the other groups. Although DHA levels were increased in total kidney fatty acids, the levels of nonesterified DHA were not significantly different among the 3 groups, whereas the levels of protectin D1, resolvin D1, and resolvin D2 were significantly increased in the TAK-085-administered group. The results show that the use of combination therapy with DHA and EPA in SHRcp rats improved or prevented renal failure associate with metabolic syndrome with decreasing triglyceride levels and increasing ω-3 PUFA lipid mediators.

  18. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  19. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  20. Molecular characterization, functional expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium fatty acid-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illescas, Oscar; Carrero, Julio C; Bobes, Raúl J; Flisser, Ana; Rosas, Gabriela; Laclette, Juan P

    2012-12-01

    The fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) comprise a family of proteins that are widely expressed in animal cells and perform a variety of vital functions. Here, we report the identification, characterization, recombinant expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium FABP (TsFABP1). The TsFABP1 primary structure showed all the conserved residues characteristic of the subfamily iv of the intracellular Lipid-Binding Proteins (iLBPs), including those involved in the binding stabilization of the fatty acid molecule. Through a competitive binding assay we found that TsFABP1 is able to bind at least six different fatty acids with preference toward palmitic and stearic acid, suggesting that TsFABP1 is a member of the iLBP subfamily iv. Immunolocalization assays carried out on larval and adult tissues of four species of taeniids using anti-TsFABP1 hyperimmune sera produced in mice and rabbit, showed intense labeling in the tegument of the spiral canal and in subtegumental cytons of the larvae. These findings suggest that the spiral canal might be a major place for FA uptake in the developing scolex. In contrast, only subtegumental cytons in the adult worms stained positive. We propose that TsFABP1 is involved in the mechanism to mobilize fatty acids between compartments in the extensive syncytial tissue of taeniids. Protection assays carried out in a murine model of cysticercosis showed that subcutaneous immunization with TsFABP1 resulted in about 45% reduction of parasite load against an intraperitoneal challenge with Taenia crassiceps cysts. This reduction in parasite load correlated with the level of cellular and humoral immune responses against TsFABP1, as determined in spleen lymphocyte proliferation and ELISA testing.

  1. Myocardial protection during elective coronary artery bypasses grafting by pretreatment with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljović Milić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Despite recent advances in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG, cardioplegic cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB are still associated with myocardial injury. Accordingly, the efforts have been made lately to improve the outcome of CPB by glucose-insulinpotassium, adenosine, Ca2+-channel antagonists, L-arginine, N-acetylcysteine, coenzyme Q10, diazoxide, Na+/H+ exchange inhibitors, but with an unequal results. Since omega-3 polyunsatutated fatty acids (PUFAs have shown remarkable cardioprotection in preclinical researches, the aim of our study was to check their effects in prevention of ischemia reperfusion injury in patients with CPB. Methods. This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study was performed with parallel groups. The patients undergoing elective CABG were randomized to receive preoperative intravenous omega-3 PUFAs infusion (n = 20 or the same volume of 0.9% saline solution infusion (n = 20. Blood samples were collected simultaneously from the radial artery and the coronary sinus before starting CPB and at 10, 20 and 30 min after the release of the aortic cross clamp. Lactate extraction/excretion and myocardial oxygen extraction were calculated and compared between the two groups. The levels of troponin I (TnT and creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB were determined before starting CPB and 4 and 24 h postoperatively. Results. Demographic and operative characteristics, including CPB and aortic cross-clamp time, were similar between the two groups of patients. The level of lactate extraction 10 and 20 min after aortic cross-clamp time has shown negative values in the control group, but positive values in the PUFAs group with statistically significant differences (-19.6% vs 7.9%; p < 0.0001 and -19.9% vs 8.2%; p < 0.0008, respectively. The level of lactate extraction 30 minutes after reperfusion was not statistically different between the two groups (6.9% vs 4.2%; p < 0.54. Oxygen extraction in the

  2. Phytic acid protects porcine intestinal epithelial cells from deoxynivalenol (DON) cytotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, Graziela Drociunas; Silva, Caio Abércio da; Pinton, Philippe; Oswald, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of phytic acid (IP(6)) as a possible inhibitor of cellular damage induced by toxic substances such as mycotoxins on a porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-1). We first observed that a dose of 5 mM phytic acid decreases cell viability and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of cell monolayer. We next investigate the effect of non-cytotoxic dose of phytic acid on the deoxinivalenol (DON) induced decreased TEER. We showed th...

  3. Protection of NdFeB magnets by corrosion resistance phytic acid conversion film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Haiyang; Zhu, Liqun; Liu, Huicong; Li, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    Phytic acid conversion film was prepared on NdFeB magnets by dipping the NdFeB into phytic acid solution. The morphology, composition, structure and corrosion resistance of the film were systematically investigated. The results showed that the phytic acid film was effective in improving the corrosion resistance of NdFeB magnets. XRD, TEM and FT-IR analyses revealed that the film was amorphous and had a strong peak of phosphate radical (PO43-). The formation mechanism of the film was also explored by XPS and the potential of zero charge (Epzc) measurement at the solution-metal interface.

  4. Possible Causes of Ileal Injury in Two Models of Microbial Sepsis and Protective Effect of Phytic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Rashad Ahmed

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sepsis related-multiple organ dysfunction is associatedwith ileum injury. We aimed to determine the causes ofileal injury in two models of microbial sepsis resulted from infectionwith Aeromonas hydrophila or its endotoxin. We alsoevaluated the protective effect of phytic acid.Methods: Thin sections of ileum from 60 Swiss male mice incontrol, bacteria-infected or lipopolysaccharides (LPS andbacteria-infected or LPS-infected co-administered with phyticacid were subjected to histopathological and TdT-mediateddUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay for apoptotic cellsdetection while ultra thin sections were stained with uranylacetate and lead citrate for cytological changes examination.Also, ileum images were exposed to the image analysis softwareto determine some related morphometric measures.Results: Necrosis and apoptosis were observed in ileum injuryin both examined sepsis models. The ileum injury was moresevere in LPS model. Phytic acid showed the ability to attenuateileum injury in Aeromonas hydrophila and its endotoxinmodels of sepsis after four weeks administration where itssupplementation significantly minimized the histopathologicaland cytological complications and morphometric alterationsresulted from the injury.Conclusion: The protective effects of phytic acid may becaused by increased mucous secretion, decreased apoptoticindex, attenuating the inflammatory and lymphocytic cellscount or increasing the renewal of the crypt cells and villousepithelial cells proliferation.

  5. Engrafted human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived anterior specified neural progenitors protect the rat crushed optic nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Satarian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs is a common occurrence in several eye diseases. This study examined the functional improvement and protection of host RGCs in addition to the survival, integration and neuronal differentiation capabilities of anterior specified neural progenitors (NPs following intravitreal transplantation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NPs were produced under defined conditions from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs and transplanted into rats whose optic nerves have been crushed (ONC. hiPSCs were induced to differentiate into anterior specified NPs by the use of Noggin and retinoic acid. The hiPSC-NPs were labeled by green fluorescent protein or a fluorescent tracer 1,1' -dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI and injected two days after induction of ONC in hooded rats. Functional analysis according to visual evoked potential recordings showed significant amplitude recovery in animals transplanted with hiPSC-NPs. Retrograde labeling by an intra-collicular DiI injection showed significantly higher numbers of RGCs and spared axons in ONC rats treated with hiPSC-NPs or their conditioned medium (CM. The analysis of CM of hiPSC-NPs showed the secretion of ciliary neurotrophic factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor. Optic nerve of cell transplanted groups also had increased GAP43 immunoreactivity and myelin staining by FluoroMyelin™ which imply for protection of axons and myelin. At 60 days post-transplantation hiPSC-NPs were integrated into the ganglion cell layer of the retina and expressed neuronal markers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The transplantation of anterior specified NPs may improve optic nerve injury through neuroprotection and differentiation into neuronal lineages. These NPs possibly provide a promising new therapeutic approach for traumatic optic nerve injuries and loss of RGCs caused by other diseases.

  6. Conformation and crystal structures of 1-aminocyclohexaneacetic acid (β3,3Ac6c in N-protected derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiem Ahmad Wani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available N-Protected derivatives of 1-aminocyclohexaneacetic acid (β3,3-Ac6c, namely Valeroyl-β3,3-Ac6c-OH [2-(1-pentanamidocyclohexylacetic acid, C13H23NO3], (I, Fmoc-β3,3-Ac6c-OH [2-(1-{[(9H-fluoren-9-yloxycarbonyl]amino}cyclohexylacetic acid, C23H25NO4], (II, and Pyr-β3,3-Ac6c-OH {2-[1-(pyrazine-2-amidocyclohexyl]acetic acid, C13H17N3O3}, (III, were synthesized and their conformational properties were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The backbone torsion angles (ϕ, θ for β3,3-Ac6c-OH are restricted to gauche conformations in all the derivatives, with a chair conformation of the cyclohexane ring. In the crystal structure of (I, the packing of molecules shows both carboxylic acid R22(8 O—H...O and centrosymmetric R22(14 N—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions, giving rise to chains along the c-axis direction. In (II, centrosymmetric carboxylic acid R22(8 O—H...O dimers are extended through N—H...O hydrogen bonds and together with inter-ring π–π interactions between Fmoc groups [ring centroid distance = 3.786 (2 Å], generate a layered structure lying parallel to (010. In the case of compound (III, carboxylic acid O—H...Npyrazine hydrogen bonds give rise to zigzag ribbon structures extending along the c-axis direction.

  7. Preparation of co-spray dried cushioning agent containing stearic acid for protecting pellet coatings when compressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Xu, De Sheng; Li, Min; Liu, Li; Heng, Paul

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the applicability of stearic acid as a co-adjuvant in cushioning agent formulated to prevent coat damage when compressing coated pellets. The co-processed and physical blended fillers were prepared by spray drying and physically blending, respectively, with filler ingredients consisting of stearic acid, microcrystalline cellulose, fully gelatinized starch, and corn starch. Pellets containing drug were produced by coating onto non-pariels a drug layer of metformin followed by a sustained-release layer. Drug release from tablets composed of co-processed or physical blended fillers (0, 1, 5, and 10% stearic acid levels) and coated drug containing pellets were analyzed using similarity factor F2. Under the same force and the stearic acid level, co-processed fillers produced pellet containing tablets which showed higher F2 or t50 values and tensile strengths as well as lower yield pressures as compared with tablets containing physical blended fillers. It was shown that the destructive degree of pellet coating was significantly reduced after being co-processed by homogenization and the incorporation of stearic acid in the cushioning agents, as shown by the improved F2 and t50 values. In addition, disintegrate times of tablets containing co-processed agents decreased despite the hydrophobic stearic acid. In conclusion, the inclusion of stearic acid in co-processed cushioning agents was effective at protecting compacted coated pellets from compression-induced damage without compromising disintegratability. The findings could serve as a step towards resolving the technical challenges of balancing the drug release profiles, tablet tensile strength, and disintegration time of compacting coated pellets into multi-particulate-sustained release tablets. PMID:26289006

  8. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective.

  9. Comparative analysis of ascorbic acid in human milk and infant formula using varied milk delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickton Darby

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of human milk for later use is on the rise. Bottle systems are used to deliver the expressed milk. Research has shown that storage of both human milk and artificial baby milk, or infant formula, leads to a loss of ascorbic acid (commonly called Vitamin C. As milk is removed from the bottle during feeding and replaced by ambient air, it is unknown if loss of ascorbic acid occurs during the course of a feeding. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the milk delivery system on levels of ascorbic acid in human milk and infant formula. The objectives are to 1 determine changes in ascorbic acid concentration during a 20 minute "feed," 2 determine if there is a difference in ascorbic acid concentration between delivery systems, and 3 evaluate if any differences are of clinical importance. Methods Commonly available bottles were used for comparison of bottle delivery systems. Mature human milk was standardized to 42 mg/L of ascorbic acid. Infant formula with iron and infant formula with docosahexanoic acid were used for the formula samples. Each sample was analyzed for ascorbic acid concentration at baseline (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes. Each collection of samples was completed in triplicate. Samples were analyzed for ascorbic acid using normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Results Ascorbic acid concentration declined in all bottle systems during testing, Differences between the bottle systems were noted. Ascorbic acid concentrations declined to less than 40% of recommended daily intake for infants in 4 of the bottles systems at the 20 minute sampling. Conclusion The bottle systems used in this study had measurable decreases in the mean concentration of ascorbic acid. More research is needed to determine if the observed decreases are related to lower plasma ascorbic acid concentration in infants exclusively bottle fed. The decrease of ascorbic acid concentration observed in both

  10. Loss of n-6 fatty acid induced pediatric obesity protects against acute murine colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary influences may affect microbiome composition and host immune responses, thereby modulating propensity toward inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. Dietary n-6 fatty acids have been associated with ulcetative colitis in prospective studies. However, the critical d...

  11. Nucleoside-nucleotide free diet protects rat colonic mucosa from damage induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Adjei, A A; Morioka, T.; Ameho, C K; Yamauchi, K.; Kulkarni, A. D.; Al-Mansouri, H M; Kawajiri, A; Yamamoto, S.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Growing evidence suggests that intestinal recovery from injury induced by radiation, endotoxin, and protein deficiency is improved by the ingestion of nucleosides and nucleotides. AIM: This study examined the effect of dietary nucleosides and nucleotides supplementation on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid induced colonic damage in experimental colitis. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into two groups and fed nucleic acid free 20% casein diet (control) or this diet supple...

  12. The importance of the human factor in a physical protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A complete physical protection system gathers three elements: equipment's, guards and procedures. The integration of these three elements will guarantee the efficiency of the overall PPS in such a way that it can meet the objectives that were defined during its project: clear and precise procedures will rule the relation between the technical factor (equipments/ hardware and software) and the human factor (guards). The technical factor is easily adapted ad upgraded to continue meet the objectives of the PPS; however, the human factor presents some resistance, internal and external, concerning the performance of its function within the overall PPS. The objective of this paper is to show the importance of the human factor as an integrant part of the PPS of a nuclear facility. 1. Good relationship between guards and other employees in a facility; 2. the knowledge and acceptance of rules and procedures; 3. and the awareness of the needing to implement security measures, as well as the cooperation with these measures to avoid unauthorized nuclear material removal from the facility or sabotage with consequent radioactive release will guarantee the success of the human factor within the overall PPS. In countries where there is no recent record of terrorist activities, as in Brazil's case, these three key factors are particularly critical, once the concept of security culture is not present in those people's way of life. The target public of this survey are the employees, including the guards of the security force, of the CNAAA - Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto - consisting of Angra 1 and Angra 2 nuclear power plants. The tools used to came up with the conclusions of this work were two different kinds of questionnaires: a) one of the questionnaires was answered by the guards of the security force concerning their feelings or impressions about other employees' knowledge, acceptance and cooperation of/with the security measures applied on site, and their

  13. Protective effect of α-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (α-hANP) on chemical-induced pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been established that α-hANP, the newly discovered peptide extracted from human cardiac atria, has potent natriuretic and hypotensive actions. The authors present investigation is the first to demonstrate that α-hANP is capable of protecting against pulmonary edema caused by various chemicals, using isolated perfused guinea pig lung system. Lungs were perfused via pulmonary artery with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer at 5.0 ml/min, and wet weight of lungs and perfusion pressure of pulmonary artery (Pa) were monitored. Bolus injection of Triton-X or CHAPS into cannulated pulmonary artery produced enema as indicated by a massive increase in wet weight and a slight increase in Pa. Constant infusion of α-hANP through pulmonary artery at 200 ng/ml was effective in causing decrease in wet weight of lung. Perfusion of lung with paraquat or PGF/sub 2α'/, and repeated bolus injection of arachidonic acid or PGE2 caused elevation in both wet weight of lung and Pa

  14. Stability of free and mineral-protected nucleic acids: Implications for the RNA world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, Jacob B.; Coveney, Peter V.; Christopher Greenwell, H.

    2012-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the structural stability of three different nucleic acids intercalated within a magnesium aluminium layered double hydroxide (LDH) mineral, at varying degrees of hydration, and free in aqueous solution. The nucleotides investigated are ribose nucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA), all in duplex form. Our simulations show that DNA has enhanced Watson-Crick hydrogen-bonding when intercalated within the LDH clay interlayers, compared with intercalated RNA and PNA, whilst the reverse trend is found for the nucleic acids in bulk water. The tendency for LDH to alter the stability of the three nucleic acids persists for higher temperature and pressure conditions. The uncharged protein backbone of PNA is found to have a detrimental effect on the overall stability of the duplex, as it experiences a greatly reduced electrostatic interaction with the charged LDH sheets compared to RNA and DNA. Assuming an RNA world, in which RNA preceded the DNA/protein world, at some point in time DNA must have taken over the role as the information storage molecule from RNA. These results suggest that a mineral based origin of life may have favoured DNA as the information-storage biomolecule over potentially competing RNA and PNA, providing a route to modern biology from the RNA world.

  15. New analogues of 13-hydroxyocatdecadienoic acid and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid block human blood platelet aggregation and cyclooxygenase-1 activity

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    Hirz Taghreed

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thromboxane A2 is derived from arachidonic acid through the action of cyclooxygenases and thromboxane synthase. It is mainly formed in blood platelets upon activation and plays an important role in aggregation. Aspirin is effective in reducing the incidence of complications following acute coronary syndrome and stroke. The anti-thrombotic effect of aspirin is obtained through the irreversible inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Analogues of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 13-hydroxyocatdecadienoic acid were shown previously to modulate platelet activation and to block thromboxane receptors. Results and discussion We synthesized 10 compounds based on the structures of analogues of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 13-hydroxyocatdecadienoic acid and evaluated their effect on platelet aggregation triggered by arachidonic acid. The structure activity relationship was evaluated. Five compounds showed a significant inhibition of platelet aggregation and highlighted the importance of the lipidic hydrophobic hydrocarbon chain and the phenol group. Their IC50 ranged from 7.5 ± 0.8 to 14.2 ± 5.7 μM (Mean ± S.E.M.. All five compounds decreased platelet aggregation and thromboxane synthesis in response to collagen whereas no modification of platelet aggregation in response to thromboxane receptor agonist, U46619, was observed. Using COS-7 cells overexpressing human cyclooxygenase-1, we showed that these compounds are specific inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-1 with IC50 ranging from 1.3 to 12 μM. Docking observation of human recombinant cyclooxygenase-1 supported a role of the phenol group in the fitting of cyclooxygenase-1, most likely related to hydrogen bonding with the Tyr 355 of cyclooxygenase-1. Conclusions In conclusion, the compounds we synthesized at first based on the structures of analogues of 12 lipoxygenase metabolites showed a role of the phenol group in the anti-platelet and anti-cyclooxygenase-1 activities

  16. Gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase optimizes the fatty acid composition of human breast cancer cells

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    Meilan Xue

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella vulgaris has the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3, which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs or convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally and efficiently expressed in human breast cancer cells and whether its expression can exert a significant effect on cell fatty acid composition. We inserted the CvFad3 gene into the plasmid pEGFP-C3 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C3-n-3 and to express the n-3 Fad gene in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells. Transfection of MCF-7 cells with the recombinant vector resulted in a high expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Lipid analysis indicated that the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs was decreased from 6:1 in the control cells to about 1:1 in the cells expressing the n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Accordingly, the CvFad3 gene significantly decreased the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs of the MCF-7 cell membrane. The expression of the CvFad3 gene can decrease cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that the CvFad3 gene can dramatically balance the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs and may provide an effective approach to the modification of the fatty acid composition of mammalian cells, also providing a basis for potential applications of its transfer in experimental and clinical settings.

  17. Gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase optimizes the fatty acid composition of human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Meilan; Ge, Yinlin; Zhang, Jinyu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong (China); Wang, Qing [Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong (China); Hou, Lin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong (China)

    2012-09-14

    Chlorella vulgaris has the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3), which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally and efficiently expressed in human breast cancer cells and whether its expression can exert a significant effect on cell fatty acid composition. We inserted the CvFad3 gene into the plasmid pEGFP-C3 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C3-n-3 and to express the n-3 Fad gene in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells). Transfection of MCF-7 cells with the recombinant vector resulted in a high expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Lipid analysis indicated that the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs was decreased from 6:1 in the control cells to about 1:1 in the cells expressing the n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Accordingly, the CvFad3 gene significantly decreased the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs of the MCF-7 cell membrane. The expression of the CvFad3 gene can decrease cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that the CvFad3 gene can dramatically balance the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs and may provide an effective approach to the modification of the fatty acid composition of mammalian cells, also providing a basis for potential applications of its transfer in experimental and clinical settings.

  18. Celastrol Protects against Antimycin A-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are widely accepted as key hallmarks of obesity-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional roles of an anti-inflammatory compound, celastrol, in mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by antimycin A (AMA in human skeletal muscle cells. We found that celastrol treatment improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity of AMA-treated cells, apparently via PI3K/Akt pathways, with significant enhancement of mitochondrial activities. Furthermore, celastrol prevented increased levels of cellular oxidative damage where the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in cultures cells was greatly reduced. Celastrol significantly increased protein phosphorylation of insulin signaling cascades with amplified expression of AMPK protein and attenuated NF-κB and PKC θ activation in human skeletal muscle treated with AMA. The improvement of insulin signaling pathways by celastrol was also accompanied by augmented GLUT4 protein expression. Taken together, these results suggest that celastrol may be advocated for use as a potential therapeutic molecule to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle cells.

  19. Are Protected Areas Required to Maintain Functional Diversity in Human-Modified Landscapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottee-Jones, H. Eden W.; Matthews, Thomas J.; Bregman, Tom P.; Barua, Maan; Tamuly, Jatin; Whittaker, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of forest to agriculture across the world’s tropics, and the limited space for protected areas, has increased the need to identify effective conservation strategies in human-modified landscapes. Isolated trees are believed to conserve elements of ecological structure, providing micro-sites for conservation in matrix landscapes, and facilitating seed dispersal and forest restoration. Here we investigate the role of isolated Ficus trees, which are of critical importance to tropical forest ecosystems, in conserving frugivore composition and function in a human-modified landscape in Assam, India. We surveyed the frugivorous birds feeding at 122 isolated Ficus trees, 33 fruit trees, and 31 other large trees across a range of 32 km from the nearest intact forest. We found that Ficus trees attracted richer and more abundant assemblages of frugivores than the other tree categories. However, incidence function estimates revealed that forest specialist species decreased dramatically within the first kilometre of the forest edge. Despite this, species richness and functional diversity remained consistent across the human-modified landscape, as habitat generalists replaced forest-dependent frugivores, and accounted for most of the ecological function found in Ficus trees near the forest edge. We recommend that isolated Ficus trees are awarded greater conservation status, and suggest that their conservation can support ecologically functional networks of frugivorous bird communities. PMID:25946032

  20. Scalable synthesis of Fmoc-protected GalNAc-threonine amino acid and T(N) antigen via nickel catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; McConnell, Matthew S; Nguyen, Hien M

    2015-04-17

    The highly α-selective and scalable synthesis of the Fmoc-protected GalNAc-threonine amino acid and TN antigen in gram scale (0.5-1 g) is described. The challenging 1,2-cis-2-amino glycosidic bond is addressed through a coupling of threonine residues with C(2)-N-ortho-(trifluoromethyl)benzylidenamino trihaloacetimidate donors mediated by Ni(4-F-PhCN)4(OTf)2. The desired 1,2-cis-2-amino glycoside was obtained in 66% yield (3.77 g) with α-only selectivity and subsequently transformed into the Fmoc-protected GalNAc-threonine and TN antigen. This operationally simple procedure no longer requires utilization of the commonly used C(2)-azido donors and overcomes many of the limitations associated with the synthesis of 1,2-cis linkage.

  1. Lactic acid bacteria as protective cultures in fermented pork meat to prevent Clostridium spp. growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gioia, Diana; Mazzola, Giuseppe; Nikodinoska, Ivana; Aloisio, Irene; Langerholc, Tomaz; Rossi, Maddalena; Raimondi, Stefano; Melero, Beatriz; Rovira, Jordi

    2016-10-17

    In meat fermented foods, Clostridium spp. growth is kept under control by the addition of nitrite. The growing request of consumers for safer products has led to consider alternative bio-based approaches, the use of protective cultures being one of them. This work is aimed at checking the possibility of using two Lactobacillus spp. strains as protective cultures against Clostridium spp. in pork ground meat for fermented salami preparation. Both Lactobacillus strains displayed anti-clostridia activity in vitro using the spot agar test and after co-culturing them in liquid medium with each Clostridium strain. Only one of them, however, namely L. plantarum PCS20, was capable of effectively surviving in ground meat and of performing anti-microbial activity in carnis in a challenge test where meat was inoculated with the Clostridium strain. Therefore, this work pointed out that protective cultures can be a feasible approach for nitrite reduction in fermented meat products. PMID:27400453

  2. 论我国同性恋者的人权保障%On the Protection of Human Rights of Homosexuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何东平

    2011-01-01

    同性恋是客观存在的,在我国的人数也不算少;同性恋者人权保障的必要性是对同性恋者权利呼声的回应,是包容发展的国家发展趋势、紧跟世界保障同性恋者人权发展趋势之必然。在进行人权保障的时候,我们应该注重构建保障同性恋者的自由权、平等权、生存权、发展权的理念。具体的保障措施是:立法保障、司法和执法保障以及社会保障。%Homosexuality is an objective existence,and the number of homosexuals in our country is not too small.Protecting the human rights of homosexuals is the response to the calls of gay rights,a developmental trend for countries adopting inclusive development policy,and a necessity to keeping pace with the worldwide trend of protecting the human rights of homosexuals.When protecting homosexuals' human rights,we should focus on building the concepts of protecting their rights of freedom,equality,survival and development.The specific supporting measures include legislative protection,judicial protection,law enforcement protection and social security.

  3. Gold Nanoparticles Protected with Thiol-Derivatized Amphiphilic Poly( -caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Hvilsted, Søren

    2008-01-01

    )2 catalysed ATRP of tBA. ATRP of tBA provided diblock copolymers with low polydispersity index (1.17-1.39) while preserving the protected thiol function. Sequential or simultaneous removal of 2,4-dinitrophenyl or 4-methoxytrityl and tert-butyl ester groups resulted in HS-PCL-b-PAA. The PCL backbone remained...... chromatography (SEC), nuclear magnetic resonance eR NMR) and infrared (FT IR) spectroscopy. The capacity of the resulting block copolymer in preparation of monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles has been examined by reduction of a gold salt in the presence of this macroligand under thiol-deficient conditions...

  4. Considerations of an air-quality standard to protect terrestrial vegetation from acidic precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Studies on the effects of acidic precipitation which is here defined as wet or frozen deposition with a hydrogen ion concentration greater than 2.5 ..mu..eq 1/sup -1/, are reviewed. At the present time there is an inadequate amount of information that shows decreases in crop growth except for one field study. Most studies with plants (crops and forests) are inadequate for standard setting because they are not conducted in the field with adequate randomization of plots coupled with rigorous statistical analyses. Although visible injury to foliage has been documented in a variety of greenhouse studies, no experimental evidence demonstrates loss of field crop value or reduction in plant productivity due to visible foliar injury. Acidic precipitation can contribute nutrients to vegetation and could also influence leaching rates of nutrients from vegetation. Although these processes occur, there are no data that show changes in nutrient levels in foliage that relate to crop or natural ecosystem productivity. Experimental results show that fertilization of ferns is inhibited by current levels of acidic precipitation in the northeastern United States. However, the overall impacts of inhibited fertilization on perpetuation of the species or ecosystem productivity have not been evaluated. Simulated acidic precipitation has been shown to effect plant pathogens in greenhouse and field experiments. Simulated acidic precipitation inhibited pathogen activities under some circumstances and promoted pathogen activities under other circumstances. No conclusion can be drawn about the effects of current levels of precipitation acidity on plant pathogen-host interactions. From these data it must be concluded that research on the effects of acidic precipitation on terrestrial vegetation is too meager to draw any conclusions with regard to an air quality standard.

  5. Effect of fatty acids on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell energy metabolism and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, Natasha; Huqi, Alda; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Mori, Jun; Paulin, Roxane; Haromy, Alois; Onay-Besikci, Arzu; Ionescu, Lavinia; Thébaud, Bernard; Michelakis, Evangelos; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Successful stem cell therapy requires the optimal proliferation, engraftment, and differentiation of stem cells into the desired cell lineage of tissues. However, stem cell therapy clinical trials to date have had limited success, suggesting that a better understanding of stem cell biology is needed. This includes a better understanding of stem cell energy metabolism because of the importance of energy metabolism in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here the first direct evidence that human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMMSC) energy metabolism is highly glycolytic with low rates of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The contribution of glycolysis to ATP production is greater than 97% in undifferentiated BMMSCs, while glucose and fatty acid oxidation combined only contribute 3% of ATP production. We also assessed the effect of physiological levels of fatty acids on human BMMSC survival and energy metabolism. We found that the saturated fatty acid palmitate induces BMMSC apoptosis and decreases proliferation, an effect prevented by the unsaturated fatty acid oleate. Interestingly, chronic exposure of human BMMSCs to physiological levels of palmitate (for 24 hr) reduces palmitate oxidation rates. This decrease in palmitate oxidation is prevented by chronic exposure of the BMMSCs to oleate. These results suggest that reducing saturated fatty acid oxidation can decrease human BMMSC proliferation and cause cell death. These results also suggest that saturated fatty acids may be involved in the long-term impairment of BMMSC survival in vivo.

  6. Arsenic-induced toxicity and the protective role of ascorbic acid in mouse testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to be a major cause of male reproductive failure. Here, we investigated whether arsenic, which impairs male reproductive functions in rodent models, acts by inducing oxidative stress. Male 8-week-old ICR mice were given drinking water containing 20 or 40 mg/l sodium arsenite with or without 0.75 or 1.5 g/l of the antioxidant ascorbic acid for 5 weeks. The arsenic-treated mice showed decreased epididymidal sperm counts and testicular weights compared to untreated mice. These effects were reversed in mice that were co-treated with ascorbic acid. Similarly, arsenic treatment lowered the activities of testicular 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and 17β-HSD, which play important roles in steroidogenesis, and this was reversed by co-treatment with ascorbic acid. The testicles of arsenic-treated mice had decreased glutathione (GSH) levels (which correlate inversely with the degree of cellular oxidative stress) and elevated levels of protein carbonyl (a marker of oxidative damage to tissue proteins). Ascorbic acid co-treatment reversed both of these effects. Thus, ascorbic acid blocks both the adverse effects of arsenic on male reproductive functions and the arsenic-induced testicular oxidative changes. These observations support the notion that arsenic impairs male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress

  7. Inhibition of Excitatory Amino Acid Efflux Contributes to Protective Effects of Puerarin Against Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the protective effects of puerarine (Pur) against cerebral ischemia is associated with depressing the extracellular levels of amino acid transmitters in brain of rats. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 60 min followed by 24 h reperfusion. Pur (50, 100 mg/kg,i.p.) was administered at the onset of MCAO. The infarct rate and edema rate were detected on TTC (2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride)-stained coronal sections. The extracellular levels of amino acid transmitters were monitored in striatum of rats with ischemic/reperfusion injury using in vivo microdialysis technique. Furthermore, the protective effects of Pur against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity were detected. Glutamate-induced apoptotic and necrotic cells in hippocampus were estimated by flow cytometric analysis of Annexin-Ⅴ and PI labeling cells. Results Pur (100 mg/kg) significantly decreased infarct size by 31.6% (P<0.05), reduced edema volume (P<0.05), and improved neurological functions (P<0.05) following MCAO. In these rats, the ischemia-induced extracellular levels of aspartate (Asp), glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and taurine (Tau) were significantly reduced in striatum of vehicle-treated animals by 54.7%, 56.7%, 75.8%, and 68.1% (P<0.01 and P<0.05). Pur reduced the peak values of Glu and Asp more obviously than those of GABA and Tau, and the rate of Glu/GABA during MCAO markedly decreased in Pur-treated MCAO rats, compared with the vehicle-treated MCAO rats.Meanwhile, apoptosis and necrosis induced by Glu in cultured hippocampal neurons were significantly reduced after Pur treatment. Conclusion Acute treatment with Pur at the onset of occlusion significantly depresses ischemia-induced efflux of amino acids, especially, excitotoxicity in the striatum, a mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect on cellular survival.

  8. Reference values for basic human anatomical and physiological characteristics for use in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new publication prepared by the ICRP Task Group on Reference Man. Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values, is focused on those human characteristics that are important for dosimetric calculations. Moving from the past emphasis on a Reference Man. the new report presents a series of reference values for both male and female subjects of six different ages - newborn, 1, 5, 10, 15 y, and adult. In selecting reference values, the task group has used data on Western Europeans and North Americans because these populations have been well studied with respect to anatomy, body composition and physiology. When appropriate, comparisons are made between the chosen reference values and data from several Asian populations. The reference values for height and body mass are higher than those reported for various Asian populations. However, the reported masses of individual organs and tissues, particularly for China and Japan, are similar to the reference values. (author)

  9. Unintended consequences of using alien fish for human benefit in protected areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf L.F. Weyl

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing pressure on conservation agencies to allow access to natural resources within protected areas for human benefit. Alien fishes are often seen as a convenient resource because their harvest does not conflict with conservation goals. However, allowing such access may have unintended consequences for managers. This opinion essay is intended to provide some insights into how promoting access to alien fish resources can add to the complexity of conservation interventions, may facilitate additional fish introductions and create dependencies on alien fish that could compromise potential eradication efforts.Conservation implications: Management plans for the utilisation of alien fishes by external stakeholders must include clear exit strategies so that the ability to eradicate when necessary or feasible is not compromised.

  10. The pharmaceutical industry's responsibility for protecting human subjects of clinical trials in developing nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Finnuala

    2004-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies increasingly perform clinical trials in developing nations. Governments of host nations see the trials as a way to provide otherwise unaffordable medical care, while trial sponsors are drawn to those countries by lower costs, the prevalence of diseases rare in developed nations, and large numbers of impoverished patients. Local governments, however, fail to police trials, and the FDA does not monitor trials in foreign countries, resulting in the routine violation of international standards for the protection of human subjects. This Note proposes independent accreditation of those institutions involved in clinical trials--the institutional review boards which oversee trial protocol; the organizations, such as pharmaceutical companies, which sponsor the trials; and the research organizations that conduct the trials. Accreditation, similar to that used in the footwear and apparel industries, would increase the transparency of pharmaceutical trials and would enable the United States government and consumers to hold trial sponsors accountable for their actions. PMID:16755695

  11. Redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles protect human dermal fibroblasts from PQ-induced damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia von Montfort

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been published that cerium (Ce oxide nanoparticles (CNP; nanoceria are able to downregulate tumor invasion in cancer cell lines. Redox-active CNP exhibit both selective pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties, the first being responsible for impairment of tumor growth and invasion. A non-toxic and even protective effect of CNP in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF has already been observed. However, the effect on important parameters such as cell death, proliferation and redox state of the cells needs further clarification. Here, we present that nanoceria prevent HDF from reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced cell death and stimulate proliferation due to the antioxidative property of these particles.

  12. Geniposide protects human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against corticosterone-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Chen; Fawei Wang; Miao Geng; Hongyan Chen; Dongmei Duan

    2011-01-01

    In vitro cultured human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were pretreated with 50 or 5 μg/mL geniposide for 12 hours and exposed to 400 μmol/L corticosterone. Corticosterone exposure in cultures not pretreated with geniposide resulted in inhibited cell growth, reduced cell survival, and increased P53 and P21 protein expression. However, in geniposide pretreated SH-SY5Y cells, cell viability and the number of cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle were significantly increased, P21 and P53 protein expression was reduced, and cell apoptosis was inhibited following corticosterone exposure. These results indicate that geniposide can protect SH-SY5Y cells against high-dose corticosterone-induced injury.

  13. Protective Effect of Curcumin on γ - radiation Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Blood Lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the radioprotective effect of curcumin on γ radiation induced genetic toxicity. The DNA damage was analyzed by the frequencies of chromosome aberrations assay. Human lymphocytes were treated in vitro with 5.0 γg/ml of curcumin for 30 min at 37 degree C then exposed to 1, 2 and 4 Gy gamma-radiation. The lymphocytes which were pre-treated with curcumin exhibited a significant decrease in the frequency of chromosome aberration at 1 and 2 Gy radiation-induced chromosome damage as compared with the irradiated cells which did not receive the curcumin pretreatment. Thus, pretreatment with curcumin gives protection to lymphocytes against γ-radiation induced chromosome aberration at certain doses. (author)

  14. Kinetics for the synthetic bile acid 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine in humans: comparison with [14C]taurocholate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apparent fractional turnover rate of the gamma-labeled bile acid analogue 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine (75-SeHCAT) was assessed from decline in radioactivity over the gallbladder area on 4 successive days using a gamma-camera, and was compared in the same subjects with the fractional turnover rate of the corresponding natural bile acid, cholic acid-taurine, labeled with 14C ([14C]CAT) using the classical Lindstedt technique. Very similar results were obtained in 5 healthy individuals (coefficient of variation 4.8%, medians 0.35 and 0.34, respectively). By contrast, the fractional deconjugation rate assessed from zonal scanning of glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography was much less for 75-SeHCAT than for [14C]CAT (0.02 and 0.13, respectively; p less than 0.05). The fractional rate for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation was also determined by zonal scanning, and gave lower values for 75-SeHCAT than for [14C]CAT (0.02 and 0.12, respectively; p less than 0.05). There was a striking similarity between the fractional rate for deconjugation alone and that for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation for both bile acids in individual samples (r = 0.999, p less than 0.001), suggesting that these two processes might occur simultaneously and probably involve the same bacteria. We conclude that our scintiscanning technique provides an accurate, noninvasive method of measuring fractional turnover rate of a bile acid in humans, and that the finding that 75SeHCAT remains conjugated with taurine during enterohepatic recycling means that absorption should be specific for the ileal active transport site, thus rendering it an ideal substance for assessing ileal function

  15. Protective efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B12 against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharjee Ankita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although cigarette smoking is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, few studies have examined the effect of nicotine on the adult endocrine pancreas. In this study, male Wister rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight/day with or without supplementation of folic acid (36 μg/kg body weight/day or vitamin B12 (0.63 μg/kg body weight/day alone or in combination. Fasting blood glucose, insulin and HBA1C level and different oxidative and anti-oxidative stress parameters were measured and pancreatic tissue sections were stained with eosin-haematoxylene. Data were analysed by nonparametric statistics. The results revealed that nicotine induced prediabetes condition with subsequent damage to pancreatic islets in rats. Nicotine also caused oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue as evidenced by increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde level and decreased superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level. Compared to vitamin B12 supplementation, folic acid blunted the nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets with higher efficacy. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination were able to confer significant protection on pancreatic islets against nicotine induced toxicity. These results suggest that supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination may be a possible strategy of detoxification against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat.

  16. Protective efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B12 against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Ankita; Prasad, Shilpi Kumari; Pal, Swagata; Maji, Bithin; Syamal, Alak Kumar; Banerjee, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although cigarette smoking is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, few studies have examined the effect of nicotine on the adult endocrine pancreas. In this study, male Wister rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight/ day) with or without supplementation of folic acid (36 μg/kg body weight/day) or vitamin B12 (0.63 μg/kg body weight/day) alone or in combination. Fasting blood glucose, insulin and HBA1C level and different oxidative and anti-oxidative stress parameters were measured and pancreatic tissue sections were stained with eosin-haematoxylene. Data were analysed by nonparametric statistics. The results revealed that nicotine induced prediabetes condition with subsequent damage to pancreatic islets in rats. Nicotine also caused oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue as evidenced by increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde level and decreased superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level. Compared to vitamin B12 supplementation, folic acid blunted the nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets with higher efficacy. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination were able to confer significant protection on pancreatic islets against nicotine induced toxicity. These results suggest that supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination may be a possible strategy of detoxification against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat.

  17. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer. PMID:27219644

  18. Protective efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B12 against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Ankita; Prasad, Shilpi Kumari; Pal, Swagata; Maji, Bithin; Syamal, Alak Kumar; Banerjee, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although cigarette smoking is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, few studies have examined the effect of nicotine on the adult endocrine pancreas. In this study, male Wister rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight/ day) with or without supplementation of folic acid (36 μg/kg body weight/day) or vitamin B12 (0.63 μg/kg body weight/day) alone or in combination. Fasting blood glucose, insulin and HBA1C level and different oxidative and anti-oxidative stress parameters were measured and pancreatic tissue sections were stained with eosin-haematoxylene. Data were analysed by nonparametric statistics. The results revealed that nicotine induced prediabetes condition with subsequent damage to pancreatic islets in rats. Nicotine also caused oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue as evidenced by increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde level and decreased superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level. Compared to vitamin B12 supplementation, folic acid blunted the nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets with higher efficacy. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination were able to confer significant protection on pancreatic islets against nicotine induced toxicity. These results suggest that supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination may be a possible strategy of detoxification against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat. PMID:27486368

  19. Cordyceps militaris Extract Protects Human Dermal Fibroblasts against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis and Premature Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Myoung Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS is the major cause of degenerative disorders including aging and disease. In this study, we investigated whether Cordyceps militaris extract (CME has in vitro protective effects on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs. Our results showed that the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity of CME was increased in a dose-dependent manner. We found that hydrogen peroxide treatment in HDFs increased ROS generation and cell death as compared with the control. However, CME improved the survival of HDFs against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress via inhibition of intracellular ROS production. CME treatment inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptotic cell death and apoptotic nuclear condensation in HDFs. In addition, CME prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced SA-β-gal-positive cells suggesting CME could inhibit oxidative stress-induced premature senescence. Therefore, these results suggest that CME might have protective effects against oxidative stress-induced premature senescence via scavenging ROS.

  20. Quercetin protects human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Ramyaa; Kalal, Iravathy Goud; Krishnaswamy, Rajashree; Viswanadha, VijayaPadma

    2016-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins world wide, and is detrimental to human and animal health. This study evaluated the protective effect of quercetin against OTA-induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and inflammatory response in lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity determined by MTT assay revealed IC20 value of OTA to be 20 µM, which was restored to near control values by pretreatment with quercetin. Oxidative stress parameters such as antioxidant enzymes, LPO and PCC levels indicated that quercetin exerted a protective effect on OTA-induced oxidative stress. Quercetin exerted an antigenotoxic effect on OTA-induced genotoxicity, by significantly reducing the number of structural aberrations in chromosomes and comet parameters like, % olive tail moment from 2.76 ± 0.02 to 0.56 ± 0.02 and % tail DNA from 56.23 ± 2.56 to 12.36 ± 0.56 as determined by comet assay. OTA-induced NO, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were significantly reduced in the quercetin pretreated samples indicating its anti-inflammatory role. Our results demonstrate for the first time that quercetin exerts a cytoprotective effect against OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation in lymphocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 855-865, 2016. PMID:25532488

  1. Strategies for protecting ground water used for human consumption in the Guadalquivir basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a way of defining safeguard zones for groundwater protection according to the requirements of the Water Framework Directive (WFD). Taking into account the peculiarities of the groundwater bodies in the region of the Mediterranean arch, we chose to conduct our study in the Guadalquivir basin in southern Spain, an area of special interest because it combines the influence of rain fronts and the mixed characteristics of both Mediterranean and Atlantic climates, together with the fact that a large percentage of water for human consumption is provided by groundwater, especially at the head of the basin, where this percentage may account for up to 80%. Safeguard zones are defined by an initial delimitation of quality-protection perimeters using the Reduced DRASTIC and COP methods, designed specifically for detrital and karstic aquifers respectively, to assess the potential impact of the existing pressures upon them and study their intrinsic vulnerability. An analysis of all this spatial information using a geographical information system allowed us to test and validate the method used and to obtain an initial definition of safeguard zones in the basin in question. (Author) 37 refs.

  2. Oral nicotinamide protects against ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiasemides, Eleni; Sivapirabu, Geetha; Halliday, Gary M; Park, Joohong; Damian, Diona L

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous immunity, which is a key defence against the development of skin cancers, is suppressed by even small doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Preventing this UV-induced immunosuppression may therefore reduce the incidence of skin cancer. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) has immune-protective and cancer-preventive effects against UV radiation in mice, and we have shown previously that topical nicotinamide is immune protective in humans. Using the Mantoux model of skin immunity in healthy volunteers, we compared oral nicotinamide to placebo (both administered for 1 week) in a randomized, double-blinded, crossover design against the effects of solar-simulated ultraviolet (ssUV) radiation on delayed-type hypersensitivity to tuberculin purified protein derivative. Discrete areas of the back were irradiated with low doses of ssUV daily for three consecutive days. Immunosuppression, calculated as the difference in Mantoux-induced erythema of irradiated sites compared with unirradiated control sites, was determined in volunteers taking oral nicotinamide and placebo. Significant immunosuppression occurred in an UV dose-dependent manner in the presence of placebo. Oral nicotinamide, at doses of either 1500 or 500 mg daily, was well tolerated and significantly reduced UV immunosuppression with no immune effects in unirradiated skin. Oral nicotinamide is safe and inexpensive and looks promising as a chemopreventive supplement for reducing the immunosuppressive effects of sunlight.

  3. Protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in human neuroblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-gao; Chen, Li-ping; Wang, Fa-wei; Xu, Cheng-yong; Geng, Miao

    2016-01-01

    The active ingredient of ginseng, ginsenosides Rg1, has been shown to scavenge free radicals and improve antioxidant capacity. This study hypothesized that ginsenosides Rg1 has a protective role in human neuroblastoma cells injured by H2O2. Ginsenosides Rg1 at different concentrations (50 and 100 μM) was used to treat H2O2 (150 μM)-injured SH-SY5Y cells. Results demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg1 elevated the survival rate of SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2, diminished the amount of leaked lactate dehydrogenase, and increased superoxide dismutase activity. Ginsenoside Rg1 effectively suppressed caspase-3 immunoreactivity, and contributed to heat shock protein 70 gene expression, in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that ginsenoside Rg1 has protective effects on SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2 and that its mechanism of action is associated with anti-oxidation and the inhibition of apoptosis.

  4. Protective role of a novel human erythrocyte-derived depressing factor on blood vessels in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The protective role of a human erythrocyte-derived depressing factor (EDDF) on blood vessels was evaluated. The experiments were carried out on 25male Wistar rats aged 6-8 weeks, which were divided into control (n = 8), calcium overload (n = 8) and NG-L-nitro-arginine hypertensive model groups (L-NNA,n = 9), respectively. The isolated vascular ring perfusion assay, two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (TPM) and transmitted electron microscope were used to examine the effect of EDDF on vascular function and ultrastructure. Results showed that the contractile response of calcium overload rats and L-NNA rats to phenylephrine (PE) was significantly enhanced compared with that of the control (P < 0.05), and EDDF (10-3 g @mL-1) remarkably decreased the vascular contractile response of control's and calcium overload rats (P < 0.05),while EDDF had no effect on that of L-NNA rats. EDDF also alleviated the ultrastructural lesion of aorta VSMC in calcium overload rats by easing the abnormal in the nucleus, mitochondrion and other organell. It is concluded that EDDF could efficiently protect blood vessels against injury by influencing Ca2+ transport and ameliorating the lesion of VSMC, and further supported the hypothesis that the NO-cGMP pathway might contribute to the vasodilation and partially antihypertensive mechanism of EDDF.``

  5. Protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Gao; Chen, Li-Ping; Wang, Fa-Wei; Xu, Cheng-Yong; Geng, Miao

    2016-07-01

    The active ingredient of ginseng, ginsenosides Rg1, has been shown to scavenge free radicals and improve antioxidant capacity. This study hypothesized that ginsenosides Rg1 has a protective role in human neuroblastoma cells injured by H2O2. Ginsenosides Rg1 at different concentrations (50 and 100 μM) was used to treat H2O2 (150 μM)-injured SH-SY5Y cells. Results demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg1 elevated the survival rate of SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2, diminished the amount of leaked lactate dehydrogenase, and increased superoxide dismutase activity. Ginsenoside Rg1 effectively suppressed caspase-3 immunoreactivity, and contributed to heat shock protein 70 gene expression, in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that ginsenoside Rg1 has protective effects on SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2 and that its mechanism of action is associated with anti-oxidation and the inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:27630703

  6. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferranda Puig

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549 exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml or vehicle (control. Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  7. A Chlamydomonas-derived Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 vaccine induces specific tumor protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia C Demurtas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The E7 protein of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV type 16, being involved in malignant cellular transformation, represents a key antigen for developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV-related lesions and cancers. Recombinant production of this vaccine antigen in an active form and in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP plays a crucial role for developing effective vaccines. E7-based therapeutic vaccines produced in plants have been shown to be active in tumor regression and protection in pre-clinical models. However, some drawbacks of in whole-plant vaccine production encouraged us to explore the production of the E7-based therapeutic vaccine in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an organism easy to grow and transform and fully amenable to GMP guidelines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An expression cassette encoding E7GGG, a mutated, attenuated form of the E7 oncoprotein, alone or as a fusion with affinity tags (His6 or FLAG, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast psbD 5' UTR and the psbA 3' UTR, was introduced into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. The protein was mostly soluble and reached 0.12% of total soluble proteins. Affinity purification was optimized and performed for both tagged forms. Induction of specific anti-E7 IgGs and E7-specific T-cell proliferation were detected in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with total Chlamydomonas extract and with affinity-purified protein. High levels of tumor protection were achieved after challenge with a tumor cell line expressing the E7 protein. CONCLUSIONS: The C. reinhardtii chloroplast is a suitable expression system for the production of the E7GGG protein, in a soluble, immunogenic form. The production in contained and sterile conditions highlights the potential of microalgae as alternative platforms for the production of vaccines for human uses.

  8. Gustatory sensation of (L)- and (D)-amino acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Misako; Sekine-Hayakawa, Yuki; Okiyama, Atsushi; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2012-12-01

    Amino acids are known to elicit complex taste, but most human psychophysical studies on the taste of amino acids have focused on a single basic taste, such as umami (savory) taste, sweetness, or bitterness. In this study, we addressed the potential relationship between the structure and the taste properties of amino acids by measuring the human gustatory intensity and quality in response to aqueous solutions of proteogenic amino acids in comparison to D-enantiomers. Trained subjects tasted aqueous solution of each amino acid and evaluated the intensities of total taste and each basic taste using a category-ratio scale. Each basic taste of amino acids showed the dependency on its hydrophobicity, size, charge, functional groups on the side chain, and chirality of the alpha carbon. In addition, the overall taste of amino acid was found to be the combination of basic tastes according to the partial structure. For example, hydrophilic non-charged middle-sized amino acids elicited sweetness, and L-enantiomeric hydrophilic middle-sized structure was necessary for umami taste. For example, L-serine had mainly sweet and minor umami taste, and D-serine was sweet. We further applied Stevens' psychophysical function to relate the total-taste intensity and the concentration, and found that the slope values depended on the major quality of taste (e.g., bitter large, sour small).

  9. Decreased Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Content Contributes to Increased Survival in Human Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Oraldi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Among diet components, some fatty acids are known to affect several stages of colon carcinogenesis, whereas others are probably helpful in preventing tumors. In light of this, our aim was to determine the composition of fatty acids and the possible correlation with apoptosis in human colon carcinoma specimens at different Duke's stages and to evaluate the effect of enriching human colon cancer cell line with the possible reduced fatty acid(s. Specimens of carcinoma were compared with the corresponding non-neoplastic mucosa: a significant decrease of arachidonic acid, PPARα, Bad, and Bax and a significant increase of COX-2, Bcl-2, and pBad were found. The importance of arachidonic acid in apoptosis was demonstrated by enriching a Caco-2 cell line with this fatty acid. It induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner via induction of PPARα that, in turn, decreased COX-2. In conclusion, the reduced content of arachidonic acid is likely related to carcinogenic process decreasing the susceptibility of cancer cells to apoptosis.

  10. The Nrf2-inducers tanshinone I and dihydrotanshinone protect human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Tao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is a causative factor in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging, and an urgent need exists for improved strategies for skin photoprotection. The redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2, a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense against environmental electrophilic insult, has recently emerged as an important determinant of cutaneous damage from solar UV, and the concept of pharmacological activation of Nrf2 has attracted considerable attention as a novel approach to skin photoprotection. In this study, we examined feasibility of using tanshinones, a novel class of phenanthrenequinone-based cytoprotective Nrf2 inducers derived from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, for protection of cultured human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay in human Hs27 dermal fibroblasts pronounced transcriptional activation of Nrf2 by four major tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I, dihydrotanshinone (DHT, tanshinone IIA (T-II-A and cryptotanshinone (CT] was detected. In fibroblasts, the more potent tanshinones T-I and DHT caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination, ultimately resulting in upregulated expression of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes (GCLC, NQO1 with the elevation of cellular glutathione levels. Similar tanshinone-induced changes were also observed in HaCaT keratinocytes. T-I and DHT pretreatment caused significant suppression of skin cell death induced by solar simulated UV and riboflavin-sensitized UVA. Moreover, feasibility of tanshinone-based cutaneous photoprotection was tested employing a human skin reconstruct exposed to solar simulated UV (80 mJ/cm2 UVB; 1.53 J/cm2 UVA. The occurrence of markers of epidermal solar insult (cleaved procaspase 3, pycnotic nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm, acellular cavities was significantly attenuated in DHT

  11. The Role of Human Milk Immunomodulators in Protecting Against Viral Bronchiolitis and Development of Chronic Wheezing Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani-Louise Dixon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Infants who are breastfed are at an immunological advantage when compared with formula fed infants, evidenced by decreased incidence of infections and diminished propensity for long term conditions, including chronic wheeze and/or asthma. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces the duration of hospital admission, risk of respiratory failure and requirement for supplemental oxygen in infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis suggesting a potentially protective mechanism. This review examines the evidence and potential pathways for protection by immunomodulatory factors in human milk against the most common viral cause of bronchiolitis, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, and subsequent recurrent wheeze in infants. Further investigations into the interplay between respiratory virus infections such as RSV and how they affect, and are affected by, human milk immunomodulators is necessary if we are to gain a true understanding of how breastfeeding protects many infants but not all against infections, and how this relates to long-term protection against conditions such as chronic wheezing illness or asthma.

  12. The Role of Human Milk Immunomodulators in Protecting Against Viral Bronchiolitis and Development of Chronic Wheezing Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Dani-Louise

    2015-07-07

    Infants who are breastfed are at an immunological advantage when compared with formula fed infants, evidenced by decreased incidence of infections and diminished propensity for long term conditions, including chronic wheeze and/or asthma. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces the duration of hospital admission, risk of respiratory failure and requirement for supplemental oxygen in infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis suggesting a potentially protective mechanism. This review examines the evidence and potential pathways for protection by immunomodulatory factors in human milk against the most common viral cause of bronchiolitis, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and subsequent recurrent wheeze in infants. Further investigations into the interplay between respiratory virus infections such as RSV and how they affect, and are affected by, human milk immunomodulators is necessary if we are to gain a true understanding of how breastfeeding protects many infants but not all against infections, and how this relates to long-term protection against conditions such as chronic wheezing illness or asthma.

  13. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase: close homology to placental alkaline phosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cDNA clone for human adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) [orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum); EC 3.1.3.1] was isolated from a λgt11 expression library. The cDNA insert of this clone is 2513 base pairs in length and contains an open reading frame that encodes a 528-amino acid polypeptide. This deduced polypeptide contains the first 40 amino acids of human intestinal ALP, as determined by direct protein sequencing. Intestinal ALP shows 86.5% amino acid identity to placental (type 1) ALP and 56.6% amino acid identity to liver/bone/kidney ALP. In the 3'-untranslated regions, intestinal and placental ALP cDNAs are 73.5% identical (excluding gaps). The evolution of this multigene enzyme family is discussed

  14. Inhibitor of fatty acid synthase induced apoptosis in human colonic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Lin Huang; Zhen Sheng Dai; Yue Lin Jin; Shi Neng Zhu; Shi Lun Lu

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION The treatment of human epithelial malignancies is limited by drug resistance and toxic and side effects,which results in the failure in the treatment of majority of advanced cancer victims. To seek for a new, and specific antineoplastic therapy will provide hope for tumor treatment. Although disordered intermediary metabolism in cancer cells has been known for many years, much of the work focused on abnormal glucose catabolism. At the same time, little attention has been paid to fatty acid synthasis in tumor tissues, dispite of the significance of fatty acid synthase (FAS) in some clinical human ovarian[1], breast[2], colorectal[3],and prostatic cancers[4,5]. Tumor cells which express high levels of fatty acid synthesizing enzymes use endogeneously synthesized fatty acids for membrance biosynthesis and appear to export large amounts of lipid. In contrast, normal cells preferentially utilize diary lipid.

  15. Chemical Modification of Amino Acid Residues in Human Plasminogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Fang; SUN Hong; ZHAO Cheng-guang; CUI Ting; HONG Shui-sheng; CHEN Jia; LIU Lan-ying

    2003-01-01

    The chemical modification of human plasminogen(HPg) was studied with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide(EDC), N-acetylimidazole(NAI), 1,2-cyclohexanedione(CHD), chloramine T(Ch-T) and N-bromosuccinimide(NBS) as modifying reagents at its carboxyl group, tyrosine, arginine, methionine and tryptophan residues, respectively. The results indicate that tyrosine and arginine residues are not essential for HPg activity, while carboxyl groups, methionine and tryptophan residues are important for the activity of HPg. The Keech and Farrant′s kinetic analysis reveals that one tryptophan residue, one methionine residue and two carboxyl groups are essential for HPg activity.

  16. Rosmarinic Acid-Rich Extracts of Summer Savory (Satureja hortensis L. Protect Jurkat T Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irakli Chkhikvishvili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Summer savory (Satureja hortensis L., Lamiaceae is used in several regions of the world as a spice and folk medicine. Anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of S. hortensis and of its rosmarinic acid-rich phenolic fraction have been demonstrated in animal trials. However, previous studies of rosmarinic acid in cell models have yielded controversial results. In this study, we investigated the effects of summer savory extracts on H2O2-challenged human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T cells. LC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of rosmarinic acid and flavonoids such as hesperidin and naringin in the phenolic fraction. Adding 25 or 50 µM of H2O2 to the cell culture caused oxidative stress, manifested as generation of superoxide and peroxyl radicals, reduced cell viability, G0/G1 arrest, and enhanced apoptosis. This stress was significantly alleviated by the ethanolic and aqueous extracts of S. hortensis and by the partially purified rosmarinic acid fraction. The application of an aqueous S. hortensis extract doubled the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the cells. The production of IL-2 and IL-10 interleukins was stimulated by H2O2 and was further enhanced by the addition of the S. hortensis extract or rosmarinic acid fraction. The H2O2-challenged Jurkat cells may serve as a model for investigating cellular mechanisms of cytoprotective phytonutrient effects.

  17. Structural and functional interaction of fatty acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-05-01

    The human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant, the most common in the FABP family, has been associated with elevated liver triglyceride levels. How this amino acid substitution elicits these effects is not known. This issue was addressed using human recombinant wild-type (WT) and T94A variant L-FABP proteins as well as cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the respective proteins (genotyped as TT, TC and CC). The T94A substitution did not alter or only slightly altered L-FABP binding affinities for saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids, nor did it change the affinity for intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Nevertheless, the T94A substitution markedly altered the secondary structural response of L-FABP induced by binding long chain fatty acids or intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Finally, the T94A substitution markedly decreased the levels of induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, fatty acid transport protein 5 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α itself meditated by the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Thus, although the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of human L-FABP for long chain fatty acids, it significantly altered human L-FABP structure and stability, as well as the conformational and functional response to these ligands.

  18. Gold Nanoparticles Protected with Thiol-Derivatized Amphiphilic Poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Hvilsted, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Amphiphilic poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (HS-PCL-b-PAA) with a thiol functionality in the PCL terminal has been prepared in a novel synthetic cascade. Initially, living anionic ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of epsilon-caprolactone (epsilon-CL) employing the difunctional...

  19. Gene expression profiling identifies mechanisms of protection to recurrent trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid colitis mediated by probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariman, R.; Kremer, S.H.A.; Erk, M. van; Lagerweij, T.; Koning, F.; Nagelkerken, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Host-microbiota interactions in the intestinal mucosa play a major role in intestinal immune homeostasis and control the threshold of local inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of probiotics in the recurrent trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis

  20. A metallothionein mimetic peptide protects neurons against kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonn, Katrin; Pankratova, Stanislava; Korshunova, Irina;

    2010-01-01

    the neuroprotective effect of EmtinB in the in vitro and in vivo models of kainic acid (KA)-induced neurotoxicity. We show that EmtinB passes the blood-brain barrier and is detectable in plasma for up to 24 hr. Treatment with EmtinB significantly attenuates seizures in C57BL/6J mice exposed to moderate (20 mg...