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Sample records for acid phosphoribosyltransferase 1-deficient

  1. Expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human malignant lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Hastrup, Nina; Sehested, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine in human malignant lymphomas the expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT), the primary, rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of NAD+. NAMPT is a potential biomarker...... for sensitivity to NAMPT inhibitors and NAPRT is a biomarker for the use of nicotinic acid as a chemoprotectant in treatment with NAMPT inhibitors. The NAMPT inhibitor, APO866, is currently in clinical phase II trials in lymphomas. The expression of NAMPT and NAPRT was investigated in 53 samples of malignant.......0024). In conclusion, FL are a promising target for NAMPT inhibitors whereas substantial subsets of malignant lymphomas especially in Hodgkin lymphoma may be suitable for a combination treatment with nicotinic acid and NAMPT inhibitors....

  2. Expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human malignant lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Hastrup, Nina; Sehested, Maxwell

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine in human malignant lymphomas the expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT), the primary, rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of NAD+. NAMPT is a potential biomarker for sensitivity to NAMPT inhibitors and NAPRT is a biomarker for the use of nicotinic acid as a chemoprotectant in treatment with NAMPT inhibitors. The NAMPT inhibitor, APO866, is currently in clinical phase II trials in lymphomas. The expression of NAMPT and NAPRT was investigated in 53 samples of malignant lymphomas (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma). The expression of NAMPT was generally high in the more aggressive malignant lymphomas, with >80% strong expression, whereas the expression in the more indolent follicular lymphoma (FL) was significantly lower (>75% moderate or low expression, p = 0.0002). NAMPT was very highly expressed in Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg cells in Hodgkin's lymphoma. NAPRT expression was more varied (p > 0.0001) with 30-50% low expression except for Hodgkin's lymphoma where 85% displayed low expression (p = 0.0024). In conclusion, FL are a promising target for NAMPT inhibitors whereas substantial subsets of malignant lymphomas especially in Hodgkin lymphoma may be suitable for a combination treatment with nicotinic acid and NAMPT inhibitors. © 2011 The Authors. APMIS © 2011 APMIS.

  3. Inducible arginase 1 deficiency in mice leads to hyperargininemia and altered amino acid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yan Sin

    Full Text Available Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1, which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing "floxed" Arg1 mice with CreER(T2 mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency.

  4. IDH1 deficiency attenuates gluconeogenesis in mouse liver by impairing amino acid utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Gu, Yu; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Yuanlin; Yuan, Yuan; Hao, Zhenyue; Sheng, Yi; Li, Wanda Y; Wakeham, Andrew; Cairns, Rob A; Mak, Tak W

    2017-01-10

    Although the enzymatic activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) was defined decades ago, its functions in vivo are not yet fully understood. Cytosolic IDH1 converts isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), a key metabolite regulating nitrogen homeostasis in catabolic pathways. It was thought that IDH1 might enhance lipid biosynthesis in liver or adipose tissue by generating NADPH, but we show here that lipid contents are relatively unchanged in both IDH1-null mouse liver and IDH1-deficient HepG2 cells generated using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Instead, we found that IDH1 is critical for liver amino acid (AA) utilization. Body weights of IDH1-null mice fed a high-protein diet (HPD) were abnormally low. After prolonged fasting, IDH1-null mice exhibited decreased blood glucose but elevated blood alanine and glycine compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Similarly, in IDH1-deficient HepG2 cells, glucose consumption was increased, but alanine utilization and levels of intracellular α-KG and glutamate were reduced. In IDH1-deficient primary hepatocytes, gluconeogenesis as well as production of ammonia and urea were decreased. In IDH1-deficient whole livers, expression levels of genes involved in AA metabolism were reduced, whereas those involved in gluconeogenesis were up-regulated. Thus, IDH1 is critical for AA utilization in vivo and its deficiency attenuates gluconeogenesis primarily by impairing α-KG-dependent transamination of glucogenic AAs such as alanine.

  5. A preclinical study on the rescue of normal tissue by nicotinic acid in high-dose treatment with APO866, a specific nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Thougaard, Annemette V; Jensen, Peter Buhl

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase APO866 is a promising cancer drug currently in phase II clinical trials in oncology. Here, we present a strategy for increasing the therapeutic potential of APO866 through the rescue of normal tissues by coadministration of nicotinic acid (Vitam...

  6. A preclinical study on the rescue of normal tissue by nicotinic acid in high-dose treatment with APO866, a specific nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Thougaard, Annemette V; Jensen, Peter Buhl

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase APO866 is a promising cancer drug currently in phase II clinical trials in oncology. Here, we present a strategy for increasing the therapeutic potential of APO866 through the rescue of normal tissues by coadministration of nicotinic acid (Vitamin...... B(3)). We examined the toxicity profile of APO866 in B6D2F1 mice and the effect of oral administration of nicotinic acid on tissue toxicity. Nicotinic acid (50 mg/kg) protects mice from death and severe toxicity from an APO866 dose (60 mg/kg) four times the monotherapy maximum tolerated dose (15 mg....../kg). In a panel of six cancer cell lines, we find that three (including ML-2 cells) are protected by nicotinic acid in vitro, whereas the cytotoxicity of APO866 remains unaffected in the remaining three (including A2780 cells). A selective biomarker for the protection by nicotinic acid was subsequently identified...

  7. Effect of Six Sessions of High Intensity Interval Training on Levels of Hypoxanthine, Xanthine, Hypoxanthine-Guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT and Serum Uric Acid in active young men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROHOULLAH HAGHSHENAS GATABI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction and objectives: long-term sport and physical activity results in compatibility in maintaining purine derivatives but the compatibility achieved within a few sessions is not well investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a 30-seconds high intensity interval training on Hypoxanthine, xanthine, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT and serum uric acid in young college men. Methods: In this study, 18 untrained healthy men were divided into two control and training groups after homogenization based on their personal characteristics. Training included six sessions (every other day for two weeks with different intervals (4, 7, 6, 6, 5 & 4, respectively with a fixed four-minute rest between each interval, and with a constant load of .6 on the cycle-ergometer. Blood samples were taken before and 48 hours after the last training session, and were used to analyze hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid, and serum HGPRT. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA. Results: The results showed that high-intensity interval training for two weeks did not cause significant changes in serum HGPRT (P = .73; likewise, the increase in serum hypoxanthine (P = .170 and serum xanthine (P = .170 was not statistically significant but significant reduction was observed in serum uric acid (P = .025. Discussion and conclusion: The results of this study indicated that two-week HIIT training is likely to enhance athletic performance and recovery of purine nucleotide cycle.

  8. Novel nucleotide analogues bearing (1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)phosphonic acid moiety as inhibitors of Plasmodium and human 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukáč, Miloš; Hocková, Dana; Keough, D. T.; Guddat, L. W.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 6 (2017), s. 692-702 ISSN 0040-4020 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06049S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * 6-oxopurine * hypoxanthine-guanine-(xanthine) phosphoribosyltransferase * copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 2.651, year: 2016

  9. Dermatan Sulfate Epimerase 1-Deficient Mice Have Reduced Content and Changed Distribution of Iduronic Acids in Dermatan Sulfate and an Altered Collagen Structure in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarana, M.; Kalamajski, S.; Kongsgaard, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 (DS-epi1) and DS-epi2 convert glucuronic acid to iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Here we report on the generation of DS-epi1-null mice and the resulting alterations in the chondroitin/dermatan polysaccharide chains. The numbers of long blocks...... of adjacent iduronic acids are greatly decreased in skin decorin and biglycan chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, along with a parallel decrease in iduronic-2-O-sulfated-galactosamine-4-O-sulfated structures. Both iduronic acid blocks and iduronic acids surrounded by glucuronic acids are also decreased in versican......-derived chains. DS-epi1-deficient mice are smaller than their wild-type littermates but otherwise have no gross macroscopic alterations. The lack of DS-epi1 affects the chondroitin/dermatan sulfate in many proteoglycans, and the consequences for skin collagen structure were initially analyzed. We found...

  10. Dermatan Sulfate Epimerase 1-Deficient Mice Have Reduced Content and Changed Distribution of Iduronic Acids in Dermatan Sulfate and an Altered Collagen Structure in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarana, M.; Kalamajski, S.; Kongsgaard, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 (DS-epi1) and DS-epi2 convert glucuronic acid to iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Here we report on the generation of DS-epi1-null mice and the resulting alterations in the chondroitin/dermatan polysaccharide chains. The numbers of long blocks......-derived chains. DS-epi1-deficient mice are smaller than their wild-type littermates but otherwise have no gross macroscopic alterations. The lack of DS-epi1 affects the chondroitin/dermatan sulfate in many proteoglycans, and the consequences for skin collagen structure were initially analyzed. We found...... that the skin collagen architecture was altered, and electron microscopy showed that the DS-epi1-null fibrils have a larger diameter than the wild-type fibrils. The altered chondroitin/dermatan sulfate chains carried by decorin in skin are likely to affect collagen fibril formation and reduce the tensile...

  11. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of human quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Gil Bu; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Youn, Hyung-Seop; An, Jun Yop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Sung Hang; Kim, Yongseong; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    H. sapiens quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase has been expressed, purified and crystallized. A diffraction data set has been collected and processed at 2.8 Å resolution. Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRTase) is a key NAD-biosynthetic enzyme which catalyzes the transfer of quinolinic acid to 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, yielding nicotinic acid mononucleotide. Homo sapiens QPRTase (Hs-QPRTase) appeared as a hexamer during purification and the protein was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected and processed at 2.8 Å resolution. Native Hs-QPRTase crystals belonged to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 76.2, b = 137.1, c = 92.7 Å, β = 103.8°. Assuming the presence of six molecules in the asymmetric unit, the calculated Matthews coefficient is 2.46 Å 3 Da −1 , which corresponds to a solvent content of 49.9%

  13. Kinetic Mechanism of Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Escherichia coli and Catalytic Importance of the Conserved Proline in the PRPP Binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoribosyltransferases catalyze the formation of nucleotides from a nitrogenous base and 5-phosphoribosyl-a-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). These enzymes and the PRPP synthases resemble each other in a short homologous sequence of 13 amino acid residues which has been termed the PRPP binding site and...

  14. Two Genes Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase Are Present in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Glaser, Philippe; Andersen, Paal S.

    1995-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. Surprisingly, two genes encoding UPRTase activity were cloned from Bacillus subtilis by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The genes were sequenced, and the putative...

  15. Biochemical characterization of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Drumond Villela

    Full Text Available Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT catalyzes the conversion of uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP to uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP and pyrophosphate (PP(i. UPRT plays an important role in the pyrimidine salvage pathway since UMP is a common precursor of all pyrimidine nucleotides. Here we describe cloning, expression and purification to homogeneity of upp-encoded UPRT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUPRT. Mass spectrometry and N-terminal amino acid sequencing unambiguously identified the homogeneous protein as MtUPRT. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that native MtUPRT follows a monomer-tetramer association model. MtUPRT is specific for uracil. GTP is not a modulator of MtUPRT ativity. MtUPRT was not significantly activated or inhibited by ATP, UTP, and CTP. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry studies suggest that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism, in which PRPP binding is followed by uracil, and PP(i product is released first followed by UMP. The pH-rate profiles indicated that groups with pK values of 5.7 and 8.1 are important for catalysis, and a group with a pK value of 9.5 is involved in PRPP binding. The results here described provide a solid foundation on which to base upp gene knockout aiming at the development of strategies to prevent tuberculosis.

  16. Cloning and Characterization of upp, a Gene Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1994-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. The gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (upp) was cloned from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The gene was sequenced...

  17. Oligomeric state of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eng, W. S.; Keough, D. T.; Hocková, Dana; Winzor, D. J.; Guddat, L. W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 135, Apr (2017), s. 6-14 ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06049S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : enzyme inhibitors * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 3.112, year: 2016

  18. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2015-01-01

    P. falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, a potential target for antimalarial drugs and a conduit for prodrugs, crystallized as a structure with eight molecules per asymmetric unit that included some unique parasite-specific auto-inhibitory interactions between catalytic dimers. The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions

  19. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K., E-mail: rathod@chem.washington.edu [University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    P. falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, a potential target for antimalarial drugs and a conduit for prodrugs, crystallized as a structure with eight molecules per asymmetric unit that included some unique parasite-specific auto-inhibitory interactions between catalytic dimers. The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions.

  20. Autosomal dominant transmission of GLUT1 deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Verrips, A.; Guertsen, E.; Herrmann, R.; Kutzick, C.; Florcken, A.; Voit, T.

    2001-01-01

    GLUT1 deficiency is caused by a defect in the facilitative glucose transporter GLUT1. Impaired glucose transport across brain tissue barriers is reflected by hypoglycorrhachia and results in an epileptic encephalopathy with developmental delay and motor disorders. Recently heterozygous mutations in

  1. Clickable prodrugs bearing potent and hydrolytically cleavable nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadrerafi K

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Keivan Sadrerafi, Emilia O Mason, Mark W Lee Jr Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA Purpose: Our previous study indicated that carborane containing small-molecule 1-(hydroxymethyl-7-(4′-(trans-3″-(3‴-pyridylacrylamidobutyl-1,7-dicarbadodecaborane (hm-MC4-PPEA, was a potent inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt. Nampt has been shown to be upregulated in most cancers and is a promising target for the treatment of many different types of cancers, including breast cancers. Patients and methods: To increase the selectivity of hm-MC4-PPEA toward cancer cells, three prodrugs were synthesized with different hydrolyzable linkers: ester, carbonate, and carbamate. Using click chemistry a fluorophore was attached to these prodrugs to act as a model for our conjugation strategy and to serve as an aid for prodrug stability studies. The stabilities of these drug conjugates were tested in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at normothermia (37°C using three different pH levels, 5.5, 7.5, and 9.5, as well as in horse serum at physiological pH. The stability of each was monitored using reversed-phase HPLC equipped with both diode array and fluorescence detection. The inhibitory activity of hm-MC4-PPEA was also measured using a commercially available colorimetric assay. The biological activities of the drug conjugates as well as those of the free drug (hm-MC4-PPEA, were evaluated using the MTT assay against the human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF7, as well as the noncancerous, transformed, Nampt-dependent human breast epithelium cell line 184A1.Results: hm-MC4-PPEA showed to be a potent inhibitor of recombinant Nampt activity, exhibiting an IC50 concentration of 6.8 nM. The prodrugs showed great stability towards hydrolytic degradation under neutral, mildly acidic and mildly basic conditions. The carbamate prodrug also showed to be stable in rat serum. However, the carbonate and the ester prodrug

  2. Wound Healing in Mac-1 Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. 2 Department of Defense Biotechnology High Performance Computing Software...study, we used a commercially available Mac-1 deficient strain to examine whether this deficit 5 extends to slightly smaller wounds and incisional...levels of Collagen I and Collagen III in wounds from the two strains of mice at any time point. Unwounded skin from both WT and Mac-1 -/- mice contained

  3. The molecular basis of aminoacylase 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Anke; Christensen, Ernst; Schwenger, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    deficiency have not been characterized so far. This has prompted us to approach expression studies of all mutations known to occur in aminoacylase 1 deficient individuals in a human cell line (HEK293), thus providing the authentic human machinery for posttranslational modifications. Mutations were inserted...... using site directed mutagenesis and aminoacylase 1 enzyme activity was assessed in cells overexpressing aminoacylase 1, using mainly the natural high affinity substrate N-acetyl methionine. Overexpression of the wild type enzyme in HEK293 cells resulted in an approximately 50-fold increase...

  4. Glycogen synthesis in glycogenin 1-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O.; Ruiz-Ruiz, Cristina; Vissing, John

    2017-01-01

    Context: Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type XV is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GYG1 gene that codes for the core molecule of muscle glycogen, glycogenin 1. Nonetheless, glycogen is present in muscles of glycogenin 1-deficient patients, suggesting an alternative for glycogen buildup....... A likely candidate is glycogenin 2, an isoform expressed in the liver and heart but not in healthy skeletal muscle. Objective: We wanted to investigate the formation of glycogen and changes in glycogen metabolism in patients with GSD type XV. Design, Setting, and Patients: Two patients with mutations...... in the GYG1 gene were investigated for histopathology, ultrastructure, and expression of proteins involved in glycogen synthesis and metabolism. Results: Apart from occurrence of polyglucosan (PG) bodies in few fibers, glycogen appeared normal in most cells, and the concentration was normal in patients...

  5. Crystal structure of Sus scrofa quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase in complex with nicotinate mononucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Seop Youn

    Full Text Available We have determined the crystal structure of porcine quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase in complex with nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN, which is the first crystal structure of a mammalian QAPRTase with its reaction product. The structure was determined from protein obtained from the porcine kidney. Because the full protein sequence of porcine QAPRTase was not available in either protein or nucleotide databases, cDNA was synthesized using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to determine the porcine QAPRTase amino acid sequence. The crystal structure revealed that porcine QAPRTases have a hexameric structure that is similar to other eukaryotic QAPRTases, such as the human and yeast enzymes. However, the interaction between NAMN and porcine QAPRTase was different from the interaction found in prokaryotic enzymes, such as those of Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The crystal structure of porcine QAPRTase in complex with NAMN provides a structural framework for understanding the unique properties of the mammalian QAPRTase active site and designing new antibiotics that are selective for the QAPRTases of pathogenic bacteria, such as H. pylori and M. tuberculosis.

  6. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 deficiency alters the gut microbiome response to Western diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jethro S; Opiyo, Monica N; Thomson, Marian; Gharbi, Karim; Seckl, Jonathan R; Heger, Andreas; Chapman, Karen E

    2017-02-01

    The enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) interconverts active glucocorticoids and their intrinsically inert 11-keto forms. The type 1 isozyme, 11β-HSD1, predominantly reactivates glucocorticoids in vivo and can also metabolise bile acids. 11β-HSD1-deficient mice show altered inflammatory responses and are protected against the adverse metabolic effects of a high-fat diet. However, the impact of 11β-HSD1 on the composition of the gut microbiome has not previously been investigated. We used high-throughput 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing to characterise the gut microbiome of 11β-HSD1-deficient and C57Bl/6 control mice, fed either a standard chow diet or a cholesterol- and fat-enriched 'Western' diet. 11β-HSD1 deficiency significantly altered the composition of the gut microbiome, and did so in a diet-specific manner. On a Western diet, 11β-HSD1 deficiency increased the relative abundance of the family Bacteroidaceae, and on a chow diet, it altered relative abundance of the family Prevotellaceae Our results demonstrate that (i) genetic effects on host-microbiome interactions can depend upon diet and (ii) that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiome may contribute to the aspects of the metabolic and/or inflammatory phenotype observed with 11β-HSD1 deficiency. © 2017 The authors.

  7. Limitations of galactose therapy in phosphoglucomutase 1 deficiency

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    Kristine Nolting

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: The results of our study indicate that the current standard dose of galactose might be too low to achieve normal glycosylation in all patients. In addition, growth retardation in PGM1 deficiency is complex and multifactorial. Furthermore, heart rhythm abnormalities must be considered when treating patients with PGM1 deficiency.

  8. Metabolomics analysis of metabolic effects of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT inhibition on human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tolstikov

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA, and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level.

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of Asymmetric Acyclic Nucleoside Bisphosphonates as Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum and Human Hypoxanthine-Guanine-(Xanthine) Phosphoribosyltransferase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špaček, Petr; Keough, D. T.; Chavchich, M.; Dračínský, Martin; Janeba, Zlatko; Naesens, L.; Edstein, M. D.; Guddat, L. W.; Hocková, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 17 (2017), s. 7539-7554 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06049S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase * 2nd phosphonate group * 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 6.259, year: 2016

  10. IGF-1 deficiency impairs cerebral myogenic autoregulation in hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Tarantini, Stefano; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Koller, Akos; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2014-12-01

    Aging impairs autoregulatory protection in the brain, exacerbating hypertension-induced cerebromicrovascular injury, neuroinflammation, and development of vascular cognitive impairment. Despite the importance of the age-related decline in circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels in cerebrovascular aging, the effects of IGF-1 deficiency on functional adaptation of cerebral arteries to high blood pressure remain elusive. To determine whether IGF-1 deficiency impairs autoregulatory protection, hypertension was induced in control and IGF-1-deficient mice (Igf1(f/f)+TBG-iCre-AAV8) by chronic infusion of angiotensin-II. In hypertensive control mice, cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation was extended to higher pressure values and the pressure-induced tone of middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) was increased. In hypertensive IGF-1-deficient mice, autoregulation was markedly disrupted, and MCAs did not show adaptive increases in myogenic tone. In control mice, the mechanism of adaptation to hypertension involved upregulation of TRPC channels in MCAs and this mechanism was impaired in hypertensive IGF-1-deficient mice. Likely downstream consequences of cerebrovascular autoregulatory dysfunction in hypertensive IGF-1-deficient mice included exacerbated disruption of the blood-brain barrier and neuroinflammation (microglia activation and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines), which were associated with impaired hippocampal cognitive function. Collectively, IGF-1 deficiency impairs autoregulatory protection in the brain of hypertensive mice, potentially exacerbating cerebromicrovascular injury and neuroinflammation mimicking the aging phenotype.

  11. Inhibition of the Escherichia coli 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases by nucleoside phosphonates: potential for new antibacterial agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keough, D. T.; Hocková, Dana; Rejman, Dominik; Špaček, Petr; Vrbková, Silvie; Krečmerová, Marcela; Eng, W. S.; Jans, H.; West, N. P.; Naesens, L. M. J.; de Jersey, J.; Guddat, L. W.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 17 (2013), s. 6967-6984 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/0108 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nucleoside phosphonates * antibacterial agents * hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase * state analog inhibitor * antimalarial chemotherapy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.480, year: 2013

  12. Inhibition of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase by acyclic nucleoside phosphonates: A new class of antimalarial therapeutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keough, D. T.; Hocková, Dana; Holý, Antonín; Naesens, L.; Skinner-Adams, T. S.; de Jersey, J.; Guddat, L. W.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 14 (2009), s. 4391-4399 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA AV ČR 1QS400550501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * phosphoribosyltransferase * enzyme inhibitors * Plasmodium falciparum Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.802, year: 2009

  13. Wfs1-deficient mice display altered function of serotonergic system and increased behavioural response to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanel eVisnapuu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene make humans more susceptible to mood disorders. Besides that, mood disorders are associated with alterations in the activity of serotonergic and noradrenergic systems. Therefore, in this study, the effects of imipramine, an inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT and noradrenaline (NA reuptake, and paroxetine, a selective inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, were studied in tests of behavioural despair. The tail suspension test (TST and forced swimming test (FST were performed in Wfs1-deficient mice. Simultaneously, gene expression and monoamine metabolism studies were conducted to evaluate changes in 5-HT- and NA-ergic systems of Wfs1-deficient mice. The basal immobility time of Wfs1-deficient mice in TST and FST did not differ from that of their wild-type littermates. However, a significant reduction of immobility time in response to lower doses of imipramine and paroxetine was observed in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice, but not in their wild-type littermates. In gene expression studies, the levels of 5-HT transporter (SERT were significantly reduced in the pons of homozygous animals. Monoamine metabolism was assayed separately in the dorsal and ventral striatum of naive mice and mice exposed for 30 minutes tobrightly lit motility boxes. We found that this aversive challenge caused a significant increase in the levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, a metabolite of 5-HT, in the ventral and dorsal striatum of wild-type mice, but not in their homozygous littermates. Taken together, the blunted 5-HT metabolism and reduced levels of SERT are a likely reason for the elevated sensitivity of these mice to the action of imipramine and paroxetine. These changes in the pharmacological and neurochemical phenotype of Wfs1-deficient mice may help to explain the increased susceptibility of Wolfram syndrome patients to depressive states.

  14. GLUT1 deficiency with delayed myelination responding to ketogenic diet.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Engelbrecht, V.; Scheffer, H.; Knaap, M.S. van der; Fiedler, A.

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring effects of a ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome without seizures is difficult. Neuroimaging is considered uninformative. We report the case of a boy with neurodevelopmental delay, severe ataxia, an E54X-mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (previously GLUT1), and neuroimaging

  15. Reduced hepatic tumor incidence in cyclin G1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Rugaard; Factor, Valentina M; Fantozzi, Anna

    2003-01-01

    found that the p53 levels in the cyclin G1-deficient mice are 2-fold higher that in wild-type mice. Moreover, we showed that treatment of mice with the alkylating agent 1,4-bis[N,N'-di(ethylene)-phosphamide]piperazine (Dipin), followed by partial hepatectomy, decreased G1-S transition in cyclin G1-null...

  16. Autosomal recessive inheritance of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Scheffer, H.; Elsaid, M.F.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Leferink, M.; Ben-Omran, T.

    2009-01-01

    GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) is understood as a monogenetic disease caused by heterozygous SLC2A1 gene mutations with autosomaldominant and sporadic transmission. We report on a six-year-old girl from an inbred Arab family with moderate global developmental delay, epilepsy, ataxia, hypotonia,

  17. 26 CFR 1.860-1 - Deficiency dividends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deficiency dividends. 1.860-1 Section 1.860-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.860-1 Deficiency dividends. Section 860 allows a qualified...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: complete plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... well studied in a large family belonging to the Old Order Amish population of eastern and southern Indiana. Additional cases in North ... Human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency: characterization of a large kindred with a null mutation in the PAI-1 gene. Blood. 1997 Jul 1;90( ...

  19. GLUT1 deficiency with delayed myelination responding to ketogenic diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, Jörg; Engelbrecht, Volkher; Scheffer, Hans; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Fiedler, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring effects of a ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome without seizures is difficult. Neuroimaging is considered uninformative. We report the case of a boy with neurodevelopmental delay, severe ataxia, an E54X-mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (previously GLUT1), and neuroimaging

  20. Absence of hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in murine Dunn osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelson, H.T.; Gorka, C.

    1983-01-01

    The transplantable murine Dunn osteosarcoma has no detectable hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity. This was established from the tumors directly and from tissue culture cell lines derived from the tumor using a variety of assays: e.g., no [3H]hypoxanthine uptake into tumor or tissue culture cells, no conversion of [3H]hypoxanthine to [3H]IMP by cell extracts from tumors or tissue culture cells, no growth of tissue culture cells in hypoxanthine:aminopterin:thymidine medium, and normal growth of these cells in 10 microM 6-mercaptopurine. Ten human osteosarcomas have been assayed, and two have no apparent hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activity. After high-dose methotrexate treatment in vivo, murine tumors could be selectively killed and normal tissues could be spared by using a rescue regimen of hypoxanthine-thymidine-allopurinol

  1. Refractory absence epilepsy associated with GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Susan

    2011-05-01

    GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS) is a disorder of cerebral glucose transport associated with early infantile epilepsy and microcephaly. We report two boys who presented with refractory absence epilepsy associated with hypoglycorrhachia, both of whom have genetically confirmed GLUT-1 DS. We propose that these children serve to expand the phenotype of GLUT-1 DS and suggest that this condition should be considered as a cause of refractory absence seizures in childhood.

  2. Sick sinus syndrome in HCN1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Stefanie; Krause, Stefanie C; Hassan, Sami I H; Becirovic, Elvir; Auer, Franziska; Bernard, Rebekka; Kupatt, Christian; Lange, Philipp; Ziegler, Tilman; Wotjak, Carsten T; Zhang, Henggui; Hammelmann, Verena; Paparizos, Christos; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A

    2013-12-17

    Sinus node dysfunction (SND) is a major clinically relevant disease that is associated with sudden cardiac death and requires surgical implantation of electric pacemaker devices. Frequently, SND occurs in heart failure and hypertension, conditions that lead to electric instability of the heart. Although the pathologies of acquired SND have been studied extensively, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms that cause congenital SND. Here, we show that the HCN1 protein is highly expressed in the sinoatrial node and is colocalized with HCN4, the main sinoatrial pacemaker channel isoform. To characterize the cardiac phenotype of HCN1-deficient mice, a detailed functional characterization of pacemaker mechanisms in single isolated sinoatrial node cells, explanted beating sinoatrial node preparation, telemetric in vivo electrocardiography, echocardiography, and in vivo electrophysiology was performed. On the basis of these experiments we demonstrate that mice lacking the pacemaker channel HCN1 display congenital SND characterized by bradycardia, sinus dysrhythmia, prolonged sinoatrial node recovery time, increased sinoatrial conduction time, and recurrent sinus pauses. As a consequence of SND, HCN1-deficient mice display a severely reduced cardiac output. We propose that HCN1 stabilizes the leading pacemaker region within the sinoatrial node and hence is crucial for stable heart rate and regular beat-to-beat variation. Furthermore, we suggest that HCN1-deficient mice may be a valuable genetic disease model for human SND.

  3. PLAG1 deficiency impairs spermatogenesis and sperm motility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Almas R; Grommen, Sylvia V H; O'Bryan, Moira K; O'Connor, Anne E; Merriner, D Jo; Hall, Nathan E; Doyle, Stephen R; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina E; Barriga, Daniel; Hart, Adam H; Van de Ven, Wim J M; De Groef, Bert

    2017-07-13

    Deficiency in pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) leads to reduced fertility in male mice, but the mechanism by which PLAG1 contributes to reproduction is unknown. To investigate the involvement of PLAG1 in testicular function, we determined (i) the spatial distribution of PLAG1 in the testis using X-gal staining; (ii) transcriptomic consequences of PLAG1 deficiency in knock-out and heterozygous mice compared to wild-type mice using RNA-seq; and (iii) morphological and functional consequences of PLAG1 deficiency by determining testicular histology, daily sperm production and sperm motility in knock-out and wild-type mice. PLAG1 was sparsely expressed in germ cells and in Sertoli cells. Genes known to be involved in spermatogenesis were downregulated in the testes of knock-out mice, as well as Hsd17b3, which encodes a key enzyme in androgen biosynthesis. In the absence of Plag1, a number of genes involved in immune processes and epididymis-specific genes were upregulated in the testes. Finally, loss of PLAG1 resulted in significantly lowered daily sperm production, in reduced sperm motility, and in several animals, in sloughing of the germinal epithelium. Our results demonstrate that the subfertility seen in male PLAG1-deficient mice is, at least in part, the result of significantly reduced sperm output and sperm motility.

  4. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Christoffersen, Stig; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Mølgaard, Anne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-04-14

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic, and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and adenine or the product adenosine monophosphate (AMP) or the inhibitor adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in each active site. The individual subunit adopts an overall structure that resembles a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase) more than known APRTases implying that APRT functionality in Crenarchaeotae has its evolutionary origin in this family of PRTases. Only the N-terminal two-thirds of the polypeptide chain folds as a traditional type I PRTase with a five-stranded β-sheet surrounded by helices. The C-terminal third adopts an unusual three-helix bundle structure that together with the nucleobase-binding loop undergoes a conformational change upon binding of adenine and phosphate resulting in a slight contraction of the active site. The inhibitor ADP binds like the product AMP with both the α- and β-phosphates occupying the 5'-phosphoribosyl binding site. The enzyme shows activity over a wide pH range, and the kinetic and ligand binding properties depend on both pH and the presence/absence of phosphate in the buffers. A slow hydrolysis of PRPP to ribose 5-phosphate and pyrophosphate, catalyzed by the enzyme, may be facilitated by elements in the C-terminal three-helix bundle part of the protein.

  5. Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the extreme thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus shibatae is an allosteric enzyme, activated by GTP and inhibited by CTP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Lise; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1996-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, which catalyses the formation of UMP and pyrophosphate from uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl a-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), was partly purified from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus shibatae. The enzyme required divalent metal ions for activity...... and it showed the highest activity at pH 6.4. The specific activity of the enzyme was 50-times higher at 95°C than at 37°C, but the functional half-life was short at 95°C. The activity of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase was strongly activated by GTP, which increased Vmax of the reaction by approximately 20......-fold without much effect on Km for the substrates. The concentration of GTP required for half-maximal activation was about 80 µM. CTP was a strong inhibitor and acted by raising the concentration of GTP needed for half-maximal activation of the enzyme. We conclude that uracil phosphoribosyltransferase...

  6. Fat and carbohydrate metabolism during exercise in phosphoglucomutase type 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoglucomutase type 1 (PGM1) deficiency is a rare metabolic myopathy in which symptoms are provoked by exercise.......Phosphoglucomutase type 1 (PGM1) deficiency is a rare metabolic myopathy in which symptoms are provoked by exercise....

  7. SAR and characterization of non-substrate isoindoline urea inhibitors of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, Michael L.; Heyman, H. Robin; Clark, Richard F.; Sorensen, Bryan K.; Doherty, George A.; Hansen, T. Matthew; Frey, Robin R.; Sarris, Kathy A.; Aguirre, Ana L.; Shrestha, Anurupa; Tu, Noah; Woller, Kevin; Pliushchev, Marina A.; Sweis, Ramzi F.; Cheng, Min; Wilsbacher, Julie L.; Kovar, Peter J.; Guo, Jun; Cheng, Dong; Longenecker, Kenton L.; Raich, Diana; Korepanova, Alla V.; Soni, Nirupama B.; Algire, Mikkel A.; Richardson, Paul L.; Marin, Violeta L.; Badagnani, Ilaria; Vasudevan, Anil; Buchanan, F.Greg; Maag, David; Chiang, Gary G.; Tse, Chris; Michaelides, Michael R. (AbbVie)

    2017-08-01

    Herein we disclose SAR studies that led to a series of isoindoline ureas which we recently reported were first-in-class, non-substrate nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibitors. Modification of the isoindoline and/or the terminal functionality of screening hit 5 provided inhibitors such as 52 and 58 with nanomolar antiproliferative activity and preclinical pharmacokinetics properties which enabled potent antitumor activity when dosed orally in mouse xenograft models. X-ray crystal structures of two inhibitors bound in the NAMPT active-site are discussed.

  8. Sustained Release Talazoparib Implants for Localized Treatment of BRCA1-deficient Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Jodi E; Kumar, Rajiv; Baldwin, Paige; Ojo, Noelle Castilla; Leal, Ana S; Royce, Darlene B; Zhang, Di; van de Ven, Anne L; Liby, Karen T; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    Talazoparib, a potent PARP inhibitor, has shown promising clinical and pre-clinical activity by inducing synthetic lethality in cancers with germline Brca1/2 mutations. Conventional oral delivery of Talazoparib is associated with significant off-target effects, therefore we sought to develop new delivery systems in the form of an implant loaded with Talazoparib for localized, slow and sustained release of the drug at the tumor site in Brca1 -deficient breast cancer. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) implants (0.8 mm diameter) loaded with subclinical dose (25 or 50 µg) Talazoparib were fabricated and characterized. In vitro studies with Brca1 -deficient W780 and W0069 breast cancer cells were conducted to test sensitivity to PARP inhibition. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy of Talazoparib implants was assessed following a one-time intratumoral injection in Brca1 Co/Co ;MMTV-Cre;p53 +/- mice and compared to drug-free implants and oral gavage. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed on tumor sections using PCNA and γ-H2AX staining. Sustained release of Talazoparib was observed over 28 days in vitro . Mice treated with Talazoparib implants showed statistically significant tumor growth inhibition compared to those receiving drug-free implants or free Talazoparib orally. Talazoparib implants were well-tolerated at both drug doses and resulted in less weight loss than oral gavage. PARP inhibition in mice treated with Talazoparib implants significantly increased double-stranded DNA damage and decreased tumor cell proliferation as shown by PCNA and γ-H2AX staining as compared to controls. These results demonstrate that localized and sustained delivery of Talazoparib via implants has potential to provide superior treatment outcomes at sub-clinical doses with minimal toxicity in patients with BRCA1 deficient tumors.

  9. LPIN1 deficiency with severe recurrent rhabdomyolysis and persistent elevation of creatine kinase levels due to chromosome 2 maternal isodisomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Meijer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid oxidation disorders and lipin-1 deficiency are the commonest genetic causes of rhabdomyolysis in children. We describe a lipin-1-deficient boy with recurrent, severe rhabdomyolytic episodes from the age of 4 years. Analysis of the LPIN1 gene that encodes lipin-1 revealed a novel homozygous frameshift mutation in exon 9, c.1381delC (p.Leu461SerfsX47, and complete uniparental isodisomy of maternal chromosome 2. This mutation is predicted to cause complete lipin-1 deficiency. The patient had six rhabdomyolytic crises, with creatine kinase (CK levels up to 300,000 U/L (normal, 30 to 200. Plasma CK remained elevated between crises. A treatment protocol was instituted, with early aggressive monitoring, hydration, electrolyte replacement and high caloric, high carbohydrate intake. The patient received dexamethasone during two crises, which was well-tolerated and in these episodes, peak CK values were lower than in preceding episodes. Studies of anti-inflammatory therapy may be indicated in lipin-1 deficiency.

  10. Impaired glycogen breakdown and synthesis in phosphoglucomutase 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Cohen, Jonathan; Vissing, Christoffer Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    contracture. Comparable to patients with McArdle disease, the patient developed a 'second wind' with a spontaneous fall in exercise heart rate and perceived exertion. Like in McArdle disease, this was attributable to an increase in muscle oxidative capacity. Carbohydrate oxidation was blocked during exercise......, and the patient had exaggerated oxidation of fat to fuel exercise. Exercise heart rate and perceived exertion were lower after IV glucose and oral sucrose. Muscle glycogen level was low normal. CONCLUSIONS: The second wind phenomenon has been considered to be pathognomonic for McArdle disease, but we demonstrate...... that it can also be present in PGM1 deficiency. We show that severe loss of PGM1 activity causes blocked muscle glycogenolysis that mimics McArdle disease, but may also limit glycogen synthesis, which broadens the phenotypic spectrum of this disorder....

  11. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen

    2015-01-01

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2, was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5...

  12. Localization of the 5-phospho-alpha-D-ribosyl-1-pyrophosphate binding site of human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, D T; Emmerson, B T; de Jersey, J

    1991-02-22

    Human erythrocyte hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) is inactivated by iodoacetate in the absence, but not in the presence, of the substrate, 5-phospho-alpha-D-ribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRib-PP). Treatment of HPRT with [14C]iodoacetate followed by tryptic digestion, peptide separation and sequencing has shown that Cys-22 reacts with iodoacetate only in the absence of PRib-PP; this strongly suggests that Cys-22 is in or near the PRib-PP binding site. In contrast, Cys-105 reacts with [14C]iodoacetate both in the presence and absence of PRib-PP. Carboxymethylation of Cys-22 resulted in an increase in the Km for PRib-PP, but no change in Vmax. Storage of HPRT also resulted in an increase in the Km for PRib-PP and a decrease in its susceptibility to inactivation by iodoacetate. Dialysis of stored enzyme against 1 mM dithiothreitol resulted in a marked decrease in Km for PRib-PP. The stoichiometry of the reaction of [14C]iodoacetate with Cys-22 in HPRT leading to inactivation (approx. 1 residue modified per tetramer) showed that, in this preparation of HPRT purified from erythrocytes, only about 25% of the Cys-22 side chains were present as free and accessible thiols. Titration of thiol groups [with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)] and the effect of dithiothreitol on Km for PRib-PP indicate that oxidation of thiol groups occurs on storage of HPRT, even in the presence of 1 mM beta-mercaptoethanol.

  13. The extraordinary specificity of xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase from Bacillus subtilis elucidated by reaction kinetics, ligand binding, and crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arent, Susan; Kadziola, Anders; Larsen, Sine

    2006-01-01

    Xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRTase) from Bacillus subtilis is a representative of the highly xanthine specific XPRTases found in Gram-positive bacteria. These XPRTases constitute a distinct subclass of 6-oxopurine PRTases, which deviate strongly from the major class of H(X)GPRTases with ...

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates as Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum and Human 6-Oxopurine Phosphoribosyltransferases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaiser, Martin Maxmilian; Hocková, Dana; Wang, T. H.; Dračínský, Martin; Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Procházková, Eliška; Edstein, M. D.; Chavchich, M.; Keough, D. T.; Guddat, L. W.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 10 (2015), s. 1707-1723 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046; GA ČR GAP207/11/0108 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 6-oxopurine * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * phosphoribosyltransferases * malaria * phosphoramidates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2015

  15. Clinical and Molecular Heterogeneity of RTEL1 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin W. Wlodarski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Typical features of dyskeratosis congenita (DC resulting from excessive telomere shortening include bone marrow failure (BMF, mucosal fragility, and pulmonary or liver fibrosis. In more severe cases, immune deficiency and recurring infections can add to disease severity. RTEL1 deficiency has recently been described as a major genetic etiology, but the molecular basis and clinical consequences of RTEL1-associated DC are incompletely characterized. We report our observations in a cohort of six patients: five with novel biallelic RTEL1 mutations p.Trp456Cys, p.Ile425Thr, p.Cys1244ProfsX17, p.Pro884_Gln885ins53X13, and one with novel heterozygous mutation p.Val796AlafsX4. The most unifying features were hypocellular BMF in 6/6 and B-/NK-cell lymphopenia in 5/6 patients. In addition, three patients with homozygous mutations p.Trp456Cys or p.Ile425Thr also suffered from immunodeficiency, cerebellar hypoplasia, and enteropathy, consistent with Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome. Chromosomal breakage resembling a homologous recombination defect was detected in patient-derived fibroblasts but not in hematopoietic compartment. Notably, in both cellular compartments, differential expression of 1243aa and 1219/1300aa RTEL1 isoforms was observed. In fibroblasts, response to ionizing irradiation and non-homologous end joining were not impaired. Telomeric circles did not accumulate in patient-derived primary cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines, implying alternative pathomechanisms for telomeric loss. Overall, RTEL1-deficient cells exhibited a phenotype of replicative exhaustion, spontaneous apoptosis and senescence. Specifically, CD34+ cells failed to expand in vitro, B-cell development was compromised, and T-cells did not proliferate in long-term culture. Finally, we report on the natural history and outcome of our patients. While two patients died from infections, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT resulted in sustained engraftment in two patients

  16. Clinical and Molecular Heterogeneity of RTEL1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckmann, Carsten; Sahoo, Sushree Sangita; Rizzi, Marta; Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Karow, Axel; Serwas, Nina Kathrin; Hoemberg, Marc; Damatova, Natalja; Schindler, Detlev; Vannier, Jean-Baptiste; Boulton, Simon J; Pannicke, Ulrich; Göhring, Gudrun; Thomay, Kathrin; Verdu-Amoros, J J; Hauch, Holger; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Escherich, Gabriele; Laack, Eckart; Rindle, Liliana; Seidl, Maximilian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Lausch, Ekkehart; Jandrasits, Christine; Strahm, Brigitte; Schwarz, Klaus; Ehl, Stephan R; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Boztug, Kaan; Wlodarski, Marcin W

    2017-01-01

    Typical features of dyskeratosis congenita (DC) resulting from excessive telomere shortening include bone marrow failure (BMF), mucosal fragility, and pulmonary or liver fibrosis. In more severe cases, immune deficiency and recurring infections can add to disease severity. RTEL1 deficiency has recently been described as a major genetic etiology, but the molecular basis and clinical consequences of RTEL1-associated DC are incompletely characterized. We report our observations in a cohort of six patients: five with novel biallelic RTEL1 mutations p.Trp456Cys, p.Ile425Thr, p.Cys1244ProfsX17, p.Pro884_Gln885ins53X13, and one with novel heterozygous mutation p.Val796AlafsX4. The most unifying features were hypocellular BMF in 6/6 and B-/NK-cell lymphopenia in 5/6 patients. In addition, three patients with homozygous mutations p.Trp456Cys or p.Ile425Thr also suffered from immunodeficiency, cerebellar hypoplasia, and enteropathy, consistent with Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome. Chromosomal breakage resembling a homologous recombination defect was detected in patient-derived fibroblasts but not in hematopoietic compartment. Notably, in both cellular compartments, differential expression of 1243aa and 1219/1300aa RTEL1 isoforms was observed. In fibroblasts, response to ionizing irradiation and non-homologous end joining were not impaired. Telomeric circles did not accumulate in patient-derived primary cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines, implying alternative pathomechanisms for telomeric loss. Overall, RTEL1-deficient cells exhibited a phenotype of replicative exhaustion, spontaneous apoptosis and senescence. Specifically, CD34 + cells failed to expand in vitro , B-cell development was compromised, and T-cells did not proliferate in long-term culture. Finally, we report on the natural history and outcome of our patients. While two patients died from infections, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) resulted in sustained engraftment in two patients. Whether

  17. Aged PROP1 deficient dwarf mice maintain ACTH production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor O Nasonkin

    Full Text Available Humans with PROP1 mutations have multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD that typically advance from growth insufficiency diagnosed in infancy to include more severe growth hormone (GH deficiency and progressive reduction in other anterior pituitary hormones, eventually including adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH deficiency and hypocortisolism. Congenital deficiencies of GH, prolactin, and thyroid stimulating hormone have been reported in the Prop1(null (Prop1(-/- and the Ames dwarf (Prop1(df/df mouse models, but corticotroph and pituitary adrenal axis function have not been thoroughly investigated. Here we report that the C57BL6 background sensitizes mutants to a wasting phenotype that causes approximately one third to die precipitously between weaning and adulthood, while remaining homozygotes live with no signs of illness. The wasting phenotype is associated with severe hypoglycemia. Circulating ACTH and corticosterone levels are elevated in juvenile and aged Prop1 mutants, indicating activation of the pituitary-adrenal axis. Despite this, young adult Prop1 deficient mice are capable of responding to restraint stress with further elevation of ACTH and corticosterone. Low blood glucose, an expected side effect of GH deficiency, is likely responsible for the elevated corticosterone level. These studies suggest that the mouse model differs from the human patients who display progressive hormone loss and hypocortisolism.

  18. GABA transporter-1 deficiency confers schizophrenia-like behavioral phenotypes.

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    Zhe Yu

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of schizophrenia remains poorly understood. The hyper-dopamine and hypo-NMDA receptor hypotheses have been the most enduring ideas. Recently, emerging evidence implicates alterations of the major inhibitory system, GABAergic neurotransmission in the schizophrenic patients. However, the pathophysiological role of GABAergic system in schizophrenia still remains dubious. In this study, we took advantage of GABA transporter 1 (GAT1 knockout (KO mouse, a unique animal model with elevated ambient GABA, to study the schizophrenia-related behavioral abnormalities. We found that GAT1 KO mice displayed multiple behavioral abnormalities related to schizophrenic positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Moreover, GAT1 deficiency did not change the striatal dopamine levels, but significantly enhanced the tonic GABA currents in prefrontal cortex. The GABA(A receptor antagonist picrotoxin could effectively ameliorate several behavioral defects of GAT1 KO mice. These results identified a novel function of GAT1, and indicated that the elevated ambient GABA contributed critically to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Furthermore, several commonly used antipsychotic drugs were effective in treating the locomotor hyperactivity in GAT1 KO mice, suggesting the utility of GAT1 KO mice as an alternative animal model for studying schizophrenia pathogenesis and developing new antipsychotic drugs.

  19. Isolation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-defective mutants in Chinese hamster V79 cells by tritium suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, R.E.; Schauer, I.E.; Hatcher, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Tritium suicide was shown to be a highly efficient method for isolating mutants defective in hypoxanthine incorporation in the Chinese hamster lung of one kill cycle were used for the next kill cycle. The kill cycles involved incorporation of ( 3 H) hypoxanthine for 5 or 10 min, followed by storage of 3 H-labelled cells at -70 0 C for 4-10 days. 12 clones that survived the 3rd kill cycle were tested for incorporation of ( 3 H)hypoxanthine and all were found to be defective. At least 6 of the clones have defective hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity. One mutant, H19, chosen for further characterization, had HPRT with a 13-fold elevation in apparent Ksub(m) for phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Thin-layer chromatography of cell extracts showed that this mutant was incapable of converting intracellular hypoxanthine to IMP or to other purine metabolites. In addition, H19 was resistant to 6-thioguanine. (orig.)

  20. Intestinal Irradiation and Fibrosis in a Th1-Deficient Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linard, Christine; Billiard, Fabienne; Benderitter, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Changes in the Th1/Th2 immune balance may play a role in increasing the incidence of radiation-induced toxicity. This study evaluates the consequences of Th1 deficiency on intestinal response (fibrosis and T cell trafficking) to abdominal irradiation and examines in mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) the differential involvement of the two Th1 pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, in controlling this balance in mice. Methods and Materials: Using T-bet-deficient mice (T-bet −/− ), we evaluated the mRNA and protein expression of the Th1 pathways (IFN-γ, T-bet/STAT1, and IL-12/STAT4) and the CD4 + and CD8 + populations in ileal mucosa and MLN during the first 3 months after 10 Gy abdominal irradiation. Results: The T-bet-deficient mice showed an increased fibrotic response to radiation, characterized by higher TGF-β1, col3a1 expression, and collagen deposition in mucosa compared with wild-type mice. This response was associated with drastically lower expression of IFN-γ, the hallmark Th1 cytokine. Analysis of the Th1 expression pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, showed their equal involvement in the failure of Th1 polarization. A minimal IFN-γ level depended on the IL-23-p19/STAT4 level. In addition, the radiation-induced deficiency in the priming of Th1 by IFN-γ was related to the defective homing capacity of CD8 + cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: Irradiation induces Th2 polarization, and the Th2 immune response may play a role in potentiating irradiation-induced intestinal collagen deposition.

  1. Intestinal Irradiation and Fibrosis in a Th1-Deficient Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linard, Christine, E-mail: christine.linard@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Billiard, Fabienne; Benderitter, Marc [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Changes in the Th1/Th2 immune balance may play a role in increasing the incidence of radiation-induced toxicity. This study evaluates the consequences of Th1 deficiency on intestinal response (fibrosis and T cell trafficking) to abdominal irradiation and examines in mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) the differential involvement of the two Th1 pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, in controlling this balance in mice. Methods and Materials: Using T-bet-deficient mice (T-bet{sup -/-}), we evaluated the mRNA and protein expression of the Th1 pathways (IFN-{gamma}, T-bet/STAT1, and IL-12/STAT4) and the CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} populations in ileal mucosa and MLN during the first 3 months after 10 Gy abdominal irradiation. Results: The T-bet-deficient mice showed an increased fibrotic response to radiation, characterized by higher TGF-{beta}1, col3a1 expression, and collagen deposition in mucosa compared with wild-type mice. This response was associated with drastically lower expression of IFN-{gamma}, the hallmark Th1 cytokine. Analysis of the Th1 expression pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, showed their equal involvement in the failure of Th1 polarization. A minimal IFN-{gamma} level depended on the IL-23-p19/STAT4 level. In addition, the radiation-induced deficiency in the priming of Th1 by IFN-{gamma} was related to the defective homing capacity of CD8{sup +} cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: Irradiation induces Th2 polarization, and the Th2 immune response may play a role in potentiating irradiation-induced intestinal collagen deposition.

  2. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 deficiency attenuates and high-fat diet exacerbates bone loss in mice with Lewis lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Nielsen, Forrest H; Sundaram, Sneha; Cao, Jay

    2017-04-04

    Bone loss occurs in obesity and cancer-associated complications including wasting. This study determined whether a high-fat diet and a deficiency in monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) altered bone structural defects in male C57BL/6 mice with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) metastases in lungs. Compared to non-tumor-bearing mice, LLC reduced bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number, trabecular thickness and bone mineral density and increased trabecular separation in femurs. Similar changes occurred in vertebrae. The high-fat diet compared to the AIN93G diet exacerbated LLC-induced detrimental structural changes; the exacerbation was greater in femurs than in vertebrae. Mice deficient in MCP-1 compared to wild-type mice exhibited increases in bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number and decreases in trabecular separation in both femurs and vertebrae, and increases in trabecular thickness and bone mineral density and a decrease in structure model index in vertebrae. Lewis lung carcinoma significantly decreased osteocalcin but increased tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP 5b) in plasma. In LLC-bearing mice, the high-fat diet increased and MCP-1 deficiency decreased plasma TRAP 5b; neither the high-fat diet nor MCP-1 deficiency resulted in significant changes in plasma concentration of osteocalcin. In conclusion, pulmonary metastasis of LLC is accompanied by detrimental bone structural changes; MCP-1 deficiency attenuates and high-fat diet exacerbates the metastasis-associated bone wasting.

  3. Autophagy resolves early retinal inflammation in Igf1-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Arroba

    2016-09-01

    provides new evidence in a mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency that autophagy is an adaptive response that might confer protection against persistent inflammation in the retina during ageing.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase from porcine kidney in complex with nicotinate mononucleotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Kang, Gil Bu; Kim, Tae Gyun; An, Jun Yop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Youngjin; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Crystals of S. scrofa quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase purified from porcine kidney in complex with nicotinate mononucleotidewere obtained and diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.1 Å resolution. Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase) is a key enzyme in NAD biosynthesis; it catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN) from quinolinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. In order to elucidate the mechanism of NAMN biosynthesis, crystals of Sus scrofa QAPRTase (Ss-QAPRTase) purified from porcine kidney in complex with NAMN were obtained and diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.1 Å resolution. The Ss-QAPRTase–NAMN cocrystals belonged to space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a = 119.1, b = 119.1, c = 93.7 Å, γ = 120.0°. The Matthews coefficient and the solvent content were estimated as 3.10 Å 3 Da –1 and 60.3%, respectively, assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit

  5. GPR40/FFAR1 deficient mice increase noradrenaline levels in the brain and exhibit abnormal behavior

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    Fuka Aizawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The free fatty acid receptor 1 (GPR40/FFAR1 is a G protein-coupled receptor, which is activated by long chain fatty acids. We have previously demonstrated that activation of brain GPR40/FFAR1 exerts an antinociceptive effect that is mediated by the modulation of the descending pain control system. However, it is unclear whether brain GPR40/FFAR1 contributes to emotional function. In this study, we investigated the involvement of GPR40/FFAR1 in emotional behavior using GPR40/FFAR1 deficient (knockout, KO mice. The emotional behavior in wild and KO male mice was evaluated at 9–10 weeks of age by the elevated plus-maze test, open field test, social interaction test, and sucrose preference test. Brain monoamines levels were measured using LC–MS/MS. The elevated plus-maze test and open field tests revealed that the KO mice reduced anxiety-like behavior. There were no differences in locomotor activity or social behavior between the wild and KO mice. In the sucrose preference test, the KO mice showed reduction in sucrose preference and intake. The level of noradrenaline was higher in the hippocampus, medulla oblongata, hypothalamus and midbrain of KO mice. Therefore, these results suggest that brain GPR40/FFAR1 is associated with anxiety- and depression-related behavior regulated by the increment of noradrenaline in the brain.

  6. GPR40/FFAR1 deficient mice increase noradrenaline levels in the brain and exhibit abnormal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Fuka; Nishinaka, Takashi; Yamashita, Takuya; Nakamoto, Kazuo; Kurihara, Takashi; Hirasawa, Akira; Kasuya, Fumiyo; Miyata, Atsuro; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-12-01

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (GPR40/FFAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor, which is activated by long chain fatty acids. We have previously demonstrated that activation of brain GPR40/FFAR1 exerts an antinociceptive effect that is mediated by the modulation of the descending pain control system. However, it is unclear whether brain GPR40/FFAR1 contributes to emotional function. In this study, we investigated the involvement of GPR40/FFAR1 in emotional behavior using GPR40/FFAR1 deficient (knockout, KO) mice. The emotional behavior in wild and KO male mice was evaluated at 9-10 weeks of age by the elevated plus-maze test, open field test, social interaction test, and sucrose preference test. Brain monoamines levels were measured using LC-MS/MS. The elevated plus-maze test and open field tests revealed that the KO mice reduced anxiety-like behavior. There were no differences in locomotor activity or social behavior between the wild and KO mice. In the sucrose preference test, the KO mice showed reduction in sucrose preference and intake. The level of noradrenaline was higher in the hippocampus, medulla oblongata, hypothalamus and midbrain of KO mice. Therefore, these results suggest that brain GPR40/FFAR1 is associated with anxiety- and depression-related behavior regulated by the increment of noradrenaline in the brain. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Purine salvage in the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona, and generation of hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient clones for positive-negative selection of transgenic parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Zhang, Zijing; Howe, Daniel K

    2014-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that causes severe neurological disease in horses and marine mammals. The Apicomplexa are all obligate intracellular parasites that lack purine biosynthesis pathways and rely on the host cell for their purine requirements. Hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) and adenosine kinase (AK) are key enzymes that function in two complementary purine salvage pathways in apicomplexans. Bioinformatic searches of the S. neurona genome revealed genes encoding HXGPRT, AK and all of the major purine salvage enzymes except purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Wild-type S. neurona were able to grow in the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) but were inhibited by 6-thioxanthine (6-TX), suggesting that the pathways involving either HXGPRT or AK are functional in this parasite. Prior work with Toxoplasma gondii demonstrated the utility of HXGPRT as a positive-negative selection marker. To enable the use of HXGPRT in S. neurona, the SnHXGPRT gene sequence was determined and a gene-targeting plasmid was transfected into S. neurona. SnHXGPRT-deficient mutants were selected with 6-TX, and single-cell clones were obtained. These Sn∆HXG parasites were susceptible to MPA and could be complemented using the heterologous T. gondii HXGPRT gene. In summary, S. neurona possesses both purine salvage pathways described in apicomplexans, thus allowing the use of HXGPRT as a positive-negative drug selection marker in this parasite.

  8. PD-L1 Deficiency within Islets Reduces Allograft Survival in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxia Ma

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation may potentially cure type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. However, immune rejection, especially that induced by the alloreactive T-cell response, remains a restraining factor for the long-term survival of grafted islets. Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 is a negative costimulatory molecule. PD-L1 deficiency within the donor heart accelerates allograft rejection. Here, we investigate whether PD-L1 deficiency in donor islets reduces allograft survival time.Glucose Stimulation Assays were performed to evaluate whether PD-L1 deficiency has detrimental effects on islet function. Islets isolated from PDL1-deficient mice or wild- type (WT mice (C57BL/6j were implanted beneath the renal capsule of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic BALB/c mice. Blood glucose levels and graft survival time after transplantation were monitored. Moreover, we analyzed the residual islets, infiltrating immune cells and alloreactive cells from the recipients.PD-L1 deficiency within islets does not affect islet function. However, islet PD-L1 deficiency increased allograft rejection and was associated with enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration and recipient T-cell alloreactivity.This is the first report to demonstrate that PD-L1 deficiency accelerated islet allograft rejection and regulated recipient alloimmune responses.

  9. BTB and CNC homolog 1 (Bach1) deficiency ameliorates TNBS colitis in mice: role of M2 macrophages and heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harusato, Akihito; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Hirai, Yasuko; Higashimura, Yasuki; Katada, Kazuhiro; Handa, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Muto, Akihiko; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    BTB and CNC homolog 1 (Bach1) is a transcriptional repressor of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which plays an important role in the protection of cells and tissues against acute and chronic inflammation. However, the role of Bach1 in the gastrointestinal mucosal defense system remains little understood. HO-1 supports the suppression of experimental colitis and localizes mainly in macrophages in colonic mucosa. This study was undertaken to elucidate the Bach1/HO-1 system's effects on the pathogenesis of experimental colitis. This study used C57BL/6 (wild-type) and homozygous Bach1-deficient C57BL/6 mice in which colonic damage was induced by the administration of an enema of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Subsequently, they were evaluated macroscopically, histologically, and biochemically. Peritoneal macrophages from the respective mice were isolated and analyzed. Then, wild-type mice were injected with peritoneal macrophages from the respective mice. Acute colitis was induced similarly. TNBS-induced colitis was inhibited in Bach1-deficient mice. TNBS administration increased the expression of HO-1 messenger RNA and protein in colonic mucosa in Bach1-deficient mice. The expression of HO-1 mainly localized in F4/80-immunopositive and CD11b-immunopositive macrophages. Isolated peritoneal macrophages from Bach1-deficient mice highly expressed HO-1 and also manifested M2 macrophage markers, such as Arginase-1, Fizz-1, Ym1, and MRC1. Furthermore, TNBS-induced colitis was inhibited by the transfer of Bach1-deficient macrophages into wild-type mice. Deficiency of Bach1 ameliorated TNBS-induced colitis. Bach1-deficient macrophages played a key role in protection against colitis. Targeting of this mechanism is applicable to cell therapy for human inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Increasing NAD Synthesis in Muscle via Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Is Not Sufficient to Promote Oxidative Metabolism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, David W.; Davis, James G.; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  11. Kinetic analysis and chemical modification studies of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase from yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NaPRTase) from Baker's yeast catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate from phosphoribosyl α-1-pyrophosphate and nicotinate, concomitant with ATP hydrolysis. Using purified NaPRTase, initial velocity measurements were performed varying one substrate concentration at different fixed levels of the second substrate and maintaining the third substrate constant. Subsequently, an exchange of label was observed between ATP and [ 14 C]-ADP. This rate of exchange was inhibited by PRibPP and pyrophosphate. Incubations of NaPRTase with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate followed by sodium borohydride reduction led to inactivation of the enzyme. Pyridoxal was a less effective inhibitor than pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The inactivation of the enzyme by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was reversible upon flow dialysis, whereas reduction of the enzyme-pyridoxal complex with sodium borohydride rendered the inhibition irreversible. The presence of ATP or PRibPP, with or with Mg 2+ , provided protection against this inactivation, while a kinetic analysis revealed the inhibition to be competitive, and noncompetitive, respectively. One mole of [ 3 H]-pyridoxal phosphate was required to completely inactivate the enzyme, which was reduced in the presence of MgATP and MgPRibPP to 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. No incorporation of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was observed in the combination of both of the two substrates

  12. Cerebral ischemia is exacerbated by extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase via a non-enzymatic mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhao

    Full Text Available Intracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (iNAMPT in neuron has been known as a protective factor against cerebral ischemia through its enzymatic activity, but the role of central extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT is not clear. Here we show that eNAMPT protein level was elevated in the ischemic rat brain after middle-cerebral-artery occlusion (MCAO and reperfusion, which can be traced to at least in part from blood circulation. Administration of recombinant NAMPT protein exacerbated MCAO-induced neuronal injury in rat brain, while exacerbated oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD induced neuronal injury only in neuron-glial mixed culture, but not in neuron culture. In the mixed culture, NAMPT protein promoted TNF-α release in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion, while TNF-α neutralizing antibody protected OGD-induced, NAMPT-enhanced neuronal injury. Importantly, H247A mutant of NAMPT with essentially no enzymatic activity exerted similar effects on ischemic neuronal injury and TNF-α release as the wild type protein. Thus, eNAMPT is an injurious and inflammatory factor in cerebral ischemia and aggravates ischemic neuronal injury by triggering TNF-α release from glia cells, via a mechanism not related to NAMPT enzymatic activity.

  13. TREX1 deficiency triggers cell-autonomous immunity in a cGAS-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablasser, Andrea; Hemmerling, Inga; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Behrendt, Rayk; Roers, Axel; Hornung, Veit

    2014-06-15

    Cytosolic detection of DNA is crucial for the initiation of antiviral immunity but can also cause autoimmunity in the context of endogenous nucleic acids being sensed. Mutations in the human 3' repair exonuclease 1 (TREX1) have been linked to the type I IFN-associated autoimmune disease Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. The exact mechanisms driving unabated type I IFN responses in the absence of TREX1 are only partly understood, but it appears likely that accumulation of endogenous DNA species triggers a cell-autonomous immune response by activating a cytosolic DNA receptor. In this article, we demonstrate that knocking out the DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase completely abrogates spontaneous induction of IFN-stimulated genes in TREX1-deficient cells. These findings indicate a key role of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase for the initiation of self-DNA-induced autoimmune disorders, thus providing important implications for novel therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency on ageing and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2002-01-01

    Present knowledge on the effects of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth hormone (IGF)1 deficiency on ageing and lifespan are reviewed. Evidence is presented that isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) including GH, as well as primary IGE1 deficiency (GH resistance, Laron syndrome) present signs of early ageing such as thin and wrinkled skin, obesity, hyperglycemia and osteoporosis. These changes do not seem to affect the lifespan, as patients reach old age. Animal models of genetic MPHD (Ames and Snell mice) and GH receptor knockout mice (primary IGF1 deficiency) also have a statistically significant higher longevity compared to normal controls. On the contrary, mice transgenic for GH and acromegalic patients secreting large amounts of GH have premature death. In conclusion longstanding GH/IGF1 deficiency affects several parameters of the ageing process without impairing lifespan, and as shown in animal models prolongs longevity. In contrast high GH/IGF1 levels accelerate death.

  15. The GH-IGF1 axis and longevity. The paradigm of IGF1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2008-01-01

    Primary or secondary IGF1 deficiency has been implicated in shortening of lifespan. This paper reviews available data on the influence of IGF1 deficiency on lifespan and longevity in animals and man. It has been shown that inactivation of the IGF1 gene or of the GH receptor in both invertebrates (C-elegans, flies-Drosphila) and rodents (mice and rats), leading to IGF1 deficiency, prolong life, particularly in females. In man, evaluation of the 2 largest cohorts of patients with Laron syndrome (inactive GH receptor resulting in IGF1 deficiency) in Israel and Ecuador revealed that despite their dwarfism and marked obesity, patients are alive at the ages of 75-78 years, with some having reached even more advanced ages. It is assumed that a major contributing factor is their protection from cancer, a major cause of death in the general population.

  16. Sustained beta-cell dysfunction but normalized islet mass in aged thrombospondin-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Johan Drott

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet endothelial cells have in recent years been shown to support beta-cell mass and function by paracrine interactions. Recently, we identified an islets endothelial-specific glycoprotein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, that showed to be of importance for islet angiogenesis and beta-cell function in young mice. The present study aimed to investigate long-term consequences for islet morphology and beta-cell function of TSP-1 deficiency. Islet and beta-cell mass were observed increased at 10-12 weeks of age in TSP-1 deficient mice, but were normalized before 16 weeks of age when compared to wild-type controls. Islet vascularity was normal in 10-12 and 16-week-old TSP-1 deficient animals, whereas islets of one-year-old animals lacking TSP-1 were hypervascular. Beta-cell dysfunction in TSP-1 deficient animals was present at similar magnitudes between 10-12 and 52 weeks of age, as evaluated by glucose tolerance tests. The insulin secretion capacity in vivo of islets in one-year-old TSP-1 deficient animals was only ∼15% of that in wild-type animals. Using a transplantation model, we reconstituted TSP-1 in adult TSP-deficient islets. In contrast to neonatal TSP-1 deficient islets that we previously reported to regain function after TSP-1 reconstitution, adult islets failed to recover. We conclude that TSP-1 deficiency in islets causes changing vascular and endocrine morphological alterations postnatally, but is coupled to a chronic beta-cell dysfunction. The beta-cell dysfunction induced by TSP-1 deficiency is irreversible if not substituted early in life.

  17. Paroxysmal Exercise-induced Dyskinesias Caused by GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Mongin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is due to de novo mutations in the SLC2A1 gene encoding the glucose transporter type 1. Phenomenology Shown: Paroxysmal motor manifestations induced by exercise or fasting may be the main manifestations of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Educational Value: Proper identification of the paroxysmal events and early diagnosis is important since the disease is potentially treatable.

  18. IGF-1 deficiency impairs neurovascular coupling in mice: implications for cerebromicrovascular aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Ashpole, Nicole M; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Milne, Ginger L; Valcarcel-Ares, Noa M; Menyhart, Akos; Farkas, Eszter; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-12-01

    Aging is associated with marked deficiency in circulating IGF-1, which has been shown to contribute to age-related cognitive decline. Impairment of moment-to-moment adjustment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) via neurovascular coupling is thought to play a critical role in the genesis of age-related cognitive impairment. To establish the link between IGF-1 deficiency and cerebromicrovascular impairment, neurovascular coupling mechanisms were studied in a novel mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency (Igf1(f/f) -TBG-Cre-AAV8) and accelerated vascular aging. We found that IGF-1-deficient mice exhibit neurovascular uncoupling and show a deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory test, mimicking the aging phenotype. IGF-1 deficiency significantly impaired cerebromicrovascular endothelial function decreasing NO mediation of neurovascular coupling. IGF-1 deficiency also impaired glutamate-mediated CBF responses, likely due to dysregulation of astrocytic expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors and impairing mediation of CBF responses by eicosanoid gliotransmitters. Collectively, we demonstrate that IGF-1 deficiency promotes cerebromicrovascular dysfunction and neurovascular uncoupling mimicking the aging phenotype, which are likely to contribute to cognitive impairment. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jett, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  20. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Upregulation by Phenylephrine Reduces Radiation Injury in Submandibular Gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Bin; Han, Lichi; Wang, Xinyue; Tang, Ling; Li, Kailiang; Li, Xiuxiu; Zhao, Xibo; Xia, Miaomiao; Zhou, Xixi; Zhang, Fuyin; Liu, Ke Jian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy for head and neck cancer commonly leads to radiation sialadenitis. Emerging evidence has indicated that phenylephrine pretreatment reduces radiosensitivity in the salivary gland; however, the underlying cytoprotective mechanism remains unclear. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is not only a key enzyme for the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide salvage pathway, but also a cytokine participating in cell survival, metabolism, and longevity, with a broad effect on cellular functions in physiology and pathology. However, the regulatory events of NAMPT in response to the irradiated salivary gland are unknown. Methods and Materials: The cell viability of primary cultured submandibular gland cells was determined using the PrestoBlue assay. NAMPT expression was measured using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting in vitro and in vivo. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) and phosphorylated Akt protein levels were examined by Western blotting. The cellular locations of NAMPT and SIRT1 were detected by immunohistochemistry. NAMPT promoter activity was assessed using the luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: NAMPT was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of granular convoluted tubule cells and ductal cells in normal submandibular glands. mRNA and protein expression of NAMPT was downregulated after radiation but upregulated with phenylephrine pretreatment both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, the protein expression of phosphorylated Akt and SIRT1 was decreased in irradiated glands, and phenylephrine pretreatment restored the expression of both. SIRT1 was mainly located in the cell nucleus and cytoplasm in the normal submandibular gland. Phenylephrine dramatically enhanced the expression of SIRT1, which was significantly reduced by radiation. Furthermore, phenylephrine induced a marked increase of NAMPT promoter activity. Conclusions: These findings reveal the regulatory mechanisms of NAMPT expression

  1. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Upregulation by Phenylephrine Reduces Radiation Injury in Submandibular Gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Bin, E-mail: xiangbin72@163.com [Laboratory of Oral and Maxillofacial Disease, Second Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian (China); Han, Lichi [Department of Oral Medicine and Medical Research Center of Medical College, Dalian University, Dalian (China); Wang, Xinyue [Laboratory of Oral and Maxillofacial Disease, Second Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian (China); Tang, Ling [Life Sciences and Technology College, Dalian University, Dalian (China); Li, Kailiang [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Second Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian (China); Li, Xiuxiu [Department of Oral Medicine and Medical Research Center of Medical College, Dalian University, Dalian (China); Zhao, Xibo [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Second Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian (China); Xia, Miaomiao [Department of Oral Medicine and Medical Research Center of Medical College, Dalian University, Dalian (China); Zhou, Xixi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Zhang, Fuyin [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Second Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian (China); Liu, Ke Jian, E-mail: kliu@salud.unm.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy for head and neck cancer commonly leads to radiation sialadenitis. Emerging evidence has indicated that phenylephrine pretreatment reduces radiosensitivity in the salivary gland; however, the underlying cytoprotective mechanism remains unclear. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is not only a key enzyme for the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide salvage pathway, but also a cytokine participating in cell survival, metabolism, and longevity, with a broad effect on cellular functions in physiology and pathology. However, the regulatory events of NAMPT in response to the irradiated salivary gland are unknown. Methods and Materials: The cell viability of primary cultured submandibular gland cells was determined using the PrestoBlue assay. NAMPT expression was measured using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting in vitro and in vivo. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) and phosphorylated Akt protein levels were examined by Western blotting. The cellular locations of NAMPT and SIRT1 were detected by immunohistochemistry. NAMPT promoter activity was assessed using the luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: NAMPT was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of granular convoluted tubule cells and ductal cells in normal submandibular glands. mRNA and protein expression of NAMPT was downregulated after radiation but upregulated with phenylephrine pretreatment both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, the protein expression of phosphorylated Akt and SIRT1 was decreased in irradiated glands, and phenylephrine pretreatment restored the expression of both. SIRT1 was mainly located in the cell nucleus and cytoplasm in the normal submandibular gland. Phenylephrine dramatically enhanced the expression of SIRT1, which was significantly reduced by radiation. Furthermore, phenylephrine induced a marked increase of NAMPT promoter activity. Conclusions: These findings reveal the regulatory mechanisms of NAMPT expression

  2. CT study of infantile cerebral vitamin B1 deficiency (analysis of 22 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bin; Xi Meifang; Wang Mengding; Wang Chaoxiu

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the CT features of infantile cerebral vitamin B 1 deficiency. Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical manifestations and CT findings of 22 cases of infantile vitamin B 1 deficiency. Results: The main clinical signs were seizure malaise dullness and vomiting. CT scans showed bilateral symmetrical hypodense foci in lenticular nucleus (20/22), head of caudate nucleus (15/22), thalamus (3/22), anterior limb of internal capsule (4/22), external capsule (1/22) and para-ventricle white matter (2/22), and in many cases, signs of cerebral atrophy. 22 cases received thiamine treatment and were fully recovered. Conclusion: The authors concluded that bilateral symmetric hypodense foci in lenticular nucleus thalamus, head of caudate nucleus, anterior limb of internal capsule, external capsule and para-ventricle white matter were important CT signs suggestive of infantile cerebral vitamin B 1 deficiency

  3. Trafficking of cholesterol from cell bodies to distal axons in Niemann Pick C1-deficient neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karten, Barbara; Vance, Dennis E; Campenot, Robert B; Vance, Jean E

    2003-02-07

    Niemann Pick type C (NPC) disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. In cells lacking functional NPC1 protein, endocytosed cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes/lysosomes. We utilized primary neuronal cultures in which cell bodies and distal axons reside in separate compartments to investigate the requirement of NPC1 protein for transport of cholesterol from cell bodies to distal axons. We have recently observed that in NPC1-deficient neurons compared with wild-type neurons, cholesterol accumulates in cell bodies but is reduced in distal axons (Karten, B., Vance, D. E., Campenot, R. B., and Vance, J. E. (2002) J. Neurochem. 83, 1154-1163). We now show that NPC1 protein is expressed in both cell bodies and distal axons. In NPC1-deficient neurons, cholesterol delivered to cell bodies from low density lipoproteins (LDLs), high density lipoproteins, or cyclodextrin complexes was transported into axons in normal amounts, whereas transport of endogenously synthesized cholesterol was impaired. Inhibition of cholesterol synthesis with pravastatin in wild-type and NPC1-deficient neurons reduced axonal growth. However, LDLs restored a normal rate of growth to wild-type but not NPC1-deficient neurons treated with pravastatin. Thus, although LDL cholesterol is transported into axons of NPC1-deficient neurons, this source of cholesterol does not sustain normal axonal growth. Over the lifespan of NPC1-deficient neurons, these defects in cholesterol transport might be responsible for the observed altered distribution of cholesterol between cell bodies and axons and, consequently, might contribute to the neurological dysfunction in NPC disease.

  4. Strategies to rescue the consequences of inducible arginase-1 deficiency in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel L Ballantyne

    Full Text Available Arginase-1 catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, which is the final step of the urea cycle used to remove excess ammonia from the body. Arginase-1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia in mice and man with severe lethal consequences in the former and progressive neurological impairment to varying degrees in the latter. In a tamoxifen-induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model, mice succumb to the enzyme deficiency within 2 weeks after inducing the knockout and retain <2 % enzyme in the liver. Standard clinical care regimens for arginase-1 deficiency (low-protein diet, the nitrogen-scavenging drug sodium phenylbutyrate, ornithine supplementation either failed to extend lifespan (ornithine or only minimally prolonged lifespan (maximum 8 days with low-protein diet and drug. A conditional, tamoxifen-inducible arginase-1 transgenic mouse strain expressing the enzyme from the Rosa26 locus modestly extended lifespan of neonatal mice, but not that of 4-week old mice, when crossed to the inducible arginase-1 knockout mouse strain. Delivery of an arginase-1/enhanced green fluorescent fusion construct by adeno-associated viral delivery (rh10 serotype with a strong cytomegalovirus-chicken β-actin hybrid promoter rescued about 30% of male mice with lifespan prolongation to at least 6 months, extensive hepatic expression and restoration of significant enzyme activity in liver. In contrast, a vector of the AAV8 serotype driven by the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter led to weaker liver expression and did not rescue arginase-1 deficient mice to any great extent. Since the induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model displays a much more severe phenotype when compared to human arginase-1 deficiency, these studies reveal that it may be feasible with gene therapy strategies to correct the various manifestations of the disorder and they provide optimism for future clinical studies.

  5. Small-intestinal dysfunction accompanies the complex endocrinopathy of human proprotein convertase 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Robert S; Creemers, John W M; Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2003-01-01

    . The differences in the nature and severity of presentation between the two cases cannot readily be explained on the basis of allelic heterogeneity, as the nonsense and missense mutations from both subjects had comparably severe effects on the catalytic activity of PC1. Despite Subject A's negligible PC1 activity......We have previously described the only reported case of human proprotein convertase 1 (PC1) deficiency, in a female (Subject A) with obesity, hypogonadism, hypoadrenalism, and reactive hypoglycemia. We now report the second case of human PC1 deficiency (Subject B), also due to compound...

  6. Structural and kinetic studies of the allosteric transition in Sulfolobus solfataricus uracil phosphoribosyltransferase: Permanent activation by engineering of the C-terminus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Stig; Kadziola, Anders; Johansson, Eva

    2009-01-01

    and PPi, in the other sites. Combined with three existing structures of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase in complex with UMP and the allosteric inhibitor cytidine triphosphate (CTP), these structures provide valuable insight into the mechanism of allosteric transition from inhibited to active enzyme...

  7. Androgen-sensitive hypertension associated with soluble guanylate cyclase-α1 deficiency is mediated by 20-HETE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dordea, Ana C; Vandenwijngaert, Sara; Garcia, Victor; Tainsh, Robert E T; Nathan, Daniel I; Allen, Kaitlin; Raher, Michael J; Tainsh, Laurel T; Zhang, Fan; Lieb, Wolfgang S; Mikelman, Sarah; Kirby, Andrew; Stevens, Christine; Thoonen, Robrecht; Hindle, Allyson G; Sips, Patrick Y; Falck, John R; Daly, Mark J; Brouckaert, Peter; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B; Malhotra, Rajeev; Schwartzman, Michal L; Buys, Emmanuel S

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulated nitric oxide (NO) signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension, a prevalent and often sex-specific risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We previously reported that mice deficient in the α1-subunit of the NO receptor soluble guanylate cyclase (sGCα1 (-/-) mice) display sex- and strain-specific hypertension: male but not female sGCα1 (-/-) mice are hypertensive on an 129S6 (S6) but not a C57BL6/J (B6) background. We aimed to uncover the genetic and molecular basis of the observed sex- and strain-specific blood pressure phenotype. Via linkage analysis, we identified a suggestive quantitative trait locus associated with elevated blood pressure in male sGCα1 (-/-)S6 mice. This locus encompasses Cyp4a12a, encoding the predominant murine synthase of the vasoconstrictor 20-hydroxy-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE). Renal expression of Cyp4a12a in mice was associated with genetic background, sex, and testosterone levels. In addition, 20-HETE levels were higher in renal preglomerular microvessels of male sGCα1 (-/-)S6 than of male sGCα1 (-/-)B6 mice. Furthermore, treating male sGCα1 (-/-)S6 mice with the 20-HETE antagonist 20-hydroxyeicosa-6(Z),15(Z)-dienoic acid (20-HEDE) lowered blood pressure. Finally, 20-HEDE rescued the genetic background- and testosterone-dependent impairment of acetylcholine-induced relaxation in renal interlobar arteries associated with sGCα1 deficiency. Elevated Cyp4a12a expression and 20-HETE levels render mice susceptible to hypertension and vascular dysfunction in a setting of sGCα1 deficiency. Our data identify Cyp4a12a as a candidate sex-specific blood pressure-modifying gene in the context of deficient NO-sGC signaling. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome into adulthood: a follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Taher, M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Willemsen, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) is a treatable neurometabolic disorder in which glucose transport into the brain is disturbed. Besides the classic phenotype of intellectual disability, epilepsy, and movement disorders, other phenotypes are increasingly recognized. These include, for example,

  9. Caspase-1 deficiency in mice reduces intestinal triglyceride absorption and hepatic triglyceride secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepen, J.A. van; Stienstra, R.; Vroegrijk, I.O.C.M.; Berg, S.A.A. van den; Salvatori, D.; Hooiveld, G.J.; Kersten, S.; Tack, C.J.; Netea, M.G.; Smit, J.W.A.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Havekes, L.M.; Dijk, K.W. van; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2013-01-01

    Caspase-1 is known to activate the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Additionally, it can cleave other substrates, including proteins involved in metabolism. Recently, we showed that caspase-1 deficiency in mice strongly reduces high-fat diet-induced weight gain, at least partly caused by

  10. Caspase-1 deficiency reduces intestinal and hepatic triglyceride-rich lipoprotein secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepen, van Janna A.; Stienstra, Rinke; Hooiveld, Guido; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Rensen, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Inflammasome-mediated caspase-1 activity regulates the maturation and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1ß and IL-18. Recently, we showed that caspase-1 deficiency strongly reduces high fat diet-induced adiposity although the mechanism is still unclear.

  11. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome : the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G.; Klepper, Joerg; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Leferink, Maike; Hofste, Tom; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Wevers, Ron A.; Arthur, Todd; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Ballhausen, Diana; Bekhof, Jolita; van Bogaert, Patrick; Carrilho, Ines; Chabrol, Brigitte; Champion, Michael P.; Coldwell, James; Clayton, Peter; Donner, Elizabeth; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Ebinger, Friedrich; Farrell, Kevin; Forsyth, Rob J.; de Goede, Christian G. E. L.; Gross, Stephanie; Grunewald, Stephanie; Holthausen, Hans; Jayawant, Sandeep; Lachlan, Katherine; Laugel, Vincent; Leppig, Kathy; Lim, Ming J.; Mancini, Grazia; Della Marina, Adela; Martorell, Loreto; McMenamin, Joe; Meuwissen, Marije E. C.; Mundy, Helen; Nilsson, Nils O.; Panzer, Axel; Poll-The, Bwee T.; Rauscher, Christian; Rouselle, Christophe M. R.; Sandvig, Inger; Scheffner, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Simpson, Neil; Sykora, Parol; Tomlinson, Richard; Trounce, John; Webb, David; Weschke, Bernhard; Scheffer, Hans; Willemsen, Michel A.

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  12. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: The expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Leen (Wilhelmina); J. Klepper (Joerg); M.M. Verbeek (Marcel); M. Leferink (Maike); T. Hofste (Tom); B.G.M. van Engelen (Baziel); R.A. Wevers (Ron); T. Arthur (Todd); N. Bahi-Buisson (Nadia); D. Ballhausen (Diana); J. Bekhof (Jolita); P. van Bogaert (Patrick); I. Carrilho (Inês); B. Chabrol (Brigitte); M.P. Champion (Michael); J. Coldwell (James); P. Clayton (Peter); E. Donner (Elizabeth); A. Evangeliou (Athanasios); F. Ebinger (Friedrich); K. Farrell (Kevin); R.J. Forsyth (Rob); C.G.E.L. de Goede (Christian); S. Gross (Stephanie); S. Grünewald (Sonja); H. Holthausen (Hans); S. Jayawant (Sandeep); K. Lachlan (Katherine); V. Laugel (Vincent); K. Leppig (Kathy); M.J. Lim (Ming); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); A.D. Marina; L. Martorell (Loreto); J. McMenamin (Joe); M.E.C. Meuwissen (Marije); H. Mundy (Helen); N.O. Nilsson (Nils); A. Panzer (Axel); B.T. Poll-The; C. Rauscher (Christian); C.M.R. Rouselle (Christophe); I. Sandvig (Inger); T. Scheffner (Thomas); E. Sheridan (Eamonn); N. Simpson (Neil); P. Sykora (Parol); R. Tomlinson (Richard); J. Trounce (John); D.W.M. Webb (David); B. Weschke (Bernhard); H. Scheffer (Hans); M.A. Willemsen (Michél)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractGlucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing

  13. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G.; Klepper, Joerg; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Leferink, Maike; Hofste, Tom; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Wevers, Ron A.; Arthur, Todd; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Ballhausen, Diana; Bekhof, Jolita; van Bogaert, Patrick; Carrilho, Inês; Chabrol, Brigitte; Champion, Michael P.; Coldwell, James; Clayton, Peter; Donner, Elizabeth; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Ebinger, Friedrich; Farrell, Kevin; Forsyth, Rob J.; de Goede, Christian G. E. L.; Gross, Stephanie; Grunewald, Stephanie; Holthausen, Hans; Jayawant, Sandeep; Lachlan, Katherine; Laugel, Vincent; Leppig, Kathy; Lim, Ming J.; Mancini, Grazia; Marina, Adela Della; Martorell, Loreto; McMenamin, Joe; Meuwissen, Marije E. C.; Mundy, Helen; Nilsson, Nils O.; Panzer, Axel; Poll-The, Bwee T.; Rauscher, Christian; Rouselle, Christophe M. R.; Sandvig, Inger; Scheffner, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Simpson, Neil; Sykora, Parol; Tomlinson, Richard; Trounce, John; Webb, David; Weschke, Bernhard; Scheffer, Hans; Willemsen, Michél A.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  14. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Klepper, J.; Verbeek, M.M.; Leferink, M.; Hofste, T.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Wevers, R.A.; Arthur, T.; Bahi-Buisson, N.; Ballhausen, D.; Bekhof, J.; Bogaert, P. van; Carrilho, I.; Chabrol, B.; Champion, M.P.; Coldwell, J.; Clayton, P.; Donner, E.; Evangeliou, A.; Ebinger, F.; Farrell, K.; Forsyth, R.J.; Goede, C.G. de; Gross, S.; Grunewald, S.; Holthausen, H.; Jayawant, S.; Lachlan, K.; Laugel, V.; Leppig, K.; Lim, M.J.; Mancini, G.; Marina, A.D.; Martorell, L.; McMenamin, J.; Meuwissen, M.E.; Mundy, H.; Nilsson, N.O.; Panzer, A.; Poll-The, B.T.; Rauscher, C.; Rouselle, C.M.; Sandvig, I.; Scheffner, T.; Sheridan, E.; Simpson, N.; Sykora, P.; Tomlinson, R.; Trounce, J.; Webb, D.; Weschke, B.; Scheffer, H.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  15. Circadian rhythms and food anticipatory behavior in Wfs1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luuk, Hendrik; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    in significantly lower body weight and reduced wheel-running activity. Circadian rhythmicity of behavior was normal in Wfs1-deficient mice under ad libitum feeding apart from elongated free-running period in constant light. The amount of food anticipatory activity induced by restricted feeding...

  16. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun

    2015-01-01

    of long microhomologies was found at recombination junctions derived from E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RNF168-deficient, Fanconi anemia group J protein (FACJ, BRIP1)-deficient, or DNA endonuclease RBBP8 (CtIP)-compromised cells, whereas an increased frequency of S-region inversions was observed in breast...

  17. Cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction is impaired in IGF-1 deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, M.; Daemen, M. J.; Bronsaer, R.; Dassen, W. R.; Zandbergen, H. R.; Kockx, M.; Smits, J. F.; van der Zee, R.; Doevendans, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain more insight in the role of IGF-1 in cardiac remodeling and function after experimental myocardial infarction. We hypothesized that cardiac remodeling is altered in IGF-1 deficient mice, which may affect cardiac function. A myocardial infarction was induced by surgical coronary artery

  18. Reduced migration of MLH1 deficient colon cancer cells depends on SPTAN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Ernst, Benjamin Philipp; Nuber, Franziska; Passmann, Sandra; Schäfer, Dieter; Steinke, Verena; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Plotz, Guido; Zeuzem, Stefan; Brieger, Angela

    2014-01-24

    Defects in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein MLH1 are frequently observed in sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers (CRC). Affected tumors generate much less metastatic potential than the MLH1 proficient forms. Although MLH1 has been shown to be not only involved in postreplicative MMR but also in several MMR independent processes like cytoskeletal organization, the connection between MLH1 and metastasis remains unclear. We recently identified non-erythroid spectrin αII (SPTAN1), a scaffolding protein involved in cell adhesion and motility, to interact with MLH1. In the current study, the interaction of MLH1 and SPTAN1 and its potential consequences for CRC metastasis was evaluated. Nine cancer cell lines as well as fresh and paraffin embedded colon cancer tissue from 12 patients were used in gene expression studies of SPTAN1 and MLH1. Co-expression of SPTAN1 and MLH1 was analyzed by siRNA knock down of MLH1 in HeLa, HEK293, MLH1 positive HCT116, SW480 and LoVo cells. Effects on cellular motility were determined in MLH1 deficient HCT116 and MLH1 deficient HEK293T compared to their MLH1 proficient sister cells, respectively. MLH1 deficiency is clearly associated with SPTAN1 reduction. Moreover, siRNA knock down of MLH1 decreased the mRNA level of SPTAN1 in HeLa, HEK293 as well as in MLH1 positive HCT116 cells, which indicates a co-expression of SPTAN1 by MLH1. In addition, cellular motility of MLH1 deficient HCT116 and MLH1 deficient HEK293T cells was impaired compared to the MLH1 proficient sister clones. Consequently, overexpression of SPTAN1 increased migration of MLH1 deficient cells while knock down of SPTAN1 decreased cellular mobility of MLH1 proficient cells, indicating SPTAN1-dependent migration ability. These data suggest that SPTAN1 levels decreased in concordance with MLH1 reduction and impaired cellular mobility in MLH1 deficient colon cancer cells. Therefore, aggressiveness of MLH1-positive CRC might be related to SPTAN1.

  19. Increased glucocerebrosidase (GBA) 2 activity in GBA1 deficient mice brains and in Gaucher leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Derek G; Rahim, Ahad A; Waddington, Simon N; Karlsson, Stefan; Enquist, Ida; Bhatia, Kailash; Mehta, Atul; Vellodi, Ashok; Heales, Simon

    2013-09-01

    Lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) deficiency is causative for Gaucher disease. Not all individuals with GBA1 mutations develop neurological involvement raising the possibility that other factors may provide compensatory protection. One factor may be the activity of the non-lysosomal β-glucosidase (GBA2) which exhibits catalytic activity towards glucosylceramide and is reported to be highly expressed in brain tissue. Here, we assessed brain GBA2 enzymatic activity in wild type, heterozygote and GBA1 deficient mice. Additionally, we determined activity in leucocytes obtained from 13 patients with Gaucher disease, 10 patients with enzymology consistent with heterozygote status and 19 controls. For wild type animals, GBA2 accounted for over 85 % of total brain GBA activity and was significantly elevated in GBA1 deficient mice when compared to heterozygote and wild types (GBA1 deficient; 92.4 ± 5.6, heterozygote; 71.5 ± 2.4, wild type 76.8 ± 5.1 nmol/h/mg protein). For the patient samples, five Gaucher patients had GBA2 leucocyte activities markedly greater than controls. No difference in GBA2 activity was apparent between the control and carrier groups. Undetectable GBA2 activity was identified in four leucocyte preparations; one in the control group, two in the carrier group and one from the Gaucher disease group. Work is now required to ascertain whether GBA2 activity is a disease modifying factor in Gaucher disease and to identify the mechanism(s) responsible for triggering increased GBA2 activity in GBA1 deficiency states.

  20. Analysis of B chromosome nondisjunction induced by the r-X1 deficiency in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shih-Hsuan; Peng, Shu-Fen; Cheng, Ya-Ming

    2017-11-20

    The maize B chromosome typically undergoes nondisjunction during the second microspore division. For normal A chromosomes, the r-X1 deficiency in maize can induce nondisjunction during the second megaspore and first microspore divisions. However, it is not known whether the r-X1 deficiency also induces nondisjunction of the maize B chromosome during these cell divisions. To answer this question, chromosome numbers were determined in the progeny of r-X1/R-r female parents carrying two B chromosomes. Some of the r-X1-lacking progeny (21.2%) contained zero or two B chromosomes. However, a much higher percentage of the r-X1-containing progeny (43.4%) exhibited zero or two B chromosomes, but none displayed more than two B chromosomes. Thus, the results indicated that the r-X1 deficiency could also induce nondisjunction of the B chromosome during the second megaspore division; moreover, the B chromosome in itself could undergo nondisjunction during the same division. In addition, pollen grains from plants with two B chromosomes lacking or exhibiting the r-X1 deficiency were compared via pollen fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a B chromosome-specific probe. The results revealed that the r-X1 deficiency could induce the occurrence of B chromosome nondisjunction during the first microspore division and that the B chromosome in itself could undergo nondisjunction during the same division at a lower frequency. Our data shed more light on the behavior of the maize B chromosome during cell division.

  1. Bleomycin-Treated Chimeric Thy1-Deficient Mice with Thy1-Deficient Myofibroblasts and Thy-Positive Lymphocytes Resolve Inflammation without Affecting the Fibrotic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazit Y. Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung fibrosis is characterized by abnormal accumulation of fibroblasts in the interstitium of the alveolar space. Two populations of myofibroblasts, distinguished by Thy1 expression, are detected in human and murine lungs. Accumulation of Thy1-negative (Thy1− myofibroblasts was shown in the lungs of humans with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and of bleomycin-treated mice. We aimed to identify genetic changes in lung myofibroblasts following Thy1 crosslinking and assess the impact of specific lung myofibroblast Thy1-deficiency, in vivo, in bleomycin-injured mouse lungs. Thy1 increased in mouse lung lymphocytes following bleomycin injury but decreased in myofibroblasts when fibrosis was at the highest point (14 days, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Using gene chip analysis, we detected that myofibroblast Thy1 crosslinking mediates downregulation of genes promoting cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation, and reduces production of extracellular matrix (ECM components, while concurrently mediating the upregulation of genes known to foster inflammation and immunological functions. Chimeric Thy1-deficient mice with Thy1+ lymphocytes and Thy1− myofibroblasts showed fibrosis similar to wild-type mice and an increased number of CD4/CD25 regulatory T cells, with a concomitant decrease in inflammation. Lung myofibroblasts downregulate Thy1 expression to increase their proliferation but to diminish the in vivo inflammatory milieu. Inflammation is not essential for evolution of fibrosis as was previously stated.

  2. Allosteric regulation of the GTP activated and CTP inhibited uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Arent, Susan; Larsen, Sine

    2005-01-01

    The upp gene, encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It behaved as a tetramer in solution and showed optimal activity at pH 5.5 when...... assayed at 60 °C. Enzyme activity was strongly stimulated by GTP and inhibited by CTP. GTP caused an approximately 20-fold increase in the turnover number kcat and raised the Km values for 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) and uracil by two- and >10-fold, respectively. The inhibition by CTP...... was complex as it depended on the presence of the reaction product UMP. Neither CTP nor UMP were strong inhibitors of the enzyme, but when present in combination their inhibition was extremely powerful. Ligand binding analyses showed that GTP and PRPP bind cooperatively to the enzyme and that the inhibitors...

  3. Altered synaptic phospholipid signaling in PRG-1 deficient mice induces exploratory behavior and motor hyperactivity resembling psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patrick; Petzold, Sandra; Sommer, Angela; Nitsch, Robert; Schwegler, Herbert; Vogt, Johannes; Roskoden, Thomas

    2018-01-15

    Plasticity related gene 1 (PRG-1) is a neuron specific membrane protein located at the postsynaptic density of glutamatergic synapses. PRG-1 modulates signaling pathways of phosphorylated lipid substrates such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Deletion of PRG-1 increases presynaptic glutamate release probability leading to neuronal over-excitation. However, due to its cortical expression, PRG-1 deficiency leading to increased glutamatergic transmission is supposed to also affect motor pathways. We therefore analyzed the effects of PRG-1 function on exploratory and motor behavior using homozygous PRG-1 knockout (PRG-1 -/- ) mice and PRG-1/LPA 2 -receptor double knockout (PRG-1 -/- /LPA 2 -/- ) mice in two open field settings of different size and assessing motor behavior in the Rota Rod test. PRG-1 -/- mice displayed significantly longer path lengths and higher running speed in both open field conditions. In addition, PRG-1 -/- mice spent significantly longer time in the larger open field and displayed rearing and self-grooming behavior. Furthermore PRG-1 -/- mice displayed stereotypical behavior resembling phenotypes of psychiatric disorders in the smaller sized open field arena. Altogether, this behavior is similar to the stereotypical behavior observed in animal models for psychiatric disease of autistic spectrum disorders which reflects a disrupted balance between glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. These differences indicate an altered excitation/inhibition balance in neuronal circuits in PRG-1 -/- mice as recently shown in the somatosensory cortex [38]. In contrast, PRG-1 -/- /LPA 2 -/- did not show significant changes in behavior in the open field suggesting that these specific alterations were abolished when the LPA 2 -receptor was lacking. Our findings indicate that PRG-1 deficiency led to over-excitability caused by an altered LPA/LPA 2 -R signaling inducing a behavioral phenotype typically observed in animal models for psychiatric disorders. Copyright

  4. SOCS-1 deficiency does not prevent diet-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Macotela, Yazmin; Boucher, Jérémie

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and increased expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins, which inhibit cytokine and insulin signaling. Thus, reducing SOCS expression could prevent the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. Using SOCS-1 knockout mice, we...... investigated the contribution of SOCS-1 in the development of insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet (HFD). SOCS-1 knockout mice on HFD gained 70% more weight, displayed a 2.3-fold increase in epididymal fat pads mass and increased hepatic lipid content. This was accompanied by increased mRNA expression...... of leptin and the macrophage marker CD68 in white adipose tissue and of SREBP1c and FAS in liver. HFD also induced hyperglycemia in SOCS-1 deficient mice with impairment of glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Thus, despite the role of SOCS proteins in obesity-related insulin resistance, SOCS-1 deficiency...

  5. BRCA1 deficiency increases the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to auranofin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oommen, Deepu; Yiannakis, Dennis; Jha, Awadhesh N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • BRCA1 deficient cancer cells exhibit increased DNA damage upon auranofin treatment. • Auranofin induces apoptosis in BRCA1 deficient cancer cells despite the activation of Nrf2. • Antioxidant protects BRCA1 deficient cancer cells from auranofin. - Abstract: Auranofin, a thioredoxin reductase inhibitor and an anti-rheumatic drug is currently undergoing phase 2 clinical studies for repurposing to treat recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Previous studies have established that auranofin exerts its cytotoxic activity by increasing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) is a DNA repair protein whose functional status is critical in the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Apart from its key role in DNA repair, BRCA1 is also known to modulate cellular redox homeostasis by regulating the stability of anti-oxidant transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2—related factor 2 (Nrf2) via direct protein–protein interaction. However, it is currently unknown whether BRCA1 modulates the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to auranofin. Here we report that BRCA1-depleted cells exhibited increased DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and decreased clonogenic cell survival upon auranofin treatment. Interestingly, auranofin induced the expression of Nrf2 in BRCA1-depleted cells suggesting its regulation independent of BRCA1. Furthermore, anti-oxidant agent, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) protected BRCA1-depleted cells from DNA damage and apoptosis induced by auranofin. Our study suggests that accumulated lethal DSBs resulting from the oxidative damage render BRCA1 deficient cells more sensitive to auranofin despite the activation of Nrf2.

  6. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Vikram, E-mail: prasadvm@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Chirra, Shivani [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Kohli, Rohit [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Shull, Gary E. [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  7. BRCA1 deficiency increases the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to auranofin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oommen, Deepu [School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Yiannakis, Dennis [Plymouth Oncology Centre, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N., E-mail: a.jha@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • BRCA1 deficient cancer cells exhibit increased DNA damage upon auranofin treatment. • Auranofin induces apoptosis in BRCA1 deficient cancer cells despite the activation of Nrf2. • Antioxidant protects BRCA1 deficient cancer cells from auranofin. - Abstract: Auranofin, a thioredoxin reductase inhibitor and an anti-rheumatic drug is currently undergoing phase 2 clinical studies for repurposing to treat recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Previous studies have established that auranofin exerts its cytotoxic activity by increasing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) is a DNA repair protein whose functional status is critical in the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Apart from its key role in DNA repair, BRCA1 is also known to modulate cellular redox homeostasis by regulating the stability of anti-oxidant transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2—related factor 2 (Nrf2) via direct protein–protein interaction. However, it is currently unknown whether BRCA1 modulates the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to auranofin. Here we report that BRCA1-depleted cells exhibited increased DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and decreased clonogenic cell survival upon auranofin treatment. Interestingly, auranofin induced the expression of Nrf2 in BRCA1-depleted cells suggesting its regulation independent of BRCA1. Furthermore, anti-oxidant agent, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) protected BRCA1-depleted cells from DNA damage and apoptosis induced by auranofin. Our study suggests that accumulated lethal DSBs resulting from the oxidative damage render BRCA1 deficient cells more sensitive to auranofin despite the activation of Nrf2.

  8. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Vikram; Chirra, Shivani; Kohli, Rohit; Shull, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na + /H + exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors

  9. NADPH oxidase 1 deficiency alters caveolin phosphorylation and angiotensin II-receptor localization in vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, Olivier; Deffert, Christine; Foti, Michelangelo; Bedard, Karen; Jaquet, Vincent; Ogier-Denis, Eric; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2009-10-01

    The superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase NOX1 is thought to be involved in signaling by the angiotensin II-receptor AT1R. However, underlying signaling steps are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AngII on aortic smooth muscle from wild-type and NOX1-deficient mice. NOX1-deficient cells showed decreased basal ROS generation and did not produce ROS in response to AngII. Unexpectedly, AngII-dependent Ca(2+) signaling was markedly decreased in NOX1-deficient cells. Immunostaining demonstrated that AT1R was localized on the plasma membrane in wild-type, but intracellularly in NOX1-deficient cells. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting showed a decreased expression of AT1R in the aorta of NOX1-deficient mice. To investigate the basis of the abnormal AT1R targeting, we studied caveolin expression and phosphorylation. The amounts of total caveolin and of caveolae were not different in NOX1-deficient mice, but a marked decrease occurred in the phosphorylated form of caveolin. Exogenous H(2)O(2) or transfection of a NOX1 plasmid restored AngII responses in NOX1-deficient cells. Based on these findings, we propose that NOX1-derived reactive oxygen species regulate cell-surface expression of AT1R through mechanisms including caveolin phosphorylation. The lack cell-surface AT1R expression in smooth muscle could be involved in the decreased blood pressure in NOX1-deficient mice.

  10. Uvrag targeting by Mir125a and Mir351 modulates autophagy associated with Ewsr1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunha; Kang, Young-Sook; Lee, Na-Young; Kim, Ki Yoon; Hwang, Yu Jin; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo; Her, Song; Jung, Min-Kyung; Kim, Sun; Lee, Chai-Jin; Ko, Seyoon; Kowall, Neil W; Lee, Sean Bong; Lee, Junghee; Ryu, Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The EWSR1 (EWS RNA-binding protein 1/Ewing Sarcoma Break Point Region 1) gene encodes a RNA/DNA binding protein that is ubiquitously expressed and involved in various cellular processes. EWSR1 deficiency leads to impairment of development and accelerated senescence but the mechanism is not known. Herein, we found that EWSR1 modulates the Uvrag (UV radiation resistance associated) gene at the post-transcription level. Interestingly, EWSR1 deficiency led to the activation of the DROSHA-mediated microprocessor complex and increased the level of Mir125a and Mir351, which directly target Uvrag. Moreover, the Mir125a- and Mir351-mediated reduction of Uvrag was associated with the inhibition of autophagy that was confirmed in ewsr1 knockout (KO) MEFs and ewsr1 KO mice. Taken together, our data indicate that EWSR1 is involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of Uvrag via a miRNA-dependent pathway, resulting in the deregulation of autophagy inhibition. The mechanism of Uvrag and autophagy regulation by EWSR1 provides new insights into the role of EWSR1 deficiency-related cellular dysfunction.

  11. Inherited MST1 deficiency underlies susceptibility to EV-HPV infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Crequer

    Full Text Available Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV is characterized by persistent cutaneous lesions caused by a specific group of related human papillomavirus genotypes (EV-HPVs in otherwise healthy individuals. Autosomal recessive (AR EVER1 and EVER2 deficiencies account for two thirds of known cases of EV. AR RHOH deficiency has recently been described in two siblings with EV-HPV infections as well as other infectious and tumoral manifestations. We report here the whole-exome based discovery of AR MST1 deficiency in a 19-year-old patient with a T-cell deficiency associated with EV-HPV, bacterial and fungal infections. MST1 deficiency has recently been described in seven patients from three unrelated kindreds with profound T-cell deficiency and various viral and bacterial infections. The patient was also homozygous for a rare ERCC3 variation. Our findings broaden the clinical range of infections seen in MST1 deficiency and provide a new genetic etiology of susceptibility to EV-HPV infections. Together with the recent discovery of RHOH deficiency, they suggest that T cells are involved in the control of EV-HPVs, at least in some individuals.

  12. High Mutation Levels are Compatible with Normal Embryonic Development in Mlh1-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoyan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yulong; Sang, Meixiang; Cai, Jianhui; Li, Qiaoxia; Ozaki, Toshinori; Ono, Tetsuya; He, Dongwei

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the role of the mismatch repair gene Mlh1 in genome instability during the fetal stage, spontaneous mutations were studied in Mlh1-deficient lacZ-transgenic mouse fetuses. Mutation levels were high at 9.5 days post coitum (dpc) and gradually increased during the embryonic stage, after which they remained unchanged. In addition, mutations that were found in brain, liver, spleen, small intestine and thymus showed similar levels and no statistically significant difference was found. The molecular nature of mutations at 12.5 dpc in fetuses of Mlh1 +/+ and Mlh1 -/- mice showed their own unique spectra, suggesting that deletion mutations were the main causes in the deficiency of the Mlh1 gene. Of note, fetuses of irradiated mice exhibited marked differences such as post-implantation loss and Mendelian distribution. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that high mutation ofMlh1 -/- -deficient fetuses has little effect on the fetuses during their early developmental stages, whereas Mlh1 -/- -deficient fetuses from X-ray irradiated mothers are clearly effected.

  13. MCPIP1 deficiency in mice results in severe anemia related to autoimmune mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhou

    Full Text Available Autoimmune gastritis is an organ-specific autoimmune disease of the stomach associated with pernicious anemia. The previous work from us and other groups identified MCPIP1 as an essential factor controlling inflammation and immune homeostasis. MCPIP1(-/- developed severe anemia. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenotype remain unclear. In the present study, we found that MCPIP1 deficiency in mice resulted in severe anemia related to autoimmune mechanisms. Although MCPIP1 deficiency did not affect erythropoiesis per se, the erythropoiesis in MCPIP1(-/- bone marrow erythroblasts was significantly attenuated due to iron and vitamin B12 (VB12 deficiency, which was mainly resulted from autoimmunity-associated gastritis and parietal cell loss. Consistently, exogenous supplement of iron and VB12 greatly improved the anemia phenotype of MCPIP1(-/- mice. Finally, we have evidence suggesting that autoimmune hemolysis may also contribute to anemia phenotype of MCPIP1(-/- mice. Taken together, our study suggests that MCPIP1 deficiency in mice leads to the development of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia. Thus, MCPIP1(-/- mice may be a good mouse model for investigating the pathogenesis of pernicious anemia and testing the efficacy of some potential drugs for treatment of this disease.

  14. MAPK Phosphatase-1 Deficiency Exacerbates the Severity of Imiquimod-Induced Psoriasiform Skin Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiheng Zhao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Persistent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK is believed to be involved in psoriasis pathogenesis. MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 is an important negative regulator of MAPK activity, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms of MKP-1 in psoriasis development are largely unknown. In this study, we found that the expression of MKP-1 was decreased in the imiquimod (IMQ-induced psoriasiform mouse skin. MKP-1-deficient (MKP-1−/− mice were highly susceptible to IMQ-induced skin inflammation, which was associated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. MKP-1 acted on both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells to regulate psoriasis pathogenesis. MKP-1 deficiency in macrophages led to enhanced p38 activation and higher expression of interleukin (IL-1β, CXCL2, and S100a8 upon R848 stimulation. Moreover, MKP-1 deficiency in the non-hematopoietic compartments led to an enhanced IL-22 receptor signaling and higher expression of CXCL1 and CXCL2 upon IMQ treatment. Collectively, our data suggest a critical role for MKP-1 in the regulation of skin inflammation.

  15. Partial IGF-1 deficiency induces brain oxidative damage and edema, which are ameliorated by replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puche, Juan E; Muñoz, Úrsula; García-Magariño, Mariano; Sádaba, María C; Castilla-Cortázar, Inma

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) induces multiple cytoprotective effects on every tissue, including the brain. Since the mechanisms by which IGF-1 produces neuroprotection are not fully understood, the aim of this work was to delve into the underlying mechanisms. IGF-1 deficient mice (Hz) were compared with wild type (WT) and Hz mice treated with low doses of IGF-1 (2 µg/100 g body weight/day) for 10 days (Hz + IGF). Gene expression, quantitative PCR, histology, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed in the three groups. IGF-1 deficiency induced increased oxidative damage determined by markers of lipid peroxidation and hypoxia, as well as gene expression of heat shock proteins, antioxidant enzymes, and molecules involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial protection. These changes correlated with edema and learning impairment in Hz mice. IGF-1 therapy improved all these alterations. In conclusion, IGF-1 deficiency is responsible for increased brain oxidative damage, edema, and impaired learning and memory capabilities which are rescued by IGF-1 replacement therapy. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Metabolic Effects of CX3CR1 Deficiency in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Shah

    Full Text Available The fractalkine (CX3CL1-CX3CR1 chemokine system is associated with obesity-related inflammation and type 2 diabetes, but data on effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency on metabolic pathways is contradictory. We examined male C57BL/6 Cx3cr1-/- mice on chow and high-fat diet to determine the metabolic effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency. We found no difference in body weight and fat content or feeding and energy expenditure between Cx3cr1-/- and WT mice. Cx3cr1-/- mice had reduced glucose intolerance assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests at chow and high-fat fed states, though there was no difference in glucose-stimulated insulin values. Cx3cr1-/- mice also had improved insulin sensitivity at hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, with higher glucose infusion rate, rate of disposal, and hepatic glucose production suppression compared to WT mice. Enhanced insulin signaling in response to acute intravenous insulin injection was demonstrated in Cx3cr1-/- by increased liver protein levels of phosphorylated AKT and GSK3β proteins. There were no differences in adipose tissue macrophage populations, circulating inflammatory monocytes, adipokines, lipids, or inflammatory markers. In conclusion, we demonstrate a moderate and reproducible protective effect of Cx3cr1 deficiency on glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.

  17. Slitrk1-deficient mice display elevated anxiety-like behavior and noradrenergic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, K; Yamada, K; Ornthanalai, V G; Inoue, T; Ota, M; Murphy, N P; Aruga, J

    2010-02-01

    Mutations in SLITRK1 are found in patients with Tourette's syndrome and trichotillomania. SLITRK1 encodes a transmembrane protein containing leucine-rich repeats that is produced predominantly in the nervous system. However, the role of this protein is largely unknown, except that it can modulate neurite outgrowth in vitro. To clarify the role of Slitrk1 in vivo, we developed Slitrk1-knockout mice and analyzed their behavioral and neurochemical phenotypes. Slitrk1-deficient mice exhibited elevated anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze test as well as increased immobility time in forced swimming and tail suspension tests. Neurochemical analysis revealed that Slitrk1-knockout mice had increased levels of norepinephrine and its metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol. Administration of clonidine, an alpha2-adrenergic agonist that is frequently used to treat patients with Tourette's syndrome, attenuated the anxiety-like behavior of Slitrk1-deficient mice in the elevated plus-maze test. These results lead us to conclude that noradrenergic mechanisms are involved in the behavioral abnormalities of Slitrk1-deficient mice. Elevated anxiety due to Slitrk1 dysfunction may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases such as Tourette's syndrome and trichotillomania.

  18. Glycogen Synthesis in Glycogenin 1-Deficient Patients: A Role for Glycogenin 2 in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krag, Thomas O; Ruiz-Ruiz, Cristina; Vissing, John

    2017-08-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type XV is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GYG1 gene that codes for the core molecule of muscle glycogen, glycogenin 1. Nonetheless, glycogen is present in muscles of glycogenin 1-deficient patients, suggesting an alternative for glycogen buildup. A likely candidate is glycogenin 2, an isoform expressed in the liver and heart but not in healthy skeletal muscle. We wanted to investigate the formation of glycogen and changes in glycogen metabolism in patients with GSD type XV. Two patients with mutations in the GYG1 gene were investigated for histopathology, ultrastructure, and expression of proteins involved in glycogen synthesis and metabolism. Apart from occurrence of polyglucosan (PG) bodies in few fibers, glycogen appeared normal in most cells, and the concentration was normal in patients with GSD type XV. We found that glycogenin 1 was absent, but glycogenin 2 was present in the patients, whereas the opposite was the case in healthy controls. Electron microscopy revealed that glycogen was present between and not inside myofibrils in type II fibers, compromising the ultrastructure of these fibers, and only type I fibers contained PG bodies. We also found significant changes to the expression levels of several enzymes directly involved in glycogen and glucose metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating expression of glycogenin 2 in glycogenin 1-deficient patients, suggesting that glycogenin 2 rescues the formation of glycogen in patients with glycogenin 1 deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  19. Mcph1-deficient mice reveal a role for MCPH1 in otitis media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available Otitis media is a common reason for hearing loss, especially in children. Otitis media is a multifactorial disease and environmental factors, anatomic dysmorphology and genetic predisposition can all contribute to its pathogenesis. However, the reasons for the variable susceptibility to otitis media are elusive. MCPH1 mutations cause primary microcephaly in humans. So far, no hearing impairment has been reported either in the MCPH1 patients or mouse models with Mcph1 deficiency. In this study, Mcph1-deficient (Mcph1(tm1a (/tm1a mice were produced using embryonic stem cells with a targeted mutation by the Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project. Auditory brainstem response measurements revealed that Mcph1(tm1a (/tm1a mice had mild to moderate hearing impairment with around 70% penetrance. We found otitis media with effusion in the hearing-impaired Mcph1(tm1a (/tm1a mice by anatomic and histological examinations. Expression of Mcph1 in the epithelial cells of middle ear cavities supported its involvement in the development of otitis media. Other defects of Mcph1(tm1a (/tm1a mice included small skull sizes, increased micronuclei in red blood cells, increased B cells and ocular abnormalities. These findings not only recapitulated the defects found in other Mcph1-deficient mice or MCPH1 patients, but also revealed an unexpected phenotype, otitis media with hearing impairment, which suggests Mcph1 is a new gene underlying genetic predisposition to otitis media.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of recombinant adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus strain HB27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyna, E. V.; Timofeev, V. I.; Tuzova, E. S.; Kostromina, M. A.; Murav'eva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2017-07-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) belongs to the type I phosphoribosyltransferase family and catalyzes the formation of adenosine monophosphate via transfer of the 5-phosphoribosyl group from phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate to the nitrogen atom N9 of the adenine base. Proteins of this family are involved in a salvage pathway of nucleotide synthesis, thus providing purine base utilization and maintaining the optimal level of purine bases in the body. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from the extremely thermophilic Thermus thermophilus strain HB27 was produced using a highly efficient E. coli producer strain and was then purified by affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. This enzyme was successfully employed as a catalyst for the cascade biosynthesis of biologically important nucleotides. The screening of crystallization conditions for recombinant APRT from T. thermophilus HB27 was performed in order to determine the enzyme structure by X-ray diffraction. The crystallization conditions, which were found by the vapor-diffusion technique, were then optimized to apply the counter-diffusion technique. The crystals of the enzyme were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P1211 and have the following unitcell parameters: a = 69.86 Å, b = 82.16 Å, c = 91.39 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 102.58°. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the APRT structure at 2.6 Å resolution was collected from the crystals at the SPring-8 synchrotron facility (Japan).

  1. CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency: New form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosho, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Carbohydrate sulfotransferase 14/dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase-1 (CHST14/D4ST1) deficiency represents a specific form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) caused by recessive loss-of-function mutations in CHST14. The disorder has been independently termed "adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome", "EDS, Kosho type", and "EDS, musculocontractural type". To date, 31 affected patients from 21 families have been described. Clinically, CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency is characterized by multiple congenital malformations (craniofacial features including large fontanelle, hypertelorism, short and downslanting palpebral fissures, blue sclerae, short nose with hypoplastic columella, low-set and rotated ears, high palate, long philtrum, thin upper lip vermilion, small mouth, and micro-retrognathia; multiple congenital contractures including adduction-flexion contractures and talipes equinovarus as well as other visceral or ophthalmological malformations) and progressive multisystem fragility-related complications (skin hyperextensibility, bruisability, and fragility with atrophic scars; recurrent dislocations; progressive talipes or spinal deformities; pneumothorax or pneumohemothorax; large subcutaneous hematomas; and diverticular perforation). Etiologically, multisystem fragility is presumably caused by impaired assembly of collagen fibrils resulting from loss of dermatan sulfate (DS) in the decorin glycosaminoglycan side chain that promotes electrostatic binding between collagen fibrils. This is the first reported human disorder that specifically affects biosynthesis of DS. Its clinical characteristics indicate that CHST14/D4ST1 and, more fundamentally, DS, play a critical role in fetal development and maintenance of connective tissues in multiple organs. Considering that patients with CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency develop progressive multisystem fragility-related manifestations, establishment of a comprehensive and detailed natural history and health-care guidelines as well as further elucidation

  2. Muc1 deficiency exacerbates pulmonary fibrosis in a mouse model of silicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kosuke; Zemskova, Marina A; Hanss, Alec D; Kim, Marianne M; Summer, Ross; Kim, Kwang Chul

    2017-11-25

    MUC1 (MUC in human and Muc in animals) is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the apical surface of lung epithelial cells. However, in the lungs of patients with interstitial lung disease, MUC1 is aberrantly expressed in hyperplastic alveolar type II epithelial (ATII) cells and alveolar macrophages (AM), and elevated levels of extracellular MUC1 are found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the serum of these patients. While pro-fibrotic effects of extracellular MUC1 have recently been described in cultured fibroblasts, the contribution of MUC1 to the pathobiology of pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that MUC1 deficiency would reduce susceptibility to pulmonary fibrosis in a mouse model of silicosis. We employed human MUC1 transgenic mice, Muc1 deficient mice and wild-type mice on C57BL/6 background in these studies. Some mice received a one-time dose of crystalline silica instilled into their oropharynx in order to induce pulmonary fibrosis and assess the effects of Muc1 deficiency on fibrotic and inflammatory responses in the lung. As previously described in other mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis, we found that extracellular MUC1 levels were markedly increased in whole lung tissues, BALF and serum of human MUC1 transgenic mice after silica. We also detected an increase in total MUC1 levels in the lungs of these mice, indicating that production as well as release contributed to elevated levels after lung injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that increased MUC1 expression was mostly confined to ATII cells and AMs in areas of fibrotic remodeling, illustrating a pattern similar to the expression of MUC1 in human fibrotic lung tissues. However, contrary to our hypothesis, we found that Muc1 deficiency resulted in a worsening of fibrotic remodeling in the mouse lung as judged by an increase in number of silicotic nodules, an increase in lung collagen deposition and an increase in the severity of pulmonary inflammation

  3. Impact of glutathione peroxidase-1 deficiency on macrophage foam cell formation and proliferation: implications for atherogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Cheng

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a protective role for the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1 in the atherogenic process. GPx-1 deficiency accelerates atherosclerosis and increases lesion cellularity in ApoE(-/- mice. However, the distribution of GPx-1 within the atherosclerotic lesion as well as the mechanisms leading to increased macrophage numbers in lesions is still unknown. Accordingly, the aims of the present study were (1 to analyze which cells express GPx-1 within atherosclerotic lesions and (2 to determine whether a lack of GPx-1 affects macrophage foam cell formation and cellular proliferation. Both in situ-hybridization and immunohistochemistry of lesions of the aortic sinus of ApoE(-/- mice after 12 weeks on a Western type diet revealed that both macrophages and - even though to a less extent - smooth muscle cells contribute to GPx-1 expression within atherosclerotic lesions. In isolated mouse peritoneal macrophages differentiated for 3 days with macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (MCSF, GPx-1 deficiency increased oxidized low density-lipoprotein (oxLDL induced foam cell formation and led to increased proliferative activity of peritoneal macrophages. The MCSF- and oxLDL-induced proliferation of peritoneal macrophages from GPx-1(-/-ApoE(-/- mice was mediated by the p44/42 MAPK (p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase, namely ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2, signaling pathway as demonstrated by ERK1/2 signaling pathways inhibitors, Western blots on cell lysates with primary antibodies against total and phosphorylated ERK1/2, MEK1/2 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2, p90RSK (p90 ribosomal s6 kinase, p38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK (stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and immunohistochemistry of mice atherosclerotic lesions with antibodies against phosphorylated ERK1/2, MEK1/2 and p90RSK. Representative effects of GPx-1 deficiency on both macrophage proliferation and

  4. Clinical and molecular diagnosis of a cartilage-hair hypoplasia with IGF-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Cortázar, Inma; Rodríguez De Ita, Julieta; Martín-Estal, Irene; Castorena, Fabiola; Aguirre, Gabriel A; García de la Garza, Rocío; Elizondo, Martha I

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia syndrome (CHH) is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterized by metaphyseal chondrodysplasia and characteristic hair, together with a myriad of other symptoms, being most common immunodeficiency and gastrointestinal complications. A 15-year-old Mexican male initially diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease and posterior immunodeficiency, presents to our department for genetic and complementary evaluation for suspected CHH. Physical, biochemical, and genetic studies confirmed CHH together with IGF-1 deficiency. For this reason, we propose IGF-1 replacement therapy for its well-known actions on hematopoiesis, immune function and maturation, and metabolism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. CMKLR1 deficiency maintains ovarian steroid production in mice treated chronically with dihydrotestosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mi; Huang, Chen; Wang, Yu-Fei; Ren, Pei-Gen; Chen, Li; Xiao, Tian-Xia; Wang, Bao-Bei; Pan, Yan-Fei; Tsang, Benjamin K; Zabel, Brian A; Ma, Bao-Hua; Zhao, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Jian V

    2016-02-19

    Elevated serum chemerin levels correlate with increased severity of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, the role of CMKLR1 signaling in ovarian biology under conditions of excess DHT remains unclear. In this study we compared the effects of continuous 90-day high dose DHT exposure (83.3 □g/day) on wild type and CMKLR1-deficient mice. DHT induced PCOS-like clinical signs in wild type mice as well as significant changes in the expression of hormone receptors, steroid synthesis enzymes, and BMPs and their receptors. In contrast, CMKLR1-deficient mice significantly attenuated DHT-induced clinical signs of PCOS and alterations in ovarian gene expression. To determine whether the BMP4 signaling pathway was involved in the pathogenic effects of CMKLR1 signaling in DHT-induced ovarian steroidogenesis, antral follicles were isolated from wild type and CMKLR1 knockout (KO) mice and treated in vitro with combinations of hCG, DHT, and BMP4 inhibitors. BMP4 inhibition attenuated the induction effects of hCG and DHT on estrogen and progesterone secretion in CMKLR1 KO mice, but not in WT mice, implicating the BMP4 signaling pathway in the CMKLR1-dependent response to DHT. In conclusion, CMKLR1 gene deletion attenuates the effects of chronic DHT treatment on ovarian function in experimental PCOS, likely via BMP4 signaling.

  6. Congenital IGF1 deficiency tends to confer protection against post-natal development of malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuerman, Rachel; Shevah, Orit; Laron, Zvi

    2011-04-01

    To investigate whether congenital IGF1 deficiency confers protection against development of malignancies, by comparing the prevalence of malignancies in patients with congenital (secondary) deficiency of IGF1 with the prevalence of cancer in their family members. Only patients with an ascertained diagnosis of either Laron syndrome (LS), congenital IGHD, congenital multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (cMPHD) including GH or GHRHR defect were included in this study. In addition to our own patients, we performed a worldwide survey and collected data on a total of 538 patients, 752 of their first-degree family members, of which 274 were siblings and 131 were further family members. We found that none of the 230 LS patients developed cancer and that only 1 out of 116 patients with congenital IGHD, also suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum, had a malignancy. Out of 79 patients with GHRHR defects and out of 113 patients with congenital MPHD, we found three patients with cancer in each group. Among the first-degree family members (most heterozygotes) of LS, IGHD and MPHD, we found 30 cases of cancer and 1 suspected. In addition, 31 malignancies were reported among 131 further relatives. Our findings bear heavily on the relationship between GH/IGF1 and cancer. Homozygous patients with congenital IGF1 deficiency and insensitivity to GH such as LS seem protected from future cancer development, even if treated by IGF1. Patients with congenital IGHD also seem protected.

  7. Partial absence of pleuropericardial membranes in Tbx18- and Wt1-deficient mice.

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    Julia Norden

    Full Text Available The pleuropericardial membranes are fibro-serous walls that separate the pericardial and pleural cavities and anchor the heart inside the mediastinum. Partial or complete absence of pleuropericardial membranes is a rare human disease, the etiology of which is poorly understood. As an attempt to better understand these defects, we wished to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms directing the separation of pericardial and pleural cavities by pleuropericardial membranes in the mouse. We found by histological analyses that both in Tbx18- and Wt1-deficient mice the pleural and pericardial cavities communicate due to a partial absence of the pleuropericardial membranes in the hilus region. We trace these defects to a persisting embryonic connection between these cavities, the pericardioperitoneal canals. Furthermore, we identify mesenchymal ridges in the sinus venosus region that tether the growing pleuropericardial membranes to the hilus of the lung, and thus, close the pericardioperitoneal canals. In Tbx18-deficient embryos these mesenchymal ridges are not established, whereas in Wt1-deficient embryos the final fusion process between these tissues and the body wall does not occur. We suggest that this fusion is an active rather than a passive process, and discuss the interrelation between closure of the pericardioperitoneal canals, lateral release of the pleuropericardial membranes from the lateral body wall, and sinus horn development.

  8. GLUT-1 DEFICIENCY: FROM PATHOPHYSILOGY AND GENETICS TO ABROAD CLINICAL SPECTRUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsov Todor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The classical GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS, De Vivo disease was described over 2 decades ago as a metabolic encephalopathy characterized by developmental delay, secondary microcephaly paroxysmal neurological symptoms (epilepsy and movement disorders. The biochemical parameters of this disease, used in diagnosis, are low levels of glucose in the cerebrospinal fluid, normal level of glucose in the blood and consequent low ratio of cerebrospinal fluid vs. blood glucose levels (<40-45%. So far, more than 200 cases of the classical GLUT-1 DS have been described in the literature. Genetic research demonstrated that this disease is caused by mutations in SLC2A1 gene coding for GLUT-1, a transporter of glucose across the blood brain barrier. Over the last few years the clinical spectrum of GLUT-1 deficiencywas expanded to include other rare diseases such as paroxysmal exertional dyskinesia and early-onset absence epilepsy, but also some more common diseases such as idiopathic generalised epilepsy (1-2%. GLUT-1 deficiency is an important pathophysiological basis of these diseases as early diagnosis (aided by DNA mutation testing and treatment (ketogenic diet could lead to improved disease outcomes.

  9. Akt1 deficiency diminishes skeletal muscle hypertrophy by reducing satellite cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Nobuki; Miyazaki, Mitsunori

    2018-02-14

    Skeletal muscle mass is determined by the net dynamic balance between protein synthesis and degradation. Although the Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent pathway plays an important role in promoting protein synthesis and subsequent skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the precise molecular regulation of mTOR activity by the upstream protein kinase Akt is largely unknown. In addition, the activation of satellite cells has been indicated as a key regulator of muscle mass. However, the requirement of satellite cells for load-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy is still under intense debate. In this study, female germline Akt1 knockout (KO) mice were used to examine whether Akt1 deficiency attenuates load-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy through suppressing mTOR-dependent signaling and satellite cell proliferation. Akt1 KO mice showed a blunted hypertrophic response of skeletal muscle, with a diminished rate of satellite cell proliferation following mechanical overload. In contrast, Akt1 deficiency did not affect the load-induced activation of mTOR signaling and the subsequent enhanced rate of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. These observations suggest that the load-induced activation of mTOR signaling occurs independently of Akt1 regulation and that Akt1 plays a critical role in regulating satellite cell proliferation during load-induced muscle hypertrophy.

  10. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase delays cellular senescence by upregulating SIRT1 activity and antioxidant gene expression in mouse cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaidizar, Fiqri D; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Kume, Akira; Sumizawa, Kyosuke; Kohno, Kenji; Matsui, Takaaki; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2017-12-01

    Senescent cells accumulate in tissues of aged animals and deteriorate tissue functions. The elimination of senescent cells from aged mice not only attenuates progression of already established age-related disorders, but also extends median lifespan. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD + salvage pathway, has shown a protective effect on cellular senescence of human primary cells. However, it still remains unclear how NAMPT has a protective impact on aging in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that primary mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells undergo progressive decline of NAMPT and NAD + contents during serial passaging before becoming senescent. Furthermore, we showed that constitutive Nampt over-expression increases cellular NAD + content and delays cellular senescence of MEF cells in vitro. We further found that constitutive Nampt over-expression increases SIRT1 activity, increases the expression of antioxidant genes, superoxide dismutase 2 and catalase and promotes resistance against oxidative stress. These findings suggest that Nampt over-expression in MEF cells delays cellular senescence by the mitigation of oxidative stress via the upregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 and catalase gene expressions by SIRT1 activation. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. The urinary excretion of orotic acid and orotidine, measured by an isotope dilution assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tax, W.J.M.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Schretlen, E.D.A.M.

    1978-01-01

    Unknown concentrations of orotic acid can be measured by competition with a known amount of [carboxyl- 14 C]orotic acid for reaction with a limiting amount of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate in the presence of orotate phosphoribosyltransferase and orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase. The dilution of the specific radioactivity in the product 14 CO 2 is a sensitive and accurate measure of the amount of orotic acid present in the sample. Orotidine can also be determined after hydrolytic cleavage to orotic acid. The method was used to measure orotic acid and orotidine in urine samples from newborns, healthy controls and patients with gout or deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase receiving allopurinol. Urinary excretion of orotic acid and orotidine in newborns was similar whether the infants were breast-fed or received milk powder. The excretion of orotidine was increased in all patients receiving allopurinol. After allopurinol administration orotic acid excretion was increased in gouty patients but close to normal values in patients with deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The results are discussed in relation to the mechanism by which allopurinol inhibits pyrimidine metabolism. (Auth.)

  12. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance.

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    Birgitte Holst

    Full Text Available Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1 as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of

  13. Genetic KCa3.1-deficiency produces locomotor hyperactivity and alterations in cerebral monoamine levels.

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    Kate Lykke Lambertsen

    Full Text Available The calmodulin/calcium-activated K(+ channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice.In the open field test, KCa3.1-deficiency increased horizontal activity, as KCa3.1(-/- mice travelled longer distances (≈145% of KCa3.1(+/+ and at higher speed (≈1.5-fold of KCa3.1(+/+. Working memory in the Y-maze was reduced by KCa3.1-deficiency. Motor coordination on the rotarod and neuromuscular functions were unchanged. In KCa3.1(-/- mice, HPLC analysis revealed that turn-over rates of serotonin were reduced in frontal cortex, striatum and brain stem, while noradrenalin turn-over rates were increased in the frontal cortex. Dopamine turn-over rates were unaltered. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels were unaltered. Intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg/kg of the KCa3.1/KCa2-activator SKA-31 reduced rearing and turning behavior in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice, while 30 mg/kg SKA-31 caused strong sedation in 50% of the animals of either genotypes. KCa3.1(-/- mice were hyperactive (≈+60% in their home cage and SKA-31-administration reduced nocturnal physical activity in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice.KCa3.1-deficiency causes locomotor hyperactivity and altered monoamine levels in selected brain regions, suggesting a so far unknown functional link of KCa3.1 channels to behavior and monoaminergic neurotransmission in mice. The tranquilizing effects of low-dose SKA-31 raise the possibility to use KCa3.1/KCa2 channels as novel pharmacological targets for the treatment of neuropsychiatric hyperactivity disorders.

  14. OPA1 deficiency promotes secretion of FGF21 from muscle that prevents obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renata Oliveira; Tadinada, Satya M; Zasadny, Frederick M; Oliveira, Karen Jesus; Pires, Karla Maria Pereira; Olvera, Angela; Jeffers, Jennifer; Souvenir, Rhonda; Mcglauflin, Rose; Seei, Alec; Funari, Trevor; Sesaki, Hiromi; Potthoff, Matthew J; Adams, Christopher M; Anderson, Ethan J; Abel, E Dale

    2017-07-14

    Mitochondrial dynamics is a conserved process by which mitochondria undergo repeated cycles of fusion and fission, leading to exchange of mitochondrial genetic content, ions, metabolites, and proteins. Here, we examine the role of the mitochondrial fusion protein optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) in differentiated skeletal muscle by reducing OPA1 gene expression in an inducible manner. OPA1 deficiency in young mice results in non-lethal progressive mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of muscle mass. Mutant mice are resistant to age- and diet-induced weight gain and insulin resistance, by mechanisms that involve activation of ER stress and secretion of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) from skeletal muscle, resulting in increased metabolic rates and improved whole-body insulin sensitivity. OPA1-elicited mitochondrial dysfunction activates an integrated stress response that locally induces muscle atrophy, but via secretion of FGF21 acts distally to modulate whole-body metabolism. © 2017 The Authors.

  15. Amplification of EDHF-type vasodilatations in TRPC1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Kjestine; Dubrovska, Galyna; Nielsen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    -deficient mice (TRPC1-/-). Experimental approach. Vascular responses were studied using pressure/wire-myography and intravital microscopy. We performed electrophysiological measurements, and confocal Ca(2+) imaging for studying K(Ca)-channel functions and Ca(2+)sparks. Key results. TRPC1-deficiency...... in carotid arteries produced a twofold augmentation of TRAM-34- and UCL1684-sensitive EDHF-type vasodilatations and of endothelial hyperpolarization to acetylcholine. NO-mediated vasodilatations were unchanged. TRPC1-/- exhibited enhanced EDHF-type vasodilatations in resistance-sized arterioles in vivo...... associated with reduced spontaneous tone. Endothelial IK(Ca)/SK(Ca)-type K(Ca) currents, smooth muscle cell Ca(2+) sparks and associated BK(Ca)-mediated spontaneous transient outward currents (STOC) were unchanged in TRPC1-/-. Smooth muscle contractility induced by receptor-operated Ca(2+) influx or Ca(2...

  16. Human RTEL1 deficiency causes Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome with short telomeres and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, Tangui; Jullien, Laurent; Touzot, Fabien; Schertzer, Michael; Gaillard, Laetitia; Perderiset, Mylène; Carpentier, Wassila; Nitschke, Patrick; Picard, Capucine; Couillault, Gérard; Soulier, Jean; Fischer, Alain; Callebaut, Isabelle; Jabado, Nada; Londono-Vallejo, Arturo; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Revy, Patrick

    2013-08-15

    Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS), a severe variant of dyskeratosis congenita (DC), is characterized by early onset bone marrow failure, immunodeficiency and developmental defects. Several factors involved in telomere length maintenance and/or protection are defective in HHS/DC, underlining the relationship between telomere dysfunction and these diseases. By combining whole-genome linkage analysis and exome sequencing, we identified compound heterozygous RTEL1 (regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1) mutations in three patients with HHS from two unrelated families. RTEL1 is a DNA helicase that participates in DNA replication, DNA repair and telomere integrity. We show that, in addition to short telomeres, RTEL1-deficient cells from patients exhibit hallmarks of genome instability, including spontaneous DNA damage, anaphase bridges and telomeric aberrations. Collectively, these results identify RTEL1 as a novel HHS-causing gene and highlight its role as a genomic caretaker in humans.

  17. HSulf-1 deficiency dictates a metabolic reprograming of glycolysis and TCA cycle in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Susmita; Roy, Debarshi; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Khurana, Ashwani; Chini, Eduardo; Yang, Lifeng; Baddour, Joelle; Stilles, Katherine; Padmabandu, Seth; Leung, Sam; Kalloger, Steve; Gilks, Blake; Lowe, Val; Dierks, Thomas; Hammond, Edward; Dredge, Keith; Nagrath, Deepak; Shridhar, Viji

    2015-10-20

    Warburg effect has emerged as a potential hallmark of many cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms that led to this metabolic state of aerobic glycolysis, particularly in ovarian cancer (OVCA) have not been completely elucidated. HSulf-1 predominantly functions by limiting the bioavailability of heparan binding growth factors and hence their downstream signaling. Here we report that HSulf-1, a known putative tumor suppressor, is a negative regulator of glycolysis. Silencing of HSulf-1 expression in OV202 cell line increased glucose uptake and lactate production by upregulating glycolytic genes such as Glut1, HKII, LDHA, as well as metabolites. Conversely, HSulf-1 overexpression in TOV21G cells resulted in the down regulation of glycolytic enzymes and reduced glycolytic phenotype, supporting the role of HSulf-1 loss in enhanced aerobic glycolysis. HSulf-1 deficiency mediated glycolytic enhancement also resulted in increased inhibitory phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) thus blocking the entry of glucose flux into TCA cycle. Consistent with this, metabolomic and isotope tracer analysis showed reduced glucose flux into TCA cycle. Moreover, HSulf-1 loss is associated with lower oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and impaired mitochondrial function. Mechanistically, lack of HSulf-1 promotes c-Myc induction through HB-EGF-mediated p-ERK activation. Pharmacological inhibition of c-Myc reduced HB-EGF induced glycolytic enzymes implicating a major role of c-Myc in loss of HSulf-1 mediated altered glycolytic pathway in OVCA. Similarly, PG545 treatment, an agent that binds to heparan binding growth factors and sequesters growth factors away from their ligand also blocked HB-EGF signaling and reduced glucose uptake in vivo in HSulf-1 deficient cells.

  18. Clinical features of Candidiasis in patients with inherited interleukin 12 receptor β1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouederni, Monia; Sanal, Ozden; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Tezcan, Ilhan; Dogu, Figen; Sologuren, Ithaisa; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Keser, Melike; Tanir, Gonul; Nieuwhof, Chris; Colino, Elena; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Levy, Jacov; Kutukculer, Necil; Aytekin, Caner; Herrera-Ramos, Estefanía; Bhatti, Micah; Karaca, Neslihan; Barbouche, Ridha; Broides, Arnon; Goudouris, Ekaterini; Franco, José Luis; Parvaneh, Nima; Reisli, Ismail; Strickler, Alexis; Shcherbina, Anna; Somer, Ayper; Segal, Anthony; Angel-Moreno, Alfonso; Lezana-Fernandez, José Luis; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Bobadilla-Del Valle, Miriam; Kachboura, Salem; Sentongo, Timothy; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 12Rβ1 (IL-12Rβ1)-deficient patients are prone to clinical disease caused by mycobacteria, Salmonella, and other intramacrophagic pathogens, probably because of impaired interleukin 12-dependent interferon γ production. About 25% of patients also display mucocutaneous candidiasis, probably owing to impaired interleukin 23-dependent interleukin 17 immunity. The clinical features and outcome of candidiasis in these patients have not been described before, to our knowledge. We report here the clinical signs of candidiasis in 35 patients with IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Most (n = 71) of the 76 episodes of candidiasis were mucocutaneous. Isolated oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) was the most common presentation (59 episodes, 34 patients) and was recurrent or persistent in 26 patients. Esophageal candidiasis (n = 7) was associated with proven OPC in 2 episodes, and cutaneous candidiasis (n = 2) with OPC in 1 patient, whereas isolated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC; n = 3) was not. Five episodes of proven invasive candidiasis were documented in 4 patients; 1 of these episodes was community acquired in the absence of any other comorbid condition. The first episode of candidiasis occurred earlier in life (median age±standard deviation, 1.5 ± 7.87 years) than infections with environmental mycobacteria (4.29 ± 11.9 years), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4 ± 3.12 years), or Salmonella species (4.58 ± 4.17 years) or other rare infections (3 ± 11.67 years). Candidiasis was the first documented infection in 19 of the 35 patients, despite the vaccination of 10 of these 19 patients with live bacille Calmette-Guérin. Patients who are deficient in IL-12Rβ1 may have candidiasis, usually mucocutaneous, which is frequently recurrent or persistent. Candidiasis may be the first clinical manifestation in these patients.

  19. Effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 deficiency or administration on the occurrence of acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Amitai, D; Laron, Z

    2011-08-01

    The role of growth hormone, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in the development of acne is incompletely understood. To study the effect of the absence of IGF-1 and its pharmacologic replacement on the occurrence of acne vulgaris. Laron syndrome (LS) is characterized by congenital IGF-1 deficiency. The study group consisted of 21 patients with classical LS, who underwent puberty: 13 (8 male, 5 female) untreated and under regular follow-up until age 20?48 years; and 8 (2 male, 6 female) treated with IGF-1 (70-200 μg/kg/day), including 6 adults (2 male, treated at age 14.5-29 years and 4 female, treated at age 30-37 years) and 2 adolescents (2 female, treated at age 3.5-16 years). The medical files were reviewed for occurrence of acne and the corresponding sex hormone levels, and the findings were compared between the treated and untreated patients. Puberty was delayed in all untreated patients. Only one patient had slight acne at age 22 years, when he reached full puberty. Among the 2 IGF-1 treated male patients, none acquired acne. Among the 6 treated female patients, 3 had signs of hyperandrogenism (oligo-amenorrhea) and acne during IGF-1 over-dosage. On reduction of the IGF-1 dose (to 50 μg/kg/day) or cessation of treatment, the acne disappeared in all 3 patients. This study demonstrates for the first time that serum IGF-1 deficiency prevents the occurrence of acne. The findings suggest that an interaction between IGF-1 and androgens is necessary for the development of acne. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  20. Delayed onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Olig1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Olig1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor that is essential for oligodendrogenesis and efficient remyelination. However, its role in neurodegenerative disorders has not been well-elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the effects of Olig1 deficiency on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. We show that the mean disease onset of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced EAE in Olig1(-/- mice is significantly slower than wide-type (WT mice (19.8 ± 2.2 in Olig1(-/- mice and 9.5 ± 0.3 days in WT mice. In addition, 10% of Olig1(-/- mice did not develop EAE by the end of the observation periods (60 days. The severity of EAE, the extent of demyelination, and the activation of microglial cells and astrocytes in spinal cords, were significantly milder in Olig1(-/- mice compared with WT mice in the early stage. Moreover, the visual function, as assessed by the second-kernel of multifocal electroretinograms, was better preserved, and the number of degenerating axons in the optic nerve was significantly reduced in Olig1(-/- mice. Interestingly, Olig1 deficiency had no effect on T cell response capability, however, it reduced the expression of myelin proteins such as MOG, myelin basic protein (MBP and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG. The expression of Olig2 remained unchanged in the optic nerve and brain, and it was reduced in the spinal cord of Olig1(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the Olig1 signaling pathways may be involved in the incidence rate and the severity of neurological symptoms in MS.

  1. Anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase: Binding determinants for 5'-phospho-alpha-d-ribosyl-1'-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and the implications for inhibitor design.

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    Evans, Genevieve L; Furkert, Daniel P; Abermil, Nacim; Kundu, Preeti; de Lange, Katrina M; Parker, Emily J; Brimble, Margaret A; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun

    2018-02-01

    Phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTs) bind 5'-phospho-α-d-ribosyl-1'-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and transfer its phosphoribosyl group (PRib) to specific nucleophiles. Anthranilate PRT (AnPRT) is a promiscuous PRT that can phosphoribosylate both anthranilate and alternative substrates, and is the only example of a type III PRT. Comparison of the PRPP binding mode in type I, II and III PRTs indicates that AnPRT does not bind PRPP, or nearby metals, in the same conformation as other PRTs. A structure with a stereoisomer of PRPP bound to AnPRT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) suggests a catalytic or post-catalytic state that links PRib movement to metal movement. Crystal structures of Mtb-AnPRT in complex with PRPP and with varying occupancies of the two metal binding sites, complemented by activity assay data, indicate that this type III PRT binds a single metal-coordinated species of PRPP, while an adjacent second metal site can be occupied due to a separate binding event. A series of compounds were synthesized that included a phosphonate group to probe PRPP binding site. Compounds containing a "bianthranilate"-like moiety are inhibitors with IC 50 values of 10-60μM, and K i values of 1.3-15μM. Structures of Mtb-AnPRT in complex with these compounds indicate that their phosphonate moieties are unable to mimic the binding modes of the PRib or pyrophosphate moieties of PRPP. The AnPRT structures presented herein indicated that PRPP binds a surface cleft and becomes enclosed due to re-positioning of two mobile loops. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased PRPP synthetase activity in cultured rat hepatoma cells containing mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene.

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    Graf, L H; McRoberts, J A; Harrison, T M; Martin, D W

    1976-07-01

    Nine independently derived clones of mutagenized rat hepatoma cells selected for resistance to 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) or 6-thioguanine (6-ThioG) have been isolated. Each has severely reduced catalytic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and seven of them possess significantly increased activities of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase. The degrees of elevations of PRPP synthetase activities do not correlate with the degrees of deficiencies of HPRT activities. The cells from one of these clones, 1020/12, posses 40% of the normal HPRT catalytic activity and overproduce purines. We have extensively examined the cells from this clone. Immunotration studies of 1020/12 cells indicate that there is a mutation in the structural gene for HPRT. Although they possess increased specific catalytic activities of the enzyme. PRPP synthetase, the catalytic parameters, heat stability, and isoelectric pH of PRPP synthetase from 1020/12 cells are indistinguishable from those of the enzyme from wild-type cells. The cause of purine overproduction by 1020/12 cells appears to be the elevated PRPP synthetase activity, rather than a PRPP "sparing" effect stemming from reduced HPRT activity. Support for this idea is provided by the observation that the complete loss of HPRT activity in a clone derived from 1020/12 cells does not further enhance the levels of PRPP synthetase or purine overproduction. We propose that the elevated levels of PRPP synthetase activity in these HPRT deficient cells result from a mutational event in the structural gene for HPRT, and that this causes the disruption of a previously undescribed regulatory function of this gene on the expression of the PRPP synthetase gene.

  3. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

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    Oosterveer Maaike H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/- mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and quantified lipogenic and lipolytic activities in fat tissues of CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice fed a high-fat (HF or a high-fat/fish oil (HF/FO diet as compared to animals receiving a low-fat chow diet. Comparison between HF diet and HF/FO diet allowed to investigate the influence of dietary fat quality on adipose tissue biology in relation to CB1 functioning. Results The adiposity-resistant phenotype of the CB1-/- mice was characterized by reduced fat mass and adipocyte size in HF and HF/FO-fed CB1-/- mice in parallel to a significant increase in energy expenditure as compared to CB1+/+ mice. The expression levels of adipocyte differentiation and proliferation markers were however maintained in these animals. Consistent with unaltered lipogenic gene expression, the fatty acid synthesis rates in adipose tissues from CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice were unchanged. Whole-body and adipose-specific lipoprotein lipase (LPL activities were also not altered in CB1-/- mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that protection against diet-induced adiposity in CB1-deficient mice is not related to changes in adipocyte function per se, but rather results from increased energy dissipation by oxidative and non-oxidative pathways.

  4. Biochemical phenotyping unravels novel metabolic abnormalities and potential biomarkers associated with treatment of GLUT1 deficiency with ketogenic diet.

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    Cappuccio, Gerarda; Pinelli, Michele; Alagia, Marianna; Donti, Taraka; Day-Salvatore, Debra-Lynn; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; De Giorgis, Valentina; Lunghi, Simona; Vari, Maria Stella; Striano, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kennedy, Adam D; Elsea, Sarah H

    2017-01-01

    Global metabolomic profiling offers novel opportunities for the discovery of biomarkers and for the elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms that might lead to the development of novel therapies. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is an inborn error of metabolism due to reduced function of glucose transporter type 1. Clinical presentation of GLUT1-DS is heterogeneous and the disorder mirrors patients with epilepsy, movement disorders, or any paroxysmal events or unexplained neurological manifestation triggered by exercise or fasting. The diagnostic biochemical hallmark of the disease is a reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/blood glucose ratio and the only available treatment is ketogenic diet. This study aimed at advancing our understanding of the biochemical perturbations in GLUT1-DS pathogenesis through biochemical phenotyping and the treatment of GLUT1-DS with a ketogenic diet. Metabolomic analysis of three CSF samples from GLUT1-DS patients not on ketogenic diet was feasible inasmuch as CSF sampling was used for diagnosis before to start with ketogenic diet. The analysis of plasma and urine samples obtained from GLUT1-DS patients treated with a ketogenic diet showed alterations in lipid and amino acid profiles. While subtle, these were consistent findings across the patients with GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet, suggesting impacts on mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, low levels of free carnitine were present suggesting its consumption in GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet. 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrylcarnitine, 3-methyladipate, and N-acetylglycine were identified as potential biomarkers of GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet. This is the first study to identify CSF, plasma, and urine metabolites associated with GLUT1-DS, as well as biochemical changes impacted by a ketogenic diet. Potential biomarkers and metabolic insights deserve further investigation.

  5. Mice with Sort1 deficiency display normal cognition but elevated anxiety-like behavior.

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    Ruan, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Chun-Rui; Li, Jia-Yi; Luo, Hai-Yun; Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to stressful life events plays a central role in the development of mood disorders in vulnerable individuals. However, the mechanisms that link mood disorders to stress are poorly understood. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has long been implicated in positive regulation of depression and anxiety, while its precursor (proBDNF) recently showed an opposing effect on such mental illnesses. P75(NTR) and sortilin are co-receptors of proBDNF, however, the role of these receptors in mood regulation is not established. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of sortilin in regulating mood-related behaviors and its role in the proBDNF-mediated mood abnormality in mice. We found that sortilin was up-regulated in neocortex (by 78.3%) and hippocampus (by 111%) of chronically stressed mice as assessed by western blot analysis. These changes were associated with decreased mobility in the open field test and increased depression-like behavior in the forced swimming test. We also found that sortilin deficiency in mice resulted in hyperlocomotion in the open field test and increased anxiety-like behavior in both the open field and elevated plus maze tests. No depression-like behavior in the forced swimming test and no deficit in spatial cognition in the Morris water maze test were found in the Sort1-deficient mice. Moreover, the intracellular and extracellular levels of mature BDNF and proBDNF were not changed when sortilin was absent in vivo and in vitro. Finally, we found that both WT and Sort1-deficient mice injected with proBDNF in lateral ventricle displayed increased depression-like behavior in the forced swimming test but not anxiety-like behaviors in the open field and elevated plus maze tests. The present study suggests that sortilin functions as a negative regulator of mood performance and can be a therapeutic target for the treatment of mental illness. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Commensal microbiota contributes to chronic endocarditis in TAX1BP1 deficient mice.

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    Satoko Nakano

    Full Text Available Tax1-binding protein 1 (Tax1bp1 negatively regulates NF-κB by editing the ubiquitylation of target molecules by its catalytic partner A20. Genetically engineered TAX1BP1-deficient (KO mice develop age-dependent inflammatory constitutions in multiple organs manifested as valvulitis or dermatitis and succumb to premature death. Laser capture dissection and gene expression microarray analysis on the mitral valves of TAX1BP1-KO mice (8 and 16 week old revealed 588 gene transcription alterations from the wild type. SAA3 (serum amyloid A3, CHI3L1, HP, IL1B and SPP1/OPN were induced 1,180-, 361-, 187-, 122- and 101-fold respectively. WIF1 (Wnt inhibitory factor 1 exhibited 11-fold reduction. Intense Saa3 staining and significant I-κBα reduction were reconfirmed and massive infiltration of inflammatory lymphocytes and edema formation were seen in the area. Antibiotics-induced 'germ free' status or the additional MyD88 deficiency significantly ameliorated TAX1BP1-KO mice's inflammatory lesions. These pathological conditions, as we named 'pseudo-infective endocarditis' were boosted by the commensal microbiota who are usually harmless by their nature. This experimental outcome raises a novel mechanistic linkage between endothelial inflammation caused by the ubiquitin remodeling immune regulators and fatal cardiac dysfunction.

  7. Heat shock transcription factor 1-deficiency attenuates overloading-associated hypertrophy of mouse soleus muscle.

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    Koya, Tomoyuki; Nishizawa, Sono; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Goto, Ayumi; Ikuta, Akihiro; Suzuki, Miho; Ohira, Tomotaka; Egawa, Tatsuro; Nakai, Akira; Sugiura, Takao; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Beppu, Moroe; Goto, Katsumasa

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs) in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on the left soleus was performed by cutting the distal tendons of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles for 4 weeks. The right muscle served as the control. Soleus muscles from both hindlimbs were dissected 2 and 4 weeks after the operation. Hypertrophy of soleus muscle in HSF1-null mice was partially inhibited, compared with that in wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice. Absence of HSF1 partially attenuated the increase of muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area of overloaded soleus muscle. Population of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells in HSF1-null mice was significantly less than that in wild-type mice following 2 weeks of overloading (pmuscle hypertrophy might be attributed to the greater and prolonged enhancement of IL-6 expression. HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response may, in part, play a key role in loading-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  8. Modeling Late-Onset Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease through BMI1 Deficiency

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    Anthony Flamier

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Late-onset sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most prevalent form of dementia, but its origin remains poorly understood. The Bmi1/Ring1 protein complex maintains transcriptional repression of developmental genes through histone H2A mono-ubiquitination, and Bmi1 deficiency in mice results in growth retardation, progeria, and neurodegeneration. Here, we demonstrate that BMI1 is silenced in AD brains, but not in those with early-onset familial AD, frontotemporal dementia, or Lewy body dementia. BMI1 expression was also reduced in cortical neurons from AD patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells but not in neurons overexpressing mutant APP and PSEN1. BMI1 knockout in human post-mitotic neurons resulted in amyloid beta peptide secretion and deposition, p-Tau accumulation, and neurodegeneration. Mechanistically, BMI1 was required to repress microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT transcription and prevent GSK3beta and p53 stabilization, which otherwise resulted in neurodegeneration. Restoration of BMI1 activity through genetic or pharmaceutical approaches could represent a therapeutic strategy against AD.

  9. Decay-accelerating factor 1 deficiency exacerbates Trypanosoma cruzi-induced murine chronic myositis.

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    Solana, María E; Ferrer, María F; Novoa, María Mercedes; Song, Wen-Chao; Gómez, Ricardo M

    2012-10-01

    Murine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) has been used to study the role of T-cells in the pathogenesis of human inflammatory idiopathic myositis. Absence of decay-accelerating factor 1 (Daf1) has been shown to enhance murine T-cell responses and autoimmunity. To determine whether Daf1 deficiency can exacerbate Tc-induced myositis, C57BL/6 DAF(+/+) and DAF(-/-) mice were inoculated with 5 × 10(4) trypomastigotes, and their morbidity, parasitemia, parasite burden, histopathology, and T-cell expansion were studied in the acute and chronic stages. DAF(-/-) mice had lower parasitemia and parasite burden but higher morbidity, muscle histopathology, and increased number of CD44(+) (activated/memory phenotype) splenic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells. An enhanced CD8(+) T-cell immune-specific response may explain the lower parasitemia and parasite burden levels and the increase in histopathological lesions. We propose that Tc-inoculated DAF(-/-) mice are a useful model to study T-cell mediated immunity in skeletal muscle tissues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. CALHM1 deficiency impairs cerebral neuron activity and memory flexibility in mice.

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    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Chang, Eric H; Frattini, Stephen A; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Adrien, Leslie; Strohl, Joshua J; Gibson, Elizabeth L; Ohmoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Huerta, Patricio T; Marambaud, Philippe

    2016-04-12

    CALHM1 is a cell surface calcium channel expressed in cerebral neurons. CALHM1 function in the brain remains unknown, but recent results showed that neuronal CALHM1 controls intracellular calcium signaling and cell excitability, two mechanisms required for synaptic function. Here, we describe the generation of Calhm1 knockout (Calhm1(-/-)) mice and investigate CALHM1 role in neuronal and cognitive functions. Structural analysis revealed that Calhm1(-/-) brains had normal regional and cellular architecture, and showed no evidence of neuronal or synaptic loss, indicating that CALHM1 deficiency does not affect brain development or brain integrity in adulthood. However, Calhm1(-/-) mice showed a severe impairment in memory flexibility, assessed in the Morris water maze, and a significant disruption of long-term potentiation without alteration of long-term depression, measured in ex vivo hippocampal slices. Importantly, in primary neurons and hippocampal slices, CALHM1 activation facilitated the phosphorylation of NMDA and AMPA receptors by protein kinase A. Furthermore, neuronal CALHM1 activation potentiated the effect of glutamate on the expression of c-Fos and C/EBPβ, two immediate-early gene markers of neuronal activity. Thus, CALHM1 controls synaptic activity in cerebral neurons and is required for the flexible processing of memory in mice. These results shed light on CALHM1 physiology in the mammalian brain.

  11. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 deficiency misguides venous thrombus resolution.

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    Kellermair, Joerg; Redwan, Bassam; Alias, Sherin; Jabkowski, Joerg; Panzenboeck, Adelheid; Kellermair, Lukas; Winter, Max P; Weltermann, Ansgar; Lang, Irene M

    2013-11-07

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) is involved in leukocyte migration and angiogenesis, which are key components of venous thrombus resolution. This study investigated the effect of PECAM-1 deficiency on thrombus resolution in FVB/n mice and the extent to which levels of soluble PECAM-1 (sPECAM-1) correlate with delayed thrombus resolution in humans after acute symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In a mouse stagnant flow venous thrombosis model Pecam-1(-/-) thrombi were larger, persisted for longer periods of time, and displayed attenuated macrophage invasion and decreased vessel formation in the presence of increased fibrosis. In humans, higher levels of truncated plasma sPECAM-1 possibly cleaved from cell surfaces, were found in patients with delayed thrombus resolution (assessed via duplex-based thrombus scoring) relative to those whose thrombi resolved (median, 25th/75th percentile): 92.5 (87.7/103.4) ng/mL vs 71.5 (51.1/81.0) ng/mL; P deep vein thrombus specimens stained positively with antibodies specific for the extracellular, but not the cytoplasmic domain of PECAM-1, consistent with accumulation of cleaved PECAM-1. Our data suggest a regulatory role of PECAM-1 in venous thrombus resolution and suggest a predictive value of sPECAM-1 for postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) after acute DVT.

  12. Sod1 deficiency reduces incubation time in mouse models of prion disease.

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    Shaheen Akhtar

    Full Text Available Prion infections, causing neurodegenerative conditions such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep and BSE in cattle are characterised by prolonged and variable incubation periods that are faithfully reproduced in mouse models. Incubation time is partly determined by genetic factors including polymorphisms in the prion protein gene. Quantitative trait loci studies in mice and human genome-wide association studies have confirmed that multiple genes are involved. Candidate gene approaches have also been used and identified App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 as affecting incubation times. In this study we looked for an association between App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 representative SNPs and prion disease incubation time in the Northport heterogeneous stock of mice inoculated with the Chandler/RML prion strain. No association was seen with App, however, significant associations were seen with Il1-r1 (P = 0.02 and Sod1 (P<0.0001 suggesting that polymorphisms at these loci contribute to the natural variation observed in incubation time. Furthermore, following challenge with Chandler/RML, ME7 and MRC2 prion strains, Sod1 deficient mice showed highly significant reductions in incubation time of 20, 13 and 24%, respectively. No differences were detected in Sod1 expression or activity. Our data confirm the protective role of endogenous Sod1 in prion disease.

  13. Irgm1-deficient mice exhibit Paneth cell abnormalities and increased susceptibility to acute intestinal inflammation.

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    Liu, Bo; Gulati, Ajay S; Cantillana, Viviana; Henry, Stanley C; Schmidt, Elyse A; Daniell, Xiaoju; Grossniklaus, Emily; Schoenborn, Alexi A; Sartor, R Balfour; Taylor, Gregory A

    2013-10-15

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory disorder of the intestine that has been linked to numerous susceptibility genes, including the immunity-related GTPase (IRG) M (IRGM). IRGs comprise a family of proteins known to confer resistance to intracellular infections through various mechanisms, including regulation of phagosome processing, cell motility, and autophagy. However, despite its association with CD, the role of IRGM and other IRGs in regulating intestinal inflammation is unclear. We investigated the involvement of Irgm1, an ortholog of IRGM, in the genesis of murine intestinal inflammation. After dextran sodium sulfate exposure, Irgm1-deficient [Irgm1 knockout (KO)] mice showed increased acute inflammation in the colon and ileum, with worsened clinical responses. Marked alterations of Paneth cell location and granule morphology were present in Irgm1 KO mice, even without dextran sodium sulfate exposure, and were associated with impaired mitophagy and autophagy in Irgm1 KO intestinal cells (including Paneth cells). This was manifested by frequent tubular and swollen mitochondria and increased LC3-positive autophagic structures. Interestingly, these LC3-positive structures often contained Paneth cell granules. These results suggest that Irgm1 modulates acute inflammatory responses in the mouse intestine, putatively through the regulation of gut autophagic processes, that may be pivotal for proper Paneth cell functioning.

  14. Effects of PARP-1 Deficiency on Th1 and Th2 Cell Differentiation

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    M. Sambucci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available T cell differentiation to effector Th cells such as Th1 and Th2 requires the integration of multiple synergic and antagonist signals. Poly(ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational modification of proteins catalyzed by Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs. Recently, many reports showed that PARP-1, the prototypical member of the PARP family, plays a role in immune/inflammatory responses. Consistently, its enzymatic inhibition confers protection in several models of immune-mediated diseases, mainly through an inhibitory effect on NF-κB (and NFAT activation. PARP-1 regulates cell functions in many types of immune cells, including dendritic cells, macrophages, and T and B lymphocytes. Our results show that PARP-1KO cells displayed a reduced ability to differentiate in Th2 cells. Under both nonskewing and Th2-polarizing conditions, naïve CD4 cells from PARP-1KO mice generated a reduced frequency of IL-4+ cells, produced less IL-5, and expressed GATA-3 at lower levels compared with cells from wild type mice. Conversely, PARP-1 deficiency did not substantially affect differentiation to Th1 cells. Indeed, the frequency of IFN-γ+ cells as well as IFN-γ production, in nonskewing and Th1-polarizing conditions, was not affected by PARP-1 gene ablation. These findings demonstrate that PARP-1 plays a relevant role in Th2 cell differentiation and it might be a target to be exploited for the modulation of Th2-dependent immune-mediated diseases.

  15. Metabolomics of the Wolfram Syndrome 1 Gene (Wfs1) Deficient Mice.

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    Porosk, Rando; Terasmaa, Anton; Mahlapuu, Riina; Soomets, Ursel; Kilk, Kalle

    2017-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome 1 is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness. Mutations in the WFS1 gene encoding the wolframin glycoprotein can lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein responses in cells, but the pathophysiology at whole organism level is poorly understood. In this study, several organs (heart, liver, kidneys, and pancreas) and bodily fluids (trunk blood and urine) of 2- and 6-month old Wfs1 knockout (KO), heterozygote (HZ), and wild-type (WT) mice were analyzed by untargeted and targeted metabolomics using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The key findings were significant perturbations in the metabolism of pancreas and heart before the onset of related clinical signs such as glycosuria that precedes hyperglycemia and thus implies a kidney dysfunction before the onset of classical diabetic nephropathy. The glucose use and gluconeogenesis in KO mice are intensified in early stages, but later the energetic needs are mainly covered by lipolysis. Furthermore, in young mice liver and trunk blood hypouricemia, which in time turns to hyperuricemia, was detected. In summary, we show that the metabolism in Wfs1-deficient mice markedly differs from the metabolism of WT mice in many aspects and discuss the future biological and clinical relevance of these observations.

  16. BACE1 Deficiency Causes Abnormal Neuronal Clustering in the Dentate Gyrus

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    Hailong Hou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACE1 is validated as Alzheimer's β-secretase and a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease. In examining BACE1-null mice, we discovered that BACE1 deficiency develops abnormal clusters of immature neurons, forming doublecortin-positive neuroblasts, in the developing dentate gyrus, mainly in the subpial zone (SPZ. Such clusters were rarely observed in wild-type SPZ and not reported in other mouse models. To understand their origins and fates, we examined how neuroblasts in BACE1-null SPZ mature and migrate during early postnatal development. We show that such neuroblasts are destined to form Prox1-positive granule cells in the dentate granule cell layer, and mainly mature to form excitatory neurons, but not inhibitory neurons. Mechanistically, higher levels of reelin potentially contribute to abnormal neurogenesis and timely migration in BACE1-null SPZ. Altogether, we demonstrate that BACE1 is a critical regulator in forming the dentate granule cell layer through timely maturation and migration of SPZ neuroblasts.

  17. A novel MCPH1 isoform complements the defective chromosome condensation of human MCPH1-deficient cells.

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    Ioannis Gavvovidis

    Full Text Available Biallelic mutations in MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly (MCPH with the cellular phenotype of defective chromosome condensation. MCPH1 encodes a multifunctional protein that notably is involved in brain development, regulation of chromosome condensation, and DNA damage response. In the present studies, we detected that MCPH1 encodes several distinct transcripts, including two major forms: full-length MCPH1 (MCPH1-FL and a second transcript lacking the six 3' exons (MCPH1Δe9-14. Both variants show comparable tissue-specific expression patterns, demonstrate nuclear localization that is mediated independently via separate NLS motifs, and are more abundant in certain fetal than adult organs. In addition, the expression of either isoform complements the chromosome condensation defect found in genetically MCPH1-deficient or MCPH1 siRNA-depleted cells, demonstrating a redundancy of both MCPH1 isoforms for the regulation of chromosome condensation. Strikingly however, both transcripts are regulated antagonistically during cell-cycle progression and there are functional differences between the isoforms with regard to the DNA damage response; MCPH1-FL localizes to phosphorylated H2AX repair foci following ionizing irradiation, while MCPH1Δe9-14 was evenly distributed in the nucleus. In summary, our results demonstrate here that MCPH1 encodes different isoforms that are differentially regulated at the transcript level and have different functions at the protein level.

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for IFNγR1 deficiency protects mice from mycobacterial infections.

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    Hetzel, Miriam; Mucci, Adele; Blank, Patrick; Nguyen, Ariane Hai Ha; Schiller, Jan; Halle, Olga; Kühnel, Mark-Philipp; Billig, Sandra; Meineke, Robert; Brand, Daniel; Herder, Vanessa; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Bange, Franz-Christoph; Goethe, Ralph; Jonigk, Danny; Förster, Reinhold; Gentner, Bernhard; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta; Schambach, Axel; Kalinke, Ulrich; Lachmann, Nico

    2018-02-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by severe infections caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria. Biallelic null mutations in genes encoding interferon gamma receptor 1 or 2 ( IFNGR1 or IFNGR2 ) result in a life-threatening disease phenotype in early childhood. Recombinant interferon γ (IFN-γ) therapy is inefficient, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has a poor prognosis. Thus, we developed a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy approach using lentiviral vectors that express Ifnγr1 either constitutively or myeloid specifically. Transduction of mouse Ifnγr1 -/- HSCs led to stable IFNγR1 expression on macrophages, which rescued their cellular responses to IFN-γ. As a consequence, genetically corrected HSC-derived macrophages were able to suppress T-cell activation and showed restored antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in vitro. Transplantation of genetically corrected HSCs into Ifnγr1 -/- mice before BCG infection prevented manifestations of severe BCG disease and maintained lung and spleen organ integrity, which was accompanied by a reduced mycobacterial burden in lung and spleen and a prolonged overall survival in animals that received a transplant. In summary, we demonstrate an HSC-based gene therapy approach for IFNγR1 deficiency, which protects mice from severe mycobacterial infections, thereby laying the foundation for a new therapeutic intervention in corresponding human patients. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Association of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT Gene Polymorphisms and of Serum NAMPT Levels with Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Chinese Population

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    Qingyu Dou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT has crucial roles for myocardial development, cardiomyocyte energy metabolism and cell death/survival by regulating NAD+-dependent sirtuin-1 (SIRT1 deacetylase. This study aimed to determine if the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the NAMPT gene may affect the susceptibility and prognosis for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM and to describe the association of serum NAMPT levels with clinical features of DCM. Three SNPs (rs61330082, rs2505568, and rs9034 were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in a case-control study of 394 DCM patients and 395 controls from China. Serum NAMPT levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The homozygote for the minor allele at rs2505568 and rs9034 could not be detected in this study. Rs9034 T allele and CT genotype were associated with increased DCM risk (OR: 1.63, 95% CI = 1.16–2.27, p = 0.005 and OR: 1.72, 95% CI = 1.20–2.50, p = 0.0027, respectively. Nominally significant decreased DCM risk was found to be associated with the A allele and AT genotype of rs2505568 (OR: 0.48, 95% CI = 0.35–0.67, p < 0.0001 and OR: 0.44, 95% CI = 0.31–0.62, p < 0.0001, respectively, but it should be interpreted with caution because of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in the control group. Of five haplotypes constructed, TAC (rs61330082-rs2505568-rs9034 was a protective haplotype to DCM (OR: 0.22, 95% CI = 0.13–0.39, p = 1.84 × 10−8. The Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that the rs9034 CT genotype (hazard ratio (HR: 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37–0.96, p = 0.03 was an independently multivariate predictor for longer overall survival in DCM patients. Serum NAMPT levels were significantly higher in the DCM group than controls (p < 0.0001 and gradually increased with the increase of New York Heart Association grade in DCM patients. However, there was a lack of association of the three

  20. Ehlers Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliotic type due to Lysyl Hydroxylase 1 deficiency in two children without congenital or early onset kyphoscoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Mancini, Grazia M. S.; Maugeri, Alessandra; Cobben, Jan M.

    2017-01-01

    We report two children with Ehlers Danlos, kyphoscoliotic type confirmed by Lysyl Hydroxylase 1 deficiency due to bi-allelic PLOD1 mutations (kEDS-PLOD1) who were initially thought to have either a diagnosis of classical EDS (cEDS) or a neuromuscular disorder due to absence of (congenital)

  1. Topography of brain glucose hypometabolism and epileptic network in glucose transporter 1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Cigdem Inan; Provenzano, Frank; Wang, Dong; Engelstad, Kristin; Hinton, Veronica; Yu, Julia; Tikofsky, Ronald; Ichese, Masonari; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2015-02-01

    (18)F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F FDG-PET) facilitates examination of glucose metabolism. Previously, we described regional cerebral glucose hypometabolism using (18)F FDG-PET in patients with Glucose transporter 1 Deficiency Syndrome (Glut1 DS). We now expand this observation in Glut1 DS using quantitative image analysis to identify the epileptic network based on the regional distribution of glucose hypometabolism. (18)F FDG-PET scans of 16 Glut1 DS patients and 7 healthy participants were examined using Statistical parametric Mapping (SPM). Summed images were preprocessed for statistical analysis using MATLAB 7.1 and SPM 2 software. Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed to validate SPM results. Visual analysis of the (18)F FDG-PET images demonstrated prominent regional glucose hypometabolism in the thalamus, neocortical regions and cerebellum bilaterally. Group comparison using SPM analysis confirmed that the regional distribution of glucose hypo-metabolism was present in thalamus, cerebellum, temporal cortex and central lobule. Two mildly affected patients without epilepsy had hypometabolism in cerebellum, inferior frontal cortex, and temporal lobe, but not thalamus. Glucose hypometabolism did not correlate with age at the time of PET imaging, head circumference, CSF glucose concentration at the time of diagnosis, RBC glucose uptake, or CNS score. Quantitative analysis of (18)F FDG-PET imaging in Glut1 DS patients confirmed that hypometabolism was present symmetrically in thalamus, cerebellum, frontal and temporal cortex. The hypometabolism in thalamus correlated with the clinical history of epilepsy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Acute hyperglycemia produces transient improvement in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Cigdem I; Engelstad, Kristin; Hinton, Veronica J; Ullner, Paivi; Koenigsberger, Dorcas; Leary, Linda; Wang, Dong; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1-DS) is characterized clinically by acquired microcephaly, infantile-onset seizures, psychomotor retardation, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and ataxia. The laboratory signature is hypoglycorrhachia. The 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed to assess cerebral function and systemic carbohydrate homeostasis during acute hyperglycemia, in the knowledge that GLUT1 is constitutively expressed ubiquitously and upregulated in the brain. Thirteen Glut1-DS patients completed a 5-hour OGTT. Six patients had prolonged electroencephalographic (EEG)/video monitoring, 10 patients had plasma glucose and serum insulin measurements, and 5 patients had repeated measures of attention, memory, fine motor coordination, and well-being. All patients had a full neuropsychological battery prior to OGTT. The glycemic profile and insulin response during the OGTT were normal. Following the glucose load, transient improvement of clinical seizures and EEG findings were observed, with the most significant improvement beginning within the first 30 minutes and continuing for 180 minutes. Thereafter, clinical seizures returned, and EEG findings worsened. Additionally, transient improvement in attention, fine motor coordination, and reported well-being were observed without any change in memory performance. This study documents transient neurological improvement in Glut1-DS patients following acute hyperglycemia, associated with improved fine motor coordination and attention. Also, systemic carbohydrate homeostasis was normal, despite GLUT1 haploinsufficiency, confirming the specific role of GLUT1 as the transporter of metabolic fuel across the blood-brain barrier. The transient improvement in brain function underscores the rate-limiting role of glucose transport and the critical minute-to-minute dependence of cerebral function on fuel availability for energy metabolism.

  3. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome with carbohydrate-responsive symptoms but without epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, Anne; Assmann, Birgit; Klepper, Joerg; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2011-12-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. The main symptoms are epilepsy, developmental delay, movement disorders, and deceleration of head circumference. A ketogenic diet has been shown to be effective in controlling epilepsy in GLUT1-DS. We report a female child (3 y 4 mo) who presented with delayed psychomotor development and frequent episodes of staggering, impaired vigilance, and vomiting that resolved promptly after food intake. Electroencephalography was normal. The cerebrospinal fluid-blood glucose ratio was 0.42 (normal ≥ 0.45). GLUT1-DS was confirmed by molecular genetic testing, which showed a novel de novo heterozygous mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (c.497_499delTCG, p.VAL166del). Before starting a ketogenic diet, the child's cognitive development was tested using the Snijders-Oomen Non-Verbal Intelligence Test, which revealed a heterogeneous intelligence profile with deficits in her visuomotor skills and spatial awareness. Her motor development was delayed. Three months after introducing a ketogenic diet, she showed marked improvement in speech and motor development, as tested by the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (manual dexterity 16th centile, ball skills 1st centile, static and dynamic balance 5th centile). This case demonstrates that GLUT1-DS should be investigated in individuals with unexplained developmental delay. Epilepsy is not a mandatory symptom. The ketogenic diet is also beneficial for non-epileptic symptoms in GLUT1-DS. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Ionizing radiation, inflammation, and their interactions in colon carcinogenesis in Mlh1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Takamitsu; Miyoshi-Imamura, Tomoko; Blyth, Benjamin J; Kaminishi, Mutsumi; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kito, Seiji; Tokairin, Yutaka; Tani, Shusuke; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko; Yoshimi, Naoki; Shimada, Yoshiya; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2015-03-01

    Genetic, physiological and environmental factors are implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Mutations in the mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) gene, one of the DNA mismatch repair genes, are a main cause of hereditary colon cancer syndromes such as Lynch syndrome. Long-term chronic inflammation is also a key risk factor, responsible for colitis-associated colorectal cancer; radiation exposure is also known to increase colorectal cancer risk. Here, we studied the effects of radiation exposure on inflammation-induced colon carcinogenesis in DNA mismatch repair-proficient and repair-deficient mice. Male and female Mlh1(-/-) and Mlh1(+/+) mice were irradiated with 2 Gy X-rays when aged 2 weeks or 7 weeks and/or were treated with 1% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days at 10 weeks old to induce mild inflammatory colitis. No colon tumors developed after X-rays and/or DSS treatment in Mlh1(+/+) mice. Colon tumors developed after DSS treatment alone in Mlh1(-/-) mice, and exposure to radiation prior to DSS treatment increased the number of tumors. Histologically, colon tumors in the mice resembled the subtype of well-to-moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of human Lynch syndrome. Immunohistochemistry revealed that expression of both p53 and β-catenin and loss of p21 and adenomatosis polyposis coli proteins were observed at the later stages of carcinogenesis, suggesting a course of molecular pathogenesis distinct from typical sporadic or colitis-associated colon cancer in humans. In conclusion, radiation exposure could further increase the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis induced by inflammation under the conditions of Mlh1 deficiency. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 modulates degeneration of the intervertebral disc after puncture in Bach 1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Ryo; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Kazuyoshi; Kamei, Naosuke; Nakamae, Toshio; Izumi, Bunichiro; Fujioka, Yuki; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2012-09-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is considered to be a major feature of low back pain. Furthermore, oxidative stress has been shown to be an important factor in degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis and is considered a cause of intervertebral disc degeneration. The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between oxidative stress and intervertebral disc degeneration using Broad complex-Tramtrack-Bric-a-brac and cap'n'collar homology 1 deficient (Bach 1-/-) mice which highly express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 protects cells from oxidative stress. Caudal discs of 12-week-old and 1-year-old mice were evaluated as age-related models. Each group and period, 5 mice (a total of 20 mice, a total of 20 discs) were evaluated as age-related model. C9-C10 caudal discs in 12-week-old Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice were punctured using a 29-gauge needle as annulus puncture model. Each group and period, 5 mice (a total of 60 mice, a total of 60 discs) were evaluated. The progress of disc degeneration was evaluated at pre-puncture, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-puncture. Radiographic, histologic and immunohistologic analysis were performed to compare between Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice. In the age-related model, there were no significant differences between Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice radiologically and histologically. However, in the annulus puncture model, histological scoring revealed significant difference at 8 and 12 weeks post-puncture. The number of HO-1 positive cells was significantly greater in Bach 1-/- mice at every period. The apoptosis rate was significantly lower at 1 and 2 weeks post-puncture in Bach 1-/- mice. Oxidative stress prevention may avoid the degenerative process of the intervertebral disc after puncture, reducing the number of apoptosis cells. High HO-1 expression may also inhibit oxidative stress and delay the process of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  6. TAP1-deficiency does not alter atherosclerosis development in Apoe-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kolbus

    Full Text Available Antigen presenting cells (APC have the ability to present both extra-cellular and intra-cellular antigens via MHC class I molecules to CD8(+ T cells. The cross presentation of extra-cellular antigens is reduced in mice with deficient Antigen Peptide Transporter 1 (TAP1-dependent MHC class I antigen presentation, and these mice are characterized by a diminished CD8(+ T cell population. We have recently reported an increased activation of CD8(+ T cells in hypercholesterolemic Apoe(-/- mice. Therefore, this study included TAP1-deficient Apoe(-/- mice (Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- to test the atherogenicity of CD8(+ T cells and TAP1-dependent cross presentation in a hypercholesterolemic environment. As expected the CD8(+ T cell numbers were low in Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- mice in comparison to Apoe(-/- mice, constituting ~1% of the lymphocyte population. In spite of this there were no differences in the extent of atherosclerosis as assessed by en face Oil Red O staining of the aorta and cross-sections of the aortic root between Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- and Apoe(-/- mice. Moreover, no differences were detected in lesion infiltration of macrophages or CD3(+ T cells in Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- compared to Apoe(-/- mice. The CD3(+CD4(+ T cell fraction was increased in Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- mice, suggesting a compensation for the decreased CD8(+ T cell population. Interestingly, the fraction of CD8(+ effector memory T cells was increased but this appeared to have little impact on the atherosclerosis development.In conclusion, Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- mice develop atherosclerosis equal to Apoe(-/- mice, indicating a minor role for CD8(+ T cells and TAP1-dependent antigen presentation in the disease process.

  7. Clinical Features of Candidiasis in Patients With Inherited Interleukin 12 Receptor β1 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouederni, Monia; Sanal, Ozden; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Tezcan, Ilhan; Dogu, Figen; Sologuren, Ithaisa; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Keser, Melike; Tanir, Gonul; Nieuwhof, Chris; Colino, Elena; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Levy, Jacov; Kutukculer, Necil; Aytekin, Caner; Herrera-Ramos, Estefanía; Bhatti, Micah; Karaca, Neslihan; Barbouche, Ridha; Broides, Arnon; Goudouris, Ekaterini; Franco, José Luis; Parvaneh, Nima; Reisli, Ismail; Strickler, Alexis; Shcherbina, Anna; Somer, Ayper; Segal, Anthony; Angel-Moreno, Alfonso; Lezana-Fernandez, José Luis; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Bobadilla-Del Valle, Miriam; Kachboura, Salem; Sentongo, Timothy; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background. Interleukin 12Rβ1 (IL-12Rβ1)–deficient patients are prone to clinical disease caused by mycobacteria, Salmonella, and other intramacrophagic pathogens, probably because of impaired interleukin 12–dependent interferon γ production. About 25% of patients also display mucocutaneous candidiasis, probably owing to impaired interleukin 23–dependent interleukin 17 immunity. The clinical features and outcome of candidiasis in these patients have not been described before, to our knowledge. We report here the clinical signs of candidiasis in 35 patients with IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Results. Most (n = 71) of the 76 episodes of candidiasis were mucocutaneous. Isolated oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) was the most common presentation (59 episodes, 34 patients) and was recurrent or persistent in 26 patients. Esophageal candidiasis (n = 7) was associated with proven OPC in 2 episodes, and cutaneous candidiasis (n = 2) with OPC in 1 patient, whereas isolated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC; n = 3) was not. Five episodes of proven invasive candidiasis were documented in 4 patients; 1 of these episodes was community acquired in the absence of any other comorbid condition. The first episode of candidiasis occurred earlier in life (median age±standard deviation, 1.5 ± 7.87 years) than infections with environmental mycobacteria (4.29 ± 11.9 years), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4 ± 3.12 years), or Salmonella species (4.58 ± 4.17 years) or other rare infections (3 ± 11.67 years). Candidiasis was the first documented infection in 19 of the 35 patients, despite the vaccination of 10 of these 19 patients with live bacille Calmette-Guérin. Conclusions. Patients who are deficient in IL-12Rβ1 may have candidiasis, usually mucocutaneous, which is frequently recurrent or persistent. Candidiasis may be the first clinical manifestation in these patients. PMID:24186907

  8. Cardiac dysfunction in Pkd1-deficient mice with phenotype rescue by galectin-3 knockout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbo, Bruno E.; Amaral, Andressa G.; Fonseca, Jonathan M.; de Castro, Isac; Salemi, Vera M.; Souza, Leandro E.; dos Santos, Fernando; Irigoyen, Maria C.; Qian, Feng; Chammas, Roger; Onuchic, Luiz F.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in myocardial wall texture stand out among ADPKD cardiovascular manifestations, in hypertensive and normotensive patients. To elucidate their pathogenesis, we analyzed the cardiac phenotype in Pkd1cond/cond:Nestincre (CYG+) cystic mice exposed to increased blood pressure, at 5–6 and 20–24 weeks of age, and Pkd1+/− (HTG+) noncystic mice at 5–6 and 10–13 weeks. Echocardiographic analyses revealed decreased myocardial deformation and systolic function in CYG+ and HTG+ mice, as well as diastolic dysfunction in older CYG+ mice, compared to their Pkd1cond/cond and Pkd1+/+ controls. Hearts from CYG+ and HTG+ mice presented reduced polycystin-1 expression, increased apoptosis and mild fibrosis. Since galectin-3 has been associated with heart dysfunction, we studied it as a potential modifier of the ADPKD cardiac phenotype. Double-mutant Pkd1cond/cond:Nestincre;Lgals3−/− (CYG−) and Pkd1+/−;Lgals3−/− (HTG−) mice displayed improved cardiac deformability and systolic parameters compared to single-mutants, not differing from their controls. CYG− and HTG− showed decreased apoptosis and fibrosis. Analysis of a severe cystic model (Pkd1V/V; VVG+) showed that Pkd1V/V;Lgals3−/− (VVG−) mice have longer survival, decreased cardiac apoptosis and improved heart function compared to VVG+. CYG− and VVG− animals showed no difference in renal cystic burden compared to CYG+ and VVG+ mice. Thus, myocardial dysfunction occurs in different Pkd1-deficient models and suppression of galectin-3 expression rescues this phenotype. PMID:27475230

  9. Niemann-Pick C1-deficient mice lacking sterol O-acyltransferase 2 have less hepatic cholesterol entrapment and improved liver function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Adam M; Jones, Ryan Dale; Repa, Joyce J; Turley, Stephen D

    2018-06-07

    Cholesteryl esters are generated at multiple sites in the body by sterol O-acyltransferase 1 (SOAT1) or sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) in various cell types, and lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) in plasma. Esterified cholesterol (EC) and triacylglycerol (TAG) contained in lipoproteins cleared from the circulation via receptor-mediated or bulk-phase endocytosis are hydrolyzed by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) within the late endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartment. Then, through the successive actions of Niemann-Pick C2 (NPC2) and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), unesterified cholesterol (UC) is exported from the E/L compartment to the cytosol. Mutations in either NPC1 or NPC2 lead to continuing entrapment of UC in all organs, resulting in multisystem disease which includes hepatic dysfunction and in some cases liver failure. These studies investigated primarily whether elimination of SOAT2 in NPC1-deficient mice impacted hepatic UC sequestration, inflammation, and transaminase activities. Measurements were made in 7 wk-old mice fed a low-cholesterol chow diet or one enriched with cholesterol starting 2 wk before study. In the chow-fed mice, NPC1:SOAT2 double knockouts, compared to their littermates lacking only NPC1, had 20% less liver mass, 28% lower hepatic UC concentrations, and plasma ALT and AST activities that were decreased by 48% and 36%, respectively. mRNA expression levels for several markers of inflammation were all significantly lower in the NPC1 mutants lacking SOAT2. The existence of a new class of potent and selective SOAT2 inhibitors provides an opportunity for exploring if suppression of this enzyme could potentially become an adjunctive therapy for liver disease in NPC1 deficiency.

  10. Reduced cellular DNA repair capacity after environmentally relevant arsenic exposure. Influence of Ogg1 deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, Jordi; Peremartí, Jana; Annangi, Balasubramnayam; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Repair ability under long-term exposure to arsenic was tested using the comet assay. • Effects were measured under Ogg1 wild-type and deficient backgrounds. • Exposed cells repair less efficiency the DNA damage induced by SA, KBrO 3 , MMA III or UVC radiation. • Oxidative damage and Ogg1 deficient background exacerbate repair deficiencies. • Overexpression of the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt acts as adaptive mechanism. - Abstract: Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminant known to affect millions of people worldwide. Our previous work demonstrated that chronic sub-toxic i-As concentrations were able to induce biologically significant levels of genotoxic and oxidative DNA damage that were strongly influenced by the Ogg1 genotype. In order to study the nature of the observed levels of damage and the observed differences between MEF Ogg1 +/+ and Ogg1 −/− genetic backgrounds, the genotoxic and oxidative DNA repair kinetics of 18-weeks exposed MEF cells were evaluated by the comet assay. Results indicate that MEF Ogg1 +/+ and Ogg1 −/− cells chronically exposed to i-As repair the DNA damage induced by arsenite, potassium bromide and UVC radiation less efficiently than control cells, being that observation clearly more pronounced in MEF Ogg1 −/− cells. Consequently, exposed cells accumulate a higher percentage of unrepaired DNA damage at the end of the repair period. As an attempt to eliminate i-As associated toxicity, chronically exposed MEF Ogg1 −/− cells overexpress the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt. This adaptive response confers cells a significant resistance to i-As-induced cell death, but at expenses of accumulating high levels of DNA damage due to their repair impairment. Overall, the work presented here evidences that i-As chronic exposure disrupts the normal cellular repair function, and that oxidative DNA damage—and Ogg1 deficiency—exacerbates this phenomenon. The

  11. Fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 deficiency sensitizes mice to the behavioral changes induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Keith W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between fractalkine (CX3CL1 and fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 regulate microglial activation in the CNS. Recent findings indicate that age-associated impairments in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 are directly associated with exaggerated microglial activation and an impaired recovery from sickness behavior after peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which an acute LPS injection causes amplified and prolonged microglial activation and behavioral deficits in CX3CR1-deficient mice (CX3CR1-/-. Methods CX3CR1-/- mice or control heterozygote mice (CX3CR1+/- were injected with LPS (0.5 mg/kg i.p. or saline and behavior (i.e., sickness and depression-like behavior, microglial activation, and markers of tryptophan metabolism were determined. All data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Systems General Linear Model procedures and were subjected to one-, two-, or three-way ANOVA to determine significant main effects and interactions. Results LPS injection caused a prolonged duration of social withdrawal in CX3CR1-/- mice compared to control mice. This extended social withdrawal was associated with enhanced mRNA expression of IL-1β, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO in microglia 4 h after LPS. Moreover, elevated expression of IL-1β and CD14 was still detected in microglia of CX3CR1-/- mice 24 h after LPS. There was also increased turnover of tryptophan, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain 24 h after LPS, but these increases were independent of CX3CR1 expression. When submitted to the tail suspension test 48 and 72 h after LPS, an increased duration of immobility was evident only in CX3CR1-/- mice. This depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-/- mice was associated with a persistent activated microglial phenotype in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Conclusions Taken together, these data indicate that a deficiency of CX3CR1

  12. Fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) deficiency sensitizes mice to the behavioral changes induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Interactions between fractalkine (CX3CL1) and fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) regulate microglial activation in the CNS. Recent findings indicate that age-associated impairments in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 are directly associated with exaggerated microglial activation and an impaired recovery from sickness behavior after peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which an acute LPS injection causes amplified and prolonged microglial activation and behavioral deficits in CX3CR1-deficient mice (CX3CR1-/-). Methods CX3CR1-/- mice or control heterozygote mice (CX3CR1+/-) were injected with LPS (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) or saline and behavior (i.e., sickness and depression-like behavior), microglial activation, and markers of tryptophan metabolism were determined. All data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Systems General Linear Model procedures and were subjected to one-, two-, or three-way ANOVA to determine significant main effects and interactions. Results LPS injection caused a prolonged duration of social withdrawal in CX3CR1-/- mice compared to control mice. This extended social withdrawal was associated with enhanced mRNA expression of IL-1β, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) in microglia 4 h after LPS. Moreover, elevated expression of IL-1β and CD14 was still detected in microglia of CX3CR1-/- mice 24 h after LPS. There was also increased turnover of tryptophan, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain 24 h after LPS, but these increases were independent of CX3CR1 expression. When submitted to the tail suspension test 48 and 72 h after LPS, an increased duration of immobility was evident only in CX3CR1-/- mice. This depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-/- mice was associated with a persistent activated microglial phenotype in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Conclusions Taken together, these data indicate that a deficiency of CX3CR1 is permissive to

  13. Trps1 deficiency inhibits the morphogenesis of secondary hair follicles via decreased Noggin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yujing [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan Wen Hua Xi Road 44, Jinan 250012 (China); Nakanishi, Masako; Sato, Fuyuki; Oikawa, Kosuke [First Department of Pathology, Wakayama Medical University School of Medicine, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan); Muragaki, Yasuteru, E-mail: ymuragak@wakayama-med.ac.jp [First Department of Pathology, Wakayama Medical University School of Medicine, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan); Zhou, Gengyin, E-mail: zhougy@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan Wen Hua Xi Road 44, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • The number of secondary hair follicles is reduced by half in Trps1 KO embryonic skin compared to wild-type skin. • Noggin expression is significantly decreased and BMP signaling is promoted in Trps1 KO embryonic skin. • Treatment with a Noggin or BMP inhibitor rescued the decreased number of hair follicles in Trps1 KO skin graft cultures. • Cell proliferation and apoptosis of the epidermis were normalized by Noggin treatment. - Abstract: A representative phenotype of patients with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is sparse hair. To understand the developmental defects of these patient’s hair follicles, we analyzed the development of hair follicles histologically and biochemically using Trps1 deficient (KO) mice. First, we compared the numbers of primary hair follicles in wild-type (WT) and KO embryos at different developmental stages. No differences were observed in the E14.5 skins of WT and KO mice. However, at later time points, KO fetal skin failed to properly develop secondary hair follicles, and the number of secondary hair follicles present in E18.5 KO skin was approximately half compared to that of WT skin. Sonic hedgehog expression was significantly decreased in E17.5 KO skin, whereas no changes were observed in Eda/Edar expression in E14.5 or E17.5 skins. In addition, Noggin expression was significantly decreased in E14.5 and E17.5 KO skin compared to WT skin. In parallel with the suppression of Noggin expression, BMP signaling was promoted in the epidermal cells of KO skins compared to WT skins as determined by immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated Smad1/5/8. The reduced number of secondary hair follicles was restored in skin graft cultures treated with a Noggin and BMP inhibitor. Furthermore, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis in KO skin was rescued by Noggin treatment. Taken together, we conclude that hair follicle development in Trps1 KO embryos is impaired directly or indirectly by decreased Noggin

  14. Reduced cellular DNA repair capacity after environmentally relevant arsenic exposure. Influence of Ogg1 deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Jordi; Peremartí, Jana; Annangi, Balasubramnayam [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); Marcos, Ricard, E-mail: ricard.marcos@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, ISCIII, Madrid (Spain); Hernández, Alba, E-mail: alba.hernandez@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, ISCIII, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Repair ability under long-term exposure to arsenic was tested using the comet assay. • Effects were measured under Ogg1 wild-type and deficient backgrounds. • Exposed cells repair less efficiency the DNA damage induced by SA, KBrO{sub 3}, MMA{sup III} or UVC radiation. • Oxidative damage and Ogg1 deficient background exacerbate repair deficiencies. • Overexpression of the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt acts as adaptive mechanism. - Abstract: Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminant known to affect millions of people worldwide. Our previous work demonstrated that chronic sub-toxic i-As concentrations were able to induce biologically significant levels of genotoxic and oxidative DNA damage that were strongly influenced by the Ogg1 genotype. In order to study the nature of the observed levels of damage and the observed differences between MEF Ogg1{sup +/+} and Ogg1{sup −/−} genetic backgrounds, the genotoxic and oxidative DNA repair kinetics of 18-weeks exposed MEF cells were evaluated by the comet assay. Results indicate that MEF Ogg1{sup +/+} and Ogg1{sup −/−} cells chronically exposed to i-As repair the DNA damage induced by arsenite, potassium bromide and UVC radiation less efficiently than control cells, being that observation clearly more pronounced in MEF Ogg1{sup −/−} cells. Consequently, exposed cells accumulate a higher percentage of unrepaired DNA damage at the end of the repair period. As an attempt to eliminate i-As associated toxicity, chronically exposed MEF Ogg1{sup −/−} cells overexpress the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt. This adaptive response confers cells a significant resistance to i-As-induced cell death, but at expenses of accumulating high levels of DNA damage due to their repair impairment. Overall, the work presented here evidences that i-As chronic exposure disrupts the normal cellular repair function, and that oxidative DNA damage—and Ogg1 deficiency

  15. Trps1 deficiency inhibits the morphogenesis of secondary hair follicles via decreased Noggin expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yujing; Nakanishi, Masako; Sato, Fuyuki; Oikawa, Kosuke; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Zhou, Gengyin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The number of secondary hair follicles is reduced by half in Trps1 KO embryonic skin compared to wild-type skin. • Noggin expression is significantly decreased and BMP signaling is promoted in Trps1 KO embryonic skin. • Treatment with a Noggin or BMP inhibitor rescued the decreased number of hair follicles in Trps1 KO skin graft cultures. • Cell proliferation and apoptosis of the epidermis were normalized by Noggin treatment. - Abstract: A representative phenotype of patients with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is sparse hair. To understand the developmental defects of these patient’s hair follicles, we analyzed the development of hair follicles histologically and biochemically using Trps1 deficient (KO) mice. First, we compared the numbers of primary hair follicles in wild-type (WT) and KO embryos at different developmental stages. No differences were observed in the E14.5 skins of WT and KO mice. However, at later time points, KO fetal skin failed to properly develop secondary hair follicles, and the number of secondary hair follicles present in E18.5 KO skin was approximately half compared to that of WT skin. Sonic hedgehog expression was significantly decreased in E17.5 KO skin, whereas no changes were observed in Eda/Edar expression in E14.5 or E17.5 skins. In addition, Noggin expression was significantly decreased in E14.5 and E17.5 KO skin compared to WT skin. In parallel with the suppression of Noggin expression, BMP signaling was promoted in the epidermal cells of KO skins compared to WT skins as determined by immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated Smad1/5/8. The reduced number of secondary hair follicles was restored in skin graft cultures treated with a Noggin and BMP inhibitor. Furthermore, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis in KO skin was rescued by Noggin treatment. Taken together, we conclude that hair follicle development in Trps1 KO embryos is impaired directly or indirectly by decreased Noggin

  16. Specificities and pH profiles of adenine and hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (nucleotide synthases) of the thermoacidophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Rasmussen, Mads Skytte

    2014-01-01

    Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine...... phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase), the protein product turned out to be a PRTase highly specific for adenine and we suggest that the reading frame should be renamed apT. The other reading frame SSO2424 (gpT-2) proved to be a true 6-oxopurine PRTase active with hypoxanthine, xanthine and guanine as substrates, and we.......5, while maximal activity with xanthine was observed at pH 7.5. We discuss likely reasons why SSO2341 in S. solfataricus and similar open reading frames in other Crenarchaeota could not be identified as genes encoding APRTase....

  17. Thrombospondin1 deficiency reduces obesity-associated inflammation and improves insulin sensitivity in a diet-induced obese mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhang Li

    Full Text Available Obesity is prevalent worldwide and is associated with insulin resistance. Advanced studies suggest that obesity-associated low-grade chronic inflammation contributes to the development of insulin resistance and other metabolic complications. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein that is up-regulated in inflamed adipose tissue. A recent study suggests a positive correlation of TSP1 with obesity, adipose inflammation, and insulin resistance. However, the direct effect of TSP1 on obesity and insulin resistance is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role of TSP1 in mediating obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance by using TSP1 knockout mice.Male TSP1-/- mice and wild type littermate controls were fed a low-fat (LF or a high-fat (HF diet for 16 weeks. Throughout the study, body weight and fat mass increased similarly between the TSP1-/- mice and WT mice under HF feeding conditions, suggesting that TSP1 deficiency does not affect the development of obesity. However, obese TSP1-/- mice had improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin sensitivity compared to the obese wild type mice. Macrophage accumulation and inflammatory cytokine expression in adipose tissue were reduced in obese TSP1-/- mice. Consistent with the local decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, systemic inflammation was also decreased in the obese TSP1-/- mice. Furthermore, in vitro data demonstrated that TSP1 deficient macrophages had decreased mobility and a reduced inflammatory phenotype.TSP1 deficiency did not affect the development of high-fat diet induced obesity. However, TSP1 deficiency reduced macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue and protected against obesity related inflammation and insulin resistance. Our data demonstrate that TSP1 may play an important role in regulating macrophage function and mediating obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. These data suggest that TSP1 may serve as a

  18. Transplantation of Gene-Edited Hepatocyte-like Cells Modestly Improves Survival of Arginase-1-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yan Sin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Progress in gene editing research has been accelerated by utilizing engineered nucleases in combination with induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology. Here, we report transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN-mediated reincorporation of Arg1 exons 7 and 8 in iPSCs derived from arginase-1-deficient mice possessing Arg1Δ alleles lacking these terminal exons. The edited cells could be induced to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (iHLCs in vitro and were subsequently used for transplantation into our previously described (Sin et al., PLoS ONE 2013 tamoxifen-inducible Arg1-Cre arginase-1-deficient mouse model. While successful gene-targeted repair was achieved in iPSCs containing Arg1Δ alleles, only minimal restoration of urea cycle function could be observed in the iHLC-transplanted mice compared to control mice, and survival in this lethal model was extended by up to a week in some mice. The partially rescued phenotype may be due to inadequate regenerative capacity of arginase-1-expressing cells in the correct metabolic zones. Technical hurdles exist and will need to be overcome for gene-edited iPSC to iHLC rescue of arginase-1 deficiency, a rare urea cycle disorder.

  19. 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1 deficiency elicits coordinated changes in lipid and mitochondrial metabolism in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vartanian

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress resulting from endogenous and exogenous sources causes damage to cellular components, including genomic and mitochondrial DNA. Oxidative DNA damage is primarily repaired via the base excision repair pathway that is initiated by DNA glycosylases. 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1 recognizes and cleaves oxidized and ring-fragmented purines, including 8-oxoguanine, the most commonly formed oxidative DNA lesion. Mice lacking the OGG1 gene product are prone to multiple features of the metabolic syndrome, including high-fat diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. Here, we report that OGG1-deficient mice also display skeletal muscle pathologies, including increased muscle lipid deposition and alterations in genes regulating lipid uptake and mitochondrial fission in skeletal muscle. In addition, expression of genes of the TCA cycle and of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are also significantly altered in muscle of OGG1-deficient mice. These tissue changes are accompanied by marked reductions in markers of muscle function in OGG1-deficient animals, including decreased grip strength and treadmill endurance. Collectively, these data indicate a role for skeletal muscle OGG1 in the maintenance of optimal tissue function.

  20. Endothelin-1-induced focal cerebral ischemia in the growth hormone/IGF-1 deficient Lewis Dwarf rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Mitschelen, Matthew; Toth, Peter; Ashpole, Nicole M; Farley, Julie A; Hodges, Erik L; Warrington, Junie P; Han, Song; Fung, Kar-Ming; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan; Sonntag, William E

    2014-11-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for cerebrovascular disease. Growth hormone (GH) and its anabolic mediator, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, decrease with advancing age and this decline has been shown to promote vascular dysfunction. In addition, lower GH/IGF-1 levels are associated with higher stroke mortality in humans. These results suggest that decreased GH/IGF-1 level is an important factor in increased risk of cerebrovascular diseases. This study was designed to assess whether GH/IGF-1-deficiency influences the outcome of cerebral ischemia. We found that endothelin-1-induced middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in a modest but nonsignificant decrease in cerebral infarct size in GH/IGF-1 deficient dw/dw rats compared with control heterozygous littermates and dw/dw rats with early-life GH treatment. Expression of endothelin receptors and endothelin-1-induced constriction of the middle cerebral arteries were similar in the three experimental groups. Interestingly, dw/dw rats exhibited reduced brain edema and less astrocytic infiltration compared with their heterozygous littermates and this effect was reversed by GH-treatment. Because reactive astrocytes are critical for the regulation of poststroke inflammatory processes, maintenance of the blood-brain barrier and neural repair, further studies are warranted to determine the long-term functional consequences of decreased astrocytic activation in GH/IGF-1 deficient animals after cerebral ischemia. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2014.

  1. Parkinson phenotype in aged PINK1-deficient mice is accompanied by progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in absence of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Gispert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is an adult-onset movement disorder of largely unknown etiology. We have previously shown that loss-of-function mutations of the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 (PTEN induced putative kinase 1 cause the recessive PARK6 variant of PD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Now we generated a PINK1 deficient mouse and observed several novel phenotypes: A progressive reduction of weight and of locomotor activity selectively for spontaneous movements occurred at old age. As in PD, abnormal dopamine levels in the aged nigrostriatal projection accompanied the reduced movements. Possibly in line with the PARK6 syndrome but in contrast to sporadic PD, a reduced lifespan, dysfunction of brainstem and sympathetic nerves, visible aggregates of alpha-synuclein within Lewy bodies or nigrostriatal neurodegeneration were not present in aged PINK1-deficient mice. However, we demonstrate PINK1 mutant mice to exhibit a progressive reduction in mitochondrial preprotein import correlating with defects of core mitochondrial functions like ATP-generation and respiration. In contrast to the strong effect of PINK1 on mitochondrial dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster and in spite of reduced expression of fission factor Mtp18, we show reduced fission and increased aggregation of mitochondria only under stress in PINK1-deficient mouse neurons. CONCLUSION: Thus, aging Pink1(-/- mice show increasing mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in impaired neural activity similar to PD, in absence of overt neuronal death.

  2. Uridine monophosphate synthetase enables eukaryotic de novo NAD+ biosynthesis from quinolinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McReynolds, Melanie R; Wang, Wenqing; Holleran, Lauren M; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2017-07-07

    NAD + biosynthesis is an attractive and promising therapeutic target for influencing health span and obesity-related phenotypes as well as tumor growth. Full and effective use of this target for therapeutic benefit requires a complete understanding of NAD + biosynthetic pathways. Here, we report a previously unrecognized role for a conserved phosphoribosyltransferase in NAD + biosynthesis. Because a required quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRTase) is not encoded in its genome, Caenorhabditis elegans are reported to lack a de novo NAD + biosynthetic pathway. However, all the genes of the kynurenine pathway required for quinolinic acid (QA) production from tryptophan are present. Thus, we investigated the presence of de novo NAD + biosynthesis in this organism. By combining isotope-tracing and genetic experiments, we have demonstrated the presence of an intact de novo biosynthesis pathway for NAD + from tryptophan via QA, highlighting the functional conservation of this important biosynthetic activity. Supplementation with kynurenine pathway intermediates also boosted NAD + levels and partially reversed NAD + -dependent phenotypes caused by mutation of pnc-1 , which encodes a nicotinamidase required for NAD + salvage biosynthesis, demonstrating contribution of de novo synthesis to NAD + homeostasis. By investigating candidate phosphoribosyltransferase genes in the genome, we determined that the conserved uridine monophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (UMPS), which acts in pyrimidine biosynthesis, is required for NAD + biosynthesis in place of the missing QPRTase. We suggest that similar underground metabolic activity of UMPS may function in other organisms. This mechanism for NAD + biosynthesis creates novel possibilities for manipulating NAD + biosynthetic pathways, which is key for the future of therapeutics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Pancreas-Specific Sirt1-Deficiency in Mice Compromises Beta-Cell Function without Development of Hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Andreia V; Bensellam, Mohammed; Wauters, Elke; Rees, Maxine; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Mawson, Amanda; Ly, Le Quan; Biankin, Andrew V; Wu, Jianmin; Laybutt, D Ross; Rooman, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) has been reported to be a critical positive regulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. The effects on islet cells and blood glucose levels when Sirt1 is deleted specifically in the pancreas are still unclear. This study examined islet glucose responsiveness, blood glucose levels, pancreatic islet histology and gene expression in Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice that have loss of function and loss of expression of Sirt1 specifically in the pancreas. We found that in the Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice, the relative insulin positive area and the islet size distribution were unchanged. However, beta-cells were functionally impaired, presenting with lower glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This defect was not due to a reduced expression of insulin but was associated with a decreased expression of the glucose transporter Slc2a2/Glut2 and of the Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (Glp1r) as well as a marked down regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones that participate in the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) pathway. Counter intuitively, the Sirt1-deficient mice did not develop hyperglycemia. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells were the only other islet cells affected, with reduced numbers in the Sirt1-deficient pancreas. This study provides new mechanistic insights showing that beta-cell function in Sirt1-deficient pancreas is affected due to altered glucose sensing and deregulation of the UPR pathway. Interestingly, we uncovered a context in which impaired beta-cell function is not accompanied by increased glycemia. This points to a unique compensatory mechanism. Given the reduction in PP, investigation of its role in the control of blood glucose is warranted.

  4. Pancreas-Specific Sirt1-Deficiency in Mice Compromises Beta-Cell Function without Development of Hyperglycemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia V Pinho

    Full Text Available Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1 has been reported to be a critical positive regulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. The effects on islet cells and blood glucose levels when Sirt1 is deleted specifically in the pancreas are still unclear.This study examined islet glucose responsiveness, blood glucose levels, pancreatic islet histology and gene expression in Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice that have loss of function and loss of expression of Sirt1 specifically in the pancreas.We found that in the Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice, the relative insulin positive area and the islet size distribution were unchanged. However, beta-cells were functionally impaired, presenting with lower glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This defect was not due to a reduced expression of insulin but was associated with a decreased expression of the glucose transporter Slc2a2/Glut2 and of the Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (Glp1r as well as a marked down regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones that participate in the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR pathway. Counter intuitively, the Sirt1-deficient mice did not develop hyperglycemia. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP cells were the only other islet cells affected, with reduced numbers in the Sirt1-deficient pancreas.This study provides new mechanistic insights showing that beta-cell function in Sirt1-deficient pancreas is affected due to altered glucose sensing and deregulation of the UPR pathway. Interestingly, we uncovered a context in which impaired beta-cell function is not accompanied by increased glycemia. This points to a unique compensatory mechanism. Given the reduction in PP, investigation of its role in the control of blood glucose is warranted.

  5. Pineal germinoma in a child with interferon-γ receptor 1 deficiency. case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taramasso, L; Boisson-Dupuis, S; Garrè, M L; Bondi, E; Cama, A; Nozza, P; Morana, G; Casanova, J L; Marazzi, M G

    2014-11-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFN-γR1) deficiency is one of the primary immunodeficiencies conferring Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease (MSMD). Some cases of neoplasms have been recently reported in patients with MSMD, underlying the already known link between immunodeficiency and carcinogenesis. We report the first case of intracranial tumour, i.e. pineal germinoma, in a 11-year-old patient with complete IFN-γR1 deficiency. The first clinical presentation of the genetic immunodeficiency dates back to when the child was aged 2 y and 10 mo, when he presented a multi-focal osteomyelitis caused by Mycobacterium scrofulaceum. The diagnosis of IFN-γR1 deficiency (523delT/523delT in IFNGR1 gene) was subsequently made. The child responded to antibiotic therapy and remained in stable clinical condition until the age of 11 years, when he started complaining of frontal, chronic headache. MRI revealed a solid pineal region mass lesion measuring 20 × 29 × 36 mm. Histological findings revealed a diagnosis of pineal germinoma. The patient received chemotherapy followed by local whole ventricular irradiation with boost on pineal site, experiencing complete remission, and to date he is tumor-free at four years follow-up. Four other cases of tumors have been reported in patients affected by MSMD in our knowledge: a case of Kaposi sarcoma, a case of B-cell lymphoma, a case of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and a case of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, in patients with MSMD, not only the surveillance of infectious diseases, but also that of tumors is important.

  6. Protein Kinase A Deregulation in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Impairs Working Memory in Murine Oligophrenin-1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Lei; Aime, Mattia; Laheranne, Emilie; Houbaert, Xander; El Oussini, Hajer; Martin, Christelle; Lepleux, Marilyn; Normand, Elisabeth; Chelly, Jamel; Herzog, Etienne; Billuart, Pierre; Humeau, Yann

    2017-11-15

    Classical and systems genetics have identified wide networks of genes associated with cognitive and neurodevelopmental diseases. In parallel to deciphering the role of each of these genes in neuronal or synaptic function, evaluating the response of neuronal and molecular networks to gene loss of function could reveal some pathophysiological mechanisms potentially accessible to nongenetic therapies. Loss of function of the Rho-GAP oligophrenin-1 is associated with cognitive impairments in both human and mouse. Upregulation of both PKA and ROCK has been reported in Ophn1 -/ y mice, but it remains unclear whether kinase hyperactivity contributes to the behavioral phenotypes. In this study, we thoroughly characterized a prominent perseveration phenotype displayed by Ophn1 -deficient mice using a Y-maze spatial working memory (SWM) test. We report that Ophn1 deficiency in the mouse generated severe cognitive impairments, characterized by both a high occurrence of perseverative behaviors and a lack of deliberation during the SWM test. In vivo and in vitro pharmacological experiments suggest that PKA dysregulation in the mPFC underlies cognitive dysfunction in Ophn1 -deficient mice, as assessed using a delayed spatial alternation task results. Functionally, mPFC neuronal networks appeared to be affected in a PKA-dependent manner, whereas hippocampal-PFC projections involved in SWM were not affected in Ophn1 -/y mice. Thus, we propose that discrete gene mutations in intellectual disability might generate "secondary" pathophysiological mechanisms, which are prone to become pharmacological targets for curative strategies in adult patients. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here we report that Ophn1 deficiency generates severe impairments in performance at spatial working memory tests, characterized by a high occurrence of perseverative behaviors and a lack of decision making. This cognitive deficit is consecutive to PKA deregulation in the mPFC that prevents Ophn1 KO mice to exploit a

  7. Inherited IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency in a Child With BCG Adenitis and Oral Candidiasis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Nevin; Güvenç, B Haluk; Deswarte, Caroline; Koksalan, Kaya; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta

    2017-11-01

    Tuberculosis is a major worldwide problem, and protection from it is achieved mainly by live attenuated bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine, which is capable of causing disease in immunocompromised host. Oral thrush is abnormal in healthy children, which suggests an underlying immunodeficiency. Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by a selective predisposition to weakly virulent Mycobacteria and Salmonella and also predisposition to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. Interleukin 12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) deficiency is the most common disease of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease, and to date only 50 IL-12Rβ1 deficient patients with clinical signs of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis have been reported. We report a 2.5-year-old daughter of consanguineous parents with both regional bacille Calmette-Guérin lymphadenitis and recurrent oral candidiasis carrying biallelic R175W mutation in the IL12RB1 gene, resulting in complete loss of expression of IL-12Rβ1. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bacille Calmette-Guérin lymphadenitis with concurrent oral candidiasis displaying such a mutation. New mutations and wide clinical diversities are the indisputable fact of populations with a high rate of consanguineous marriages. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Arginine Deprivation Inhibits the Warburg Effect and Upregulates Glutamine Anaplerosis and Serine Biosynthesis in ASS1-Deficient Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Charles Kremer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting defects in metabolism is an underutilized strategy for the treatment of cancer. Arginine auxotrophy resulting from the silencing of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1 is a common metabolic alteration reported in a broad range of aggressive cancers. To assess the metabolic effects that arise from acute and chronic arginine starvation in ASS1-deficient cell lines, we performed metabolite profiling. We found that pharmacologically induced arginine depletion causes increased serine biosynthesis, glutamine anaplerosis, oxidative phosphorylation, and decreased aerobic glycolysis, effectively inhibiting the Warburg effect. The reduction of glycolysis in cells otherwise dependent on aerobic glycolysis is correlated with reduced PKM2 expression and phosphorylation and upregulation of PHGDH. Concurrent arginine deprivation and glutaminase inhibition was found to be synthetic lethal across a spectrum of ASS1-deficient tumor cell lines and is sufficient to cause in vivo tumor regression in mice. These results identify two synthetic lethal therapeutic strategies exploiting metabolic vulnerabilities of ASS1-negative cancers.

  9. PNPLA1 Deficiency in Mice and Humans Leads to a Defect in the Synthesis of Omega-O-Acylceramides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grond, Susanne; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Dubrac, Sandrine; Kolb, Dagmar; Schmuth, Matthias; Fischer, Judith; Crumrine, Debra; Elias, Peter M.; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Lass, Achim; Radner, Franz P.W.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in PNPLA1 have been identified as causative for autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans and dogs. So far, the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we generated and characterized PNPLA1-deficient mice and found that PNPLA1 is crucial for epidermal sphingolipid synthesis. The absence of functional PNPLA1 in mice impaired the formation of omega-O-acylceramides and led to an accumulation of nonesterified omega-hydroxy-ceramides. As a consequence, PNPLA1-deficient mice lacked a functional corneocyte-bound lipid envelope leading to a severe skin barrier defect and premature death of newborn animals. Functional analyses of differentiated keratinocytes from a patient with mutated PNPLA1 demonstrated an identical defect in omega-O-acylceramide synthesis in human cells, indicating that PNPLA1 function is conserved among mammals and indispensable for normal skin physiology. Notably, topical application of epidermal lipids from wild-type onto Pnpla1-mutant mice promoted rebuilding of the corneocyte-bound lipid envelope, indicating that supplementation of ichthyotic skin with omega-O-acylceramides might be a therapeutic approach for the treatment of skin symptoms in individuals affected by omega-O-acylceramide deficiency. PMID:27751867

  10. Unravelling the potential of a new uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) from Arabidopsis thaliana in sensitizing HeLa cells towards 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sharmila; Sanpui, Pallab; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-10-01

    In silico studies with uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtUPRT) revealed its lower binding energies for uracil and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as compared to those of bacterial UPRT indicating the prospective of AtUPRT in gene therapy implications. Hence, AtUPRT was cloned and stably expressed in cervical cancer cells (HeLa) to investigate the effect of prodrug 5-FU on these transfected cancer cells. The treatment of AtUPRT-expressing HeLa (HeLa-UPP) cells with 5-FU for 72h resulted in significant decrease in cell viability. Moreover, 5-FU was observed to induce apoptosis and perturb mitochondrial membrane potential in HeLa-UPP cells. While cell cycle analysis revealed significant S-phase arrest as a result of 5-FU treatment in HeLa-UPP cells, quantitative gene expression analysis demonstrated simultaneous upregulation of important cell cycle related genes, cyclin D1 and p21. The survival fractions of non-transfected, vector-transfected and AtUPRT-transfected HeLa cells, following 5-FU treatment, were calculated to be 0.425, 0.366 and 0.227, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Polychlorinated biphenyl-induced VCAM-1 expression is attenuated in aortic endothelial cells isolated from caveolin-1 deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sung Gu; Eum, Sung Yong; Toborek, Michal; Smart, Eric; Hennig, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to environmental contaminants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is a critical mediator for adhesion and uptake of monocytes across the endothelium in the early stages of atherosclerosis development. The upregulation of VCAM-1 by PCBs may be dependent on functional membrane domains called caveolae. Caveolae are particularly abundant in endothelial cell membranes and involved in trafficking and signal transduction. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of caveolae in PCB-induced endothelial cell dysfunction. Primary mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs) isolated from caveolin-1-deficient mice and background C57BL/6 mice were treated with coplanar PCBs, such as PCB77 and PCB126. In addition, siRNA gene silencing technique was used to knockdown caveolin-1 in porcine vascular endothelial cells. In MAECs with functional caveolae, VCAM-1 protein levels were increased after exposure to both coplanar PCBs, whereas expression levels of VCAM-1 were not significantly altered in cells deficient of caveolin-1. Furthermore, PCB-induced monocyte adhesion was attenuated in caveolin-1-deficient MAECs. Similarly, siRNA silencing of caveolin-1 in porcine endothelial cells confirmed the caveolin-1-dependent VCAM-1 expression. Treatment of cells with PCB77 and PCB126 resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2), and pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 diminished the observed PCB-induced increase in monocyte adhesion. These findings suggest that coplanar PCBs induce adhesion molecule expression, such as VCAM-1, in endothelial cells, and that this response is regulated by caveolin-1 and functional caveolae. Our data demonstrate a critical role of functional caveolae in the activation and dysfunction of endothelial cells by coplanar PCBs.

  12. Anti-aging Effect of Transplanted Amniotic Membrane Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Premature Aging Model of Bmi-1 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chunfeng; Jin, Jianliang; Lv, Xianhui; Tao, Jianguo; Wang, Rong; Miao, Dengshun

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether transplanted amniotic membrane mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) ameliorated the premature senescent phenotype of Bmi-1-deficient mice, postnatal 2-day-old Bmi-1−/− mice were injected intraperitoneally with the second-passage AMSCs from amniotic membranes of β-galactosidase (β-gal) transgenic mice or wild-type (WT) mice labeled with DiI. Three reinjections were given, once every seven days. Phenotypes of 5-week-old β-gal+ AMSC-transplanted or 6-week-old DiI+ AMSC-transplanted Bmi-1−/− mice were compared with vehicle-transplanted Bmi-1−/− and WT mice. Vehicle-transplanted Bmi-1−/− mice displayed growth retardation and premature aging with decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis; a decreased ratio and dysmaturity of lymphocytic series; premature osteoporosis with reduced osteogenesis and increased adipogenesis; redox imbalance and DNA damage in multiple organs. Transplanted AMSCs carried Bmi-1 migrated into multiple organs, proliferated and differentiated into multiple tissue cells, promoted growth and delayed senescence in Bmi-1−/− transplant recipients. The dysmaturity of lymphocytic series were ameliorated, premature osteoporosis were rescued by promoting osteogenesis and inhibiting adipogenesis, the oxidative stress and DNA damage in multiple organs were inhibited by the AMSC transplantation in Bmi-1−/− mice. These findings indicate that AMSC transplantation ameliorated the premature senescent phenotype of Bmi-1-deficient mice and could be a novel therapy to delay aging and prevent aging-associated degenerative diseases. PMID:26370922

  13. Epiphyseal abnormalities, trabecular bone loss and articular chondrocyte hypertrophy develop in the long bones of postnatal Ext1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgariglia, Federica; Candela, Maria Elena; Huegel, Julianne; Jacenko, Olena; Koyama, Eiki; Yamaguchi, Yu; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2013-11-01

    Long bones are integral components of the limb skeleton. Recent studies have indicated that embryonic long bone development is altered by mutations in Ext genes and consequent heparan sulfate (HS) deficiency, possibly due to changes in activity and distribution of HS-binding/growth plate-associated signaling proteins. Here we asked whether Ext function is continuously required after birth to sustain growth plate function and long bone growth and organization. Compound transgenic Ext1(f/f);Col2CreERT mice were injected with tamoxifen at postnatal day 5 (P5) to ablate Ext1 in cartilage and monitored over time. The Ext1-deficient mice exhibited growth retardation already by 2weeks post-injection, as did their long bones. Mutant growth plates displayed a severe disorganization of chondrocyte columnar organization, a shortened hypertrophic zone with low expression of collagen X and MMP-13, and reduced primary spongiosa accompanied, however, by increased numbers of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous border. The mutant epiphyses were abnormal as well. Formation of a secondary ossification center was significantly delayed but interestingly, hypertrophic-like chondrocytes emerged within articular cartilage, similar to those often seen in osteoarthritic joints. Indeed, the cells displayed a large size and round shape, expressed collagen X and MMP-13 and were surrounded by an abundant Perlecan-rich pericellular matrix not seen in control articular chondrocytes. In addition, ectopic cartilaginous outgrowths developed on the lateral side of mutant growth plates over time that resembled exostotic characteristic of children with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses, a syndrome caused by Ext mutations and HS deficiency. In sum, the data do show that Ext1 is continuously required for postnatal growth and organization of long bones as well as their adjacent joints. Ext1 deficiency elicits defects that can occur in human skeletal conditions including trabecular bone loss

  14. Circulating IGF-1 deficiency exacerbates hypertension-induced microvascular rarefaction in the mouse hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex: implications for cerebromicrovascular and brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, Stefano; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Valcarcel-Ares, M Noa; Toth, Peter; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B; Ballabh, Praveen; Wei, Jeanne Y; Wren, Jonathan D; Ashpole, Nicole M; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Strong epidemiological and experimental evidence indicate that both age and hypertension lead to significant functional and structural impairment of the cerebral microcirculation, predisposing to the development of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and Alzheimer's disease. Preclinical studies establish a causal link between cognitive decline and microvascular rarefaction in the hippocampus, an area of brain important for learning and memory. Age-related decline in circulating IGF-1 levels results in functional impairment of the cerebral microvessels; however, the mechanistic role of IGF-1 deficiency in impaired hippocampal microvascularization remains elusive. The present study was designed to characterize the additive/synergistic effects of IGF-1 deficiency and hypertension on microvascular density and expression of genes involved in angiogenesis and microvascular regression in the hippocampus. To achieve that goal, we induced hypertension in control and IGF-1 deficient mice (Igf1 f/f  + TBG-Cre-AAV8) by chronic infusion of angiotensin II. We found that circulating IGF-1 deficiency is associated with decreased microvascular density and exacerbates hypertension-induced microvascular rarefaction both in the hippocampus and the neocortex. The anti-angiogenic hippocampal gene expression signature observed in hypertensive IGF-1 deficient mice in the present study provides important clues for subsequent studies to elucidate mechanisms by which hypertension may contribute to the pathogenesis and clinical manifestation of VCI. In conclusion, adult-onset, isolated endocrine IGF-1 deficiency exerts deleterious effects on the cerebral microcirculation, leading to a significant decline in cortical and hippocampal capillarity and exacerbating hypertension-induced cerebromicrovascular rarefaction. The morphological impairment of the cerebral microvasculature induced by IGF-1 deficiency and hypertension reported here, in combination with neurovascular uncoupling, increased

  15. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris, semiaquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens and terrestrial (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna eBarjau Perez-Milicua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens can hold their breath for about 30 sec. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia and reduced blood supply (ischemia to tissues. Production of adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa, are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal (n=11, semiaquatic (neotropical river otter (n=4 and terrestrial (domestic pig (n=11. Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX, inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP, adenosine 5’-monophosphate (AMP, adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP, ATP, guanosine 5’-diphosphate (GDP, guanosine 5’-triphosphate (GTP, and xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise, aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  16. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Smooth Muscle Cells Maintains Genome Integrity, Resists Aortic Medial Degeneration, and Is Suppressed in Human Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alanna; Nong, Zengxuan; Yin, Hao; O'Neil, Caroline; Fox, Stephanie; Balint, Brittany; Guo, Linrui; Leo, Oberdan; Chu, Michael W A; Gros, Robert; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2017-06-09

    The thoracic aortic wall can degenerate over time with catastrophic consequences. Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can resist and repair artery damage, but their capacities decline with age and stress. Recently, cellular production of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) has emerged as a mediator of cell vitality. However, a role for Nampt in aortic SMCs in vivo is unknown. To determine whether a Nampt-NAD + control system exists within the aortic media and is required for aortic health. Ascending aortas from patients with dilated aortopathy were immunostained for NAMPT, revealing an inverse relationship between SMC NAMPT content and aortic diameter. To determine whether a Nampt-NAD + control system in SMCs impacts aortic integrity, mice with Nampt -deficient SMCs were generated. SMC- Nampt knockout mice were viable but with mildly dilated aortas that had a 43% reduction in NAD + in the media. Infusion of angiotensin II led to aortic medial hemorrhage and dissection. SMCs were not apoptotic but displayed senescence associated-ß-galactosidase activity and upregulated p16, indicating premature senescence. Furthermore, there was evidence for oxidized DNA lesions, double-strand DNA strand breaks, and pronounced susceptibility to single-strand breakage. This was linked to suppressed poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity and was reversible on resupplying NAD + with nicotinamide riboside. Remarkably, we discovered unrepaired DNA strand breaks in SMCs within the human ascending aorta, which were specifically enriched in SMCs with low NAMPT. NAMPT promoter analysis revealed CpG hypermethylation within the dilated human thoracic aorta and in SMCs cultured from these tissues, which inversely correlated with NAMPT expression. The aortic media depends on an intrinsic NAD + fueling system to protect against DNA damage and premature SMC senescence, with relevance to human thoracic aortopathy. © 2017 American Heart

  17. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells: A preliminary study

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    Ivyna Pau Ni Bong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a malignancy of B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Our array-based comparative genomic hybridization findings revealed chromosomal gains at 7q22.3 and 1q42.3, where nicotinamide (NAM phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST genes are localized, respectively. This led us to further study the functions of these genes in myeloma cells. NAMPT is a key enzyme involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide salvage pathway, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. In contrast, little is known about the function of LYST in cancer. The expression of LYST is shown to affect lysosomal size, granule size, and autophagy in human cells. In this study, the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated silencing of NAMPT and LYST on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in RPMI 8226 myeloma cells. Transfection efficiencies were determined by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay, while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay. The NAMPT protein expression in siRNA-treated cells was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results showed that NAMPT and LYST were successfully knockdown by siRNA transfection (p < 0.05. NAMPT or LYST gene silencing significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in RPMI 8226 cells (p < 0.05. Silencing of NAMPT gene also decreased NAMPT protein levels (p < 0.01. Our study demonstrated that NAMPT and LYST play pivotal roles in the molecular pathogenesis of MM. This is the first report describing the possible functions of LYST in myelomagenesis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in MM.

  18. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Ivyna Pau Ni; Ng, Ching Ching; Fakiruddin, Shaik Kamal; Lim, Moon Nian; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Our array-based comparative genomic hybridization findings revealed chromosomal gains at 7q22.3 and 1q42.3, where nicotinamide (NAM) phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) genes are localized, respectively. This led us to further study the fprotein expression in unctions of these genes in myeloma cells. NAMPT is a key enzyme involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide salvage pathway, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. In contrast, little is known about the function of LYST in cancer. The expression of LYST is shown to affect lysosomal size, granule size, and autophagy in human cells. In this study, the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of NAMPT and LYST on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in RPMI 8226 myeloma cells. Transfection efficiencies were determined by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay, while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay. The NAMPT protein expression in siRNA-treated cells was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results showed that NAMPT and LYST were successfully knockdown by siRNA transfection (p < 0.05). NAMPT or LYST gene silencing significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in RPMI 8226 cells (p < 0.05). Silencing of NAMPT gene also decreased NAMPT protein levels (p < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that NAMPT and LYST play pivotal roles in the molecular pathogenesis of MM. This is the first report describing the possible functions of LYST in myelomagenesis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in MM. PMID:27754828

  19. PGM1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voermans, N C; Preisler, N; Madsen, K L

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in PGM1 (phosphoglucomutase 1) cause Glycogen Storage Disease type XIV, which is also a congenital disorder of protein N-glycosylation. It presents throughout life as myopathy with additional systemic symptoms. We report the effect of oral galactose treatment during five months in a pat...

  20. In a model of Batten disease, palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 deficiency is associated with brown adipose tissue and thermoregulation abnormalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfia Khaibullina

    Full Text Available Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a deficiency of palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1. We have previously shown that children with INCL have increased risk of hypothermia during anesthesia and that PPT1-deficiency in mice is associated with disruption of adaptive energy metabolism, downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we hypothesized that Ppt1-knockout mice, a well-studied model of INCL that shows many of the neurologic manifestations of the disease, would recapitulate the thermoregulation impairment observed in children with INCL. We also hypothesized that when exposed to cold, Ppt1-knockout mice would be unable to maintain body temperature as in mice thermogenesis requires upregulation of Pgc-1α and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp-1 in brown adipose tissue. We found that the Ppt1-KO mice had lower basal body temperature as they aged and developed hypothermia during cold exposure. Surprisingly, this inability to maintain body temperature during cold exposure in Ppt1-KO mice was associated with an adequate upregulation of Pgc-1α and Ucp-1 but with lower levels of sympathetic neurotransmitters in brown adipose tissue. In addition, during baseline conditions, brown adipose tissue of Ppt1-KO mice had less vacuolization (lipid droplets compared to wild-type animals. After cold stress, wild-type animals had significant decreases whereas Ppt1-KO had insignificant changes in lipid droplets compared with baseline measurements, thus suggesting that Ppt1-KO had less lipolysis in response to cold stress. These results uncover a previously unknown phenotype associated with PPT1 deficiency, that of altered thermoregulation, which is associated with impaired lipolysis and neurotransmitter release to brown adipose tissue during cold exposure. These findings suggest that INCL should be added to the list of

  1. GRAF1 deficiency blunts sarcolemmal injury repair and exacerbates cardiac and skeletal muscle pathology in dystrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Kaitlin C; O'Neill, Thomas J; Cheng, Zhaokang; Dee, Rachel; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Li, Jianbin; Xiao, Xiao; McNally, Elizabeth M; Mack, Christopher P; Taylor, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    The plasma membranes of striated muscle cells are particularly susceptible to rupture as they endure significant mechanical stress and strain during muscle contraction, and studies have shown that defects in membrane repair can contribute to the progression of muscular dystrophy. The synaptotagmin-related protein, dysferlin, has been implicated in mediating rapid membrane repair through its ability to direct intracellular vesicles to sites of membrane injury. However, further work is required to identify the precise molecular mechanisms that govern dysferlin targeting and membrane repair. We previously showed that the bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR)-pleckstrin homology (PH) domain containing Rho-GAP GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase-1 (GRAF1) was dynamically recruited to the tips of fusing myoblasts wherein it promoted membrane merging by facilitating ferlin-dependent capturing of intracellular vesicles. Because acute membrane repair responses involve similar vesicle trafficking complexes/events and because our prior studies in GRAF1-deficient tadpoles revealed a putative role for GRAF1 in maintaining muscle membrane integrity, we postulated that GRAF1 might also play an important role in facilitating dysferlin-dependent plasma membrane repair. We used an in vitro laser-injury model to test whether GRAF1 was necessary for efficient muscle membrane repair. We also generated dystrophin/GRAF1 doubledeficient mice by breeding mdx mice with GRAF1 hypomorphic mice. Evans blue dye uptake and extensive morphometric analyses were used to assess sarcolemmal integrity and related pathologies in cardiac and skeletal muscles isolated from these mice. Herein, we show that GRAF1 is dynamically recruited to damaged skeletal and cardiac muscle plasma membranes and that GRAF1-depleted muscle cells have reduced membrane healing abilities. Moreover, we show that dystrophin depletion exacerbated muscle damage in GRAF1-deficient mice and that mice with dystrophin/GRAF1

  2. Mechanisms Underlying Testicular Damage and Dysfunction in Mice With Partial IGF-1 Deficiency and the Effectiveness of IGF-1 Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Cortázar, Inma; Gago, Alberto; Muñoz, Úrsula; Ávila-Gallego, Elena; Guerra-Menéndez, Lucía; Sádaba, María Cruz; García-Magariño, Mariano; Olleros Santos-Ruiz, María; Aguirre, G A; Puche, Juan Enrique

    2015-12-01

    To determine whether insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) deficiency can cause testicular damage and to examine changes of the testicular morphology and testicular function-related gene expression caused by IGF-1 deficiency. Therefore, this study aims to determine the benefits of low doses of IGF-1 and to explore the mechanisms underlying the IGF-1 replacement therapy. A murine model of IGF-1 deficiency was used to avoid any factor that could contribute to testicular damage. Testicular weight, score of histopathological damage, and gene expressions were studied in 3 experimental groups of mice: controls (wild-type Igf1(+/+)), heterozygous Igf1(+/-) with partial IGF-1 deficiency, and heterozygous Igf1(+/-) treated with IGF-1. Results show that the partial IGF-1 deficiency induced testicular damage and altered expression of genes involved in IGF-1 and growth hormone signaling and regulation, testicular hormonal function, extracellular matrix establishment and its regulation, angiogenesis, fibrogenesis, inflammation, and cytoprotection. In addition, proteins involved in tight junction expression were found to be reduced. However, low doses of IGF-1 restored the testicular damage and most of these parameters. IGF-1 deficiency caused the damage of the blood-testis barrier and testicular structure and induced the abnormal testicular function-related gene expressions. However, low doses of IGF-1 constitute an effective replacement therapy that restores the described testicular damage. Data herein show that (1) cytoprotective activities of IGF-1 seem to be mediated by heat shock proteins and that (2) connective tissue growth factor could play a relevant role together with IGF-1 in the extracellular matrix establishment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeting CPS1 in the treatment of Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) deficiency, a urea cycle disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Fernandez, Carmen; Häberle, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) deficiency (CPS1D) is a rare autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder (UCD), which can lead to life-threatening hyperammonemia. Unless promptly treated, it can result in encephalopathy, coma and death, or intellectual disability in surviving patients. Over recent decades, therapies for CPS1D have barely improved leaving the management of these patients largely unchanged. Additionally, in many cases, current management (protein-restriction and supplementation with citrulline and/or arginine and ammonia scavengers) is insufficient for achieving metabolic stability, highlighting the importance of developing alternative therapeutic approaches. Areas covered: After describing UCDs and CPS1D, we give an overview of the structure- function of CPS1. We then describe current management and potential novel treatments including N-carbamoyl-L-glutamate (NCG), pharmacological chaperones, and gene therapy to treat hyperammonemia. Expert opinion: Probably, the first novel CPS1D therapies to reach the clinics will be the already commercial substance NCG, which is the standard treatment for N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency and has been proven to rescue specific CPS1D mutations. Pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy are under development too, but these two technologies still have key challenges to be overcome. In addition, current experimental therapies will hopefully add further treatment options.

  4. Decreased in vitro mitochondrial function is associated with enhanced brain metabolism, blood flow, and memory in Surf1-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Pulliam, Daniel A; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S; Halloran, Jonathan J; Hussong, Stacy A; Burbank, Raquel R; Bresnen, Andrew; Liu, Yuhong; Podlutskaya, Natalia; Soundararajan, Anuradha; Muir, Eric; Duong, Timothy Q; Bokov, Alex F; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Richardson, Arlan G; Van Remmen, Holly; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have challenged the prevailing view that reduced mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress are correlated with reduced longevity. Mice carrying a homozygous knockout (KO) of the Surf1 gene showed a significant decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain Complex IV activity, yet displayed increased lifespan and reduced brain damage after excitotoxic insults. In the present study, we examined brain metabolism, brain hemodynamics, and memory of Surf1 KO mice using in vitro measures of mitochondrial function, in vivo neuroimaging, and behavioral testing. We show that decreased respiration and increased generation of hydrogen peroxide in isolated Surf1 KO brain mitochondria are associated with increased brain glucose metabolism, cerebral blood flow, and lactate levels, and with enhanced memory in Surf1 KO mice. These metabolic and functional changes in Surf1 KO brains were accompanied by higher levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha, and by increases in the activated form of cyclic AMP response element-binding factor, which is integral to memory formation. These findings suggest that Surf1 deficiency-induced metabolic alterations may have positive effects on brain function. Exploring the relationship between mitochondrial activity, oxidative stress, and brain function will enhance our understanding of cognitive aging and of age-related neurologic disorders. PMID:23838831

  5. Activated Fps/Fes partially rescues the in vivo developmental potential of Flk1-deficient vascular progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Jody J; Ema, Masatsugu; Haigh, Katharina; Gertsenstein, Marina; Greer, Peter; Rossant, Janet; Nagy, Andras; Wagner, Erwin F

    2004-02-01

    Relatively little is known about the modulators of the vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A)/Flk1 signaling cascade. To functionally characterize this pathway, VEGF-A stimulation of endothelial cells was performed. VEGF-A-mediated Flk1 activation resulted in increased translocation of the endogenous Fps/Fes cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase to the plasma membrane and increased tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting a role for Fps/Fes in VEGF-A/Flk1 signaling events. Addition of a myristoylation consensus sequence to Fps/Fes resulted in VEGF-A-independent membrane localization of Fps/Fes in endothelial cells. Expression of the activated Fps/Fes protein in Flk1-deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells rescued their contribution to the developing vascular endothelium in vivo by using ES cell-derived chimeras. Activated Fps/Fes contributed to this rescue event by restoring the migratory potential to Flk1 null progenitors, which is required for movement of hemangioblasts from the primitive streak region into the yolk sac proper. Activated Fps/Fes in the presence of Flk1 increased the number of hemangioblast colonies in vitro and increased the number of mesodermal progenitors in vivo. These results suggest that Fps/Fes may act synergistically with Flk1 to modulate hemangioblast differentiation into the endothelium. We have also demonstrated that activated Fps/Fes causes hemangioma formation in vivo, independently of Flk1, as a result of increasing vascular progenitor density.

  6. CX3CR1 deficiency alters hippocampal-dependent plasticity phenomena blunting the effects of enriched environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eMaggi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years several evidence demonstrated that some features of hippocampal biology, like neurogenesis, synaptic transmission, learning and memory performances are deeply modulated by social, motor and sensorial experiences. Fractalkine/CX3CL1 is a transmembrane chemokine abundantly expressed in the brain by neurons, where it modulates glutamatergic transmission and long-term plasticity processes regulating the intercellular communication between glia and neurons, being its specific receptor CX3CR1 expressed by microglia. In this paper we investigated the role of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling on experience-dependent hippocampal plasticity processes. At this aim wt and CX3CR1GFP/GFP mice were exposed to long-lasting-enriched environment (EE and the effects on hippocampal functions were studied by electrophysiological recordings of long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic activity, behavioral tests of learning and memory in the Morris water maze paradigm and analysis of neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG.We found that CX3CR1 deficiency increases hippocampal plasticity and spatial memory blunting the potentiating effects of EE. In contrast, exposure to EE increased the number and migration of neural progenitors in the DG of both wt and CX3CR1GFP/GFP mice. These data indicate that CX3CL1/CX3CR1-mediated signaling is crucial for a normal experience-dependent modulation of hippocampal functions.

  7. Impaired IFNγ-Signaling and Mycobacterial Clearance in IFNγR1-Deficient Human iPSC-Derived Macrophages

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    Anna-Lena Neehus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD is caused by inborn errors of interferon gamma (IFNγ immunity and is characterized by severe infections by weakly virulent mycobacteria. Although IFNγ is the macrophage-activating factor, macrophages from these patients have never been studied. We demonstrate the generation of heterozygous and compound heterozygous (iMSMD-cohet induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a single chimeric patient, who suffered from complete autosomal recessive IFNγR1 deficiency and received bone-marrow transplantation. Loss of IFNγR1 expression had no influence on the macrophage differentiation potential of patient-specific iPSCs. In contrast, lack of IFNγR1 in iMSMD-cohet macrophages abolished IFNγ-dependent phosphorylation of STAT1 and induction of IFNγ-downstream targets such as IRF-1, SOCS-3, and IDO. As a consequence, iMSMD-cohet macrophages show impaired upregulation of HLA-DR and reduced intracellular killing of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin. We provide a disease-modeling platform that might be suited to investigate novel treatment options for MSMD and to gain insights into IFNγ signaling in macrophages.

  8. Alterations in cell growth and signaling in ErbB3 binding protein-1 (Ebp1 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Myounghee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ErbB3 binding protein-1 (Ebp1 belongs to a family of DNA/RNA binding proteins implicated in cell growth, apoptosis and differentiation. However, the physiological role of Ebp1 in the whole organism is not known. Therefore, we generated Ebp1-deficient mice carrying a gene trap insertion in intron 2 of the Ebp1 (pa2g4 gene. Results Ebp1-/- mice were on average 30% smaller than wild type and heterozygous sex matched littermates. Growth retardation was apparent from Day 10 until Day 30. IGF-1 production and IGBP-3 and 4 protein levels were reduced in both embryo fibroblasts and adult knock-out mice. The proliferation of fibroblasts derived from Day 12.5 knock out embryos was also decreased as compared to that of wild type cells. Microarray expression analysis revealed changes in genes important in cell growth including members of the MAPK signal transduction pathway. In addition, the expression or activation of proliferation related genes such as AKT and the androgen receptor, previously demonstrated to be affected by Ebp1 expression in vitro, was altered in adult tissues. Conclusion These results indicate that Ebp1 can affect growth in an animal model, but that the expression of proliferation related genes is cell and context specific. The Ebp1-/- mouse line represents a new in vivo model to investigate Ebp1 function in the whole organism.

  9. Long-Term Effect of GPi-DBS in a Patient With Generalized Dystonia Due to GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idil Hanci

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Treatment outcomes from pallidal deep brain stimulation are highly heterogeneous reflecting the phenotypic and etiologic spectrum of dystonia. Treatment stratification to neurostimulation therapy primarily relies on the phenotypic motor presentation; however, etiology including genetic factors are increasingly recognized as modifiers of treatment outcomes. Here, we describe a 53 year-old female patient with a progressive generalized dystonia since age 25. The patient underwent deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus (GPi-DBS at age 44. Since the clinical phenotype included mobile choreo-dystonic features, we expected favorable therapeutic outcome from GPi-DBS. Although mobile dystonia components were slightly improved in the long-term outcome from GPi-DBS the overall therapeutic response 9 years from implantation was limited when comparing “stimulation off” and “stimulation on” despite of proper electrode localization and sufficient stimulation programming. In order to further understand the reason for this limited motor symptom response, we aimed to clarify the etiology of generalized dystonia in this patient. Genetic testing identified a novel heterozygous pathogenic SLC2A1 mutation as cause of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS. This case report presents the first outcome of GPi-DBS in a patient with GLUT1-DS, and suggests that genotype relations may increasingly complement phenotype-based therapy stratification of GPi-DBS in dystonia.

  10. Impaired IFNγ-Signaling and Mycobacterial Clearance in IFNγR1-Deficient Human iPSC-Derived Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neehus, Anna-Lena; Lam, Jenny; Haake, Kathrin; Merkert, Sylvia; Schmidt, Nico; Mucci, Adele; Ackermann, Mania; Schubert, Madline; Happle, Christine; Kühnel, Mark Philipp; Blank, Patrick; Philipp, Friederike; Goethe, Ralph; Jonigk, Danny; Martin, Ulrich; Kalinke, Ulrich; Baumann, Ulrich; Schambach, Axel; Roesler, Joachim; Lachmann, Nico

    2018-01-09

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is caused by inborn errors of interferon gamma (IFNγ) immunity and is characterized by severe infections by weakly virulent mycobacteria. Although IFNγ is the macrophage-activating factor, macrophages from these patients have never been studied. We demonstrate the generation of heterozygous and compound heterozygous (iMSMD-cohet) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a single chimeric patient, who suffered from complete autosomal recessive IFNγR1 deficiency and received bone-marrow transplantation. Loss of IFNγR1 expression had no influence on the macrophage differentiation potential of patient-specific iPSCs. In contrast, lack of IFNγR1 in iMSMD-cohet macrophages abolished IFNγ-dependent phosphorylation of STAT1 and induction of IFNγ-downstream targets such as IRF-1, SOCS-3, and IDO. As a consequence, iMSMD-cohet macrophages show impaired upregulation of HLA-DR and reduced intracellular killing of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin. We provide a disease-modeling platform that might be suited to investigate novel treatment options for MSMD and to gain insights into IFNγ signaling in macrophages. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Seizure control and acceptance of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome: a 2- to 5-year follow-up of 15 children enrolled prospectively.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Scheffer, H.; Leiendecker, B.; Gertsen, E.; Binder, S.; Leferink, M.; Hertzberg, C.; Nake, A.; Voit, T.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is caused by impaired glucose transport into the brain resulting in an epileptic encephalopathy, developmental delay, and a complex motor disorder. A ketogenic diet provides an alternative fuel to the brain and effectively restores brain energy metabolism.

  12. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome as a cause of encephalopathy that includes cognitive disability, treatment-resistant infantile epilepsy and a complex movement disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, John M

    2012-05-01

    Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the SLC2A1 gene, resulting in impaired glucose transport into the brain. It is characterized by a low glucose concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (hypoglycorrhachia) in the absence of hypoglycemia, in combination with low to normal lactate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It often results in treatment-resistant infantile epilepsy with progressive developmental disabilities and a complex movement disorder. Recognizing GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is important, since initiation of a ketogenic diet can reduce the frequency of seizures and the severity of the movement disorder. There can be a considerable delay in diagnosing GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and this point is illustrated by the natural history of this disorder in a 21-year-old woman with severe, progressive neurological disabilities. Her encephalopathy consisted of treatment-resistant seizures, a complex movement disorder, progressive intellectual disability, and deceleration of her head growth after late infancy. Focused evaluation at age 21 revealed GLUT1 deficiency caused by a novel heterozygous missence mutation in exon 7 (c.938C > A; p.Ser313Try) in SLC2A1 as the cause for her disabilities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic mild stress impairs latent inhibition and induces region-specific neural activation in CHL1-deficient mice, a mouse model of schizophrenia.

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    Buhusi, Mona; Obray, Daniel; Guercio, Bret; Bartlett, Mitchell J; Buhusi, Catalin V

    2017-08-30

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal processing of information and attentional deficits. Schizophrenia has a high genetic component but is precipitated by environmental factors, as proposed by the 'two-hit' theory of schizophrenia. Here we compared latent inhibition as a measure of learning and attention, in CHL1-deficient mice, an animal model of schizophrenia, and their wild-type littermates, under no-stress and chronic mild stress conditions. All unstressed mice as well as the stressed wild-type mice showed latent inhibition. In contrast, CHL1-deficient mice did not show latent inhibition after exposure to chronic stress. Differences in neuronal activation (c-Fos-positive cell counts) were noted in brain regions associated with latent inhibition: Neuronal activation in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortices and the nucleus accumbens shell was affected solely by stress. Neuronal activation in basolateral amygdala and ventral hippocampus was affected independently by stress and genotype. Most importantly, neural activation in nucleus accumbens core was affected by the interaction between stress and genotype. These results provide strong support for a 'two-hit' (genes x environment) effect on latent inhibition in CHL1-deficient mice, and identify CHL1-deficient mice as a model of schizophrenia-like learning and attention impairments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Partial IGF-1 deficiency is sufficient to reduce heart contractibility, angiotensin II sensibility, and alter gene expression of structural and functional cardiac proteins.

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    González-Guerra, José Luis; Castilla-Cortazar, Inma; Aguirre, Gabriel A; Muñoz, Úrsula; Martín-Estal, Irene; Ávila-Gallego, Elena; Granado, Miriam; Puche, Juan E; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2017-01-01

    Circulating levels of IGF-1 may decrease under several circumstances like ageing, metabolic syndrome, and advanced cirrhosis. This reduction is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, progression to type 2 diabetes, and increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, underlying mechanisms between IGF-1 deficiency and cardiovascular disease remain elusive. The specific aim of the present work was to study whether the partial IGF-1 deficiency influences heart and/or coronary circulation, comparing vasoactive factors before and after of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). In addition, histology of the heart was performed together with cardiac gene expression for proteins involved in structure and function (extracellular matrix, contractile proteins, active peptides); carried out using microarrays, followed by RT-qPCR confirmation of the three experimental groups. IGF-1 partial deficiency is associated to a reduction in contractility and angiotensin II sensitivity, interstitial fibrosis as well as altered expression pattern of genes involved in extracellular matrix proteins, calcium dynamics, and cardiac structure and function. Although this work is descriptive, it provides a clear insight of the impact that partial IGF-1 deficiency on the heart and establishes this experimental model as suitable for studying cardiac disease mechanisms and exploring therapeutic options for patients under IGF-1 deficiency conditions.

  15. Partial IGF-1 deficiency is sufficient to reduce heart contractibility, angiotensin II sensibility, and alter gene expression of structural and functional cardiac proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis González-Guerra

    Full Text Available Circulating levels of IGF-1 may decrease under several circumstances like ageing, metabolic syndrome, and advanced cirrhosis. This reduction is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, progression to type 2 diabetes, and increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, underlying mechanisms between IGF-1 deficiency and cardiovascular disease remain elusive. The specific aim of the present work was to study whether the partial IGF-1 deficiency influences heart and/or coronary circulation, comparing vasoactive factors before and after of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R. In addition, histology of the heart was performed together with cardiac gene expression for proteins involved in structure and function (extracellular matrix, contractile proteins, active peptides; carried out using microarrays, followed by RT-qPCR confirmation of the three experimental groups. IGF-1 partial deficiency is associated to a reduction in contractility and angiotensin II sensitivity, interstitial fibrosis as well as altered expression pattern of genes involved in extracellular matrix proteins, calcium dynamics, and cardiac structure and function. Although this work is descriptive, it provides a clear insight of the impact that partial IGF-1 deficiency on the heart and establishes this experimental model as suitable for studying cardiac disease mechanisms and exploring therapeutic options for patients under IGF-1 deficiency conditions.

  16. SHIP-1 Deficiency in AID+ B Cells Leads to the Impaired Function of B10 Cells with Spontaneous Autoimmunity.

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    Chen, Yingjia; Hu, Fanlei; Dong, Xuejiao; Zhao, Meng; Wang, Jing; Sun, Xiaolin; Kim, Tae Jin; Li, Zhanguo; Liu, Wanli

    2017-11-01

    Unlike conventional B cells, regulatory B cells exhibit immunosuppressive functions to downregulate inflammation via IL-10 production. However, the molecular mechanism regulating the production of IL-10 is not fully understood. In this study, we report the finding that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is highly upregulated in the IL-10-competent B cell (B10) cell from Innp5d fl/fl Aicda Cre/+ mice, whereas the 5' inositol phosphatase SHIP-1 is downregulated. Notably, SHIP-1 deficiency in AID + B cells leads to a reduction in cell count and impaired IL-10 production by B10 cells. Furthermore, the Innp5d fl/fl Aicda Cre/+ mouse model shows B cell-dependent autoimmune lupus-like phenotypes, such as elevated IgG serum Abs, formation of spontaneous germinal centers, production of anti-dsDNA and anti-nuclear Abs, and the obvious deposition of IgG immune complexes in the kidney with age. We observe that these lupus-like phenotypes can be reversed by the adoptive transfer of B10 cells from control Innp5d fl/fl mice, but not from the Innp5d fl/fl Aicda Cre/+ mice. This finding highlights the importance of defective B10 cells in Innp5d fl/fl Aicda Cre/+ mice. Whereas p-Akt is significantly upregulated, MAPK and AP-1 activation is impaired in B10 cells from Innp5d fl/fl Aicda Cre/+ mice, resulting in the reduced production of IL-10. These results show that SHIP-1 is required for the maintenance of B10 cells and production of IL-10, and collectively suggests that SHIP-1 could be a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Myg1-deficient mice display alterations in stress-induced responses and reduction of sex-dependent behavioural differences.

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    Philips, Mari-Anne; Abramov, Urho; Lilleväli, Kersti; Luuk, Hendrik; Kurrikoff, Kaido; Raud, Sirli; Plaas, Mario; Innos, Jürgen; Puussaar, Triinu; Kõks, Sulev; Vasar, Eero

    2010-02-11

    Myg1 (Melanocyte proliferating gene 1) is a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed gene, which encodes a protein with mitochondrial and nuclear localization. In the current study we demonstrate a gradual decline of Myg1 expression during the postnatal development of the mouse brain that suggests relevance for Myg1 in developmental processes. To study the effects of Myg1 loss-of-function, we created Myg1-deficient (-/-) mice by displacing the entire coding sequence of the gene. Initial phenotyping, covering a multitude of behavioural, cognitive, neurological, physiological and stress-related responses, revealed that homozygous Myg1 (-/-) mice are vital, fertile and display no gross abnormalities. Myg1 (-/-) mice showed an inconsistent pattern of altered anxiety-like behaviour in different tests. The plus-maze and social interaction tests revealed that male Myg1 (-/-) mice were significantly less anxious than their wild-type littermates; female (-/-) mice showed increased anxiety in the locomotor activity arena. Restraint-stress significantly reduced the expression of the Myg1 gene in the prefrontal cortex of female wild-type mice and restrained female (-/-) mice showed a blunted corticosterone response, suggesting involvement of Myg1 in stress-induced responses. The main finding of the present study was that Myg1 invalidation decreases several behavioural differences between male and female animals that were obvious in wild-type mice, indicating that Myg1 contributes to the expression of sex-dependent behavioural differences in mice. Taken together, we provide evidence for the involvement of Myg1 in anxiety- and stress-related responses and suggest that Myg1 contributes to the expression of sex-dependent behavioural differences.

  18. Notch1 deficiency in postnatal neural progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus leads to emotional and cognitive impairment.

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    Feng, Shufang; Shi, Tianyao; Qiu, Jiangxia; Yang, Haihong; Wu, Yan; Zhou, Wenxia; Wang, Wei; Wu, Haitao

    2017-10-01

    It is well known that Notch1 signaling plays a crucial role in embryonic neural development and adult neurogenesis. The latest evidence shows that Notch1 also plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity in mature hippocampal neurons. So far, deeper insights into the function of Notch1 signaling during the different steps of adult neurogenesis are still lacking, and the mechanisms by which Notch1 dysfunction is associated with brain disorders are also poorly understood. In the current study, we found that Notch1 was highly expressed in the adult-born immature neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Using a genetic approach to selectively ablate Notch1 signaling in late immature precursors in the postnatal hippocampus by cross-breeding doublecortin (DCX) + neuron-specific proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-α Cre mice with floxed Notch1 mice, we demonstrated a previously unreported pivotal role of Notch1 signaling in survival and function of adult newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus. Moreover, behavioral and functional studies demonstrated that POMC-Notch1 -/- mutant mice showed anxiety and depressive-like behavior with impaired synaptic transmission properties in the dentate gyrus. Finally, our mechanistic study showed significantly compromised phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in Notch1 mutants, suggesting that the dysfunction of Notch1 mutants is associated with the disrupted pCREB signaling in postnatally generated immature neurons in the dentate gyrus.-Feng, S., Shi, T., Qiu, J., Yang, H., Wu, Y., Zhou, W., Wang, W., Wu, H. Notch1 deficiency in postnatal neural progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus leads to emotional and cognitive impairment. © FASEB.

  19. Ketone Bodies as a Possible Adjuvant to Ketogenic Diet in PDHc Deficiency but Not in GLUT1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habarou, F; Bahi-Buisson, N; Lebigot, E; Pontoizeau, C; Abi-Warde, M T; Brassier, A; Le Quan Sang, K H; Broissand, C; Vuillaumier-Barrot, S; Roubertie, A; Boutron, A; Ottolenghi, C; de Lonlay, P

    2018-01-01

    Ketogenic diet is the first line therapy for neurological symptoms associated with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDHD) and intractable seizures in a number of disorders, including GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS). Because high-fat diet raises serious compliance issues, we investigated if oral L,D-3-hydroxybutyrate administration could be as effective as ketogenic diet in PDHD and GLUT1-DS. We designed a partial or total progressive substitution of KD with L,D-3-hydroxybutyrate in three GLUT1-DS and two PDHD patients. In GLUT1-DS patients, we observed clinical deterioration including increased frequency of seizures and myoclonus. In parallel, ketone bodies in CSF decreased after introducing 3-hydroxybutyrate. By contrast, two patients with PDHD showed clinical improvement as dystonic crises and fatigability decreased under basal metabolic conditions. In one of the two PDHD children, 3-hydroxybutyrate has largely replaced the ketogenic diet, with the latter that is mostly resumed only during febrile illness. Positive direct effects on energy metabolism in PDHD patients were suggested by negative correlation between ketonemia and lactatemia (r 2  = 0.59). Moreover, in cultured PDHc-deficient fibroblasts, the increase of CO 2 production after 14 C-labeled 3-hydroxybutyrate supplementation was consistent with improved Krebs cycle activity. However, except in one patient, ketonemia tended to be lower with 3-hydroxybutyrate administration compared to ketogenic diet. 3-hydroxybutyrate may be an adjuvant treatment to ketogenic diet in PDHD but not in GLUT1-DS under basal metabolic conditions. Nevertheless, ketogenic diet is still necessary in PDHD patients during febrile illness.

  20. Heterozygous ambra1 deficiency in mice: a genetic trait with autism-like behavior restricted to the female gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Ekrem; Dahm, Liane; Lu, Derek; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Ju, Anes; Tantra, Martesa; Kästner, Anne; Chowdhury, Kamal; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    Autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) are heterogeneous, highly heritable neurodevelopmental conditions affecting around 0.5% of the population across cultures, with a male/female ratio of approximately 4:1. Phenotypically, ASD are characterized by social interaction and communication deficits, restricted interests, repetitive behaviors, and reduced cognitive flexibility. Identified causes converge at the level of the synapse, ranging from mutation of synaptic genes to quantitative alterations in synaptic protein expression, e.g., through compromised transcriptional or translational control. We wondered whether reduced turnover and degradation of synapses, due to deregulated autophagy, would lead to similar phenotypical consequences. Ambra1, strongly expressed in cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, is a positive regulator of Beclin1, a principal player in autophagosome formation. While homozygosity of the Ambra1 null mutation causes embryonic lethality, heterozygous mice with reduced Ambra1 expression are viable, reproduce normally, and lack any immediately obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, comprehensive behavioral characterization of these mice revealed an autism-like phenotype in Ambra1 (+/-) females only, including compromised communication and social interactions, a tendency of enhanced stereotypies/repetitive behaviors, and impaired cognitive flexibility. Reduced ultrasound communication was found in adults as well as pups, which achieved otherwise normal neurodevelopmental milestones. These features were all absent in male Ambra1 (+/-) mice. As a first hint explaining this gender difference, we found a much stronger reduction of Ambra1 protein in the cortex of Ambra1 (+/-) females compared to males. To conclude, Ambra1 deficiency can induce an autism-like phenotype. The restriction to the female gender of autism-generation by a defined genetic trait is unique thus far and warrants further investigation.

  1. Heterozygous Ambra1 deficiency in mice: A genetic trait with autism-like behavior restricted to the female gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem eDere

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are heterogeneous, highly heritable neurodevelopmental conditions affecting around 0.5% of the population across cultures, with a male/female ratio of ~4:1. Phenotypically, ASD are characterized by social interaction and communication deficits, restricted interests, repetitive behaviors, and reduced cognitive flexibility. Identified causes converge at the level of the synapse, ranging from mutation of synaptic genes to quantitative alterations in synaptic protein expression, e.g. through compromised transcriptional or translational control. We wondered whether reduced turnover and degradation of synapses, due to deregulated autophagy, would lead to similar phenotypical consequences. Ambra1, strongly expressed in cortex, hippocampus and striatum, is a positive regulator of Beclin1, a principal player in autophagosome formation. While homozygosity of the Ambra1 null mutation causes embryonic lethality, heterozygous mice with reduced Ambra1 expression are viable, reproduce normally, and lack any immediately obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, comprehensive behavioral characterization of these mice revealed an autism-like phenotype in Ambra1+/- females only, including compromised communication and social interactions, a tendency of enhanced stereotypies/repetitive behaviors, and impaired cognitive flexibility. Reduced ultrasound communication was found in adults as well as pups which achieved otherwise normal neurodevelopmental milestones. These features were all absent in male Ambra1+/- mice. As a first hint explaining this gender difference, we found a much stronger reduction of Ambra1 protein in the cortex of Ambra1+/- females compared to males. To conclude, Ambra1 deficiency can induce an autism-like phenotype. The restriction to the female gender of autism-generation by a defined genetic trait is unique thus far and warrants further investigation.

  2. Accumulation of free oligosaccharides and tissue damage in cytosolic α-mannosidase (Man2c1)-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciotti, Silvia; Persichetti, Emanuele; Klein, Katharina; Tasegian, Anna; Duvet, Sandrine; Hartmann, Dieter; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Beccari, Tommaso

    2014-04-04

    Free Man(7-9)GlcNAc2 is released during the biosynthesis pathway of N-linked glycans or from misfolded glycoproteins during the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation process and are reduced to Man5GlcNAc in the cytosol. In this form, free oligosaccharides can be transferred into the lysosomes to be degraded completely. α-Mannosidase (MAN2C1) is the enzyme responsible for the partial demannosylation occurring in the cytosol. It has been demonstrated that the inhibition of MAN2C1 expression induces accumulation of Man(8-9)GlcNAc oligosaccharides and apoptosis in vitro. We investigated the consequences caused by the lack of cytosolic α-mannosidase activity in vivo by the generation of Man2c1-deficient mice. Increased amounts of Man(8-9)GlcNAc oligosaccharides were recognized in all analyzed KO tissues. Histological analysis of the CNS revealed neuronal and glial degeneration with formation of multiple vacuoles in deep neocortical layers and major telencephalic white matter tracts. Enterocytes of the small intestine accumulate mannose-containing saccharides and glycogen particles in their apical cytoplasm as well as large clear vacuoles in retronuclear position. Liver tissue is characterized by groups of hepatocytes with increased content of mannosyl compounds and glycogen, some of them undergoing degeneration by hydropic swelling. In addition, lectin screening showed the presence of mannose-containing saccharides in the epithelium of proximal kidney tubules, whereas scattered glomeruli appeared collapsed or featured signs of fibrosis along Bowman's capsule. Except for a moderate enrichment of mannosyl compounds and glycogen, heterozygous mice were normal, arguing against possible toxic effects of truncated Man2c1. These findings confirm the key role played by Man2c1 in the catabolism of free oligosaccharides.

  3. MLH1-deficient Colorectal Carcinoma With Wild-type BRAF and MLH1 Promoter Hypermethylation Harbor KRAS Mutations and Arise From Conventional Adenomas.

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    Farchoukh, Lama; Kuan, Shih-Fan; Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall; Nikiforova, Marina; Pai, Reetesh K

    2016-10-01

    Between 10% and 15% of colorectal carcinomas demonstrate sporadic DNA mismatch-repair protein deficiency as a result of MLH1 promoter methylation and are thought to arise from sessile serrated adenomas, termed the serrated neoplasia pathway. Although the presence of the BRAF V600E mutation is indicative of a sporadic cancer, up to 30% to 50% of colorectal carcinomas with MLH1 promoter hypermethylation will lack a BRAF mutation. We report the clinicopathologic and molecular features of MLH1-deficient colorectal carcinoma with wild-type BRAF and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation (referred to as MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinoma, n=36) in comparison with MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinoma (n=113) and Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma (n=36). KRAS mutations were identified in 31% of MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinomas compared with 0% of MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinomas and 37% of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinomas. When a precursor polyp was identified, MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinomas arose from precursor polyps resembling conventional tubular/tubulovillous adenomas in contrast to MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinomas, which arose from precursor sessile serrated adenomas (PMLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinoma and MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinoma had a predilection for the right colon compared with Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma (86% vs. 92% vs. 49%, P0.05). In conclusion, our results indicate that MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinomas can harbor KRAS mutations and arise from precursor polyps resembling conventional tubular/tubulovillous adenomas.

  4. Differential effects of silver nanoparticles on DNA damage and DNA repair gene expression in Ogg1-deficient and wild type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallanthighal, Sameera; Chan, Cadia; Murray, Thomas M; Mosier, Aaron P; Cady, Nathaniel C; Reliene, Ramune

    2017-10-01

    Due to extensive use in consumer goods, it is important to understand the genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and identify susceptible populations. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) excises 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanine (8-oxoG), a pro-mutagenic lesion induced by oxidative stress. To understand whether defects in OGG1 is a possible genetic factor increasing an individual's susceptibly to AgNPs, we determined DNA damage, genome rearrangements, and expression of DNA repair genes in Ogg1-deficient and wild type mice exposed orally to 4 mg/kg of citrate-coated AgNPs over a period of 7 d. DNA damage was examined at 3 and 7 d of exposure and 7 and 14 d post-exposure. AgNPs induced 8-oxoG, double strand breaks (DSBs), chromosomal damage, and DNA deletions in both genotypes. However, 8-oxoG was induced earlier in Ogg1-deficient mice and 8-oxoG levels were higher after 7-d treatment and persisted longer after exposure termination. AgNPs downregulated DNA glycosylases Ogg1, Neil1, and Neil2 in wild type mice, but upregulated Myh, Neil1, and Neil2 glycosylases in Ogg1-deficient mice. Neil1 and Neil2 can repair 8-oxoG. Thus, AgNP-mediated downregulation of DNA glycosylases in wild type mice may contribute to genotoxicity, while upregulation thereof in Ogg1-deficient mice could serve as an adaptive response to AgNP-induced DNA damage. However, our data show that Ogg1 is indispensable for the efficient repair of AgNP-induced damage. In summary, citrate-coated AgNPs are genotoxic in both genotypes and Ogg1 deficiency exacerbates the effect. These data suggest that humans with genetic polymorphisms and mutations in OGG1 may have increased susceptibility to AgNP-mediated DNA damage.

  5. Growth hormone and IGF-1 deficiency exacerbate high-fat diet-induced endothelial impairment in obese Lewis dwarf rats: implications for vascular aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey-Downs, Lora C; Sosnowska, Danuta; Toth, Peter; Mitschelen, Matthew; Gautam, Tripti; Henthorn, Jim C; Ballabh, Praveen; Koller, Akos; Farley, Julie A; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies suggest that the age-related decline in circulating growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels significantly contribute to vascular dysfunction in aging by impairing cellular oxidative stress resistance pathways. Obesity in elderly individuals is increasing at alarming rates, and there is evidence suggesting that elderly individuals are more vulnerable to the deleterious cardiovascular effects of obesity than younger individuals. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging, GH/IGF-1 deficiency, and obesity interact to promote the development of cardiovascular disease remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that low circulating GH/IGF-1 levels exacerbate the pro-oxidant and proinflammatory vascular effects of obesity, GH/IGF-1-deficient Lewis dwarf rats and heterozygous control rats were fed either a standard diet or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 7 months. Feeding an HFD resulted in similar relative weight gains and increases in body fat content in Lewis dwarf rats and control rats. HFD-fed Lewis dwarf rats exhibited a relative increase in blood glucose levels, lower insulin, and impaired glucose tolerance as compared with HFD-fed control rats. Analysis of serum cytokine expression signatures indicated that chronic GH/IGF-1 deficiency exacerbates HFD-induced inflammation. GH/IGF-1 deficiency also exacerbated HFD-induced endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and expression of inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor-α, ICAM-1) in aortas of Lewis dwarf rats. Overall, our results are consistent with the available clinical and experimental evidence suggesting that GH/IGF-1 deficiency renders the cardiovascular system more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of obesity.

  6. Development of a New Reporter Gene System-dsRed/Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase-Xanthine for Molecular Imaging of Processes Behind the Intact Blood-Brain Barrier

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    Mikhail Doubrovin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of a novel dual-modality fusion reporter gene system consisting of Escherichia coli xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRT for nuclear imaging with radiolabeled xanthine and Discosoma red fluorescent protein for optical fluorescent imaging applications. The dsRed/XPRT fusion gene was successfully created and stably transduced into RG2 glioma cells, and both reporters were shown to be functional. The level of dsRed fluorescence directly correlated with XPRT enzymatic activity as measured by ribophosphorylation of [14C]-xanthine was in vitro (Ki = 0.124 ± 0.008 vs. 0.00031 ± 0.00005 mL/min/g in parental cell line, and [*]-xanthine octanol/water partition coefficient was 0.20 at pH = 7.4 (logP = 0.69, meeting requirements for the blood-brain barrier (BBB penetrating tracer. In the in vivo experiment, the concentration of [* C]-xanthine in the normal brain varied from 0.20 to 0.16 + 0.05% dose/g under 0.87 + 0.24% dose/g plasma radiotracer concentration. The accumulation in vivo in the transfected flank tumor was to 2.4 ± 0.3% dose/g, compared to 0.78 ± 0.02% dose/g and 0.64 ± 0.05% dose/g in the control flank tumors and intact muscle, respectively. [14C]-Xanthine appeared to be capable of specific accumulation in the transfected infiltrative brain tumor (RG2-dsRed/XPRT, which corresponded to the 585 nm fluorescent signal obtained from the adjacent cryosections. The images of endogenous gene expression with the “sensory system” have to be normalized for the transfection efficiency based on the “beacon system” image data. Such an approach requires two different “reporter genes” and two different “reporter substrates.” Therefore, the novel dsRed/XPRT fusion gene can be used as a multimodality reporter system in the biological applications requiring two independent reporter genes, including the cells located behind the BBB.

  7. Up-regulated Ectonucleotidases in Fas-Associated Death Domain Protein- and Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase 1-Deficient Jurkat Leukemia Cells Counteract Extracellular ATP/AMP Accumulation via Pannexin-1 Channels during Chemotherapeutic Drug-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd-Tressler, Andrea M; Lane, Graham S; Dubyak, George R

    2017-07-01

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) channels mediate the efflux of ATP and AMP from cancer cells in response to induction of extrinsic apoptosis by death receptors or intrinsic apoptosis by chemotherapeutic agents. We previously described the accumulation of extracellular ATP /AMP during chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in Jurkat human leukemia cells. In this study, we compared how different signaling pathways determine extracellular nucleotide pools in control Jurkat cells versus Jurkat lines that lack the Fas-associated death domain (FADD) or receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1) cell death regulatory proteins. Tumor necrosis factor- α induced extrinsic apoptosis in control Jurkat cells and necroptosis in FADD-deficient cells; treatment of both lines with chemotherapeutic drugs elicited similar intrinsic apoptosis. Robust extracellular ATP/AMP accumulation was observed in the FADD-deficient cells during necroptosis, but not during apoptotic activation of Panx1 channels. Accumulation of extracellular ATP/AMP was similarly absent in RIP1-deficient Jurkat cells during apoptotic responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Apoptotic activation triggered equivalent proteolytic gating of Panx1 channels in all three Jurkat cell lines. The differences in extracellular ATP/AMP accumulation correlated with cell-line-specific expression of ectonucleotidases that metabolized the released ATP/AMP. CD73 mRNA, and α β -methylene-ADP-inhibitable ecto-AMPase activity were elevated in the FADD-deficient cells. In contrast, the RIP1-deficient cells were defined by increased expression of tartrate-sensitive prostatic acid phosphatase as a broadly acting ectonucleotidase. Thus, extracellular nucleotide accumulation during regulated tumor cell death involves interplay between ATP/AMP efflux pathways and different cell-autonomous ectonucleotidases. Differential expression of particular ectonucleotidases in tumor cell variants will determine whether chemotherapy-induced activation of Panx1 channels

  8. Environmental factors regulate Paneth cell phenotype and host susceptibility to intestinal inflammation in Irgm1-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison R. Rogala

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD represents a chronic inflammatory disorder of the intestinal tract. Several susceptibility genes have been linked to CD, though their precise role in the pathogenesis of this disorder remains unclear. Immunity-related GTPase M (IRGM is an established risk allele in CD. We have shown previously that conventionally raised (CV mice lacking the IRGM ortholog, Irgm1 exhibit abnormal Paneth cells (PCs and increased susceptibility to intestinal injury. In the present study, we sought to utilize this model system to determine if environmental conditions impact these phenotypes, as is thought to be the case in human CD. To accomplish this, wild-type and Irgm1−/− mice were rederived into specific pathogen-free (SPF and germ-free (GF conditions. We next assessed how these differential housing environments influenced intestinal injury patterns, and epithelial cell morphology and function in wild-type and Irgm1−/− mice. Remarkably, in contrast to CV mice, SPF Irgm1−/− mice showed only a slight increase in susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate-induced inflammation. SPF Irgm1−/− mice also displayed minimal abnormalities in PC number and morphology, and in antimicrobial peptide expression. Goblet cell numbers and epithelial proliferation were also unaffected by Irgm1 in SPF conditions. No microbial differences were observed between wild-type and Irgm1−/− mice, but gut bacterial communities differed profoundly between CV and SPF mice. Specifically, Helicobacter sequences were significantly increased in CV mice; however, inoculating SPF Irgm1−/− mice with Helicobacter hepaticus was not sufficient to transmit a pro-inflammatory phenotype. In summary, our findings suggest the impact of Irgm1-deficiency on susceptibility to intestinal inflammation and epithelial function is critically dependent on environmental influences. This work establishes the importance of Irgm1−/− mice as a model to elucidate host

  9. MTH1 deficiency selectively increases non-cytotoxic oxidative DNA damage in lung cancer cells: more bad news than good?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hussein H K; Alhamoudi, Kheloud M H; Evans, Mark D; Jones, George D D; Foster, Steven S

    2018-04-16

    Targeted therapies are based on exploiting cancer-cell-specific genetic features or phenotypic traits to selectively kill cancer cells while leaving normal cells unaffected. Oxidative stress is a cancer hallmark phenotype. Given that free nucleotide pools are particularly vulnerable to oxidation, the nucleotide pool sanitising enzyme, MTH1, is potentially conditionally essential in cancer cells. However, findings from previous MTH1 studies have been contradictory, meaning the relevance of MTH1 in cancer is still to be determined. Here we ascertained the role of MTH1 specifically in lung cancer cell maintenance, and the potential of MTH1 inhibition as a targeted therapy strategy to improve lung cancer treatments. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown or small-molecule inhibition, we tested the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of MTH1 deficiency on H23 (p53-mutated), H522 (p53-mutated) and A549 (wildtype p53) non-small cell lung cancer cell lines relative to normal MRC-5 lung fibroblasts. We also assessed if MTH1 inhibition augments current therapies. MTH1 knockdown increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA and DNA damage signaling alterations in all lung cancer cell lines but not normal fibroblasts, despite no detectable differences in reactive oxygen species levels between any cell lines. Furthermore, MTH1 knockdown reduced H23 cell proliferation. However, unexpectedly, it did not induce apoptosis in any cell line or enhance the effects of gemcitabine, cisplatin or radiation in combination treatments. Contrastingly, TH287 and TH588 MTH1 inhibitors induced apoptosis in H23 and H522 cells, but only increased oxidative DNA damage levels in H23, indicating that they kill cells independently of DNA oxidation and seemingly via MTH1-distinct mechanisms. MTH1 has a NSCLC-specific p53-independent role for suppressing DNA oxidation and genomic instability, though surprisingly the basis of this may not be reactive-oxygen-species-associated oxidative stress. Despite this, overall

  10. IGF-1 deficiency causes atrophic changes associated with upregulation of VGluT1 and downregulation of MEF2 transcription factors in the mouse cochlear nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes-Santamaría, V.; Rodriguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Contreras, Julio; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a neurotrophic protein that plays a crucial role in modulating neuronal function and synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. Mice lacking the Igf1 gene exhibit profound deafness and multiple anomalies in the inner ear and spiral ganglion. An issue that remains unknown is whether, in addition to these peripheral abnormalities, IGF-1 deficiency also results in structural changes along the central auditory pathway that may contribute to an imbalance betwee...

  11. 4PS/insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, M E; Sun, X J; Bruening, J C; Araki, E; Lipes, M A; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1995-10-20

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is the major cytoplasmic substrate of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptors. Transgenic mice lacking IRS-1 are resistant to insulin and IGF-1, but exhibit significant residual insulin action which corresponds to the presence of an alternative high molecular weight substrate in liver and muscle. Recently, Sun et al. (Sun, X.-J., Wang, L.-M., Zhang, Y., Yenush, L. P., Myers, M. G., Jr., Glasheen, E., Lane, W.S., Pierce, J. H., and White, M. F. (1995) Nature 377, 173-177) purified and cloned 4PS, the major substrate of the IL-4 receptor-associated tyrosine kinase in myeloid cells, which has significant structural similarity to IRS-1. To determine if 4PS is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice, we performed immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase assays using specific antibodies to 4PS. Following insulin stimulation, 4PS is rapidly phosphorylated in liver and muscle, binds to the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, and activates the enzyme. Insulin stimulation also results in the association of 4PS with Grb 2 in both liver and muscle. In IRS-1-deficient mice, both the phosphorylation of 4PS and associated PI 3-kinase activity are enhanced, without an increase in protein expression. Immunodepletion of 4PS from liver and muscle homogenates removes most of the phosphotyrosine-associated PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1-deficient mice. Thus, 4PS is the primary alternative substrate, i.e. IRS-2, which plays a major role in physiologic insulin signal transduction via both PI 3-kinase activation and Grb 2/Sos association. In IRS-1-deficient mice, 4PS/IRS-2 provides signal transduction to these two major pathways of insulin signaling.

  12. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I (IGF-1) Deficiency Ameliorates Sex Difference in Cardiac Contractile Function and Intracellular Ca2+ Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan-Isik, Asli F.; Li, Qun; Ren, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Sex difference in cardiac contractile function exists which may contribute to the different prevalence in cardiovascular diseases between genders. However, the precise mechanisms of action behind sex difference in cardiac function are still elusive. Given that sex difference exists in insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) cascade, this study is designed to evaluate the impact of severe liver IGF-1 deficiency (LID) on sex difference in cardiac function. Echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties were evaluated including ventricular geometry, fractional shortening, peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (± dL/dt), time-to-peak shortening (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90), fura-fluorescence intensity (FFI) and intracellular Ca2+ clearance. Female C57 mice exhibited significantly higher plasma IGF-1 levels than their male counterpart. LID mice possessed comparably low IGF-1 levels in both sexes. Female C57 and LID mice displayed lower body, heart and liver weights compared to male counterparts. Echocardiographic analysis revealed larger LV mass in female C57 but not LID mice without sex difference in other cardiac geometric indices. Myocytes from female C57 mice exhibited reduced peak shortening, ± dL/dt, longer TPS, TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ clearance compared with males. Interestingly, this sex difference was greatly attenuated or abolished by IGF-1 deficiency. Female C57 mice displayed significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, SERCA2a and phosphorylated phospholamban as well as SERCA activity compared with male C57 mice. These sex differences in Ca2+ regulatory proteins were abolished or overtly attenuated by IGF-1 deficiency. In summary, our data suggested that IGF-1 deficiency may significantly attenuated or mitigate the sex difference in cardiomyocyte contractile function associated with intracellular Ca2+ regulation. PMID:21763763

  13. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) deficiency ameliorates sex difference in cardiac contractile function and intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan-Isik, Asli F; Li, Qun; Ren, Jun

    2011-10-10

    Sex difference in cardiac contractile function exists which may contribute to the different prevalence in cardiovascular diseases between genders. However, the precise mechanisms of action behind sex difference in cardiac function are still elusive. Given that sex difference exists in insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) cascade, this study is designed to evaluate the impact of severe liver IGF-1 deficiency (LID) on sex difference in cardiac function. Echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties were evaluated including ventricular geometry, fractional shortening, peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (±dL/dt), time-to-peak shortening (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR(90)), fura-fluorescence intensity (FFI) and intracellular Ca(2+) clearance. Female C57 mice exhibited significantly higher plasma IGF-1 levels than their male counterpart. LID mice possessed comparably low IGF-1 levels in both sexes. Female C57 and LID mice displayed lower body, heart and liver weights compared to male counterparts. Echocardiographic analysis revealed larger LV mass in female C57 but not LID mice without sex difference in other cardiac geometric indices. Myocytes from female C57 mice exhibited reduced peak shortening, ±dL/dt, longer TPS, TR(90) and intracellular Ca(2+) clearance compared with males. Interestingly, this sex difference was greatly attenuated or abolished by IGF-1 deficiency. Female C57 mice displayed significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger, SERCA2a and phosphorylated phospholamban as well as SERCA activity compared with male C57 mice. These sex differences in Ca(2+) regulatory proteins were abolished or overtly attenuated by IGF-1 deficiency. In summary, our data suggested that IGF-1 deficiency may significantly attenuated or mitigate the sex difference in cardiomyocyte contractile function associated with intracellular Ca(2+) regulation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland

  14. ILDR1 deficiency causes degeneration of cochlear outer hair cells and disrupts the structure of the organ of Corti: a mouse model for human DFNB42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Sang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1 is a poorly characterized gene that was first identified in lymphoma cells. Mutations in ILDR1 are responsible for DFNB42, but the pathogenesis of hearing loss caused by ILDR1 mutations remains to be elucidated. To explore the role of ILDR1 in hearing, we created Ildr1 knockout mice. In heterozygous mice, ILDR1 expression was found in outer hair cells (OHCs and inner hair cells (IHCs of the organ of Corti. ILDR1-deficient mice are profoundly deaf by postnatal day 21 (P21. No significant difference was observed in the supporting cells and IHCs of ILDR1-deficient mice, but progressive degeneration of OHCs occurred at P15 and disruption of the tunnel running through the organ of Corti was noticeable at P21. By P28, there were no OHCs visible in any of the turns of the organ of Corti, and the tunnel of the organ of Corti was entirely destroyed. ILDR1 deficiency affects expression of tricellulin in vivo, and this provides a possible explanation to hearing loss. To further elucidate the mechanism of deafness related to ILDR1 deficiency, we pursued a differential proteomic approach to comprehensively assess differential protein expression in the cochleae of Ildr1+/− and Ildr1−/− mice at P21. Altogether, 708 proteins were up-regulated (fold change >1.5 and 114 proteins were down-regulated (fold change <0.5 in the Ildr1−/− mice compared with Ildr1+/− mice. Gene ontology classification indicated that a number of differentially expressed proteins are involved in cell adhesion, protein and vesicle-mediated transport, cell death, membrane organization, and cellular homeostasis. A few of these proteins are closely related to hearing development. Taken together, our data suggest that ILDR1 is important for the survival of OHCs and provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of human deafness DFNB42 deafness.

  15. The use of mrp1-deficient (Danio rerio) zebrafish embryos to investigate the role of Mrp1 in the toxicity of cadmium chloride and benzo[a]pyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Jingjing; Hu, Jia; Chen, Mingli; Yin, Huancai; Miao, Peng; Bai, Pengli; Yin, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies in our lab have revealed that both P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multi-resistance associated protein (Mrp) 1 played important roles in the detoxification of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in zebrafish embryos. This paper aims to extend this research by using mrp1-deficient model to illustrate the individual function of Mrp1. In this respect, CRISPR/Cas9 system was employed to generate a frameshift mutation in zebrafish mrp1 causing premature translational stops in Mrp1. Significant reduction on the efflux function of Mrps was found in mutant zebrafish embryos, which correlated well with the significantly enhanced accumulation and toxicity of cadmium chloride (CdCl_2) and benzo[a]pyrene (BαP), indicating the protective role of the corresponding protein. The different alteration on the accumulation and toxicity of Cd"2"+ and BαP could be attributed to the fact that Cd"2"+ and its metabolites were mainly excreted by Mrp1, while BαP was primarily pumped out by Pgp. More importantly, the compensation mechanism for the absence of Mrp1, including elevated glutathione (GSH) level and up-regulated expression of pgp and mrp2 were also found. Thus, mrp1-deficient zebrafish embryo could be a useful tool in the investigation of Mrp1 functions in the early life stages of aquatic organisms. However, compensation mechanism should be taken into consideration in the interpretation of results obtained with mrp1-deficient fish.

  16. The use of mrp1-deficient (Danio rerio) zebrafish embryos to investigate the role of Mrp1 in the toxicity of cadmium chloride and benzo[a]pyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jingjing [CAS Key Lab of Bio-Medical Diagnostics, Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215163 (China); Hu, Jia [School of Biology & Basic Medical Sciences, Medical College, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu (China); Chen, Mingli [CAS Key Lab of Bio-Medical Diagnostics, Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215163 (China); Yin, Huancai [CAS Key Lab of Bio-Medical Diagnostics, Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215163 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Miao, Peng; Bai, Pengli [CAS Key Lab of Bio-Medical Diagnostics, Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215163 (China); Yin, Jian, E-mail: yinj@sibet.ac.cn [CAS Key Lab of Bio-Medical Diagnostics, Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215163 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Previous studies in our lab have revealed that both P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multi-resistance associated protein (Mrp) 1 played important roles in the detoxification of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in zebrafish embryos. This paper aims to extend this research by using mrp1-deficient model to illustrate the individual function of Mrp1. In this respect, CRISPR/Cas9 system was employed to generate a frameshift mutation in zebrafish mrp1 causing premature translational stops in Mrp1. Significant reduction on the efflux function of Mrps was found in mutant zebrafish embryos, which correlated well with the significantly enhanced accumulation and toxicity of cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) and benzo[a]pyrene (BαP), indicating the protective role of the corresponding protein. The different alteration on the accumulation and toxicity of Cd{sup 2+} and BαP could be attributed to the fact that Cd{sup 2+} and its metabolites were mainly excreted by Mrp1, while BαP was primarily pumped out by Pgp. More importantly, the compensation mechanism for the absence of Mrp1, including elevated glutathione (GSH) level and up-regulated expression of pgp and mrp2 were also found. Thus, mrp1-deficient zebrafish embryo could be a useful tool in the investigation of Mrp1 functions in the early life stages of aquatic organisms. However, compensation mechanism should be taken into consideration in the interpretation of results obtained with mrp1-deficient fish.

  17. Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone insensitivity): a unique model to explore the effect of insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency on human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, R; Ben-Amitai, D; Laron, Z

    2004-01-01

    Classical Laron syndrome is a recessive disease of primary insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) deficiency and primary growth hormone insensitivity. Affected children have, among other defects, sparse hair growth and frontal recessions. The hair is thin and easy to pluck. Young adults have various degrees of alopecia, more pronounced in males. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of primary IGF-1 deficiency on hair structure. The study sample included 11 patients with Laron syndrome--5 children (2 untreated) and 6 adults (5 untreated). Hairs were examined by light and electron microscopy. The most significant structured defect, pili torti et canaliculi, was found in 2 young, untreated patients. Grooving, tapered hair and trichorrhexis nodosa were found in the remainder. IGF-1-treated patients had either none or significantly fewer pathological changes compared to the untreated patients. This is the first documentation of the role of primary IGF-1 deficiency on hair structure in human beings. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Chemokine-like receptor 1 deficiency does not affect the development of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Gruben

    Full Text Available The adipokine chemerin and its receptor, chemokine-like receptor 1 (Cmklr1, are associated with insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which covers a broad spectrum of liver diseases, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. It is possible that chemerin and/or Cmklr1 exert their effects on these disorders through inflammation, but so far the data have been controversial. To gain further insight into this matter, we studied the effect of whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency on insulin resistance and NAFLD. In view of the primary role of macrophages in hepatic inflammation, we also transplanted bone marrow from Cmklr1 knock-out (Cmklr1-/- mice and wild type (WT mice into low-density lipoprotein receptor knock-out (Ldlr-/- mice, a mouse model for NASH. All mice were fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet containing 21% fat from milk butter and 0.2% cholesterol for 12 weeks. Insulin resistance was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, an insulin tolerance test, and by measurement of plasma glucose and insulin levels. Liver pathology was determined by measuring hepatic inflammation, fibrosis, lipid accumulation and the NAFLD activity score (NAS. Whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency did not affect body weight gain or food intake. In addition, we observed no differences between WT and Cmklr1-/- mice for hepatic inflammatory and fibrotic gene expression, immune cell infiltration, lipid accumulation or NAS. In line with this, we detected no differences in insulin resistance. In concordance with whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency, the absence of Cmklr1 in bone marrow-derived cells in Ldlr-/- mice did not affect their insulin resistance or liver pathology. Our results indicate that Cmklr1 is not involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance or NAFLD. Thus, we recommend that the associations reported between Cmklr1 and insulin resistance or NAFLD should be interpreted with caution.

  19. TOB1 Deficiency Enhances the Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Tendon-Bone Healing in a Rat Rotator Cuff Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulei Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study investigated the effect of silencing TOB1 (Transducer of ERBB2, 1 expression in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on MSC-facilitated tendon-bone healing in a rat supraspinatus repair model. Methods: Rat MSCs were transduced with a recombinant lentivirus encoding short hairpin RNA (shRNA against TOB1. MSC cell proliferation was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. The effect of MSCs with TOB1 deficiency on tendon-bone healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model was evaluated by biomechanical testing, histological analysis and collagen type I and II gene expression. An upstream regulator (miR-218 of TOB1 was determined in MSCs. Results: We found that knockdown of TOB1 significantly increased the proliferative activity of rat MSCs in vitro. When MSCs with TOB1 deficiency were injected into injured rat supraspinatus tendon-bone junctions, the effect on tendon-bone healing was enhanced compared to treatment with control MSCs with normal TOB1 expression, as evidenced by elevated levels of ultimate load to failure and stiffness, increased amount of fibrocartilage and augmented expression of collagen type I and type II genes. In addition, we found that the TOB1 3′ untranslated region is a direct target of miR-218. Similar to the effect of TOB1 deficiency, overexpression of miR-218 effectively promoted tendon-bone healing in rat. Conclusion: These results suggest that TOB1 may play a negative role in the effect of MSCs on tendon-bone healing, and imply that expression of TOB1 may be regulated by miR-218.

  20. Experimental approach to IGF-1 therapy in CCl4-induced acute liver damage in healthy controls and mice with partial IGF-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Garza, Luis A; Puche, Juan E; Aguirre, Gabriel A; Muñoz, Úrsula; García-Magariño, Mariano; De la Garza, Rocío G; Castilla-Cortazar, Inma

    2017-05-04

    Cell necrosis, oxidative damage, and fibrogenesis are involved in cirrhosis development, a condition in which insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels are diminished. This study evaluates whether the exogenous administration of low doses of IGF-1 can induce hepatoprotection in acute carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 )-induced liver damage compared to healthy controls (Wt Igf +/+ ). Additionally, the impact of IGF-1 deficiency on a damaged liver was investigated in mice with a partial deficit of this hormone (Hz Igf1 +/- ). Three groups of 25 ± 5-week-old healthy male mice (Wt Igf +/+ ) were included in the protocol: untreated controls (Wt). Controls that received CCl 4 (Wt + CCl 4 ) and Wt + CCl 4 were treated subcutaneously with IGF-1 (2 µg/100 g body weight/day) for 10 days (Wt + CCl 4  + IGF1). In parallel, three IGF-1-deficient mice (Hz Igf1 +/- ) groups were studied: untreated Hz, Hz + CCl 4 , and Hz + CCl 4  + IGF-1. Microarray and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analyses, serum aminotransferases levels, liver histology, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were assessed at the end of the treatment in all groups. All data represent mean ± SEM. An altered gene coding expression pattern for proteins of the extracellular matrix, fibrosis, and cellular protection were found, as compared to healthy controls, in which IGF-1 therapy normalized in the series including healthy mice. Liver histology showed that Wt + CCl 4  + IGF1 mice had less oxidative damage, fibrosis, lymphocytic infiltrate, and cellular changes when compared to the Wt + CCl 4 . Moreover, there was a correlation between MDA levels and the histological damage score (Pearson's r = 0.858). In the IGF-1-deficient mice series, similar findings were identified, denoting a much more vulnerable hepatic parenchyma. IGF1 treatment improved the biochemistry, histology, and genetic expression of pro-regenerative and cytoprotective factors in both series

  1. Application of HPLC to study the kinetics of a branched bi-enzyme system consisting of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and xanthine oxidase--an important biochemical system to evaluate the efficiency of the anticancer drug 6-mercaptopurine in ALL cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sukirti; Paul, Manash K; Balaram, Hemalatha; Mukhopadhyay, Anup Kumar

    2007-05-01

    The thiopurine antimetabolite 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) is an important chemotherapeutic drug in the conventional treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). 6MP is mainly catabolized by both hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and xanthine oxidase (XOD) to form thioinosinic monophosphate (TIMP) (therapeutically active metabolite) and 6-thiouric acid (6TUA) (inactive metabolite), respectively. The activity of both the enzymes varies among ALL patients governing the active and the inactive metabolite profile within the immature lymphocytes. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the kinetic nature of the branched bi-enzyme system acting on 6MP and to quantitate TIMP and 6TUA formed when the two enzymes are present in equal and variable ratios. The quantification of the branched kinetics using spectrophotometric method presents problem due to the closely apposed lambda(max) of the substrates and products. Hence, employing an HPLC method, the quantification of the products was done with the progress of time. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of substrate was found to be 10nM and for products as 50 nM. The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 1 nM for the substrate and the products. The method exhibited linearity in the range of 0.01-100 microM for 6MP and 0.05-100 microM for both 6TUA and TIMP. The amount of TIMP formed was higher than that of 6TUA in the bi-enzyme system when both the enzymes were present in equivalent enzymatic ratio. It was further found that enzymatic ratios play an important role in determining the amounts of TIMP and 6TUA. This method was further validated using actively growing T-ALL cell line (Jurkat) to study the branched kinetics, wherein it was observed that treatment of 50 microM 6MP led to the generation of 12 microM TIMP and 0.8 microM 6TUA in 6 h at 37 degrees C.

  2. Endothelial sirtuin 1 deficiency perpetrates nephrosclerosis through downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-14: relevance to fibrosis of vascular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, Radovan; Xavier, Sandhya; Chen, Jun; Lin, Chi Hua Sarah; Ratliff, Brian; Rabadi, May; Maizel, Julien; Tanokuchi, Rina; Zhang, Frank; Cao, Jian; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2014-02-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) depletion in vascular endothelial cells mediates endothelial dysfunction and premature senescence in diverse cardiovascular and renal diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these pathologic effects remain unclear. Here, we examined the phenotype of a mouse model of vascular senescence created by genetically ablating exon 4 of Sirt1 in endothelial cells (Sirt1(endo-/-)). Under basal conditions, Sirt1(endo-/-) mice showed impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and angiogenesis, and fibrosis occurred spontaneously at low levels at an early age. In contrast, induction of nephrotoxic stress (acute and chronic folic acid-induced nephropathy) in Sirt1(endo-/-) mice resulted in robust acute renal functional deterioration followed by an exaggerated fibrotic response compared with control animals. Additional studies identified matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) as a target of SIRT1. In the kidneys of Sirt1(endo-/-) mice, impaired angiogenesis, reduced matrilytic activity, and retention of the profibrotic cleavage substrates tissue transglutaminase and endoglin accompanied MMP-14 suppression. Furthermore, restoration of MMP-14 expression in SIRT1-depeleted mice improved angiogenic and matrilytic functions of the endothelium, prevented renal dysfunction, and attenuated nephrosclerosis. Our findings establish a novel mechanistic molecular link between endothelial SIRT1 depletion, downregulation of MMP-14, and the development of nephrosclerosis.

  3. Wfs1- deficient rats develop primary symptoms of Wolfram syndrome: insulin-dependent diabetes, optic nerve atrophy and medullary degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaas, Mario; Seppa, Kadri; Reimets, Riin; Jagomäe, Toomas; Toots, Maarja; Koppel, Tuuliki; Vallisoo, Tuuli; Nigul, Mait; Heinla, Indrek; Meier, Riho; Kaasik, Allen; Piirsoo, Andres; Hickey, Miriam A; Terasmaa, Anton; Vasar, Eero

    2017-08-31

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder that is caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene and is characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes, optic atrophy, hearing loss and a number of other complications. Here, we describe the creation and phenotype of Wfs1 mutant rats, in which exon 5 of the Wfs1 gene is deleted, resulting in a loss of 27 amino acids from the WFS1 protein sequence. These Wfs1-ex5-KO232 rats show progressive glucose intolerance, which culminates in the development of diabetes mellitus, glycosuria, hyperglycaemia and severe body weight loss by 12 months of age. Beta cell mass is reduced in older mutant rats, which is accompanied by decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from 3 months of age. Medullary volume is decreased in older Wfs1-ex5-KO232 rats, with the largest decreases at the level of the inferior olive. Finally, older Wfs1-ex5-KO232 rats show retinal gliosis and optic nerve atrophy at 15 months of age. Electron microscopy revealed axonal degeneration and disorganization of the myelin in the optic nerves of older Wfs1-ex5-KO232 rats. The phenotype of Wfs1-ex5-KO232 rats indicates that they have the core symptoms of WS. Therefore, we present a novel rat model of WS.

  4. E2F transcription factor-1 deficiency reduces pathophysiology in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through increased muscle oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Emilie; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Pradelli, Ludivine A; Hugon, Gérald; Matecki, Stéfan; Mornet, Dominique; Rivier, François; Fajas, Lluis

    2012-09-01

    E2F1 deletion leads to increased mitochondrial number and function, increased body temperature in response to cold and increased resistance to fatigue with exercise. Since E2f1-/- mice show increased muscle performance, we examined the effect of E2f1 genetic inactivation in the mdx background, a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). E2f1-/-;mdx mice demonstrated a strong reduction of physiopathological signs of DMD, including preservation of muscle structure, decreased inflammatory profile, increased utrophin expression, resulting in better endurance and muscle contractile parameters, comparable to normal mdx mice. E2f1 deficiency in the mdx genetic background increased the oxidative metabolic gene program, mitochondrial activity and improved muscle functions. Interestingly, we observed increased E2F1 protein levels in DMD patients, suggesting that E2F1 might represent a promising target for the treatment of DMD.

  5. Pre-symptomatic activation of antioxidant responses and alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C1-deficient murine brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry E Kennedy

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused in most cases by mutations in the NPC1 gene. NPC1-deficiency is characterized by late endosomal accumulation of cholesterol, impaired cholesterol homeostasis, and a broad range of other cellular abnormalities. Although neuronal abnormalities and glial activation are observed in nearly all areas of the brain, the most severe consequence of NPC1-deficiency is a near complete loss of Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum. The link between cholesterol trafficking and NPC pathogenesis is not yet clear; however, increased oxidative stress in symptomatic NPC disease, increases in mitochondrial cholesterol, and alterations in autophagy/mitophagy suggest that mitochondria play a role in NPC disease pathology. Alterations in mitochondrial function affect energy and neurotransmitter metabolism, and are particularly harmful to the central nervous system. To investigate early metabolic alterations that could affect NPC disease progression, we performed metabolomics analyses of different brain regions from age-matched wildtype and Npc1 (-/- mice at pre-symptomatic, early symptomatic and late stage disease by (1H-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolic profiling revealed markedly increased lactate and decreased acetate/acetyl-CoA levels in Npc1 (-/- cerebellum and cerebral cortex at all ages. Protein and gene expression analyses indicated a pre-symptomatic deficiency in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, and an upregulation of glycolytic gene expression at the early symptomatic stage. We also observed a pre-symptomatic increase in several indicators of oxidative stress and antioxidant response systems in Npc1 (-/- cerebellum. Our findings suggest that energy metabolism and oxidative stress may present additional therapeutic targets in NPC disease, especially if intervention can be started at an early stage of the disease.

  6. IGF-1 deficiency causes atrophic changes associated with upregulation of VGluT1 and downregulation of MEF2 transcription factors in the mouse cochlear nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Santamaría, V; Alvarado, J C; Rodríguez-de la Rosa, L; Murillo-Cuesta, S; Contreras, J; Juiz, J M; Varela-Nieto, I

    2016-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a neurotrophic protein that plays a crucial role in modulating neuronal function and synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. Mice lacking the Igf1 gene exhibit profound deafness and multiple anomalies in the inner ear and spiral ganglion. An issue that remains unknown is whether, in addition to these peripheral abnormalities, IGF-1 deficiency also results in structural changes along the central auditory pathway that may contribute to an imbalance between excitation and inhibition, which might be reflected in abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABR). To assess such a possibility, we evaluated the morphological and physiological alterations in the cochlear nucleus complex of the adult mouse. The expression and distribution of the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1) and the vesicular inhibitory transporter (VGAT), which were used as specific markers for labeling excitatory and inhibitory terminals, and the involvement of the activity-dependent myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors in regulating excitatory synapses were assessed in a 4-month-old mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency and neurosensorial deafness (Igf1 (-/-) homozygous null mice). The results demonstrate decreases in the cochlear nucleus area and cell size along with cell loss in the cochlear nuclei of the deficient mouse. Additionally, our results demonstrate that there is upregulation of VGluT1, but not VGAT, immunostaining and downregulation of MEF2 transcription factors together with increased wave II amplitude in the ABR recording. Our observations provide evidence of an abnormal neuronal cytoarchitecture in the cochlear nuclei of Igf1 (-/-) null mice and suggest that the increased efficacy of glutamatergic synapses might be mediated by MEF2 transcription factors.

  7. Loss of the interferon-γ-inducible regulatory immunity-related GTPase (IRG), Irgm1, causes activation of effector IRG proteins on lysosomes, damaging lysosomal function and predicting the dramatic susceptibility of Irgm1-deficient mice to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric-Biresev, Jelena; Hunn, Julia P; Krut, Oleg; Helms, J Bernd; Martens, Sascha; Howard, Jonathan C

    2016-04-20

    The interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible immunity-related GTPase (IRG), Irgm1, plays an essential role in restraining activation of the IRG pathogen resistance system. However, the loss of Irgm1 in mice also causes a dramatic but unexplained susceptibility phenotype upon infection with a variety of pathogens, including many not normally controlled by the IRG system. This phenotype is associated with lymphopenia, hemopoietic collapse, and death of the mouse. We show that the three regulatory IRG proteins (GMS sub-family), including Irgm1, each of which localizes to distinct sets of endocellular membranes, play an important role during the cellular response to IFN-γ, each protecting specific membranes from off-target activation of effector IRG proteins (GKS sub-family). In the absence of Irgm1, which is localized mainly at lysosomal and Golgi membranes, activated GKS proteins load onto lysosomes, and are associated with reduced lysosomal acidity and failure to process autophagosomes. Another GMS protein, Irgm3, is localized to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes; in the Irgm3-deficient mouse, activated GKS proteins are found at the ER. The Irgm3-deficient mouse does not show the drastic phenotype of the Irgm1 mouse. In the Irgm1/Irgm3 double knock-out mouse, activated GKS proteins associate with lipid droplets, but not with lysosomes, and the Irgm1/Irgm3(-/-) does not have the generalized immunodeficiency phenotype expected from its Irgm1 deficiency. The membrane targeting properties of the three GMS proteins to specific endocellular membranes prevent accumulation of activated GKS protein effectors on the corresponding membranes and thus enable GKS proteins to distinguish organellar cellular membranes from the membranes of pathogen vacuoles. Our data suggest that the generalized lymphomyeloid collapse that occurs in Irgm1(-/-) mice upon infection with a variety of pathogens may be due to lysosomal damage caused by off-target activation of GKS proteins on lysosomal

  8. Raman microspectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for the non-invasive analysis of fibrillin-1 deficiency in the skin and in the in vitro skin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchle, Eva; Bauer, Hannah; Fernes, Patrick; Zuk, Alexandra; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Sengle, Gerhard

    2017-04-01

    Fibrillin microfibrils and elastic fibers are critical determinants of elastic tissues where they define as tissue-specific architectures vital mechanical properties such as pliability and elastic recoil. Fibrillin microfibrils also facilitate elastic fiber formation and support the association of epithelial cells with the interstitial matrix. Mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1) are causative for the Marfan syndrome, a congenital multisystem disorder characterized by progressive deterioration of the fibrillin microfibril/ elastic fiber architecture in the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, ocular, and dermal system. In this study, we utilized Raman microspectroscopy in combination with principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze the molecular consequences of fibrillin-1 deficiency in skin of a mouse model (GT8) of Marfan syndrome. In addition, full-thickness skin models incorporating murine wild-type and Fbn1 GT8/GT8 fibroblasts as well as human HaCaT keratinocytes were generated and analyzed. Skin models containing GT8 fibroblasts showed an altered epidermal morphology when compared to wild-type models indicating a new role for fibrillin-1 in dermal-epidermal crosstalk. Obtained Raman spectra together with PCA allowed to discriminate between healthy and deficient microfibrillar networks in murine dermis and skin models. Interestingly, results obtained from GT8 dermis and skin models showed similar alterations in molecular signatures triggered by fibrillin-1 deficiency such as amide III vibrations and decreased levels of glycan vibrations. Overall, this study indicates that Raman microspectroscopy has the potential to analyze subtle changes in fibrillin-1 microfibrils and elastic fiber networks. Therefore Raman microspectroscopy may be utilized as a non-invasive and sensitive diagnostic tool to identify connective tissue disorders and monitor their disease progression. Mutations in building blocks of the fibrillin microfibril/ elastic fiber network manifest in disease

  9. IGF-1 deficiency in a critical period early in life influences the vascular aging phenotype in mice by altering miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene regulation: implications for the developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, Stefano; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Ashpole, Nicole M; Valcarcel-Ares, M Noa; Wei, Jeanne Y; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological findings support the concept of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, suggesting that early-life hormonal influences during a sensitive period of development have a fundamental impact on vascular health later in life. The endocrine changes that occur during development are highly conserved across mammalian species and include dramatic increases in circulating IGF-1 levels during adolescence. The present study was designed to characterize the effect of developmental IGF-1 deficiency on the vascular aging phenotype. To achieve that goal, early-onset endocrine IGF-1 deficiency was induced in mice by knockdown of IGF-1 in the liver using Cre-lox technology (Igf1 f/f mice crossed with mice expressing albumin-driven Cre recombinase). This model exhibits low-circulating IGF-1 levels during the peripubertal phase of development, which is critical for the biology of aging. Due to the emergence of miRNAs as important regulators of the vascular aging phenotype, the effect of early-life IGF-1 deficiency on miRNA expression profile in the aorta was examined in animals at 27 months of age. We found that developmental IGF-1 deficiency elicits persisting late-life changes in miRNA expression in the vasculature, which significantly differed from those in mice with adult-onset IGF-1 deficiency (TBG-Cre-AAV8-mediated knockdown of IGF-1 at 5 month of age in Igf1 f/f mice). Using a novel computational approach, we identified miRNA target genes that are co-expressed with IGF-1 and associate with aging and vascular pathophysiology. We found that among the predicted targets, the expression of multiple extracellular matrix-related genes, including collagen-encoding genes, were downregulated in mice with developmental IGF-1 deficiency. Collectively, IGF-1 deficiency during a critical period during early in life results in persistent changes in post-transcriptional miRNA-mediated control of genes critical targets for vascular health, which likely contribute to the

  10. ARALAR/AGC1 deficiency, a neurodevelopmental disorder with severe impairment of neuronal mitochondrial respiration, does not produce a primary increase in brain lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juaristi, Inés; García-Martín, María L; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Pardo, Beatriz

    2017-07-01

    ARALAR/AGC1 (aspartate-glutamate mitochondrial carrier 1) is an important component of the NADH malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS). AGC1-deficiency is a rare disease causing global cerebral hypomyelination, developmental arrest, hypotonia, and epilepsy (OMIM ID #612949); the aralar-KO mouse recapitulates the major findings in humans. This study was aimed at understanding the impact of ARALAR-deficiency in brain lactate levels as a biomarker. We report that lactate was equally abundant in wild-type and aralar-KO mouse brain in vivo at postnatal day 17. We find that lactate production upon mitochondrial blockade depends on up-regulation of lactate formation in astrocytes rather than in neurons. However, ARALAR-deficiency decreased cell respiration in neurons, not astrocytes, which maintained unchanged respiration and lactate production. As the primary site of ARALAR-deficiency is neuronal, this explains the lack of accumulation of brain lactate in ARALAR-deficiency in humans and mice. On the other hand, we find that the cytosolic and mitochondrial components of the glycerol phosphate shuttle are present in astrocytes with similar activities. This suggests that glycerol phosphate shuttle is the main NADH shuttle in astrocytes and explains the absence of effects of ARALAR-deficiency in these cells. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Expression of Nek1 during kidney development and cyst formation in multiple nephron segments in the Nek1-deficient kat2J mouse model of polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yumay; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Litchfield, Patricia; Pena, Michelle; Juang, Charity; Riley, Daniel J

    2014-07-17

    Neks, mammalian orthologs of the fungal protein kinase never-in-mitosis A, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease. Among them, Nek1 is the primary protein inactivated in kat2J mouse models of PKD. We report the expression pattern of Nek1 and characterize the renal cysts that develop in kat2J mice. Nek1 is detectable in all murine tissues but its expression in wild type and kat2J heterozygous kidneys decrease as the kidneys mature, especially in tubular epithelial cells. In the embryonic kidney, Nek1 expression is most prominent in cells that will become podocytes and proximal tubules. Kidney development in kat2J homozygous mice is aberrant early, before the appearance of gross cysts: developing cortical zones are thin, populated by immature glomeruli, and characterized by excessive apoptosis of several cell types. Cysts in kat2J homozygous mice form postnatally in Bowman's space as well as different tubular subtypes. Late in life, kat2J heterozygous mice form renal cysts and the cells lining these cysts lack staining for Nek1. The primary cilia of cells lining cysts in kat2J homozygous mice are morphologically diverse: in some cells they are unusually long and in others there are multiple cilia of varying lengths. Our studies indicate that Nek1 deficiency leads to disordered kidney maturation, and cysts throughout the nephron.

  12. Restoration of human B-cell differentiation into NOD-SCID mice engrafted with gene-corrected CD34+ cells isolated from Artemis or RAG1-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Benjelloun, Fatine; Hue, Christophe; Andre-Schmutz, Isabelle; Bonhomme, Delphine; Forveille, Monique; Beldjord, Kheira; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Charneau, Pierre; Durandy, Anne; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2008-02-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by mutation of the recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) or Artemis gene lead to the absence of B- and T-cell differentiation. The only curative treatment is allogeneic bone marrow (BM) transplantation, which displays a high survival rate when an HLA compatible donor is available but has a poorer prognosis when the donor is partially compatible. Consequently, gene therapy may be a promising alternative strategy for these diseases. Here, we report that lentiviral gene-corrected BM CD34(+) cells (isolated from Artemis- or RAG1-deficient patients) sustain human B-cell differentiation following injection into non-obese diabetic/SCID (NOD-SCID) mice previously infused with anti-interleukin-2 receptor beta chain monoclonal antibody. In most of the mice BM, engrafted with Artemis-transduced cells, human B-cell differentiation occurred until the mature stage. The B cells were functional as human immunoglobulin M (IgM) was present in the serum. Following injection with RAG1-transduced cells, human engraftment occurred in vivo but B-cell differentiation until the mature stage was less frequent. However, when it occurred, it was always associated with human IgM production. This overall approach represents a useful tool for evaluating gene transfer efficiency in human SCID forms affecting B-cell development (such as Artemis deficiency) and for testing new vectors for improving in vivo RAG1 complementation.

  13. Short-term impact of a classical ketogenic diet on gut microbiota in GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome: A 3-month prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabue, Anna; Ferraris, Cinzia; Uggeri, Francesca; Trentani, Claudia; Bertoli, Simona; de Giorgis, Valentina; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Elli, Marina

    2017-02-01

    The classical ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat, very low-carbohydrate normocaloric diet used for drug-resistant epilepsy and Glucose Transporter 1 Deficiency Syndrome (GLUT1 DS). In animal models, high fat diet induces large alterations in microbiota producing deleterious effects on gut health. We carried out a pilot study on patients treated with KD comparing their microbiota composition before and after three months on the diet. Six patients affected by GLUT1 DS were asked to collect fecal samples before and after three months on the diet. RT - PCR analysis was performed in order to quantify Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., Clostridium perfringens, Enterobacteriaceae, Clostridium cluster XIV, Desulfovibrio spp. and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Compared with baseline, there were no statistically significant differences at 3 months in Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. However fecal microbial profiles revealed a statistically significant increase in Desulfovibrio spp. (p = 0.025), a bacterial group supposed to be involved in the exacerbation of the inflammatory condition of the gut mucosa associated to the consumption of fats of animal origin. A future prospective study on the changes in gut microbiota of all children with epilepsy started on a KD is warranted. In patients with dysbiosis demonstrated by fecal samples, it my be reasonable to consider an empiric trial of pre or probiotics to potentially restore the «ecological balance» of intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Profile of mecasermin for the long-term treatment of growth failure in children and adolescents with severe primary IGF-1 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Fintini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Danilo Fintini, Claudia Brufani, Marco CappaEndocrinology Unit, “Bambino Gesù” Children’s Hospital-IRCCS, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHI or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 deficiency (IGFD is characterized by deficit of IGF-1 production due to alteration of response of growth hormone (GH receptor to GH. This syndrome is due to mutation of GH receptor or IGF-1 gene and patients affected showed no response to GH therapy. The only treatment is recombinant IGF-1 (mecasermin, which has been available since 1986, but approved in the United States by the US Food and Drug Administration only in 2005 and in Europe by the European Medicines Agency in 2007. To date, few studies are available on long-term treatment with mecasermin in IGFD patients and some of them have a very small number of subjects. In this review we discuss briefly clinical features of severe primary IGFD, laboratory findings, and indications for treatment. Results of long-term therapy with rhIGF1 (mecasermin in patients affected by severe primary IGFD and possible side effects are explained.Keywords: mecasermin, therapy, Laron syndrome, IGF-1

  15. Selected Alkylating Agents Can Overcome Drug Tolerance of G0-like Tumor Cells and Eradicate BRCA1-Deficient Mammary Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic, Marina; Blatter, Sohvi; Guyader, Charlotte; Gonggrijp, Maaike; Kersbergen, Ariena; Küçükosmanoğlu, Aslι; Sol, Wendy; Drost, Rinske; Jonkers, Jos; Borst, Piet; Rottenberg, Sven

    2017-11-15

    Purpose: We aimed to characterize and target drug-tolerant BRCA1-deficient tumor cells that cause residual disease and subsequent tumor relapse. Experimental Design: We studied responses to various mono- and bifunctional alkylating agents in a genetically engineered mouse model for BRCA1/p53 -mutant breast cancer. Because of the large intragenic deletion of the Brca1 gene, no restoration of BRCA1 function is possible, and therefore, no BRCA1-dependent acquired resistance occurs. To characterize the cell-cycle stage from which Brca1 -/- ;p53 -/- mammary tumors arise after cisplatin treatment, we introduced the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (FUCCI) construct into the tumor cells. Results: Despite repeated sensitivity to the MTD of platinum drugs, the Brca1 -mutated mammary tumors are not eradicated, not even by a frequent dosing schedule. We show that relapse comes from single-nucleated cells delaying entry into the S-phase. Such slowly cycling cells, which are present within the drug-naïve tumors, are enriched in tumor remnants. Using the FUCCI construct, we identified nonfluorescent G 0 -like cells as the population most tolerant to platinum drugs. Intriguingly, these cells are more sensitive to the DNA-crosslinking agent nimustine, resulting in an increased number of multinucleated cells that lack clonogenicity. This is consistent with our in vivo finding that the nimustine MTD, among several alkylating agents, is the most effective in eradicating Brca1 -mutated mouse mammary tumors. Conclusions: Our data show that targeting G 0 -like cells is crucial for the eradication of BRCA1/p53-deficient tumor cells. This can be achieved with selected alkylating agents such as nimustine. Clin Cancer Res; 23(22); 7020-33. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Defect in dermatan sulfate in urine of patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by a CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Kosho, Tomoki; Hatamochi, Atsushi; Honda, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Tomomi; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Miyake, Noriko; Yamada, Shuhei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2017-08-01

    Dermatan sulfate (DS) plays a number of roles in a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling and tissue morphogenesis through interactions with various extracellular matrix proteins including collagen. Mutations in the carbohydrate sulfotransferase 14 gene (CHST14) encoding CHST14/dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase-1 (D4ST1), which is responsible for the biosynthesis of DS, cause a recently delineated form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, musculocontractural type 1), an autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder characterized by congenital malformations (specific craniofacial features, and congenital multiple contractures) and progressive fragility-related complications (skin hyperextensibility, bruisability, and fragility with atrophic scars; recurrent dislocations; progressive talipes or spinal deformities; and large subcutaneous hematomas). In an attempt to develop a diagnostic screening method for this type of EDS, the amount of DS in the urine of patients was analyzed. Urinary DS was quantified by an anion-exchange chromatography after treatment with DS-specific degrading enzyme. DS was not detected in the urine of patients with homo- or compound heterozygous mutations in CHST14. These results suggest that the quantification of DS in urine is applicable to an initial diagnosis of DS-defective EDS. This is the first study to perform a urinary disaccharide compositional analysis of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/DS chains in patients with EDS caused by a CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency, and demonstrated the absence of DS chains. This result suggests systemic DS depletion in this disorder, and also proposes the usefulness of a urinary disaccharide compositional analysis of CS/DS chains as a non-invasive screening method for this disorder. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Progranulin Overproduction Due to Fli-1 Deficiency Contributes to the Resistance of Dermal Fibroblasts to Tumor Necrosis Factor in Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Yohei; Asano, Yoshihide; Akamata, Kaname; Noda, Shinji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Takahashi, Takehiro; Toyama, Tetsuo; Tada, Yayoi; Sugaya, Makoto; Sato, Shinichi; Kadono, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    Progranulin is a growth factor that is active in wound repair and is an antagonist of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors, regulating fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Because long-standing activation of gene programs related to wound healing is a hallmark of systemic sclerosis (SSc), we sought to investigate the role of progranulin in SSc. Progranulin expression levels in human and murine skin samples were determined by immunohistochemical analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The role of progranulin in fibroblast activation was examined using a gene-silencing technique. Progranulin levels in serum obtained from 60 patients with SSc and 16 healthy control subjects were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Progranulin expression was increased in SSc dermal fibroblasts compared with normal dermal fibroblasts, both in vivo and in vitro. Transcription factor Fli-1, a deficiency of which is involved in the activation of SSc dermal fibroblasts, served as a potent repressor of the progranulin gene, and Fli-1(+/-) mice and bleomycin-treated wild-type mice exhibited up-regulated expression of progranulin in dermal fibroblasts. SSc dermal fibroblasts were resistant to the antifibrotic effect of TNF, but this resistance was reversed by gene silencing of progranulin. Serum progranulin levels were elevated in patients with early diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc), especially in those with inflammatory skin symptoms, and were positively correlated with the C-reactive protein level. Progranulin overproduction due to Fli-1 deficiency may contribute to the constitutive activation of SSc dermal fibroblasts by antagonizing the antifibrotic effect of TNF. Progranulin may also be involved in the inflammatory process associated with progressive skin sclerosis in early dcSSc. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Sphingosine kinase 1 deficiency confers protection against hyperoxia-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia in a murine model: role of S1P signaling and Nox proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harijith, Anantha; Pendyala, Srikanth; Reddy, Narsa M; Bai, Tao; Usatyuk, Peter V; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Gorshkova, Irina; Huang, Long Shuang; Mohan, Vijay; Garzon, Steve; Kanteti, Prasad; Reddy, Sekhar P; Raj, J Usha; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2013-10-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia of the premature newborn is characterized by lung injury, resulting in alveolar simplification and reduced pulmonary function. Exposure of neonatal mice to hyperoxia enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels in lung tissues; however, the role of increased S1P in the pathobiological characteristics of bronchopulmonary dysplasia has not been investigated. We hypothesized that an altered S1P signaling axis, in part, is responsible for neonatal lung injury leading to bronchopulmonary dysplasia. To validate this hypothesis, newborn wild-type, sphingosine kinase1(-/-) (Sphk1(-/-)), sphingosine kinase 2(-/-) (Sphk2(-/-)), and S1P lyase(+/-) (Sgpl1(+/-)) mice were exposed to hyperoxia (75%) from postnatal day 1 to 7. Sphk1(-/-), but not Sphk2(-/-) or Sgpl1(+/-), mice offered protection against hyperoxia-induced lung injury, with improved alveolarization and alveolar integrity compared with wild type. Furthermore, SphK1 deficiency attenuated hyperoxia-induced accumulation of IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and NADPH oxidase (NOX) 2 and NOX4 protein expression in lung tissue. In vitro experiments using human lung microvascular endothelial cells showed that exogenous S1P stimulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, whereas SphK1 siRNA, or inhibitor against SphK1, attenuated hyperoxia-induced S1P generation. Knockdown of NOX2 and NOX4, using specific siRNA, reduced both basal and S1P-induced ROS formation. These results suggest an important role for SphK1-mediated S1P signaling-regulated ROS in the development of hyperoxia-induced lung injury in a murine neonatal model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Middle Eastern Founder Mutation Expands the Genotypic and Phenotypic Spectrum of Mitochondrial MICU1 Deficiency: A Report of 13 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Sara; Eyaid, Wafaa; Kamer, Kimberli; Ali, Rehab; Al-Mureikhi, Mariam; Shahbeck, Noora; Al Mesaifri, Fatma; Makhseed, Nawal; Mohamed, Zakkiriah; AlShehhi, Wafaa Ali; Mootha, Vamsi K; Juusola, Jane; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg

    2018-05-03

    MICU1 encodes a Ca 2+ sensing, regulatory subunit of the mitochondrial uniporter, a selective calcium channel within the organelle's inner membrane. Ca 2+ entry into mitochondria helps to buffer cytosolic Ca 2+ transients and also activates ATP production within the organelle. Mutations in MICU1 have previously been reported in 17 children from nine families with muscle weakness, fatigue, normal lactate, and persistently elevated creatine kinase, as well as variable features that include progressive extrapyramidal signs, learning disabilities, nystagmus, and cataracts. In this study, we report the clinical features of an additional 13 patients from consanguineous Middle Eastern families with recessive mutations in MICU1. Of these patients, 12/13 are homozygous for a novel founder mutation c.553C>T (p.Q185*) that is predicted to lead to a complete loss of function of MICU1, while one patient is compound heterozygous for this mutation and an intragenic duplication of exons 9 and 10. The founder mutation occurs with a minor allele frequency of 1:60,000 in the ExAC database, but in ~1:500 individual in the Middle East. All 13 of these patients presented with developmental delay, learning disability, muscle weakness and easy fatigability, and failure to thrive, as well as additional variable features we tabulate. Consistent with previous cases, all of these patients had persistently elevated serum creatine kinase with normal lactate levels, but they also exhibited elevated transaminase enzymes. Our work helps to better define the clinical sequelae of MICU1 deficiency. Furthermore, our work suggests that targeted analysis of the MICU1 founder mutation in Middle Eastern patients may be warranted.

  20. CXC-chemokine regulation and neutrophil trafficking in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in P-selectin/ICAM-1 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crockett Elahé T

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophil adhesion and migration are critical in hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury (I/R. P-selectin and the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 can mediate neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions, neutrophil migration, and the interactions of neutrophils with hepatocytes in the liver. Despite very strong preclinical data, recent clinical trials failed to show a protective effect of anti-adhesion therapy in reperfusion injury, indicating that the length of injury might be a critical factor in neutrophil infiltration. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the role of P-selectin and ICAM-1 in neutrophil infiltration and liver injury during early and late phases of liver I/R. Methods Adult male wild-type and P-selectin/ICAM-1-deficient (P/I null mice underwent 90 minutes of partial liver ischemia followed by various periods of reperfusion (6, 15 h, and a survival study. Liver injury was assessed by plasma level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT and histopathology. The plasma cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6, MIP-2 and KC, were measured by ELISA. Results Reperfusion caused significant hepatocellular injury in both wild-type and P/I null mice as was determined by plasma ALT levels and liver histopathology. The injury was associated with a marked neutrophil infiltration into the ischemic livers of both wild-type and P/I null mice. Although the levels of ALT and neutrophil infiltration were slightly lower in the P/I null mice compared with the wild-type mice the differences were not statistically significant. The plasma cytokine data of TNF-α and IL-6 followed a similar pattern to ALT data, and no significant difference was found between the wild-type and P/I null groups. In contrast, a significant difference in KC and MIP-2 chemokine levels was observed between the wild-type and P/I null mice. Additionally, the survival study showed a trend towards increased survival in the P/I null group. Conclusion While ICAM-1 and P

  1. Specific gamma-hydroxybutyrate-binding sites but loss of pharmacological effects of gamma-hydroxybutyrate in GABA-B1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaupmann, Klemens; Cryan, John F; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2003-01-01

    gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. gamma-Hydroxybutyrate and its prodrug, gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), recently received increased public attention as they emerged as popular drugs of abuse. T...

  2. Uric acid, an important screening tool to detect inborn errors of metabolism: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinge, Eresha; Kularatnam, Grace Angeline Malarnangai; Dilanthi, Hewa Warawitage; Vidanapathirana, Dinesha Maduri; Jayasena, Kandana Liyanage Subhashinie Priyadarshika Kapilani Menike; Chandrasiri, Nambage Dona Priyani Dhammika; Indika, Neluwa Liyanage Ruwan; Ratnayake, Pyara Dilani; Gunasekara, Vindya Nandani; Fairbanks, Lynette Dianne; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2017-09-06

    Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism in humans. Altered serum and urine uric acid level (both above and below the reference ranges) is an indispensable marker in detecting rare inborn errors of metabolism. We describe different case scenarios of 4 Sri Lankan patients related to abnormal uric acid levels in blood and urine. CASE 1: A one-and-half-year-old boy was investigated for haematuria and a calculus in the bladder. Xanthine crystals were seen in microscopic examination of urine sediment. Low uric acid concentrations in serum and low urinary fractional excretion of uric acid associated with high urinary excretion of xanthine and hypoxanthine were compatible with xanthine oxidase deficiency. CASE 2: An 8-month-old boy presented with intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, screaming episodes, microcephaly, facial dysmorphism and severe neuro developmental delay. Low uric acid level in serum, low fractional excretion of uric acid and radiological findings were consistent with possible molybdenum cofactor deficiency. Diagnosis was confirmed by elevated levels of xanthine, hypoxanthine and sulfocysteine levels in urine. CASE 3: A 3-year-10-month-old boy presented with global developmental delay, failure to thrive, dystonia and self-destructive behaviour. High uric acid levels in serum, increased fractional excretion of uric acid and absent hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme level confirmed the diagnosis of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. CASE 4: A 9-year-old boy was investigated for lower abdominal pain, gross haematuria and right renal calculus. Low uric acid level in serum and increased fractional excretion of uric acid pointed towards hereditary renal hypouricaemia which was confirmed by genetic studies. Abnormal uric acid level in blood and urine is a valuable tool in screening for clinical conditions related to derangement of the nucleic acid metabolic pathway.

  3. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient Leishmania donovani

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, K.; Iovannisci, D.M.; Ullman, B.

    1986-01-01

    To elucidate the relative roles of two routes for adenine salvage, the authors use biochemical genetic approaches to isolate clonal strains of Leishmania donovani promasatigotes genetically deficient in APRTase activity. The studies suggest that the metabolic rate of adenine in these organisms is initiated by deamination. The radiolabel incorporation experiments and biochemical experiments are described in which the rate of uptake of radiolabelled purine nucleobases (C 14) was determined. Results are presented

  4. Tysnd1 deficiency in mice interferes with the peroxisomal localization of PTS2 enzymes, causing lipid metabolic abnormalities and male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Mizuno

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles involved in lipid metabolic processes, including those of very-long-chain fatty acids and branched-chain fatty acids, among others. Peroxisome matrix proteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm. Targeting signals (PTS or peroxisomal targeting signal at the C-terminus (PTS1 or N-terminus (PTS2 of peroxisomal matrix proteins mediate their import into the organelle. In the case of PTS2-containing proteins, the PTS2 signal is cleaved from the protein when transported into peroxisomes. The functional mechanism of PTS2 processing, however, is poorly understood. Previously we identified Tysnd1 (Trypsin domain containing 1 and biochemically characterized it as a peroxisomal cysteine endopeptidase that directly processes PTS2-containing prethiolase Acaa1 and PTS1-containing Acox1, Hsd17b4, and ScpX. The latter three enzymes are crucial components of the very-long-chain fatty acids β-oxidation pathway. To clarify the in vivo functions and physiological role of Tysnd1, we analyzed the phenotype of Tysnd1(-/- mice. Male Tysnd1(-/- mice are infertile, and the epididymal sperms lack the acrosomal cap. These phenotypic features are most likely the result of changes in the molecular species composition of choline and ethanolamine plasmalogens. Tysnd1(-/- mice also developed liver dysfunctions when the phytanic acid precursor phytol was orally administered. Phyh and Agps are known PTS2-containing proteins, but were identified as novel Tysnd1 substrates. Loss of Tysnd1 interferes with the peroxisomal localization of Acaa1, Phyh, and Agps, which might cause the mild Zellweger syndrome spectrum-resembling phenotypes. Our data established that peroxisomal processing protease Tysnd1 is necessary to mediate the physiological functions of PTS2-containing substrates.

  5. LC–MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1-Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depuydt, Geert; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smolders, Arne; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2014-04-04

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity, and metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including the expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS)-based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2);daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the upregulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complexes I, II, III, and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative of spatiotemporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. Finally, this restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves and possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways to sustain longevity.

  6. LC-MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1 Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depuydt, Geert G.; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smolders, Arne; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2014-02-20

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity and metabolism in C. elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2); daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the up-regulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complex I, II, III and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative for spatio-temporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. This restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves, possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways, in order to sustain longevity.

  7. LC–MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1-Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity, and metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including the expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS)-based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2);daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the upregulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complexes I, II, III, and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative of spatiotemporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. This restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves and possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways to sustain longevity. PMID:24555535

  8. Genetics Home Reference: TRNT1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some of these individuals have a condition called retinitis pigmentosa , in which the light-sensing cells of the ... developmental delay (SIFD) and a milder disorder called retinitis pigmentosa with erythrocytic microcytosis (RPEM), each named for its ...

  9. Identification of BRCA1-deficient ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Anne-Bine; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Rasmussen, Anders Aamann

    2011-01-01

    of offering genetic counseling and due to beneficial effects of PARP inhibitor treatment in this group. Since DNA sequencing is expensive and time-consuming efforts have been devoted to develop more indirect methods for BRCA screening that can improve the selection of patients for sequence-based BRCA testing....... Design. BRCA1-immunohistochemistry (IHC), fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and methylation analyses were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded ovarian cancer tissue. Sample: 54 ovarian cancers; 15 BRCA1 cancers, 4 BRCA2 cancers, 10 cancers from patients with a family history...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 150(5):627-33. Review. Citation on PubMed Pearson TS, Akman C, Hinton VJ, Engelstad K, De ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  11. Aspartic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... we eat. Aspartic acid is also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It ... release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: avocado, asparagus, and molasses. Animal sources of ...

  12. Connexin31.1 deficiency in the mouse impairs object memory and modulates open-field exploration, acetylcholine esterase levels in the striatum, and cAMP response element-binding protein levels in the striatum and piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, E; Zheng-Fischhöfer, Q; Viggiano, D; Gironi Carnevale, U A; Ruocco, L A; Zlomuzica, A; Schnichels, M; Willecke, K; Huston, J P; Sadile, A G

    2008-05-02

    Neuronal gap junctions in the brain, providing intercellular electrotonic signal transfer, have been implicated in physiological and behavioral correlates of learning and memory. In connexin31.1 (Cx31.1) knockout (KO) mice the coding region of the Cx31.1 gene was replaced by a LacZ reporter gene. We investigated the impact of Cx31.1 deficiency on open-field exploration, the behavioral response to an odor, non-selective attention, learning and memory performance, and the levels of memory-related proteins in the hippocampus, striatum and the piriform cortex. In terms of behavior, the deletion of the Cx31.1 coding DNA in the mouse led to increased exploratory behaviors in a novel environment, and impaired one-trial object recognition at all delays tested. Despite strong Cx31.1 expression in the peripheral and central olfactory system, Cx31.1 KO mice exhibited normal behavioral responses to an odor. We found increased levels of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the striatum of Cx31.1 KO mice. In the piriform cortex the Cx31.1 KO mice had an increased heterogeneity of CREB expression among neurons. In conclusion, gap-junctions featuring the Cx31.1 protein might be involved in open-field exploration as well as object memory and modulate levels of AChE and CREB in the striatum and piriform cortex.

  13. Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  14. Amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  15. Valproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by increasing the amount of a ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as valproic acid to treat various conditions ...

  16. Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  17. Aminocaproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  18. Ethacrynic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  19. Well acidizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Street, E H

    1980-01-23

    The apparatus relates in particular to a well-treating process in which an aqueous acid solution having a pH of < 2 is injected into a subterranean reservoir in a manner such that materials that contain ferric ions are present in the acid and, as the acid reacts within the reservoir and attains a pH exceeding 3, tend to be precipitated as ferric ion-containing solid materials that may plug the pores of the reservoir. Such a precipitation is prevented by dissolving in the acid solution an amount of 5-sulfosalicylic acid which is at least sufficient to sequester significant proportions of ferric ions when the pH of the acid is from 0.5 to 3 but is less than enough to cause a significant salting-out of solid materials, and an amount of citric acid which is at least sufficient to sequester significant proportions of ferric ions when the pH of the acid is from 3 to 6 but is less than enough to precipitate a significant amount of calcium citrate. The amount of the 5-sulfosalicylic acid may be from 0.01 to 0.05 moles/l and the amount of citric acid is from 0.001 to 0.009 moles/l. 11 claims.

  20. Ibotenic acid and thioibotenic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have determined and compared the pharmacological profiles of ibotenic acid and its isothiazole analogue thioibotenic acid at native rat ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors and at recombinant rat metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines....... Thioibotenic acid has a distinct pharmacological profile at group III mGlu receptors compared with the closely structurally related ibotenic acid; the former is a potent (low microm) agonist, whereas the latter is inactive. By comparing the conformational energy profiles of ibotenic and thioibotenic acid...... with the conformations preferred by the ligands upon docking to mGlu1 and models of the other mGlu subtypes, we propose that unlike other subtypes, group III mGlu receptor binding sites require a ligand conformation at an energy level which is prohibitively expensive for ibotenic acid, but not for thioibotenic acid...

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_002755 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osphoribosyltransferase (Qaprtase) From ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis In Complex With Phthalate And ...b|1QPR|D Chain D, Quinolinate ... Phosphoribosyltransferase (Qaprtase) From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis...horibosyltransferase (Qaprtase) From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis In Com...e (Qaprtase) From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis In Complex With Phthalate And Prpcp ... pdb|1...cture Of Quinolinic Acid ... Phosphoribosyltransferase From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis: A

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osphoribosyltransferase (Qaprtase) From ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis In Complex With Phthalate And ...b|1QPR|D Chain D, Quinolinate ... Phosphoribosyltransferase (Qaprtase) From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis...horibosyltransferase (Qaprtase) From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis In Com...e (Qaprtase) From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis In Complex With Phthalate And Prpcp ... pdb|1...cture Of Quinolinic Acid ... Phosphoribosyltransferase From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis: A

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osphoribosyltransferase (Qaprtase) From ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis In Complex With Phthalate And ...b|1QPR|D Chain D, Quinolinate ... Phosphoribosyltransferase (Qaprtase) From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis...horibosyltransferase (Qaprtase) From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis In Com...e (Qaprtase) From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis In Complex With Phthalate And Prpcp ... pdb|1...cture Of Quinolinic Acid ... Phosphoribosyltransferase From Mycobacterium ... Tuberculosis: A

  4. Human triose-phosphate isomerase deficiency: a single amino acid substitution results in a thermolabile enzyme.

    OpenAIRE

    Daar, I O; Artymiuk, P J; Phillips, D C; Maquat, L E

    1986-01-01

    Triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI; D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ketol-isomerase, EC 5.3.1.1) deficiency is a recessive disorder that results in hemolytic anemia and neuromuscular dysfunction. To determine the molecular basis of this disorder, a TPI allele from two unrelated patients homozygous for TPI deficiency was compared with an allele from a normal individual. Each disease-associated sequence harbors a G X C----C X G transversion in the codon for amino acid-104 and specifies a structurally...

  5. Formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, H; Laing, B

    1921-12-03

    The production of formic acid by the oxidation of methane with a metallic oxide or by the interaction of carbon monoxide and water vapor in the presence of a catalyst, preferably a metallic oxide, is described along with the destructive distillation of carbonaceous material in the preesnce of formic acid vapor for the purpose of increasing the yield of condensible hydrocarbons.

  6. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongjin; Ntui, Valentine Otang; Xiong, Liming

    2016-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2016-06-06

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Lipoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Tetikcok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipoic acid, which is defined as a miralce antioxidan, is used by many departments. Eventhough clinical using data are very limited , it is used in treatment of diabetic neuropathy, physical therapy and rehabilitation clinic, dermatology clinic, geriatric clinics. It has usage area for cosmetic purposes. Although there are reports there are the direction of the effectiveness in these areas, the works done are not enough. Today lipoic acid , used in many areas ,is evaluated as universal antioxidant [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 206-209

  9. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid comes as a capsule to take by mouth. It is usually taken with food every 6 hours as needed for up to 1 week. Follow ... pain vomit that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds black, tarry, or bloody stools slowed breathing ...

  10. Acid rain. Les pluies acides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curren, T

    1979-11-28

    This report was produced for the use of Members of Parliament and House of Commons committees. The document describes the formation of acid rain, emissions of acidifying pollutants in North America, the growth of the problem and its environmental effects on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, human health and man-made structures. Areas of Canada which are most susceptible are identified. Actions taken by Parliament are given, including the formation of a sub-committee on acid rain and the passing of Bill C-51 in 1980 to amend the Clean Air Act, bringing it closer to a similar law in the U.S. A chronology of government responses to acid rain at the international, national and provincial level, is given. The most recent government actions included the passing of the US Clean Air Act by the Senate, the amending of the act into law, and commencement of negotiations to develop a Canada-US Air Quality Accord. 10 refs.

  11. Levulinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hachuła

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound (systematic name: 4-oxopentanoic acid, C5H8O3, is close to planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0762 Å. In the crystal, the molecules interact via O—H...O hydrogen bonds in which the hydroxy O atoms act as donors and the ketone O atoms in adjacent molecules as acceptors, forming C(7 chains along [20-1].

  12. Impaired nutrient signaling and body weight control in a Na+ neutral amino acid cotransporter (Slc6a19)-deficient mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröer, Angelika; Juelich, Torsten; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M; Tietze, Nadine; Solomon, Peter S; Holst, Jeff; Bailey, Charles G; Rasko, John E J; Bröer, Stefan

    2011-07-29

    Amino acid uptake in the intestine and kidney is mediated by a variety of amino acid transporters. To understand the role of epithelial neutral amino acid uptake in whole body homeostasis, we analyzed mice lacking the apical broad-spectrum neutral (0) amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (Slc6a19). A general neutral aminoaciduria was observed similar to human Hartnup disorder which is caused by mutations in SLC6A19. Na(+)-dependent uptake of neutral amino acids into the intestine and renal brush-border membrane vesicles was abolished. No compensatory increase of peptide transport or other neutral amino acid transporters was detected. Mice lacking B(0)AT1 showed a reduced body weight. When adapted to a standard 20% protein diet, B(0)AT1-deficient mice lost body weight rapidly on diets containing 6 or 40% protein. Secretion of insulin in response to food ingestion after fasting was blunted. In the intestine, amino acid signaling to the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was reduced, whereas the GCN2/ATF4 stress response pathway was activated, indicating amino acid deprivation in epithelial cells. The results demonstrate that epithelial amino acid uptake is essential for optimal growth and body weight regulation.

  13. PEX1 deficiency presenting as Leber congenital amaurosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michelakakis, Helen M.; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I.; Moraitou, Marina S.; Gootjes, Jeannette; Wanders, Ronald J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Peroxisome biogenesis disorders result from defects in peroxin proteins involved in peroxisomal matrix and membrane protein import. Peroxins are encoded in peroxin protein genes; to date, the PEX genes responsible for all 12 peroxisome biogenesis disorders complementation groups are known. Peroxin

  14. Hypocretin-1 Deficiency in a Girl With ROHHAD Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, K.; Verloo, P.; Verhelst, H.; Coster, R. van; Overeem, S.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare and complex pediatric syndrome, essentially caused by dysfunction of 3 vital systems regulating endocrine, respiratory, and autonomic nervous system functioning. The clinical spectrum

  15. Hypocretin-1 deficiency in a girl with ROHHAD syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhondt, Karlien; Verloo, Patrick; Verhelst, Hélène; Van Coster, Rudy; Overeem, Sebastiaan

    2013-09-01

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare and complex pediatric syndrome, essentially caused by dysfunction of 3 vital systems regulating endocrine, respiratory, and autonomic nervous system functioning. The clinical spectrum of ROHHAD is broad, but sleep/wake disorders have received relatively little attention so far, although the central hypothalamic dysfunction would make the occurrence of sleep symptoms likely. In this case report, we expand the phenotype of ROHHAD with a number of striking sleep symptoms that together can be classified as a secondary form of narcolepsy. We present a 7-year-old girl with ROHHAD who displayed the classic features of narcolepsy with cataplexy: excessive daytime sleepiness with daytime naps, visual hallucinations, and partial cataplexy reflected in intermittent loss of facial muscle tone. Nocturnal polysomnography revealed sleep fragmentation and a sleep-onset REM period characteristic for narcolepsy. The diagnosis was confirmed by showing an absence of hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. We discuss potential pathophysiological implications as well as symptomatic treatment options.

  16. Consequences of SOS1 deficiency: Intracellular physiology and transcription

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, OhDong; Zahir, Ali; Cheol, ParkHyeong; Bressan, Ray Anthony; Jin, YunDae; Bohnert, Hans Jü rgen

    2010-01-01

    –confined to the N-terminus, but the modular structure of the protein includes a segment with several domains that are functionally not studied but comprise more than half of the protein’s length. Additional functions of the protein appear to be an influence

  17. Quantitative proteomics suggests metabolic reprogramming during ETHE1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahebekhtiari, Navid; Thomsen, Michelle M.; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase (ETHE1) causes the severe metabolic disorder ethylmalonic encephalopathy, which is characterized by early-onset encephalopathy and defective cytochrome C oxidase because of hydrogen sulfide accumulation. Although the severe systemic consequences of t...

  18. Human Dectin-1 Deficiency and Mucocutaneous Fungal Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferwerda, Bart; Ferwerda, Gerben; Plantinga, Theo S.; Willment, Janet A.; van Spriel, Annemiek B.; Venselaar, Hanka; Elbers, Clara C.; Johnson, Melissa D.; Cambi, Alessandra; Huysamen, Cristal; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Jansen, Trees; Verheijen, Karlijn; Masthoff, Laury; Morre, Servaas A.; Vriend, Gert; Williams, David L.; Perfect, John R.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Adema, Gosse J.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Brown, Gordon D.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2009-01-01

    Mucocutaneous fungal infections are typically found in patients who have no known immune defects. We describe a family in which four women who were affected by either recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis or onychomycosis had the early-stop-codon mutation Tyr238X in the beta-glucan receptor dectin-1.

  19. Attenuation of Cerebral Ischemic Injury in Smad1 Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie K Wong

    Full Text Available Stroke results in brain tissue damage from ischemia and oxidative stress. Molecular regulators of the protective versus deleterious cellular responses after cerebral ischemia remain to be identified. Here, we show that deletion of Smad1, a conserved transcription factor that mediates canonical bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling, results in neuroprotection in an ischemia-reperfusion (I/R stroke model. Uninjured mice with conditional deletion of Smad1 in the CNS (Smad1 cKO displayed upregulation of the reactive astrocyte marker GFAP and hypertrophic morphological changes in astrocytes compared to littermate controls. Additionally, cultured Smad1(-/- astrocytes exhibited an enhanced antioxidant capacity. When subjected to I/R injury by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO, Smad1 cKO mice showed enhanced neuronal survival and improved neurological recovery at 7 days post-stroke. This neuroprotective phenotype is associated with attenuated reactive astrocytosis and neuroinflammation, along with reductions in oxidative stress, p53 induction, and apoptosis. Our data suggest that Smad1-mediated signaling pathway is involved in stroke pathophysiology and may present a new potential target for stroke therapy.

  20. Consequences of SOS1 deficiency: Intracellular physiology and transcription

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, OhDong

    2010-06-01

    As much as there is known about the function of the sodium/proton antiporter SOS1 in plants, recent studies point towards a more general role for this protein. The crucial involvement in salt stress protection is clearly one of its functions –confined to the N-terminus, but the modular structure of the protein includes a segment with several domains that are functionally not studied but comprise more than half of the protein’s length. Additional functions of the protein appear to be an influence on vesicle trafficking, vacuolar pH and general ion homeostasis during salt stress. Eliminating SOS1 leads to the expression of genes that are not strictly salinity stress related. Functions that are regulated in sos1 mutants included pathogen responses, and effects on circadian rhythm.

  1. A distinctive patchy osteomalacia characterises Phospho1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Alan; Staines, Katherine A; Javaheri, Behzad; Millan, Jose Luis; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Farquharson, Colin

    2017-08-01

    The phosphatase PHOSPHO1 is involved in the initiation of biomineralisation. Bones in Phospho1 knockout (KO) mice show histological osteomalacia with frequent bowing of long bones and spontaneous fractures: they contain less mineral, with smaller mineral crystals. However, the consequences of Phospho1 ablation on the microscale structure of bone are not yet fully elucidated. Tibias and femurs obtained from wild-type and Phospho1 null (KO) mice (25-32 weeks old) were embedded in PMMA, cut and polished to produce near longitudinal sections. Block surfaces were studied using 20 kV backscattered-electron (BSE) imaging, and again after iodine staining to reveal non-mineralised matrix and cellular components. For 3D characterisation, we used X-ray micro-tomography. Bones opened with carbide milling tools to expose endosteal surfaces were macerated using an alkaline bacterial pronase enzyme detergent, 5% hydrogen peroxide and 7% sodium hypochlorite solutions to produce 3D surfaces for study with 3D BSE scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Extensive regions of both compact cortical and trabecular bone matrix in Phospho1 KO mice contained no significant mineral and/or showed arrested mineralisation fronts, characterised by a failure in the fusion of the calcospherite-like, separately mineralising, individual micro-volumes within bone. Osteoclastic resorption of the uncalcified matrix in Phospho1 KO mice was attenuated compared with surrounding normally mineralised bone. The extent and position of this aberrant biomineralisation varied considerably between animals, contralateral limbs and anatomical sites. The most frequent manifestation lay, however, in the nearly complete failure of mineralisation in the bone surrounding the numerous transverse blood vessel canals in the cortices. In conclusion, SEM disclosed defective mineralising fronts and extensive patchy osteomalacia, which has previously not been recognised. These data further confirm the role of this phosphatase in physiological skeletal mineralisation. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  2. Silencing of acidic pathogenesis-related PR-1 genes increases extracellular beta-(1 -> 3)-glucanase activity at the onset of tobacco defence reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riviere, M.P.; Marais, A.; Ponchet, M.

    2008-01-01

    silenced. Plants lacking extracellular PR-1s were more susceptible than wild-type plants to the oomycete Phytophthora parasitica but displayed unaffected systemic acquired resistance and developmental resistance to this pathogen. Treatment with salicylic acid up-regulates the PR-1g gene, encoding a basic...... protein of the PR-1 family, in PR-1-deficient tobacco, indicating that PR-1 expression may repress that of PR-1g. This shows that acidic PR-1s are dispensable for expression of salicylic acid-dependent acquired resistances against P. parasitica and may reveal a functional overlap in tobacco defence......The class 1 pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are thought to be involved in plant defence responses, but their molecular functions are unknown. The function of PR-1 was investigated in tobacco by generating stable PR-1a-silenced lines in which other acidic PR-1 genes (PR-1b and PR-1c) were...

  3. Understanding Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  4. Mild Lesch-Nyhan Disease in a Boy with a Null Mutation inHPRT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayat, Allan; Christensen, Mette; Wibrand, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency results in a continuous spectrum of clinical phenotypes though all include overproduction of uric acid with hyperuricaemia, urate nephrolithiasis and gout. HPRT1 mutations that result in very low or no HPRT enzyme activities...

  5. The acidic functional groups of humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanxiang, Li; Shuhe, Sun; Zhai Zongxi, Wu Qihu

    1983-09-01

    The acidic functional groups content, pK value, DELTAH and DELTAS of humic acid (HA) and nitro-humic acid (NHA) were determined by potentiometry, conductometry and calorimetric titration. The thermodynamic parameters of carboxylic groups and phenolic hydroxyl groups of humic acid are similar to that of simple hydroxy-benzoic acid. The configuration sites of acidic functional groups in humic acid from different coals are different. The carbonyl groups on aromatic rings are probably ortho to phenolic -OH for HA and NHA extracted from Huangxian's brown coal and Japanese lignite, while those from Lingshi's weathered coal are not. The weak -COOH groups of the latter possess higher chemical activity. The -COOH content in HA increases, phenolic -OH group decreases and the chemical acidity of acidic functional groups increases when HA is oxidized by nitric acid. (14 refs.)

  6. Okadaic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Severinsen, Mai C K

    2014-01-01

    are the hallmark of phospholipidosis, a pathological condition characterized by lysosomal phospholipid accumulation. Phospholipidosis is observed in acquired lysosomal storage diseases and is induced by a large number of cationic amphiphilic drugs. Unlike the latter, however, OA does not act by accumulating...... in acidic organelles, implying a different toxic mechanism of action. We propose that rapid induction of LBs, an indicator of phospholipidosis, should be included in the future toxicity profile of OA....... hyper protein phosphorylation, but no detectable loss of cell polarity or cytoskeletal integrity of the enterocytes. Using a fluorescent membrane marker, FM dye, endocytosis from the brush border was affected by the toxin. Although constitutive uptake into subapical terminal web-localized early...

  7. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  8. Plasma amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  9. Uric acid - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on ... are no risks with this test. Images Uric acid test Uric acid crystals References Burns CM, Wortmann RL. Clinical ...

  10. Uric acid test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... for testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  11. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid in the ...

  12. Facts about Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... of the baby’s brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  13. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  14. Citric acid urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine - citric acid test; Renal tubular acidosis - citric acid test; Kidney stones - citric acid test; Urolithiasis - citric acid test ... No special preparation is necessary for this test. But the results ... test is usually done while you are on a normal diet. Ask your ...

  15. Acid Deposition Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.E.K.

    2004-01-01

    Acid deposition, commonly known as acid rain, occurs when emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and other industrial processes undergo complex chemical reactions in the atmosphere and fall to the earth as wet deposition (rain, snow, cloud, fog) or dry deposition (dry particles, gas). Rain and snow are already naturally acidic, but are only considered problematic when less than a ph of 5.0 The main chemical precursors leading to acidic conditions are atmospheric concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). When these two compounds react with water, oxygen, and sunlight in the atmosphere, the result is sulfuric (H 2 SO 4 ) and nitric acids (HNO 3 ), the primary agents of acid deposition which mainly produced from the combustion of fossil fuel and from petroleum refinery. Airborne chemicals can travel long distances from their sources and can therefore affect ecosystems over broad regional scales and in locations far from the sources of emissions. According to the concern of petroleum ministry with the environment and occupational health, in this paper we will discussed the acid deposition phenomena through the following: Types of acidic deposition and its components in the atmosphere Natural and man-made sources of compounds causing the acidic deposition. Chemical reactions causing the acidic deposition phenomenon in the atmosphere. Factors affecting level of acidic deposition in the atmosphere. Impact of acid deposition. Procedures for acidic deposition control in petroleum industry

  16. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ...

  17. Lactic acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  18. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  19. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth / For Parents / Folic Acid and Pregnancy Print ...

  20. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  1. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  2. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  3. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  4. Azelaic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  5. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  6. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  7. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  8. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  9. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  10. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  11. Stomach acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour (mEq/ ...

  12. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  13. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  14. Amino acids in the sedimentary humic and fulvic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.

    acids in the coastal Arabian Sea sediments: whereas amino acids content of fulvic acids was lower than that of humic acids in the coastal sediments of Bay of Bengal. Slope sedimentary humic acids were relatively enriched in amino acids as compared...

  15. 78 FR 20029 - Castor Oil, Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic Acid; Tolerance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ..., Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic Acid; Tolerance Exemption AGENCY... from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of castor oil, polymer with adipic acid, linoleic acid... pesticide formulation. Advance Polymer Technology submitted a petition to EPA under the Federal Food, Drug...

  16. Bile acid sequestrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid...... and glucose metabolism, and possibly energy homeostasis, through activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) constitute a class of drugs that bind bile acids in the intestine to form a nonabsorbable complex resulting in interruption...... of the enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...

  17. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  18. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  19. Acidity of hydroxamic acids and amides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Böhm, S.; Exner, Otto

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 7 (2003), s. 1176-1180 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : hydroxamic acids * DFT calculations * isodesmic reactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  20. Fusidic acid in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöfer, Helmut; Simonsen, Lene

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the clinical efficacy of fusidic acid in skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), notably those due to Staphylococcus aureus, are reviewed. Oral fusidic acid (tablets dosed at 250 mg twice daily, or a suspension for paediatric use at 20 mg/kg/day given as two daily doses) has shown goo...

  1. Characterization of acid tars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Sunday A.; Stegemann, Julia A.; Roy, Amitava

    2010-01-01

    Acid tars from the processing of petroleum and petrochemicals using sulfuric acid were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) micro-analysis. Leaching of contaminants from the acid tars in 48 h batch tests with distilled water at a liquid-to-solid ratio 10:1 was also studied. GC/MS results show that the samples contained aliphatic hydrocarbons, cyclic hydrocarbons, up to 12 of the 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and numerous other organic groups, including organic acids (sulfonic acids, carboxylic acids and aromatic acids), phenyl, nitrile, amide, furans, thiophenes, pyrroles, and phthalates, many of which are toxic. Metals analysis shows that Pb was present in significant concentration. DSC results show different transition peaks in the studied samples, demonstrating their complexity and variability. FTIR analysis further confirmed the presence of the organic groups detected by GC/MS. The SEM/EDX micro-analysis results provided insight on the surface characteristics of the samples and show that contaminants distribution was heterogeneous. The results provide useful data on the composition, complexity, and variability of acid tars; information which hitherto have been scarce in public domain.

  2. Characterization of acid tars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Sunday A., E-mail: sunday.leonard@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Civil Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Stegemann, Julia A. [Department of Civil Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Roy, Amitava [J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Centre for Advance Microstructures and Devices (CAMD), 6980 Jefferson Highway, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70806 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Acid tars from the processing of petroleum and petrochemicals using sulfuric acid were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) micro-analysis. Leaching of contaminants from the acid tars in 48 h batch tests with distilled water at a liquid-to-solid ratio 10:1 was also studied. GC/MS results show that the samples contained aliphatic hydrocarbons, cyclic hydrocarbons, up to 12 of the 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and numerous other organic groups, including organic acids (sulfonic acids, carboxylic acids and aromatic acids), phenyl, nitrile, amide, furans, thiophenes, pyrroles, and phthalates, many of which are toxic. Metals analysis shows that Pb was present in significant concentration. DSC results show different transition peaks in the studied samples, demonstrating their complexity and variability. FTIR analysis further confirmed the presence of the organic groups detected by GC/MS. The SEM/EDX micro-analysis results provided insight on the surface characteristics of the samples and show that contaminants distribution was heterogeneous. The results provide useful data on the composition, complexity, and variability of acid tars; information which hitherto have been scarce in public domain.

  3. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  4. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  5. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  7. Folic acid in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regularly removed from the body through urine, so excess amounts do not build up in the body. You should not get more than 1000 mcg per day of folic acid. Using higher levels of folic acid can mask vitamin B12 deficiency.

  8. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  9. Locked nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Sørensen, Mads D; Wengel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing very high affinity and excellent specificity toward complementary DNA and RNA, and LNA oligonucleotides have been applied as antisense molecules both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we briefly describe the basic...

  10. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Wesén, Clas; Sundin, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids have been found to be major contributors to organohalogen compounds in fish, bivalves, jellyfish, and lobster, and they have been indicated to contribute considerably to organohalogens in marine mammals. Brominated fatty acids have been found in marine sponges. Also...

  11. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  12. Phosphates and phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, P [Compagnie Francaise de l' Azote, Paris (France)

    1983-01-01

    In chapter 8.5 the following aspects of uranium recovery are treated: basis of extraction process, extraction principle, solvents, strength of the acid to be treated, technology, main processes in use, impact of uranium recovery on phosphoric acid plants, and economics of uranium recovery plants.

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat- ... in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  14. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, Margreet R.; Hollman, Peter C H; Katan, Martijn B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the

  15. Enzymatic formation of hexadecenoic acid from palmitic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masao; Fujino, Yasuhiko

    1975-01-01

    Desaturation of palmitic acid was investigated in an enzyme system prepared from rat liver. 2-trans-Hexadecenoic acid as well as 9-cis-gexadecenoic acid (palmitoleic acid) were found to be formed as monoenoic acid in this system. (author)

  16. Lewis Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lucy C; Hogg, James M; Swadźba-Kwaśny, Małgorzata

    2017-08-21

    Until very recently, the term Lewis acidic ionic liquids (ILs) was nearly synonymous with halometallate ILs, with a strong focus on chloroaluminate(III) systems. The first part of this review covers the historical context in which these were developed, speciation of a range of halometallate ionic liquids, attempts to quantify their Lewis acidity, and selected recent applications: in industrial alkylation processes, in supported systems (SILPs/SCILLs) and in inorganic synthesis. In the last decade, interesting alternatives to halometallate ILs have emerged, which can be divided into two sub-sections: (1) liquid coordination complexes (LCCs), still based on halometallate species, but less expensive and more diverse than halometallate ionic liquids, and (2) ILs with main-group Lewis acidic cations. The two following sections cover these new liquid Lewis acids, also highlighting speciation studies, Lewis acidity measurements, and applications.

  17. Acidity in rainfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisue, G.T.; Kacoyannakis, J.

    1975-01-01

    The reported increasing acidity of rainfall raises many interesting ecological and chemical questions. In spite of extensive studies in Europe and North America there are, for example, great uncertainties in the relative contributions of strong and weak acids to the acid-base properties of rainwater. Unravelling this and similar problems may require even more rigorous sample collection and analytical procedures than previously employed. Careful analysis of titration curves permits inferences to be made regarding chemical composition, the possible response of rainwater to further inputs of acidic components to the atmosphere, and the behavior to be expected when rainwater interacts with the buffers present in biological materials and natural waters. Rainwater samples collected during several precipitation events at Argonne National Laboratory during October and November 1975 have been analyzed for pH, acid and base neutralizing properties, and the ions of ammonium, nitrate, chloride, sulfate, and calcium. The results are tabulated

  18. The Xenobiotic Transporter Mdr1 Enforces T Cell Homeostasis in the Presence of Intestinal Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Kayama, Hisako; Chen, Mei Lan; Delmas, Amber; Sun, Amy; Kim, Sang Yong; Rangarajan, Erumbi S; McKevitt, Kelly; Beck, Amanda P; Jackson, Cody B; Crynen, Gogce; Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; Lacey, Precious N; Martinez, Gustavo J; Izard, Tina; Lorenz, Robin G; Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Cominelli, Fabio; Abreu, Maria T; Hommes, Daniel W; Koralov, Sergei B; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Sundrud, Mark S

    2017-12-19

    CD4 + T cells are tightly regulated by microbiota in the intestine, but whether intestinal T cells interface with host-derived metabolites is less clear. Here, we show that CD4 + T effector (Teff) cells upregulated the xenobiotic transporter, Mdr1, in the ileum to maintain homeostasis in the presence of bile acids. Whereas wild-type Teff cells upregulated Mdr1 in the ileum, those lacking Mdr1 displayed mucosal dysfunction and induced Crohn's disease-like ileitis following transfer into Rag1 -/- hosts. Mdr1 mitigated oxidative stress and enforced homeostasis in Teff cells exposed to conjugated bile acids (CBAs), a class of liver-derived emulsifying agents that actively circulate through the ileal mucosa. Blocking ileal CBA reabsorption in transferred Rag1 -/- mice restored Mdr1-deficient Teff cell homeostasis and attenuated ileitis. Further, a subset of ileal Crohn's disease patients displayed MDR1 loss of function. Together, these results suggest that coordinated interaction between mucosal Teff cells and CBAs in the ileum regulate intestinal immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human triose-phosphate isomerase deficiency: a single amino acid substitution results in a thermolabile enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daar, I O; Artymiuk, P J; Phillips, D C; Maquat, L E

    1986-10-01

    Triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI; D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ketol-isomerase, EC 5.3.1.1) deficiency is a recessive disorder that results in hemolytic anemia and neuromuscular dysfunction. To determine the molecular basis of this disorder, a TPI allele from two unrelated patients homozygous for TPI deficiency was compared with an allele from a normal individual. Each disease-associated sequence harbors a G X C----C X G transversion in the codon for amino acid-104 and specifies a structurally altered protein in which a glutamate residue is replaced by an aspartate residue. The importance of glutamate-104 to enzyme structure and function is implicated by its conservation in the TPI protein of all species that have been characterized to date. The glutamate-to-aspartate substitution results in a thermolabile enzyme as demonstrated by assays of TPI activity in cultured fibroblasts of each patient and cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that were stably transformed with the mutant alleles. Although this substitution conserves the overall charge of amino acid-104, the x-ray crystal structure of chicken TPI indicates that the loss of a side-chain methylene group (-CH2CH2COO- ---- -CH2COO-) is sufficient to disrupt the counterbalancing of charges that normally exists within a hydrophobic pocket of the native enzyme.

  20. Conjugated Fatty Acid Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Richa; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Sweet, Marie; Shanklin, John

    2012-01-01

    Conjugated linolenic acids (CLNs), 18:3 Δ9,11,13, lack the methylene groups found between the double bonds of linolenic acid (18:3 Δ9,12,15). CLNs are produced by conjugase enzymes that are homologs of the oleate desaturases FAD2. The goal of this study was to map the domain(s) within the Momordica charantia conjugase (FADX) responsible for CLN formation. To achieve this, a series of Momordica FADX-Arabidopsis FAD2 chimeras were expressed in the Arabidopsis fad3fae1 mutant, and the transformed seeds were analyzed for the accumulation of CLN. These experiments identified helix 2 and the first histidine box as a determinant of conjugase product partitioning into punicic acid (18:3 Δ9cis,11trans,13cis) or α-eleostearic acid (18:3 Δ9cis,11trans,13trans). This was confirmed by analysis of a FADX mutant containing six substitutions in which the sequence of helix 2 and first histidine box was converted to that of FAD2. Each of the six FAD2 substitutions was individually converted back to the FADX equivalent identifying residues 111 and 115, adjacent to the first histidine box, as key determinants of conjugase product partitioning. Additionally, expression of FADX G111V and FADX G111V/D115E resulted in an approximate doubling of eleostearic acid accumulation to 20.4% and 21.2%, respectively, compared with 9.9% upon expression of the native Momordica FADX. Like the Momordica conjugase, FADX G111V and FADX D115E produced predominantly α-eleostearic acid and little punicic acid, but the FADX G111V/D115E double mutant produced approximately equal amounts of α-eleostearic acid and its isomer, punicic acid, implicating an interactive effect of residues 111 and 115 in punicic acid formation. PMID:22451660

  1. Glycosyltransferase glycosylating flavokermesic acid and/or kermesic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I) : conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II) : conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid.......An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I) : conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II) : conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid....

  2. GLYCOSYLTRANSFERASE GLYCOSYLATING FLAVOKERMESIC ACID AND/OR KERMESIC ACID

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I): conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II): conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid.......An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I): conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II): conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid....

  3. Waht is 'molybdic acid' or 'polymolybdic acid'?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tytko, K.H.; Baethe, G.; Mehmke, K.

    1987-01-01

    According to a comparative study of the literature, supplemented by well-aimed experimental investigations and equilibrium calculations, the terms 'molybdic acid' or 'polymolybdic acid', used for many substances, species, or solutions in the literature, are applicable to a species, a solution, and two solids: a) The monomeric molybdic acid, most probably having the formula MoO 2 (OH) 2 (H 2 O) 2 (= H 2 MoO 4 , aq), exists in (aqueous) solution only and never exceeds a concentration of ∼ 10 -3 M since at higher concentrations it reacts with other monomeric molybdenum(VI) species to give anionic or cationic polymers. b) A concentrated (> 0.1 M Mo VI ) aqueous molybdate solution of degree of acidification P = 2 (realized, e.g., by a solution of one of the Mo VI oxides; by any molybdate solutions whose cations have been exchanged by H 2 O + on a cation exchanger; by suitable acidification of a molybdate solution) contains 8 H 3 O + and the well-known polyanion Mo 36 O 112 (H 2 O) 16 8- exactly in the stoichiometric proportions. c) A glassy substance, obtained from an alkali metal salt-free solution prepared acording to (b), refers to the compound (H 3 O) 8 [Mo 36 O 112 (H 2 O) 16 ] · xH 2 O, x = 25 - 29. d) A solid having the ideal composition [(H 3 O)Mo 5 O 15 (OH)H 2 O · H 2 O] ∞ consists of a polymolybdate skeleton (the well-known 'decamolybdate' structure), in the tunnels of which H 3 O + and H 2 O are intercalated. The structure is very unstable if only H 3 O + cations are present, but it is enormously stabilized by a partial exchange of H 3 O + by certain alkali or alkaline earth metal cations. For the compounds MoO 3 , MoO 3 ·H 2 O, and MoO 3 · 2 H 2 O the term 'molybdic acid' is unjustified. The commercial product 'molybdic acid, ∼ 85% MoO 3 ' is the well-known polymolybdate (NH 4 ) 2 O · 4 MoO 3 with a layer structure of the polyanion. 84 refs. (author)

  4. Amino acid racemisation dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray-Wallace, C.V.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the time-dependent amino acid racemisation reaction as a method of age assessment was first reported by Hare and Abelson (1968). They noted that in specimens of the bivalve mollusc Mercenaria sp., greater concentrations of amino acids in the D-configuration with increasing fossil age. Hare and Abelson (1968) also reported negligible racemisation in a modern specimen of Mecanaria sp. On this basis they suggested that the extent of amino acid racemisation (epimerisation in the case of isoleucine) may be used to assess the age of materials within and beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. For the past thirty years amino acid racemisation has been extensively applied in Quaternary research as a method of relative and numeric dating, and a particularly large literature has emerged on the subject

  5. Amino Acids and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  6. Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fripp, Jon

    2000-01-01

    .... Acid mine drainage (AMD) can have severe impacts to aquatic resources, can stunt terrestrial plant growth and harm wetlands, contaminate groundwater, raise water treatment costs, and damage concrete and metal structures...

  7. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a class of medications called penicillin-like antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Clavulanic acid ... It works by preventing bacteria from destroying amoxicillin. Antibiotics will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

  8. Alpha Hydroxy Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or tenderness (8), chemical burns (6), and increased sunburn (3). The frequency of such reports for skin ... bear a statement that conveys the following information: Sunburn Alert: This product contains an alpha hydroxy acid ( ...

  9. Azetidinic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Bunch, Lennart; Chopin, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    A set of ten azetidinic amino acids, that can be envisioned as C-4 alkyl substituted analogues of trans-2-carboxyazetidine-3-acetic acid (t-CAA) and/or conformationally constrained analogues of (R)- or (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) have been synthesized in a diastereo- and enantiomerically pure form from...... of two diastereoisomers that were easily separated and converted in two steps into azetidinic amino acids. Azetidines 35-44 were characterized in binding studies on native ionotropic Glu receptors and in functional assays at cloned metabotropic receptors mGluR1, 2 and 4, representing group I, II and III...... beta-amino alcohols through a straightforward five step sequence. The key step of this synthesis is an original anionic 4-exo-tet ring closure that forms the azetidine ring upon an intramolecular Michael addition. This reaction was proven to be reversible and to lead to a thermodynamic distribution...

  10. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is possible. Studies have found that women with seizure disorders and women with bipolar disorder might have menstrual ... valproic acid to leave your body. Women with epilepsy or bipolar disorder who are planning a pregnancy ...

  11. [Acids in coffee. XI. The proportion of individual acids in the total titratable acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, U H; Maier, H G

    1985-07-01

    22 acids in ground roast coffees and instant coffees were determined by GLC of their silyl derivatives (after preseparation by gel electrophoresis) or isotachophoresis. The contribution to the total acidity (which was estimated by titration to pH 8 after cation exchange of the coffee solutions) was calculated for each individual acid. The mentioned acids contribute with 67% (roast coffee) and 72% (instant coffee) to the total acidity. In the first place citric acid (12.2% in roast coffee/10.7% in instant coffee), acetic acid (11.2%/8.8%) and the high molecular weight acids (8%/9%) contribute to the total acidity. Also to be mentioned are the shares of chlorogenic acids (9%/4.8%), formic acid (5.3%/4.6%), quinic acid (4.7%/5.9%), malic acid (3.9%/3%) and phosphoric acid (2.5%/5.2%). A notable difference in the contribution to total acidity between roast and instant coffee was found for phosphoric acid and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid (0.7%/1.9%). It can be concluded that those two acids are formed or released from e.g. their esters in higher amounts than other acids during the production of instant coffee.

  12. Portable nucleic acid thermocyclers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassian, David R; Cockrell, Lisa M; Nelson, William M

    2013-11-21

    A nucleic acid thermal cycler is considered to be portable if it is under ten pounds, easily carried by one individual, and battery powered. Nucleic acid amplification includes both polymerase chain reaction (e.g. PCR, RT-PCR) and isothermal amplification (e.g. RPA, HDA, LAMP, NASBA, RCA, ICAN, SMART, SDA). There are valuable applications for portable nucleic acid thermocyclers in fields that include clinical diagnostics, biothreat detection, and veterinary testing. A system that is portable allows for the distributed detection of targets at the point of care and a reduction of the time from sample to answer. The designer of a portable nucleic acid thermocycler must carefully consider both thermal control and the detection of amplification. In addition to thermal control and detection, the designer may consider the integration of a sample preparation subsystem with the nucleic acid thermocycler. There are a variety of technologies that can achieve accurate thermal control and the detection of nucleic acid amplification. Important evaluation criteria for each technology include maturity, power requirements, cost, sensitivity, speed, and manufacturability. Ultimately the needs of a particular market will lead to user requirements that drive the decision between available technologies.

  13. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Dils, R.

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid...... synthetase complex was isolated free from acetyl-CoA. It was rapidly hydrolysed at 30°C, but hydrolysis was greatly diminished at o°C and triacetic lactone synthesis occurred. In the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH, all the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase was incorporated into long-chain fatty acids....... Hydrolysis of bound acetate and incorporation of bound acetate into fatty acids were inhibited to the same extent by guanidine hydrochloride. # 3. 3. Acetate was also covalently bound to fatty acid synthetase by chemical acetylation with [I-14C]acetic anhydride in the absence of CoASH. A total of 60 moles...

  14. Acidification and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  15. Target enzyme mutations are the molecular basis for resistance towards pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe H; Petersen, Jakob G; Garten, Antje

    2010-01-01

    CHS-828 and TP201565 as competitive inhibitors of NAMPT through docking studies and by NAMPT precipitation from cellular lysate by an analogue of TP201565 linked to sepharose. The NAMPT precipitation could be inhibited by addition of APO866. CONCLUSION: We found that CHS-828 and TP201565...

  16. Crystal Structures of Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates in Complex with Escherichia coli Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eng, W. S.; Hocková, Dana; Špaček, Petr; Baszczyňski, Ondřej; Janeba, Zlatko; Naesens, L.; Keough, D. T.; Guddat, L. W.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 19 (2016), s. 6267-6276 ISSN 2365-6549 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06049S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : enzyme inhibitors * nucleotide analogues * HPRT Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  17. Changes of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Expressions in Thyroid Glands of Patients with Different Thyroid Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Sawicka-Gutaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Our aim was to analyze NAMPT expression in thyroid tissue derived from patients with Graves’ disease with (GD and without (GO orbitopathy, patients with toxic nodular goiters (TNG and thyroid cancers (TC, and healthy controls. Methods. 153 thyroid tissue samples of consecutive patients who underwent thyroidectomy were collected. Previous therapy with steroids was an exclusion criterion. We collected clinicopathological data of all subjects and we assessed NAMPT expression using qPCR. Results. We found the highest NAMPT expression in the thyroids of patients with GO (n = 20 and cancers (n = 40. Also, there was statistically significant NAMPT overexpression in patients with TNG (n = 30. Relatively low NAMPT expression was found in GD patients (n = 21 and in the control group (n = 39. In one-way ANCOVA, we confirmed that NAMPT expression differs between subgroups and that it is not influenced by age, BMI, or sex of patients. Conclusions. Reported alteration of NAMPT expression might suggest its involvement in thyroid pathologies. Observed NAMPT overexpression in patients with GO and its relatively low levels in thyroids of patients with GD without eye changes do not confirm causal relationship between NAMPT level and orbitopathy, but this needs further investigation.

  18. Allosteric regulation and communication between subunits in uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arent, Susan; Harris, Pernille; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2005-01-01

    organisms. To understand the allosteric regulation, crystal structures were determined for S. solfataricus UPRTase in complex with UMP and with UMP and the allosteric inhibitor CTP. Also, a structure with UMP bound in half of the active sites was determined. All three complexes form tetramers but reveal...... to rearrangements in the quaternary structure imply that this residue plays a major role in regulation of the enzyme and in communication between subunits. The ribose ring of UMP adopts alternative conformations in the cis and trans subunits of the UPRTase-UMP tetramer with associated differences...

  19. Antimalarial activity of prodrugs of N-branched acyclic nucleoside phosphonate inhibitors of 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocková, Dana; Janeba, Zlatko; Naesens, L.; Edstein, M. D.; Chavchich, M.; Keough, D. T.; Guddat, L. W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 17 (2015), s. 5502-5510 ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/0108 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nucleotide analogues * enzyme inhibitors * malaria * HG(X)PRT * ANP Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.923, year: 2015

  20. Crystal structures and inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Terán, D.; Hocková, Dana; Česnek, Michal; Zíková, Alena; Naesens, L.; Keough, D. T.; Guddat, L. W.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Oct 27 (2016), č. článku 35894. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06049S; GA MŠk LL1205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : enzyme inhibitors * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * HGPRT Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; EE - Microbiology, Virology (BC-A) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016 http://www.nature.com/articles/srep35894

  1. 6-Oxopurine Phosphoribosyltransferase: A Target for the Development of Antimalarial Drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Jersey, J.; Holý, Antonín; Hocková, Dana; Naesens, L.; Keough, D. T.; Guddat, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 16 (2011), s. 2085-2102 ISSN 1568-0266 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Malaria * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * hypoxanthine * guanine phosphoribosyl transferase Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.174, year: 2011

  2. Design of Plasmodium vivax Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase Inhibitors as Potential Antimalarial Therapeutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keough, D. T.; Rejman, Dominik; Pohl, Radek; Zborníková, Eva; Hocková, Dana; Croll, T.; Edstein, M. D.; Birrell, G. W.; Chavchich, M.; Naesens, L. M. J.; Pierens, G. K.; Brereton, I. M.; Guddat, L. W.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2018), s. 82-90 ISSN 1554-8929 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06049S; GA ČR GA15-11711S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : plasmodium vivax * inhibitor * pyrrolidine nucleotide bisphosphonate * HXGPRT Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 4.995, year: 2016

  3. Why is hydrofluoric acid a weak acid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Patrick; Hébert, Martin; Marchand, Patrick

    2005-11-08

    The infrared vibrational spectra of amorphous solid water thin films doped with HF at 40 K reveal a strong continuous absorbance in the 1000-3275 cm(-1) range. This so-called Zundel continuum is the spectroscopic hallmark for aqueous protons. The extensive ionic dissociation of HF at such low temperature suggests that the reaction enthalpy remains negative down to 40 K. These observations support the interpretation that dilute HF aqueous solutions behave as weak acids largely due to the large positive reaction entropy resulting from the structure making character of the hydrated fluoride ion.

  4. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  5. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  6. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of novel bicyclic acidic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; De Amici, Marco; Joppolo Di Ventimiglia, Samuele

    2003-01-01

    Bicyclic acidic amino acids (+/-)-6 and (+/-)-7, which are conformationally constrained homologues of glutamic acid, were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The new amino acids were tested toward ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes; both of them...

  7. Chemistry and electrochemistry in trifluoroacetic acid. Comparison with acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Gerard

    1972-01-01

    As the trifluoroacetic acid is, with the acetic acid, one of most often used carboxylic acids as solvent, notably in organic chemistry, this research thesis addresses some relatively simple complexing and redox reactions to highlight the peculiar feature of this acid, and to explain its very much different behaviour with respect to acetic acid. The author develops the notion of acidity level in solvents of low dielectric constant. The second part addresses a specific solvent: BF 3 (CH 3 COOH) 2 . The boron trifluoride strengthens the acidity of acetic acid and modifies its chemical and physical-chemical properties. In the third part, the author compares solvent properties of CF 3 COOH and CH 3 COOH. Noticed differences explain why the trifluoroacetic acid is a more interesting reaction environment than acetic acid for reactions such as electrophilic substitutions or protein solubilisation [fr

  8. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  9. Citric acid by fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed, R M

    1978-11-30

    Citric acid is produced in 2 stages, in the first of which Escherichia coli KG93 F-is cultured on a substrate consisting of whey permeate to which phosphate and nitrate or urea is added. In the second stage, Hansenula wickerhamii CBS 4308 is cultured on the culture solution from the first stage and the citric acid isolated in the usual manner. Thus, a whey permeate comprising fat 0.20, protein 0.05, lactose 5.0, lactic acid 0.1, and salts 0.6% (Ca 0.06, P 0.06, K 0.16, N 0.03, and NaCl 0.3%) was amended with 1.2 g phosphate/L and 1.0 g NO/sub 3/sup -///L. After introducing the whey permeate into a continuous fermentor, it was inoculated with E. coli K693 F- and allowed to incubate at 37/sup 0/ and pH 7 (Maintained with NH/sub 3/ gas) for 12 h with aeration, thereby producing concentration pyruvic acid. After an additional 6 h cultivation without aeration, the broth was transferred to another fermentor and there inoculated with H. wickerhamii CBS 4308. The second cultivation step was carried out at 30/sup 0/ and a pH of 5 for 24 h with the pH stabilized by NH/sub 3/ gas. To the second stage culture, 0.3 g Fe(CN)/sup 4 -//L was added. The yield of pyruvic acid in the first stage was 32 g/L and the final yield of citric acid was 43 g/L.

  10. 2-arylureidobenzoic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsson, Jon; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan

    2003-01-01

    A series of 2-arylureidobenzoic acids (AUBAs) was prepared by a short and effective synthesis, and the pharmacological activity at glutamate receptors was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The compounds showed noncompetitive antagonistic activity at the kainate receptor subtype GluR5. The most potent...... on the benzoic acid moiety (ring A), whereas ring B tolerated a variety of substituents, but with a preference for lipophilic substituents. The most potent compounds had a 4-chloro substituent on ring A and 3-chlorobenzene (6b), 2-naphthalene (8h), or 2-indole (8k) as ring B and had IC(50) values of 1.3, 1...

  11. Whither Acid Rain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brimblecombe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  12. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  13. Catalytic acetoxylation of lactic acid to 2-acetoxypropionic acid, en route to acrylic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerthuis, R.; Granollers, M.; Brown, D.R.; Salavagione, H.J.; Rothenberg, G.; Shiju, N.R.

    2015-01-01

    We present an alternative synthetic route to acrylic acid, starting from the platform chemical lactic acid and using heterogeneous catalysis. To improve selectivity, we designed an indirect dehydration reaction that proceeds via acetoxylation of lactic acid to 2-acetoxypropionic acid. This

  14. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, Mian Umer; Mahmud, Hisham Khaled Ben; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-01-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H 3 PO 4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid. (paper)

  15. Usnic acid controls the acidity tolerance of lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Markus; Juergens, Sascha-Rene

    2008-01-01

    The hypotheses were tested that, firstly, lichens producing the dibenzofuran usnic acid colonize substrates characterized by specific pH ranges, secondly, this preferred pH is in a range where soluble usnic acid and its corresponding anion occur in similar concentrations, and thirdly, usnic acid makes lichens vulnerable to acidity. Lichens with usnic acid prefer an ambient pH range between 3.5 and 5.5 with an optimum between 4.0 and 4.5. This optimum is close to the pK a1 value of usnic acid of 4.4. Below this optimum pH, dissolved SO 2 reduces the chlorophyll fluorescence yield more in lichens with than without their natural content of usnic acid. This suggests that usnic acid influences the acidity tolerance of lichens. The putative mechanism of the limited acidity tolerance of usnic acid-containing lichens is the acidification of the cytosol by molecules of protonated usnic acid shuttling protons through the plasma membrane at an apoplastic pH a1 . - Combined field and experimental data suggest that usnic acid makes lichens sensitive to acidity at pH <3.5

  16. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huqin; Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Zhensheng; Liao, Guangxi; Wu, Xiaoming; Du, Jianqiang; Cao, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination.

  17. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  18. Molecular interaction of pinic acid with sulfuric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, Jonas; Kurtén, Theo; Bilde, Merete

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the molecular interactions between the semivolatile α-pinene oxidation product pinic acid and sulfuric acid using computational methods. The stepwise Gibbs free energies of formation have been calculated utilizing the M06-2X functional, and the stability of the clusters is evaluated...... cluster. The involvement of more than one pinic acid molecule in a single cluster is observed to lead to the formation of favorable (pinic acid)2(H2SO4) and (pinic acid)2(H2SO4)2 clusters. The identified most favorable growth paths starting from a single pinic acid molecule lead to closed structures...

  19. Alkyl phosphonic acids and sulfonic acids in the Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, George W.; Onwo, Wilfred M.; Cronin, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Homologous series of alkyl phosphonic acids and alkyl sulfonic acids, along with inorganic orthophosphate and sulfate, are identified in water extracts of the Murchison meteorite after conversion to their t-butyl dimethylsilyl derivatives. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl compounds are observed in both series. Five of the eight possible alkyl phosphonic acids and seven of the eight possible alkyl sulfonic acids through C4 are identified. Abundances decrease with increasing carbon number as observed of other homologous series indigenous to Murchison. Concentrations range downward from approximately 380 nmol/gram in the alkyl sulfonic acid series, and from 9 nmol/gram in the alkyl phosphonic acid series.

  20. Koetjapic acid chloroform hemisolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. D. Nassar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C30H46O4·0.5CHCl3, consists of one koetjapic acid [systematic name: (3R,4aR,4bS,7S,8S,10bS,12aS-7-(2-carboxyethyl-3,4b,7,10b,12a-pentamethyl-8-(prop-1-en-2-yl-1,2,3,4,4a,4b,5,6,7,8,9,10,10b,11,12,12a-hexadecahydrochrysene-3-carboxylic acid] molecule and one half-molecule of chloroform solvent, which is disordered about a twofold rotation axis. The symmetry-independent component is further disordered over two sites, with occupancies of 0.30 and 0.20. The koetjapic acid contains a fused four-ring system, A/B/C/D. The A/B, B/C and C/D junctions adopt E/trans/cis configurations, respectively. The conformation of ring A is intermediate between envelope and half-chair and ring B adopts an envelope conformation whereas rings C and D adopt chair conformations. A weak intramolecular C—H...O hydrogen bond is observed. The koetjapic acid molecules are linked into dimers by two pairs of intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds. The dimers are stacked along the c axis.

  1. Microbial Propionic Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Axayacatl Gonzalez-Garcia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Propionic acid (propionate is a commercially valuable carboxylic acid produced through microbial fermentation. Propionic acid is mainly used in the food industry but has recently found applications in the cosmetic, plastics and pharmaceutical industries. Propionate can be produced via various metabolic pathways, which can be classified into three major groups: fermentative pathways, biosynthetic pathways, and amino acid catabolic pathways. The current review provides an in-depth description of the major metabolic routes for propionate production from an energy optimization perspective. Biological propionate production is limited by high downstream purification costs which can be addressed if the target yield, productivity and titre can be achieved. Genome shuffling combined with high throughput omics and metabolic engineering is providing new opportunities, and biological propionate production is likely to enter the market in the not so distant future. In order to realise the full potential of metabolic engineering and heterologous expression, however, a greater understanding of metabolic capabilities of the native producers, the fittest producers, is required.

  2. Acid dip for dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.C.; McWhan, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Background signal in a PTFE based dosemeter caused by impurities in the PTFE and in the active component such as lithium fluoride is substantially reduced by treating the dosemeter with acid. The optimum treatment involves use of hydrofluoric acid at room temperature for approximately one minute, followed by thorough washing with methanol, and finally drying. This treatment is best applied after the original manufacture of the dosemeters. It may also be applied to existing dosemeters after they have been in use for some time. The treatment produces a permanent effect in reducing both the light induced signal and the non-light induced signal. The process may be applied to all types of dosemeter manufactured from PTFE or other plastics or resins which are able to resist brief exposure to acid. The treatment works particularly well with dosemeters based on PTFE and lithium fluoride. It is also applicable to dosemeters based on calcium sulphate, lithium borate and magnesium borate. Acids which may be used include hydrofluoric, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric and sulphuric. (author)

  3. Acid Ceramidase in Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Realini, Natalia; Palese, Francesca; Pizzirani, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Acid ceramidase (AC) is a lysosomal cysteine amidase that controls sphingolipid signaling by lowering the levels of ceramides and concomitantly increasing those of sphingosine and its bioactive metabolite, sphingosine 1-phosphate. In the present study, we evaluated the role of AC-regulated sphing...

  4. Nucleic acids in circulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elevated blood levels of extracellular nucleic acids have been reported in various disease conditions; such as ageing and age-related degenerative disorders, cancer; acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, severe trauma and autoimmune disorders. In addition to genomic DNA and nucleosomes, mitochondrial DNA is ...

  5. Salicylic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the package label for more information.Apply a small amount of the salicylic acid product to one or two small areas you want to treat for 3 days ... know that children and teenagers who have chicken pox or the flu should not use topical salicylic ...

  6. Acid Rain: Science Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is a science activity designed to help students monitor the pH of rainfall. Materials, procedures and follow-up activities are listed. A list of domestic and foreign sources of information is provided. Topics which relate to acid precipitation are outlined. (CW)

  7. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  8. Multifunctional Cinnamic Acid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Peperidou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Our research to discover potential new multitarget agents led to the synthesis of 10 novel derivatives of cinnamic acids and propranolol, atenolol, 1-adamantanol, naphth-1-ol, and (benzylamino ethan-1-ol. The synthesized molecules were evaluated as trypsin, lipoxygenase and lipid peroxidation inhibitors and for their cytotoxicity. Compound 2b derived from phenoxyphenyl cinnamic acid and propranolol showed the highest lipoxygenase (LOX inhibition (IC50 = 6 μΜ and antiproteolytic activity (IC50 = 0.425 μΜ. The conjugate 1a of simple cinnamic acid with propranolol showed the higher antiproteolytic activity (IC50 = 0.315 μΜ and good LOX inhibitory activity (IC50 = 66 μΜ. Compounds 3a and 3b, derived from methoxylated caffeic acid present a promising combination of in vitro inhibitory and antioxidative activities. The S isomer of 2b also presented an interesting multitarget biological profile in vitro. Molecular docking studies point to the fact that the theoretical results for LOX-inhibitor binding are identical to those from preliminary in vitro study.

  9. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  10. Pantothenic acid and biotin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantothenic acid and biotin are types of B vitamins. They are water-soluble, which means that the body can't store them. If the body can't use all of the vitamin, the extra vitamins leave the body through the ...

  11. and amino acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    P RABINDRA REDDY* and A MOHAN REDDY. Department of ... The mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) with uridine and amino acids ..... Sabat M, Satyashur K A and Sundaralingam M 1983 J. Am. Chem. Soc. ... Uemura T, Shimura T, Nakamishi H, Tomahiro T, Nagawa Y and Okuno (Yohmei) H 1991. Inorg.

  12. Lactic acid and lactates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, V.V.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to integrate the present state of knowledge on lactate metabolism in human and mammalian physiology as far as it could be subject to nutritional interventions. An integrated view on the nutritional, metabolic and physiological aspects of lactic acid and lactates might open a

  13. Origin of fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieur, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    The appearance of fatty acids and membranes is one of the most important events of the prebiotic world because genesis of life required the compartmentalization of molecules. Membranes allowed cells to become enriched with molecules relevant for their evolution and gave rise to gradients convertible into energy. By virtue of their hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface, membranes developed certain enzymatic activities impossible in the aqueous phase. A prebiotic cell is an energy unit but it is also an information unit. It has a past, a present and a future. The biochemistry of fatty acids involves acetylCoA, malonylCoA and an enzyme, acyl synthetase, which joins both molecules. After substitution of the acetyl group in place of the carboxyl group of malonyl derivatives, the chain is reduced and dehydrated to crotonyl derivatives. These molecules can again react with malonylCoA to form unsaturated chain; they can also undergo a new reduction step to form butyryl derivatives which can react with malonylCoA to form a longer aliphatic chain. The formation of malonylCoA consumes ATP. The reduction step needs NADPH and proton. Dehydration requires structural information because the reduction product is chiral (D configuration). It is unlikely that these steps were possible in a prebiotic environment. Thus we have to understand how fatty acids could appear in the prebiotic era. This hypothesis about the origin of fatty acids is based on the chemistry of sulfonium ylides and sulfonium salts. The most well-known among these molecules are S-melthyl-methionine and S-adenosyl methionine. The simplest sulfonium cation is the trimethylsulfonium cation. Chemists have evidence that these products can produce olefin when they are heated or flashed with UV light in some conditions. I suggest that these volatile products can allow the formation of fatty acids chains in atmospheric phase with UV and temperature using methanol as starting material. Different synthetic pathways will be

  14. Transcription factor TLX1 controls retinoic acid signaling to ensure spleen development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, Elisa; Farinello, Diego; Penkov, Dmitry; Castagnaro, Laura; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Wuputra, Kenly; Tjaden, Naomi E. Butler; Bernassola, Francesca; Caridi, Nicoletta; Wagner, Michael; Kozinc, Katja; Niederreither, Karen; Blasi, Francesco; Pasini, Diego; Trainor, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie spleen development and congenital asplenia, a condition linked to increased risk of overwhelming infections, remain largely unknown. The transcription factor TLX1 controls cell fate specification and organ expansion during spleen development, and Tlx1 deletion causes asplenia in mice. Deregulation of TLX1 expression has recently been proposed in the pathogenesis of congenital asplenia in patients carrying mutations of the gene-encoding transcription factor SF-1. Herein, we have shown that TLX1-dependent regulation of retinoic acid (RA) metabolism is critical for spleen organogenesis. In a murine model, loss of Tlx1 during formation of the splenic anlage increased RA signaling by regulating several genes involved in RA metabolism. Uncontrolled RA activity resulted in premature differentiation of mesenchymal cells and reduced vasculogenesis of the splenic primordium. Pharmacological inhibition of RA signaling in Tlx1-deficient animals partially rescued the spleen defect. Finally, spleen growth was impaired in mice lacking either cytochrome P450 26B1 (Cyp26b1), which results in excess RA, or retinol dehydrogenase 10 (Rdh10), which results in RA deficiency. Together, these findings establish TLX1 as a critical regulator of RA metabolism and provide mechanistic insights into the molecular determinants of human congenital asplenia. PMID:27214556

  15. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  16. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; Schuur, Boelo

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  17. College Chemistry Students' Mental Models of Acids and Acid Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClary, LaKeisha; Talanquer, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to characterize the mental models of acids and acid strength expressed by advanced college chemistry students when engaged in prediction, explanation, and justification tasks that asked them to rank chemical compounds based on their relative acid strength. For that purpose we completed a qualitative research…

  18. Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated from Melaleuca cajuput on human myeloid leukemia (HL-60) cell line. ... The cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid (BA), isolated from Melaleuca cajuput a Malaysian plant and its four synthetic derivatives were tested for their cytotoxicity in various cell line or ...

  19. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent.

  20. Radioimmunoassay for jasmonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoefel, H.D.; Brueckner, C.; Kramell, R.; Sembdner, G.; Schreiber, K. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Halle/Saale. Inst. fuer Biochemie der Pflanzen)

    1984-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the natural plant growth regulator jasmonic acid (JA) was developed. The antiserum was raised in rabbits against (+-)-JA linked to bovine serum albumin. As tracer tritium labelled (+-)-JA (spec. act. 7.4 x 10/sup 9/ Bq x mmol/sup -1/) was used. Cross-reactivity studies with compounds structurally related to JA demonstrated the antiserum to be specific for JA, abscisic acid normally present in the same extract does not interfer. The RIA has a detection limit of 2 ng (-)-JA methylester, a measuring range 2-200 ng, and no extensive purification is required prior to estimation. Therefore, in JA analysis the RIA described is superior to GC, HPLC, and bioassay. This new method has been employed for studies on the distribution of JA in different plant organs of the broad bean, Vicia faba L.

  1. Acid corrosion inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N G

    1964-04-28

    An acid corrosion inhibitor is prepared by a 2-stage vacuum evaporation of effluents obtained from the ammonia columns of the coking oven plant. The effluent, leaving a scrubber in which the phenols are removed at a temperature of 98$C, passes through a quartz filter and flows into a heated chamber in which it is used for preheating a solution circulating through a vacuum unit, maintaining the temperature of the solution at 55$ to 60$C. The effluent enters a large tank in which it is boiled at 55$ to 60$C under 635 to 640 mm Hg pressure. Double evaporation of this solution yields a very effective acid corrosion inhibitor. Its corrosion-preventing effect is 97.9% compared with 90.1% for thiourea and 88.5% for urotropin under identical conditions.

  2. N-(3-Methylphenylsuccinamic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thimme Gowda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, C11H13NO3, the conformations of the N—H and C=O bonds in the amide segment are anti to each other, and that of the amide H atom is anti to the meta-methyl group in the benzene ring. Furthermore, the conformations of the amide oxygen and the carbonyl O atom of the acid segment are also anti to the adjacent –CH2 groups. The C=O and O—H bonds of the acid group are syn to each other. In the crystal, the molecules are packed into infinite chains through intermolecular N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  3. N-(3-Chlorophenylmaleamic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thimme Gowda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C10H8ClNO3, the molecular conformation is stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The first is a short O—H...O hydrogen bond within the maleamic acid unit and the second is a C—H...O hydrogen bond which connects the amide group with the phenyl ring. The maleamic acid unit is essentially planar, with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.044 Å, and makes a dihedral angle of 15.2 (1° with the phenyl ring. In the crystal, intermolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules into C(7 chains running [010].

  4. Mortar fights acid corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-14

    The burning of coal or oil to produce heat required to operate a power boiler also generates a severe corrosion problem within the interior of the duct and stacks used to emit the flue gas into the atmosphere. How can concrete and steel be protected from the effects of acid attack, when the acids are carried in a gas form, or come into direct contact with the steel or concrete from spillage or immersion conditions. Industry in North America has found that the solution to this problem is to build an outside concrete column, in this case of Portland cement, and inside that column, build a totally independent brick liner bonded with Sauereisen mortar.

  5. (Radioiodinated free fatty acids)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1987-12-11

    The traveler participated in the Second International Workshop on Radioiodinated Free Fatty Acids in Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he presented an invited paper describing the pioneering work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving the design, development and testing of new radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids for evaluation of heart disease. He also chaired a technical session on the testing of new agents in various in vitro and in vivo systems. He also visited the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, West Germany, to review, discuss, plan and coordinate collaborative investigations with that institution. In addition, he visited the Cyclotron Research Center in Liege, Belgium, to discuss continuing collaborative studies with the Osmium-191/Iridium-191m radionuclide generator system, and to complete manuscripts and plan future studies.

  6. Acidity of Scandinavian precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, E; Bordin, G

    1955-01-01

    Data on the pH of the total monthly precipitation at stations of a Swedish network for sampling and chemical analysis of precipitation and atmospheric aerosols during the year July 1953 to June 1954 are presented and discussed, together with the pH data from the first two months of operation of a large pan-Scandinavian net. It is found that well-defined regions of acidity and alkalinity relative to the pH of water in equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide exist, and that these regions persist to such an extent that the monthly deviations from the pattern of the annual mean pH at stations unaffected by local pollution show persistently high acidity, while inland northern stations show equally persistent alkalinity. Some possible reasons for the observed distributions are considered.

  7. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  8. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  9. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Sundin, Peter; Wesén, Clas

    1997-01-01

    Halogenated fatty acids are the major contributors to organohalogen compounds in lipids of marine mammals, fish, and bivalves. For the initial characterization of these recently noticed compounds, a determination of the halogen concentration has usually been combined with some lipid isolation......), atomic emission spectrometry, and mass spectrometry. For most environmental samples, chlorinated FAMEs must be enriched prior to GC. ELCD is a useful detection method for indicating halogenated FAMEs in the chromatograms, and tentative identification of the halogenated species can be obtained...

  10. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eigh...

  11. Sources of atmospheric acidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    The emissions of acid gases from anthropogenic sources and their impact on the environment are the main concern of this book. However, that impact can only be assessed if all the naturally occurring sources of these gases are also known and can be quantified. Given the widely dispersed nature of the natural sources and the problems of measurement of trace species at low concentrations, often in remote regions, the quantification is a very difficult task. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made over the last decade. In this chapter both man-made and natural sources of atmospheric acidity will be reviewed, but the emphasis will be placed not so much on the global balances as on the scale of the natural sources in relation to the man-made sources. This requires that the very uneven geographical distribution of emissions and the lifetime of individual chemical species be taken into account. The emissions considered are sulphur compounds, nitrogen compounds, chlorine compounds and organic acids. The anthropogenic sources discussed are the combustion of fossil fuels and certain industrial processes. Emissions data for anthropogenic sources are given for the United Kingdom, Europe, USA and globally. A list of 95 references is given. (Author)

  12. Whence the acid raindrop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, T.H.E.

    1987-01-01

    Absorption of NO 2 can cause damage in animals and plants and, if present trends for NO x emissions continue, their by-product nitric acid may soon overtake sulphuric acid as the main acidifying agent of 'acid' rain. In response to this problem the feasibility of reducing NO x emissions from power stations is being studied. Although there can be no doubt that these expensive controls are desirable, their benefits are difficult to predict for two reasons: NO x is not only emitted by fuel combustion and the degree to which an industrialised country benefits from the implementation of NO x emission controls depends on how much its pollutant 'fall out' is immediately returned from the atmosphere, and how much is exported to neighbouring countries. The above factors involve questions regarding the source and reaction mechanisms for nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere. Because stable isotope ratio analysis has proved to be of value in providing answers to such questions in other environments, an investigation of the 15 N/ 14 N ratios of atmospheric gases (NO x , NH 3 ) and their solution products in rain (NO 3 , NH + 4 ) seemed to be justified

  13. Hepatic Toxicity of Perfluorocarboxylic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    1995). 3. N. V. Reo, C. M. Goecke, L. Narayanan, and B. M. Jarnot. "Effects of Perfluoro-n-octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate ...Artz, and B. M. Jarnot: "ILiver Phosphorous Metabolic Response to Perfluorocarboxylic Acids and Clofibrate in Rats and Guinea Pigs: A 31 P NMR Study...Peroxisome Induction by Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid and Clofibrate in the Rat: Proliferation Versus Activity." International Society for the Study of

  14. Acids and bases solvent effects on acid-base strenght

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    Acids and bases are ubiquitous in chemistry. Our understanding of them, however, is dominated by their behaviour in water. Transfer to non-aqueous solvents leads to profound changes in acid-base strengths and to the rates and equilibria of many processes: for example, synthetic reactions involving acids, bases and nucleophiles; isolation of pharmaceutical actives through salt formation; formation of zwitter- ions in amino acids; and chromatographic separation of substrates. This book seeks to enhance our understanding of acids and bases by reviewing and analysing their behaviour in non-aqueous solvents. The behaviour is related where possible to that in water, but correlations and contrasts between solvents are also presented.

  15. Sequential injection redox or acid-base titration for determination of ascorbic acid or acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenghor, Narong; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Vilen, Michael; Sara, Rolf; Christian, Gary D; Grudpan, Kate

    2002-12-06

    Two sequential injection titration systems with spectrophotometric detection have been developed. The first system for determination of ascorbic acid was based on redox reaction between ascorbic acid and permanganate in an acidic medium and lead to a decrease in color intensity of permanganate, monitored at 525 nm. A linear dependence of peak area obtained with ascorbic acid concentration up to 1200 mg l(-1) was achieved. The relative standard deviation for 11 replicate determinations of 400 mg l(-1) ascorbic acid was 2.9%. The second system, for acetic acid determination, was based on acid-base titration of acetic acid with sodium hydroxide using phenolphthalein as an indicator. The decrease in color intensity of the indicator was proportional to the acid content. A linear calibration graph in the range of 2-8% w v(-1) of acetic acid with a relative standard deviation of 4.8% (5.0% w v(-1) acetic acid, n=11) was obtained. Sample throughputs of 60 h(-1) were achieved for both systems. The systems were successfully applied for the assays of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets and acetic acid content in vinegars, respectively.

  16. Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids. A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid. J. D. Watson and F. H. C. Crick. Medical Research Council Unit for the Study of the Molecular Structure of Biological. Systems, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge. April 2. We wish to suggest a structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid ...

  17. Fumaric acid production by fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roa Engel, C.A.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Zijlmans, T.W.; Van Gulik, W.M.; Van der Wielen, L.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The potential of fumaric acid as a raw material in the polymer industry and the increment of cost of petroleum-based fumaric acid raises interest in fermentation processes for production of this compound from renewable resources. Although the chemical process yields 112% w/w fumaric acid

  18. Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

    2014-07-01

    Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

  19. Danburite decomposition by hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamatov, E.D.; Ashurov, N.A.; Mirsaidov, U.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of danburite of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan by hydrochloric acid. The interaction of boron containing ores of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan with mineral acids, including hydrochloric acid was studied. The optimal conditions of extraction of valuable components from danburite composition were determined. The chemical composition of danburite of Ak-Arkhar Deposit was determined as well. The kinetics of decomposition of calcined danburite by hydrochloric acid was studied. The apparent activation energy of the process of danburite decomposition by hydrochloric acid was calculated.

  20. Essential role of the electroneutral Na+-HCO3- cotransporter NBCn1 in murine duodenal acid-base balance and colonic mucus layer build-up in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anurag Kumar; Xia, Weiliang; Riederer, Brigitte; Juric, Marina; Li, Junhua; Zheng, Wen; Cinar, Ayhan; Xiao, Fang; Bachmann, Oliver; Song, Penghong; Praetorius, Jeppe; Aalkjaer, Christian; Seidler, Ursula

    2013-04-15

    Duodenal epithelial cells need efficient defence strategies during gastric acidification of the lumen, while colonic mucosa counteracts damage by pathogens by building up a bacteria-free adherent mucus layer. Transport of HCO3(-) is considered crucial for duodenal defence against acid as well as for mucus release and expansion, but the transport pathways involved are incompletely understood. This study investigated the significance of the electroneutral Na(+)-HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 for duodenal defence against acid and colonic mucus release. NBCn1 was localized to the basolateral membrane of duodenal villous enterocytes and of colonic crypt cells, with predominant expression in goblet cells. Duodenal villous enterocyte intracellular pH was studied before and during a luminal acid load by two-photon microscopy in exteriorized, vascularly perfused, indicator (SNARF-1 AM)-loaded duodenum of isoflurane-anaesthetized, systemic acid-base-controlled mice. Acid-induced HCO3(-) secretion was measured in vivo by single-pass perfusion and pH-stat titration. After a luminal acid load, NBCn1-deficient duodenocytes were unable to recover rapidly from intracellular acidification and could not respond adequately with protective HCO3(-) secretion. In the colon, build-up of the mucus layer was delayed, and a decreased thickness of the adherent mucus layer was observed, suggesting that basolateral HCO3(-) uptake is essential for optimal release of mucus. The electroneutral Na(+)-HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 displays a differential cellular distribution in the murine intestine and is essential for HCO3(-)-dependent mucosal protective functions, such as recovery of intracellular pH and HCO3(-) secretion in the duodenum and secretion of mucus in the colon.

  1. Waste acid detoxification and reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, T.M.; Stewart, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    Economically feasible processes that reduce the volume, quantity, and toxicity of metal-bearing waste acids by reclaiming, reusing, and recycling spent acids and metal salts are being developed and demonstrated. The acids used in the demonstrations are generated during metal-finishing operations used in nuclear fuel fabrication; HF-HNO 3 , HNO 3 , and HNO 3 -H 2 SO 4 wastes result from Zr etching, Cu stripping, and chemical milling of U. At discharge, wastes contain high concentrations of acid and one major metal impurity. The waste minimization process used to reclaim acid from these three streams incorporates three processes for acid regeneration and reclamation. Normally, HNO 3 remains in the bottoms when an aqueous acid solution is distilled; however, in the presence of H 2 SO 4 , HNO 3 will distill to the overhead stream. In this process, nitrates and fluorides present as free acid and metal salts can be reclaimed as acid for recycle to the metal-finishing processes. Uranium present in the chemical milling solution can be economically recovered from distillation bottoms and refined. Using acid distillation, the volume of chemical milling solution discharged as waste can be reduced by as much as 60% depending on the H 2 SO 4 concentration. A payback period of 2.2 years has been estimated for this process. The development and demonstration of precipitation and distillation processes for detoxification and reclamation of waste acid is supported by the US Department of Energy's Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP)

  2. New Acid Combination for a Successful Sandstone Acidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, M. U.; Mahmud, H. K. B.; Rezaee, R.

    2017-05-01

    With the development of new enhanced oil recovery techniques, sandstone acidizing has been introduced and played a pivotal role in the petroleum industry. Different acid combinations have been applied, which react with the formation, dissolve the soluble particles; thus increase the production of hydrocarbons. To solve the problems which occurred using current preflush sandstone acidizing technology (hydrochloric acid); a new acid combination has been developed. Core flooding experiments on sandstone core samples with dimensions 1.5 in. × 3 in. were conducted at a flow rate of 2 cm3/min. A series of hydrochloric-acetic acid mixtures with different ratios were tested under 150°F temperature. The core flooding experiments performed are aimed to dissolve carbonate, sodium, potassium and calcium particles from the core samples. These experiments are followed by few important tests which include, porosity-permeability, pH value, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR measurements). All the results are compared with the results of conventional hydrochloric acid technology. NMR and porosity analysis concluded that the new acid combination is more effective in creating fresh pore spaces and thus increasing the reservoir permeability. It can be seen from the pore distribution before and after the acidizing. Prior applying acid; the large size of pores appears most frequently in the pore distribution while with the applied acid, it was found that the small pore size is most the predominant of the pore distribution. These results are validated using ICP analysis which shows the effective removal of calcium and other positive ions from the core sample. This study concludes that the combination of acetic-hydrochloric acid can be a potential candidate for the preflush stage of sandstone acidizing at high temperature reservoirs.

  3. Urban acid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlan, D.E.; Longhurst, J.W.S.; Gee, D.R.; Hare, S.E.

    1991-07-01

    In this document results from the Greater Manchester Acid Deposition Survey (GMADS), an urban precipitation chemistry network, for 1990 are presented. Full analytical methods are described along with the precision and accuracy of the methods used. The spatial variability of precipitation chemistry and deposition over this urban region was investigated using a network of twenty collectors. Concentrations of non marine sulphate, ammonium, calcium and hydrogen, and nitrogen dioxide gas concentrations all show significant spatial variability. The spatial variability of the deposition rates of non marine sulphate, nitrate, ammonium, hydrogen and calcium were significant. (Author).

  4. Synthesis of aminoaldonic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christel Thea

    With the aim of synthesising aminoaldonic acids, two 2-acetamido-2-deoxyaldonolactones with D-galacto (6) and D-arabino (11) configuration were prepared from acetylated sugar formazans in analogy with a known procedure. Empolying the same procedure to acetylated sugar phenylhydrazones gave mixtures...... and 82, respectively. The aminolactone 84 was converted into the corresponding amino sugar 89.With the aim of synthesising substrates for the Pictet-Spengler reaction three 4-aldehydo acetamidodideoxytetronolactones 92, 97 and 103 were prepared by periodate cleavage of the corresponding hexonolactones...

  5. Folic Acid: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid in diet (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Folic Acid updates ... acid - test Folic acid in diet Related Health Topics Vitamins National Institutes of Health The primary NIH ...

  6. Solid acid catalysis from fundamentals to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Hideshi

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionTypes of solid acid catalystsAdvantages of solid acid catalysts Historical overviews of solid acid catalystsFuture outlookSolid Acids CatalysisDefinition of acid and base -Brnsted acid and Lewis acid-Acid sites on surfacesAcid strengthRole of acid sites in catalysisBifunctional catalysisPore size effect on catalysis -shape selectivity-Characterization of Solid Acid Catalysts Indicator methodTemperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ammoniaCalorimetry of adsorption of basic moleculesInfrare

  7. Uracil in formic acid hydrolysates of deoxyribonucleic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Arnold H.

    1966-01-01

    1. When DNA is hydrolysed with formic acid for 30min. at 175° and the hydrolysate is chromatographed on paper with propan-2-ol–2n-hydrochloric acid, in addition to expected ultraviolet-absorbing spots corresponding to guanine, adenine, cytosine and thymine, an ultraviolet-absorbing region with RF similar to that of uracil can be detected. Uracil was separated from this region and identified by its spectra in acid and alkali, and by its RF in several solvent systems. 2. Cytosine, deoxyribocytidine and deoxyribocytidylic acid similarly treated with formic acid all yielded uracil, as did a mixture of deoxyribonucleotides. 3. Approx. 4% of deoxyribonucleotide cytosine was converted into uracil by the formic acid treatment. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:5949371

  8. Uric acid nephrolithiasis: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicerello, Elisa

    2018-04-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis appears to increase in prevalence. While a relationship between uric acid stones and low urinary pH has been for long known, additional association with various metabolic conditions and pathophysiological basis has recently been elucidated. Some conditions such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome disease, excessive dietary intake, and increased endogenous uric acid production and/or defect in ammoniagenesis are associated with low urinary pH. In addition, the phenomenon of global warming could result in an increase in areas with greater climate risk for uric acid stone formation. There are three therapeutic steps to be taken for management of uric acid stones: identification of urinary pH profiles, assessment of urinary volume status, and identification of disorders leading to excessive uric acid production. However, the most important factor for uric acid stone formation is acid urinary pH, which is a prerequisite for uric acid precipitation. This article reviews recent insights into the pathophysiology of uric acid stones and their management.

  9. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are important physiological agents for intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary secretion of lipids, toxic metabolites, and xenobiotics. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and metabolic regulators that activate nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to regulate hepatic lipid, glucose, and energy homeostasis and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is critical for maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing accumulation of cholesterol, triglycerides, and toxic metabolites, and injury in the liver and other organs. Enterohepatic circulation of bile acids from the liver to intestine and back to the liver plays a central role in nutrient absorption and distribution, and metabolic regulation and homeostasis. This physiological process is regulated by a complex membrane transport system in the liver and intestine regulated by nuclear receptors. Toxic bile acids may cause inflammation, apoptosis, and cell death. On the other hand, bile acid-activated nuclear and GPCR signaling protects against inflammation in liver, intestine, and macrophages. Disorders in bile acid metabolism cause cholestatic liver diseases, dyslipidemia, fatty liver diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and bile acid sequestrants are therapeutic agents for treating chronic liver diseases, obesity, and diabetes in humans. PMID:23897684

  10. Electrolytic nature of aqueous sulfuric acid. 2. Acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2012-09-27

    In part 1 of this study, I reported that the Debye-Hückel limiting law and the smaller-ion shell (SiS) model of strong electrolyte solutions fit nicely with the experimental mean ionic activity coefficient (γ(±)) of aqueous sulfuric acid as a function of concentration and of temperature when the acid is assumed to be a strong 1-3 electrolyte. Here, I report that the SiS-derived activity coefficient of H(+), γ(H(+)), of the 1-3 acid is comparable to that of aqueous HCl. This agrees with titration curves showing, as well-known, that sulfuric acid in water is parallel in strength to aqueous HCl. The calculated pH is in good accord with the Hammett acidity function, H(0), of aqueous sulfuric acid at low concentration, and differences between the two functions at high concentration are discussed and explained. This pH-H(0) relation is consistent with the literature showing that the H(0) of sulfuric acid (in the 1-9 M range) is similar to those of HCl and the other strong mineral monoprotic acids. The titration of aqueous sulfuric acid with NaOH does not agree with the known second dissociation constant of 0.010 23; rather, the constant is found to be ~0.32 and the acid behaves upon neutralization as a strong diprotic acid practically dissociating in one step. A plausible reaction pathway is offered to explain how the acid may transform, upon base neutralization, from a dissociated H(4)SO(5) (as 3H(+) and HSO(5)(3-)) to a dissociated H(2)SO(4) even though the equilibrium constant of the reaction H(+) + HSO(5)(3-) ↔ SO(4)(2-) + H(2)O, at 25 °C, is 10(-37) (part 1).

  11. Counter current extraction of phosphoric acid: Food grade acid production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlewit, H.; AlIbrahim, M.

    2009-01-01

    Extraction, scrubbing and stripping of phosphoric acid from the Syrian wet-phosphoric acid was carried out using Micro-pilot plant of mixer settler type of 8 l/h capacity. Tributyl phosphate (TBP)/di-isopropyl ether (DIPE) in kerosene was used as extractant. Extraction and stripping equilibrium curves were evaluated. The number of extraction and stripping stages to achieve the convenient and feasible yield was determined. Detailed flow sheet was suggested for the proposed continuous process. Data obtained include useful information for the design of phosphoric acid extraction plant. The produced phosphoric acid was characterized using different analytical techniques. (author)

  12. Acidizing reservoirs while chelating iron with sulfosalicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, W A; Berkshire, D C

    1980-09-30

    A well treating process is described in which an aqueous solution of a strong acid capable of dissolving solids in a manner increasing the permeability of a subterranean earth formation is injected into a subterranean reservoir that contains an asphaltenic oil. At least the first injected portion of the aqueous acid and a solution or homogeneous dispersion of at least enough 5-sulfosalicylic acid to chelate with and prevent the formation of iron-asphaltene solids are included with substantially all of the ferric ions that become dissolved within the strong acid solution that enters the earth formation. 10 claims.

  13. Danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.; Mamatov, E.D.; Ashurov, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of danburite of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan by sulfuric acid. The process of decomposition of danburite concentrate by sulfuric acid was studied. The chemical nature of decomposition process of boron containing ore was determined. The influence of temperature on the rate of extraction of boron and iron oxides was defined. The dependence of decomposition of boron and iron oxides on process duration, dosage of H 2 SO 4 , acid concentration and size of danburite particles was determined. The kinetics of danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid was studied as well. The apparent activation energy of the process of danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid was calculated. The flowsheet of danburite processing by sulfuric acid was elaborated.

  14. Recovering uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Wet-process phosphoric acid contains a significant amount of uranium. This uranium totals more than 1,500 tons/yr in current U.S. acid output--and projections put the uranium level at 8,000 tons/yr in the year 2000. Since the phosphoric acid is a major raw material for fertilizers, uranium finds its way into those products and is effectively lost as a resource, while adding to the amount of radioactive material that can contaminate the food chain. So, resource-conservation and environmental considerations both make recovery of the uranium from phosphoric acid desirable. This paper describes the newly developed process for recovering uranium from phosphoric acid by using solvent-extraction technique. After many extractants had been tested, the researchers eventually selected the combination of di (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as the most suitable. The flowscheme of the process is included

  15. Acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Jerry M.; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) consists of metal-laden solutions produced by the oxidative dissolution of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air, moisture, and acidophilic microbes during the mining of coal and metal deposits. The pH of AMD is usually in the range of 2–6, but mine-impacted waters at circumneutral pH (5–8) are also common. Mine drainage usually contains elevated concentrations of sulfate, iron, aluminum, and other potentially toxic metals leached from rock that hydrolyze and coprecipitate to form rust-colored encrustations or sediments. When AMD is discharged into surface waters or groundwaters, degradation of water quality, injury to aquatic life, and corrosion or encrustation of engineered structures can occur for substantial distances. Prevention and remediation strategies should consider the biogeochemical complexity of the system, the longevity of AMD pollution, the predictive power of geochemical modeling, and the full range of available field technologies for problem mitigation.

  16. Dicarboxylic acids from electric discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitman, B.; Chang, S.; Lawless, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted concerning the possible synthesis of a suite of dicarboxylic acids similar to that found in the Murchison meteorite. The investigation included the conduction of a chemical evolution experiment which simulated electric discharge through the primitive atmosphere of the earth. The suite of dicarboxylic acids obtained in the electric discharge experiment is similar to that of the Murchison meteorite, except for the fact that 2-chlorosuccinic acid is present in the spark discharge.

  17. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from phosphoric liquor by two extraction process is studied. First, uranium is reduced to tetravalent condition and is extracted by dioctypyrophosphoric acid. The re-extraction is made by concentrated phosphoric acid with an oxidizing agent. The re-extract is submitted to the second process and uranium is extracted by di-ethylhexilphosphoric acid and trioctylphosphine oxide. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Acid precipitation literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seip, H M; Andersen, B; Andersson, G; Hov, Oe; Kucera, V; Moseholm, L

    1986-01-01

    There is an increasing number of publications on acid deposition and related phenomena. Interest in these topics has also been reflected in a considerable number of meetings and conferences in this field. The largest of these in 1985 was the ''International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation'' (Muskoka, Ontario). Most work so far has been carried out in North America and Europe. There is, however, an increasing interest in obtaining a better picture of sensitive areas and possible acidification in other parts of the world. Anthropogenic SO/sub 2/ emissions have been estimated to be (in TgSyr/sup -1/): 2.4 (Africa), 4.1 (South America), 0.7 (Ocenia), and 18.3 (Asia). The largest increase during the last decade has been in Asia. Based on Studies of precipitation in remote areas it has been suggested that the natural background concentration for sulphate in many areas should be about 6 ..mu..eq 1/sup -1/. A new study of sulphate and nitrate in Greenland snow showed that both ions increased by a factor of about 2 from 1895 to 1978. The concentrations of SO/sub 2/ at Norwegian rural sites show a decreasing trend since late 1970s, while concentrations of sulphate in air show no clear trend. More reliable models for transformation, transport and deposition of chemicals are being developed, including three-dimensional grid models to describe episodes of elevated pollution levels lasting for a few days. Model calculations indicate that control of hydrocarbon (HC) emissions is much more efficient in reducing the ozone level in southern Scandinavia in episodes influenced by long-range transported pollutants than NO/sub x/ control of combined NO/sub x/ and HC control. 36 refs. (EG).

  19. A radioimmunoassay for abscisic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, D.; Dashek, W.; Galson, E.

    1979-01-01

    We have developed a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for abscisic acid (ABA) in the 0.1 ng to 2.5 ng range. Antibodies were obtained from rabbits immunized with ABA bound via its carboxyl group to bovine serum albumin. Cross-reactivity studies indicate that ABA esters are completely cross-reactive with ABA, while trans, trans abscisic acid (t-ABA) phaseic acid (PA) and dihydrophaseic acid (DPA) have much lower but significant cross-reactivities. Purification methods which reduce the levels of cross-reacting substances are described. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 MKO [de

  20. Acid digestion of organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capp, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    To overcome the high temperatures involved in straight incineration of organic waste and the difficulty of extracting actinides from the ash various research establishments throughout the world, including Winfrith and Harwell in the UK, have carried out studies on an alternative chemical combustion method known as acid digestion. The basis of the technique is to digest the waste in concentrated sulphuric acid containing a few percent of nitric acid at a temperature of about 250 0 C. Acid digestion residues consist mainly of non-refractory inorganic sulphates and oxides from which any actinide materials can easily be extracted. (author)

  1. [Fatty acids in confectionery products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniewski, M; Mielniczuk, E; Jacórzyński, B; Pawlicka, M; Balas, J; Filipek, A; Górnicka, M

    2000-01-01

    The content of fat and fatty acids in 144 different confectionery products purchased on the market in Warsaw region during 1997-1999 have been investigated. In examined confectionery products considerable variability of both fat and fatty acids content have been found. The content of fat varied from 6.6% (coconut cookies) up to 40% (chocolate wafers). Saturated fatty acids were present in both cis and trans form. Especially trans fatty acids reach (above 50%) were fats extracted from nut wafers, coconuts wafers.

  2. Preparation and characterization Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang for esterification fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulloh, Abdulloh; Aminah, Nanik Siti; Triyono, Mudasir, Trisunaryanti, Wega

    2016-03-01

    Catalyst preparation and characterization of Al3+-bentonite for esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid has been done. Al3+-bentonite catalyst was prepared from natural bentonite of Turen Malang through cation exchange reaction using AlCl3 solution. The catalysts obtained were characterized by XRD, XRF, pyridine-FTIR and surface area analyser using the BET method. Catalyst activity test of Al3+-bentonite for esterification reaction was done at 65°C using molar ratio of metanol-fatty acid of 30:1 and 0.25 g of Al3+-bentonite catalyst for the period of ½, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours. Based on the characterization results, the Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst has a d-spacing of 15.63 Ǻ, acid sites of Brönsted and Lewis respectively of 230.79 µmol/g and 99.39 µmol/g, surface area of 507.3 m2/g and the average of radius pore of 20.09 Å. GC-MS analysis results of the oil phase after esterification reaction showed the formation of biodiesel (FAME: Fatty acid methyl ester), namely methyl palmitate, methyl oleate and methyl linoleate. The number of conversions resulted in esterification reaction using Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst was 74.61%, 37.75%, and 20, 93% for the esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively.

  3. Zirconium for nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The excellent corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid has been known for over 30 years. Recently, there is an increasing interest in using zirconium for nitric acid services. Therefore, an extensive research effort has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the corrosion properties of zirconium in nitric acid. Particular attention is paid to the effect of concentration, temperature, structure, solution impurities, and stress. Immersion, autoclave, U-bend, and constant strain-rate tests were used in this study. Results of this study indicate that the corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid is little affected by changes in temperature and concentration, and the presence of common impurities such as seawater, sodium chloride, ferric chloride, iron, and stainless steel. Moreover, the presence of seawater, sodium chloride, ferric chloride, and stainless steel has little effect on the stress corrosion craking (SCC) susceptibility of zirconium in 70% nitric acid at room temperatures. However, zirconium could be attacked by fluoride-containing nitric acid and the vapors of chloride-containing nitric acid. Also, high sustained tensile stresses should be avoided when zirconium is used to handle 70% nitric acid at elevated temperatures or > 70% nitric acid

  4. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonaemic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanat, S.; Shahbaz, N.; Hassan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To observe clinical and laboratory features of valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic encephalopathy in patients taking valproic acid. Methods: Observational study was conducted at the Neurology Department, Dow University of Health Sciences, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from February 26, 2010 to March 20, 2011. Ten patients on valproic acid therapy of any age group with idiopathic or secondary epilepsy, who presented with encephalopathic symptoms, were registered and followed up during the study. Serum ammonia level, serum valproic acid level, liver function test, cerebrospinal fluid examination, electroencephalogram and brain imaging of all the patients were done. Other causes of encephalopathy were excluded after clinical and appropriate laboratory investigations. Microsoft Excel 2007 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Hyperammonaemia was found in all patients with encephalopathic symptoms. Rise in serum ammonia was independent of dose and serum level of valproic acid. Liver function was also found to be normal in 80% (n=8) of the patients. Valproic acid was withdrawn in all patients. Three (30%) patients improved only after the withdrawal of valproic acid. Six (60%) patients improved after L-Carnitine replacement, one (10%) after sodium benzoate. On followup, serum ammonia had reduced to normal in five (50%) patients and to more than half of the baseline level in two (20%) patients. Three (30%) patients were lost to followup after complete clinical improvement. Conclusion: Within therapeutic dose and serum levels, valproic acid can cause symptomatic hyperammonaemia resulting in encephalopathy. All patients taking valproic acid presenting with encephalopathic symptoms must be monitored for the condition. (author)

  5. ACETIC ACID AND A BUFFER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent.......The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent....

  6. A second pathway to degrade pyrimidine nucleic acid precursors in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Bjornberg, Olof; Polakova, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    Pyrimidine bases are the central precursors for RNA and DNA, and their intracellular pools are determined by de novo, salvage and catabolic pathways. In eukaryotes, degradation of uracil has been believed to proceed only via the reduction to dihydrouracil. Using a yeast model, Saccharomyces kluyv...... of the eukaryotic or prokaryotic genes involved in pyrimidine degradation described to date.......Pyrimidine bases are the central precursors for RNA and DNA, and their intracellular pools are determined by de novo, salvage and catabolic pathways. In eukaryotes, degradation of uracil has been believed to proceed only via the reduction to dihydrouracil. Using a yeast model, Saccharomyces......, respectively. The gene products of URC1 and URC4 are highly conserved proteins with so far unknown functions and they are present in a variety of prokaryotes and fungi. In bacteria and in some fungi, URC1 and URC4 are linked on the genome together with the gene for uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (URC6). Urc1...

  7. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caarls, Lotte|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371746213; Pieterse, Corné M J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113; van Wees, Saskia C M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/185445373

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between

  8. C-11 Acid and the Stereochemistry of Abietic Acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    While many features, like the phenanthrene-type of fusion of the three ... thought to contain the original ring A of abietic acid, retaining the. 'nuclear methyl .... Thinking that the anhydride he had obtained by the action of heat on the C-11 acid ...

  9. Composition of amino acids, fatty acids and dietary fibre monomers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is increasing demand for sources of energy and non-meat protein with balanced amino acid profiles worldwide. Nuts are rich in protein and essential amino acids, and have a high energy value due to their high fat content. Kernels from two wild fruits in Mozambique, Adansonia digitata and Sclerocarya birrea, were ...

  10. Application of citric acid in acid stimulation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkhaldi, M.H.; Sarma, H.K. [Adelaide Univ., Adelaide (Australia); Nasr-el-Din, H.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    A rotating disk apparatus was used to investigate mass transfer during the reaction of citric acid with calcite. The study evaluated the effects of initial acid concentrations, temperature, and disk rotational speed on the effective diffusion coefficient of citric acid. The diffusion coefficient was calculated at 25, 40, and 50 degrees C using various citric acid concentrations. The study indicated that the coefficient was a function of the interactions between calcium citrate precipitation and counter calcium ions. At high acid concentrations, the effects of calcium citrate precipitation and counter calcium ions were significant. The calculated citric acid diffusion coefficients were not comparable with measured effective diffusion coefficients using the rotating disk. At lower initial citric acid concentrations, the effects of both calcium citrate precipitation and counter calcium ions on citric acid diffusivity were minimal. It was concluded that temperature effects on the diffusion coefficient followed Arrhenius law. Activation energy was equal to 37.9 kJ/mol. 34 refs., 4 tabs., 13 figs.

  11. Bile acid analysis in human disorders of bile acid biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaz, Frédéric M.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids facilitate the absorption of lipids in the gut, but are also needed to maintain cholesterol homeostasis, induce bile flow, excrete toxic substances and regulate energy metabolism by acting as signaling molecules. Bile acid biosynthesis is a complex process distributed across many cellular

  12. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Amino Acid Side Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting...

  13. Biopropionic acid production via molybdenumcatalyzed deoxygenation of lactic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, T.J.; Kleijn, H.; Jastrzebski, J.T.B.H.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    As the search for non-fossil based building blocks for the chemical industry increases, new methods for the deoxygenation of biomass-derived substrates are required. Here we present the deoxygenation of lactic acid to propionic acid, using a catalyst based on the non-noble and abundant metal

  14. Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... Betulinic acid acetate (BAAC) was most effective than other betulinic acid derivatives. It had most ... blastoma (Schmidt et al., 1997), malignant brain tumor .... 96 well plate and incubated in 37oC, 5% CO2 and 90% humidity.

  15. Classifying Your Food as Acid, Low-Acid, or Acidified

    OpenAIRE

    Bacon, Karleigh

    2012-01-01

    As a food entrepreneur, you should be aware of how ingredients in your product make the food look, feel, and taste; as well as how the ingredients create environments for microorganisms like bacteria, yeast, and molds to survive and grow. This guide will help you classifying your food as acid, low-acid, or acidified.

  16. Resveratrol Derivative-Rich Melinjo Seed Extract Attenuates Skin Atrophy in Sod1-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Watanabe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative damages induced by a redox imbalance cause age-related changes in cells and tissues. Superoxide dismutase (SOD enzymes play a pivotal role in the antioxidant system and they also catalyze superoxide radicals. Since the loss of cytoplasmic SOD (SOD1 resulted in aging-like phenotypes in several types of murine tissue, SOD1 is essential for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Melinjo (Gnetum gnemon Linn seed extract (MSE contains trans-resveratrol (RSV and resveratrol derivatives, including gnetin C, gnemonoside A, and gnemonoside D. MSE intake also exerts no adverse events in human study. In the present studies, we investigated protective effects of MSE on age-related skin pathologies in mice. Orally MSE and RSV treatment reversed the skin thinning associated with increased oxidative damage in the Sod1−/− mice. Furthermore, MSE and RSV normalized gene expression of Col1a1 and p53 and upregulated gene expression of Sirt1 in skin tissues. In vitro experiments revealed that RSV significantly promoted the viability of Sod1−/− fibroblasts. These finding demonstrated that RSV in MSE stably suppressed an intrinsic superoxide generation in vivo and in vitro leading to protecting skin damages. RSV derivative-rich MSE may be a powerful food of treatment for age-related skin diseases caused by oxidative damages.

  17. Cellular response to alkylating agent MNNG is impaired in STAT1-deficients cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah-Koon, Laurent; Lesage, Denis; Lemadre, Elodie; Souissi, Inès; Fagard, Remi; Varin-Blank, Nadine; Fabre, Emmanuelle E; Schischmanoff, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    The SN 1 alkylating agents activate the mismatch repair system leading to delayed G2 /M cell cycle arrest and DNA repair with subsequent survival or cell death. STAT1, an anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic transcription factor is known to potentiate p53 and to affect DNA-damage cellular response. We studied whether STAT1 may modulate cell fate following activation of the mismatch repair system upon exposure to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Using STAT1-proficient or -deficient cell lines, we found that STAT1 is required for: (i) reduction in the extent of DNA lesions, (ii) rapid phosphorylation of T68-CHK2 and of S15-p53, (iii) progression through the G2 /M checkpoint and (iv) long-term survival following treatment with MNNG. Presence of STAT1 is critical for the formation of a p53-DNA complex comprising: STAT1, c-Abl and MLH1 following exposure to MNNG. Importantly, presence of STAT1 allows recruitment of c-Abl to p53-DNA complex and links c-Abl tyrosine kinase activity to MNNG-toxicity. Thus, our data highlight the important modulatory role of STAT1 in the signalling pathway activated by the mismatch repair system. This ability of STAT1 to favour resistance to MNNG indicates the targeting of STAT1 pathway as a therapeutic option for enhancing the efficacy of SN1 alkylating agent-based chemotherapy. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  18. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1 deficiency)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Philippa B; Footitt, Emma J; Mills, Kevin A

    2010-01-01

    to antiepileptic drugs; (ii) in infants with multisystem pathology, the response to pyridoxine may not be instant and obvious; and (iii) structural brain abnormalities may co-exist and be considered sufficient cause of epilepsy, whereas the fits may be a consequence of antiquitin deficiency and are then responsive...

  19. Fast neutron radiation induced Glu-B1 deficient lines of an elite bread wheat variety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five isogenic wheat lines deficient in high-molecular weight subunit (HMW-GS) proteins encoded by the B-genome were identified from a fast-neutron radiation-mutagenized population of Summit, an elite variety of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The mutant lines differ from the wild-type progenit...

  20. Genetic KCa3.1-deficiency produces locomotor hyperactivity and alterations in cerebral monoamine levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Sivasaravanaparan, Mithula

    2012-01-01

    The calmodulin/calcium-activated K(+) channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether...... genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice....

  1. Decay-accelerating factor 1 deficiency exacerbates leptospiral-induced murine chronic nephritis and renal fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F Ferrer

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a global zoonosis caused by pathogenic Leptospira, which can colonize the proximal renal tubules and persist for long periods in the kidneys of infected hosts. Here, we characterized the infection of C57BL/6J wild-type and Daf1-/- mice, which have an enhanced host response, with a virulent Leptospira interrogans strain at 14 days post-infection, its persistence in the kidney, and its link to kidney fibrosis at 90 days post-infection. We found that Leptospira interrogans can induce acute moderate nephritis in wild-type mice and is able to persist in some animals, inducing fibrosis in the absence of mortality. In contrast, Daf1-/- mice showed acute mortality, with a higher bacterial burden. At the chronic stage, Daf1-/- mice showed greater inflammation and fibrosis than at 14 days post-infection and higher levels at all times than the wild-type counterpart. Compared with uninfected mice, infected wild-type mice showed higher levels of IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13, with similar levels of α-smooth muscle actin, galectin-3, TGF-β1, IL-17, IFN-γ, and lower IL-12 levels at 90 days post-infection. In contrast, fibrosis in Daf1-/- mice was accompanied by high expression of α-smooth muscle actin, galectin-3, IL-10, IL-13, and IFN-γ, similar levels of TGF-β1, IL-12, and IL-17 and lower IL-4 levels. This study demonstrates the link between Leptospira-induced murine chronic nephritis with renal fibrosis and shows a protective role of Daf1.

  2. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1 deficiency)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Philippa B; Footitt, Emma J; Mills, Kevin A

    2010-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy was recently shown to be due to mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, which encodes antiquitin, an enzyme that catalyses the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent dehydrogenation of l-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde/L-Delta1-piperideine 6-carboxylate. However, whilst t...

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin 1 deficiency, overweight, and metabolic dysregulation in patients with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Mona S; Jansson, Tine S; Gautvik, Kaare M

    2011-12-15

    The possible relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin and leptin levels, overweight, and association to risk factors for diabetes 2 in narcolepsy with cataplexy were compared to patients with idiopathic hypersomnia and controls. 26 patients with narcolepsy, cataplexy, and hypocretin deficiency; 23 patients with narcolepsy, cataplexy, and normal hypocretin values; 11 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia; and 43 controls. Body mass index (BMI), serum leptin, and HbA1C were measured in patients and controls; and CSF hypocretin 1 and leptin measured in all patients. Female and male patients with narcolepsy and hypocretin deficiency had the highest mean BMI (27.8 and 26.2, respectively), not statistically different from patients with narcolepsy and normal hypocretin or controls, but statistically higher than the patients with idiopathic hypersomnia (p 30) was increased in both narcolepsy groups. Serum and CSF leptin levels correlated positively to BMI in patients and controls, but not to CSF hypocretin concentrations. HbA1C was within normal levels and similar in all groups. The study confirms a moderate tendency to obesity (BMI > 30) and overweight in patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Obesity was not correlated to hypocretin deficiency or reduced serum or CSF leptin concentrations. We suggest that overweight and possible metabolic changes previously reported in narcolepsy, may be caused by other mechanisms.

  4. Mlh1 deficiency in normal mouse colon mucosa associates with chromosomally unstable colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pussila, Marjaana; Törönen, Petri; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Katayama, Shintaro; Krjutškov, Kaarel; Holm, Liisa; Kere, Juha; Peltomäki, Päivi; Mäkinen, Markus J; Linden, Jere; Nyström, Minna

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC) genome is unstable and different types of instabilities, such as chromosomal instability (CIN) and microsatellite instability (MSI) are thought to reflect distinct cancer initiating mechanisms. Although 85% of sporadic CRC reveal CIN, 15% reveal mismatch repair (MMR) malfunction and MSI, the hallmarks of Lynch syndrome with inherited heterozygous germline mutations in MMR genes. Our study was designed to comprehensively follow genome-wide expression changes and their implications during colon tumorigenesis. We conducted a long-term feeding experiment in the mouse to address expression changes arising in histologically normal colonic mucosa as putative cancer preceding events, and the effect of inherited predisposition (Mlh1+/−) and Western-style diet (WD) on those. During the 21-month experiment, carcinomas developed mainly in WD-fed mice and were evenly distributed between genotypes. Unexpectedly, the heterozygote (B6.129-Mlh1tm1Rak) mice did not show MSI in their CRCs. Instead, both wildtype and heterozygote CRC mice showed a distinct mRNA expression profile and shortage of several chromosomal segregation gene-specific transcripts (Mlh1, Bub1, Mis18a, Tpx2, Rad9a, Pms2, Cenpe, Ncapd3, Odf2 and Dclre1b) in their colon mucosa, as well as an increased mitotic activity and abundant numbers of unbalanced/atypical mitoses in tumours. Our genome-wide expression profiling experiment demonstrates that cancer preceding changes are already seen in histologically normal colon mucosa and that decreased expressions of Mlh1 and other chromosomal segregation genes may form a field-defect in mucosa, which trigger MMR-proficient, chromosomally unstable CRC. PMID:29701748

  5. Increased susceptibility to otitis media in a Splunc1-deficient mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jennifer A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Naumann, Paul W.; Salzman, Nita H.; McCray, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Otitis media (inflammation of the middle ear) is one of the most common diseases of early childhood. Susceptibility to otitis is influenced by a number of factors, including the actions of innate immune molecules secreted by the epithelia lining the nasopharynx, middle ear and Eustachian tube. The SPLUNC1 (short palate, lung, nasal epithelial clone 1) protein is a highly abundant secretory product of the mammalian nasal, oral and respiratory mucosa that is thought to play a multifunctional role in host defense. In this study we investigated Splunc1 expression in the ear of the mouse, and examined whether this protein contributes to overall host defense in the middle ear and/or Eustachian tube. We found that Splunc1 is highly expressed in both the surface epithelium and in submucosal glands in these regions in wild-type mice. In mice lacking Splunc1, we noted histologically an increased frequency of otitis media, characterized by the accumulation of leukocytes (neutrophils with scattered macrophages), proteinaceous fluid and mucus in the middle ear lumens. Furthermore, many of these mice had extensive remodeling of the middle ear wall, suggesting a chronic course of disease. From these observations, we conclude that loss of Splunc1 predisposes mice to the development of otitis media. The Splunc1−/− mouse model should help investigators to better understand both the biological role of Splunc1 as well as host defense mechanisms in the middle ear. PMID:25765466

  6. Altered circadian food anticipatory activity rhythms in PACAP receptor 1 (PAC1) deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2016-01-01

    increase in amplitude compared to PAC1+/+ mice when placed in SPP at 300 lux. The same pattern of FAA was observed at 10 lux during both FPP and SPP. The present study indicates a role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling during light regulated FAA. Most likely, PACAP found in ipRGCs mediating non-image forming light...

  7. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Madsen, Kenneth L; Jansen, Anna M

    2013-01-01

    by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate...

  8. Thymidine kinase 1 deficient cells show increased survival rate after UV-induced DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, T; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Balanced deoxynucleotide pools are known to be important for correct DNA repair, and deficiency for some of the central enzymes in deoxynucleotide metabolism can cause imbalanced pools, which in turn can lead to mutagenesis and cell death. Here we show that cells deficient for the thymidine salva...

  9. Alphavirus production is inhibited in neurofibromin 1-deficient cells through activated RAS signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolokoltsova, Olga A.; Domina, Aaron M.; Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Davey, Robert A.; Weaver, Scott C.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    Virus-host interactions essential for alphavirus pathogenesis are poorly understood. To address this shortcoming, we coupled retrovirus insertional mutagenesis and a cell survival selection strategy to generate clonal cell lines broadly resistant to Sindbis virus (SINV) and other alphaviruses. Resistant cells had significantly impaired SINV production relative to wild-type (WT) cells, although virus binding and fusion events were similar in both sets of cells. Analysis of the retroviral integration sites identified the neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene as disrupted in alphavirus-resistant cell lines. Subsequent analysis indicated that expression of NF1 was significantly reduced in alphavirus-resistant cells. Importantly, independent down-regulation of NF1 expression in WT HEK 293 cells decreased virus production and increased cell viability during SINV infection, relative to infected WT cells. Additionally, we observed hyperactive RAS signalling in the resistant HEK 293 cells, which was anticipated because NF1 is a negative regulator of RAS. Expression of constitutively active RAS (HRAS-G12V) in a WT HEK 293 cell line resulted in a marked delay in virus production, compared with infected cells transfected with parental plasmid or dominant-negative RAS (HRAS-S17N). This work highlights novel host cell determinants required for alphavirus pathogenesis and suggests that RAS signalling may play an important role in neuronal susceptibility to SINV infection

  10. Reconstitution of the NF1 GAP-related domain in NF1-deficient human Schwann cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Stacey L.; Deadwyler, Gail D.; Tang, Jun; Stubbs, Evan B.; Muir, David; Hiatt, Kelly K.; Clapp, D. Wade; De Vries, George H.

    2006-01-01

    Schwann cells derived from peripheral nerve sheath tumors from individuals with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) are deficient for the protein neurofibromin, which contains a GAP-related domain (NF1-GRD). Neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells have increased Ras activation, increased proliferation in response to certain growth stimuli, increased angiogenic potential, and altered cell morphology. This study examined whether expression of functional NF1-GRD can reverse the transformed phenotype of neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells from both benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. We reconstituted the NF1-GRD using retroviral transduction and examined the effects on cell morphology, growth potential, and angiogenic potential. NF1-GRD reconstitution resulted in morphologic changes, a 16-33% reduction in Ras activation, and a 53% decrease in proliferation in neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells. However, NF1-GRD reconstitution was not sufficient to decrease the in vitro angiogenic potential of the cells. This study demonstrates that reconstitution of the NF1-GRD can at least partially reverse the transformation of human NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cells

  11. Cystogenesis and elongated primary cilia in Tsc1-deficient distal convoluted tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Eric A; Carson, Robert P; Ess, Kevin C

    2012-08-15

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multiorgan hamartomatous disease caused by loss of function mutations of either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. Neurological symptoms of TSC predominate in younger patients, but renal pathologies are a serious aspect of the disease in older children and adults. To study TSC pathogenesis in the kidney, we inactivated the mouse Tsc1 gene in the distal convoluted tubules (DCT). At young ages, Tsc1 conditional knockout (CKO) mice have enlarged kidneys and mild cystogenesis with increased mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)1 but decreased mTORC2 signaling. Treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin reduces kidney size and cystogenesis. Rapamycin withdrawal led to massive cystogenesis involving both distal as well as proximal tubules. To assess the contribution of decreased mTORC2 signaling in kidney pathogenesis, we also generated Rictor CKO mice. These animals did not have any detectable kidney pathology. Finally, we examined primary cilia in the DCT. Cilia were longer in Tsc1 CKO mice, and rapamycin treatment returned cilia length to normal. Rictor CKO mice had normal cilia in the DCT. Overall, our findings suggest that loss of the Tsc1 gene in the DCT is sufficient for renal cystogenesis. This cytogenesis appears to be mTORC1 but not mTORC2 dependent. Intriguingly, the mechanism may be cell autonomous as well as non-cell autonomous and possibly involves the length and function of primary cilia.

  12. Retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 deficiency inhibits PPARγ-mediated bone loss and marrow adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamshetty, Shriram; Le, Phuong T; Wang, Hong; Issacsohn, Maya J; Reeder, David J; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Kiefer, Florian W; Brown, Jonathan D; Rosen, Clifford J; Plutzky, Jorge

    2014-10-01

    PPARγ, a ligand-activated nuclear receptor, regulates fundamental aspects of bone homeostasis and skeletal remodeling. PPARγ-activating anti-diabetic thiazolidinediones in clinical use promote marrow adiposity, bone loss, and skeletal fractures. As such, delineating novel regulatory pathways that modulate the action of PPARγ, and its obligate heterodimeric partner RXR, may have important implications for our understanding and treatment of disorders of low bone mineral density. We present data here establishing retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Aldh1a1) and its substrate retinaldehyde (Rald) as novel determinants of PPARγ-RXR actions in the skeleton. When compared to wild type (WT) controls, retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-deficient (Aldh1a1(-/-)) mice were protected against bone loss and marrow adiposity induced by either the thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone or a high fat diet, both of which potently activate the PPARγ-RXR complex. Consistent with these results, Rald, which accumulates in vivo in Aldh1a1(-/-) mice, protects against rosiglitazone-mediated inhibition of osteoblastogenesis in vitro. In addition, Rald potently inhibits in vitro adipogenesis and osteoclastogenesis in WT mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) respectively. Primary Aldh1a1(-/-) HSCs also demonstrate impaired osteoclastogenesis in vitro compared to WT controls. Collectively, these findings identify Rald and retinoid metabolism through Aldh1a1 as important novel modulators of PPARγ-RXR transactivation in the marrow niche. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Epileptogenesis and Seizure Progression in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 1 Deficient Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    dysregulation in epileptogenesis in the developing brain? 2) What are the molecular mechanisms downstream of mTOR hyperactivation that trigger epileptogenesis...underlying epilepsy. Hopefully, a knowledge of these mechanisms will aid in a rational development of therapies. KEYWORDS Tuberous Sclerosis, Epilepsy

  14. Neuropilin 1 deficiency on CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells impairs mouse melanoma growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzler, Marina; Abel, Simone; Alter, Christina; Stockmann, Christian; Kliche, Stefanie; Albert, Juliane; Sparwasser, Tim; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Buer, Jan; Helfrich, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Infiltration of Foxp3+ regulatory T (T reg) cells is considered to be a critical step during tumor development and progression. T reg cells supposedly suppress locally an effective anti-tumor immune response within tumor tissues, although the precise mechanism by which T reg cells infiltrate the tumor is still unclear. We provide evidence that Neuropilin 1 (Nrp-1), highly expressed by Foxp3+ T reg cells, regulates the immunological anti-tumor control by guiding T reg cells into the tumor in response to tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We demonstrate for the first time that T cell–specific ablation of Nrp-1 expression results in a significant breakdown in tumor immune escape in various transplantation models and in a spontaneous, endogenously driven melanoma model associated with strongly reduced tumor growth and prolonged tumor-free survival. Strikingly, numbers of tumor-infiltrating Foxp3+ T reg cells were significantly reduced accompanied by enhanced activation of CD8+ T cells within tumors of T cell–specific Nrp-1–deficient mice. This phenotype can be reversed by adoptive transfer of Nrp-1+ T reg cells from wild-type mice. Thus, our data strongly suggest that Nrp-1 acts as a key mediator of Foxp3+ T reg cell infiltration into the tumor site resulting in a dampened anti-tumor immune response and enhanced tumor progression. PMID:23045606

  15. Neuronal Cx3cr1 Deficiency Protects against Amyloid β-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworzak, Jenny; Renvoisé, Benoît; Habchi, Johnny; Yates, Emma V.; Combadière, Christophe; Knowles, Tuomas P.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Blackstone, Craig; Paulsen, Ole; Murphy, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    Cx3cr1, the receptor for the chemokine Cx3cl1 (fractalkine), has been implicated in the progression and severity of Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology in mice, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. A complicating factor is that Cx3cr1 has been demonstrated in both neurons and microglia. Here, we have dissected the differences between neuronal and microglial Cx3cr1, specifically by comparing direct amyloid-β-induced toxicity in cultured, mature, microglia-depleted hippocampal neurons from wild-type and Cx3cr1-/- mice. Wild-type neurons expressed both Cx3cl1 and Cx3cr1 and released Cx3cl1 in response to amyloid-β. Knockout of neuronal Cx3cr1 abated amyloid-β-induced lactate dehydrogenase release. Furthermore, amyloid-β differentially induced depression of pre- and postsynaptic components of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, in a peptide conformation-dependent manner. Knockout of neuronal Cx3cr1 abated effects of both amyloid-β conformational states, which were differentiable by aggregation kinetics and peptide morphology. We obtained similar results after both acute and chronic treatment of cultured neurons with the Cx3cr1 antagonist F1. Thus, neuronal Cx3cr1 may impact Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology by modulating conformational state-dependent amyloid-β-induced synaptotoxicity. PMID:26038823

  16. Neuronal Cx3cr1 Deficiency Protects against Amyloid β-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Dworzak

    Full Text Available Cx3cr1, the receptor for the chemokine Cx3cl1 (fractalkine, has been implicated in the progression and severity of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in mice, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. A complicating factor is that Cx3cr1 has been demonstrated in both neurons and microglia. Here, we have dissected the differences between neuronal and microglial Cx3cr1, specifically by comparing direct amyloid-β-induced toxicity in cultured, mature, microglia-depleted hippocampal neurons from wild-type and Cx3cr1-/- mice. Wild-type neurons expressed both Cx3cl1 and Cx3cr1 and released Cx3cl1 in response to amyloid-β. Knockout of neuronal Cx3cr1 abated amyloid-β-induced lactate dehydrogenase release. Furthermore, amyloid-β differentially induced depression of pre- and postsynaptic components of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, in a peptide conformation-dependent manner. Knockout of neuronal Cx3cr1 abated effects of both amyloid-β conformational states, which were differentiable by aggregation kinetics and peptide morphology. We obtained similar results after both acute and chronic treatment of cultured neurons with the Cx3cr1 antagonist F1. Thus, neuronal Cx3cr1 may impact Alzheimer's disease-like pathology by modulating conformational state-dependent amyloid-β-induced synaptotoxicity.

  17. Clinical heterogeneity and phenotype/genotype findings in 5 families with GYG1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Yaou, Rabah; Hubert, Aurélie; Nelson, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    showed vacuoles with an abnormal accumulation of glycogen in muscle fibers, partially α-amylase resistant suggesting polyglucosan bodies. The patients had either progressive early-onset limb-girdle weakness or late-onset distal or scapuloperoneal muscle affection as shown by muscle imaging. No clear...

  18. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by dream-enacting behaviour and impaired motor inhibition during rapid eye movement sleep. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, but also reported in narcolepsy with cataplexy....... Most narcolepsy with cataplexy patients lack the sleep-wake, and rapid eye movement sleep, motor-regulating hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. In contrast, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and hypocretin deficiency are rare in narcolepsy without cataplexy. We hypothesized...... that rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder coexists with cataplexy in narcolepsy due to hypocretin deficiency. In our study, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder was diagnosed by the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (2nd edition) criteria in 63 narcolepsy patients with or without...

  19. Glutaredoxin-1 Deficiency Causes Fatty Liver and Dyslipidemia by Inhibiting Sirtuin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Di; Han, Jingyan; Hou, Xiuyun; Fry, Jessica; Behring, Jessica B.; Seta, Francesca; Long, Michelle T.; Roy, Hemant K.; Cohen, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is a common liver disease associated with metabolic syndrome, obesity, and diabetes that is rising in prevalence worldwide. Various molecular perturbations of key regulators and enzymes in hepatic lipid metabolism cause NAFL. However, redox regulation through glutathione (GSH) adducts in NAFL remains largely elusive. Glutaredoxin-1 (Glrx) is a small thioltransferase that removes protein GSH adducts without having direct antioxidant properties. The liver contains abundant Glrx but its metabolic function is unknown. Results: Here we report that normal diet-fed Glrx-deficient mice (Glrx−/−) spontaneously develop obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hepatic steatosis by 8 months of age. Adenoviral Glrx repletion in the liver of Glrx−/− mice corrected lipid metabolism. Glrx−/− mice exhibited decreased sirtuin-1 (SirT1) activity that leads to hyperacetylation and activation of SREBP-1 and upregulation of key hepatic enzymes involved in lipid synthesis. We found that GSH adducts inhibited SirT1 activity in Glrx−/− mice. Hepatic expression of nonoxidizable cysteine mutant SirT1 corrected hepatic lipids in Glrx−/− mice. Wild-type mice fed high-fat diet develop metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and NAFL within several months. Glrx deficiency accelerated high-fat-induced NAFL and progression to steatohepatitis, manifested by hepatic damage and inflammation. Innovation: These data suggest an essential role of hepatic Glrx in regulating SirT1, which controls protein glutathione adducts in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. Conclusion: We provide a novel redox-dependent mechanism for regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism, and propose that upregulation of hepatic Glrx may be a beneficial strategy for NAFL. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 313–327. PMID:27958883

  20. Embryonic Lethality of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Deficient Mouse Can Be Rescued by a Ketogenic Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krznar, Petra; Hörl, Manuel; Ammar, Zeinab; Montessuit, Sylvie; Pierredon, Sandra; Zamboni, Nicola; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial import of pyruvate by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) is a central step which links cytosolic and mitochondrial intermediary metabolism. To investigate the role of the MPC in mammalian physiology and development, we generated a mouse strain with complete loss of MPC1 expression. This resulted in embryonic lethality at around E13.5. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from mutant mice displayed defective pyruvate-driven respiration as well as perturbed metabolic profiles, and both defects could be restored by reexpression of MPC1. Labeling experiments using 13C-labeled glucose and glutamine demonstrated that MPC deficiency causes increased glutaminolysis and reduced contribution of glucose-derived pyruvate to the TCA cycle. Morphological defects were observed in mutant embryonic brains, together with major alterations of their metabolome including lactic acidosis, diminished TCA cycle intermediates, energy deficit and a perturbed balance of neurotransmitters. Strikingly, these changes were reversed when the pregnant dams were fed a ketogenic diet, which provides acetyl-CoA directly to the TCA cycle and bypasses the need for a functional MPC. This allowed the normal gestation and development of MPC deficient pups, even though they all died within a few minutes post-delivery. This study establishes the MPC as a key player in regulating the metabolic state necessary for embryonic development, neurotransmitter balance and post-natal survival. PMID:27176894