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Sample records for acid phosphoribosyltransferase 1-deficient

  1. Expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human malignant lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Hastrup, Nina; Sehested, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine in human malignant lymphomas the expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT), the primary, rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of NAD+. NAMPT is a potential biomarker for se...

  2. True Niacin Deficiency in Quinolinic Acid Phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotide coenzymes (PNCs) are involved in over 500 enzyme reactions. PNCs are biosynthesized from the amino acid L-tryptophan (L-Trp), as well as the vitamin niacin. Hence, "true" niacin-deficient animals cannot be "created" using nutritional techniques. We wanted to establish a truly niacin-deficient model animal using a protocol that did not involve manipulating dietary L-Trp. We generated mice that are missing the quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) gene. QPRT activity was not detected in qprt(-/-)mice. The qprt(+/+), qprt(+/-) or qprt(-/-) mice (8 wk old) were fed a complete diet containing 30 mg nicotinic acid (NiA) and 2.3 g L-Trp/kg diet or an NiA-free diet containing 2.3 g L-Trp/kg diet for 23 d. When qprt(-/-)mice were fed a complete diet, food intake and body weight gain did not differ from those of the qprt(+/+) and the qprt(+/-) mice. On the other hand, in the qprt(-/-) mice fed the NiA-free diet, food intake and body weight were reduced to 60% (pniacin such as blood and liver NAD concentrations were also lower in the qprt(-/-) mice than in the qprt(+/+) and the qprt(+/-) mice. Urinary excretion of quinolinic acid was greater in the qprt(-/-) mice than in the qprt(+/+) and the qprt(+/-) mice (pniacin-deficient mice.

  3. Establishment of true niacin deficiency in quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase knockout mice.

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    Terakata, Miki; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Sano, Mitsue; Nakao, Natsuki; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Shibata, Katsumi

    2012-12-01

    Pyridine nucleotide coenzymes are involved in >500 enzyme reactions and are biosynthesized from the amino acid L-tryptophan (L-Trp) as well as the vitamin niacin. Hence, "true" niacin-deficient animals cannot be "created" using nutritional techniques. We wanted to establish a truly niacin-deficient model animal using a protocol that did not involve manipulating dietary L-Trp. We generated mice that are missing the quinolinic acid (QA) phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) gene. QPRT activity was not detected in qprt(-/-)mice. The qprt(+/+), qprt(+/-), or qprt(-/-) mice (8 wk old) were fed a complete diet containing 30 mg nicotinic acid (NiA) and 2.3 g L-Trp/kg diet or an NiA-free diet containing 2.3 g L-Trp/kg diet for 23 d. When qprt(-/-)mice were fed a complete diet, food intake and body weight gain did not differ from those of the qprt(+/+) and qprt(+/-) mice. On the contrary, in the qprt(-/-) mice fed the NiA-free diet, food intake and body weight were reduced to 60% (P niacin, such as blood and liver NAD concentrations, were also lower in the qprt(-/-) mice than in the qprt(+/+) and the qprt(+/-) mice. Urinary excretion of QA was greater in the qprt(-/-) mice than in the qprt(+/+) and qprt(+/-) mice (P niacin-deficient mice.

  4. Inducible arginase 1 deficiency in mice leads to hyperargininemia and altered amino acid metabolism.

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    Sin, Yuan Yan; Ballantyne, Laurel L; Mukherjee, Kamalika; St Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing "floxed" Arg1 mice with CreER(T2) mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency.

  5. IDH1 deficiency attenuates gluconeogenesis in mouse liver by impairing amino acid utilization

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    Ye, Jing; Gu, Yu; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Yuanlin; Yuan, Yuan; Hao, Zhenyue; Sheng, Yi; Li, Wanda Y.; Wakeham, Andrew; Cairns, Rob A.; Mak, Tak W.

    2017-01-01

    Although the enzymatic activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) was defined decades ago, its functions in vivo are not yet fully understood. Cytosolic IDH1 converts isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), a key metabolite regulating nitrogen homeostasis in catabolic pathways. It was thought that IDH1 might enhance lipid biosynthesis in liver or adipose tissue by generating NADPH, but we show here that lipid contents are relatively unchanged in both IDH1-null mouse liver and IDH1-deficient HepG2 cells generated using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Instead, we found that IDH1 is critical for liver amino acid (AA) utilization. Body weights of IDH1-null mice fed a high-protein diet (HPD) were abnormally low. After prolonged fasting, IDH1-null mice exhibited decreased blood glucose but elevated blood alanine and glycine compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Similarly, in IDH1-deficient HepG2 cells, glucose consumption was increased, but alanine utilization and levels of intracellular α-KG and glutamate were reduced. In IDH1-deficient primary hepatocytes, gluconeogenesis as well as production of ammonia and urea were decreased. In IDH1-deficient whole livers, expression levels of genes involved in AA metabolism were reduced, whereas those involved in gluconeogenesis were up-regulated. Thus, IDH1 is critical for AA utilization in vivo and its deficiency attenuates gluconeogenesis primarily by impairing α-KG–dependent transamination of glucogenic AAs such as alanine. PMID:28011762

  6. A preclinical study on the rescue of normal tissue by nicotinic acid in high-dose treatment with APO866, a specific nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Thougaard, Annemette V; Jensen, Peter Buhl;

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase APO866 is a promising cancer drug currently in phase II clinical trials in oncology. Here, we present a strategy for increasing the therapeutic potential of APO866 through the rescue of normal tissues by coadministration of nicotinic acid (Vitamin...

  7. Amino acids in CSF and plasma in hyperammonaemic coma due to arginase1 deficiency.

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    Scholl-Bürgi, S; Sigl, S Baumgartner; Häberle, J; Haberlandt, E; Rostásy, K; Ertl, C; Eichinger-Öttl, U; Heinz-Erian, P; Karall, D

    2008-12-01

    We report the CSF and plasma amino acid concentrations and their ratios in a male patient with arginase1 deficiency with an unusual early presentation at 34 days of age. He developed hyperammonaemic coma (ammonia >400 μmol/L; normal amino acids were elevated but not those of the imino- and of the dibasic amino acids lysine and ornithine. The mechanism leading to the increase of most neutral amino acids in brain is not known. A normal glutamine in plasma does not exclude an increased concentration in CSF; it could be useful to ascertain by MRS that a high CSF glutamine concentration truly reflects a high concentration in brain tissue for better understanding its pathogenesis.

  8. Biochemical characterization of quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and inhibition of its activity by pyrazinamide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kim

    Full Text Available Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19 is a key enzyme in the de novo pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD biosynthesis and a target for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. QAPRTase catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide from quinolinic acid (QA and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP through a phosphoribosyl transfer reaction followed by decarboxylation. The crystal structure of QAPRTase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (MtQAPRTase has been determined; however, a detailed functional analysis of MtQAPRTase has not been published. Here, we analyzed the enzymatic activities of MtQAPRTase and determined the effect on catalysis of the anti-tuberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA. The optimum temperature and pH for MtQAPRTase activity were 60°C and pH 9.2. MtQAPRTase required bivalent metal ions and its activity was highest in the presence of Mg2+. Kinetic analyses revealed that the Km values for QA and PRPP were 0.08 and 0.39 mM, respectively, and the kcat values for QA and PRPP were 0.12 and 0.14 [s-1], respectively. When the amino acid residues of MtQAPRTase, which may interact with QA, were substituted with alanine residues, catalytic activity was undetectable. Further, PZA, which is an anti-tuberculosis drug and a structural analog of QA, markedly inhibited the catalytic activity of MtQAPRTase. The structure of PZA may provide the basis for the design of new inhibitors of MtQAPRTase. These findings provide new insights into the catalytic properties of MtQAPRTase.

  9. A preclinical study on the rescue of normal tissue by nicotinic acid in high-dose treatment with APO866, a specific nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Thougaard, Annemette V; Jensen, Peter Buhl

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase APO866 is a promising cancer drug currently in phase II clinical trials in oncology. Here, we present a strategy for increasing the therapeutic potential of APO866 through the rescue of normal tissues by coadministration of nicotinic acid (Vitamin...... B(3)). We examined the toxicity profile of APO866 in B6D2F1 mice and the effect of oral administration of nicotinic acid on tissue toxicity. Nicotinic acid (50 mg/kg) protects mice from death and severe toxicity from an APO866 dose (60 mg/kg) four times the monotherapy maximum tolerated dose (15 mg...

  10. Hypercholesterolemia and changes in lipid and bile acid metabolism in male and female cyp7A1-deficient mice.

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    Erickson, Sandra K; Lear, Steven R; Deane, Sean; Dubrac, Sandrine; Huling, Sandra L; Nguyen, Lien; Bollineni, Jaya S; Shefer, Sarah; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Cohen, David E; Shneider, Benjamin; Sehayek, Ephraim; Ananthanarayanan, Meena; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Suchy, Fredrick J; Batta, Ashok K; Salen, Gerald

    2003-05-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis, has been implicated in genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis. The gene, CYP7A1, encoding a protein with this activity, is expressed normally only in hepatocytes and is highly regulated. Our cyp7A1 gene knockout mouse colony, as young adults on a chow diet, is hypercholesterolemic. These mice were characterized extensively to understand how cyp7A1 affects lipid and bile acid homeostasis in different tissue compartments and whether gender plays a modifying role. Both male and female cyp7A1-deficient mice had decreased hepatic LDL receptors, unchanged hepatic cholesterol synthesis, increased intestinal cholesterol synthesis and bile acid transporters, and decreased fecal bile acids but increased fecal sterols. In females, cyp7A1 deficiency also caused changes in hepatic fatty acid metabolism, decreased hepatic canalicular bile acid transporter, Bsep, and gallbladder bile composition altered to a lithogenic profile. Taken together, the data suggest that cyp7A1 deficiency results in a proatherogenic phenotype in both genders and leads to a prolithogenic phenotype in females.

  11. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 deficiency induces compensatory amino acid metabolism during fasting in mice.

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    Sato, Tomoki; Yoshida, Yuma; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2016-11-01

    Glucose is used as an energy source in many organs and obtained from dietary carbohydrates. However, when the external energy supply is interrupted, e.g., during fasting, carbohydrates preserved in the liver and glycogenic precursors derived from other organs are used to maintain blood glucose levels. Glycerol and glycogenic amino acids derived from adipocytes and skeletal muscles are utilized as glycogenic precursors. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), an NAD(+)/NADH-dependent enzyme present in the cytosol, catalyzes the reversible conversion of glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) to dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). Since G3P is one of the substrates utilized for gluconeogenesis in the liver, the conversion of G3P to DHAP by GPD1 is essential for maintaining blood glucose levels during fasting. We focused on GPD1 and examined its roles in gluconeogenesis during fasting. Using GPD1 null model BALB/cHeA mice (HeA mice), we measured gluconeogenesis from glycerol and the change of blood glucose levels under fasting conditions. We also measured gene expression related to gluconeogenesis in the liver and protein metabolism in skeletal muscle. BALB/cBy mice (By mice) were used as a control. The blood glucose levels in the HeA mice were lower than that in the By mice after glycerol administration. Although lack of GPD1 inhibited gluconeogenesis from glycerol, blood glucose levels in the HeA mice after 1-4h of fasting were significantly higher than that in the By mice. Muscle protein synthesis in HeA mice was significantly lower than that in the By mice. Moreover, blood alanine levels and usage of alanine for gluconeogenesis in the liver were significantly higher in the HeA mice than that in the By mice. Although these data indicate that a lack of GPD1 inhibits gluconeogenesis from glycerol, chronic GPD1 deficiency may induce an adaptation that enhances gluconeogenesis from glycogenic amino acids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibitor upregulates peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and inhibits apoptotic cell death in abcd1-deficient glial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Singh

    Full Text Available In X-ALD, mutation/deletion of ALD gene (ABCD1 and the resultant very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA derangement has dramatically opposing effects in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. While loss of Abcd1 in astrocytes produces a robust inflammatory response, the oligodendrocytes undergo cell death leading to demyelination in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD. The mechanisms of these distinct pathways in the two cell types are not well understood. Here, we investigated the effects of Abcd1-knockdown and the subsequent alteration in VLCFA metabolism in human U87 astrocytes and rat B12 oligodendrocytes. Loss of Abcd1 inhibited peroxisomal β-oxidation activity and increased expression of VLCFA synthesizing enzymes, elongase of very long chain fatty acids (ELOVLs (1 and 3 in both cell types. However, higher induction of ELOVL's in Abcd1-deficient B12 oligodendrocytes than astrocytes suggests that ELOVL pathway may play a prominent role in oligodendrocytes in X-ALD. While astrocytes are able to maintain the cellular homeostasis of anti-apoptotic proteins, Abcd1-deletion in B12 oligodendrocytes downregulated the anti-apototic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and cell survival (phospho-Erk1/2 proteins, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bim, Bax and Bid leading to cell loss. These observations provide insights into different cellular signaling mechanisms in response to Abcd1-deletion in two different cell types of CNS. The apoptotic responses were accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial-caspase-9-dependent mechanism in Abcd1-deficient oligodendrocytes. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA corrected the VLCFA derangement both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the oligodendrocytes loss. These observations provide a proof-of principle that HDAC inhibitor SAHA may have a therapeutic potential for X-ALD.

  13. Amino acid substitution in NPC1 that abolishes cholesterol binding reproduces phenotype of complete NPC1 deficiency in mice

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    Xie, Xuefen; Brown, Michael S.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Liang, Guosheng

    2011-01-01

    Substitution mutations in adjacent amino acids of the N-terminal domain of NPC1, a lysosomal membrane protein, abolish its cholesterol binding activity and impair its ability to export cholesterol from lysosomes of cultured cells lacking npc1 [Kwon HJ, et al. (2009) Cell 137:1213–1224]. Here, we show that the same two mutations (proline-202 and phenylalanine-203, both changed to alanine) reproduce the phenotype of complete NPC1 deficiency when knocked into the mouse npc1 gene by homologous recombination. Homozygous npc1pf/pf mice exhibited neurodegeneration beginning at day 49 and died at a median age of 84 d, as previously reported for mice that lack npc1. Liver and other organs of the npc1pf/pf mice accumulated excess cholesterol in lysosomes. In liver, mRNAs encoding several lysosomal proteins were elevated, including NPC1 and NPC2 and several digestive enzymes (acid lipase, β-glucuronidase, and cathepsins B and D). Weekly treatment with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) beginning at 7 wk reduced hepatic cholesterol accumulation and diminished the lysosomal mRNAs. We conclude that the cholesterol binding site in the N-terminal domain of NPC1 is essential for cholesterol export from lysosomes in living animals as it is in cultured cells. The HPCD-mediated reduction of excess lysosomal enzymes may contribute to the ability of this drug to delay the progression of NPC disease in mice. PMID:21896731

  14. The role for an invariant aspartic acid in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases is examined using saturation mutagenesis, functional analysis, and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canyuk, B; Focia, P J; Eakin, A E

    2001-03-01

    The role of an invariant aspartic acid (Asp137) in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs) was examined by site-directed and saturation mutagenesis, functional analysis, and X-ray crystallography using the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi. Alanine substitution (D137A) resulted in a 30-fold decrease of k(cat), suggesting that Asp137 participates in catalysis. Saturation mutagenesis was used to generate a library of mutant HPRTs with random substitutions at position 137, and active enzymes were identified by complementation of a bacterial purine auxotroph. Functional analyses of the mutants, including determination of steady-state kinetic parameters and pH-rate dependence, indicate that glutamic acid or glutamine can replace the wild-type aspartate. However, the catalytic efficiency and pH-rate profile for the structural isosteric mutant, D137N, were similar to the D137A mutant. Crystal structures of four of the mutant enzymes were determined in ternary complex with substrate ligands. Structures of the D137E and D137Q mutants reveal potential hydrogen bonds, utilizing several bound water molecules in addition to protein atoms, that position these side chains within hydrogen bond distance of the bound purine analogue, similar in position to the aspartate in the wild-type structure. The crystal structure of the D137N mutant demonstrates that the Asn137 side chain does not form interactions with the purine substrate but instead forms novel interactions that cause the side chain to adopt a nonfunctional rotamer. The results from these structural and functional analyses demonstrate that HPRTs do not require a general base at position 137 for catalysis. Instead, hydrogen bonding sufficiently stabilizes the developing partial positive charge at the N7-atom of the purine substrate in the transition-state to promote catalysis.

  15. Adult Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1-Deficient Rats with Hyperoxia-Induced Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease Are Protected against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

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    Chen, Xueyu; Walther, Frans J.; Laghmani, El H.; Hoogeboom, Annemarie M.; Hogen-Esch, Anne C. B.; van Ark, Ingrid; Folkerts, Gert; Wagenaar, Gerry T. M.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Survivors of neonatal chronic lung disease or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) suffer from compromised lung function and are at high risk for developing lung injury by multiple insults later in life. Because neonatal lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 (LPAR1)-deficient rats are protected against hyperoxia-induced lung injury, we hypothesize that LPAR1-deficiency may protect adult survivors of BPD from a second hit response against lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced lung injury. Methods: Directly after birth, Wistar control and LPAR1-deficient rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia (90%) for 8 days followed by recovery in room air. After 7 weeks, male rats received either LPS (2 mg kg−1) or 0.9% NaCl by intraperitoneal injection. Alveolar development and lung inflammation were investigated by morphometric analysis, IL-6 production, and mRNA expression of cytokines, chemokines, coagulation factors, and an indicator of oxidative stress. Results: LPAR1-deficient and control rats developed hyperoxia-induced neonatal emphysema, which persisted into adulthood, as demonstrated by alveolar enlargement and decreased vessel density. LPAR1-deficiency protected against LPS-induced lung injury. Adult controls with BPD exhibited an exacerbated response toward LPS with an increased expression of pro-inflammatory mRNAs, whereas LPAR1-deficient rats with BPD were less sensitive to this “second hit” with a decreased pulmonary influx of macrophages and neutrophils, interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, and mRNA expression of IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and tissue factor. Conclusion: LPAR1-deficient rats have increased hyperoxia-induced BPD survival rates and, despite the presence of neonatal emphysema, are less sensitive to an aggravated “second hit” than Wistar controls with BPD. Intervening in LPA-LPAR1-dependent signaling may not only have therapeutic potential for neonatal chronic

  16. Dermatan Sulfate Epimerase 1-Deficient Mice Have Reduced Content and Changed Distribution of Iduronic Acids in Dermatan Sulfate and an Altered Collagen Structure in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarana, M.; Kalamajski, S.; Kongsgaard, M.;

    2009-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 (DS-epi1) and DS-epi2 convert glucuronic acid to iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Here we report on the generation of DS-epi1-null mice and the resulting alterations in the chondroitin/dermatan polysaccharide chains. The numbers of long blocks...... of adjacent iduronic acids are greatly decreased in skin decorin and biglycan chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, along with a parallel decrease in iduronic-2-O-sulfated-galactosamine-4-O-sulfated structures. Both iduronic acid blocks and iduronic acids surrounded by glucuronic acids are also decreased in versican......-derived chains. DS-epi1-deficient mice are smaller than their wild-type littermates but otherwise have no gross macroscopic alterations. The lack of DS-epi1 affects the chondroitin/dermatan sulfate in many proteoglycans, and the consequences for skin collagen structure were initially analyzed. We found...

  17. Impact of physiological levels of chenodeoxycholic acid supplementation on intestinal and hepatic bile acid and cholesterol metabolism in Cyp7a1-deficient mice.

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    Jones, Ryan D; Lopez, Adam M; Tong, Ernest Y; Posey, Kenneth S; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Repa, Joyce J; Turley, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Mice deficient in cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) have a diminished bile acid pool (BAP) and therefore represent a useful model for investigating the metabolic effects of restoring the pool with a specific BA. Previously we carried out such studies in Cyp7a1(-/-) mice fed physiological levels of cholic acid (CA) and achieved BAP restoration, along with an increased CA enrichment, at a dietary level of just 0.03% (w/w). Here we demonstrate that in Cyp7a1(-/-) mice fed chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) at a level of 0.06% (w/w), the BAP was restored to normal size and became substantially enriched with muricholic acid (MCA) (>70%), leaving the combined contribution of CA and CDCA to be Cyp7a1 deficiency such as an elevated rate of intestinal sterol synthesis, an enhanced level of mRNA for Cyp8b1 in the liver, and depressed mRNA levels for Ibabp, Shp and Fgf15 in the distal small intestine. When Cyp7a1(-/-) and matching Cyp7a1(+/+) mice were fed a diet with added cholesterol (0.2%) (w/w), either alone, or also containing CDCA (0.06%) (w/w) or CA (0.03%) (w/w) for 18days, the hepatic total cholesterol concentrations (mg/g) in the Cyp7a1(-/-) mice were 26.9±3.7, 16.4±0.9 and 47.6±1.9, respectively, vs. 4.9±0.4, 5.0±0.7 and 6.4±1.9, respectively in the corresponding Cyp7a1(+/+) controls. These data affirm the importance of using moderate levels of dietary BA supplementation to elicit changes in hepatic cholesterol metabolism through shifts in BAP size and composition.

  18. ALDH1A1 Deficiency in Gorlin Syndrome Suggests a Central Role for Retinoic Acid and ATM Deficits in Radiation Carcinogenesis.

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    Weber, Thomas J; Magnaldo, Thierry; Xiong, Yijia

    2014-09-11

    We hypothesize that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) deficiency will result in impaired ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation in a retinoic acid-sensitive fashion. Data supporting this hypothesis include (1) reduced ATM activation in irradiated primary dermal fibroblasts from ALDH1A1-deficient Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), relative to ALDH1A1-positive normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) and (2) increased ATM activation by X-radiation in GDFs pretreated with retinoic acid, however, the impact of donor variability on ATM activation in fibroblasts was not assessed and is a prudent consideration in future studies. Clonogenic survival of irradiated cells showed differential responses to retinoic acid as a function of treatment time. Long-term (5 Day) retinoic acid treatment functioned as a radiosensitizer and was associated with downregulation of ATM protein levels. Short-term (7 h) retinoic acid treatment showed a trend toward increased survival of irradiated cells and did not downregulate ATM protein levels. Using a newly developed IncubATR technology, which defines changes in bulk chemical bond patterns in live cells, we can discriminate between the NHDF and GDF phenotypes, but treatment of GDFs with retinoic acid does not induce reversion of bulk chemical bond patterns associated with GDFs toward the NHDF phenotype. Collectively, our preliminary investigation of the Gorlin phenotype has identified deficient ALDH1A1 expression associated with deficient ATM activation as a possible susceptibility factor that is consistent with the high incidence of spontaneous and radiation-induced carcinogenesis in these patients. The IncubATR technology exhibits sufficient sensitivity to detect phenotypic differences in live cells that may be relevant to radiation health effects.

  19. Maximizing bone formation in posterior spine fusion using rhBMP-2 and zoledronic acid in wild type and NF1 deficient mice.

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    Bobyn, Justin; Rasch, Anton; Kathy, Mikulec; Little, David G; Schindeler, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    Spinal pseudarthrosis is a well described complication of spine fusion surgery in NF1 patients. Reduced bone formation and excessive resorption have been described in NF1 and anti-resorptive agents may be advantageous in these individuals. In this study, 16 wild type and 16 Nf1(+/-) mice were subjected to posterolateral fusion using collagen sponges containing 5 µg rhBMP-2 introduced bilaterally. Mice were dosed twice weekly with 0.02 mg/kg zoledronic acid (ZA) or sterile saline. The fusion mass was assessed for bone volume (BV) and bone mineral density (BMD) by microCT. Co-treatment using rhBMP-2 and ZA produced a significant increase (p Nf1(+/-) mice (+174%). Co-treatment also produced a significantly higher total BMD of the fusion mass compared to rhBMP-2 alone in both groups (p Nf1(+/-) deficient mice still generated less bone than wild type controls. TRAP staining on histological sections indicated an increased osteoclast surface/bone surface (Oc.S/BS) in Nf1(+/-) mice relative to wild type mice, and this was reduced with ZA treatment.

  20. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitors, design, preparation and SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Knak; Erichsen, Kamille Dumong; Olesen, Uffe Hogh;

    2013-01-01

    Existing pharmacological inhibitors for nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) are promising therapeutics for treating cancer. Using medicinal and computational chemistry methods, the structure-activity relationship for novel classes of NAMPT inhibitors is described and compounds optimized....... Compounds are designed inspired by the NAMPT inhibitor APO866 and cyanoguanidine inhibitor scaffolds. In comparison with recently published derivatives the new analogues exhibit an equally potent anti-proliferative activity in vitro and comparable activity in vivo. The best performing compounds from...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

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    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions GLUT1 deficiency syndrome GLUT1 deficiency syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is a disorder affecting the nervous ...

  2. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a new cancer metabokine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this review, we focus on the secreted form of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT); extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT), also known as pre‐B cell colony‐enhancing factor or visfatin. Although intracellular NAMPT is a key enzyme in controlling NAD metabolism, eNAMPT has been reported to function as a cytokine, with many roles in physiology and pathology. Circulating eNAMPT has been associated with several metabolic and inflammatory disorders, including cancer. Because cytokines produced in the tumour micro‐environment play an important role in cancer pathogenesis, in part by reprogramming cellular metabolism, future improvements in cancer immunotherapy will require a better understanding of the crosstalk between cytokine action and tumour biology. In this review, the knowledge of eNAMPT in cancer will be discussed, focusing on its immunometabolic function as a metabokine, its secretion, its mechanism of action and possible roles in the cancer micro‐environment. PMID:27128025

  3. Two Genes Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase Are Present in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Glaser, Philippe; Andersen, Paal S.

    1995-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. Surprisingly, two genes encoding UPRTase activity were cloned from Bacillus subtilis by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The genes were sequenced, and the putative...

  4. SIZ1 deficiency causes reduced stomatal aperture and enhanced drought tolerance via controlling salicylic acid-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kenji; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Okuma, Eiji; Shiba, Hayato; Kamada, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Paul M; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Transpiration and gas exchange occur through stomata. Thus, the control of stomatal aperture is important for the efficiency and regulation of water use, and for the response to drought. Here, we demonstrate that SIZ1-mediated endogenous salicylic acid (SA) accumulation plays an important role in stomatal closure and drought tolerance. siz1 reduced stomatal apertures. The reduced stomatal apertures of siz1 were inhibited by the application of peroxidase inhibitors, salicylhydroxamic acid and azide, which inhibits SA-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, but not by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenyl iodonium chloride, which inhibits ABA-dependent ROS production. Furthermore, the introduction of nahG into siz1, which reduces SA accumulation, restored stomatal opening. Stomatal closure is generally induced by water deficit. The siz1 mutation caused drought tolerance, whereas nahG siz1 suppressed the tolerant phenotype. Drought stresses also induced expression of SA-responsive genes, such as PR1 and PR2. Furthermore, other SA-accumulating mutants, cpr5 and acd6, exhibited stomatal closure and drought tolerance, and nahG suppressed the phenotype of cpr5 and acd6, as did siz1 and nahG siz1. Together, these results suggest that SIZ1 negatively affects stomatal closure and drought tolerance through the accumulation of SA.

  5. Biochemical Characterization of Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villela, Anne Drumond; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Rosado, Leonardo Astolfi; Bloch, Carlos Junior; Prates, Maura Vianna; Gonçalves, Danieli Cristina; Ramos, Carlos Henrique Inacio; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diogenes Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) catalyzes the conversion of uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) and pyrophosphate (PPi). UPRT plays an important role in the pyrimidine salvage pathway since UMP is a common precursor of all pyrimidine nucleotides. Here we describe cloning, expression and purification to homogeneity of upp-encoded UPRT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUPRT). Mass spectrometry and N-terminal amino acid sequencing unambiguously identified the homogeneous protein as MtUPRT. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that native MtUPRT follows a monomer-tetramer association model. MtUPRT is specific for uracil. GTP is not a modulator of MtUPRT ativity. MtUPRT was not significantly activated or inhibited by ATP, UTP, and CTP. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry studies suggest that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism, in which PRPP binding is followed by uracil, and PPi product is released first followed by UMP. The pH-rate profiles indicated that groups with pK values of 5.7 and 8.1 are important for catalysis, and a group with a pK value of 9.5 is involved in PRPP binding. The results here described provide a solid foundation on which to base upp gene knockout aiming at the development of strategies to prevent tuberculosis. PMID:23424660

  6. Biochemical characterization of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Drumond Villela

    Full Text Available Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT catalyzes the conversion of uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP to uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP and pyrophosphate (PP(i. UPRT plays an important role in the pyrimidine salvage pathway since UMP is a common precursor of all pyrimidine nucleotides. Here we describe cloning, expression and purification to homogeneity of upp-encoded UPRT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUPRT. Mass spectrometry and N-terminal amino acid sequencing unambiguously identified the homogeneous protein as MtUPRT. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that native MtUPRT follows a monomer-tetramer association model. MtUPRT is specific for uracil. GTP is not a modulator of MtUPRT ativity. MtUPRT was not significantly activated or inhibited by ATP, UTP, and CTP. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry studies suggest that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism, in which PRPP binding is followed by uracil, and PP(i product is released first followed by UMP. The pH-rate profiles indicated that groups with pK values of 5.7 and 8.1 are important for catalysis, and a group with a pK value of 9.5 is involved in PRPP binding. The results here described provide a solid foundation on which to base upp gene knockout aiming at the development of strategies to prevent tuberculosis.

  7. Expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human malignant lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Hastrup, Nina; Sehested, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    lymphomas (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma). The expression of NAMPT was generally high in the more aggressive malignant lymphomas, with >80% strong expression, whereas the expression in the more indolent follicular lymphoma (FL...

  8. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K., E-mail: rathod@chem.washington.edu [University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    P. falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, a potential target for antimalarial drugs and a conduit for prodrugs, crystallized as a structure with eight molecules per asymmetric unit that included some unique parasite-specific auto-inhibitory interactions between catalytic dimers. The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions.

  9. Wound healing in Mac-1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Nagaraja, Sridevi; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Yan; Fine, David; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y; Reifman, Jaques; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2017-05-01

    Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) is a macrophage receptor that plays several critical roles in macrophage recruitment and activation. Because macrophages are essential for proper wound healing, the impact of Mac-1 deficiency on wound healing is of significant interest. Prior studies have shown that Mac-1(-/-) mice exhibit deficits in healing, including delayed wound closure in scalp and ear wounds. This study examined whether Mac-1 deficiency influences wound healing in small excisional and incisional skin wounds. Three millimeter diameter full thickness excisional wounds and incisional wounds were prepared on the dorsal skin of Mac-1 deficient (Mac-1(-/-) ) and wild type (WT) mice, and wound healing outcomes were examined. Mac-1 deficient mice exhibited a normal rate of wound closure, generally normal levels of total collagen, and nearly normal synthesis and distribution of collagens I and III. In incisional wounds, wound breaking strength was similar for Mac-1(-/-) and WT mice. Wounds of Mac-1 deficient mice displayed normal total macrophage content, although macrophage phenotype markers were skewed as compared to WT. Interestingly, amounts of TGF-β1 and its downstream signaling molecules, SMAD2 and SMAD3, were significantly decreased in the wounds of Mac-1 deficient mice compared to WT. The results suggest that Mac-1 deficiency has little impact on the healing of small excisional and incisional wounds. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that the effect of single genetic deficiencies on wound healing may markedly differ among wound models. These conclusions have implications for the interpretation of the many prior studies that utilize a single model system to examine wound healing outcomes in genetically deficient mice. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. Paroxysmal Nonepileptic Events in Glut1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel; Eltze, Christin; Heussinger, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    View Supplementary Video Movement disorders are a major feature of Glut1 deficiency. As recently identified in adults with paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia, similar events were reported in pediatric Glut1 deficiency. In a case series, parent videos of regular motor state and paroxysmal events were requested from children with Glut1 deficiency on clinical follow-up. A questionnaire was sent out to 60 families. Videos of nonparoxysmal/paroxysmal states in 3 children illustrated the ataxic-dystonic, choreatiform, and dyskinetic-dystonic nature of paroxysmal events. Fifty-six evaluated questionnaires confirmed this observation in 73% of patients. Events appeared to increase with age, were triggered by low ketosis, sleep deprivation, and physical exercise, and unrelated to sex, hypoglycorrhachia, SLC2A1 mutations, or type of ketogenic diet. We conclude that paroxysmal events are a major clinical feature in Glut1 deficieny, linking the pediatric disease to adult Glut1D-associated exercise-induced paroxysmal dyskinesias.

  11. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency: an underdiagnosed cause of lithiasis and renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Giuseppina; Vercelloni, Paolo Gilles; Edefonti, Alberto; Manzoni, Gianantonio; Pavesi, Maria Angela; Fogazzi, Giovanni Battista; Garigali, Giuseppe; Mockel, Lionel; Picot, Irene Ceballos

    2012-01-01

    We describe an infant affected by adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency diagnosed at 18 months of age with a de novo mutation that has not been previously reported. APRT deficiency is a rare defect of uric acid catabolism that leads to the accumulation of 2,8 dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA), a highly insoluble substance excreted by the kidneys that may precipitate in urine and form stones. The child suffered from renal colic due to a stone found in the peno-scrotal junction of the bulbar urethra. Stone spectrophotometric analysis allowed us to diagnose the disease and start kidney-saving therapy in order to avoid irreversible chronic kidney damage. APRT deficiency should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of pediatric urolithiasis.

  12. Atypical Manifestations in Glut1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giorgis, V; Varesio, C; Baldassari, C; Piazza, E; Olivotto, S; Macasaet, J; Balottin, U; Veggiotti, P

    2016-08-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is a genetically determined, treatable, neurologic disorder that is caused by an insufficient transport of glucose into the brain. It is caused by a mutation in the SCL2A1 gene, which is so far the only known to be associated with this condition. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome consists of a wide clinical spectrum that usually presents with cognitive impairment, epilepsy, paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, acquired microcephaly, hemolytic anemia, gait disturbance, and dyspraxia in different combinations. However, there are other clinical manifestations that we consider equally peculiar but that have so far been poorly described in literature. In this review, supported by a video contribution, we will accurately describe this type of clinical manifestation such as oculogyric crises, weakness, paroxysmal kinesigenic and nonkinesigenic dyskinesia in order to provide an additional instrument for a correct, rapid diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Cited1 deficiency suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Méniel

    Full Text Available Conditional deletion of Apc in the murine intestine alters crypt-villus architecture and function. This process is accompanied by multiple changes in gene expression, including upregulation of Cited1, whose role in colorectal carcinogenesis is unknown. Here we explore the relevance of Cited1 to intestinal tumorigenesis. We crossed Cited1 null mice with Apc(Min/+ and AhCre(+Apc(fl/fl mice and determined the impact of Cited1 deficiency on tumour growth/initiation including tumour multiplicity, cell proliferation, apoptosis and the transcriptome. We show that Cited1 is up-regulated in both human and murine tumours, and that constitutive deficiency of Cited1 increases survival in Apc(Min/+ mice from 230.5 to 515 days. However, paradoxically, Cited1 deficiency accentuated nearly all aspects of the immediate phenotype 4 days after conditional deletion of Apc, including an increase in cell death and enhanced perturbation of differentiation, including of the stem cell compartment. Transcriptome analysis revealed multiple pathway changes, including p53, PI3K and Wnt. The activation of Wnt through Cited1 deficiency correlated with increased transcription of β-catenin and increased levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin. Hence, immediately following deletion of Apc, Cited1 normally restrains the Wnt pathway at the level of β-catenin. Thus deficiency of Cited1 leads to hyper-activation of Wnt signaling and an exaggerated Wnt phenotype including elevated cell death. Cited1 deficiency decreases intestinal tumourigenesis in Apc(Min/+ mice and impacts upon a number of oncogenic signaling pathways, including Wnt. This restraint imposed by Cited1 is consistent with a requirement for Cited1 to constrain Wnt activity to a level commensurate with optimal adenoma formation and maintenance, and provides one mechanism for tumour repression in the absence of Cited1.

  14. The molecular basis of aminoacylase 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Anke; Christensen, Ernst; Schwenger, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    deficiency have not been characterized so far. This has prompted us to approach expression studies of all mutations known to occur in aminoacylase 1 deficient individuals in a human cell line (HEK293), thus providing the authentic human machinery for posttranslational modifications. Mutations were inserted...... by their intramolecular localization and molecular characteristics. In contrast to aminoacylase 1 variants which showed no detectable aminoacylase 1 activity, aminoacylase 1 proteins with the mutations p.Arg378Trp, p.Arg378Gln and p.Arg393His were also detected in Western blot analysis. Investigations of the molecular...

  15. Pannexin 1 deficiency can induce hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Bo; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Chen, Jin

    Gap junctions play a critical role in hearing. Connexin gap junction gene mutations can induce a high incidence of hearing loss. Pannexin (Panx) gene also encodes gap junction proteins in vertebrates. Panx1 is a predominant pannexin isoform and has extensive expression in the cochlea. Here, we report that deletion of Panx1 in the cochlea could produce a progressive hearing loss. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) recording showed that hearing loss was moderate to severe and severe at high-frequencies. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), which reflects the activity of active cochlear mechanics that can amply acoustic stimulation to enhance hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity, was also reduced. We further found that Panx1 deficiency could activate Caspase-3 cell apoptotic pathway in the cochlea to cause hair cells and other types of cells degeneration. These data indicate that like connexins Panx1 deficiency can also induce hearing loss. These data also suggest that pannexins play important rather than redundant roles in the cochlea and hearing.

  16. [Glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, A; Ticus, I; Chabrol, B

    2008-11-01

    Impaired glucose transport across the blood brain barrier results in glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency syndrome, first described in 1991. It is characterized by infantile seizures refractory to anticonvulsive treatments, microcephaly, delays in mental and motor development, spasticity, ataxia, dysarthria and other paroxysmal neurologic phenomena, often occurring prior to meals. Affected infants are normal at birth following an uneventful pregnancy and delivery. Seizures usually begin between the age of one and four months and can be preceded by apneic episodes or abnormal eyes movements. Patients with atypical presentations such as mental retardation and intermittent ataxia without seizures, or movement disorders characterized by choreoathetosis and dystonia, have also been described. Glucose is the principal fuel source for the brain and GLUT-1 is the only vehicle by which glucose enters the brain. In case of GLUT-1 deficiency, the risk of clinical manifestations is increased in infancy and childhood, when the brain glucose demand is maximal. The hallmark of the disease is a low glucose concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid in a presence of normoglycemia (cerebrospinal fluid/blood glucose ratio less than 0.4). The GLUT-1 defect can be confirmed by molecular analysis of the SCL2A1 gene or in erythrocytes by glucose uptake studies and GLUT-1 immunoreactivity. Several heterozygous mutations, with a majority of de novo mutations, resulting in GLUT-1 haploinsufficiency, have been described. Cases with an autosomal dominant transmission have been established and adults can exhibit symptoms of this deficiency. Ketogenic diet is an effective treatment of epileptic manifestations as ketone bodies serve as an alternative fuel for the developing brain. However, this diet is not effective on cognitive impairment and other treatments are being evaluated. The physiopathology of this disorder is partially unclear and its understanding could explain the clinical

  17. Allosteric regulation and communication between subunits in uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arent, Susan; Harris, Pernille; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2005-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) catalyzes the conversion of 5-phosphate-alpha-1-diphosphate (PRPP) and uracil to uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) and diphosphate. The UPRTase from Sulfolobus solfataricus has a unique regulation by nucleoside triphosphates compared to UPRTases from other...

  18. Nitroglycerin tolerance in caveolin-1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Mao; Varadarajan, Sudhahar; Fukai, Tohru; Bakhshi, Farnaz R; Chernaya, Olga; Dudley, Samuel C; Minshall, Richard D; Bonini, Marcelo G

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN) exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae) and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48-72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50%) of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%), and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations). In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation.

  19. Nitroglycerin tolerance in caveolin-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Mao

    Full Text Available Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3 activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48-72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50% of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%, and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations. In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation.

  20. Nitroglycerin Tolerance in Caveolin-1 Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Mao; Varadarajan, Sudhahar; Fukai, Tohru; Bakhshi, Farnaz R.; Chernaya, Olga; Dudley, Samuel C.; Minshall, Richard D.; Bonini, Marcelo G.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN) exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae) and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48–72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50%) of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%), and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations). In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation. PMID:25158065

  1. Crystal structure of Leishmania tarentolae hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva Glaucius

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT (EC 2.4.2.8 is a central enzyme in the purine recycling pathway. Parasitic protozoa of the order Kinetoplastida cannot synthesize purines de novo and use the salvage pathway to synthesize purine bases, making this an attractive target for antiparasitic drug design. Results The glycosomal HGPRT from Leishmania tarentolae in a catalytically active form purified and co-crystallized with a guanosine monophosphate (GMP in the active site. The dimeric structure of HGPRT has been solved by molecular replacement and refined against data extending to 2.1 Å resolution. The structure reveals the contacts of the active site residues with GMP. Conclusion Comparative analysis of the active sites of Leishmania and human HGPRT revealed subtle differences in the position of the ligand and its interaction with the active site residues, which could be responsible for the different reactivities of the enzymes to allopurinol reported in the literature. The solution and analysis of the structure of Leishmania HGPRT may contribute to further investigations leading to a full understanding of this important enzyme family in protozoan parasites.

  2. Caspase-1 deficiency in mice reduces intestinal triglyceride absorption and hepatic triglyceride secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Janna A; Stienstra, Rinke; Vroegrijk, Irene O C M; van den Berg, Sjoerd A A; Salvatori, Daniela; Hooiveld, Guido J; Kersten, Sander; Tack, Cees J; Netea, Mihai G; Smit, Johannes W A; Joosten, Leo A B; Havekes, Louis M; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2013-02-01

    Caspase-1 is known to activate the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Additionally, it can cleave other substrates, including proteins involved in metabolism. Recently, we showed that caspase-1 deficiency in mice strongly reduces high-fat diet-induced weight gain, at least partly caused by an increased energy production. Increased feces secretion by caspase-1-deficient mice suggests that lipid malabsorption possibly further reduces adipose tissue mass. In this study we investigated whether caspase-1 plays a role in triglyceride-(TG)-rich lipoprotein metabolism using caspase-1-deficient and wild-type mice. Caspase-1 deficiency reduced the postprandial TG response to an oral lipid load, whereas TG-derived fatty acid (FA) uptake by peripheral tissues was not affected, demonstrated by unaltered kinetics of [(3)H]TG-labeled very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-like emulsion particles. An oral gavage of [(3)H]TG-containing olive oil revealed that caspase-1 deficiency reduced TG absorption and subsequent uptake of TG-derived FA in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. Similarly, despite an elevated hepatic TG content, caspase-1 deficiency reduced hepatic VLDL-TG production. Intestinal and hepatic gene expression analysis revealed that caspase-1 deficiency did not affect FA oxidation or FA uptake but rather reduced intracellular FA transport, thereby limiting lipid availability for the assembly and secretion of TG-rich lipoproteins. The current study reveals a novel function for caspase-1, or caspase-1-cleaved substrates, in controlling intestinal TG absorption and hepatic TG secretion.

  3. Metabolomics Analysis of Metabolic Effects of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) Inhibition on Human Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstikov, Vladimir; Nikolayev, Alexander; Dong, Sucai; Zhao, Genshi; Kuo, Ming-Shang

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry–based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer) and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer) cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA), and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC)-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level. PMID:25486521

  4. Metabolomics analysis of metabolic effects of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibition on human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstikov, Vladimir; Nikolayev, Alexander; Dong, Sucai; Zhao, Genshi; Kuo, Ming-Shang

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer) and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer) cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA), and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC)-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level.

  5. Metabolomics analysis of metabolic effects of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT inhibition on human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tolstikov

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA, and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level.

  6. Analysis of Gait Disturbance in Glut 1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenschine, Michelle; Montes, Jacqueline; Rao, Ashwini K; Engelstad, Kristin; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2016-11-01

    Anticipating potential therapies for Glut 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1DS) emphasizes the need for effective clinical outcome measures. The 6-minute walk test is a well-established outcome measure that evaluates walking ability in neurological diseases. Twenty-one children with Glut 1 deficiency syndrome and 21 controls performed the 6-minute walk test. Fatigue was determined by comparing distance walked in the first and sixth minutes. Gait was analyzed by stride length, velocity, cadence, base of support, and percentage time in double support. Independent sample t-tests examined differences between group. Repeated-measures analysis of variance evaluated gait parameters over time. Glut 1 deficiency syndrome patients walked less (P Glut 1 deficiency syndrome patients have impaired motor performance, walk more slowly, and have poor balance. The 6-minute walk test with gait analysis may serve as a useful outcome measure in clinical trials in Glut 1 deficiency syndrome.

  7. Astrocytes and mitochondria from adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ABCD1)-deficient mice reveal that the adrenoleukodystrophy-associated very long-chain fatty acids target several cellular energy-dependent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruska, Nicol; Schönfeld, Peter; Pujol, Aurora; Reiser, Georg

    2015-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder resulting from defective ABCD1 transport protein. ABCD1 mediates peroxisomal uptake of free very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) as well as their CoA-esters. Consequently, VLCFA accumulate in patients' plasma and tissues, which is considered as pathogenic X-ALD triggering factor. Clinical symptoms are mostly manifested in neural tissues and adrenal gland. Here, we investigate astrocytes from wild-type control and a genetic X-ALD mouse model (Abcd1-knockout), exposed to supraphysiological VLCFA (C22:0, C24:0 and C26:0) concentrations. They exhibit multiple impairments of energy metabolism. Furthermore, brain mitochondria from Abcd1(-/-) mice and wild-type control respond similarly to VLCFA with increased ROS generation, impaired oxidative ATP synthesis and diminished Ca(2+) uptake capacity, suggesting that a defective ABCD1 exerts no adaptive pressure on mitochondria. In contrast, astrocytes from Abcd1(-/-) mice respond more sensitively to VLCFA than wild-type control astrocytes. Moreover, long-term application of VLCFA induces high ROS generation, and strong in situ depolarization of mitochondria, and, in Abcd1(-/-) astrocytes, severely diminishes the capability to revert oxidized pyridine nucleotides to NAD(P)H. In addition, observed differences in responses of mitochondria and astrocytes to the hydrocarbon chain length of VLCFA suggest that detrimental VLCFA activities in astrocytes involve defective cellular functions other than mitochondria. In summary, we clearly demonstrate that VLCFA increase the vulnerability of Abcd1(-/-) astrocytes.

  8. Cloning and Characterization of upp, a Gene Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1994-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. The gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (upp) was cloned from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The gene was sequenced...... construction of an internal deletion, a upp mutant was constructed by a double-crossover event. This implicated the utilization of a plasmid with a thermosensitive origin of replication and a new and easy way to screen for double crossover events in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains...

  9. NMR spectroscopy of aminoacylase 1 deficiency, a novel inborn error of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Udo F H; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Van Coster, Rudy N; Gerlo, Erik; Olbrich, Heike; Krywawych, Stefan; Calvin, Jacqui; Hart, Claire; Omran, Heymut; Wevers, Ron A

    2008-02-01

    Aminoacylase 1 deficiency is a novel inborn error of metabolism. The clinical significance of the deficiency is under discussion, as well as the possible consequences of the defect for brain metabolism and function. This study includes the five originally published cases as well as three novel ones. NMR spectroscopy of urine, serum and cerebrospinal fluid has been used to study these patients. A typical profile with 11 accumulating N-acetylated amino acids was observed in urine from the patients. The concentration of most of the accumulating metabolites is typically 100-500 micromol/mmol creatinine. Two additional minor N-acetylated metabolites remain unidentified. The concentrations of the accumulating metabolites are amino acids in the cerebrospinal fluid from one patient. Our data define aminoacylase 1 deficiency at the metabolite level providing a specific urinary profile of accumulating N-acetylated amino acids.

  10. ACAT1 deficiency increases cholesterol synthesis in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Dwayne E; Su, Yan Ru; Swift, Larry L; Linton, MacRae F; Fazio, Sergio

    2006-06-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) esterifies free cholesterol and stores cholesteryl esters in lipid droplets. Macrophage ACAT1 deficiency results in increased atherosclerotic lesion area in hyperlipidemic mice via disrupted cholesterol efflux, increased lipoprotein uptake, accumulation of intracellular vesicles, and accelerated apoptosis. The objective of this study was to determine whether lipid synthesis is affected by ACAT1. The synthesis, esterification, and efflux of new cholesterol were measured in peritoneal macrophages from ACAT1(-/-) mice. Cholesterol synthesis was increased by 134% (p=0.001) in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages compared to wildtype macrophages. Increased synthesis resulted in a proportional increase in the efflux of newly synthesized cholesterol. Although the esterification of new cholesterol was reduced by 93% (pSREBP1a mRNA was increased 6-fold in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages compared to wildtype macrophages, suggesting an up-regulation of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages. Increased cholesterol synthesis and up-regulation of SREBP in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages suggests that ACAT1 affects the regulation of lipid metabolism in macrophages. This change in cholesterol homeostasis may contribute to the atherogenic potential of ACAT1(-/-) macrophages.

  11. Quantitative proteomics suggests metabolic reprogramming during ETHE1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahebekhtiari, Navid; Thomsen, Michelle M.; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase (ETHE1) causes the severe metabolic disorder ethylmalonic encephalopathy, which is characterized by early-onset encephalopathy and defective cytochrome C oxidase because of hydrogen sulfide accumulation. Although the severe systemic consequences...... of the disorder are becoming clear, the molecular effects are not well defined. Therefore, for further elucidating the effects of ETHE1-deficiency, we performed a large scale quantitative proteomics study on liver tissue from ETHE1-deficient mice. Our results demonstrated a clear link between ETHE1-deficiency...... and redox active proteins, as reflected by down-regulation of several proteins related to oxidation-reduction, such as different dehydrogenases and cytochrome P450 (CYP450) members. Furthermore, the protein data indicated impact of the ETHE1-deficiency on metabolic reprogramming through up...

  12. Target enzyme mutations are the molecular basis for resistance towards pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe H; Petersen, Jakob G; Garten, Antje;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibitors of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) are promising cancer drugs currently in clinical trials in oncology, including APO866, CHS-828 and the CHS-828 prodrug EB1627/GMX1777, but cancer cell resistance to these drugs has not been studied in detail. METHODS: Here, ...

  13. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase: characteristics of the mutant enzyme in erythrocytes from patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W J; Meade, J C; Kelley, W N

    1972-07-01

    The Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is characterized clinically by choreoathetosis, spasticity, selfmutilation, and mental and growth retardation. Biochemically, there is a striking reduction of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) activity in affected individuals. We have examined erythrocytes from 14 patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome for the presence of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity and enzyme protein. In contrast to the usual finding of no detectable hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity, we have found low levels (0.002-0.79 nmoles/mg protein per hr) of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in erythrocyte lysates from five of these patients. In three of the five patients, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity appeared to be substantially more labile in vivo than normal using erythrocytes which had been separated according to their density (age). Immunochemical studies using a monospecific antiserum prepared from a homogeneous preparation of normal human erythrocyte hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase revealed immunoreactive protein (CRM) in hemolysate from all 14 patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. The immunoreactive protein from each patient gave a reaction of complete identity with normal erythrocyte hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and was present in quantities equal to those observed in normal erythrocytes. In addition, a constant amount of CRM was found in erythrocytes of increasing density (age) from patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome despite the decreasing hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity. These studies confirm previous data which indicate that the mutations leading to the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome are usually, if not always on the structural gene coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. In addition, although the mutant proteins appear to be present in normal amounts, they are often very labile in

  14. Wfs1-deficient mice display altered function of serotonergic system and increased behavioural response to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanel eVisnapuu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene make humans more susceptible to mood disorders. Besides that, mood disorders are associated with alterations in the activity of serotonergic and noradrenergic systems. Therefore, in this study, the effects of imipramine, an inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT and noradrenaline (NA reuptake, and paroxetine, a selective inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, were studied in tests of behavioural despair. The tail suspension test (TST and forced swimming test (FST were performed in Wfs1-deficient mice. Simultaneously, gene expression and monoamine metabolism studies were conducted to evaluate changes in 5-HT- and NA-ergic systems of Wfs1-deficient mice. The basal immobility time of Wfs1-deficient mice in TST and FST did not differ from that of their wild-type littermates. However, a significant reduction of immobility time in response to lower doses of imipramine and paroxetine was observed in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice, but not in their wild-type littermates. In gene expression studies, the levels of 5-HT transporter (SERT were significantly reduced in the pons of homozygous animals. Monoamine metabolism was assayed separately in the dorsal and ventral striatum of naive mice and mice exposed for 30 minutes tobrightly lit motility boxes. We found that this aversive challenge caused a significant increase in the levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, a metabolite of 5-HT, in the ventral and dorsal striatum of wild-type mice, but not in their homozygous littermates. Taken together, the blunted 5-HT metabolism and reduced levels of SERT are a likely reason for the elevated sensitivity of these mice to the action of imipramine and paroxetine. These changes in the pharmacological and neurochemical phenotype of Wfs1-deficient mice may help to explain the increased susceptibility of Wolfram syndrome patients to depressive states.

  15. Glut1 deficiency syndrome and novel ketogenic diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel

    2013-08-01

    The classical ketogenic diet has been used for refractory childhood epilepsy for decades. It is also the treatment of choice for disorders of brain energy metabolism, such as Glut1 deficiency syndrome. Novel ketogenic diets such as the modified Atkins diet and the low glycemic index treatment have significantly improved the therapeutic options for dietary treatment. Benefits of these novel diets are increased palatability, practicability, and thus compliance-at the expense of lower ketosis. As high ketones appear essential to meet the brain energy deficit caused by Glut1 deficiency syndrome, the use of novel ketogenic diets in this entity may be limited. This article discusses the current data on novel ketogenic diets and the implications on the use of these diets in regard to Glut1 deficiency syndrome.

  16. Sirt1 deficiency attenuates spermatogenesis and germ cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Coussens

    Full Text Available In mammals, Sirt1, a member of the sirtuin family of proteins, functions as a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent protein deactylase, and has important physiological roles, including the regulation of glucose metabolism, cell survival, and mitochondrial respiration. The initial investigations of Sirt1 deficient mice have revealed a phenotype that includes a reduced lifespan, small size, and an increased frequency of abnormal sperm. We have now performed a detailed analysis of the molecular and functional effects of Sirt1 deficiency in the germ line of Sirt1 knock-out (-/- mice. We find that Sirt1 deficiency markedly attenuates spermatogenesis, but not oogenesis. Numbers of mature sperm and spermatogenic precursors, as early as d15.5 of development, are significantly reduced ( approximately 2-10-fold less; P1 deficiency did not effect the efficiency oocyte production following superovulation of female mice. Furthermore, the proportion of mature sperm with elevated DNA damage ( approximately 7.5% of total epididymal sperm; P = 0.02 was significantly increased in adult Sirt1-/- males. Analysis of global gene expression by microarray analysis in Sirt1 deficient testis revealed dysregulated expression of 85 genes, which were enriched (P<0.05 for genes involved in spermatogenesis and protein sumoylation. To assess the function of Sirt1 deficient germ cells, we compared the efficiency of generating embryos and viable offspring in in vitro fertilization (IVF experiments using gametes from Sirt1-/- and sibling Sirt1+/- mice. While viable animals were derived in both Sirt1-/- X wild type and Sirt1-/- X Sirt1-/- crosses, the efficiency of producing both 2-cell zygotes and viable offspring was diminished when IVF was performed with Sirt1-/- sperm and/or oocytes. Together, these data support an important role for Sirt1 in spermatogenesis, including spermatogenic stem cells, as well as germ cell

  17. Viable offspring obtained from Prm1-deficient sperm in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Naoki Takeda; Kazuya Yoshinaga; Kenryo Furushima; Kazufumi Takamune; Zhenghua Li; Shin-ichi Abe; Shin-ichi Aizawa; Ken-ichi Yamamura

    2016-01-01

    Protamines are expressed in the spermatid nucleus and allow denser packaging of DNA compared with histones. Disruption of the coding sequence of one allele of either protamine 1 (Prm1) or Prm2 results in failure to produce offspring, although sperm with disrupted Prm1 or Prm2 alleles are produced. Here, we produced Prm1-deficient female chimeric mice carrying Prm1-deficient oocytes. These mice successfully produced Prm1 +/− male mice. Healthy Prm1 +/− offspring were then produced by transferr...

  18. Purification and identification of metabolites produced by Bacillus cereus and B. subtilis active against Meloidogyne exigua, and their in silico interaction with a putative phosphoribosyltransferase fromM. incognita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENILSON F. OLIVEIRA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To contribute to the development of products to controlMeloidogyne exigua, the bacteria Bacillus cereus and B. subtilis were cultivated in liquid medium to produce metabolites active against this plant-parasitic nematode. Fractionation of the crude dichloromethane extracts obtained from the cultures afforded uracil, 9H-purine and dihydrouracil. All compounds were active against M. exigua, the latter being the most efficient. This substance presented a LC50 of 204 µg/mL against the nematode, while a LC50 of 260 µg/mL was observed for the commercial nematicide carbofuran. A search for protein-ligand complexes in which the ligands were structurally similar to dihydrouracil resulted in the selection of phosphoribosyltransferases, the sequences of which were used in an in silico search in the genome of M. incognita for a similar sequence of amino acids. The resulting sequence was modelled and dihydrouracil and 9H-purine were inserted in the active site of this putative phosphoribosyltransferase resulting in protein-ligand complexes that underwent molecular dynamics simulations. Calculation of the binding free-energies of these complexes revealed that the dissociation constant of dihydrouracil and 9H-purine to this protein is around 8.3 x 10-7 and 1.6 x 10-6 M, respectively. Consequently, these substances and the putative phosphoribosyltransferase are promising for the development of new products to control M. exigua.

  19. GLUT1 deficiency with delayed myelination responding to ketogenic diet.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Engelbrecht, V.; Scheffer, H.; Knaap, M.S. van der; Fiedler, A.

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring effects of a ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome without seizures is difficult. Neuroimaging is considered uninformative. We report the case of a boy with neurodevelopmental delay, severe ataxia, an E54X-mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (previously GLUT1), and neuroimaging

  20. GLUT1 deficiency with delayed myelination responding to ketogenic diet.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Engelbrecht, V.; Scheffer, H.; Knaap, M.S. van der; Fiedler, A.

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring effects of a ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome without seizures is difficult. Neuroimaging is considered uninformative. We report the case of a boy with neurodevelopmental delay, severe ataxia, an E54X-mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (previously GLUT1), and neuroimaging abnormalitie

  1. GLUT-1 deficiency without epilepsy - an exceptional case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overweg-Plandsoen, WCG; Groener, JEM; Onkenhout, W; Brouwer, OF; Bakker, HD; De Vivo, DC

    2003-01-01

    The GLUT-1 deficiency is a metabolic disorder caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier as a result of a defect in the glucose-transport protein. Patients present with epileptic seizures, delayed development, ataxia and hypotonia, and in many cases acquired microcephaly.

  2. GLUT1 deficiency with delayed myelination responding to ketogenic diet.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Engelbrecht, V.; Scheffer, H.; Knaap, M.S. van der; Fiedler, A.

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring effects of a ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome without seizures is difficult. Neuroimaging is considered uninformative. We report the case of a boy with neurodevelopmental delay, severe ataxia, an E54X-mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (previously GLUT1), and neuroimaging abnormalitie

  3. GLUT-1 deficiency without epilepsy - an exceptional case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overweg-Plandsoen, WCG; Groener, JEM; Onkenhout, W; Brouwer, OF; Bakker, HD; De Vivo, DC

    2003-01-01

    The GLUT-1 deficiency is a metabolic disorder caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier as a result of a defect in the glucose-transport protein. Patients present with epileptic seizures, delayed development, ataxia and hypotonia, and in many cases acquired microcephaly.

  4. Structure-function Relationships in Human Hypoxanthine-guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) by Random Mutagenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase ( HGPRT, EC 2.4.2.8 ) is a key enzyme of the purine salvage pathway, which allows recycling of purine bases into DNA and RNA. It is widely distributed in nature and has been studied both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In humans, a complete lack of HGPRT activity causes the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, which is characterized by hyperuricaemia and neural disorders, including mental retardation and compulsive self-mutilation behavior[1].

  5. The ketogenic diet compensates for AGC1 deficiency and improves myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Maria; Martin, Daniel A; Hedlund, Zandra; Jonsson, Monica; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Wedell, Anna

    2015-11-01

    The brain aspartate-glutamate carrier (AGC1) is specifically expressed in neurons, where it transports aspartate from the mitochondria to the cytosol, and plays a role in transfer of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-reducing equivalents into the mitochondria as a part of the malate-aspartate shuttle. Deficient function of AGC1 underlies an inborn error of metabolism that presents with severe hypotonia, arrested psychomotor development, and seizures from a few months of age. In AGC1 deficiency, there is secondary hypomyelination due to lack of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), which is normally generated by acetylation of aspartate in the neuron and required for fatty acid synthesis by the adjacent oligodendrocyte. Based on experiences from AGC2 deficiency, we predicted that reduced glycolysis should compensate for the metabolic defect and allow resumed myelination in AGC1 deficiency. Carbohydrate restriction was therefore initiated in a patient with AGC1 deficiency at 6 years of age by introducing a ketogenic diet. The response was dramatic, clinically as well as radiologically. Psychomotor development showed clear improvement, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated resumed myelination. This is the first successful treatment of secondary hypomyelination reported. Because AGC1 is driven by the proton gradient generated by the neuronal mitochondrial respiratory chain, the results have potential relevance for secondary hypomyelination in general.

  6. Viable offspring obtained from Prm1-deficient sperm in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Naoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Furushima, Kenryo; Takamune, Kazufumi; Li, Zhenghua; Abe, Shin-Ichi; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi

    2016-06-02

    Protamines are expressed in the spermatid nucleus and allow denser packaging of DNA compared with histones. Disruption of the coding sequence of one allele of either protamine 1 (Prm1) or Prm2 results in failure to produce offspring, although sperm with disrupted Prm1 or Prm2 alleles are produced. Here, we produced Prm1-deficient female chimeric mice carrying Prm1-deficient oocytes. These mice successfully produced Prm1(+/-) male mice. Healthy Prm1(+/-) offspring were then produced by transferring blastocysts obtained via in vitro fertilization using zona-free oocytes and sperm from Prm1(+/-) mice. This result suggests that sperm lacking Prm1 can generate offspring despite being abnormally shaped and having destabilised DNA, decondensed chromatin and a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. Nevertheless, these mice showed little derangement of expression profiles.

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency: the first autopsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Oda, Yoshio; Yachie, Akihiro; Koizumi, Shoichi; Nakanishi, Isao

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the first autopsy case of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 deficiency. A 6-year-old boy who presented with growth retardation; anemia; leukocytosis; thrombocytosis; coagulation abnormality; elevated levels of haptoglobin, ferritin, and heme in serum; a low serum bilirubin concentration; and hyperlipidemia was diagnosed as HO-1 deficient by gene analysis several months before death. Autopsy showed amyloid deposits in the liver and adrenal glands and mesangioproliferative glomerular changes in kidneys, in addition to an irregular distribution of foamy macrophages with iron pigments. Fatty streaks and fibrous plaques were noted in the aorta. Compared with HO-1--targeted mice, the present case seems to more severely involve endothelial cells and the reticuloendothelial system, resulting in intravascular hemolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and amyloidosis with a short survival. This contrasts to the predominant iron metabolic disorders of HO-1--targeted mice with a long survival.

  8. Refractory absence epilepsy associated with GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Susan

    2011-05-01

    GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS) is a disorder of cerebral glucose transport associated with early infantile epilepsy and microcephaly. We report two boys who presented with refractory absence epilepsy associated with hypoglycorrhachia, both of whom have genetically confirmed GLUT-1 DS. We propose that these children serve to expand the phenotype of GLUT-1 DS and suggest that this condition should be considered as a cause of refractory absence seizures in childhood.

  9. SMARCB1 (INI-1)-deficient carcinomas of the sinonasal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Justin A; Antonescu, Cristina R; Westra, William H

    2014-09-01

    SMARCB1 (INI-1) is a tumor-suppressor gene located on chromosome 22q11.2. Its gene product is ubiquitously expressed in nuclei of all normal tissues. SMARCB1 gene inactivation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a diverse group of malignant neoplasms that tend to share "rhabdoid" cytomorphology. This group of SMARCB1-deficient tumors is now further expanded by a subset of carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract. SMARCB1 immunostaining was performed on 142 sinonasal carcinomas. Tumors that showed loss of expression were further characterized for SMARCB1 deletions by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Nine of 142 (6%) primary sinonasal carcinomas showed loss of SMARCB1 expression by immunohistochemistry. Five patients were women, and patients ranged in age from 33 to 78 years (mean 59 y). The SMARCB1-deficient tumors were characterized by nests, sheets, and cords of cells without any histologic evidence of specific (eg, squamous or glandular) differentiation. The tumors comprised varying proportions of basaloid and rhabdoid cells. The SMARCB1-deficient carcinomas had been diagnosed as nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinomas (n=3), sinonasal undifferentiated carcinomas (n=2), myoepithelial carcinoma (n=2), nonintestinal adenocarcinoma (n=1), and carcinoma, not otherwise specified (n=1). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed SMARCB1 deletions in 6 of 8 (75%) carcinomas. The SMARCB1-deficient carcinomas did not harbor human papillomavirus or NUT-1 alterations. Six patients presented with T4 disease, 5 patients developed local recurrences and/or distant metastases, and 4 died of their disease. Inactivation of the SMARCB1 tumor-suppressor gene appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of a subset of sinonasal carcinomas, further expanding the family of SMARCB1-deficient neoplasms and further delineating a bewildering group of poorly/undifferentiated, aggressive carcinomas arising at this site. The ability to detect SMARCB1 loss by

  10. Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the extreme thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus shibatae is an allosteric enzyme, activated by GTP and inhibited by CTP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Lise; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1996-01-01

    -fold without much effect on Km for the substrates. The concentration of GTP required for half-maximal activation was about 80 µM. CTP was a strong inhibitor and acted by raising the concentration of GTP needed for half-maximal activation of the enzyme. We conclude that uracil phosphoribosyltransferase......Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, which catalyses the formation of UMP and pyrophosphate from uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl a-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), was partly purified from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus shibatae. The enzyme required divalent metal ions for activity...... and it showed the highest activity at pH 6.4. The specific activity of the enzyme was 50-times higher at 95°C than at 37°C, but the functional half-life was short at 95°C. The activity of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase was strongly activated by GTP, which increased Vmax of the reaction by approximately 20...

  11. SAR and characterization of non-substrate isoindoline urea inhibitors of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, Michael L.; Heyman, H. Robin; Clark, Richard F.; Sorensen, Bryan K.; Doherty, George A.; Hansen, T. Matthew; Frey, Robin R.; Sarris, Kathy A.; Aguirre, Ana L.; Shrestha, Anurupa; Tu, Noah; Woller, Kevin; Pliushchev, Marina A.; Sweis, Ramzi F.; Cheng, Min; Wilsbacher, Julie L.; Kovar, Peter J.; Guo, Jun; Cheng, Dong; Longenecker, Kenton L.; Raich, Diana; Korepanova, Alla V.; Soni, Nirupama B.; Algire, Mikkel A.; Richardson, Paul L.; Marin, Violeta L.; Badagnani, Ilaria; Vasudevan, Anil; Buchanan, F.Greg; Maag, David; Chiang, Gary G.; Tse, Chris; Michaelides, Michael R. (AbbVie)

    2017-08-01

    Herein we disclose SAR studies that led to a series of isoindoline ureas which we recently reported were first-in-class, non-substrate nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibitors. Modification of the isoindoline and/or the terminal functionality of screening hit 5 provided inhibitors such as 52 and 58 with nanomolar antiproliferative activity and preclinical pharmacokinetics properties which enabled potent antitumor activity when dosed orally in mouse xenograft models. X-ray crystal structures of two inhibitors bound in the NAMPT active-site are discussed.

  12. Protein kinase D1 deficiency promotes differentiation in epidermal keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Vivek; Olala, Lawrence O.; Kaddour-Djebbar, Ismail; Helwa, Inas; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein kinase D (PKD or PKD1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that has been shown to play a role in a variety of cellular processes; however, the function of PKD1 in the skin has not been fully investigated. The balance between proliferation and differentiation processes in the predominant cells of the epidermis, the keratinocytes, is essential for normal skin function. Objective To investigate the effect of PKD1 deficiency on proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes. Methods We utilized a floxed PKD1 mouse model such that infecting epidermal keratinocytes derived from these mice with an adenovirus expressing Cre-recombinase allowed us to determine the effect of PKD1 gene loss in vitro. Proliferation and differentiation were monitored using qRT-PCR, Western blot, transglutaminase activity assays, [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell cycle analysis. Results A significant decrease in PKD1 mRNA and protein levels was achieved in adenoviral Cre-recombinase-infected cells. Deficiency of PKD1 resulted in significant increases in the mRNA and protein expression of various differentiation markers such as loricrin, involucrin, and keratin 10 either basally and/or upon stimulation of differentiation. PKD1-deficient keratinocytes also showed an increase in transglutaminase expression and activity, indicating an anti-differentiative role of PKD1. Furthermore, the PKD1-deficient keratinocytes exhibited decreased proliferation. However, PKD1 loss had no effect on stem cell marker expression. Conclusions Cre-recombinase-mediated knockdown represents an additional approach demonstrating that PKD1 is an anti-differentiative, pro-proliferative signal in mouse keratinocytes. PMID:25450094

  13. Evaluation of non-coding variation in GLUT1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Chi; Lee, Jia Wei Audrey; Bellows, Susannah T; Damiano, John A; Mullen, Saul A; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bahlo, Melanie; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Hildebrand, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in SLC2A1, encoding glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), lead to dysfunction of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. Ten percent of cases with hypoglycorrhachia (fasting cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] glucose <2.2mmol/L) do not have mutations. We hypothesized that GLUT1 deficiency could be due to non-coding SLC2A1 variants. We performed whole exome sequencing of one proband with a GLUT1 phenotype and hypoglycorrhachia negative for SLC2A1 sequencing and copy number variants. We studied a further 55 patients with different epilepsies and low CSF glucose who did not have exonic mutations or copy number variants. We sequenced non-coding promoter and intronic regions. We performed mRNA studies for the recurrent intronic variant. The proband had a de novo splice site mutation five base pairs from the intron-exon boundary. Three of 55 patients had deep intronic SLC2A1 variants, including a recurrent variant in two. The recurrent variant produced less SLC2A1 mRNA transcript. Fasting CSF glucose levels show an age-dependent correlation, which makes the definition of hypoglycorrhachia challenging. Low CSF glucose levels may be associated with pathogenic SLC2A1 mutations including deep intronic SLC2A1 variants. Extending genetic screening to non-coding regions will enable diagnosis of more patients with GLUT1 deficiency, allowing implementation of the ketogenic diet to improve outcomes. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  14. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Deficiency and Cirrhosis Establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Rocio G.; Morales-Garza, Luis Alonso; Martin-Estal, Irene; Castilla-Cortazar, Inma

    2017-01-01

    Cirrhosis represents the final stage of chronic liver damage, which can be due to different factors such as alcohol, metabolic syndrome with liver steatosis, autoimmune diseases, drugs, toxins, and viral infection, among others. Nowadays, cirrhosis is an important health problem and it is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality, being the 14th most common cause of death worldwide. The physiopathological pathways that lead to fibrosis and finally cirrhosis partly depend on the etiology. Nevertheless, some common features are shared in this complex mechanism. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cirrhosis is a dynamic process that can be altered in order to delay or revert fibrosis. In addition, when cirrhosis has been established, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) deficiency or reduced availability is a common condition, independently of the etiology of chronic liver damage that leads to cirrhosis. IGF-1 deprivation seriously contributes to the progressive malnutrition of cirrhotic patient, increasing the vulnerability of the liver to establish an inflammatory and oxidative microenvironment with mitochondrial dysfunction. In this context, IGF-1 deficiency in cirrhotic patients can justify some of the common characteristics of these individuals. Several studies in animals and humans have been done in order to test the replacement of IGF-1 as a possible therapeutic option, with promising results. PMID:28270882

  15. BACE1-Deficient Mice Exhibit Alterations in Immune System Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stertz, L; Contreras-Shannon, V; Monroy-Jaramillo, N; Sun, J; Walss-Bass, C

    2016-12-21

    BACE1 encodes for the beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 or β-secretase. Genetic deletion of Bace1 leads to behavioral alterations and affects midbrain dopaminergic signaling and memory processes. In order to further understand the role of BACE1 in brain function and behavior, we performed microarray transcriptome profiling and gene pathway analysis in the hippocampus of BACE1-deficient mice compared to wild type. We identified a total of 91 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), mostly enriched in pathways related to the immune and inflammation systems, particularly IL-9 and NF-κB activation pathways. Serum levels of IL-9 were elevated in BACE1-deficient mice. Our network analysis supports an intimate connection between immune response via NF-κB and BACE1 signaling through the NRG1/Akt1 pathway. Our findings warrant future mechanistic studies to determine if BACE1 signaling and the IL-9 pathway interact to alter behavior and brain function. This study opens new avenues in the investigation of hippocampus-related neuroimmunological and neuroinflammation-associated disorders.

  16. Fat and carbohydrate metabolism during exercise in phosphoglucomutase type 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni;

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoglucomutase type 1 (PGM1) deficiency is a rare metabolic myopathy in which symptoms are provoked by exercise.......Phosphoglucomutase type 1 (PGM1) deficiency is a rare metabolic myopathy in which symptoms are provoked by exercise....

  17. LPIN1 deficiency with severe recurrent rhabdomyolysis and persistent elevation of creatine kinase levels due to chromosome 2 maternal isodisomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Meijer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid oxidation disorders and lipin-1 deficiency are the commonest genetic causes of rhabdomyolysis in children. We describe a lipin-1-deficient boy with recurrent, severe rhabdomyolytic episodes from the age of 4 years. Analysis of the LPIN1 gene that encodes lipin-1 revealed a novel homozygous frameshift mutation in exon 9, c.1381delC (p.Leu461SerfsX47, and complete uniparental isodisomy of maternal chromosome 2. This mutation is predicted to cause complete lipin-1 deficiency. The patient had six rhabdomyolytic crises, with creatine kinase (CK levels up to 300,000 U/L (normal, 30 to 200. Plasma CK remained elevated between crises. A treatment protocol was instituted, with early aggressive monitoring, hydration, electrolyte replacement and high caloric, high carbohydrate intake. The patient received dexamethasone during two crises, which was well-tolerated and in these episodes, peak CK values were lower than in preceding episodes. Studies of anti-inflammatory therapy may be indicated in lipin-1 deficiency.

  18. Interactions at the Dimer Interface Influence the Relative Efficiencies for Purine Nucleotide Synthesis and Pyrophosphorolysis in a Phosphoribosyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canyuk, Bhutorn; Medrano, Francisco J.; Wenck, MaryAnne; Focia, Pamela J.; Eakin, Ann E.; Craig III, Sydney P. (UNC); (Connecticut)

    2010-03-05

    Enzymes that salvage 6-oxopurines, including hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs), are potential targets for drugs in the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. For this reason, a number of high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the HPRTs from protozoa have been reported. Although these structures did not reveal why HPRTs need to form dimers for catalysis, they revealed the existence of potentially relevant interactions involving residues in a loop of amino acid residues adjacent to the dimer interface, but the contributions of these interactions to catalysis remained poorly understood. The loop, referred to as active-site loop I, contains an unusual non-proline cis-peptide and is composed of residues that are structurally analogous with Leu67, Lys68, and Gly69 in the human HPRT. Functional analyses of site-directed mutations (K68D, K68E, K68N, K68P, and K68R) in the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease, show that the side-chain at position 68 can differentially influence the K{sub m} values for all four substrates as well as the k{sub cat} values for both IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis. Also, the results for the K68P mutant are inconsistent with a cis-trans peptide isomerization-assisted catalytic mechanism. These data, together with the results of structural studies of the K68R mutant, reveal that the side-chain of residue 68 does not participate directly in reaction chemistry, but it strongly influences the relative efficiencies for IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis, and the prevalence of lysine at position 68 in the HPRT of the majority of eukaryotes is consistent with there being a biological role for nucleotide pyrophosphorolysis.

  19. Human Dectin-1 Deficiency and Mucocutaneous Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferwerda, Bart; Ferwerda, Gerben; Plantinga, Theo S.; Willment, Janet A.; van Spriel, Annemiek B.; Venselaar, Hanka; Elbers, Clara C.; Johnson, Melissa D.; Cambi, Alessandra; Huysamen, Cristal; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Jansen, Trees; Verheijen, Karlijn; Masthoff, Laury; Morré, Servaas A.; Vriend, Gert; Williams, David L.; Perfect, John R.; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van der Meer, Jos W.M.; Adema, Gosse J.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Brown, Gordon D.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Mucocutaneous fungal infections are typically found in patients who have no known immune defects. We describe a family in which four women who were affected by either recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis or onychomycosis had the early-stop-codon mutation Tyr238X in the β-glucan receptor dectin-1. The mutated form of dectin-1 was poorly expressed, did not mediate β-glucan binding, and led to defective production of cytokines (interleukin-17, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6) after stimulation with β-glucan or Candida albicans. In contrast, fungal phagocytosis and fungal killing were normal in the patients, explaining why dectin-1 deficiency was not associated with invasive fungal infections and highlighting the specific role of dectin-1 in human mucosal antifungal defense. PMID:19864674

  20. Metformin administration induces hepatotoxic effects in paraoxonase-1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Heredia, Anabel; Riera-Borrull, Marta; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Cabré, Noemí; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2016-04-05

    Metformin is the first-line pharmacological treatment of diabetes. In these patients, metformin reduces body weight and decreases the risk of diabetes-related complications such as cardiovascular disease. However, whether metformin elicits beneficial effects on liver histology is a controversial issue and, as yet, there is no consensus. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1), an enzyme synthesized mainly by the liver, degrades lipid peroxides and reduces oxidative stress. PON1 activities are decreased in chronic liver diseases. We evaluated the effects of metformin in the liver of PON1-deficient mice which, untreated, present a mild degree of liver steatosis. Metformin administration aggravated inflammation in animals given a standard mouse chow and in those fed a high-fat diet. Also, it was associated with a higher degree of steatosis in animals fed a standard chow diet. This report is a cautionary note regarding the prescription of metformin for the treatment of diabetes in patients with concomitant liver impairment.

  1. Robust food anticipatory activity in BMAL1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie S Pendergast

    Full Text Available Food availability is a potent environmental cue that directs circadian locomotor activity in rodents. Even though nocturnal rodents prefer to forage at night, daytime food anticipatory activity (FAA is observed prior to short meals presented at a scheduled time of day. Under this restricted feeding regimen, rodents exhibit two distinct bouts of activity, a nocturnal activity rhythm that is entrained to the light-dark cycle and controlled by the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN and a daytime bout of activity that is phase-locked to mealtime. FAA also occurs during food deprivation, suggesting that a food-entrainable oscillator (FEO keeps time in the absence of scheduled feeding. Previous studies have demonstrated that the FEO is anatomically distinct from the SCN and that FAA is observed in mice lacking some circadian genes essential for timekeeping in the SCN. In the current study, we optimized the conditions for examining FAA during restricted feeding and food deprivation in mice lacking functional BMAL1, which is critical for circadian rhythm generation in the SCN. We found that BMAL1-deficient mice displayed FAA during restricted feeding in 12hr light:12hr dark (12L:12D and 18L:6D lighting cycles, but distinct activity during food deprivation was observed only in 18L:6D. While BMAL1-deficient mice also exhibited robust FAA during restricted feeding in constant darkness, mice were hyperactive during food deprivation so it was not clear that FAA consistently occurred at the time of previously scheduled food availability. Taken together, our findings suggest that optimization of experimental conditions such as photoperiod may be necessary to visualize FAA in genetically modified mice. Furthermore, the expression of FAA may be possible without a circadian oscillator that depends on BMAL1.

  2. GLUT1 deficiency in cardiomyocytes does not accelerate the transition from compensated hypertrophy to heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renata O; Wende, Adam R; Olsen, Curtis; Soto, Jamie; Rawlings, Tenley; Zhu, Yi; Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether endogenous GLUT1 induction and the increased glucose utilization that accompanies pressure overload hypertrophy (POH) are required to maintain cardiac function during hemodynamic stress, and to test the hypothesis that lack of GLUT1 will accelerate the transition to heart failure. To determine the contribution of endogenous GLUT1 to the cardiac adaptation to POH, male mice with cardiomyocyte-restricted deletion of the GLUT1 gene (G1KO) and their littermate controls (Cont) were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC). GLUT1 deficiency reduced glycolysis and glucose oxidation by 50%, which was associated with a reciprocal increase in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) relative to controls. Four weeks after TAC, glycolysis increased and FAO decreased by 50% in controls, but were unchanged in G1KO hearts relative to shams. G1KO and controls exhibited equivalent degrees of cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and capillary density loss after TAC. Following TAC, in vivo left ventricular developed pressure was decreased in G1KO hearts relative to controls, but+dP/dt was equivalently reduced in Cont and G1KO mice. Mitochondrial function was equivalently impaired following TAC in both Cont and G1KO hearts. GLUT1 deficiency in cardiomyocytes alters myocardial substrate utilization, but does not substantially exacerbate pressure-overload induced contractile dysfunction or accelerate the progression to heart failure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palella, T D; Silverman, L J; Schroll, C T; Homa, F L; Levine, M; Kelley, W N

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  4. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  5. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazelton, Keith Z. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Ho, Meng-Chaio [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cassera, Maria B. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Clinch, Keith [Industrial Research Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Crump, Douglas R. [Industrial Research Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Rosario Jr., Irving [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Merino, Emilio F. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Almo, Steve C. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Tyler, Peter C. [Industrial Research Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Schramm, Vern L. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  6. Clinical and Molecular Heterogeneity of RTEL1 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin W. Wlodarski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Typical features of dyskeratosis congenita (DC resulting from excessive telomere shortening include bone marrow failure (BMF, mucosal fragility, and pulmonary or liver fibrosis. In more severe cases, immune deficiency and recurring infections can add to disease severity. RTEL1 deficiency has recently been described as a major genetic etiology, but the molecular basis and clinical consequences of RTEL1-associated DC are incompletely characterized. We report our observations in a cohort of six patients: five with novel biallelic RTEL1 mutations p.Trp456Cys, p.Ile425Thr, p.Cys1244ProfsX17, p.Pro884_Gln885ins53X13, and one with novel heterozygous mutation p.Val796AlafsX4. The most unifying features were hypocellular BMF in 6/6 and B-/NK-cell lymphopenia in 5/6 patients. In addition, three patients with homozygous mutations p.Trp456Cys or p.Ile425Thr also suffered from immunodeficiency, cerebellar hypoplasia, and enteropathy, consistent with Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome. Chromosomal breakage resembling a homologous recombination defect was detected in patient-derived fibroblasts but not in hematopoietic compartment. Notably, in both cellular compartments, differential expression of 1243aa and 1219/1300aa RTEL1 isoforms was observed. In fibroblasts, response to ionizing irradiation and non-homologous end joining were not impaired. Telomeric circles did not accumulate in patient-derived primary cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines, implying alternative pathomechanisms for telomeric loss. Overall, RTEL1-deficient cells exhibited a phenotype of replicative exhaustion, spontaneous apoptosis and senescence. Specifically, CD34+ cells failed to expand in vitro, B-cell development was compromised, and T-cells did not proliferate in long-term culture. Finally, we report on the natural history and outcome of our patients. While two patients died from infections, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT resulted in sustained engraftment in two patients

  7. TREX1 deficiency triggers cell-autonomous immunity in a cGAS-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablasser, Andrea; Hemmerling, Inga; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Behrendt, Rayk; Roers, Axel; Hornung, Veit

    2014-06-15

    Cytosolic detection of DNA is crucial for the initiation of antiviral immunity but can also cause autoimmunity in the context of endogenous nucleic acids being sensed. Mutations in the human 3' repair exonuclease 1 (TREX1) have been linked to the type I IFN-associated autoimmune disease Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. The exact mechanisms driving unabated type I IFN responses in the absence of TREX1 are only partly understood, but it appears likely that accumulation of endogenous DNA species triggers a cell-autonomous immune response by activating a cytosolic DNA receptor. In this article, we demonstrate that knocking out the DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase completely abrogates spontaneous induction of IFN-stimulated genes in TREX1-deficient cells. These findings indicate a key role of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase for the initiation of self-DNA-induced autoimmune disorders, thus providing important implications for novel therapeutic approaches.

  8. Dlic1 deficiency impairs ciliogenesis of photoreceptors by destabilizing dynein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanshan Kong; Xinrong Du; Chao Peng; Yiming Wu; Huirong Li; Xi Jin; Ling Hou

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein 1 is fundamentally important for transporting a variety of essential cargoes along microtubules within eukaryotic cells.However,in mammals,few mutants are available for studying the effects of defects in dynein-controlled processes in the context of the whole organism.Here,we deleted mouse Dlic1 gene encoding DLIC1,a subunit of the dynein complex.Dlic1-/-mice are viable,but display severe photoreceptor degeneration.Ablation of Dlic1 results in ectopic accumulation of outer segment (OS) proteins,and impairs OS growth and ciliogenesis of photoreceptors by interfering with Rabll-vesicle trafficking and blocking efficient OS protein transport from Golgi to the basal body.Our studies show that Dlic1 deficiency partially blocks vesicle export from endoplasmic reticulum (ER),but seems not to affect vesicle transport from the ER to Golgi.Further mechanistic study reveals that lack of Dlic1 destabilizes dynein subunits and alters the normal subcellular distribution of dynein in photoreceptors,probably due to the impaired transport function of dynein.Our results demonstrate that Dlic1 plays important roles in ciliogenesis and protein transport to the OS,and is required for photoreceptor development and survival.The Dlic1-/-mice also provide a new mouse model to study human retinal degeneration.

  9. Syndecan-1 deficiency aggravates anti-glomerular basement membrane nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rops, A L; Götte, M; Baselmans, M H; van den Hoven, M J; Steenbergen, E J; Lensen, J F; Wijnhoven, T J; Cevikbas, F; van den Heuvel, L P; van Kuppevelt, T H; Berden, J H; van der Vlag, J

    2007-11-01

    During the heterologous phase of experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) nephritis, leukocyte influx peaks within hours, whereas albuminuria occurs within 1 day. In the subsequent autologous phase, endogenous anti-GBM IgG develops and albuminuria persists. Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans like syndecan-1 play multiple roles during inflammation and we evaluate its role in experimental anti-GBM disease using syndecan-1 knockout (sdc-1-/-) mice. During the heterologous phase, glomerular leukocyte/macrophage influx was significantly higher in the sdc-1-/- mice and this was associated with higher glomerular endothelial expression of specific HS domains. In the autologous phase, glomerular influx of CD4+/CD8+ T cells was higher in the sdc-1-/- mice and these mice had persistently higher albuminuria and serum creatinine levels than wild-type mice. This resulted in a more sever glomerular injury and increased expression of extracellular matrix proteins. The sdc-1-/- mice developed higher plasma levels and glomerular deposits of total mouse Ig and IgG1 anti-rabbit IgG, whereas the levels of mouse IgG2a anti-rabbit IgG were lower. Furthermore, decreased Th1 and higher Th2 renal cytokine/chemokine expression were found in the sdc-1-/- mice. Our studies show that syndecan-1 deficiency exacerbates anti-GBM nephritis shifting the Th1/Th2 balance towards a Th2 response.

  10. Protein Stability, Folding and Misfolding in Human PGK1 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Valentini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Conformational diseases are often caused by mutations, altering protein folding and stability in vivo. We review here our recent work on the effects of mutations on the human phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (hPGK1, with a particular focus on thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and misfolding. Expression analyses and in vitro biophysical studies indicate that disease-causing mutations enhance protein aggregation propensity. We found a strong correlation among protein aggregation propensity, thermodynamic stability, cooperativity and dynamics. Comparison of folding and unfolding properties with previous reports in PGKs from other species suggests that hPGK1 is very sensitive to mutations leading to enhance protein aggregation through changes in protein folding cooperativity and the structure of the relevant denaturation transition state for aggregation. Overall, we provide a mechanistic framework for protein misfolding of hPGK1, which is insightful to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target native state stability and foldability in hPGK1 deficient patients.

  11. Aged PROP1 deficient dwarf mice maintain ACTH production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor O Nasonkin

    Full Text Available Humans with PROP1 mutations have multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD that typically advance from growth insufficiency diagnosed in infancy to include more severe growth hormone (GH deficiency and progressive reduction in other anterior pituitary hormones, eventually including adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH deficiency and hypocortisolism. Congenital deficiencies of GH, prolactin, and thyroid stimulating hormone have been reported in the Prop1(null (Prop1(-/- and the Ames dwarf (Prop1(df/df mouse models, but corticotroph and pituitary adrenal axis function have not been thoroughly investigated. Here we report that the C57BL6 background sensitizes mutants to a wasting phenotype that causes approximately one third to die precipitously between weaning and adulthood, while remaining homozygotes live with no signs of illness. The wasting phenotype is associated with severe hypoglycemia. Circulating ACTH and corticosterone levels are elevated in juvenile and aged Prop1 mutants, indicating activation of the pituitary-adrenal axis. Despite this, young adult Prop1 deficient mice are capable of responding to restraint stress with further elevation of ACTH and corticosterone. Low blood glucose, an expected side effect of GH deficiency, is likely responsible for the elevated corticosterone level. These studies suggest that the mouse model differs from the human patients who display progressive hormone loss and hypocortisolism.

  12. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen

    2015-01-01

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2, was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5......-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and adenine or the product AMP or the inhibitor ADP in each active site. The individual subunit adopts an overall structure that resembles a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase) more than known APRTases implying that APRT functionality in Crenarchaeotae has its...... undergoes a conformational change upon binding of adenine and phosphate resulting in a slight contraction of the active site. The inhibitor, ADP binds like the product AMP with both the α- and β-phosphates occupying the 5’-phosphoribosyl binding site. The enzyme shows activity over a wide p...

  13. Paroxysmal eye-head movements in Glut1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Toni S; Pons, Roser; Engelstad, Kristin; Kane, Steven A; Goldberg, Michael E; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2017-04-25

    To describe a characteristic paroxysmal eye-head movement disorder that occurs in infants with Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS). We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 101 patients with Glut1 DS to obtain clinical data about episodic abnormal eye movements and analyzed video recordings of 18 eye movement episodes from 10 patients. A documented history of paroxysmal abnormal eye movements was found in 32/101 patients (32%), and a detailed description was available in 18 patients, presented here. Episodes started before age 6 months in 15/18 patients (83%), and preceded the onset of seizures in 10/16 patients (63%) who experienced both types of episodes. Eye movement episodes resolved, with or without treatment, by 6 years of age in 7/8 patients with documented long-term course. Episodes were brief (usually <5 minutes). Video analysis revealed that the eye movements were rapid, multidirectional, and often accompanied by a head movement in the same direction. Eye movements were separated by clear intervals of fixation, usually ranging from 200 to 800 ms. The movements were consistent with eye-head gaze saccades. These movements can be distinguished from opsoclonus by the presence of a clear intermovement fixation interval and the association of a same-direction head movement. Paroxysmal eye-head movements, for which we suggest the term aberrant gaze saccades, are an early symptom of Glut1 DS in infancy. Recognition of the episodes will facilitate prompt diagnosis of this treatable neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Evidence of adrenal failure in aging Dax1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheys, Joshua O; Heaton, Joanne H; Hammer, Gary D

    2011-09-01

    Dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1 (Dax1) is an orphan nuclear receptor essential for development and function of the mammalian adrenal cortex and gonads. DAX1 was cloned as the gene responsible for X-linked AHC, which is characterized by adrenocortical failure necessitating glucocorticoid replacement. Contrary to these human data, young mice with genetic Dax1 knockout (Dax1(-/Y)) exhibit adrenocortical hyperfunction, consistent with the historic description of Dax1 as a transcriptional repressor that inhibits steroidogenic factor 1-dependent steroidogenesis. This paradox of molecular function and two apparently opposite phenotypes associated with Dax1 deficiency in mice and humans is compounded by the recent observations that under certain circumstances, Dax1 can serve as a transcriptional activator of steroidogenic factor 1. The recently revealed role of Dax1 in embryonic stem cell pluripotency, together with the observation that its expression in the adult adrenal is restricted to the subcapsular cortex, where presumptive undifferentiated progenitor cells reside, has led us to reexamine the phenotype of Dax1(-/Y) mice in order to reconcile the conflicting mouse and human data. In this report, we demonstrate that although young Dax1(-/Y) mice have enhanced steroidogenesis and subcapsular adrenocortical proliferation, as these mice age, they exhibit declining adrenal growth, decreasing adrenal steroidogenic capacity, and a reversal of their initial enhanced hormonal sensitivity. Together with a marked adrenal dysplasia in aging mice, these data reveal that both Dax1(-/Y) mice and patients with X-linked AHC exhibit adrenal failure that is consistent with adrenocortical subcapsular progenitor cell depletion and argue for a significant role of Dax1 in maintenance of these cells.

  15. Intestinal Irradiation and Fibrosis in a Th1-Deficient Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linard, Christine, E-mail: christine.linard@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Billiard, Fabienne; Benderitter, Marc [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Changes in the Th1/Th2 immune balance may play a role in increasing the incidence of radiation-induced toxicity. This study evaluates the consequences of Th1 deficiency on intestinal response (fibrosis and T cell trafficking) to abdominal irradiation and examines in mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) the differential involvement of the two Th1 pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, in controlling this balance in mice. Methods and Materials: Using T-bet-deficient mice (T-bet{sup -/-}), we evaluated the mRNA and protein expression of the Th1 pathways (IFN-{gamma}, T-bet/STAT1, and IL-12/STAT4) and the CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} populations in ileal mucosa and MLN during the first 3 months after 10 Gy abdominal irradiation. Results: The T-bet-deficient mice showed an increased fibrotic response to radiation, characterized by higher TGF-{beta}1, col3a1 expression, and collagen deposition in mucosa compared with wild-type mice. This response was associated with drastically lower expression of IFN-{gamma}, the hallmark Th1 cytokine. Analysis of the Th1 expression pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, showed their equal involvement in the failure of Th1 polarization. A minimal IFN-{gamma} level depended on the IL-23-p19/STAT4 level. In addition, the radiation-induced deficiency in the priming of Th1 by IFN-{gamma} was related to the defective homing capacity of CD8{sup +} cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: Irradiation induces Th2 polarization, and the Th2 immune response may play a role in potentiating irradiation-induced intestinal collagen deposition.

  16. A novel approach to analyze lysosomal dysfunctions through subcellular proteomics and lipidomics: the case of NPC1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharkeshwar, Arun Kumar; Trekker, Jesse; Vermeire, Wendy; Pauwels, Jarne; Sannerud, Ragna; Priestman, David A.; Te Vruchte, Danielle; Vints, Katlijn; Baatsen, Pieter; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Lu, Huiqi; Martin, Shaun; Vangheluwe, Peter; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Lagae, Liesbet; Impens, Francis; Platt, Frances M.; Gevaert, Kris; Annaert, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have mainly been used as cellular carriers for genes and therapeutic products, while their use in subcellular organelle isolation remains underexploited. We engineered SPIONs targeting distinct subcellular compartments. Dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated SPIONs are internalized and accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes, while aminolipid-SPIONs reside at the plasma membrane. These features allowed us to establish standardized magnetic isolation procedures for these membrane compartments with a yield and purity permitting proteomic and lipidomic profiling. We validated our approach by comparing the biomolecular compositions of lysosomes and plasma membranes isolated from wild-type and Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) deficient cells. While the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids is seen as a primary hallmark of NPC1 deficiency, our lipidomics analysis revealed the buildup of several species of glycerophospholipids and other storage lipids in selectively late endosomes/lysosomes of NPC1-KO cells. While the plasma membrane proteome remained largely invariable, we observed pronounced alterations in several proteins linked to autophagy and lysosomal catabolism reflecting vesicular transport obstruction and defective lysosomal turnover resulting from NPC1 deficiency. Thus the use of SPIONs provides a major advancement in fingerprinting subcellular compartments, with an increased potential to identify disease-related alterations in their biomolecular compositions.

  17. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 deficiency attenuates and high-fat diet exacerbates bone loss in mice with Lewis lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Nielsen, Forrest H; Sundaram, Sneha; Cao, Jay

    2017-04-04

    Bone loss occurs in obesity and cancer-associated complications including wasting. This study determined whether a high-fat diet and a deficiency in monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) altered bone structural defects in male C57BL/6 mice with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) metastases in lungs. Compared to non-tumor-bearing mice, LLC reduced bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number, trabecular thickness and bone mineral density and increased trabecular separation in femurs. Similar changes occurred in vertebrae. The high-fat diet compared to the AIN93G diet exacerbated LLC-induced detrimental structural changes; the exacerbation was greater in femurs than in vertebrae. Mice deficient in MCP-1 compared to wild-type mice exhibited increases in bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number and decreases in trabecular separation in both femurs and vertebrae, and increases in trabecular thickness and bone mineral density and a decrease in structure model index in vertebrae. Lewis lung carcinoma significantly decreased osteocalcin but increased tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP 5b) in plasma. In LLC-bearing mice, the high-fat diet increased and MCP-1 deficiency decreased plasma TRAP 5b; neither the high-fat diet nor MCP-1 deficiency resulted in significant changes in plasma concentration of osteocalcin. In conclusion, pulmonary metastasis of LLC is accompanied by detrimental bone structural changes; MCP-1 deficiency attenuates and high-fat diet exacerbates the metastasis-associated bone wasting.

  18. A novel approach to analyze lysosomal dysfunctions through subcellular proteomics and lipidomics: the case of NPC1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharkeshwar, Arun Kumar; Trekker, Jesse; Vermeire, Wendy; Pauwels, Jarne; Sannerud, Ragna; Priestman, David A.; te Vruchte, Danielle; Vints, Katlijn; Baatsen, Pieter; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Lu, Huiqi; Martin, Shaun; Vangheluwe, Peter; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Lagae, Liesbet; Impens, Francis; Platt, Frances M.; Gevaert, Kris; Annaert, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have mainly been used as cellular carriers for genes and therapeutic products, while their use in subcellular organelle isolation remains underexploited. We engineered SPIONs targeting distinct subcellular compartments. Dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated SPIONs are internalized and accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes, while aminolipid-SPIONs reside at the plasma membrane. These features allowed us to establish standardized magnetic isolation procedures for these membrane compartments with a yield and purity permitting proteomic and lipidomic profiling. We validated our approach by comparing the biomolecular compositions of lysosomes and plasma membranes isolated from wild-type and Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) deficient cells. While the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids is seen as a primary hallmark of NPC1 deficiency, our lipidomics analysis revealed the buildup of several species of glycerophospholipids and other storage lipids in selectively late endosomes/lysosomes of NPC1-KO cells. While the plasma membrane proteome remained largely invariable, we observed pronounced alterations in several proteins linked to autophagy and lysosomal catabolism reflecting vesicular transport obstruction and defective lysosomal turnover resulting from NPC1 deficiency. Thus the use of SPIONs provides a major advancement in fingerprinting subcellular compartments, with an increased potential to identify disease-related alterations in their biomolecular compositions. PMID:28134274

  19. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Mingru Yin; Weihua Jiang; Zhenfu Fang; Pengcheng Kong; Fengying Xing; Yao Li; Xuejin Chen; Shangang Li

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT....

  20. Autophagy resolves early retinal inflammation in Igf1-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Vaquero-Villanueva, Laura; Hurlé, Juan M.; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Valverde, Ángela M.

    2016-01-01

    provides new evidence in a mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency that autophagy is an adaptive response that might confer protection against persistent inflammation in the retina during ageing. PMID:27483352

  1. Autophagy resolves early retinal inflammation in Igf1-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Arroba

    2016-09-01

    provides new evidence in a mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency that autophagy is an adaptive response that might confer protection against persistent inflammation in the retina during ageing.

  2. Autophagy resolves early retinal inflammation in Igf1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroba, Ana I; Rodríguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Vaquero-Villanueva, Laura; Hurlé, Juan M; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Valverde, Ángela M

    2016-09-01

    a mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency that autophagy is an adaptive response that might confer protection against persistent inflammation in the retina during ageing.

  3. Strain background modifies phenotypes in the ATP8B1-deficient mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, S.; Sanford, U.R.; Vargas, J.C.; Xu, H.; Groen, A.; Paulusma, C.C.; Grenert, J.P.; Pawlikowska, L.; Sen, S.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Bull, L.N.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in ATP8B1 (FIC1) underlie cases of cholestatic disease, ranging from chronic and progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis) to intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis). The ATP8B1-deficient mouse serves as an animal model of human ATP8B1 deficie

  4. Precision Molecular Diagnosis Defines Specific Therapy in Combined Immunodeficiency with Megaloblastic Anemia Secondary to MTHFD1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Kesava A; Pengelly, Reuben J; Gao, Yifang; Morgan, Mary; Patel, Sanjay V; Davies, E Graham; Ennis, Sarah; Faust, Saul N; Williams, Anthony P

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD1) deficiency has recently been reported to cause a folate-responsive syndrome displaying a phenotype that includes megaloblastic anemia and severe combined immunodeficiency. To describe our investigative approach to the molecular diagnosis and evaluation of immune dysfunction in a family with MTHFD1 deficiency. The methods used were exome sequencing and analysis of variants in genes involved in the folate metabolic pathway in a family with 2 affected siblings. Routine laboratory and research data were analyzed to gain an in-depth understanding of innate, humoral, and cell-mediated immune function before and after folinic acid supplementation. Interrogation of exome data for concordant variants between the siblings in the genes involved in folate metabolic pathway identified a heterozygous mutation in exon 3 of the MTHFD1 gene that was shared with their mother. In view of highly suggestive phenotype, we extended our bioinformatics interrogation for structural variants in the MTHFD1 gene by manual evaluation of the exome data for sequence depth coverage of all the exons. A deletion involving exon 13 that was shared with their father was identified. Routine laboratory data showed lymphopenia involving all subsets and poor response to vaccines. In vitro analysis of dendritic cell and lymphocyte function was comparable to that in healthy volunteers. Treatment with folinic acid led to immune reconstitution, enabling discontinuation of all prophylactic therapies. Exome sequencing demonstrated MTHFD1 deficiency as a novel cause of a combined immunodeficiency. Folinic acid was established as precision therapy to reverse the clinical and laboratory phenotype of this primary immunodeficiency. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. GPR40/FFAR1 deficient mice increase noradrenaline levels in the brain and exhibit abnormal behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuka Aizawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The free fatty acid receptor 1 (GPR40/FFAR1 is a G protein-coupled receptor, which is activated by long chain fatty acids. We have previously demonstrated that activation of brain GPR40/FFAR1 exerts an antinociceptive effect that is mediated by the modulation of the descending pain control system. However, it is unclear whether brain GPR40/FFAR1 contributes to emotional function. In this study, we investigated the involvement of GPR40/FFAR1 in emotional behavior using GPR40/FFAR1 deficient (knockout, KO mice. The emotional behavior in wild and KO male mice was evaluated at 9–10 weeks of age by the elevated plus-maze test, open field test, social interaction test, and sucrose preference test. Brain monoamines levels were measured using LC–MS/MS. The elevated plus-maze test and open field tests revealed that the KO mice reduced anxiety-like behavior. There were no differences in locomotor activity or social behavior between the wild and KO mice. In the sucrose preference test, the KO mice showed reduction in sucrose preference and intake. The level of noradrenaline was higher in the hippocampus, medulla oblongata, hypothalamus and midbrain of KO mice. Therefore, these results suggest that brain GPR40/FFAR1 is associated with anxiety- and depression-related behavior regulated by the increment of noradrenaline in the brain.

  6. Strain Background Modifies Phenotypes in the ATP8B1-Deficient Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Julie C.; Xu, Hongmei; Groen, Annamiek; Paulusma, Coen C.; Grenert, James P.; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Sen, Saunak; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Bull, Laura N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in ATP8B1 (FIC1) underlie cases of cholestatic disease, ranging from chronic and progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis) to intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis). The ATP8B1-deficient mouse serves as an animal model of human ATP8B1 deficiency. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the effect of genetic background on phenotypes of ATP8B1-deficient and wild-type mice, using C57Bl/6 (B6), 129, and (B6-129) F1 strain backgrounds. B6 background resulted in greater abnormalities in ATP8B1-deficient mice than did 129 and/or F1 background. ATP8B1-deficient pups of B6 background gained less weight. In adult ATP8B1-deficient mice at baseline, those of B6 background had lower serum cholesterol levels, higher serum alkaline phosphatase levels, and larger livers. After challenge with cholate-supplemented diet, these mice exhibited higher serum alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin levels, greater weight loss and larger livers. ATP8B1-deficient phenotypes in mice of F1 and 129 backgrounds are usually similar, suggesting that susceptibility to manifestations of ATP8B1 deficiency may be recessive. We also detected differences in hepatobiliary phenotypes between wild-type mice of differing strains. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the ATP8B1-deficient mouse in a B6 background may be a better model of human ATP8B1 deficiency and highlight the importance of informed background strain selection for mouse models of liver disease. PMID:20126555

  7. Strain background modifies phenotypes in the ATP8B1-deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohela Shah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in ATP8B1 (FIC1 underlie cases of cholestatic disease, ranging from chronic and progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis to intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis. The ATP8B1-deficient mouse serves as an animal model of human ATP8B1 deficiency. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effect of genetic background on phenotypes of ATP8B1-deficient and wild-type mice, using C57Bl/6 (B6, 129, and (B6-129 F1 strain backgrounds. B6 background resulted in greater abnormalities in ATP8B1-deficient mice than did 129 and/or F1 background. ATP8B1-deficient pups of B6 background gained less weight. In adult ATP8B1-deficient mice at baseline, those of B6 background had lower serum cholesterol levels, higher serum alkaline phosphatase levels, and larger livers. After challenge with cholate-supplemented diet, these mice exhibited higher serum alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin levels, greater weight loss and larger livers. ATP8B1-deficient phenotypes in mice of F1 and 129 backgrounds are usually similar, suggesting that susceptibility to manifestations of ATP8B1 deficiency may be recessive. We also detected differences in hepatobiliary phenotypes between wild-type mice of differing strains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the ATP8B1-deficient mouse in a B6 background may be a better model of human ATP8B1 deficiency and highlight the importance of informed background strain selection for mouse models of liver disease.

  8. Cerebral ischemia is exacerbated by extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase via a non-enzymatic mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhao

    Full Text Available Intracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (iNAMPT in neuron has been known as a protective factor against cerebral ischemia through its enzymatic activity, but the role of central extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT is not clear. Here we show that eNAMPT protein level was elevated in the ischemic rat brain after middle-cerebral-artery occlusion (MCAO and reperfusion, which can be traced to at least in part from blood circulation. Administration of recombinant NAMPT protein exacerbated MCAO-induced neuronal injury in rat brain, while exacerbated oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD induced neuronal injury only in neuron-glial mixed culture, but not in neuron culture. In the mixed culture, NAMPT protein promoted TNF-α release in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion, while TNF-α neutralizing antibody protected OGD-induced, NAMPT-enhanced neuronal injury. Importantly, H247A mutant of NAMPT with essentially no enzymatic activity exerted similar effects on ischemic neuronal injury and TNF-α release as the wild type protein. Thus, eNAMPT is an injurious and inflammatory factor in cerebral ischemia and aggravates ischemic neuronal injury by triggering TNF-α release from glia cells, via a mechanism not related to NAMPT enzymatic activity.

  9. Inhibitor of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Sensitizes Glioblastoma Cells to Temozolomide via Activating ROS/JNK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overcoming temozolomide (TMZ resistance is a great challenge in glioblastoma (GBM treatment. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and has a crucial role in cancer cell metabolism. In this study, we investigated whether FK866 and CHS828, two specific NAMPT inhibitors, could sensitize GBM cells to TMZ. Low doses of FK866 and CHS828 (5 nM and 10 nM, resp. alone did not significantly decrease cell viability in U251-MG and T98 GBM cells. However, they significantly increased the antitumor action of TMZ in these cells. In U251-MG cells, administration of NAMPT inhibitors increased the TMZ (100 μM-induced apoptosis and LDH release from GBM cells. NAMPT inhibitors remarkably enhanced the activities of caspase-1, caspase-3, and caspase-9. Moreover, NAMPT inhibitors increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production and superoxide anion level but reduced the SOD activity and total antioxidative capacity in GBM cells. Treatment of NAMPT inhibitors increased phosphorylation of c-Jun and JNK. Administration of JNK inhibitor SP600125 or ROS scavenger tocopherol with TMZ and NAMPT inhibitors substantially attenuated the sensitization of NAMPT inhibitor on TMZ antitumor action. Our data indicate a potential value of NAMPT inhibitors in combined use with TMZ for GBM treatment.

  10. Increasing NAD synthesis in muscle via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is not sufficient to promote oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, David W; Davis, James G; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A

    2015-01-16

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle.

  11. Crystal structures and inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei hypoxanthine–guanine phosphoribosyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terán, David; Hocková, Dana; Česnek, Michal; Zíková, Alena; Naesens, Lieve; Keough, Dianne T.; Guddat, Luke W.

    2016-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a life-threatening infectious disease caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei (Tbr). Due to the debilitating side effects of the current therapeutics and the emergence of resistance to these drugs, new medications for this disease need to be developed. One potential new drug target is 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRT), an enzyme central to the purine salvage pathway and whose activity is critical for the production of the nucleotides (GMP and IMP) required for DNA/RNA synthesis within this protozoan parasite. Here, the first crystal structures of this enzyme have been determined, these in complex with GMP and IMP and with three acyclic nucleoside phosphonate (ANP) inhibitors. The Ki values for GMP and IMP are 30.5 μM and 77 μM, respectively. Two of the ANPs have Ki values considerably lower than for the nucleotides, 2.3 μM (with guanine as base) and 15.8 μM (with hypoxanthine as base). The crystal structures show that when two of the ANPs bind, they induce an unusual conformation change to the loop where the reaction product, pyrophosphate, is expected to bind. This and other structural differences between the Tbr and human enzymes suggest selective inhibitors for the Tbr enzyme can be designed. PMID:27786284

  12. Purine salvage in the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona, and generation of hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient clones for positive-negative selection of transgenic parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Zhang, Zijing; Howe, Daniel K

    2014-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that causes severe neurological disease in horses and marine mammals. The Apicomplexa are all obligate intracellular parasites that lack purine biosynthesis pathways and rely on the host cell for their purine requirements. Hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) and adenosine kinase (AK) are key enzymes that function in two complementary purine salvage pathways in apicomplexans. Bioinformatic searches of the S. neurona genome revealed genes encoding HXGPRT, AK and all of the major purine salvage enzymes except purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Wild-type S. neurona were able to grow in the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) but were inhibited by 6-thioxanthine (6-TX), suggesting that the pathways involving either HXGPRT or AK are functional in this parasite. Prior work with Toxoplasma gondii demonstrated the utility of HXGPRT as a positive-negative selection marker. To enable the use of HXGPRT in S. neurona, the SnHXGPRT gene sequence was determined and a gene-targeting plasmid was transfected into S. neurona. SnHXGPRT-deficient mutants were selected with 6-TX, and single-cell clones were obtained. These Sn∆HXG parasites were susceptible to MPA and could be complemented using the heterologous T. gondii HXGPRT gene. In summary, S. neurona possesses both purine salvage pathways described in apicomplexans, thus allowing the use of HXGPRT as a positive-negative drug selection marker in this parasite.

  13. BTB and CNC homolog 1 (Bach1) deficiency ameliorates TNBS colitis in mice: role of M2 macrophages and heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harusato, Akihito; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Hirai, Yasuko; Higashimura, Yasuki; Katada, Kazuhiro; Handa, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Muto, Akihiko; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    BTB and CNC homolog 1 (Bach1) is a transcriptional repressor of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which plays an important role in the protection of cells and tissues against acute and chronic inflammation. However, the role of Bach1 in the gastrointestinal mucosal defense system remains little understood. HO-1 supports the suppression of experimental colitis and localizes mainly in macrophages in colonic mucosa. This study was undertaken to elucidate the Bach1/HO-1 system's effects on the pathogenesis of experimental colitis. This study used C57BL/6 (wild-type) and homozygous Bach1-deficient C57BL/6 mice in which colonic damage was induced by the administration of an enema of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Subsequently, they were evaluated macroscopically, histologically, and biochemically. Peritoneal macrophages from the respective mice were isolated and analyzed. Then, wild-type mice were injected with peritoneal macrophages from the respective mice. Acute colitis was induced similarly. TNBS-induced colitis was inhibited in Bach1-deficient mice. TNBS administration increased the expression of HO-1 messenger RNA and protein in colonic mucosa in Bach1-deficient mice. The expression of HO-1 mainly localized in F4/80-immunopositive and CD11b-immunopositive macrophages. Isolated peritoneal macrophages from Bach1-deficient mice highly expressed HO-1 and also manifested M2 macrophage markers, such as Arginase-1, Fizz-1, Ym1, and MRC1. Furthermore, TNBS-induced colitis was inhibited by the transfer of Bach1-deficient macrophages into wild-type mice. Deficiency of Bach1 ameliorated TNBS-induced colitis. Bach1-deficient macrophages played a key role in protection against colitis. Targeting of this mechanism is applicable to cell therapy for human inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. Circadian rhythms and food anticipatory behavior in Wfs1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luuk, Hendrik; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    in rodents with suprachiasmatic nucleus lesions. In the present study, we have characterized the circadian rhythmicity of behavior in Wfs1-deficient mice during ad libitum and restricted feeding. Based on the expression of Wfs1 protein in the DMH it was hypothesized that Wfs1-deficient mice will display...... in significantly lower body weight and reduced wheel-running activity. Circadian rhythmicity of behavior was normal in Wfs1-deficient mice under ad libitum feeding apart from elongated free-running period in constant light. The amount of food anticipatory activity induced by restricted feeding...

  15. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption.

  16. Skeletal Muscle-Specific CPT1 Deficiency Elevates Lipotoxic Intermediates but Preserves Insulin Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchun Shi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. By specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1b (CPT1b in skeletal muscles, we explored the effect of CPT1b deficiency on lipids and insulin sensitivity. Methods. Mice with specific knockout of CPT1b in skeletal muscles (CPT1b M−/− were used for the experiment group, with littermate C57BL/6 as controls (CPT1b. General and metabolic profiles were measured and compared between groups. mRNA expression and CPT1 activity were measured in skeletal muscle tissues and compared between groups. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO, triglycerides (TAGs, diglycerides (DAGs, and ceramides were examined in skeletal muscles in two groups. Phosphorylated AKT (pAkt and glucose transporter 4 (Glut4 were determined with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Insulin tolerance test, glucose tolerance test, and pyruvate oxidation were performed in both groups. Results. CPT1b M−/− model was successfully established, with impaired muscle CPT1 activity. Compared with CPT1b mice, CPT1b M−/− mice had similar food intake but lower body weight or fat mass and higher lipids but similar glucose or insulin levels. Their mitochondrial FAO of skeletal muscles was impaired. There were lipids accumulations (TAGs, DAGs, and ceramides in skeletal muscle. However, pAkt and Glut4, insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and pyruvate oxidation were preserved. Conclusion. Skeletal muscle-specific CPT1 deficiency elevates lipotoxic intermediates but preserves insulin sensitivity.

  17. Regenerative Neurogenesis After Ischemic Stroke Promoted by Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase-Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Guan, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Can-Can; Wang, Pei; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2015-07-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a ubiquitous fundamental metabolite. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is the rate-limiting enzyme for mammalian NAD salvage synthesis and has been shown to protect against acute ischemic stroke. In this study, we investigated the role of Nampt-NAD cascade in brain regeneration after ischemic stroke. Nampt transgenic (Nampt-Tg) mice and H247A mutant enzymatic-dead Nampt transgenic (ΔNampt-Tg) mice were subjected with experimental cerebral ischemia by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Activation of neural stem cells, neurogenesis, and neurological function recovery were measured. Besides, nicotinamide mononucleotide and NAD, two chemical enzymatic product of Nampt, were administrated in vivo and in vitro. Compared with wild-type mice, Nampt-Tg mice showed enhanced number of neural stem cells, improved neural functional recovery, increased survival rate, and accelerated body weight gain after middle cerebral artery occlusion, which were not observed in ΔNampt-Tg mice. A delayed nicotinamide mononucleotide administration for 7 days with the first dose at 12 hours post middle cerebral artery occlusion did not protect acute brain infarction and neuronal deficit; however, it still improved postischemic regenerative neurogenesis. Nicotinamide mononucleotide and NAD(+) promoted proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in vitro. Knockdown of NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and SIRT2 inhibited the progrowth action of Nampt-NAD axis, whereas knockdown of SIRT1, SIRT2, and SIRT6 compromised the prodifferentiation effect of Nampt-NAD axis. Our data demonstrate that the Nampt-NAD cascade may act as a centralizing switch in postischemic regeneration through controlling different sirtuins and therefore represent a promising therapeutic target for long-term recovery of ischemic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Dual targeting of tumor angiogenesis and chemotherapy by endostatin-cytosine deaminase-uracil phosphoribosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Te; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Hong-Jen; Du, Yi; Lee, Heng-Huan; Xia, Weiya; Yu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Jennifer L; Yen, Chia-Jui; Sun, Hui-Lung; Wang, Yan; Yeh, Edward T H; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2011-08-01

    Several antiangiogenic drugs targeting VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR) that were approved by the Food and Drug Administration for many cancer types, including colorectal and lung cancer, can effectively reduce tumor growth. However, targeting the VEGF signaling pathway will probably influence the normal function of endothelial cells in maintaining homeostasis and can cause unwanted adverse effects. Indeed, emerging experimental evidence suggests that VEGF-targeting therapy induced less tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity, allowing residual cells to become more resistant and eventually develop a more malignant phenotype. We report an antitumor therapeutic EndoCD fusion protein developed by linking endostatin (Endo) to cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD). Specifically, Endo possesses tumor antiangiogenesis activity that targets tumor endothelial cells, followed by CD, which converts the nontoxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the cytotoxic antitumor drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the local tumor area. Moreover, selective targeting of tumor sites allows an increasing local intratumoral concentration of 5-FU, thus providing high levels of cytotoxic activity. We showed that treatment with EndoCD plus 5-FC, compared with bevacizumab plus 5-FU treatment, significantly increased the 5-FU concentration around tumor sites and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in human breast and colorectal orthotropic animal models. In addition, in contrast to treatment with bevacizumab/5-FU, EndoCD/5-FC did not induce cardiotoxicity leading to heart failure in mice after long-term treatment. Our results showed that, compared with currently used antiangiogenic drugs, EndoCD possesses potent anticancer activity with virtually no toxic effects and does not increase tumor invasion or metastasis. Together, these findings suggest that EndoCD/5-FC could become an alternative option for future antiangiogenesis therapy.

  19. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jett, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  20. Functional significance of four successive glycine residues in the pyrophosphate binding loop of fungal 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynié, Lucile; Giraud, Marie-France; Breton, Annick; Boissier, Fanny; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Dautant, Alain

    2012-08-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a key enzyme of the purine recycling pathway that catalyzes the conversion of 5-phospho-ribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate and guanine or hypoxanthine to guanosine monophosphate (GMP) or inosine monophosphate (IMP), respectively, and pyrophosphate (PPi). We report the first crystal structure of a fungal 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HGPRT (Sc-HGPRT) in complex with GMP. The crystal structures of full length protein with (WT1) or without (WT2) sulfate that mimics the phosphate group in the PPi binding site were solved by molecular replacement using the structure of a truncated version (Δ7) solved beforehand by multiwavelength anomalous diffusion. Sc-HGPRT is a dimer and adopts the overall structure of class I phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTs) with a smaller hood domain and a short two-stranded parallel β-sheet linking the N- to the C-terminal end. The catalytic loops in WT1 and WT2 are in an open form while in Δ7, due to an inter-subunit disulfide bridge, the catalytic loop is in either an open or closed form. The closure is concomitant with a peptide plane flipping in the PPi binding loop. Moreover, owing the flexibility of a GGGG motif conserved in fungi, all the peptide bonds of the phosphate binding loop are in trans conformation whereas in nonfungal 6-oxopurine PRTs, one cis-peptide bond is required for phosphate binding. Mutations affecting the enzyme activity or the previously characterized feedback inhibition by GMP are located at the nucleotide binding site and the dimer interface. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  1. The GH-IGF1 axis and longevity. The paradigm of IGF1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2008-01-01

    Primary or secondary IGF1 deficiency has been implicated in shortening of lifespan. This paper reviews available data on the influence of IGF1 deficiency on lifespan and longevity in animals and man. It has been shown that inactivation of the IGF1 gene or of the GH receptor in both invertebrates (C-elegans, flies-Drosphila) and rodents (mice and rats), leading to IGF1 deficiency, prolong life, particularly in females. In man, evaluation of the 2 largest cohorts of patients with Laron syndrome (inactive GH receptor resulting in IGF1 deficiency) in Israel and Ecuador revealed that despite their dwarfism and marked obesity, patients are alive at the ages of 75-78 years, with some having reached even more advanced ages. It is assumed that a major contributing factor is their protection from cancer, a major cause of death in the general population.

  2. Effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency on ageing and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2002-01-01

    Present knowledge on the effects of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth hormone (IGF)1 deficiency on ageing and lifespan are reviewed. Evidence is presented that isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) including GH, as well as primary IGE1 deficiency (GH resistance, Laron syndrome) present signs of early ageing such as thin and wrinkled skin, obesity, hyperglycemia and osteoporosis. These changes do not seem to affect the lifespan, as patients reach old age. Animal models of genetic MPHD (Ames and Snell mice) and GH receptor knockout mice (primary IGF1 deficiency) also have a statistically significant higher longevity compared to normal controls. On the contrary, mice transgenic for GH and acromegalic patients secreting large amounts of GH have premature death. In conclusion longstanding GH/IGF1 deficiency affects several parameters of the ageing process without impairing lifespan, and as shown in animal models prolongs longevity. In contrast high GH/IGF1 levels accelerate death.

  3. Novel Mechanisms of PARP Inhibitor Resistance in BRCA1-Deficient Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    hypothesize that in order for BRCA1-deficient cells to overcome PARP inhibition, they must acquire mutations or expression changes that alter their...Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0027 TITLE: Novel Mechanisms of PARP Inhibitor Resistance in BRCA1-Deficient Breast Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...DNA damage response, repair pathways, or checkpoint pathways. I further hypothesize that these changes will result in increased sensitivity to other

  4. Paroxysmal Exercise-induced Dyskinesias Caused by GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongin, Marie; Mezouar, Nicolas; Dodet, Pauline; Vidailhet, Marie; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is due to de novo mutations in the SLC2A1 gene encoding the glucose transporter type 1. Phenomenology Shown Paroxysmal motor manifestations induced by exercise or fasting may be the main manifestations of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Educational Value Proper identification of the paroxysmal events and early diagnosis is important since the disease is potentially treatable. PMID:27351150

  5. Sustained beta-cell dysfunction but normalized islet mass in aged thrombospondin-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Johan Drott

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet endothelial cells have in recent years been shown to support beta-cell mass and function by paracrine interactions. Recently, we identified an islets endothelial-specific glycoprotein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, that showed to be of importance for islet angiogenesis and beta-cell function in young mice. The present study aimed to investigate long-term consequences for islet morphology and beta-cell function of TSP-1 deficiency. Islet and beta-cell mass were observed increased at 10-12 weeks of age in TSP-1 deficient mice, but were normalized before 16 weeks of age when compared to wild-type controls. Islet vascularity was normal in 10-12 and 16-week-old TSP-1 deficient animals, whereas islets of one-year-old animals lacking TSP-1 were hypervascular. Beta-cell dysfunction in TSP-1 deficient animals was present at similar magnitudes between 10-12 and 52 weeks of age, as evaluated by glucose tolerance tests. The insulin secretion capacity in vivo of islets in one-year-old TSP-1 deficient animals was only ∼15% of that in wild-type animals. Using a transplantation model, we reconstituted TSP-1 in adult TSP-deficient islets. In contrast to neonatal TSP-1 deficient islets that we previously reported to regain function after TSP-1 reconstitution, adult islets failed to recover. We conclude that TSP-1 deficiency in islets causes changing vascular and endocrine morphological alterations postnatally, but is coupled to a chronic beta-cell dysfunction. The beta-cell dysfunction induced by TSP-1 deficiency is irreversible if not substituted early in life.

  6. COMMD1-deficient dogs accumulate copper in hepatocytes and provide a good model for chronic hepatitis and fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Favier

    Full Text Available New therapeutic concepts developed in rodent models should ideally be evaluated in large animal models prior to human clinical application. COMMD1-deficiency in dogs leads to hepatic copper accumulation and chronic hepatitis representing a Wilson's disease like phenotype. Detailed understanding of the pathogenesis and time course of this animal model is required to test its feasibility as a large animal model for chronic hepatitis. In addition to mouse models, true longitudinal studies are possible due to the size of these dogs permitting detailed analysis of the sequence of events from initial insult to final cirrhosis. Therefore, liver biopsies were taken each half year from five new born COMMD1-deficient dogs over a period of 42 months. Biopsies were used for H&E, reticulin, and rubeanic acid (copper staining. Immunohistochemistry was performed on hepatic stellate cell (HSC activation marker (alpha-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA, proliferation (Ki67, apoptosis (caspase-3, and bile duct and liver progenitor cell (LPC markers keratin (K 19 and 7. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western Blots were performed on gene products involved in the regenerative and fibrotic pathways. Maximum copper accumulation was reached at 12 months of age, which coincided with the first signs of hepatitis. HSCs were activated (α-SMA from 18 months onwards, with increasing reticulin deposition and hepatocytic proliferation in later stages. Hepatitis and caspase-3 activity (first noticed at 18 months increased over time. Both HGF and TGF-β1 gene expression peaked at 24 months, and thereafter decreased gradually. Both STAT3 and c-MET showed an increased time-dependent activation. Smad2/3 phosphorylation, indicative for fibrogenesis, was present at all time-points. COMMD1-deficient dogs develop chronic liver disease and cirrhosis comparable to human chronic hepatitis, although at much higher pace. Therefore they represent a genetically-defined large animal model to test clinical

  7. High-fat Diet Enhances and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Deficiency Attenuates Bone Loss in Mice with Lewis Lung Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Nielsen, Forrest H; Sundaram, Sneha; Cao, Jay

    2015-07-01

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat diet and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (Pai1(-/-)) on the bone structure in male C57BL/6 mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in lungs. Significant reduction in bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N) and bone mineral density (BMD) in femurs and vertebrae were found in LLC-bearing mice compared to non-tumor-bearing mice. In LLC-bearing mice, the high-fat diet compared to the AIN93G control diet significantly reduced BV/TV, Tb.N and BMD in femurs and BV/TV in vertebrae. The high-fat diet significantly reduced BMD in vertebrae in wild-type mice but not in Pai1(-/-) mice. Compared to wild-type mice, PAI1 deficiency significantly increased BV/TV and Tb.N in femurs. The plasma concentration of osteocalcin was significantly lower and that of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b) was significantly higher in LLC-bearing mice. The high-fat diet significantly reduced plasma osteocalcin and increased TRAP5b. Deficiency in PAI1 prevented the high-fat diet-induced increases in plasma TRAP5b. These findings demonstrate that a high-fat diet enhances, whereas PAI1 deficiency, attenuates metastasis-associated bone loss, indicating that a high-fat diet and PAI1 contribute to metastasis-associated bone deterioration. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Lethal phenotype in conditional late-onset arginase 1 deficiency in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Jennifer; Hu, Chuhong; Bhargava, Ragini; Park, Hana; Tai, Denise; Byrne, James A; Marescau, Bart; De Deyn, Peter P; Schlichting, Lisa; Grody, Wayne W; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2013-11-01

    Human arginase deficiency is characterized by hyperargininemia and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, which lead to neurological impairment with spasticity, loss of ambulation, seizures, and severe mental and growth retardation; uncommonly, patients suffer early death from this disorder. In a murine targeted knockout model, onset of the phenotypic abnormality is heralded by weight loss at around day 15, and death occurs typically by postnatal day 17 with hyperargininemia and markedly elevated ammonia. This discrepancy between the more attenuated juvenile-onset human disease and the lethal neonatal murine model has remained suboptimal for studying and developing therapy for the more common presentation of arginase deficiency. These investigations aimed to address this issue by creating an adult conditional knockout mouse to determine whether later onset of arginase deficiency also resulted in lethality. Animal survival and ammonia levels, body weight, circulating amino acids, and tissue arginase levels were examined as outcome parameters after widespread Cre-recombinase activation in a conditional knockout model of arginase 1 deficiency. One hundred percent of adult female and 70% of adult male mice died an average of 21.0 and 21.6 days, respectively, after the initiation of tamoxifen administration. Animals demonstrated elevated circulating ammonia and arginine at the onset of phenotypic abnormalities. In addition, brain and liver amino acids demonstrated abnormalities. These studies demonstrate that (a) the absence of arginase in adult animals results in a disease profile (leading to death) similar to that of the targeted knockout and (b) the phenotypic abnormalities seen in the juvenile-onset model are not exclusive to the age of the animal but instead to the biochemistry of the disorder. This adult model will be useful for developing gene- and cell-based therapies for this disorder that will not be limited by the small animal size of neonatal therapy and for

  9. Circadian rhythms and food anticipatory behavior in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luuk, Hendrik; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-08-10

    The dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) has been proposed as a candidate for the neural substrate of a food-entrainable oscillator. The existence of a food-entrainable oscillator in the mammalian nervous system was inferred previously from restricted feeding-induced behavioral rhythmicity in rodents with suprachiasmatic nucleus lesions. In the present study, we have characterized the circadian rhythmicity of behavior in Wfs1-deficient mice during ad libitum and restricted feeding. Based on the expression of Wfs1 protein in the DMH it was hypothesized that Wfs1-deficient mice will display reduced or otherwise altered food anticipatory activity. Wfs1 immunoreactivity in DMH was found almost exclusively in the compact part. Restricted feeding induced c-Fos immunoreactivity primarily in the ventral and lateral aspects of DMH and it was similar in both genotypes. Wfs1-deficiency resulted in significantly lower body weight and reduced wheel-running activity. Circadian rhythmicity of behavior was normal in Wfs1-deficient mice under ad libitum feeding apart from elongated free-running period in constant light. The amount of food anticipatory activity induced by restricted feeding was not significantly different between the genotypes. Present results indicate that the effects of Wfs1-deficiency on behavioral rhythmicity are subtle suggesting that Wfs1 is not a major player in the neural networks responsible for circadian rhythmicity of behavior.

  10. Heat shock protein B1-deficient mice display impaired wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Crowe

    Full Text Available There is large literature describing in vitro experiments on heat shock protein (hspB1 but understanding of its function in vivo is limited to studies in mice overexpressing human hspB1 protein. Experiments in cells have shown that hspB1 has chaperone activity, a cytoprotective role, regulates inflammatory gene expression, and drives cell proliferation. To investigate the function of the protein in vivo we generated hspB1-deficient mice. HspB1-deficient fibroblasts display increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, compared to wild-type cells, but reduced proliferation. HspB1-deficient fibroblasts exhibit reduced entry into S phase and increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p27(kip1 and p21(waf1. The expression of hspB1 protein and mRNA is also controlled by the cell cycle. To investigate the physiological function of hspB1 in regulating inflammation and cell proliferation we used an excisional cutaneous wound healing model. There was a significant impairment in the rate of healing of wounds in hspB1-deficient mice, characterised by reduced re-epithelialisation and collagen deposition but also increased inflammation. HspB1 deficiency augments neutrophil infiltration in wounds, driven by increased chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1 expression. This appears to be a general mechanism as similar results were obtained in the air-pouch and peritonitis models of acute inflammation.

  11. Regulation of the viability of Nf1 deficient cells by PKC isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Shen, Ling; Parris, Toshima; Huang, Junchi; Yi, Bo; Helou, Khalil; Chen, Changyan

    2014-11-15

    Suppression of protein kinase C (PKC) is known to be synthetically lethal with ras mutations in various types of cancer cells. The studies also showed that blockade of PKC affected the viability of Nf1 deficient cells. Since PKC family consists of more than 10 isoforms, our study aimed at identifying which isoform(s) played the crucial role in sensitizing Nf1 deficient cells to apoptosis. Using genetic and chemical PKC inhibitors, we demonstrated that the concurrent inhibition of PKC α and β induced Nf1 deficient ST or 96.2 cells, but not SNF02.2 cells with a normal Nf1 or ST cells ectopically expressing Nf1 effective domain gene, to apoptosis. In this process, PKC δ in Nf1 deficient cells, but not in ST/Nf1 cells, was upregulated and translocated to the nucleus. Furthermore, caspase 3 was cleaved and cytochrome c was released to the cytosol. Thus, it appeared that PKC δ and α/β are the crucial components for sustaining the aberrant Ras signaling and further viability of Nf1 deficient cells. The abrogation of these two isoforms activated their opponent PKC δ for switching on the caspase 3-governed apoptotic machinery.

  12. Induction of mitotic catastrophe by PKC inhibition in Nf1-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shen, Ling; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Chen, Changyan

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of tumor suppressor Nf1 gene deregulate Ras-mediated signaling, which confers the predisposition for developing benign or malignant tumors. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) was shown to be in synergy with aberrant Ras for the induction of apoptosis in various types of cancer cells. However, it has not been investigated whether loss of PKC is lethal for Nf1-deficient cells. In this study, using HMG (3-hydroxy-3-methylgutaryl, a PKC inhibitor), we demonstrate that the inhibition of PKC by HMG treatment triggered a persistently mitotic arrest, resulting in the occurrence of mitotic catastrophe in Nf1-deficient ST8814 cells. However, the introduction of the Nf1 effective domain gene into ST8814 cells abolished this mitotic crisis. In addition, HMG injection significantly attenuated the growth of the xenografted ST8814 tumors. Moreover, Chk1 was phosphorylated, accompanied with the persistent increase of cyclin B1 expression in HMG-treated ST8814 cells. The knockdown of Chk1 by the siRNA prevented the Nf1-deficient cells from undergoing HMG-mediated mitotic arrest as well as mitotic catastrophe. Thus, our data suggested that the suppression of PKC activates the Chk1-mediated mitotic exit checkpoint in Nf1-deficient cells, leading to the induction of apoptosis via mitotic catastrophe. Collectively, the study indicates that targeting PKC may be a potential option for developing new strategies to treat Nf1-deficiency-related diseases.

  13. A flexible loop at the dimer interface is a part of the active site of the adjacent monomer of Escherichia coli orotate phosphoribosyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Annette; Aghajari, Nushin; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1996-01-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is involved in the biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. a-d-ribosyldiphosphate 5-phosphate (PRPP) and orotate are utilized to form pyrophosphate and orotidine 5‘-monophosphate (OMP) in the presence of divalent cations, preferably Mg2+. OMP is thereaf...

  14. Two ATP phosphoribosyltransferase isozymes of Geobacter sulfurreducens contribute to growth in the presence or absence of histidine and under nitrogen fixation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklujkar, Muktak

    2011-07-01

    Bacteria of the Geobacter clade possess two distinct ATP phosphoribosyltransferases encoded by hisG(L) and hisG(S)+hisZ to catalyze the first reaction of histidine biosynthesis. This very unusual redundancy was investigated by mutational analysis. The hisG(L), hisG(S), and hisZ genes of Geobacter sulfurreducens were deleted, effects on growth and histidine biosynthesis gene expression were evaluated, and deficiencies were complemented with plasmid-borne genes. Both hisG(L) and hisG(S)+hisZ encode functional ATP phosphoribosyltransferases. However, deletion of hisG(L) resulted in no growth defect, whereas deletion of hisG(S) delayed growth when histidine was not provided. Both deletions increased hisZ transcript abundance, and both ΔhisG(S) and ΔhisZ mutations increased hisG(L) transcript abundance. Growth with HisG(L) alone (due to deletion of either hisG(S) or hisZ) was better under nitrogen fixation conditions than when ammonium was provided. Deletion of hisZ caused growth defects under all conditions tested, with or without exogenous sources of histidine, with different patterns of histidine biosynthesis gene expression under each condition. Taken together, the data indicate that G. sulfurreducens depends primarily on the HisG(S)Z isozyme as an ATP phosphoribosyltransferase in histidine biosynthesis, and for other functions when histidine is available; however, HisG(L) also functions as ATP phosphoribosyltransferase, particularly during nitrogen fixation.

  15. [18F]FLT and [18F]FDG PET for non-invasive treatment monitoring of the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor APO866 in human xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Kamille Dumong; Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Björkling, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    APO866 is a new anti-tumor compound inhibiting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). APO866 has an anti-tumor effect in several pre-clinical tumor models and is currently in several clinical phase II studies. 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F]fluorothymidine ([18F]FLT) is a tracer used to assess cell...

  16. Allosteric regulation of the GTP activated and CTP inhibited uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Arent, Susan; Larsen, Sine;

    2005-01-01

    The upp gene, encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It behaved as a tetramer in solution and showed optimal activity at pH 5.5 when...

  17. Reversible white matter lesions during ketogenic diet therapy in glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Takahashi, Satoru; Nakamura, Fumito; Kohno, Yoichi

    2013-12-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is caused by brain energy failure resulting from a disturbance in glucose transport. We describe a 4-year-old boy with classical type glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome with a heterozygous splice acceptor site mutation (c.517-2A>G) in the SLCA2A1 gene. We initiated a ketogenic diet at 4 months of age. However, even though his condition was good during ketogenic diet therapy, multiple cerebral white matter and right cerebellum lesions appeared at 9 months of age. The lesions in the cerebral white matter subsequently disappeared, indicating that white matter lesions during diet therapy may be reversible and independent of the ketogenic diet. This is the first report of reversible white matter lesions during ketogenic diet therapy in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. ROCK1 deficiency enhances protective effects of antioxidants against apoptosis and cell detachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Surma

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that the homologous Rho kinases, ROCK1 and ROCK2, play different roles in regulating stress-induced stress fiber disassembly and cell detachment, and the ROCK1 deficiency in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF has remarkable anti-apoptotic, anti-detachment and pro-survival effects against doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic drug. This study investigated the roles of ROCK isoforms in doxorubicin-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation which is believed to be the major mechanism underlying its cytotoxicity to normal cells, and especially to cardiomyocytes. Different antioxidants have been shown to provide a protective role reported in numerous experimental studies, but clinical trials of antioxidant therapy showed insufficient benefit against the cardiac side effect. We found that both ROCK1-/- and ROCK2-/- MEFs exhibited reduced ROS production in response to doxorubicin treatment. Interestingly, only ROCK1 deficiency, but not ROCK2 deficiency, significantly enhanced the protective effects of antioxidants against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. First, ROCK1 deficiency and N-acetylcysteine (an anti-oxidant treatment synergistically reduced ROS levels, caspase activation and cell detachment. In addition, the reduction of ROS generation in ROCK1-/- MEFs in response to doxorubicin treatment was in part through inhibiting NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, ROCK1 deficiency enhanced the inhibitory effects of diphenyleneiodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase on ROS generation and caspase 3 activation induced by doxorubicin. Finally, ROCK1 deficiency had greater protective effects than antioxidant treatment, especially on reducing actin cytoskeleton remodeling. ROCK1 deficiency not only reduced actomyosin contraction but also preserved central stress fiber stability, whereas antioxidant treatment only reduced actomyosin contraction without preserving central stress fibers. These results reveal a novel strategy to enhance

  19. Different oligomeric states are involved in the allosteric behavior of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Mygind, Bente

    1996-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, catalyzing the formation of UMP and pyrophosphate from uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl-a-1-diphosphate (PP RibP), was purified from an overproducing strain of Escherichia coli. GTP was shown to activate the enzyme by reducing Km for PP RibP by about fivefold without...... affecting Vmax. When started by addition of enzyme, the reactions accelerated over an extended period of time, while enzyme solutions incubated first with GTP and PP RibP displayed constant velocities. This indicated that PP RibP and GTP influenced the structure of the enzyme. Gel....... It appears that the smaller form predominates in the absence of substrates, while the larger form predominates in the presence of GTP and PP RibP. Guanosine-3',5'-bis(diphosphate) was found to activate the enzyme much like GTP....

  20. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT.

  1. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  2. The extraordinary specificity of xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase from Bacillus subtilis elucidated by reaction kinetics, ligand binding, and crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arent, Susan; Kadziola, Anders; Larsen, Sine

    2006-01-01

    (X)GPRTases with respect to sequence, PRPP binding motif, and oligomeric structure. They are more related with the PurR repressor of Gram-positive bacteria, the adenine PRTase, and orotate PRTase. The catalytic function and high specificity for xanthine of B. subtilis XPRTase were investigated by ligand binding studies...... related to a few key residues in the active site. Asn27 can in different orientations form hydrogen bonds to an amino group or an oxo group at the 2-position of the purine base, and Lys156 is positioned to make a hydrogen bond with N7. This and the absence of a catalytic carboxylate group near the N7......Xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRTase) from Bacillus subtilis is a representative of the highly xanthine specific XPRTases found in Gram-positive bacteria. These XPRTases constitute a distinct subclass of 6-oxopurine PRTases, which deviate strongly from the major class of H...

  3. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: The expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Leen (Wilhelmina); J. Klepper (Joerg); M.M. Verbeek (Marcel); M. Leferink (Maike); T. Hofste (Tom); B.G.M. van Engelen (Baziel); R.A. Wevers (Ron); T. Arthur (Todd); N. Bahi-Buisson (Nadia); D. Ballhausen (Diana); J. Bekhof (Jolita); P. van Bogaert (Patrick); I. Carrilho (Inês); B. Chabrol (Brigitte); M.P. Champion (Michael); J. Coldwell (James); P. Clayton (Peter); E. Donner (Elizabeth); A. Evangeliou (Athanasios); F. Ebinger (Friedrich); K. Farrell (Kevin); R.J. Forsyth (Rob); C.G.E.L. de Goede (Christian); S. Gross (Stephanie); S. Grünewald (Sonja); H. Holthausen (Hans); S. Jayawant (Sandeep); K. Lachlan (Katherine); V. Laugel (Vincent); K. Leppig (Kathy); M.J. Lim (Ming); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); A.D. Marina; L. Martorell (Loreto); J. McMenamin (Joe); M.E.C. Meuwissen (Marije); H. Mundy (Helen); N.O. Nilsson (Nils); A. Panzer (Axel); B.T. Poll-The; C. Rauscher (Christian); C.M.R. Rouselle (Christophe); I. Sandvig (Inger); T. Scheffner (Thomas); E. Sheridan (Eamonn); N. Simpson (Neil); P. Sykora (Parol); R. Tomlinson (Richard); J. Trounce (John); D.W.M. Webb (David); B. Weschke (Bernhard); H. Scheffer (Hans); M.A. Willemsen (Michél)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractGlucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing an

  4. Upstream SLC2A1 translation initiation causes GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Bon, B.W.M. van; Geuer, S.; Gilissen, C.F.; Klepper, J.; Kwint, M.P.; Leen, W.G.; Pennings, M.; Wevers, R.A.; Veltman, J.A.; Kamsteeg, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) is a neurometabolic disorder with a complex phenotypic spectrum but simple biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid. The disorder is caused by impaired glucose transport into the brain resulting from variants in SCL2A1. In 10% of GLUT1DS patients, a

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Analysis in the Workup of GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Wevers, R.A.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Scheffer, H.; Verbeek, M.M.; Willemsen, Marjolein

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is a treatable neurometabolic disorder, characterized by a low concentration of glucose in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a decreased CSF to blood glucose ratio. Reports of patients with apparently normal CSF glucose levels, however, have raised the question wheth

  6. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome into adulthood: a follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Taher, M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Willemsen, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) is a treatable neurometabolic disorder in which glucose transport into the brain is disturbed. Besides the classic phenotype of intellectual disability, epilepsy, and movement disorders, other phenotypes are increasingly recognized. These include, for example, idi

  7. Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome: diagnosis and treatment in late childhood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gramer, G.; Wolf, N.I.; Vater, D.; Bast, T.; Santer, R.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Wevers, R.A.; Ebinger, F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typical cases of glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) present with early-onset epilepsy. We report symptoms, diagnostic results, and effects of therapy in two patients diagnosed with GLUT1-DS at the age of 10 and 15 years, respectively. PATIENTS: Patient 1: After four cer

  8. TSP-1 Deficiency Alters Ocular Microbiota: Implications for Sjögren's Syndrome Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Terzulli, Marielle; Ruiz, Laura Contreras; Kugadas, Abirami; Masli, Sharmila; Gadjeva, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The potential role of commensals as triggering factors that promote inflammation in dry eye disease has not been explored. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether ocular microbiota changes with the onset of dry eye disease in thrombospondin-1-deficient (TSP-1−/−) mice, a strain that develops Sjögren's syndrome-like disease.

  9. Movement disorders in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome respond to the modified Atkins diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Mewasingh, L.; Verbeek, M.M.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Movement disorders are a prominent feature of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS). First-choice treatment is a ketogenic diet, but compliance is poor. We have investigated the effect of the modified Atkins diet as an alternative treatment for movement disorders in

  10. Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome: diagnosis and treatment in late childhood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gramer, G.; Wolf, N.I.; Vater, D.; Bast, T.; Santer, R.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Wevers, R.A.; Ebinger, F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typical cases of glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) present with early-onset epilepsy. We report symptoms, diagnostic results, and effects of therapy in two patients diagnosed with GLUT1-DS at the age of 10 and 15 years, respectively. PATIENTS: Patient 1: After four cer

  11. Movement disorders in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome respond to the modified Atkins diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Mewasingh, L.; Verbeek, M.M.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Movement disorders are a prominent feature of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS). First-choice treatment is a ketogenic diet, but compliance is poor. We have investigated the effect of the modified Atkins diet as an alternative treatment for movement disorders in

  12. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome : the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G.; Klepper, Joerg; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Leferink, Maike; Hofste, Tom; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Wevers, Ron A.; Arthur, Todd; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Ballhausen, Diana; Bekhof, Jolita; van Bogaert, Patrick; Carrilho, Ines; Chabrol, Brigitte; Champion, Michael P.; Coldwell, James; Clayton, Peter; Donner, Elizabeth; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Ebinger, Friedrich; Farrell, Kevin; Forsyth, Rob J.; de Goede, Christian G. E. L.; Gross, Stephanie; Grunewald, Stephanie; Holthausen, Hans; Jayawant, Sandeep; Lachlan, Katherine; Laugel, Vincent; Leppig, Kathy; Lim, Ming J.; Mancini, Grazia; Della Marina, Adela; Martorell, Loreto; McMenamin, Joe; Meuwissen, Marije E. C.; Mundy, Helen; Nilsson, Nils O.; Panzer, Axel; Poll-The, Bwee T.; Rauscher, Christian; Rouselle, Christophe M. R.; Sandvig, Inger; Scheffner, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Simpson, Neil; Sykora, Parol; Tomlinson, Richard; Trounce, John; Webb, David; Weschke, Bernhard; Scheffer, Hans; Willemsen, Michel A.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  13. Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome with Carbohydrate-Responsive Symptoms but without Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, Anne; Assmann, Birgit; Klepper, Joerg; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. The main symptoms are epilepsy, developmental delay, movement disorders, and deceleration of head circumference. A ketogenic diet has been shown to be effective in controlling epilepsy in GLUT1-DS. We report a female…

  14. Paracaspase MALT1 deficiency protects mice from autoimmune-mediated demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Guire, Conor; Wieghofer, Peter; Elton, Lynn; Muylaert, David; Prinz, Marco; Beyaert, Rudi; van Loo, Geert

    2013-03-15

    The paracaspase MALT 1 is a major player in lymphocyte activation and proliferation. MALT1 mediates Ag-induced signaling to the transcription factor NF-κB by functioning both as a scaffold protein and cysteine protease. We studied the role of MALT1 in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. MALT1-knockout mice did not develop any clinical symptoms of EAE. In addition, lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration into the spinal cord was absent in MALT1-knockout mice, as were demyelination and proinflammatory gene expression. Adoptive transfer experiments showed that MALT1 deficiency in splenocytes is sufficient for EAE resistance. Moreover, autoreactive T cell activation was severely impaired in MALT1-deficient T cells, suggesting the inability of MALT1-deficient effector T cells to induce demyelinating inflammation in the CNS. Finally, the MALT1 substrates A20 and CYLD were completely processed in wild-type T cells during EAE, which was partially impaired in MALT1-deficient T cells, suggesting a contribution of MALT1 proteolytic activity in T cell activation and EAE development. Together, our data indicate that MALT1 may be an interesting therapeutic target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  15. Caspase-1 deficiency in mice reduces intestinal triglyceride absorption and hepatic triglyceride secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepen, J.A. van; Stienstra, R.; Vroegrijk, I.O.C.M.; Berg, S.A.A. van den; Salvatori, D.; Hooiveld, G.J.; Kersten, S.; Tack, C.J.; Netea, M.G.; Smit, J.W.A.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Havekes, L.M.; Dijk, K.W. van; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2013-01-01

    Caspase-1 is known to activate the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Additionally, it can cleave other substrates, including proteins involved in metabolism. Recently, we showed that caspase-1 deficiency in mice strongly reduces high-fat diet-induced weight gain, at least partly caused by a

  16. Amplification of EDHF-type vasodilatations in TRPC1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Kjestine; Dubrovska, Galyna; Nielsen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    -deficient mice (TRPC1-/-). Experimental approach. Vascular responses were studied using pressure/wire-myography and intravital microscopy. We performed electrophysiological measurements, and confocal Ca(2+) imaging for studying K(Ca)-channel functions and Ca(2+)sparks. Key results. TRPC1-deficiency...

  17. NMR spectroscopy of aminoacylase 1 deficiency, a novel inborn error of metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelke, U.F.H.; Sass, J.O.; Coster, R.N. van; Gerlo, E.; Olbrich, H.; Krywawych, S.; Calvin, J.; Hart, C.; Omran, H.; Wevers, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Aminoacylase 1 deficiency is a novel inborn error of metabolism. The clinical significance of the deficiency is under discussion, as well as the possible consequences of the defect for brain metabolism and function. This study includes the five originally published cases as well as three novel ones.

  18. The IGSF1 deficiency syndrome: Characteristics of male and female patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.D. Joustra (Sjoerd); N. Schoenmakers (Nadia); L. Persani (Luca); I. Campi (Irene); E. Bonomi (Elisa); G. Radetti (Giorgio); P. Beck-Peccoz (Paolo); H. Zhu (H.); T.M.E. Davis (Timothy M.); Y. Sun (Y.); E.P. Corssmit (Eleonora); N.M. Appelman-Dijkstra (Natasha); C.A. Heinen (C.); A.M. Pereira (Alberto); A.J. Varewijck (Aimee); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); E. Endert (Erik); R.C.M. Hennekam (Raoul); M.P. Lombardi (Paola); M.M.A.M. Mannens (Marcel); B. Bak (Beata); D.J. Bernard (Daniel); M.H. Breuning (Martijn); K. Chatterjee (Krishna); M.T. Dattani (Mehul); W. Oostdijk (Wilma); N.R. Biermasz; J.M. Wit (Jan); A.S.P. van Trotsenburg (Paul)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractContext: Ig superfamily member1 (IGSF1) deficiency was recently discovered as a novel X-linked cause of central hypothyroidism (CeH) and macro-orchidism. However, clinical and biochemical data regarding growth, puberty, and metabolic outcome, as well as features of female carriers, are s

  19. Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome: diagnosis and treatment in late childhood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gramer, G.; Wolf, N.I.; Vater, D.; Bast, T.; Santer, R.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Wevers, R.A.; Ebinger, F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typical cases of glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) present with early-onset epilepsy. We report symptoms, diagnostic results, and effects of therapy in two patients diagnosed with GLUT1-DS at the age of 10 and 15 years, respectively. PATIENTS: Patient 1: After four

  20. MLH1-deficient tumor cells are resistant to lipoplatin, but retain sensitivity to lipoxal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedier, André; Poyet, Cédric; Perucchini, Daniele; Boulikas, Teni; Fink, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Lipoplatin, currently under phase III evaluation, is a novel liposomal cisplatin formulation highly effective against cancers. Lipoplatin has eliminated or reduced the systemic toxicity frequently seen for cisplatin. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the cytotoxic effect of lipoplatin is dependent on the functional integrity of DNA mismatch repair (MMR), a post-replicative DNA repair machinery implicated in cell cycle control and apoptosis. Clonogenic data revealed a significant (Plipoplatin of HCT116 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells lacking MLH1, one of five proteins crucial to MMR function, as compared to MLH1-expressing HCT116 cells. In addition, MLH1-deficient cells were at least 3-fold less susceptible to apoptosis (DNA fragmentation) than MLH1-proficient cells. However, proteolytic processing of caspase-3, caspase-7 and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 following lipoplatin treatment was comparable in MLH1-deficient cells and -proficient cells. Furthermore, MLH1-deficient cells retained the ability to attenuate cell cycle progression past the G2/M checkpoint following lipoplatin treatment. In conclusion, our results indicate that the lipoplatin-sensitive phenotype of MLH1-proficient cells correlated with increased apoptosis which may occur via caspase-independent pathways. They also suggest that the integrity of MMR function is a relevant determinant accounting for the cytotoxicity of lipoplatin. However, this does not seem to apply to lipoxal, a novel liposomal formulation of oxaliplatin, because MLH1-deficient cells were as sensitive to lipoxal as MLH1-proficient cells.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus encoded nuclear protein EBNA-3 binds a novel human uridine kinase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein George

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infects resting B-lymphocytes and transforms them into immortal proliferating lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs in vitro. The transformed immunoblasts may grow up as immunoblastic lymphomas in immuno-suppressed hosts. Results In order to identify cellular protein targets that may be involved in Epstein-Barr virus mediated B-cell transformation, human LCL cDNA library was screened with one of the transformation associated nuclear antigens, EBNA-3 (also called EBNA-3A, using the yeast two-hybrid system. A clone encoding a fragment of a novel human protein was isolated (clone 538. The interaction was confirmed using in vitro binding assays. A full-length cDNA clone (F538 was isolated. Sequence alignment with known proteins and 3D structure predictions suggest that F538 is a novel human uridine kinase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. The GFP-F538 fluorescent fusion protein showed a preferentially cytoplasmic distribution but translocated to the nucleus upon co-expression of EBNA-3. A naturally occurring splice variant of F538, that lacks the C-terminal uracil phosphoribosyltransferase part but maintain uridine kinase domain, did not translocate to the nucleus in the presence of EBNA3. Antibody that was raised against the bacterially produced GST-538 protein showed cytoplasmic staining in EBV negative Burkitt lymphomas but gave a predominantly nuclear staining in EBV positive LCL-s and stable transfected cells expressing EBNA-3. Conclusion We suggest that EBNA-3 by direct protein-potein interaction induces the nuclear accumulation of a novel enzyme, that is part of the ribonucleotide salvage pathway. Increased intranuclear levels of UK/UPRT may contribute to the metabolic build-up that is needed for blast transformation and rapid proliferation.

  2. Rereplication in emi1-deficient zebrafish embryos occurs through a Cdh1-mediated pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara E Robu

    Full Text Available Disruption of early mitotic inhibitor 1 (Emi1 interferes with normal cell cycle progression and results in early embryonic lethality in vertebrates. During S and G2 phases the ubiquitin ligase complex APC/C is inhibited by Emi1 protein, thereby enabling the accumulation of Cyclins A and B so they can regulate replication and promote the transition from G2 phase to mitosis, respectively. Depletion of Emi1 prevents mitotic entry and causes rereplication and an increase in cell size. In this study, we show that the developmental and cell cycle defects caused by inactivation of zebrafish emi1 are due to inappropriate activation of APC/C through its cofactor Cdh1. Inhibiting/slowing progression into S-phase by depleting Cdt1, an essential replication licensing factor, partially rescued emi1 deficiency-induced rereplication and the increased cell size. The cell size effect was enhanced by co-depletion of cell survival regulator p53. These data suggest that the increased size of emi1-deficient cells is either directly or indirectly caused by the rereplication defects. Moreover, enforced expression of Cyclin A partially ablated the rereplicating population in emi1-deficient zebrafish embryos, consistent with the role of Cyclin A in origin licensing. Forced expression of Cyclin B partially restored the G1 population, in agreement with the established role of Cyclin B in mitotic progression and exit. However, expression of Cyclin B also partially inhibited rereplication in emi1-deficient embryos, suggesting a role for Cyclin B in regulating replication in this cellular context. As Cyclin A and B are substrates for APC/C-Cdh1 - mediated degradation, and Cdt1 is under control of Cyclin A, these data indicate that emi1 deficiency-induced defects in vivo are due to the dysregulation of an APC/C-Cdh1 molecular axis.

  3. Bleomycin-Treated Chimeric Thy1-Deficient Mice with Thy1-Deficient Myofibroblasts and Thy-Positive Lymphocytes Resolve Inflammation without Affecting the Fibrotic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazit Y. Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung fibrosis is characterized by abnormal accumulation of fibroblasts in the interstitium of the alveolar space. Two populations of myofibroblasts, distinguished by Thy1 expression, are detected in human and murine lungs. Accumulation of Thy1-negative (Thy1− myofibroblasts was shown in the lungs of humans with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and of bleomycin-treated mice. We aimed to identify genetic changes in lung myofibroblasts following Thy1 crosslinking and assess the impact of specific lung myofibroblast Thy1-deficiency, in vivo, in bleomycin-injured mouse lungs. Thy1 increased in mouse lung lymphocytes following bleomycin injury but decreased in myofibroblasts when fibrosis was at the highest point (14 days, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Using gene chip analysis, we detected that myofibroblast Thy1 crosslinking mediates downregulation of genes promoting cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation, and reduces production of extracellular matrix (ECM components, while concurrently mediating the upregulation of genes known to foster inflammation and immunological functions. Chimeric Thy1-deficient mice with Thy1+ lymphocytes and Thy1− myofibroblasts showed fibrosis similar to wild-type mice and an increased number of CD4/CD25 regulatory T cells, with a concomitant decrease in inflammation. Lung myofibroblasts downregulate Thy1 expression to increase their proliferation but to diminish the in vivo inflammatory milieu. Inflammation is not essential for evolution of fibrosis as was previously stated.

  4. Altered synaptic phospholipid signaling in PRG-1 deficient mice induces exploratory behavior and motor hyperactivity resembling psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patrick; Petzold, Sandra; Sommer, Angela; Nitsch, Robert; Schwegler, Herbert; Vogt, Johannes; Roskoden, Thomas

    2017-08-24

    Plasticity related gene 1 (PRG-1) is a neuron specific membrane protein located at the postsynaptic density of glutamatergic synapses. PRG-1 modulates signaling pathways of phosphorylated lipid substrates such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Deletion of PRG-1 increases presynaptic glutamate release probability leading to neuronal over-excitation. However, due to its cortical expression, PRG-1 deficiency leading to increased glutamatergic transmission is supposed to also affect motor pathways. We therefore analyzed the effects of PRG-1 function on exploratory and motor behavior using homozygous PRG-1 knockout (PRG-1(-/-)) mice and PRG-1/LPA2-receptor double knockout (PRG-1(-/-)/LPA2(-/-)) mice in two open field settings of different size and assessing motor behavior in the Rota Rod test. PRG-1(-/-) mice displayed significantly longer path lengths and higher running speed in both open field conditions. In addition, PRG-1(-/-) mice spent significantly longer time in the larger open field and displayed rearing and self-grooming behavior. Furthermore PRG-1(-/-) mice displayed stereotypical behavior resembling phenotypes of psychiatric disorders in the smaller sized open field arena. Altogether, this behavior is similar to the stereotypical behavior observed in animal models for psychiatric disease of autistic spectrum disorders which reflects a disrupted balance between glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. These differences indicate an altered excitation/inhibition balance in neuronal circuits in PRG-1(-/-) mice as recently shown in the somatosensory cortex [38]. In contrast, PRG-1(-/-)/LPA2(-/-) did not show significant changes in behavior in the open field suggesting that these specific alterations were abolished when the LPA2-receptor was lacking. Our findings indicate that PRG-1 deficiency led to over-excitability caused by an altered LPA/LPA2-R signaling inducing a behavioral phenotype typically observed in animal models for psychiatric disorders. Copyright

  5. NT-3 protein levels are enhanced in the hippocampus of PRG1-deficient mice but remain unchanged in PRG1/LPA2 double mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Sandra; Sommer, Babette; Kröber, Andrea; Nitsch, Robert; Schwegler, Herbert; Vogt, Johannes; Roskoden, Thomas

    2016-01-26

    The plasticity-related gene 1 (PRG1) modulates bioactive lipids at the postsynaptic density and is a novel player in neuronal plasticity and regulation of glutamatergic transmission at principal neurons. PRG1, a neuronal molecule, is highly expressed during development and regeneration processes at the postsynaptic density, modulates synaptic lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels and is related to epilepsy and brain injury. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between the synaptic molecules PRG1 and LPA2R with other plasticity-related molecules the neurotrophins. The protein levels of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 were measured using ELISA in hippocampal tissue of homozygous (PRG(-/-)) and heterozygous (PRG(+/-)) PRG1 deficient mice and compared to their wild type (PRG(+/+)/WT) littermates. In the hippocampus, protein levels of NT-3 were significantly increased in PRG(-/-) mice (compared to WT-litters) while protein levels of NGF and BDNF were not affected. Since PRG1 deficiency leads to increased neuronal excitability and higher hippocampal network activity, which may well influence neurotrophin levels, we further assessed PRG1 deficient mice on an LPA2-receptor (LPA2R) deficient background, reported to normalize hippocampal over-excitability in PRG1(-/-) mice. However, on an LPA2R deficient background, protein levels of NT-3 in PRG1(-/-) mice (PRG1(-/-)/LPA2R(-/-)) were not significantly different when compared to WT animals. Since PRG1 deficient mice showed over-excitability in glutamatergic neurons. This was normalized by additional LPA2R deletion, and we conclude the increased NT3-levels were directly or indirectly attributable to increased hippocampal network activity, possibly exerting a protective effect against over-excitability.

  6. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lore Becker

    Full Text Available Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1 were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  7. Creation of an isogenic P1-deficient mutant of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segada, L M; Lesse, A J

    1997-12-19

    Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius, the causative agent of Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF), expresses a heat-modifiable 48 kDa outer membrane protein, P1, which is conserved in most Brazilian case-clone isolates. To study the role of P1 in pathogenesis of BPF we constructed via homologous recombination an isogenic P1-deficient mutant of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius. The procedure involved a modification of Hererot's method for development of competence. Modifications included variations in the growth conditions, use of cAMP, specific characteristics of the donor DNA, and antibiotic selection. P1-deficient mutants were confirmed by SDS-PAGE, loss of reactivity with a specific monoclonal antibody on Western blot, restriction analysis and Southern blot. Our results establish the first successful transformation of homologous DNA into H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius.

  8. SOCS-1 deficiency does not prevent diet-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Macotela, Yazmin; Boucher, Jérémie

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and increased expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins, which inhibit cytokine and insulin signaling. Thus, reducing SOCS expression could prevent the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. Using SOCS-1 knockout mice, we...... investigated the contribution of SOCS-1 in the development of insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet (HFD). SOCS-1 knockout mice on HFD gained 70% more weight, displayed a 2.3-fold increase in epididymal fat pads mass and increased hepatic lipid content. This was accompanied by increased mRNA expression...... of leptin and the macrophage marker CD68 in white adipose tissue and of SREBP1c and FAS in liver. HFD also induced hyperglycemia in SOCS-1 deficient mice with impairment of glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Thus, despite the role of SOCS proteins in obesity-related insulin resistance, SOCS-1 deficiency...

  9. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun

    2015-01-01

    machinery. A shift to the use of microhomology-based, alternative end-joining (A-EJ) and increased frequencies of intra-S region deletions as well as insertions of inverted S sequences were observed at the recombination junctions amplified from BRCA1-deficient human B cells. Furthermore, increased use...... underlying BRCA1’s function in maintaining genome stability and tumor suppression but may also point to a previously unrecognized role of BRCA1 in B-cell lymphomagenesis....... of long microhomologies was found at recombination junctions derived from E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RNF168-deficient, Fanconi anemia group J protein (FACJ, BRIP1)-deficient, or DNA endonuclease RBBP8 (CtIP)-compromised cells, whereas an increased frequency of S-region inversions was observed in breast...

  10. Natural killer cells eradicate galectin-1-deficient glioma in the absence of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gregory J; Chockley, Peter; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Doherty, Robert; Ritt, Michael; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2014-09-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells safeguard against early tumor formation by destroying transformed target cells in a process referred to as NK immune surveillance. However, the immune escape mechanisms used by malignant brain tumors to subvert this innate type of immune surveillance remain unclear. Here we show that malignant glioma cells suppress NK immune surveillance by overexpressing the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-1. Conversely, galectin-1-deficient glioma cells could be eradicated by host NK cells before the initiation of an antitumor T-cell response. In vitro experiments demonstrated that galectin-1-deficient GL26-Cit glioma cells are ∼3-fold more sensitive to NK-mediated tumor lysis than galectin-1-expressing cells. Our findings suggest that galectin-1 suppression in human glioma could improve patient survival by restoring NK immune surveillance that can eradicate glioma cells. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5079-90. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annio Posar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1 deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity; and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches. During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment.

  12. Runx1 deficiency permits granulocyte lineage commitment but impairs subsequent maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, K. P.; Hu, Z.; Ebrahem, Q; Negrotto, S; Lausen, J.; Saunthararajah, Y

    2013-01-01

    First-hits in the multi-hit process of leukemogenesis originate in germline or hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), yet leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) usually have a lineage-committed phenotype. The molecular mechanisms underlying this compartment shift during leukemia evolution have not been a major focus of investigation and remain poorly understood. Here a mechanism underlying this shift was examined in the context of Runx1 deficiency, a frequent leukemia-initiating event. Lineage-negative c...

  13. Association between coenzyme Q10 and glucose transporter (GLUT1) deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Yubero, Delia; O’Callaghan, Mar; Montero, Raquel; Ormazabal, Aida; Armstrong, Judith; Espinos, Carmina; Rodríguez, Maria A; Jou, Cristina; Castejon, Esperanza; Aracil, Maria A; Cascajo, Maria V; Gavilan, Angela; Briones, Paz; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Pineda, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been demonstrated that glucose transporter (GLUT1) deficiency in a mouse model causes a diminished cerebral lipid synthesis. This deficient lipid biosynthesis could contribute to secondary CoQ deficiency. We report here, for the first time an association between GLUT1 and coenzyme Q10 deficiency in a pediatric patient. Case presentation We report a 15 year-old girl with truncal ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria and myoclonic epilepsy as the main clinical features. Blood lactate ...

  14. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Vikram, E-mail: prasadvm@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Chirra, Shivani [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Kohli, Rohit [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Shull, Gary E. [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  15. First Association of Interleukin 12 Receptor Beta 1 Deficiency with Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Sogkas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionInterleukin 12 receptor beta 1 (IL12Rβ1 deficiency is a primary immunodeficiency resulting mainly in susceptibility to opportunistic infection by non-tuberculous, environmental mycobacteria and severe infection caused by Salmonella spp. Till now, less than 300 patients with IL12Rβ1 deficiency have been reported. Among them, only three have been described to develop autoimmunity.Case presentationWe present the case of a 50-year-old male with IL12Rβ1 deficiency due to compound heterozygosity [c. 1623_1624delGCinsTT (pGln542Stop and c.1791 + 2T > C (donor splice site], who—18 months after diagnosis of disseminated BCGitis—presented with recurrent fever and sicca syndrome. No indication of an infectious origin of these symptoms could be found at that point. The diagnosis of a Sjögren’s syndrome (SS was made on the basis of fulfilled American-European consensus classification criteria, including a positive minor salivary gland biopsy.ConclusionApart from persistent antigenic stimulation, which may drive autoimmune inflammation in primary immunodeficiency, evidence on the involvement of interleukin 12 in pathogenesis of SS suggests that the same immunological mechanism may underlie both defense against infection and the maintenance of tolerance. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of autoimmunity in the form of SS in a patient with a primary immunodeficiency and one of the rare cases of IL12Rβ1 deficiency with manifested autoimmunity.

  16. BRCA1 deficient Mouse Models to Study Pathogenesis and Therapy of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Cruz, Edgar S.; Cabrera, Marina C.; Nakles, Rebecca; Rutstein, Beth H.; Furth, Priscilla A

    2010-01-01

    Genetically engineered mice along with allograft and xenograft models can be used to effectively model triple negative breast cancer both for studies of pathophysiology as well as preclinical prevention and therapeutic drug studies. In this review eight distinct genetically engineered mouse models of BRCA1 deficiency are discussed in relationship to the generation of triple negative mammary cancer. Allograft models derived from some of these genetically engineered mice are considered and xeno...

  17. BRCA1 deficiency increases the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to auranofin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oommen, Deepu [School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Yiannakis, Dennis [Plymouth Oncology Centre, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N., E-mail: a.jha@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • BRCA1 deficient cancer cells exhibit increased DNA damage upon auranofin treatment. • Auranofin induces apoptosis in BRCA1 deficient cancer cells despite the activation of Nrf2. • Antioxidant protects BRCA1 deficient cancer cells from auranofin. - Abstract: Auranofin, a thioredoxin reductase inhibitor and an anti-rheumatic drug is currently undergoing phase 2 clinical studies for repurposing to treat recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Previous studies have established that auranofin exerts its cytotoxic activity by increasing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) is a DNA repair protein whose functional status is critical in the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Apart from its key role in DNA repair, BRCA1 is also known to modulate cellular redox homeostasis by regulating the stability of anti-oxidant transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2—related factor 2 (Nrf2) via direct protein–protein interaction. However, it is currently unknown whether BRCA1 modulates the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to auranofin. Here we report that BRCA1-depleted cells exhibited increased DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and decreased clonogenic cell survival upon auranofin treatment. Interestingly, auranofin induced the expression of Nrf2 in BRCA1-depleted cells suggesting its regulation independent of BRCA1. Furthermore, anti-oxidant agent, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) protected BRCA1-depleted cells from DNA damage and apoptosis induced by auranofin. Our study suggests that accumulated lethal DSBs resulting from the oxidative damage render BRCA1 deficient cells more sensitive to auranofin despite the activation of Nrf2.

  18. Metabolic Effects of CX3CR1 Deficiency in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Shah

    Full Text Available The fractalkine (CX3CL1-CX3CR1 chemokine system is associated with obesity-related inflammation and type 2 diabetes, but data on effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency on metabolic pathways is contradictory. We examined male C57BL/6 Cx3cr1-/- mice on chow and high-fat diet to determine the metabolic effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency. We found no difference in body weight and fat content or feeding and energy expenditure between Cx3cr1-/- and WT mice. Cx3cr1-/- mice had reduced glucose intolerance assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests at chow and high-fat fed states, though there was no difference in glucose-stimulated insulin values. Cx3cr1-/- mice also had improved insulin sensitivity at hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, with higher glucose infusion rate, rate of disposal, and hepatic glucose production suppression compared to WT mice. Enhanced insulin signaling in response to acute intravenous insulin injection was demonstrated in Cx3cr1-/- by increased liver protein levels of phosphorylated AKT and GSK3β proteins. There were no differences in adipose tissue macrophage populations, circulating inflammatory monocytes, adipokines, lipids, or inflammatory markers. In conclusion, we demonstrate a moderate and reproducible protective effect of Cx3cr1 deficiency on glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.

  19. Clk1 deficiency promotes neuroinflammation and subsequent dopaminergic cell death through regulation of microglial metabolic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruinan; Zhang, Fali; Chen, Gang; Han, Chaojun; Liu, Jay; Ren, Zhaoxiang; Zhu, Yi; Waddington, John L; Zheng, Long Tai; Zhen, Xuechu

    2017-02-01

    Clock (Clk)1/COQ7 is a mitochondrial hydroxylase that is necessary for the biosynthesis of ubiquinone (coenzyme Q or UQ). Here, we investigate the role of Clk1 in neuroinflammation and consequentially dopaminergic (DA) neuron survival. Reduced expression of Clk1 in microglia enhanced the LPS-induced proinflammatory response and promoted aerobic glycolysis. Inhibition of glycolysis abolished Clk1 deficiency-induced hypersensitivity to the inflammatory stimulation. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that mTOR/HIF-1α and ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathways were involved in Clk1 deficiency-induced aerobic glycolysis. The increase in neuronal cell death was observed following treatment with conditioned media from Clk1 deficient microglia. Increased DA neuron loss and microgliosis were observed in Clk1(+/-) mice after treatment with MPTP, a rodent model of Parkinson's disease (PD). This increase in DA neuron loss was due to an exacerbated microglial inflammatory response, rather than direct susceptibility of Clk1(+/-) DA cells to MPP(+), the active species of MPTP. Exaggerated expressions of proinflammatory genes and loss of DA neurons were also observed in Clk1(+/-) mice after stereotaxic injection of LPS. Our results suggest that Clk1 regulates microglial metabolic reprogramming that is, in turn, involved in the neuroinflammatory processes and PD.

  20. MCPIP1 deficiency in mice results in severe anemia related to autoimmune mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhou

    Full Text Available Autoimmune gastritis is an organ-specific autoimmune disease of the stomach associated with pernicious anemia. The previous work from us and other groups identified MCPIP1 as an essential factor controlling inflammation and immune homeostasis. MCPIP1(-/- developed severe anemia. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenotype remain unclear. In the present study, we found that MCPIP1 deficiency in mice resulted in severe anemia related to autoimmune mechanisms. Although MCPIP1 deficiency did not affect erythropoiesis per se, the erythropoiesis in MCPIP1(-/- bone marrow erythroblasts was significantly attenuated due to iron and vitamin B12 (VB12 deficiency, which was mainly resulted from autoimmunity-associated gastritis and parietal cell loss. Consistently, exogenous supplement of iron and VB12 greatly improved the anemia phenotype of MCPIP1(-/- mice. Finally, we have evidence suggesting that autoimmune hemolysis may also contribute to anemia phenotype of MCPIP1(-/- mice. Taken together, our study suggests that MCPIP1 deficiency in mice leads to the development of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia. Thus, MCPIP1(-/- mice may be a good mouse model for investigating the pathogenesis of pernicious anemia and testing the efficacy of some potential drugs for treatment of this disease.

  1. Inherited MST1 deficiency underlies susceptibility to EV-HPV infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Crequer

    Full Text Available Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV is characterized by persistent cutaneous lesions caused by a specific group of related human papillomavirus genotypes (EV-HPVs in otherwise healthy individuals. Autosomal recessive (AR EVER1 and EVER2 deficiencies account for two thirds of known cases of EV. AR RHOH deficiency has recently been described in two siblings with EV-HPV infections as well as other infectious and tumoral manifestations. We report here the whole-exome based discovery of AR MST1 deficiency in a 19-year-old patient with a T-cell deficiency associated with EV-HPV, bacterial and fungal infections. MST1 deficiency has recently been described in seven patients from three unrelated kindreds with profound T-cell deficiency and various viral and bacterial infections. The patient was also homozygous for a rare ERCC3 variation. Our findings broaden the clinical range of infections seen in MST1 deficiency and provide a new genetic etiology of susceptibility to EV-HPV infections. Together with the recent discovery of RHOH deficiency, they suggest that T cells are involved in the control of EV-HPVs, at least in some individuals.

  2. A distinct response to endogenous DNA damage in the development of Nbs1-deficient cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Li; Yun-Gui Yang; Yunzhou Gao; Zhao-Qi Wang; Wei-Min Tong

    2012-01-01

    Microcephaly is a clinical characteristic for human nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS,mutated in NBS1 gene),a chromosomal instability syndrome.However,the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains elusive.In the present study,we demonstrate that neuronal disruption ofNBS (Nbn in mice) causes microcephaly characterized by the reduction of cerebral cortex and corpus cailosum,recapitulating neuronal anomalies in human NBS.Nbs1-deficient neocortex shows accumulative endogenous DNA damage and defective activation ofAtaxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR)-Chk1 pathway upon DNA damage.Notably,in contrast to massive apoptotic cell death in Nbs1-deficient cerebella,activation of p53 leads to a defective neuroprogenitor proliferation in neocortex,likely via specific persistent induction of hematopoietic zinc finger (Hzf) that preferentially promotes p53-mediated cell cycle arrest whilst inhibiting apoptosis.Moreover,Trp53 mutations substantially rescue the microcephaly in Nbs1-deficient mice.Thus,the present results reveal the first clue that developing neurons at different regions of brain selectively respond to endogenous DNA damage,and underscore an important role for Nbs1 in neurogenesis.

  3. Nat1 Deficiency Is Associated with Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Exercise Intolerance in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indumathi Chennamsetty

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We recently identified human N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 as an insulin resistance (IR gene. Here, we examine the cellular mechanism linking NAT2 to IR and find that Nat1 (mouse ortholog of NAT2 is co-regulated with key mitochondrial genes. RNAi-mediated silencing of Nat1 led to mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by increased intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial fragmentation as well as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, biogenesis, mass, cellular respiration, and ATP generation. These effects were consistent in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, C2C12 myoblasts, and in tissues from Nat1-deficient mice, including white adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscle. Nat1-deficient mice had changes in plasma metabolites and lipids consistent with a decreased ability to utilize fats for energy and a decrease in basal metabolic rate and exercise capacity without altered thermogenesis. Collectively, our results suggest that Nat1 deficiency results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which may constitute a mechanistic link between this gene and IR.

  4. Mcph1-deficient mice reveal a role for MCPH1 in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Ingham, Neil; Clare, Simon; Raisen, Claire; Vancollie, Valerie E; Ismail, Ozama; McIntyre, Rebecca E; Tsang, Stephen H; Mahajan, Vinit B; Dougan, Gordon; Adams, David J; White, Jacqueline K; Steel, Karen P

    2013-01-01

    Otitis media is a common reason for hearing loss, especially in children. Otitis media is a multifactorial disease and environmental factors, anatomic dysmorphology and genetic predisposition can all contribute to its pathogenesis. However, the reasons for the variable susceptibility to otitis media are elusive. MCPH1 mutations cause primary microcephaly in humans. So far, no hearing impairment has been reported either in the MCPH1 patients or mouse models with Mcph1 deficiency. In this study, Mcph1-deficient (Mcph1(tm1a) (/tm1a) ) mice were produced using embryonic stem cells with a targeted mutation by the Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project. Auditory brainstem response measurements revealed that Mcph1(tm1a) (/tm1a) mice had mild to moderate hearing impairment with around 70% penetrance. We found otitis media with effusion in the hearing-impaired Mcph1(tm1a) (/tm1a) mice by anatomic and histological examinations. Expression of Mcph1 in the epithelial cells of middle ear cavities supported its involvement in the development of otitis media. Other defects of Mcph1(tm1a) (/tm1a) mice included small skull sizes, increased micronuclei in red blood cells, increased B cells and ocular abnormalities. These findings not only recapitulated the defects found in other Mcph1-deficient mice or MCPH1 patients, but also revealed an unexpected phenotype, otitis media with hearing impairment, which suggests Mcph1 is a new gene underlying genetic predisposition to otitis media.

  5. Lipid absorption defects in intestine-specific microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Parks, John S; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2013-10-18

    We have previously described apolipoprotein B (apoB)-dependent and -independent cholesterol absorption pathways and the role of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in these pathways. To assess the contribution of these pathways to cholesterol absorption and to determine whether there are other pathways, we generated mice that lack MTP and ABCA1, individually and in combination, in the intestine. Intestinal deletions of Mttp and Abca1 decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations by 45 and 24%, respectively, whereas their combined deletion reduced it by 59%. Acute cholesterol absorption was reduced by 28% in the absence of ABCA1, and it was reduced by 92-95% when MTP was deleted in the intestine alone or together with ABCA1. MTP deficiency significantly reduced triglyceride absorption, although ABCA1 deficiency had no effect. ABCA1 deficiency did not affect cellular lipids, but Mttp deficiency significantly increased intestinal levels of triglycerides and free fatty acids. Accumulation of intestinal free fatty acids, but not triglycerides, in Mttp-deficient intestines was prevented when mice were also deficient in intestinal ABCA1. Combined deficiency of these genes increased intestinal fatty acid oxidation as a consequence of increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1α (CPT1α). These studies show that intestinal MTP and ABCA1 are critical for lipid absorption and are the main determinants of plasma and intestinal lipid levels. Reducing their activities might lower plasma lipid concentrations.

  6. Differential Distortion of Purine Substrates by Human and Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Catalyse the Formation of Mononucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnawat, Vishakha; Gogia, Spriha; Balaram, Hemalatha; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2015-07-20

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a potential therapeutic target. Compared to structurally homologous human enzymes, it has expanded substrate specificity. In this study, 9-deazapurines are used as in situ probes of the active sites of human and Pf HGPRTs. Through the use of these probes it is found that non-covalent interactions stabilise the pre-transition state of the HGPRT-catalysed reaction. Vibrational spectra reveal that the bound substrates are extensively distorted, the carbonyl bond of nucleobase moiety is weakened and the substrate is destabilised along the reaction coordinate. Raman shifts of the human and Pf enzymes are used to quantify the differing degrees of hydrogen bonding in the homologues. A decreased Raman cross-section in enzyme-bound 9-deazaguanine (9DAG) shows that the phenylalanine residue (Phe186 in human and Phe197 in Pf) of HGPRT stacks with the nucleobase. Differential loss of the Raman cross-section suggests that the active site is more compact in human HGPRT as compared to the Pf enzyme, and is more so in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) complex 9DAG-PRPP-HGPRT than in 9-deazahypoxanthine (9DAH)-PRPP-HGPRT.

  7. Targeted disruption of the mouse adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) gene and the production of APRT-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, S.J.; Chen, J.; Tischfield, J.A. [Indiana Univ., School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT: EC 2.4.2.7), a ubiquitously expressed purine salvage enzyme, catalyzes the synthesis of AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate from existing adenine and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Deficiency of this enzyme in humans results in the accumulation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine leading to crystalluria and nephrolithiasis. In order to facilitate our study of this rare, autosomal recessive disorder, we applied the advances in gene targeting technology and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell culture to the production of APRT-deficient mice. A positive-negative targeting strategy was used. The tageting vector contain 5.6 kb of the mouse APRT gene, a neomycin resistance gene in exon 3 as a positive selection marker, and a HSV thymidine kinase gene at the 3{prime} end of the homology as a negative selection marker. The vector was introduced into D3 ES cells by electroporation and the cells were selected for G418 and ganciclovir (GANC) resistance. G418-GANC resistant clones were screened by Southern blot. One of several correctly targeted clones was expanded and used for blastocyst microinjection to produce chimeric mice. Chimeric animals were bred and agouti progeny heterozygous for the targeted allele were obtained. Heterozygous animals have been bred to produce APRT-deficient animals. Matings are currently underway to determine the phenotype of APRT/HPRT-deficient animals.

  8. Increased Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase and Cystathionine-β-Synthase in Renal Oncocytomas, Renal Urothelial Carcinoma, and Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Rodney E; Abdulsattar, Jehan; Wei, Eric X; Cotelingam, James; Coppola, Domenico; Herrera, Guillermo A

    2017-07-01

    Renal oncocytomas (ROs), and clear cell (RCC) and urothelial carcinomas (UC), are common renal neoplasms. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of NAD(+) synthesis and its expression is increased in several tumors. Nampt concomitantly regulates hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-synthesizing enzyme levels, including cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS). We used tissue microarrays to examine Nampt and the H2S-synthesizing enzyme CBS protein levels in benign kidney, RCC, UC and ROs. Compared to benign kidney, all three neoplasms showed increased Nampt and CBS protein levels, with the levels increasing in RCC at higher Fuhrman grades. H2S is known to ameliorate chronic renal failure but, as yet, no role for H2S in renal neoplasia has been demonstrated. Here, we showed, for the first time, that Nampt, CBS and, likely, H2S likely play a role in malignant and benign neoplastic renal disease. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. RB1 deficiency in triple-negative breast cancer induces mitochondrial protein translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert A.; Robinson, Tyler J.; Liu, Jeff C.; Shrestha, Mariusz; Voisin, Veronique; Ju, YoungJun; Chung, Philip E.D.; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Fell, Victoria L.; Bae, SooIn; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Egan, Sean E.; Jiang, Zhe; Leone, Gustavo; Bader, Gary D.; Schimmer, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) includes basal-like and claudin-low subtypes for which no specific treatment is currently available. Although the retinoblastoma tumor-suppressor gene (RB1) is frequently lost together with TP53 in TNBC, it is not directly targetable. There is thus great interest in identifying vulnerabilities downstream of RB1 that can be therapeutically exploited. Here, we determined that combined inactivation of murine Rb and p53 in diverse mammary epithelial cells induced claudin-low–like TNBC with Met, Birc2/3-Mmp13-Yap1, and Pvt1-Myc amplifications. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that Rb/p53-deficient tumors showed elevated expression of the mitochondrial protein translation (MPT) gene pathway relative to tumors harboring p53 deletion alone. Accordingly, bioinformatic, functional, and biochemical analyses showed that RB1-E2F complexes bind to MPT gene promoters to regulate transcription and control MPT. Additionally, a screen of US Food and Drug Administration–approved (FDA-approved) drugs identified the MPT antagonist tigecycline (TIG) as a potent inhibitor of Rb/p53-deficient tumor cell proliferation. TIG preferentially suppressed RB1-deficient TNBC cell proliferation, targeted both the bulk and cancer stem cell fraction, and strongly attenuated xenograft growth. It also cooperated with sulfasalazine, an FDA-approved inhibitor of cystine xCT antiporter, in culture and xenograft assays. Our results suggest that RB1 deficiency promotes cancer cell proliferation in part by enhancing mitochondrial function and identify TIG as a clinically approved drug for RB1-deficient TNBC. PMID:27571409

  10. Arterial dysfunction but maintained systemic blood pressure in cavin-1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Swärd

    Full Text Available Caveolae are omega-shaped plasma membrane micro-domains that are abundant in cells of the vascular system. Formation of caveolae depends on caveolin-1 and cavin-1 and lack of either protein leads to loss of caveolae. Mice with caveolin-1 deficiency have dysfunctional blood vessels, but whether absence of cavin-1 similarly leads to vascular dysfunction is not known. Here we addressed this hypothesis using small mesenteric arteries from cavin-1-deficient mice. Cavin-1-reporter staining was intense in mesenteric arteries, brain arterioles and elsewhere in the vascular system, with positive staining of both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Arterial expression of cavin-1, -2 and -3 was reduced in knockout (KO arteries as was expression of caveolin-1, -2 and -3. Caveolae were absent in the endothelial and smooth muscle layers of small mesenteric arteries as determined by electron microscopy. Arginase, a negative regulator of nitric oxide production, was elevated in cavin-1 deficient arteries as was contraction in response to the α1-adrenergic agonist cirazoline. Detailed assessment of vascular dimensions revealed increased media thickness and reduced distensibility, arguing that enhanced contraction was due to increased muscle mass. Contrasting with increased α1-adrenergic contraction, myogenic tone was essentially absent and this appeared to be due in part to increased nitric oxide production. Vasomotion was less frequent in the knock-out vessels. In keeping with the opposing influences on arterial resistance of increased agonist-induced contractility and reduced myogenic tone, arterial blood pressure was unchanged in vivo. We conclude that deficiency of cavin-1 affects the function of small arteries, but that opposing influences on arterial resistance balance each other such that systemic blood pressure in unstressed mice is well maintained.

  11. Arginase-1 deficiency regulates arginine concentrations and NOS2-mediated NO production during endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina A P Wijnands

    Full Text Available RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVE: Arginase-1 is an important component of the intricate mechanism regulating arginine availability during immune responses and nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity. In this study Arg1(fl/fl/Tie2-Cre(tg/- mice were developed to investigate the effect of arginase-1 related arginine depletion on NOS2- and NOS3-dependent NO production and jejunal microcirculation under resting and endotoxemic conditions, in mice lacking arginase-1 in endothelial and hematopoietic cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arginase-1-deficient mice as compared with control mice exhibited higher plasma arginine concentration concomitant with enhanced NO production in endothelial cells and jejunal tissue during endotoxemia. In parallel, impaired jejunal microcirculation was observed in endotoxemic conditions. Cultured bone-marrow-derived macrophages of arginase-1 deficient animals also presented a higher inflammatory response to endotoxin than control littermates. Since NOS2 competes with arginase for their common substrate arginine during endotoxemia, Nos2 deficient mice were also studied under endotoxemic conditions. As Nos2(-/- macrophages showed an impaired inflammatory response to endotoxin compared to wild-type macrophages, NOS2 is potentially involved. A strongly reduced NO production in Arg1(fl/fl/Tie2-Cre(tg/- mice following infusion of the NOS2 inhibitor 1400W further implicated NOS2 in the enhanced capacity to produce NO production Arg1(fl/fl/Tie2-Cre(tg/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced arginase-1 activity in Arg1(fl/fl/Tie2-Cre(tg/- mice resulted in increased inflammatory response and NO production by NOS2, accompanied by a depressed microcirculatory flow during endotoxemia. Thus, arginase-1 deficiency facilitates a NOS2-mediated pro-inflammatory activity at the expense of NOS3-mediated endothelial relaxation.

  12. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome effectively treated with modified Atkins diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlandt, Edda; Karall, Daniela; Jud, Veronika; Baumgartner, Sara Sigl; Zotter, Sibylle; Rostasy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    This is a report on the successful treatment of a 6-year-old girl with genetically proven glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) with modified Atkins diet (MAD). GLUT1-DS is an inborn disorder of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier, which leads to energy deficiency of the brain with a broad spectrum of neurological symptoms including therapy-resistant epilepsy. Usually classical ketogenic diet (KD) is the standard treatment for patients with GLUT1-DS. Treatment with MAD, a variant of KD, for an observation period of 17 months resulted in improvement of seizures, alertness, cognitive abilities, and electroencephalography in this patient.

  13. Cholestasis and hypercholesterolemia in SCD1-deficient mice fed a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Matthew T; Groen, Albert K; Oler, Angie Tebon; Keller, Mark P; Choi, Younjeong; Schueler, Kathryn L; Richards, Oliver C; Lan, Hong; Miyazaki, Makoto; Kuipers, Folkert; Kendziorski, Christina M; Ntambi, James M; Attie, Alan D

    2006-12-01

    Stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1-deficient (SCD1(-/-)) mice have impaired MUFA synthesis. When maintained on a very low-fat (VLF) diet, SCD1(-/-) mice developed severe hypercholesterolemia, characterized by an increase in apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins and the appearance of lipoprotein X. The rate of LDL clearance was decreased in VLF SCD1(-/-) mice relative to VLF SCD1(+/+) mice, indicating that reduced apoB-containing lipoprotein clearance contributed to the hypercholesterolemia. Additionally, HDL-cholesterol was dramatically reduced in these mice. The presence of increased plasma bile acids, bilirubin, and aminotransferases in the VLF SCD1(-/-) mice is indicative of cholestasis. Supplementation of the VLF diet with MUFA- and PUFA-rich canola oil, but not saturated fat-rich hydrogenated coconut oil, prevented these plasma phenotypes. However, dietary oleate was not as effective as canola oil in reducing LDL-cholesterol, signifying a role for dietary PUFA deficiency in the development of this phenotype. These results indicate that the lack of SCD1 results in an increased requirement for dietary unsaturated fat to compensate for impaired MUFA synthesis and to prevent hypercholesterolemia and hepatic dysfunction. Therefore, endogenous MUFA synthesis is essential during dietary unsaturated fat insufficiency and influences the dietary requirement of PUFA.

  14. Cardiomyopathy as presenting sign of glycogenin-1 deficiency-report of three cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg-Oldfors, Carola; Glamuzina, Emma; Ruygrok, Peter; Anderson, Lisa J; Elliott, Perry; Watkinson, Oliver; Occleshaw, Chris; Abernathy, Malcolm; Turner, Clinton; Kingston, Nicola; Murphy, Elaine; Oldfors, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We describe a new type of cardiomyopathy caused by a mutation in the glycogenin-1 gene (GYG1). Three unrelated male patients aged 34 to 52 years with cardiomyopathy and abnormal glycogen storage on endomyocardial biopsy were homozygous for the missense mutation p.Asp102His in GYG1. The mutated glycogenin-1 protein was expressed in cardiac tissue but had lost its ability to autoglucosylate as demonstrated by an in vitro assay and western blot analysis. It was therefore unable to form the primer for normal glycogen synthesis. Two of the patients showed similar patterns of heart dilatation, reduced ejection fraction and extensive late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. These two patients were severely affected, necessitating cardiac transplantation. The cardiomyocyte storage material was characterized by large inclusions of periodic acid and Schiff positive material that was partly resistant to alpha-amylase treatment consistent with polyglucosan. The storage material had, unlike normal glycogen, a partly fibrillar structure by electron microscopy. None of the patients showed signs or symptoms of muscle weakness but a skeletal muscle biopsy in one case revealed muscle fibres with abnormal glycogen storage. Glycogenin-1 deficiency is known as a rare cause of skeletal muscle glycogen storage disease, usually without cardiomyopathy. We demonstrate that it may also be the cause of severe cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure without skeletal muscle weakness. GYG1 should be included in cardiomyopathy gene panels.

  15. Loss of Hep Par 1 immunoreactivity in the livers of patients with carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Maki; Kataoka, Tatsuki R; Shibayama, Takahiro; Fukuda, Akinari; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Sakurai, Takaki; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Yorifuji, Toru; Kasahara, Mureo; Uemoto, Shinji; Haga, Hironori

    2016-06-01

    The hepatocyte paraffin 1 (Hep Par 1) antibody is widely used as a hepatocyte marker, recognizing carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1), an essential component of the urea cycle. Various missense, nonsense, and frameshift mutations occur in the CPS1 gene. In neonatal patients with homozygous CPS1 deficiency (CPS1D), urea cycle defects with resulting severe hyperammonemia can be fatal, though liver transplantation provides a complete cure for CPS1D. We performed Hep Par 1 immunostaining in the explanted livers of 10 liver transplant patients with CPS1D. Seven were negative for Hep Par 1 in the hepatocytes and the other three showed normal diffuse granular cytoplasmic staining. As expected, all three Hep Par 1-positive patients had at least one missense mutation, and all four patients who had only nonsense or frameshift mutations were Hep Par 1-negative. The other three patients were unexpectedly negative for Hep Par 1, even though each had one missense mutation. These results suggest that CPS1D can be related to the loss of Hep Par 1 reactivity due to the loss of protein production, a one amino acid substitution resulting in an abortive protein product, or both. Hep Par 1 immunohistochemistry can be used as a simple method to confirm CPS1D. © 2016 The Authors Pathology International published by Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. T cells from Programmed Death-1 deficient mice respond poorly to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

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    Sultan Tousif

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Programmed Death-1 (PD-1; CD279 receptor molecule is widely believed to be a negative regulator predominantly expressed by exhausted/activated mouse T cells. Upon interaction with its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, PD-1 inhibits activation of T cells and cytokine production, which has been documented in various viral and fungal infections as well as in vitro studies. Therefore, inhibition of T cell responses by PD-1 resulted in disease resistance in a variety of mouse infection models studied heretofore. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that PD-1 deficient (PD-1(-/- mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb H37Rv by the aerosol route have increased susceptibility as compared with their wild type littermates. Surprisingly, M. tb antigen-specific T cell proliferation was dramatically reduced in PD-1 deficient animals compared with wild-type littermates, and this was due to increased numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs and recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, PD-1(-/- mice exhibited decreases in the autophagy-induced LC3-B marker protein in macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that PD-1 does not play an inhibitory role during M. tb infection and instead promotes mycobacterial clearance in mice.

  17. ATR pathway inhibition is synthetically lethal in cancer cells with ERCC1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Kavanaugh, Gina M.; Cortez, David

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR and its effector kinase CHEK1 are required for cancer cells to survive oncogene-induced replication stress. ATR inhibitors exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with deficiencies in the DNA damage response enzymes ATM and XRCC1 and with overexpression of the cell cycle kinase Cyclin E. Here we report a systematic screen to identify synthetic lethal interactions with ATR-pathway targeted drugs, rationalized by their predicted therapeutic utility in the oncology clinic. We found that reduced function in the ATR pathway itself provided the strongest synthetic lethal interaction. In addition, we found that loss of the structure specific-endonuclease ERCC1-XPF (ERCC4) is synthetic lethal with ATR pathway inhibitors. ERCC1-deficient cells exhibited elevated levels of DNA damage, which was increased further by ATR inhibition. When treated with ATR or CHEK1 inhibitors, ERCC1-deficient cells arrested in S phase and failed to complete cell cycle transit even after drug removal. Notably, triple-negative breast cancer cells and non-small cell lung cancer cells depleted of ERCC1 exhibited increased sensitivity to ATR-pathway targeted drugs. Overall, we concluded that ATR pathway-targeted drugs may offer particular utility in cancers with reduced ATR pathway function or reduced levels of ERCC4 activity. PMID:24662920

  18. GLUT-1 DEFICIENCY: FROM PATHOPHYSILOGY AND GENETICS TO ABROAD CLINICAL SPECTRUM

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    Arsov Todor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The classical GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS, De Vivo disease was described over 2 decades ago as a metabolic encephalopathy characterized by developmental delay, secondary microcephaly paroxysmal neurological symptoms (epilepsy and movement disorders. The biochemical parameters of this disease, used in diagnosis, are low levels of glucose in the cerebrospinal fluid, normal level of glucose in the blood and consequent low ratio of cerebrospinal fluid vs. blood glucose levels (<40-45%. So far, more than 200 cases of the classical GLUT-1 DS have been described in the literature. Genetic research demonstrated that this disease is caused by mutations in SLC2A1 gene coding for GLUT-1, a transporter of glucose across the blood brain barrier. Over the last few years the clinical spectrum of GLUT-1 deficiencywas expanded to include other rare diseases such as paroxysmal exertional dyskinesia and early-onset absence epilepsy, but also some more common diseases such as idiopathic generalised epilepsy (1-2%. GLUT-1 deficiency is an important pathophysiological basis of these diseases as early diagnosis (aided by DNA mutation testing and treatment (ketogenic diet could lead to improved disease outcomes.

  19. Partial absence of pleuropericardial membranes in Tbx18- and Wt1-deficient mice.

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    Julia Norden

    Full Text Available The pleuropericardial membranes are fibro-serous walls that separate the pericardial and pleural cavities and anchor the heart inside the mediastinum. Partial or complete absence of pleuropericardial membranes is a rare human disease, the etiology of which is poorly understood. As an attempt to better understand these defects, we wished to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms directing the separation of pericardial and pleural cavities by pleuropericardial membranes in the mouse. We found by histological analyses that both in Tbx18- and Wt1-deficient mice the pleural and pericardial cavities communicate due to a partial absence of the pleuropericardial membranes in the hilus region. We trace these defects to a persisting embryonic connection between these cavities, the pericardioperitoneal canals. Furthermore, we identify mesenchymal ridges in the sinus venosus region that tether the growing pleuropericardial membranes to the hilus of the lung, and thus, close the pericardioperitoneal canals. In Tbx18-deficient embryos these mesenchymal ridges are not established, whereas in Wt1-deficient embryos the final fusion process between these tissues and the body wall does not occur. We suggest that this fusion is an active rather than a passive process, and discuss the interrelation between closure of the pericardioperitoneal canals, lateral release of the pleuropericardial membranes from the lateral body wall, and sinus horn development.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Stuart T; Midwinter, Robyn G; Coupland, Lucy A; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Chong, Beng H; Parish, Christopher R; Stocker, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119(+)-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119(+)-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes.

  1. The housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT regulates multiple developmental and metabolic pathways of murine embryonic stem cell neuronal differentiation.

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    Tae Hyuk Kang

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which mutations of the purinergic housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT cause the severe neurodevelopmental Lesch Nyhan Disease (LND are poorly understood. The best recognized neural consequences of HPRT deficiency are defective basal ganglia expression of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA and aberrant DA neuronal function. We have reported that HPRT deficiency leads to dysregulated expression of multiple DA-related developmental functions and cellular signaling defects in a variety of HPRT-deficient cells, including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells. We now describe results of gene expression studies during neuronal differentiation of HPRT-deficient murine ESD3 embryonic stem cells and report that HPRT knockdown causes a marked switch from neuronal to glial gene expression and dysregulates expression of Sox2 and its regulator, genes vital for stem cell pluripotency and for the neuronal/glial cell fate decision. In addition, HPRT deficiency dysregulates many cellular functions controlling cell cycle and proliferation mechanisms, RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, replication stress, lysosome function, membrane trafficking, signaling pathway for platelet activation (SPPA multiple neurotransmission systems and sphingolipid, sulfur and glycan metabolism. We propose that the neural aberrations of HPRT deficiency result from combinatorial effects of these multi-system metabolic errors. Since some of these aberrations are also found in forms of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, we predict that some of these systems defects play similar neuropathogenic roles in diverse neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases in common and may therefore provide new experimental opportunities for clarifying pathogenesis and for devising new potential therapeutic targets in developmental and genetic disease.

  2. Runx1 deficiency permits granulocyte lineage commitment but impairs subsequent maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K P; Hu, Z; Ebrahem, Q; Negrotto, S; Lausen, J; Saunthararajah, Y

    2013-11-04

    First-hits in the multi-hit process of leukemogenesis originate in germline or hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), yet leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) usually have a lineage-committed phenotype. The molecular mechanisms underlying this compartment shift during leukemia evolution have not been a major focus of investigation and remain poorly understood. Here a mechanism underlying this shift was examined in the context of Runx1 deficiency, a frequent leukemia-initiating event. Lineage-negative cells isolated from the bone marrow of Runx1-haploinsufficient and wild-type control mice were cultured in granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor to force lineage commitment. Runx1-haploinsufficient cells demonstrated significantly greater and persistent exponential cell growth than wild-type controls. Not surprisingly, the Runx1-haploinsufficient cells were differentiation-impaired, by morphology and by flow-cytometric evaluation for granulocyte differentiation markers. Interestingly, however, this impaired differentiation was not because of decreased granulocyte lineage commitment, as RNA and protein upregulation of the master granulocyte lineage-commitment transcription factor Cebpa, and Hoxb4 repression, was similar in wild-type and Runx1-haploinsufficient cells. Instead, RNA and protein expression of Cebpe, a key driver of progressive maturation after lineage commitment, were significantly decreased in Runx1-haploinsufficient cells. Primary acute myeloid leukemia cells with normal cytogenetics and RUNX1 mutation also demonstrated this phenotype of very high CEBPA mRNA expression but paradoxically low expression of CEBPE, a CEBPA target gene. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses suggested a molecular mechanism for this phenotype: in wild-type cells, Runx1 binding was substantially greater at the Cebpe than at the Cebpa enhancer. Furthermore, Runx1 deficiency substantially diminished high-level Runx1 binding at the Cebpe enhancer, but lower-level binding at the Cebpa

  3. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance.

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    Birgitte Holst

    Full Text Available Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1 as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of

  4. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Birgitte; Madsen, Kenneth L; Jansen, Anna M; Jin, Chunyu; Rickhag, Mattias; Lund, Viktor K; Jensen, Morten; Bhatia, Vikram; Sørensen, Gunnar; Madsen, Andreas N; Xue, Zhichao; Møller, Siri K; Woldbye, David; Qvortrup, Klaus; Huganir, Richard; Stamou, Dimitrios; Kjærulff, Ole; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of peptidergic endocrine

  5. Genetic KCa3.1-deficiency produces locomotor hyperactivity and alterations in cerebral monoamine levels.

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    Kate Lykke Lambertsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The calmodulin/calcium-activated K(+ channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the open field test, KCa3.1-deficiency increased horizontal activity, as KCa3.1(-/- mice travelled longer distances (≈145% of KCa3.1(+/+ and at higher speed (≈1.5-fold of KCa3.1(+/+. Working memory in the Y-maze was reduced by KCa3.1-deficiency. Motor coordination on the rotarod and neuromuscular functions were unchanged. In KCa3.1(-/- mice, HPLC analysis revealed that turn-over rates of serotonin were reduced in frontal cortex, striatum and brain stem, while noradrenalin turn-over rates were increased in the frontal cortex. Dopamine turn-over rates were unaltered. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels were unaltered. Intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg/kg of the KCa3.1/KCa2-activator SKA-31 reduced rearing and turning behavior in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice, while 30 mg/kg SKA-31 caused strong sedation in 50% of the animals of either genotypes. KCa3.1(-/- mice were hyperactive (≈+60% in their home cage and SKA-31-administration reduced nocturnal physical activity in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: KCa3.1-deficiency causes locomotor hyperactivity and altered monoamine levels in selected brain regions, suggesting a so far unknown functional link of KCa3.1 channels to behavior and monoaminergic neurotransmission in mice. The tranquilizing effects of low-dose SKA-31 raise the possibility to use KCa3.1/KCa2 channels as novel pharmacological targets for the treatment of neuropsychiatric hyperactivity disorders.

  6. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane

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    Townsend MH

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Michelle H Townsend, Michael D Anderson, Evita G Weagel, Edwin J Velazquez, K Scott Weber, Richard A Robison, Kim L O’Neill Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA Abstract: In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X

  7. Structural and kinetic studies of the allosteric transition in Sulfolobus solfataricus uracil phosphoribosyltransferase: Permanent activation by engineering of the C-terminus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Stig; Kadziola, Anders; Johansson, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the conversion of 5-phosphoribosyl- a-1-diphosphate (PRPP) and uracil to uridine monophosphate (UMP) and diphosphate (PPi). The tetrameric enzyme from Sulfolobus solfataricus has a unique type of allosteric regulation by cytidine triphosphate (CTP......) and guanosine triphosphate (GTP). Here we report two structures of the activated state in complex with GTP. One structure (refined at 2.8-Å resolution) contains PRPP in all active sites, while the other structure (refined at 2.9-Å resolution) has PRPP in two sites and the hydrolysis products, ribose-5-phosphate...

  8. EEG findings during "paroxysmal hemiplegia" in a patient with GLUT1-deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, S; Cantalupo, G; Opri, R; Dalla Bernardina, B; Darra, F

    2017-05-01

    A growing number of studies have disclosed the myriad of features that can suggest the diagnosis of a Glucose-transporter-1 deficiency (GLUT1D). The occurrence of paroxysmal movement disorders such as exercise-induced dystonia and non-kinesigenic dyskinesia, received considerable emphasis, while limited attention has been paid to other paroxysmal phenomena, as transitory neurological disorders. These paroxysmal events are roughly and variably described as limb weakness, hemiparesis or ataxia. Their EEG correlate has been never documented. We report the EEG pattern characterizing two acute episodes of paroxysmal paresis with confusion and aphasia, in a girl with GLUT1D. The EEG picture is characterized by a clear-cut contralateral EEG slowing, similar to what is observed in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood and Hemiplegic Migraine attacks. In our patient the paroxysmal events were responsive to a ketogenic diet. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Upstream SLC2A1 translation initiation causes GLUT1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Michèl A; Vissers, Lisenka Elm; Verbeek, Marcel M; van Bon, Bregje W; Geuer, Sinje; Gilissen, Christian; Klepper, Joerg; Kwint, Michael P; Leen, Wilhelmina G; Pennings, Maartje; Wevers, Ron A; Veltman, Joris A; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan

    2017-06-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) is a neurometabolic disorder with a complex phenotypic spectrum but simple biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid. The disorder is caused by impaired glucose transport into the brain resulting from variants in SCL2A1. In 10% of GLUT1DS patients, a genetic diagnosis can not be made. Using whole-genome sequencing, we identified a de novo 5'-UTR variant in SLC2A1, generating a novel translation initiation codon, severely compromising SLC2A1 function. This finding expands our understanding of the disease mechanisms underlying GLUT1DS and encourages further in-depth analysis of SLC2A1 non-coding regions in patients without variants in the coding region.

  10. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Madsen, Kenneth L; Jansen, Anna M;

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here...... was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported...... dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus...

  11. Ectopic Runx1 expression rescues Tal-1-deficiency in the generation of primitive and definitive hematopoiesis.

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    Julia Tornack

    Full Text Available The transcription factors SCL/Tal-1 and AML1/Runx1 control the generation of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells (pHSC and, thereby, primitive and definitive hematopoiesis, during embryonic development of the mouse from mesoderm. Thus, Runx1-deficient mice generate primitive, but not definitive hematopoiesis, while Tal-1-deficient mice are completely defective. Primitive as well as definitive hematopoiesis can be developed "in vitro" from embryonic stem cells (ESC. We show that wild type, as well as Tal-1(-/- and Runx1(-/- ESCs, induced to differentiation, all expand within 5 days to comparable numbers of Flk1(+ mesodermal cells. While wild type ESCs further differentiate to primitive and definitive erythrocytes, to c-fms(+Gr1(+Mac1(+ myeloid cells, and to B220(+CD19(+ B- and CD4(+/CD8(+ T-lymphoid cells, Runx1(-/- ESCs, as expected, only develop primitive erythrocytes, and Tal-1(-/- ESCs do not generate any hematopoietic cells. Retroviral transduction with Runx1 of Runx1(-/- ESCs, differentiated for 4 days to mesoderm, rescues definitive erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis, though only with 1-10% of the efficiencies of wild type ESC hematopoiesis. Surprisingly, Tal-1(-/- ESCs can also be rescued at comparably low efficiencies to primitive and definitive erythropoiesis, and to myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis by retroviral transduction with Runx1. These results suggest that Tal-1 expression is needed to express Runx1 in mesoderm, and that ectopic expression of Runx1 in mesoderm is sufficient to induce primitive as well as definitive hematopoiesis in the absence of Tal-1. Retroviral transduction of "in vitro" differentiating Tal-1(-/- and Runx1(-/- ESCs should be a useful experimental tool to probe selected genes for activities in the generation of hematopoietic progenitors "in vitro", and to assess the potential transforming activities in hematopoiesis of mutant forms of Tal-1 and Runx1 from acute myeloid leukemia and related tumors.

  12. Derivative chromosome 1 and GLUT1 deficiency syndrome in a sibling pair

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    Akarsu Nurten

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imbalances constitute a major cause of congenital and developmental abnormalities. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is caused by various de novo mutations in the facilitated human glucose transporter 1 gene (1p34.2 and patients with this syndrome have been diagnosed with hypoglycorrhachia, mental and developmental delay, microcephaly and seizures. Furthermore, 1q terminal deletions have been submitted in the recent reports and the absence of corpus callosum has been related to the deletion between C1orf100 and C1orf121 in 1q44. Results This study reports on a sibling pair with developmental delay, mental retardation, microcephaly, hypotonia, epilepsy, facial dysmorphism, ataxia and impaired speech. Chromosome analysis revealed a derivative chromosome 1 in both patients. FISH and MCB analysis showed two interstitial deletions at 1p34.2 and 1q44. SNP array and array-CGH analysis also determined the sizes of deletions detailed. The deleted region on 1p34.2 encompasses 33 genes, among which is GLUT1 gene (SLC2A1. However, the deleted region on 1q44 includes 59 genes and distal-proximal breakpoints were located in the ZNF672 gene and SMYD3 gene, respectively. Conclusion Haploinsufficiency of GLUT1 leads to GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, consistent with the phenotype in patients of this study. Conversely, in the deleted region on 1q44, none of the genes are related to findings in these patients. Additionally, the results confirm previous reports on that corpus callosal development may depend on the critical gene(s lying in 1q44 proximal to the SMYD3 gene.

  13. RAD51AP1-deficiency in vertebrate cells impairs DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parplys, Ann C; Kratz, Katja; Speed, Michael C; Leung, Stanley G; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    RAD51-associated protein 1 (RAD51AP1) is critical for homologous recombination (HR) by interacting with and stimulating the activities of the RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases. In human somatic cells, knockdown of RAD51AP1 results in increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and to impaired HR, but the formation of DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci is unaffected. Here, we generated a genetic model system, based on chicken DT40 cells, to assess the phenotype of fully inactivated RAD51AP1 in vertebrate cells. Targeted inactivation of both RAD51AP1 alleles has no effect on either viability or doubling-time in undamaged cells, but leads to increased levels of cytotoxicity after exposure to cisplatin or to ionizing radiation. Interestingly, ectopic expression of GgRAD51AP1, but not of HsRAD51AP1 is able to fully complement in cell survival assays. Notably, in RAD51AP1-deficient DT40 cells the resolution of DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci is greatly slowed down, while their formation is not impaired. We also identify, for the first time, an important role for RAD51AP1 in counteracting both spontaneous and DNA damage-induced replication stress. In human and in chicken cells, RAD51AP1 is required to maintain wild type speed of replication fork progression, and both RAD51AP1-depleted human cells and RAD51AP1-deficient DT40 cells respond to replication stress by a slow-down of replication fork elongation rates. However, increased firing of replication origins occurs in RAD51AP1-/- DT40 cells, likely to ensure the timely duplication of the entire genome. Taken together, our results may explain why RAD51AP1 commonly is overexpressed in tumor cells and tissues, and we speculate that the disruption of RAD51AP1 function could be a promising approach in targeted tumor therapy.

  14. Delayed onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Olig1 deficient mice.

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    Xiaoli Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Olig1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor that is essential for oligodendrogenesis and efficient remyelination. However, its role in neurodegenerative disorders has not been well-elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the effects of Olig1 deficiency on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. We show that the mean disease onset of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced EAE in Olig1(-/- mice is significantly slower than wide-type (WT mice (19.8 ± 2.2 in Olig1(-/- mice and 9.5 ± 0.3 days in WT mice. In addition, 10% of Olig1(-/- mice did not develop EAE by the end of the observation periods (60 days. The severity of EAE, the extent of demyelination, and the activation of microglial cells and astrocytes in spinal cords, were significantly milder in Olig1(-/- mice compared with WT mice in the early stage. Moreover, the visual function, as assessed by the second-kernel of multifocal electroretinograms, was better preserved, and the number of degenerating axons in the optic nerve was significantly reduced in Olig1(-/- mice. Interestingly, Olig1 deficiency had no effect on T cell response capability, however, it reduced the expression of myelin proteins such as MOG, myelin basic protein (MBP and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG. The expression of Olig2 remained unchanged in the optic nerve and brain, and it was reduced in the spinal cord of Olig1(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the Olig1 signaling pathways may be involved in the incidence rate and the severity of neurological symptoms in MS.

  15. IL-12Rβ1 deficiency in two of fifty children with severe tuberculosis from Iran, Morocco, and Turkey.

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    Stéphanie Boisson-Dupuis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In the last decade, autosomal recessive IL-12Rβ1 deficiency has been diagnosed in four children with severe tuberculosis from three unrelated families from Morocco, Spain, and Turkey, providing proof-of-principle that tuberculosis in otherwise healthy children may result from single-gene inborn errors of immunity. We aimed to estimate the fraction of children developing severe tuberculosis due to IL-12Rβ1 deficiency in areas endemic for tuberculosis and where parental consanguinity is common. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched for IL12RB1 mutations in a series of 50 children from Iran, Morocco, and Turkey. All children had established severe pulmonary and/or disseminated tuberculosis requiring hospitalization and were otherwise normally resistant to weakly virulent BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria. In one child from Iran and another from Morocco, homozygosity for loss-of-function IL12RB1 alleles was documented, resulting in complete IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Despite the small sample studied, our findings suggest that IL-12Rβ1 deficiency is not a very rare cause of pediatric tuberculosis in these countries, where it should be considered in selected children with severe disease. SIGNIFICANCE: This finding may have important medical implications, as recombinant IFN-γ is an effective treatment for mycobacterial infections in IL-12Rβ1-deficient patients. It also provides additional support for the view that severe tuberculosis in childhood may result from a collection of single-gene inborn errors of immunity.

  16. Mitochondrial alterations in PINK1 deficient cells are influenced by calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation of dynamin-related protein 1.

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    Anna Sandebring

    Full Text Available PTEN-induced novel kinase 1 (PINK1 mutations are associated with autosomal recessive parkinsonism. Previous studies have shown that PINK1 influences both mitochondrial function and morphology although it is not clearly established which of these are primary events and which are secondary. Here, we describe a novel mechanism linking mitochondrial dysfunction and alterations in mitochondrial morphology related to PINK1. Cell lines were generated by stably transducing human dopaminergic M17 cells with lentiviral constructs that increased or knocked down PINK1. As in previous studies, PINK1 deficient cells have lower mitochondrial membrane potential and are more sensitive to the toxic effects of mitochondrial complex I inhibitors. We also show that wild-type PINK1, but not recessive mutant or kinase dead versions, protects against rotenone-induced mitochondrial fragmentation whereas PINK1 deficient cells show lower mitochondrial connectivity. Expression of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 exaggerates PINK1 deficiency phenotypes and Drp1 RNAi rescues them. We also show that Drp1 is dephosphorylated in PINK1 deficient cells due to activation of the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. Accordingly, the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 blocks both Drp1 dephosphorylation and loss of mitochondrial integrity in PINK1 deficient cells but does not fully rescue mitochondrial membrane potential. We propose that alterations in mitochondrial connectivity in this system are secondary to functional effects on mitochondrial membrane potential.

  17. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

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    Oosterveer Maaike H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/- mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and quantified lipogenic and lipolytic activities in fat tissues of CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice fed a high-fat (HF or a high-fat/fish oil (HF/FO diet as compared to animals receiving a low-fat chow diet. Comparison between HF diet and HF/FO diet allowed to investigate the influence of dietary fat quality on adipose tissue biology in relation to CB1 functioning. Results The adiposity-resistant phenotype of the CB1-/- mice was characterized by reduced fat mass and adipocyte size in HF and HF/FO-fed CB1-/- mice in parallel to a significant increase in energy expenditure as compared to CB1+/+ mice. The expression levels of adipocyte differentiation and proliferation markers were however maintained in these animals. Consistent with unaltered lipogenic gene expression, the fatty acid synthesis rates in adipose tissues from CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice were unchanged. Whole-body and adipose-specific lipoprotein lipase (LPL activities were also not altered in CB1-/- mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that protection against diet-induced adiposity in CB1-deficient mice is not related to changes in adipocyte function per se, but rather results from increased energy dissipation by oxidative and non-oxidative pathways.

  18. Structural investigation of the biosynthesis of alternative lower ligands for cobamides by nicotinate mononucleotide: 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase from Salmonella enterica.

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    Cheong, C G; Escalante-Semerena, J C; Rayment, I

    2001-10-05

    Nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN):5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase (CobT) from Salmonella enterica plays a central role in the synthesis of alpha-ribazole, a key component of the lower ligand of cobalamin. Surprisingly, CobT can phosphoribosylate a wide range of aromatic substrates, giving rise to a wide variety of lower ligands in cobamides. To understand the molecular basis for this lack of substrate specificity, the x-ray structures of CobT complexed with adenine, 5-methylbenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, p-cresol, and phenol were determined. Furthermore, adenine, 5-methylbenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, and 2-hydroxypurine were observed to react with NaMN within the crystal lattice and undergo the phosphoribosyl transfer reaction to form product. Significantly, the stereochemistries of all products are identical to those found in vivo. Interestingly, p-cresol and phenol, which are the lower ligand in Sporomusa ovata, bound to CobT but did not react with NaMN. This study provides a structural explanation for how CobT can phosphoribosylate most of the commonly observed lower ligands found in cobamides with the exception of the phenolic lower ligands observed in S. ovata. This is accomplished with minor conformational changes in the side chains that constitute the 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole binding site. These investigations are consistent with the implication that the nature of the lower ligand is controlled by metabolic factors rather by the specificity of the phosphoribosyltransferase.

  19. Association of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT Gene Polymorphisms and of Serum NAMPT Levels with Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Chinese Population

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    Qingyu Dou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT has crucial roles for myocardial development, cardiomyocyte energy metabolism and cell death/survival by regulating NAD+-dependent sirtuin-1 (SIRT1 deacetylase. This study aimed to determine if the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the NAMPT gene may affect the susceptibility and prognosis for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM and to describe the association of serum NAMPT levels with clinical features of DCM. Three SNPs (rs61330082, rs2505568, and rs9034 were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in a case-control study of 394 DCM patients and 395 controls from China. Serum NAMPT levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The homozygote for the minor allele at rs2505568 and rs9034 could not be detected in this study. Rs9034 T allele and CT genotype were associated with increased DCM risk (OR: 1.63, 95% CI = 1.16–2.27, p = 0.005 and OR: 1.72, 95% CI = 1.20–2.50, p = 0.0027, respectively. Nominally significant decreased DCM risk was found to be associated with the A allele and AT genotype of rs2505568 (OR: 0.48, 95% CI = 0.35–0.67, p < 0.0001 and OR: 0.44, 95% CI = 0.31–0.62, p < 0.0001, respectively, but it should be interpreted with caution because of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in the control group. Of five haplotypes constructed, TAC (rs61330082-rs2505568-rs9034 was a protective haplotype to DCM (OR: 0.22, 95% CI = 0.13–0.39, p = 1.84 × 10−8. The Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that the rs9034 CT genotype (hazard ratio (HR: 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37–0.96, p = 0.03 was an independently multivariate predictor for longer overall survival in DCM patients. Serum NAMPT levels were significantly higher in the DCM group than controls (p < 0.0001 and gradually increased with the increase of New York Heart Association grade in DCM patients. However, there was a lack of association of the three

  20. Commensal microbiota contributes to chronic endocarditis in TAX1BP1 deficient mice.

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    Satoko Nakano

    Full Text Available Tax1-binding protein 1 (Tax1bp1 negatively regulates NF-κB by editing the ubiquitylation of target molecules by its catalytic partner A20. Genetically engineered TAX1BP1-deficient (KO mice develop age-dependent inflammatory constitutions in multiple organs manifested as valvulitis or dermatitis and succumb to premature death. Laser capture dissection and gene expression microarray analysis on the mitral valves of TAX1BP1-KO mice (8 and 16 week old revealed 588 gene transcription alterations from the wild type. SAA3 (serum amyloid A3, CHI3L1, HP, IL1B and SPP1/OPN were induced 1,180-, 361-, 187-, 122- and 101-fold respectively. WIF1 (Wnt inhibitory factor 1 exhibited 11-fold reduction. Intense Saa3 staining and significant I-κBα reduction were reconfirmed and massive infiltration of inflammatory lymphocytes and edema formation were seen in the area. Antibiotics-induced 'germ free' status or the additional MyD88 deficiency significantly ameliorated TAX1BP1-KO mice's inflammatory lesions. These pathological conditions, as we named 'pseudo-infective endocarditis' were boosted by the commensal microbiota who are usually harmless by their nature. This experimental outcome raises a novel mechanistic linkage between endothelial inflammation caused by the ubiquitin remodeling immune regulators and fatal cardiac dysfunction.

  1. Analysis of metabolic effects of menthol on WFS1-deficient mice.

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    Ehrlich, Marite; Ivask, Marilin; Raasmaja, Atso; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the physiological regulation of energy metabolism in wild-type (WT) and WFS1-deficient (Wfs1KO) mice by measuring the effects of menthol treatment on the O2 consumption, CO2 production, rectal body temperature, and heat production. The basal metabolism and behavior was different between these genotypes as well as TRP family gene expressions. Wfs1KO mice had a shorter life span and weighed less than WT mice. The food and water intake of Wfs1KO mice was lower as well as the body temperature when compared to their WT littermates. Furthermore, Wfs1KO mice had higher basal O2 consumption, and CO2 and heat production than WT mice. In addition, Wfs1KO mice showed a higher response to menthol administration in comparison to WT mice. The strongest menthol effect was seen on different physiological measures 12 h after oral administration. The highest metabolic response of Wfs1KO mice was seen at the menthol dose of 10 mg/kg. Menthol increased O2 consumption, and CO2 and heat production in Wfs1KO mice when compared to their WT littermates. In addition, the expression of Trpm8 gene was increased. In conclusion, our results show that the Wfs1KO mice develop a metabolic phenotype characterized with several physiological dysfunctions.

  2. Novel mutation in a patient with late onset GLUT1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juozapaite, Sandra; Praninskiene, Ruta; Burnyte, Birute; Ambrozaityte, Laima; Skerliene, Birute

    2017-04-01

    Glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by impaired glucose transport through blood brain barrier due to mutation in SLC2A1 gene, encoding transporter protein. Clinical spectrum includes various signs and symptoms, ranging from severe epileptic encephalopathy to movement disorders. The diagnosis of GLUT1-DS requires hypoglycorrhachia in the presence of normoglycaemia with a reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF):plasma glucose ratio. The absence of pathogenic mutation in SLC2A1 gene does not exclude the diagnosis. This case report describes a patient with late onset GLUT1-DS with a novel sporadic mutation c.539T>A, p.Met180Lys in exon 5 of the SLC2A1 gene. The dominating clinical features were epilepsy and paroxysmal dyskinesias provoked by infection, emotional stress and fasting. The ictal EEG was characterized by generalized paroxysmal 3-3.5Hz spike-slow wave complexes (absences). Treatment with ketogenic diet showed clinical improvement with the reduction of paroxysmal dyskinesias. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Brain correlates of spike and wave discharges in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome.

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    Vaudano, Anna Elisabetta; Olivotto, Sara; Ruggieri, Andrea; Gessaroli, Giuliana; De Giorgis, Valentina; Parmeggiani, Antonia; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Meletti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    To provide imaging biomarkers of generalized spike-and-wave discharges (GSWD) in patients with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS). Eighteen GLUT1DS patients with pathogenetic mutation in SLC2A1 gene were studied by means of Video-EEG simultaneously recorded with functional MRI (VideoEEG-fMRI). A control group of sex and age-matched patients affected by Genetic Generalized Epilepsy (GGE) with GSWD were investigated with the same protocol. Within and between groups comparison was performed as appropriated. For GLUT1DS, correlations analyses between the contrast of interest and the main clinical measurements were provided. EEG during fMRI revealed interictal GSWD in 10 GLUT1DS patients. Group-level analysis showed BOLD signal increases at the premotor cortex and putamen. With respect to GGE, GLUT1DS patients demonstrated increased neuronal activity in the putamen, precuneus, cingulate cortex, SMA and paracentral lobule. Whole-brain correlation analyses disclosed a linear relationship between the GSWD-related BOLD changes and the levels of glycorrhachia at diagnosis over the sensory-motor cortex and superior parietal lobuli. The BOLD dynamics related to GSWD in GLUT1DS are substantially different from typical GGE showing the former an increased activity in the premotor-striatal network and a decrease in the thalamus. The revealed hemodynamic maps might represent imaging biomarkers of GLUT1DS, being potentially useful for a precocious diagnosis of this genetic disorder.

  4. Soluble guanylate cyclase α1-deficient mice: a novel murine model for primary open angle glaucoma.

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    Emmanuel S Buys

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The molecular signaling involved in the pathogenesis of POAG remains unknown. Here, we report that mice lacking the α1 subunit of the nitric oxide receptor soluble guanylate cyclase represent a novel and translatable animal model of POAG, characterized by thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer and loss of optic nerve axons in the context of an open iridocorneal angle. The optic neuropathy associated with soluble guanylate cyclase α1-deficiency was accompanied by modestly increased intraocular pressure and retinal vascular dysfunction. Moreover, data from a candidate gene association study suggests that a variant in the locus containing the genes encoding for the α1 and β1 subunits of soluble guanylate cyclase is associated with POAG in patients presenting with initial paracentral vision loss, a disease subtype thought to be associated with vascular dysregulation. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis and genetics of POAG and suggest new therapeutic strategies for POAG.

  5. Syndecan-1 deficiency promotes tumor growth in a murine model of colitis-induced colon carcinoma

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    Binder Gallimidi, Adi; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Hermano, Esther; Weizman, Barak; Meirovitz, Amichay; Vlodavsky, Israel; Götte, Martin; Elkin, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Syndecan-1 (Sdc1) is an important member of the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan family, highly expressed by epithelial cells in adult organisms. Sdc1 is involved in the regulation of cell migration, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, growth-factor, chemokine and integrin activity, and implicated in inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis. Gastrointestinal tract represents an important anatomic site where loss of Sdc1 expression was reported both in inflammation and malignancy. However, the biological significance of Sdc1 in chronic colitis-associated tumorigenesis has not been elucidated. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to test the effects of Sdc1 loss on colorectal tumor development in inflammation-driven colon tumorigenesis. Utilizing a mouse model of colitis-related colon carcinoma induced by the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM), followed by the inflammatory agent dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), we found that Sdc1 deficiency results in increased susceptibility to colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Importantly, colitis-associated tumors developed in Sdc1-defficient mice were characterized by increased local production of IL-6, activation of STAT3, as well as induction of several STAT3 target genes that act as important effectors of colonic tumorigenesis. Altogether, our results highlight a previously unknown effect of Sdc1 loss in progression of inflammation-associated cancer and suggest that decreased levels of Sdc1 may serve as an indicator of colon carcinoma progression in the setting of chronic inflammation. PMID:28350804

  6. BACE1 Deficiency Causes Abnormal Neuronal Clustering in the Dentate Gyrus

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    Hailong Hou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACE1 is validated as Alzheimer's β-secretase and a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease. In examining BACE1-null mice, we discovered that BACE1 deficiency develops abnormal clusters of immature neurons, forming doublecortin-positive neuroblasts, in the developing dentate gyrus, mainly in the subpial zone (SPZ. Such clusters were rarely observed in wild-type SPZ and not reported in other mouse models. To understand their origins and fates, we examined how neuroblasts in BACE1-null SPZ mature and migrate during early postnatal development. We show that such neuroblasts are destined to form Prox1-positive granule cells in the dentate granule cell layer, and mainly mature to form excitatory neurons, but not inhibitory neurons. Mechanistically, higher levels of reelin potentially contribute to abnormal neurogenesis and timely migration in BACE1-null SPZ. Altogether, we demonstrate that BACE1 is a critical regulator in forming the dentate granule cell layer through timely maturation and migration of SPZ neuroblasts.

  7. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Madsen, Kenneth L; Jansen, Anna M

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here...... for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of peptidergic endocrine cells and support an important role of PICK1/ICA69 in maintenance of metabolic homeostasis.......Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here......, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation...

  8. Wip1 Deficiency Promotes Neutrophil Recruitment to the Infection Site and Improves Sepsis Outcome.

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    Shen, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Yang; Cao, Ke; Guan, Wen-Xian; Li, Xue; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Yong; Ding, Yi-Tao; Du, Jun-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as an uncontrolled host response to infection, and no specific therapy or drugs have been used in clinical trials currently. Discovering new therapeutic targets for sepsis treatment has always been a central problem in the field of sepsis research. Neutrophils stand at the first line in controlling infection and have been identified to be dysregulated with impaired migration and antimicrobial function during sepsis. Based on our previous results on demonstrating wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 in controlling neutrophil development, we explored the possible relationship among Wip1, neutrophils, and sepsis in the present study. Wip1-deficient mice exhibited improved outcomes in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis model with enhanced bacterial clearance and less multi-organ damage. The protection seen in Wip1 KO mice was mainly due to an increased accumulation of neutrophils in the primary infectious locus mediated by the decreased internalization of CXCR2, as well as by an increased antimicrobial function. Additionally, we also identified a negative correlation between CXCR2 and Wip1 in human neutrophils during sepsis. Pharmacological inhibition of Wip1 with its inhibitor can also prevent the internalization of CXCR2 on human neutrophils treated with lipopolysaccharides in vitro and significantly improve the outcome in CLP-induced sepsis model. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Wip1 can negatively regulate neutrophil migration and antimicrobial immunity during sepsis and inhibition of Wip1 can be a potential therapeutic target for sepsis treatment.

  9. Occurrence of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome in patients treated with ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm-Pettersen, Anette; Nakken, Karl O; Haavardsholm, Kathrine Cammermeyer; Selmer, Kaja Kristine

    2014-03-01

    Glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is a treatable metabolic encephalopathy caused by a mutation in the SLC2A1 gene. This mutation causes a compromised transport of glucose across the blood-brain barrier. The treatment of choice is ketogenic diet, with which most patients become seizure-free. At the National Centre for Epilepsy, we have, since 2005, offered treatment with ketogenic diet (KD) and modified Atkins diet (MAD) to children with difficult-to-treat epilepsy. As we believe many children with GLUT1-DS are unrecognized, the aim of this study was to search for patients with GLUT1-DS among those who had been responders (>50% reduction in seizure frequency) to KD or MAD. Of the 130 children included, 58 (44%) were defined as responders. Among these, 11 were already diagnosed with GLUT1-DS. No mutations in the SLC2A1 gene were detected in the remaining patients. However, the clinical features of these patients differed considerably from the patients diagnosed with GLUT1-DS. While 9 out of 10 patients with GLUT1-DS became seizure-free with dietary treatment, only 3 out of the 33 remaining patients were seizure-free with KD or MAD treatment. We therefore conclude that a seizure reduction of >50% following dietary treatment is not a suitable criterion for identifying patients with GLUT1-DS, as these patients generally achieve complete seizure freedom shortly after diet initiation.

  10. Sod1 deficiency reduces incubation time in mouse models of prion disease.

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    Shaheen Akhtar

    Full Text Available Prion infections, causing neurodegenerative conditions such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep and BSE in cattle are characterised by prolonged and variable incubation periods that are faithfully reproduced in mouse models. Incubation time is partly determined by genetic factors including polymorphisms in the prion protein gene. Quantitative trait loci studies in mice and human genome-wide association studies have confirmed that multiple genes are involved. Candidate gene approaches have also been used and identified App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 as affecting incubation times. In this study we looked for an association between App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 representative SNPs and prion disease incubation time in the Northport heterogeneous stock of mice inoculated with the Chandler/RML prion strain. No association was seen with App, however, significant associations were seen with Il1-r1 (P = 0.02 and Sod1 (P<0.0001 suggesting that polymorphisms at these loci contribute to the natural variation observed in incubation time. Furthermore, following challenge with Chandler/RML, ME7 and MRC2 prion strains, Sod1 deficient mice showed highly significant reductions in incubation time of 20, 13 and 24%, respectively. No differences were detected in Sod1 expression or activity. Our data confirm the protective role of endogenous Sod1 in prion disease.

  11. DJ-1 deficiency in astrocytes selectively enhances mitochondrial Complex I inhibitor-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullett, Steven J; Hinkle, David A

    2011-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) brains show evidence of mitochondrial respiratory Complex I deficiency, oxidative stress, and neuronal death. Complex I-inhibiting neurotoxins, such as the pesticide rotenone, cause neuronal death and parkinsonism in animal models. We have previously shown that DJ-1 over-expression in astrocytes augments their capacity to protect neurons against rotenone, that DJ-1 knock-down impairs astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection against rotenone, and that each process involves astrocyte-released factors. To further investigate the mechanism behind these findings, we developed a high-throughput, plate-based bioassay that can be used to assess how genetic manipulations in astrocytes affect their ability to protect co-cultured neurons. We used this bioassay to show that DJ-1 deficiency-induced impairments in astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection occur solely in the presence of pesticides that inhibit Complex I (rotenone, pyridaben, fenazaquin, and fenpyroximate); not with agents that inhibit Complexes II-V, that primarily induce oxidative stress, or that inhibit the proteasome. This is a potentially PD-relevant finding because pesticide exposure is epidemiologically-linked with an increased risk for PD. Further investigations into our model suggested that astrocytic GSH and heme oxygenase-1 antioxidant systems are not central to the neuroprotective mechanism. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Modified Atkins diet therapy for a case with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Ito, Yasushi; Ishigaki, Keiko; Ohinata, Junko; Osawa, Makiko

    2008-03-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS), giving rise to impaired glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier, is characterized by infantile seizures, complex motor disorders, global developmental delay, acquired microcephaly, and hypoglycorrhachia. GLUT-1 DS can be treated effectively with a ketogenic diet because it can provide an alternative fuel for brain metabolism; however, the excessive restriction of food intake involved frequently makes it difficult for patients to initiate or continue the diet. Recently, the modified Atkins diet, which is much less restrictive in terms of the total calorie and protein intake than the classical ketogenic diet, has been shown to be effective and well tolerated in children with intractable epilepsy. We successfully introduced the modified Atkins diet to a 7-year-old boy with GLUT-1 DS, whose caregivers refused ketogenic diet treatment because of strong concerns over restricting the diet. The modified Atkins diet should be considered for patients with GLUT-1 DS as an alternative to the traditional ketogenic diet.

  13. Genetic modifiers of abnormal organelle biogenesis in a Drosophila model of BLOC-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheli, Verónica T; Daniels, Richard W; Godoy, Ruth; Hoyle, Diego J; Kandachar, Vasundhara; Starcevic, Marta; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Poole, Stephen; DiAntonio, Aaron; Lloyd, Vett K; Chang, Henry C; Krantz, David E; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C

    2010-03-01

    Biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex 1 (BLOC-1) is a protein complex formed by the products of eight distinct genes. Loss-of-function mutations in two of these genes, DTNBP1 and BLOC1S3, cause Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, a human disorder characterized by defective biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles. In addition, haplotype variants within the same two genes have been postulated to increase the risk of developing schizophrenia. However, the molecular function of BLOC-1 remains unknown. Here, we have generated a fly model of BLOC-1 deficiency. Mutant flies lacking the conserved Blos1 subunit displayed eye pigmentation defects due to abnormal pigment granules, which are lysosome-related organelles, as well as abnormal glutamatergic transmission and behavior. Epistatic analyses revealed that BLOC-1 function in pigment granule biogenesis requires the activities of BLOC-2 and a putative Rab guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor named Claret. The eye pigmentation phenotype was modified by misexpression of proteins involved in intracellular protein trafficking; in particular, the phenotype was partially ameliorated by Rab11 and strongly enhanced by the clathrin-disassembly factor, Auxilin. These observations validate Drosophila melanogaster as a powerful model for the study of BLOC-1 function and its interactions with modifier genes.

  14. Atrogin-1 Deficiency Leads to Myopathy and Heart Failure in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Bühler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orchestrated protein synthesis and degradation is fundamental for proper cell function. In muscle, impairment of proteostasis often leads to severe cellular defects finally interfering with contractile function. Here, we analyze for the first time the role of Atrogin-1, a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase known to be involved in the regulation of protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome and the autophagy/lysosome systems, in the in vivo model system zebrafish (Danio rerio. We found that targeted inactivation of zebrafish Atrogin-1 leads to progressive impairment of heart and skeletal muscle function and disruption of muscle structure without affecting early cardiogenesis and skeletal muscle development. Autophagy is severely impaired in Atrogin-1-deficient zebrafish embryos resulting in the disturbance of the cytoarchitecture of cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle cells. These observations are consistent with molecular and ultrastructural findings in an Atrogin-1 knockout mouse and demonstrate that the zebrafish is a suitable vertebrate model to study the molecular mechanisms of Atrogin-1-mediated autophagic muscle pathologies and to screen for novel therapeutically active substances in high-throughput in vivo small compound screens (SCS.

  15. Movement disorders in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome respond to the modified Atkins diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G; Mewasingh, Leena; Verbeek, Marcel M; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Willemsen, Michel A

    2013-09-01

    Movement disorders are a prominent feature of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS). First-choice treatment is a ketogenic diet, but compliance is poor. We have investigated the effect of the modified Atkins diet as an alternative treatment for movement disorders in GLUT1DS. Four patients with GLUT1DS ages 15 to 30 years who had movement disorders as the most prominent feature were prospectively evaluated after initiation of the modified Atkins diet. Movement disorders included dystonia, ataxia, myoclonus, and spasticity, either continuous or paroxysmal, triggered by action or exercise. Duration of treatment ranged from 3 months to 16 months. All patients reached mild to moderate ketosis and experienced remarkable improvement in the frequency and severity of paroxysmal movement disorders. Cognitive function also improved subjectively. The modified Atkins diet is an effective and feasible alternative to the ketogenic diet for the treatment of GLUT1DS-related paroxysmal movement disorders in adolescence and adulthood. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Heat shock transcription factor 1-deficiency attenuates overloading-associated hypertrophy of mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koya, Tomoyuki; Nishizawa, Sono; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Goto, Ayumi; Ikuta, Akihiro; Suzuki, Miho; Ohira, Tomotaka; Egawa, Tatsuro; Nakai, Akira; Sugiura, Takao; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Beppu, Moroe; Goto, Katsumasa

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs) in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on the left soleus was performed by cutting the distal tendons of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles for 4 weeks. The right muscle served as the control. Soleus muscles from both hindlimbs were dissected 2 and 4 weeks after the operation. Hypertrophy of soleus muscle in HSF1-null mice was partially inhibited, compared with that in wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice. Absence of HSF1 partially attenuated the increase of muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area of overloaded soleus muscle. Population of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells in HSF1-null mice was significantly less than that in wild-type mice following 2 weeks of overloading (pmuscle hypertrophy might be attributed to the greater and prolonged enhancement of IL-6 expression. HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response may, in part, play a key role in loading-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  17. Effects of PARP-1 Deficiency on Th1 and Th2 Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sambucci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available T cell differentiation to effector Th cells such as Th1 and Th2 requires the integration of multiple synergic and antagonist signals. Poly(ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational modification of proteins catalyzed by Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs. Recently, many reports showed that PARP-1, the prototypical member of the PARP family, plays a role in immune/inflammatory responses. Consistently, its enzymatic inhibition confers protection in several models of immune-mediated diseases, mainly through an inhibitory effect on NF-κB (and NFAT activation. PARP-1 regulates cell functions in many types of immune cells, including dendritic cells, macrophages, and T and B lymphocytes. Our results show that PARP-1KO cells displayed a reduced ability to differentiate in Th2 cells. Under both nonskewing and Th2-polarizing conditions, naïve CD4 cells from PARP-1KO mice generated a reduced frequency of IL-4+ cells, produced less IL-5, and expressed GATA-3 at lower levels compared with cells from wild type mice. Conversely, PARP-1 deficiency did not substantially affect differentiation to Th1 cells. Indeed, the frequency of IFN-γ+ cells as well as IFN-γ production, in nonskewing and Th1-polarizing conditions, was not affected by PARP-1 gene ablation. These findings demonstrate that PARP-1 plays a relevant role in Th2 cell differentiation and it might be a target to be exploited for the modulation of Th2-dependent immune-mediated diseases.

  18. Selective resistance to the PARP inhibitor olaparib in a mouse model for BRCA1-deficient metaplastic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Linda; van Miltenburg, Martine H; Michalak, Ewa M; Braumuller, Tanya M; Jaspers, Janneke E; Drenth, Anne Paulien; de Korte-Grimmerink, Renske; Gogola, Ewa; Szuhai, Karoly; Schlicker, Andreas; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Huijbers, Ivo J; Berns, Anton; Rottenberg, Sven; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-07-07

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare histological breast cancer subtype characterized by mesenchymal elements and poor clinical outcome. A large fraction of MBCs harbor defects in breast cancer 1 (BRCA1). As BRCA1 deficiency sensitizes tumors to DNA cross-linking agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, we sought to investigate the response of BRCA1-deficient MBCs to the PARP inhibitor olaparib. To this end, we established a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) for BRCA1-deficient MBC by introducing the MET proto-oncogene into a BRCA1-associated breast cancer model, using our novel female GEMM ES cell (ESC) pipeline. In contrast to carcinomas, BRCA1-deficient mouse carcinosarcomas resembling MBC show intrinsic resistance to olaparib caused by increased P-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux transporter expression. Indeed, resistance could be circumvented by using another PARP inhibitor, AZD2461, which is a poor Pgp substrate. These preclinical findings suggest that patients with BRCA1-associated MBC may show poor response to olaparib and illustrate the value of GEMM-ESC models of human cancer for evaluation of novel therapeutics.

  19. Selective resistance to the PARP inhibitor olaparib in a mouse model for BRCA1-deficient metaplastic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Linda; van Miltenburg, Martine H.; Michalak, Ewa M.; Braumuller, Tanya M.; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Drenth, Anne Paulien; de Korte-Grimmerink, Renske; Gogola, Ewa; Szuhai, Karoly; Schlicker, Andreas; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Huijbers, Ivo J.; Berns, Anton; Rottenberg, Sven; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare histological breast cancer subtype characterized by mesenchymal elements and poor clinical outcome. A large fraction of MBCs harbor defects in breast cancer 1 (BRCA1). As BRCA1 deficiency sensitizes tumors to DNA cross-linking agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, we sought to investigate the response of BRCA1-deficient MBCs to the PARP inhibitor olaparib. To this end, we established a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) for BRCA1-deficient MBC by introducing the MET proto-oncogene into a BRCA1-associated breast cancer model, using our novel female GEMM ES cell (ESC) pipeline. In contrast to carcinomas, BRCA1-deficient mouse carcinosarcomas resembling MBC show intrinsic resistance to olaparib caused by increased P-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux transporter expression. Indeed, resistance could be circumvented by using another PARP inhibitor, AZD2461, which is a poor Pgp substrate. These preclinical findings suggest that patients with BRCA1-associated MBC may show poor response to olaparib and illustrate the value of GEMM-ESC models of human cancer for evaluation of novel therapeutics. PMID:26100884

  20. Successful clinical treatment and functional immunological normalization of human MALT1 deficiency following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmus, Jacob; McDonald, Rachel; Fung, Shan-Yu; Del Bel, Kate L; Roden, Juliana; Senger, Christof; Schultz, Kirk R; McKinnon, Margaret L; Davis, Jeffrey; Turvey, Stuart E

    2016-07-01

    MALT1 mutations impair normal NF-κB activation and paracaspase activity to cause a novel combined immunodeficiency. The clinical and immunological phenotype of MALT1 deficiency can be successfully treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following reduced intensity conditioning.

  1. Cholestasis and hypercholesterolemia in SCD1-deficient mice fed a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flowers, Matthew T.; Groen, Albert K.; Oler, Angie Tebon; Keller, Mark P.; Choi, YounJeong; Schueler, Kathryn L.; Richards, Oliver C.; Lan, Hong; Miyazaki, Makoto; Kuipers, Folkert; Kendziorski, Christina M.; Ntambi, James M.; Attie, Alan D.

    2006-01-01

    Stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1-deficient (SCD1(-/-)) mice have impaired MUFA synthesis. When maintained on a very low-fat (VLF) diet, SCD1(-/-) mice developed severe hypercholesterolemia, characterized by an increase in apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins and the appearance of

  2. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 deficiency reduces spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice fed a high-fat diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is a risk factor for cancer. Adipose tissue produces pro-inflammatory adipokines that contribute obesity-related malignant progression. This study investigated the effects of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) deficiency on pulmonary metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male C57...

  3. Cholestasis and hypercholesterolemia in SCD1-deficient mice fed a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T. Flowers; A.K. Groen; A.T. Oler; M.P. Keller; Y. Choi; K.L. Schueler; O.C. Richards; H. Lan; M. Miyazaki; F. Kuipers; C.M. Kendziorski; J.M. Ntambi; A.D. Attie

    2006-01-01

    Stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1-deficient (SCD1(-/-)) mice have impaired MUFA synthesis. When maintained on a very low-fat (VLF) diet, SCD1(-/-) mice developed severe hypercholesterolemia, characterized by an increase in apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins and the appearance of lipoprot

  4. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Michelle H; Anderson, Michael D; Weagel, Evita G; Velazquez, Edwin J; Weber, K Scott; Robison, Richard A; O'Neill, Kim L

    2017-01-01

    In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X-ray. Further confirming HPRT presence, the gold weight percentage of the sample increased significantly when NCI-H460 cells were exposed to HPRT antibody (P=0.012) in comparison with isotype controls. Our results show that HPRT is localized on the

  5. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Michelle H; Anderson, Michael D; Weagel, Evita G; Velazquez, Edwin J; Weber, K Scott; Robison, Richard A; O’Neill, Kim L

    2017-01-01

    In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X-ray. Further confirming HPRT presence, the gold weight percentage of the sample increased significantly when NCI-H460 cells were exposed to HPRT antibody (P=0.012) in comparison with isotype controls. Our results show that HPRT is localized on the

  6. Methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 deficiency does not increase high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jung-Yoon; Cha, Hye-Na; Kim, Ki Young; Lee, Eujin; Kim, Suk-Jeong; Kim, Yong-Woon; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Lee, In-Kyu; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Kim, Hwa-Young; Park, So-Young

    2017-01-01

    Methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase (MsrA) protects against high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance due to its antioxidant effects. To determine whether its counterpart, methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase (MsrB) has similar effects, we compared MsrB1 knockout and wild-type mice using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique. High-fat feeding for eight weeks increased body weights, fat masses, and plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and triglycerides to similar extents in wild-type and MsrB1 knockout mice. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test showed no difference in blood glucose levels between the two genotypes after eight weeks on the high-fat diet. The hyperglycemic-euglycemic clamp study showed that glucose infusion rates and whole body glucose uptakes were decreased to similar extents by the high-fat diet in both wild-type and MsrB1 knockout mice. Hepatic glucose production and glucose uptake of skeletal muscle were unaffected by MsrB1 deficiency. The high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress in skeletal muscle and liver was not aggravated in MsrB1-deficient mice. Interestingly, whereas MsrB1 deficiency reduced JNK protein levels to a great extent in skeletal muscle and liver, it markedly elevated phosphorylation of JNK, suggesting the involvement of MsrB1 in JNK protein activation. However, this JNK phosphorylation based on a p-JNK/JNK level did not positively correlate with insulin resistance in MsrB1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results show that, in contrast to MsrA deficiency, MsrB1 deficiency does not increase high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice.

  7. NKCC1-deficiency results in abnormal proliferation of neural progenitor cells of the lateral ganglionic eminence

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    Ana Cathia Magalhães

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The proliferative pool of neural progenitor cells is maintained by exquisitely controlled mechanisms for cell cycle regulation. The Na-K-Cl cotransporter NKCC1 is important for regulating cell volume and the proliferation of different cell types in vitro. NKCC1 is expressed in ventral telencephalon of embryonic brains suggesting a potential role in neural development of this region. The ventral telencephalon is a major source for both interneuron and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Whether NKCC1 is involved in the proliferation of these cell populations remains unknown. In order to assess this question, we monitored several markers for neural, neuronal, and proliferating cells in wild-type and NKCC1 knockout mouse brains. We found that NKCC1 was expressed in neural progenitor cells from the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE at E12.5. Mice lacking NKCC1 expression displayed reduced PH3-labeled mitotic cells in the ventricular zone and reduced cell cycle reentry. Accordingly, we found a significant reduction of Sp8-labeled immature interneurons migrating from the dorsal LGE in NKCC1-deficient mice at a later developmental stage. Interestingly, at E14.5, NKCC1 regulated also the formation of Olig2-labeled oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Collectively, these findings show that NKCC1 serves in vivo as a modulator of the cell cycle decision in the developing ventral telencephalon at the early stage of neurogenesis. These results present a novel mechanistic avenue to be considered in the recent proposed involvement of chloride transporters in a number of developmentally related diseases such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia.

  8. Attenuated behavioural responses to acute and chronic cocaine in GASP-1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeuf, Julien; Trigo, José Manuel; Moreau, Pierre-Henri; Lecourtier, Lucas; Vogel, Elise; Cassel, Jean-Cristophe; Mathis, Chantal; Klosen, Paul; Maldonado, Rafael; Simonin, Frédéric

    2009-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) interacts with GPCRs and is implicated in their postendocytic sorting. Recently, GASP-1 has been shown to regulate dopamine (D(2)) and cannabinoid (CB1) receptor signalling, suggesting that preventing GASP-1 interaction with GPCRs might provide a means to limit the decrease in receptor signalling upon sustained agonist treatment. In order to test this hypothesis, we have generated and behaviourally characterized GASP-1 knockout (KO) mice and have examined the consequences of the absence of GASP-1 on chronic cocaine treatments. GASP-1 KO and wild-type (WT) mice were tested for sensitization to the locomotor effects of cocaine. Additional mice were trained to acquire intravenous self-administration of cocaine on a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement, and the motivational value of cocaine was then assessed using a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. The dopamine and muscarinic receptor densities were quantitatively evaluated in the striatum of WT and KO mice tested for sensitization and self-administration. Acute and sensitized cocaine-locomotor effects were attenuated in KO mice. A decrease in the percentage of animals that acquired cocaine self-administration was also observed in GASP-1-deficient mice, which was associated with pronounced down-regulation of dopamine and muscarinic receptors in the striatum. These data indicate that GASP-1 participates in acute and chronic behavioural responses induced by cocaine and are in agreement with a role of GASP-1 in postendocytic sorting of GPCRs. However, in contrast to previous studies, our data suggest that upon sustained receptor stimulation GASP-1 stimulates recycling rather than receptor degradation.

  9. Reduced cellular DNA repair capacity after environmentally relevant arsenic exposure. Influence of Ogg1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jordi; Peremartí, Jana; Annangi, Balasubramnayam; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminant known to affect millions of people worldwide. Our previous work demonstrated that chronic sub-toxic i-As concentrations were able to induce biologically significant levels of genotoxic and oxidative DNA damage that were strongly influenced by the Ogg1 genotype. In order to study the nature of the observed levels of damage and the observed differences between MEF Ogg1(+/+) and Ogg1(-/-) genetic backgrounds, the genotoxic and oxidative DNA repair kinetics of 18-weeks exposed MEF cells were evaluated by the comet assay. Results indicate that MEF Ogg1(+/+) and Ogg1(-/-) cells chronically exposed to i-As repair the DNA damage induced by arsenite, potassium bromide and UVC radiation less efficiently than control cells, being that observation clearly more pronounced in MEF Ogg1(-/-) cells. Consequently, exposed cells accumulate a higher percentage of unrepaired DNA damage at the end of the repair period. As an attempt to eliminate i-As associated toxicity, chronically exposed MEF Ogg1(-/-) cells overexpress the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt. This adaptive response confers cells a significant resistance to i-As-induced cell death, but at expenses of accumulating high levels of DNA damage due to their repair impairment. Overall, the work presented here evidences that i-As chronic exposure disrupts the normal cellular repair function, and that oxidative DNA damage-and Ogg1 deficiency-exacerbates this phenomenon. The observed cell death resistance under a chronic scenario of genotoxic and oxidative stress may in turn contribute to the carcinogenic effects of i-As.

  10. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease due to IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency in Three Iranian Children

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    Shokouh azam SARRAFZADEH

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD is a rare inheritance syndrome, characterized by a disseminated infection with mycobacterium in children following BCG vaccination at birth. Regarding the vaccination program in Iran, it may consider as a public health problem. The pathogenesis of MSMD is dependent on either insufficient production of IFN-gamma (γ or inadequate response to it. Here, we want to introduce three cases including two siblings and one girl from two unrelated families with severe mycobacterial infections referred to Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute (IAARI, from 2013 to 2015; their MSMD was confirmed by both cytokine assessment and genetic analysis. Regarding the clinical features of the patients, cell proliferation against a mitogen and BCG antigen was ordered in a lymphocyte transformation test (LTT setting. ELISA was performed for the measurement of IL-12p70 and IFN- γ in whole blood samples activated by BCG + recombinant human IFN-γ and BCG + recombinant human IL-12, respectively. In contrast to mitogen, the antigen-dependent proliferation activity of the patients’ leukocytes was significantly lower than that in normal range. We identified a homozygous mutation in IL12RB1 gene for two kindred who had a homozygous mutation affecting an essential splice site. For the third patient, a novel frameshift deletion in IL12RB1 gene was found. The genetic study results confirmed the impaired function of stimulated lymphocytes to release IFN-γ following stimulation with BCG+IL-12 while the response to rhIFN-γ for IL-12p70 production was relatively intact. Our findings show that cellular and molecular assessments are needed for precise identification of immunodeficiency disorders especially those without clear-cut diagnostic criteria. Keywords: Mendelian, IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency, Interfron-gamma, Interleukin 12, Mycobacterium

  11. Human TLR1 deficiency is associated with impaired mycobacterial signaling and protection from leprosy reversal reaction.

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    Elizabeth A Misch

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are important regulators of the innate immune response to pathogens, including Mycobacterium leprae, which is recognized by TLR1/2 heterodimers. We previously identified a transmembrane domain polymorphism, TLR1_T1805G, that encodes an isoleucine to serine substitution and is associated with impaired signaling. We hypothesized that this TLR1 SNP regulates the innate immune response and susceptibility to leprosy. In HEK293 cells transfected with the 1805T or 1805G variant and stimulated with extracts of M. leprae, NF-kappaB activity was impaired in cells with the 1805G polymorphism. We next stimulated PBMCs from individuals with different genotypes for this SNP and found that 1805GG individuals had significantly reduced cytokine responses to both whole irradiated M. leprae and cell wall extracts. To investigate whether TLR1 variation is associated with clinical presentations of leprosy or leprosy immune reactions, we examined 933 Nepalese leprosy patients, including 238 with reversal reaction (RR, an immune reaction characterized by a Th1 T cell cytokine response. We found that the 1805G allele was associated with protection from RR with an odds ratio (OR of 0.51 (95% CI 0.29-0.87, p = 0.01. Individuals with 1805 genotypes GG or TG also had a reduced risk of RR in comparison to genotype TT with an OR of 0.55 (95% CI 0.31-0.97, p = 0.04. To our knowledge, this is the first association of TLR1 with a Th1-mediated immune response. Our findings suggest that TLR1 deficiency influences adaptive immunity during leprosy infection to affect clinical manifestations such as nerve damage and disability.

  12. Outcome of ketogenic diets in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome in Japan: A nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Tatsuya; Ito, Yasushi; Takahashi, Satoru; Shimono, Kuriko; Natsume, Jun; Yanagihara, Keiko; Oguni, Hirokazu

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the outcome of ketogenic diets (KDs) in patients with glucose transport type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) in Japan. A nationwide survey for GLUT1DS was conducted by sending questionnaires to board-certified pediatric neurologists nationwide to obtain clinical and laboratory data. Among 39 patients whose diagnosis was confirmed molecularly or by the 3-O-methylglucose uptake assay, 31 were treated with KDs for longer than 1month. Seventeen patients (55%) were on the modified Atkins diet, 11 (35%) were on the classic KD, and 3 were on the medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) diet. The median values and ranges of serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels in patients on the modified Atkins diet, classic KD and MCT diet were 2.5mM (0.75-4.1), 1.7mM (0.23-3.5) and 2.6mM (1.5-3.0), respectively. The KDs were effective on seizures (80%), aggravation after fasting (80%) and ataxia (79%). Thus, ataxia was as responsive as seizures. Two patients on the classic KD with a ketogenic ratio as low as 1:1 showed improvement in neurological symptoms. The development or intelligence quotient measured using the same psychological scales before and after the KDs in 9 patients did not show a significant improvement; the median quotients before and after the diets were 40 (12-91) and 46 (12-67). The KDs were most effective on seizures, transient aggravation after fasting and ataxia. The efficacy on intellectual development was equivocal. The modified Atkins diet was more commonly used for GLUT1DS in this study, and its ketogenicity was equivalent to the classic KD. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. GLUT1-deficiency syndrome: Report of a four-generation Norwegian family with a mild phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm-Pettersen, Anette; Nakken, Karl O; Haavardsholm, Kathrine C; Selmer, Kaja Kristine

    2017-05-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is a rare metabolic encephalopathy with a wide variation of clinical phenotypes. Familial variants are often milder than de novo cases, and may therefore remain undiagnosed. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical course of GLUT1-DS in a four-generation Norwegian family where the oldest generations had never received any treatment. Through interviews and clinical investigations, we characterized a family of 26 members, where 11 members had symptoms strongly suggesting GLUT1-DS. All members were offered genetic testing of the SLC2A1 gene. Affected members were offered treatment with ketogenic diet, and the effect of the treatment was registered. We sequenced the SLC2A1 gene in 13 members, and found that 10, all with symptoms, had the c.823G>A (p.Ala275Thr) variant. All affected members had experienced early-onset epilepsy, paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesias, and most had mild learning disability. Moreover, some had symptoms and signs of a distal neuropathy in addition to reduced sense of orientation and excessive daytime sleep. Their load of symptoms had decreased over the years, although that they never had received any treatment. Nevertheless, those who started dietary treatment all experienced an improved quality of life. We report a four-generation family with GLUT1-DS where the disease has a mild course, even when untreated. In addition to classical GLUT1-DS features, we also describe symptoms which have never been reported in GLUT1-DS previously. As such, this family extends the phenotypic spectrum of GLUT1-DS and underlines the importance of diagnosing also relatively mildly affected patients, even in adult life, as they also seem to benefit from dietary treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Triheptanoin dramatically reduces paroxysmal motor disorder in patients with GLUT1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochel, Fanny; Hainque, Elodie; Gras, Domitille; Adanyeguh, Isaac M; Caillet, Samantha; Héron, Bénédicte; Roubertie, Agathe; Kaphan, Elsa; Valabregue, Romain; Rinaldi, Daisy; Vuillaumier, Sandrine; Schiffmann, Raphael; Ottolenghi, Chris; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Servais, Laurent; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of our previous work with triheptanoin, which provides key substrates to the Krebs cycle in the brain, we wished to assess its therapeutic effect in patients with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) who objected to or did not tolerate ketogenic diets. We performed an open-label pilot study with three phases of 2 months each (baseline, treatment and withdrawal) in eight patients with GLUT1-DS (7-47 years old) with non-epileptic paroxysmal manifestations. We used a comprehensive patient diary to record motor and non-motor paroxysmal events. Functional (31)P-NMR spectroscopy was performed to quantify phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) within the occipital cortex during (activation) and after (recovery) a visual stimulus. Patients with GLUT1-DS experienced a mean of 30.8 (± 27.7) paroxysmal manifestations (52% motor events) at baseline that dropped to 2.8 (± 2.9, 76% motor events) during the treatment phase (p = 0.028). After withdrawal, paroxysmal manifestations recurred with a mean of 24.2 (± 21.9, 52% motor events; p = 0.043). Furthermore, brain energy metabolism normalised with triheptanoin, that is, increased Pi/PCr ratio during brain activation compared to the recovery phase (p = 0.021), and deteriorated when triheptanoin was withdrawn. Treatment with triheptanoin resulted in a 90% clinical improvement in non-epileptic paroxysmal manifestations and a normalised brain bioenergetics profile in patients with GLUT1-DS. NCT02014883. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Marrow Adipose Tissue Expansion Coincides with Insulin Resistance in MAGP1-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walji, Tezin A; Turecamo, Sarah E; Sanchez, Alejandro Coca; Anthony, Bryan A; Abou-Ezzi, Grazia; Scheller, Erica L; Link, Daniel C; Mecham, Robert P; Craft, Clarissa S

    2016-01-01

    Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) is an endocrine organ with the potential to influence skeletal remodeling and hematopoiesis. Pathologic MAT expansion has been studied in the context of severe metabolic challenge, including caloric restriction, high fat diet feeding, and leptin deficiency. However, the rapid change in peripheral fat and glucose metabolism associated with these models impedes our ability to examine which metabolic parameters precede or coincide with MAT expansion. Microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP1) is a matricellular protein that influences cellular processes by tethering signaling molecules to extracellular matrix structures. MAGP1-deficient (Mfap2 (-/-)) mice display a progressive excess adiposity phenotype, which precedes insulin resistance and occurs without changes in caloric intake or ambulation. Mfap2 (-/-) mice were, therefore, used as a model to associate parameters of metabolic disease, bone remodeling, and hematopoiesis with MAT expansion. Marrow adiposity was normal in Mfap2 (-/-) mice until 6 months of age; however, by 10 months, marrow fat volume had increased fivefold relative to wild-type control at the same age. Increased gonadal fat pad mass and hyperglycemia were detectable in Mfap2 (-/-) mice by 2 months, but peaked by 6 months. The development of insulin resistance coincided with MAT expansion. Longitudinal characterization of bone mass demonstrated a disconnection in MAT volume and bone volume. Specifically, Mfap2 (-/-) mice had reduced trabecular bone volume by 2 months, but this phenotype did not progress with age or MAT expansion. Interestingly, MAT expansion in the 10-month-old Mfap2 (-/-) mice was associated with modest alterations in basal hematopoiesis, including a shift from granulopoiesis to B lymphopoiesis. Together, these findings indicate MAT expansion is coincident with insulin resistance, but not excess peripheral adiposity or hyperglycemia in Mfap2 (-/-) mice; and substantial MAT accumulation does

  16. Diversion of aspartate in ASS1-deficient tumours fosters de novo pyrimidine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Shiran; Adler, Lital; Yizhak, Keren; Sarver, Alona; Silberman, Alon; Agron, Shani; Stettner, Noa; Sun, Qin; Brandis, Alexander; Helbling, Daniel; Korman, Stanley; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Dimmock, David; Ulitsky, Igor; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Ruppin, Eytan; Erez, Ayelet

    2015-11-19

    Cancer cells hijack and remodel existing metabolic pathways for their benefit. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS1) is a urea cycle enzyme that is essential in the conversion of nitrogen from ammonia and aspartate to urea. A decrease in nitrogen flux through ASS1 in the liver causes the urea cycle disorder citrullinaemia. In contrast to the well-studied consequences of loss of ASS1 activity on ureagenesis, the purpose of its somatic silencing in multiple cancers is largely unknown. Here we show that decreased activity of ASS1 in cancers supports proliferation by facilitating pyrimidine synthesis via CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase complex) activation. Our studies were initiated by delineating the consequences of loss of ASS1 activity in humans with two types of citrullinaemia. We find that in citrullinaemia type I (CTLN I), which is caused by deficiency of ASS1, there is increased pyrimidine synthesis and proliferation compared with citrullinaemia type II (CTLN II), in which there is decreased substrate availability for ASS1 caused by deficiency of the aspartate transporter citrin. Building on these results, we demonstrate that ASS1 deficiency in cancer increases cytosolic aspartate levels, which increases CAD activation by upregulating its substrate availability and by increasing its phosphorylation by S6K1 through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Decreasing CAD activity by blocking citrin, the mTOR signalling, or pyrimidine synthesis decreases proliferation and thus may serve as a therapeutic strategy in multiple cancers where ASS1 is downregulated. Our results demonstrate that ASS1 downregulation is a novel mechanism supporting cancerous proliferation, and they provide a metabolic link between the urea cycle enzymes and pyrimidine synthesis.

  17. TSP-1 Deficiency Alters Ocular Microbiota: Implications for Sjögren's Syndrome Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzulli, Marielle; Contreras-Ruiz, Laura; Ruiz, Laura Contreras; Kugadas, Abirami; Masli, Sharmila; Gadjeva, Mihaela

    2015-09-01

    The potential role of commensals as triggering factors that promote inflammation in dry eye disease has not been explored. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether ocular microbiota changes with the onset of dry eye disease in thrombospondin-1-deficient (TSP-1(-/-)) mice, a strain that develops Sjögren's syndrome-like disease. Conjunctival swabs were collected from TSP-1(-/-) and C57BL/6 mice and analyzed for bacterial presence. Opsonophagocytosis of the bacterial conjunctival isolates derived from the aged TSP-1(-/-) mice by neutrophils derived from either TSP-1(-/-) or C57BL/6 bone marrow was evaluated. The bactericidal activities of TSP-1-derived peptide were examined. We found that in TSP-1(-/-) mice, the conjunctival colonization with Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci sp (CNS) species was significantly increased with aging and preceded that of the wild-type C57BL/6 control mice. This correlated with increased neutrophil infiltration into the conjunctiva of the TSP-1(-/-) mice, suggesting that TSP-1 plays a significant role in regulating immunity to commensals. Accordingly, the TSP-1(-/-) PMNs opsonophagocytozed the ocular commensals less efficiently than the TSP-1-sufficient neutrophils. Furthermore, a TSP-1-derived peptide, 4N1K, exhibited significant antimicrobial activity when compared to a control peptide against commensal sp. These studies illustrate that alterations in the commensal frequency occur in the early stages of development of Sjögren's-like pathology and suggest that interventions that limit commensal outgrowth such as the use of TSP-1-derived peptides could be used for treatment during the early stages of the disease to reduce the commensal burden and ensuing inflammation.

  18. Human TLR1 Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Mycobacterial Signaling and Protection from Leprosy Reversal Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Elizabeth A.; Macdonald, Murdo; Ranjit, Chaman; Sapkota, Bishwa R.; Wells, Richard D.; Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Kaplan, Gilla; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important regulators of the innate immune response to pathogens, including Mycobacterium leprae, which is recognized by TLR1/2 heterodimers. We previously identified a transmembrane domain polymorphism, TLR1_T1805G, that encodes an isoleucine to serine substitution and is associated with impaired signaling. We hypothesized that this TLR1 SNP regulates the innate immune response and susceptibility to leprosy. In HEK293 cells transfected with the 1805T or 1805G variant and stimulated with extracts of M. leprae, NF-κB activity was impaired in cells with the 1805G polymorphism. We next stimulated PBMCs from individuals with different genotypes for this SNP and found that 1805GG individuals had significantly reduced cytokine responses to both whole irradiated M. leprae and cell wall extracts. To investigate whether TLR1 variation is associated with clinical presentations of leprosy or leprosy immune reactions, we examined 933 Nepalese leprosy patients, including 238 with reversal reaction (RR), an immune reaction characterized by a Th1 T cell cytokine response. We found that the 1805G allele was associated with protection from RR with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.51 (95% CI 0.29–0.87, p = 0.01). Individuals with 1805 genotypes GG or TG also had a reduced risk of RR in comparison to genotype TT with an OR of 0.55 (95% CI 0.31–0.97, p = 0.04). To our knowledge, this is the first association of TLR1 with a Th1-mediated immune response. Our findings suggest that TLR1 deficiency influences adaptive immunity during leprosy infection to affect clinical manifestations such as nerve damage and disability. PMID:18461142

  19. Olfactomedin 1 Deficiency Leads to Defective Olfaction and Impaired Female Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Diao, Honglu; Zhao, Fei; Xiao, Shuo; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E.; Dudley, Elizabeth A.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactomedin 1 (OLFM1) is a glycoprotein highly expressed in the brain. Olfm1−/− female mice were previously reported to have reduced fertility. Previous microarray analysis revealed Olfm1 among the most highly upregulated genes in the uterine luminal epithelium upon embryo implantation, which was confirmed by in situ hybridization. We hypothesized that Olfm1 deficiency led to defective embryo implantation and thus impaired fertility. Indeed, Olfm1−/− females had defective embryo implantation. However, Olfm1−/− females rarely mated and those that mated rarely became pregnant. Ovarian histology indicated the absence of corpora lutea in Olfm1−/− females, indicating defective ovulation. Superovulation using equine chorionic gonadotropin-human chorionic gonadotropin rescued mating, ovulation, and pregnancy, and equine chorionic gonadotropin alone rescued ovulation in Olfm1−/− females. Olfm1−/− females had a 13% reduction of hypothalamic GnRH neurons but comparable basal serum LH levels and GnRH-induced LH levels compared with wild-type controls. These results indicated no obvious local defects in the female reproductive system and a functional hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Olfm1−/− females were unresponsive to the effects of male bedding stimulation on pubertal development and estrous cycle. There were 41% fewer cFos-positive cells in the mitral cell layer of accessory olfactory bulb upon male urine stimulation for 90 minutes. OLFM1 was expressed in the main and accessory olfactory systems including main olfactory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, main olfactory bulb, and accessory olfactory bulb, with the highest expression detected in the axon bundles of olfactory sensory neurons. These data demonstrate that defective fertility in Olfm1−/− females is most likely a secondary effect of defective olfaction. PMID:26107991

  20. Mac-1 deficiency induces respiratory failure by affecting type I alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Ci, Y B; Liu, C L; Sun, H M

    2017-08-31

    As a β2 integrin family member, Mac-1 plays an important role in the inflammatory response. Inflammation and lung injury are closely associated, but the involvement of Mac-1 in the occurrence and development of such pathologies remains poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the relationship between Mac-1 deficiency and respiratory failure in Mac-1 knockout {Mac-1(-/-)} mice, using C57BL/6J mice as a control. The newborn survival rate of Mac-1(-/-) mice was calculated, and mouse lung tissue was treated with hematoxylin and eosin and subjected to immunofluorescent staining. Moreover, western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression of molecules specific to type I and type II alveolar epithelial cells, as well as alveolar surfactant proteins secreted by the latter. Survival of Mac-1(-/-) pups was significantly lower than that of newborn C57BL/6J mice. In a float test, lung tissues from C57BL/6J mice were buoyant, whereas those of Mac-1(-/-) mice were not. Compared with C57BL/6J mice, expression of proSP-C {specific to type II alveolar epithelial cells} and alveolar surfactant proteins in Mac-1(-/-) mice was not significantly different, implying that type II cell function was unaltered. However, western blotting revealed expression of T1α, Aqp5, and Snx5 {type I alveolar epithelial cell markers} in Mac-1(-/-) mice to be significantly decreased {P Mac-1 may play an important role in respiratory failure. Its absence leads to this condition not by influencing type II alveolar epithelial cells or their secreted surfactant proteins, but rather by reducing type I alveolar cell numbers.

  1. Olfactomedin 1 Deficiency Leads to Defective Olfaction and Impaired Female Fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Diao, Honglu; Zhao, Fei; Xiao, Shuo; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Dudley, Elizabeth A; Mattson, Mark P; Ye, Xiaoqin

    2015-09-01

    Olfactomedin 1 (OLFM1) is a glycoprotein highly expressed in the brain. Olfm1(-/-) female mice were previously reported to have reduced fertility. Previous microarray analysis revealed Olfm1 among the most highly upregulated genes in the uterine luminal epithelium upon embryo implantation, which was confirmed by in situ hybridization. We hypothesized that Olfm1 deficiency led to defective embryo implantation and thus impaired fertility. Indeed, Olfm1(-/-) females had defective embryo implantation. However, Olfm1(-/-) females rarely mated and those that mated rarely became pregnant. Ovarian histology indicated the absence of corpora lutea in Olfm1(-/-) females, indicating defective ovulation. Superovulation using equine chorionic gonadotropin-human chorionic gonadotropin rescued mating, ovulation, and pregnancy, and equine chorionic gonadotropin alone rescued ovulation in Olfm1(-/-) females. Olfm1(-/-) females had a 13% reduction of hypothalamic GnRH neurons but comparable basal serum LH levels and GnRH-induced LH levels compared with wild-type controls. These results indicated no obvious local defects in the female reproductive system and a functional hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Olfm1(-/-) females were unresponsive to the effects of male bedding stimulation on pubertal development and estrous cycle. There were 41% fewer cFos-positive cells in the mitral cell layer of accessory olfactory bulb upon male urine stimulation for 90 minutes. OLFM1 was expressed in the main and accessory olfactory systems including main olfactory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, main olfactory bulb, and accessory olfactory bulb, with the highest expression detected in the axon bundles of olfactory sensory neurons. These data demonstrate that defective fertility in Olfm1(-/-) females is most likely a secondary effect of defective olfaction.

  2. PTRF/Cavin-1 Deficiency Causes Cardiac Dysfunction Accompanied by Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Cardiac Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Takehiro; Kasahara, Takeru; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Naito, Daisuke; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the PTRF/Cavin-1 gene cause congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 (CGL4) associated with myopathy. Additionally, long-QT syndrome and fatal cardiac arrhythmia are observed in patients with CGL4 who have homozygous PTRF/Cavin-1 mutations. PTRF/Cavin-1 deficiency shows reductions of caveolae and caveolin-3 (Cav3) protein expression in skeletal muscle, and Cav3 deficiency in the heart causes cardiac hypertrophy with loss of caveolae. However, it remains unknown how loss of PTRF/Cavin-1 affects cardiac morphology and function. Here, we present a characterization of the hearts of PTRF/Cavin-1-null (PTRF−/−) mice. Electron microscopy revealed the reduction of caveolae in cardiomyocytes of PTRF−/− mice. PTRF−/− mice at 16 weeks of age developed a progressive cardiomyopathic phenotype with wall thickening of left ventricles and reduced fractional shortening evaluated by echocardiography. Electrocardiography revealed that PTRF−/− mice at 24 weeks of age had low voltages and wide QRS complexes in limb leads. Histological analysis showed cardiomyocyte hypertrophy accompanied by progressive interstitial/perivascular fibrosis. Hypertrophy-related fetal gene expression was also induced in PTRF−/− hearts. Western blotting analysis and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that Cav3 expression was suppressed in PTRF−/− hearts compared with that in wild-type (WT) ones. ERK1/2 was activated in PTRF−/− hearts compared with that in WT ones. These results suggest that loss of PTRF/Cavin-1 protein expression is sufficient to induce a molecular program leading to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiomyopathy, which is partly attributable to Cav3 reduction in the heart. PMID:27612189

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 modulates degeneration of the intervertebral disc after puncture in Bach 1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Ryo; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Kazuyoshi; Kamei, Naosuke; Nakamae, Toshio; Izumi, Bunichiro; Fujioka, Yuki; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2012-09-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is considered to be a major feature of low back pain. Furthermore, oxidative stress has been shown to be an important factor in degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis and is considered a cause of intervertebral disc degeneration. The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between oxidative stress and intervertebral disc degeneration using Broad complex-Tramtrack-Bric-a-brac and cap'n'collar homology 1 deficient (Bach 1-/-) mice which highly express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 protects cells from oxidative stress. Caudal discs of 12-week-old and 1-year-old mice were evaluated as age-related models. Each group and period, 5 mice (a total of 20 mice, a total of 20 discs) were evaluated as age-related model. C9-C10 caudal discs in 12-week-old Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice were punctured using a 29-gauge needle as annulus puncture model. Each group and period, 5 mice (a total of 60 mice, a total of 60 discs) were evaluated. The progress of disc degeneration was evaluated at pre-puncture, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-puncture. Radiographic, histologic and immunohistologic analysis were performed to compare between Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice. In the age-related model, there were no significant differences between Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice radiologically and histologically. However, in the annulus puncture model, histological scoring revealed significant difference at 8 and 12 weeks post-puncture. The number of HO-1 positive cells was significantly greater in Bach 1-/- mice at every period. The apoptosis rate was significantly lower at 1 and 2 weeks post-puncture in Bach 1-/- mice. Oxidative stress prevention may avoid the degenerative process of the intervertebral disc after puncture, reducing the number of apoptosis cells. High HO-1 expression may also inhibit oxidative stress and delay the process of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  4. CaMKKβ is involved in AMP-activated protein kinase activation by baicalin in LKB1 deficient cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ma

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK plays an important role in mediating energy metabolism and is controlled mainly by two upstream kinases, LKB1 or Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β (CaMKKβ. Previously, we found that baicalin, one of the major flavonoids in a traditional Chinese herb medicine, Scutellaria baicalensis, protects against the development of hepatic steatosis in rats feeding with a high-fat diet by the activation of AMPK, but, the underlying mechanism for AMPK activation is unknown. Here we show that in two LKB1-deficient cells, HeLa and A549 cells, baicalin activates AMPK by α Thr-172 phosphorylation and subsequent phosphorylation of its downstream target, acetyl CoA carboxylase, at Ser-79, to a similar degree as does in HepG2 cells (that express LKB1. Pharmacologic inhibition of CaMKKβ by its selective inhibitor STO-609 markedly inhibits baicalin-induced AMPK activation in both HeLa and HepG2 cells, indicating that CaMKKβ is the responsible AMPK kinase. We also show that treatment of baicalin causes a larger increase in intracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](i, although the maximal level of [Ca(2+](i is lower in HepG2 cells compared to HeLa cells. Chelation of intracellular free Ca(2+ by EDTA and EGTA, or depletion of intracellular Ca(2+ stores by the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin abrogates baicalin-induced activation of AMPK in HeLa cells. Neither cellular ATP nor the production of reactive oxygen species is altered by baicalin. Finally, in HeLa cells, baicalin treatment no longer decreases intracellular lipid accumulation caused by oleic acid after inhibition of CaMKKβ by STO-609. These results demonstrate that a potential Ca(2+/CaMKKβ dependent pathway is involved in the activation of AMPK by baicalin and suggest that CaMKKβ likely acts as an upstream kinase of AMPK in response to baicalin.

  5. Fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 deficiency sensitizes mice to the behavioral changes induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Keith W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between fractalkine (CX3CL1 and fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 regulate microglial activation in the CNS. Recent findings indicate that age-associated impairments in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 are directly associated with exaggerated microglial activation and an impaired recovery from sickness behavior after peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which an acute LPS injection causes amplified and prolonged microglial activation and behavioral deficits in CX3CR1-deficient mice (CX3CR1-/-. Methods CX3CR1-/- mice or control heterozygote mice (CX3CR1+/- were injected with LPS (0.5 mg/kg i.p. or saline and behavior (i.e., sickness and depression-like behavior, microglial activation, and markers of tryptophan metabolism were determined. All data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Systems General Linear Model procedures and were subjected to one-, two-, or three-way ANOVA to determine significant main effects and interactions. Results LPS injection caused a prolonged duration of social withdrawal in CX3CR1-/- mice compared to control mice. This extended social withdrawal was associated with enhanced mRNA expression of IL-1β, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO in microglia 4 h after LPS. Moreover, elevated expression of IL-1β and CD14 was still detected in microglia of CX3CR1-/- mice 24 h after LPS. There was also increased turnover of tryptophan, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain 24 h after LPS, but these increases were independent of CX3CR1 expression. When submitted to the tail suspension test 48 and 72 h after LPS, an increased duration of immobility was evident only in CX3CR1-/- mice. This depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-/- mice was associated with a persistent activated microglial phenotype in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Conclusions Taken together, these data indicate that a deficiency of CX3CR1

  6. Trps1 deficiency inhibits the morphogenesis of secondary hair follicles via decreased Noggin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yujing [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan Wen Hua Xi Road 44, Jinan 250012 (China); Nakanishi, Masako; Sato, Fuyuki; Oikawa, Kosuke [First Department of Pathology, Wakayama Medical University School of Medicine, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan); Muragaki, Yasuteru, E-mail: ymuragak@wakayama-med.ac.jp [First Department of Pathology, Wakayama Medical University School of Medicine, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan); Zhou, Gengyin, E-mail: zhougy@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan Wen Hua Xi Road 44, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • The number of secondary hair follicles is reduced by half in Trps1 KO embryonic skin compared to wild-type skin. • Noggin expression is significantly decreased and BMP signaling is promoted in Trps1 KO embryonic skin. • Treatment with a Noggin or BMP inhibitor rescued the decreased number of hair follicles in Trps1 KO skin graft cultures. • Cell proliferation and apoptosis of the epidermis were normalized by Noggin treatment. - Abstract: A representative phenotype of patients with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is sparse hair. To understand the developmental defects of these patient’s hair follicles, we analyzed the development of hair follicles histologically and biochemically using Trps1 deficient (KO) mice. First, we compared the numbers of primary hair follicles in wild-type (WT) and KO embryos at different developmental stages. No differences were observed in the E14.5 skins of WT and KO mice. However, at later time points, KO fetal skin failed to properly develop secondary hair follicles, and the number of secondary hair follicles present in E18.5 KO skin was approximately half compared to that of WT skin. Sonic hedgehog expression was significantly decreased in E17.5 KO skin, whereas no changes were observed in Eda/Edar expression in E14.5 or E17.5 skins. In addition, Noggin expression was significantly decreased in E14.5 and E17.5 KO skin compared to WT skin. In parallel with the suppression of Noggin expression, BMP signaling was promoted in the epidermal cells of KO skins compared to WT skins as determined by immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated Smad1/5/8. The reduced number of secondary hair follicles was restored in skin graft cultures treated with a Noggin and BMP inhibitor. Furthermore, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis in KO skin was rescued by Noggin treatment. Taken together, we conclude that hair follicle development in Trps1 KO embryos is impaired directly or indirectly by decreased Noggin

  7. Reduced cellular DNA repair capacity after environmentally relevant arsenic exposure. Influence of Ogg1 deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Jordi; Peremartí, Jana; Annangi, Balasubramnayam [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); Marcos, Ricard, E-mail: ricard.marcos@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, ISCIII, Madrid (Spain); Hernández, Alba, E-mail: alba.hernandez@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, ISCIII, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Repair ability under long-term exposure to arsenic was tested using the comet assay. • Effects were measured under Ogg1 wild-type and deficient backgrounds. • Exposed cells repair less efficiency the DNA damage induced by SA, KBrO{sub 3}, MMA{sup III} or UVC radiation. • Oxidative damage and Ogg1 deficient background exacerbate repair deficiencies. • Overexpression of the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt acts as adaptive mechanism. - Abstract: Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminant known to affect millions of people worldwide. Our previous work demonstrated that chronic sub-toxic i-As concentrations were able to induce biologically significant levels of genotoxic and oxidative DNA damage that were strongly influenced by the Ogg1 genotype. In order to study the nature of the observed levels of damage and the observed differences between MEF Ogg1{sup +/+} and Ogg1{sup −/−} genetic backgrounds, the genotoxic and oxidative DNA repair kinetics of 18-weeks exposed MEF cells were evaluated by the comet assay. Results indicate that MEF Ogg1{sup +/+} and Ogg1{sup −/−} cells chronically exposed to i-As repair the DNA damage induced by arsenite, potassium bromide and UVC radiation less efficiently than control cells, being that observation clearly more pronounced in MEF Ogg1{sup −/−} cells. Consequently, exposed cells accumulate a higher percentage of unrepaired DNA damage at the end of the repair period. As an attempt to eliminate i-As associated toxicity, chronically exposed MEF Ogg1{sup −/−} cells overexpress the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt. This adaptive response confers cells a significant resistance to i-As-induced cell death, but at expenses of accumulating high levels of DNA damage due to their repair impairment. Overall, the work presented here evidences that i-As chronic exposure disrupts the normal cellular repair function, and that oxidative DNA damage—and Ogg1 deficiency

  8. Oxidative stress markers and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a patient with GLUT1 deficiency treated with modified Atkins diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Yuri; Okumura, Akihisa; Hayashi, Masaharu; Mori, Harushi; Takahashi, Satoru; Yanagihara, Keiko; Miyata, Rie; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Mimaki, Takashi; Abe, Shinpei; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2012-05-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is an inborn error of glucose transport across blood-tissue barriers, and the modified Atkins diet is an effective and well-tolerated treatment. To investigate the effects of the modified Atkins diet, we examined the cerebrospinal fluid markers and performed phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a patient with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome before and after the modified Atkins diet. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of the oxidative stress markers, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and hexanoyl-lysine adduct, were markedly increased above the cutoff index and were normalized 18 months after the modified Atkins diet. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements showed 18% increase of PCr/γ-ATP ratio after the modified Atkins diet. These results suggest that the modified Atkins diet may reduce oxidative stress in the brain and improve energy reserve capacity, which is important in sustaining electrophysiological activities essential for performing brain functions.

  9. Expanding the phenotype in aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency : characterization of the molecular defect in a 63-year-old woman with generalized dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sass, Joern Oliver; Vaithilingam, Jathana; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Delnooz, Catherine C. S.; Kluijtmans, Leo A. J.; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Wevers, Ron A.

    Aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency is an organic aciduria due to mutations in the ACY1 gene. It is considered much underdiagnosed. Most individuals known to be affected by ACY1 deficiency have presented with neurologic symptoms. We report here a cognitively normal 63-year-old woman who around the age

  10. Effects of a high-fat diet on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient and wild-type mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1-/-) and wildtype mice (C57BL/6J background) fed the AIN93G diet or that diet modified with 45% calories from fat. The high-fat diet i...

  11. Thrombospondin1 deficiency reduces obesity-associated inflammation and improves insulin sensitivity in a diet-induced obese mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is prevalent worldwide and is associated with insulin resistance. Advanced studies suggest that obesity-associated low-grade chronic inflammation contributes to the development of insulin resistance and other metabolic complications. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein that is up-regulated in inflamed adipose tissue. A recent study suggests a positive correlation of TSP1 with obesity, adipose inflammation, and insulin resistance. However, the direct effect of TSP1 on obesity and insulin resistance is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role of TSP1 in mediating obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance by using TSP1 knockout mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male TSP1-/- mice and wild type littermate controls were fed a low-fat (LF or a high-fat (HF diet for 16 weeks. Throughout the study, body weight and fat mass increased similarly between the TSP1-/- mice and WT mice under HF feeding conditions, suggesting that TSP1 deficiency does not affect the development of obesity. However, obese TSP1-/- mice had improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin sensitivity compared to the obese wild type mice. Macrophage accumulation and inflammatory cytokine expression in adipose tissue were reduced in obese TSP1-/- mice. Consistent with the local decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, systemic inflammation was also decreased in the obese TSP1-/- mice. Furthermore, in vitro data demonstrated that TSP1 deficient macrophages had decreased mobility and a reduced inflammatory phenotype. CONCLUSION: TSP1 deficiency did not affect the development of high-fat diet induced obesity. However, TSP1 deficiency reduced macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue and protected against obesity related inflammation and insulin resistance. Our data demonstrate that TSP1 may play an important role in regulating macrophage function and mediating obesity-induced inflammation and insulin

  12. Characterization of P1-deficient isogenic mutant of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius associated with Brazilian purpuric fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segada, L M; Carlone, G M; Gheesling, L L; Lesse, A J

    2000-03-01

    Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (formerly H. aegyptius) is the etiologic agent of Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF). A surface-exposed epitope on the outer membrane protein P1 is present on most strains of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius associated with BPF but is absent in almost all non-disease associated strains. The role of the outer membrane protein P1 in the pathogenesis of this disease was evaluated by utilizing an isogenic P1-deficient mutant. We compared the ability of the wild type and P1 isogenic mutant to grow under various conditions. The P1-deficient strain grew at a similar rate to the wild type in both complex and chemically defined medium. The P1-deficient mutant also had a similar growth rate to the wild type under anaerobic conditions. Anaerobic growth, however, resulted in up-regulation of the P1 protein in the wild type strain. Three assays were used to examine the pathophysiologic role of the P1 protein in BPF: 1) serum resistance; 2) sustained bacteremia in the infant rat model; and 3) the human microvascular endothelial cell (HMEC) cytotoxicity assay. Both the mutant and wild-type strains were resistant to killing in 95% normal human serum. The P1-deficient strain was also as virulent as the wild type in both the infant rat model of bacteremia and in the HMEC-1 tissue culture model. These results demonstrate that serum resistance, sustained bacteremia in the infant rat, and cytotoxicity of HMEC cells occur in the absence of P1. The P1 protein is not essential for the pathogenic potential identified by these assays. However, these results demonstrate that an anaerobic environment is a potent physiologic regulator of P1 protein expression. The impact of anaerobiosis on protein expression and pathogenesis will require further investigations.

  13. SCARLESS SKIN WOUND HEALING IN FOXN1 DEFICIENT (NUDE) MICE IS ASSOCIATED WITH DISTINCTIVE MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE EXPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Similar to mammalian fetuses FOXN1 deficient (nude) mice are able to restore the structure and integrity of injured skin in a scarless healing process by mechanisms independent of the genetic background. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are required for regular skin wound healing and the distinctive pattern of their expression has been implicated to promote scarless healing. In this study, we analyzed the temporal and spatial expression patterns of these molecules during the incisional skin w...

  14. DJ-1 deficiency impairs glutamate uptake into astrocytes via the regulation of flotillin-1 and caveolin-1 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Mo; Cha, Seon-Heui; Choi, Yu Ree; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang Myun

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Although the cause of PD is still poorly understood, mutations in many genes including SNCA, parkin, PINK1, LRRK2, and DJ-1 have been identified in the familial forms of PD. It was recently proposed that alterations in lipid rafts may cause the neurodegeneration shown in PD. Here, we observe that DJ-1 deficiency decreased the expression of flotillin-1 (flot-1) and caveolin-1 (cav-1), the main protein components of lipid rafts, in primary astrocytes and MEF cells. As a mechanism, DJ-1 regulated flot-1 stability by direct interaction, however, decreased cav-1 expression may not be a direct effect of DJ-1, but rather as a result of decreased flot-1 expression. Dysregulation of flot-1 and cav-1 by DJ-1 deficiency caused an alteration in the cellular cholesterol level, membrane fluidity, and alteration in lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis. Moreover, DJ-1 deficiency impaired glutamate uptake into astrocytes, a major function of astrocytes in the maintenance of CNS homeostasis, by altering EAAT2 expression. This study will be helpful to understand the role of DJ-1 in the pathogenesis of PD, and the modulation of lipid rafts through the regulation of flot-1 or cav-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for PD. PMID:27346864

  15. Parkinson phenotype in aged PINK1-deficient mice is accompanied by progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in absence of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Gispert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is an adult-onset movement disorder of largely unknown etiology. We have previously shown that loss-of-function mutations of the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 (PTEN induced putative kinase 1 cause the recessive PARK6 variant of PD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Now we generated a PINK1 deficient mouse and observed several novel phenotypes: A progressive reduction of weight and of locomotor activity selectively for spontaneous movements occurred at old age. As in PD, abnormal dopamine levels in the aged nigrostriatal projection accompanied the reduced movements. Possibly in line with the PARK6 syndrome but in contrast to sporadic PD, a reduced lifespan, dysfunction of brainstem and sympathetic nerves, visible aggregates of alpha-synuclein within Lewy bodies or nigrostriatal neurodegeneration were not present in aged PINK1-deficient mice. However, we demonstrate PINK1 mutant mice to exhibit a progressive reduction in mitochondrial preprotein import correlating with defects of core mitochondrial functions like ATP-generation and respiration. In contrast to the strong effect of PINK1 on mitochondrial dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster and in spite of reduced expression of fission factor Mtp18, we show reduced fission and increased aggregation of mitochondria only under stress in PINK1-deficient mouse neurons. CONCLUSION: Thus, aging Pink1(-/- mice show increasing mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in impaired neural activity similar to PD, in absence of overt neuronal death.

  16. Stat5 is critical for the development and maintenance of myeloproliferative neoplasm initiated by Nf1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Zohar; Been, Raha A; DeCoursin, Krista J; Nguyen, Hanh T; Mohd Hassan, Nurul A; Noble-Orcutt, Klara E; Eckfeldt, Craig E; Pomeroy, Emily J; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Geurts, Jennifer L; Diers, Miechaleen D; Hasz, Diane E; Morgan, Kelly J; MacMillan, Margaret L; Shannon, Kevin M; Largaespada, David A; Wiesner, Stephen M

    2016-10-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by hyperactive RAS signaling. Neurofibromin1 (encoded by the NF1 gene) is a negative regulator of RAS activation. Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 harbor loss-of-function mutations in NF1 and have a 200- to 500-fold increased risk of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. Leukemia cells from patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia display hypersensitivity to certain cytokines, such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor utilizes pre-associated JAK2 to initiate signals after ligand binding. JAK2 subsequently activates STAT5, among other downstream effectors. Although STAT5 is gaining recognition as an important mediator of growth factor signaling in myeloid leukemias, the contribution of STAT5 to the development of hyperactive RAS-initiated myeloproliferative disease has not been well described. In this study, we investigated the consequence of STAT5 attenuation via genetic and pharmacological approaches in Nf1-deficient murine models of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. We found that homozygous Stat5 deficiency extended the lifespan of Nf1-deficient mice and eliminated the development of myeloproliferative neoplasm associated with Nf1 gene loss. Likewise, we found that JAK inhibition with ruxolitinib attenuated myeloproliferative neoplasm in Nf1-deficient mice. Finally, we found that primary cells from a patient with KRAS-mutant juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia displayed reduced colony formation in response to JAK2 inhibition. Our findings establish a central role for STAT5 activation in the pathogenesis of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and suggest that targeting this pathway may be of clinical utility in these patients.

  17. Pancreas-Specific Sirt1-Deficiency in Mice Compromises Beta-Cell Function without Development of Hyperglycemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia V Pinho

    Full Text Available Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1 has been reported to be a critical positive regulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. The effects on islet cells and blood glucose levels when Sirt1 is deleted specifically in the pancreas are still unclear.This study examined islet glucose responsiveness, blood glucose levels, pancreatic islet histology and gene expression in Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice that have loss of function and loss of expression of Sirt1 specifically in the pancreas.We found that in the Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice, the relative insulin positive area and the islet size distribution were unchanged. However, beta-cells were functionally impaired, presenting with lower glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This defect was not due to a reduced expression of insulin but was associated with a decreased expression of the glucose transporter Slc2a2/Glut2 and of the Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (Glp1r as well as a marked down regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones that participate in the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR pathway. Counter intuitively, the Sirt1-deficient mice did not develop hyperglycemia. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP cells were the only other islet cells affected, with reduced numbers in the Sirt1-deficient pancreas.This study provides new mechanistic insights showing that beta-cell function in Sirt1-deficient pancreas is affected due to altered glucose sensing and deregulation of the UPR pathway. Interestingly, we uncovered a context in which impaired beta-cell function is not accompanied by increased glycemia. This points to a unique compensatory mechanism. Given the reduction in PP, investigation of its role in the control of blood glucose is warranted.

  18. Severe mitochondrial damage associated with low-dose radiation sensitivity in ATM- and NBS1-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Junya; Komatsu, Kenshi; Kunugita, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Low-dose radiation risks remain unclear owing to a lack of sufficient studies. We previously reported that low-dose, long-term fractionated radiation (FR) with 0.01 or 0.05 Gy/fraction for 31 d inflicts oxidative stress in human fibroblasts due to excess levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). To identify the small effects of low-dose radiation, we investigated how mitochondria respond to low-dose radiation in radiosensitive human ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS)1-deficient cell lines compared with corresponding cell lines expressing ATM and NBS1. Consistent with previous results in normal fibroblasts, low-dose, long-term FR increased mitochondrial mass and caused accumulation of mitochondrial ROS in ATM- and NBS1-complemented cell lines. Excess mitochondrial ROS resulted in mitochondrial damage that was in turn recognized by Parkin, leading to mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy). In contrast, ATM- and NBS1-deficient cells showed defective induction of mitophagy after low-dose, long-term FR, leading to accumulation of abnormal mitochondria; this was determined by mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Consequently, apoptosis was induced in ATM- and NBS1-deficient cells after low-dose, long-term FR. Antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine was effective as a radioprotective agent against mitochondrial damage induced by low-dose, long-term FR among all cell lines, including radiosensitive cell lines. In conclusion, we demonstrated that mitochondria are target organelles of low-dose radiation. Mitochondrial response influences radiation sensitivity in human cells. Our findings provide new insights into cancer risk estimation associated with low-dose radiation exposure.

  19. Tsc1 deficiency impairs mammary development in mice by suppression of AKT, nuclear ERα, and cell-cycle-driving proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenqi Qin; Hang Zheng; Ling Zhou; Yanhua Ou; Bin Huang; Bo Yan; Zhenshu Qin; Cuilan Yang; Yongchun Su; Xiaochun Bai; Jiasong Guo; Jun Lin

    2016-01-01

    Loss of Tsc1/Tsc2 results in excess cell growth that eventually forms hamartoma in multiple organs. Our study using a mouse model with Tsc1 conditionally knockout in mammary epithelium showed that Tsc1 deficiency impaired mammary development. Phosphorylated S6 was up-regulated in Tsc1 −/− mammary epithelium, which could be reversed by rapamycin, suggesting that mTORC1 was hyperactivated in Tsc1 −/− mammary epithelium. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin restored the development of Tsc1 −/− mammary...

  20. PINK1 Deficiency Decreases Expression Levels of mir-326, mir-330, and mir-3099 during Brain Development and Neural Stem Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Insup; Woo, Joo Hong; Jou, Ilo

    2016-01-01

    PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) is a Parkinson's disease (PD) gene. We examined miRNAs regulated by PINK1 during brain development and neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation, and found that lvels of miRNAs related to tumors and inflammation were different between 1-day-old-wild type (WT) and PINK1-knockout (KO) mouse brains. Notably, levels of miR-326, miR-330 and miR-3099, which are related to astroglioma, increased during brain development and NSC differentiation, and were significantly reduced in the absence of PINK1. Interestingly, in the presence of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), which pushes differentiation of NSCs into astrocytes, miR-326, miR-330, and miR-3099 levels in KO NSCs were also lower than those in WT NSCs. Furthermore, mimics of all three miRNAs increased expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) during differentiation of KO NSCs, but inhibitors of these miRNAs decreased GFAP expression in WT NSCs. Moreover, these miRNAs increased the translational efficacy of GFAP through the 3'-UTR of GFAP mRNA. Taken together, these results suggest that PINK1 deficiency reduce expression levels of miR-326, miR-330 and miR-3099, which may regulate GFAP expression during NSC differentiation and brain development. PMID:26924929

  1. Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Study of Pegylated Arginine Deiminase, Cisplatin, and Pemetrexed in Patients With Argininosuccinate Synthetase 1-Deficient Thoracic Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddowes, Emma; Spicer, James; Chan, Pui Ying; Khadeir, Ramsay; Corbacho, Javier Garcia; Repana, Dimitra; Steele, Jeremy P; Schmid, Peter; Szyszko, Teresa; Cook, Gary; Diaz, Monica; Feng, Xiaoxing; Johnston, Amanda; Thomson, Jim; Sheaff, Michael; Wu, Bor-Wen; Bomalaski, John; Pacey, Simon; Szlosarek, Peter W

    2017-06-01

    Purpose Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) depletes essential amino acid levels in argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) -negative tumors by converting arginine to citrulline and ammonia. The main aim of this study was to determine the recommended dose, safety, and tolerability of ADI-PEG 20, cisplatin, and pemetrexed in patients with ASS1-deficient malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) or non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Using a 3 + 3 + 3 dose-escalation study, nine chemotherapy-naïve patients (five MPM, four NSCLC) received weekly ADI-PEG 20 doses of 18 mg/m(2), 27 mg/m(2), or 36 mg/m(2), together with pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) and cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) which were given every three weeks (maximum of six cycles). Patients achieving stable disease or better could continue ADI-PEG 20 monotherapy until disease progression or withdrawal. Adverse events were assessed by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03, and pharmacodynamics and immunogenicity were also evaluated. Tumor response was assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1 for NSCLC and by modified RECIST criteria for MPM. Results No dose-limiting toxicities were reported; nine of 38 reported adverse events (all grade 1 or 2) were related to ADI-PEG 20. Circulating arginine concentrations declined rapidly, and citrulline levels increased; both changes persisted at 18 weeks. Partial responses were observed in seven of nine patients (78%), including three with either sarcomatoid or biphasic MPM. Conclusion Target engagement with depletion of arginine was maintained throughout treatment with no dose-limiting toxicities. In this biomarker-selected group of patients with ASS1-deficient cancers, clinical activity was observed in patients with poor-prognosis tumors. Therefore, we recommend a dose for future studies of weekly ADI-PEG 20 36 mg/m(2) plus three-weekly cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) and pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2).

  2. Identification of a compound heterozygote for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency (APRT*J/APART*Q0) leading to 2,8-dihydroxyadenine urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatani, N; Kuroshima, S; Yamanaka, H; Nakashe, S; Take, H; Hakoda, M

    1990-10-01

    Homozygous deficiency of a purine salvage enzyme, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT), causes urolithiasis and renal failure. There are two known types of homozygous APRT deficiencies; type I patients completely lack APRT activity while type II patients only partially lack such activity. All type II patients possess at least one APRT*J allele with a substitution from ATG (Met) to ACG (Thr) at codon 136. Type I patients are considered to possess two alleles (APRT*Q0) both of which code for complete deficiencies. Thus, some patients with type II APRT deficiencies may have a genotype of APRT*J/APRT*Q0. As no individuals with such a genotype have previously been identified, we performed extensive analysis on four members of a family by (1) the T-cell method for the identification of a homozygote, (2) the B-cell method for the identification of heterozygotes, and (3) oligonucleotide hybridization after in vitro amplification of a part of genomic APRT sequence for the identification of APRT*J and non-APRT*J alleles. We report here the first evidence that 2,8-dihydroxyadenine urolithiasis developed in a boy aged 2 years with a genotype of APRT*J/APRT*Q0.

  3. Specificities and pH profiles of adenine and hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (nucleotide synthases) of the thermoacidophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Rasmussen, Mads Skytte

    2014-01-01

    Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransfe......Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine...... phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase), the protein product turned out to be a PRTase highly specific for adenine and we suggest that the reading frame should be renamed apT. The other reading frame SSO2424 (gpT-2) proved to be a true 6-oxopurine PRTase active with hypoxanthine, xanthine and guanine as substrates, and we...... suggest that the gene should be renamed gpT. Both enzymes exhibited unusual profiles of activity versus pH. The adenine PRTase showed the highest activity at pH 7.5-8.5, but had a distinct peak of activity also at pH 4.5. The 6-oxo PRTase showed maximal activity with hypoxanthine and guanine around pH 4...

  4. [Purulent pericarditis and colonic infiltrating to Salmonella enteritidis complicated by acute intussusception in a case of IL-12Rβ1 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailal, F; Tazi, A; Bustamante, J; Picard, C; Najib, J; Casanova, J-L; Bousfiha, A A

    2014-12-01

    IL-12 receptor β1 deficiency (IL-12Rβ1) predisposes patients to mycobacteria and Salmonella infections. We report a case of IL-12Rβ1 deficiency with a fatal multi-resistant Salmonella enteritidis infection. This boy was born after from a consanguineous marriage, and diagnosed as having a IL-12Rβ1 deficiency since the age of 3 months. He presented with recurrent Salmonella enteritidis essentially digestive localization, complicated by purulent pericarditis at the same germ at the age of two and a half years. At the age of 3, a colonic infiltration due to a Salmonella enteritidis resistant to antibiotics, was complicated by acute intussusception, and the child died. The IL-12Rβ1 deficiency is considered as having a good prognosis, in contrast to what happened in our patient. We review therapeutic issues in these patients.

  5. Role of BH3-only molecules Bim and Puma in β-cell death in Pdx1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Decheng; Sun, Juan; Wang, Changzheng; Ye, Honggang; Mao, Liqun; Cheng, Emily H; Bell, Graeme I; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1) are associated with diabetes in humans. Pdx1-haploinsufficient mice develop diabetes due to an increase in β-cell death leading to reduced β-cell mass. For definition of the molecular link between Pdx1 deficiency and β-cell death, Pdx1-haploinsufficient mice in which the genes for the BH3-only molecules Bim and Puma had been ablated were studied on a high-fat diet. Compared with Pdx1(+/-) mice, animals haploinsufficient for both Pdx1 and Bim or Puma genes showed improved glucose tolerance, enhanced β-cell mass, and reduction in the number of TUNEL-positive cells in islets. These results suggest that Bim and Puma ablation improves β-cell survival in Pdx1(+/-) mice. For exploration of the mechanisms responsible for these findings, Pdx1 gene expression was knocked down in mouse MIN6 insulinoma cells resulting in apoptotic cell death that was found to be associated with increased expression of BH3-only molecules Bim and Puma. If the upregulation of Bim and Puma that occurs during Pdx1 suppression was prevented, apoptotic β-cell death was reduced in vitro. These results suggest that Bim and Puma play an important role in β-cell apoptosis in Pdx1-deficient diabetes.

  6. Arginine Deprivation Inhibits the Warburg Effect and Upregulates Glutamine Anaplerosis and Serine Biosynthesis in ASS1-Deficient Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Charles Kremer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting defects in metabolism is an underutilized strategy for the treatment of cancer. Arginine auxotrophy resulting from the silencing of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1 is a common metabolic alteration reported in a broad range of aggressive cancers. To assess the metabolic effects that arise from acute and chronic arginine starvation in ASS1-deficient cell lines, we performed metabolite profiling. We found that pharmacologically induced arginine depletion causes increased serine biosynthesis, glutamine anaplerosis, oxidative phosphorylation, and decreased aerobic glycolysis, effectively inhibiting the Warburg effect. The reduction of glycolysis in cells otherwise dependent on aerobic glycolysis is correlated with reduced PKM2 expression and phosphorylation and upregulation of PHGDH. Concurrent arginine deprivation and glutaminase inhibition was found to be synthetic lethal across a spectrum of ASS1-deficient tumor cell lines and is sufficient to cause in vivo tumor regression in mice. These results identify two synthetic lethal therapeutic strategies exploiting metabolic vulnerabilities of ASS1-negative cancers.

  7. A three-year-old boy with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome presenting with episodic ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro-Sasaki, Akiko; Shimbo, Hiroko; Takano, Kyoko; Wada, Takahito; Osaka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is a metabolic encephalopathy that results from impaired glucose transport into the brain as the result of a mutation of the SLC2A1 gene. It has been recognized recently that these patients can present with a much broader clinical spectrum than previously thought. We describe a 3-year-old boy presenting with episodic ataxia. Our patient exhibited periodic abnormal eye movements, including opsoclonus, since he was 4 months of age. At 2 years of age, he experienced acute cerebellar ataxia after a vaccination. Since then, he has had periodic attacks of ataxic gait, repeated vomiting, and abnormal eye movement. He was diagnosed as having episodic ataxia type 2 because the administration of acetazolamide seemed effective. By 3 years and 10 months of age, he exhibited mild mental retardation and mild trunk ataxia. The attacks were more likely to occur when he was hungry. Molecular analysis revealed that the SLC2A1 gene had a de novo mutation of heterozygous seven nucleotide insertion within exon 7, resulting in a frameshift. He has recently begun a modified Atkins diet; the frequency of attacks has been reduced, and his psychomotor and language skills have begun to develop. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis in children with episodic ataxia, even if acetazolamide is effective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical, biochemical, and genetic spectrum of seven new patients with NFU1 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe eAhting

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the mitochondrial energy metabolism are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. An increasingly recognized subgroup is caused by defective mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, with defects in 13 genes being linked to human disease to date. Mutations in three of them, NFU1, BOLA3, and IBA57 affect the assembly of mitochondrial [4Fe-4S] proteins leading to an impairment of diverse mitochondrial metabolic pathways and ATP production. Patients with defects in these three genes present with lactic acidosis, hyperglycinemia, and reduced activities of respiratory chain complexes I and II, the four lipoic acid-dependent 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases, and the glycine cleavage system (GCS. To date, 5 different NFU1 pathogenic variants have been reported in 15 patients from 12 families. We report on 7 new patients from 5 families carrying compound heterozygous or homozygous pathogenic NFU1 mutations identified by candidate gene screening and exome sequencing. 6 out of 8 different disease alleles were novel and functional studies were performed to support the pathogenicity of 5 of them. Characteristic clinical features included fatal infantile encephalopathy and pulmonary hypertension leading to death within the first 6 months of life in 6 out of 7 patients. Laboratory investigations revealed combined defects of PDHc (5 out of 5 and respiratory chain complexes I and II+III (4 out of 5 in skeletal muscle and/or fibroblasts as well as elevated lactate (5 out of 6 and glycine levels (7 out of 7. Our study adds to the definition of the phenotypic spectrum associated with NFU1 mutations and might contribute to the diagnostic workup of future patients

  9. Calpain-2 compensation promotes angiotensin II-induced ascending and abdominal aortic aneurysms in calpain-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswaran Subramanian

    Full Text Available Recently, we demonstrated that angiotensin II (AngII-infusion profoundly increased both aortic protein and activity of calpains, calcium-activated cysteine proteases, in mice. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of calpain attenuated AngII-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm (AA in mice. Recent studies have shown that AngII infusion into mice leads to aneurysmal formation localized to the ascending aorta. However, the precise functional contribution of calpain isoforms (-1 or -2 in AngII-induced abdominal AA formation is not known. Similarly, a functional role of calpain in AngII-induced ascending AA remains to be defined. Using BDA-410, an inhibitor of calpains, and calpain-1 genetic deficient mice, we examined the relative contribution of calpain isoforms in AngII-induced ascending and abdominal AA development.To investigate the relative contribution of calpain-1 and -2 in development of AngII-induced AAs, male LDLr -/- mice that were either calpain-1 +/+ or -/- were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet and infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min for 4 weeks. Calpain-1 deficiency had no significant effect on body weight or blood pressure during AngII infusion. Moreover, calpain-1 deficiency showed no discernible effects on AngII-induced ascending and abdominal AAs. Interestingly, AngII infusion induced increased expression of calpain-2 protein, thus compensating for total calpain activity in aortas of calpain-1 deficient mice. Oral administration of BDA-410, a calpain inhibitor, along with AngII-infusion significantly attenuated AngII-induced ascending and abdominal AA formation in both calpain-1 +/+ and -/- mice as compared to vehicle administered mice. Furthermore, BDA-410 administration attenuated AngII-induced aortic medial hypertrophy and macrophage accumulation. Western blot and immunostaining analyses revealed BDA-410 administration attenuated AngII-induced C-terminal fragmentation of filamin A, an actin binding cytoskeletal protein in aorta

  10. TRAF1 is a negative regulator of TNF signaling. enhanced TNF signaling in TRAF1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsikov, E N; Laouini, D; Dunn, I F; Sannikova, T Y; Davidson, L; Alt, F W; Geha, R S

    2001-10-01

    TNF receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1) is a unique TRAF protein because it lacks a RING finger domain and is predominantly expressed in activated lymphocytes. To elucidate the function of TRAF1, we generated TRAF1-deficient mice. TRAF1(-/-) mice are viable and have normal lymphocyte development. TRAF1(-/-) T cells exhibit stronger than wild-type (WT) T cell proliferation to anti-CD3 mAb, which persisted in the presence of IL-2 or anti-CD28 antibodies. Activated TRAF1(-/-) T cells, but not TRAF1(+/+) T cells, responded to TNF by proliferation and activation of the NF-kappa B and AP-1 signaling pathways. This TNF effect was mediated by TNFR2 (p75) but not by TNFR1 (p55). Furthermore, skin from TRAF1(-/-) mice was hypersensitive to TNF-induced necrosis. These findings suggest that TRAF1 is a negative regulator of TNF signaling.

  11. Perilipin1 deficiency in whole body or bone marrow-derived cells attenuates lesions in atherosclerosis-prone mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Zhao

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the role of perilipin 1 (Plin1 in whole body or bone marrow-derived cells on atherogenesis.Accumulated evidence have indicated the role of Plin1 in atherosclerosis, however, these findings are controversial. In this study, we showed that Plin1 was assembled and colocalized with CD68 in macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE-/- mice. We further found 39% reduction of plaque size in the aortic roots of Plin1 and ApoE double knockout (Plin1-/-ApoE-/- females compared with ApoE-/- female littermates. In order to verify whether this reduction was macrophage-specific, the bone marrow cells from wild-type or Plin1 deficient mice (Plin1-/- were transplanted into LDL receptor deficient mice (LDLR-/-. Mice receiving Plin1-/- bone marrow cells showed also 49% reduction in aortic atherosclerotic lesions compared with LDLR-/- mice received wild-type bone marrow cells. In vitro experiments showed that Plin1-/- macrophages had decreased protein expression of CD36 translocase and an enhanced cholesterol ester hydrolysis upon aggregated-LDL loading, with unaltered expression of many other regulators of cholesterol metabolism, such as cellular lipases, and Plin2 and 3. Given the fundamental role of Plin1 in protecting LD lipids from lipase hydrolysis, it is reasonably speculated that the assembly of Plin1 in microphages might function to reduce lipolysis and hence increase lipid retention in ApoE-/- plaques, but this pro-atherosclerotic property would be abrogated on inactivation of Plin1.Plin1 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells may be responsible for reduced atherosclerotic lesions in the mice.

  12. Epiphyseal abnormalities, trabecular bone loss and articular chondrocyte hypertrophy develop in the long bones of postnatal Ext1-deficient mice.

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    Sgariglia, Federica; Candela, Maria Elena; Huegel, Julianne; Jacenko, Olena; Koyama, Eiki; Yamaguchi, Yu; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2013-11-01

    Long bones are integral components of the limb skeleton. Recent studies have indicated that embryonic long bone development is altered by mutations in Ext genes and consequent heparan sulfate (HS) deficiency, possibly due to changes in activity and distribution of HS-binding/growth plate-associated signaling proteins. Here we asked whether Ext function is continuously required after birth to sustain growth plate function and long bone growth and organization. Compound transgenic Ext1(f/f);Col2CreERT mice were injected with tamoxifen at postnatal day 5 (P5) to ablate Ext1 in cartilage and monitored over time. The Ext1-deficient mice exhibited growth retardation already by 2weeks post-injection, as did their long bones. Mutant growth plates displayed a severe disorganization of chondrocyte columnar organization, a shortened hypertrophic zone with low expression of collagen X and MMP-13, and reduced primary spongiosa accompanied, however, by increased numbers of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous border. The mutant epiphyses were abnormal as well. Formation of a secondary ossification center was significantly delayed but interestingly, hypertrophic-like chondrocytes emerged within articular cartilage, similar to those often seen in osteoarthritic joints. Indeed, the cells displayed a large size and round shape, expressed collagen X and MMP-13 and were surrounded by an abundant Perlecan-rich pericellular matrix not seen in control articular chondrocytes. In addition, ectopic cartilaginous outgrowths developed on the lateral side of mutant growth plates over time that resembled exostotic characteristic of children with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses, a syndrome caused by Ext mutations and HS deficiency. In sum, the data do show that Ext1 is continuously required for postnatal growth and organization of long bones as well as their adjacent joints. Ext1 deficiency elicits defects that can occur in human skeletal conditions including trabecular bone loss

  13. Adaptation to HIF-1 deficiency by upregulation of the AMP/ATP ratio and phosphofructokinase activation in hepatomas

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    Airley Rachel E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIF-1 deficiency has marked effects on tumour glycolysis and growth. We therefore investigated the consequences of HIF-1 deficiency in mice, using the well established Hepa-1 wild-type (WT and HIF-1β-deficient (c4 model. These mechanisms could be clinically relevant, since HIF-1 is now a therapeutic target. Methods Hepa-1 WT and c4 tumours grown in vivo were analysed by 18FDG-PET and 19FDG Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for glucose uptake; by HPLC for adenine nucleotides; by immunohistochemistry for GLUTs; by immunoblotting and by DIGE followed by tandem mass spectrometry for protein expression; and by classical enzymatic methods for enzyme activity. Results HIF-1β deficient Hepa-1 c4 tumours grew significantly more slowly than WT tumours, and (as expected showed significantly lower expression of many glycolytic enzymes. However, HIF-1β deficiency caused no significant change in the rate of glucose uptake in c4 tumours compared to WT when assessed in vivo by measuring fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG uptake. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated less GLUT-1 in c4 tumours, whereas GLUT-2 (liver type was similar to WT. Factors that might upregulate glucose uptake independently of HIF-1 (phospho-Akt, c-Myc were shown to have either lower or similar expression in c4 compared to WT tumours. However the AMP/ATP ratio was 4.5 fold higher (p Conclusions Despite their defective HIF-1 and consequent down-regulation of glycolytic enzyme expression, Hepa-1 c4 tumours maintain glucose uptake and glycolysis because the resulting low [ATP] high [AMP] allosterically activate PFK-1. This mechanism of resistance would keep glycolysis functioning and also result in activation of AMP-Kinase and growth inhibition; it may have major implications for the therapeutic activity of HIF inhibitors in vivo. Interestingly, this control mechanism does not involve transcriptional control or proteomics, but rather the classical activation and inhibition mechanisms

  14. Partial recessive IFN-γR1 deficiency: genetic, immunological and clinical features of 14 patients from 11 kindreds

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    Sologuren, Ithaisa; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Pestano, Jose; Vincent, Quentin Benoit; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Chapgier, Ariane; Cárdenes, María; Feinberg, Jacqueline; García-Laorden, M. Isabel; Picard, Capucine; Santiago, Esther; Kong, Xiaofei; Jannière, Lucile; Colino, Elena; Herrera-Ramos, Estefanía; Francés, Adela; Navarrete, Carmen; Blanche, Stéphane; Faria, Emilia; Remiszewski, Paweł; Cordeiro, Ana; Freeman, Alexandra; Holland, Steven; Abarca, Katia; Valerón-Lemaur, Mónica; Gonçalo-Marques, José; Silveira, Luisa; García-Castellano, José Manuel; Caminero, José; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Bustamante, Jacinta; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    We report a series of 14 patients from 11 kindreds with recessive partial (RP)-interferon (IFN)-γR1 deficiency. The I87T mutation was found in nine homozygous patients from Chile, Portugal and Poland, and the V63G mutation was found in five homozygous patients from the Canary Islands. Founder effects accounted for the recurrence of both mutations. The most recent common ancestors of the patients with the I87T and V63G mutations probably lived 1600 (875–2950) and 500 (200–1275) years ago, respectively. The two alleles confer phenotypes that are similar but differ in terms of IFN-γR1 levels and residual response to IFN-γ. The patients suffered from bacillus Calmette-Guérin-osis (n= 6), environmental mycobacteriosis (n= 6) or tuberculosis (n= 1). One patient did not suffer from mycobacterial infections but had disseminated salmonellosis, which was also present in two other patients. Age at onset of the first environmental mycobacterial disease differed widely between patients, with a mean value of 11.25 ± 9.13 years. Thirteen patients survived until the age of 14.82 ± 11.2 years, and one patient died at the age of 7 years, 9 days after the diagnosis of long-term Mycobacterium avium infection and the initiation of antimycobacterial treatment. Up to 10 patients are currently free of infection with no prophylaxis. The clinical heterogeneity of the 14 patients was not clearly related to either IFNGR1 genotype or the resulting cellular phenotype. RP-IFN-γR1 deficiency is, thus, more common than initially thought and should be considered in both children and adults with mild or severe mycobacterial diseases. PMID:21266457

  15. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris, semiaquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens and terrestrial (Sus scrofa

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    Myrna eBarjau Perez-Milicua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens can hold their breath for about 30 sec. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia and reduced blood supply (ischemia to tissues. Production of adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa, are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal (n=11, semiaquatic (neotropical river otter (n=4 and terrestrial (domestic pig (n=11. Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX, inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP, adenosine 5’-monophosphate (AMP, adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP, ATP, guanosine 5’-diphosphate (GDP, guanosine 5’-triphosphate (GTP, and xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise, aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  16. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

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    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  17. Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated and Rad3 Related (ATR) Protein Kinase Inhibition Is Synthetically Lethal in XRCC1 Deficient Ovarian Cancer Cells

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    Sultana, Rebeka; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek; Perry, Christina; Moseley, Paul; Albarakti, Nada; Mohan, Vivek; Seedhouse, Claire; Chan, Stephen; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3 Related (ATR) protein kinase is a key sensor of single-stranded DNA associated with stalled replication forks and repair intermediates generated during DNA repair. XRCC1 is a critical enzyme in single strand break repair and base excision repair. XRCC1-LIG3 complex is also an important contributor to the ligation step of the nucleotide excision repair response. Methods In the current study, we investigated synthetic lethality in XRCC1 deficient and XRCC1 proficient Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) and human ovarian cancer cells using ATR inhibitors (NU6027). In addition, we also investigated the ability of ATR inhibitors to potentiate cisplatin cytotoxicity in XRCC1 deficient and XRCC1 proficient CHO and human cancer cells. Clonogenic assays, alkaline COMET assays, γH2AX immunocytochemistry, FACS for cell cycle as well as FITC-annexin V flow cytometric analysis were performed. Results ATR inhibition is synthetically lethal in XRCC1 deficient cells as evidenced by increased cytotoxicity, accumulation of double strand DNA breaks, G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased apoptosis. Compared to cisplatin alone, combination of cisplatin and ATR inhibitor results in enhanced cytotoxicity in XRCC1 deficient cells compared to XRCC1 proficient cells. Conclusions Our data provides evidence that ATR inhibition is suitable for synthetic lethality application and cisplatin chemopotentiation in XRCC1 deficient ovarian cancer cells. PMID:23451157

  18. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3 related (ATR protein kinase inhibition is synthetically lethal in XRCC1 deficient ovarian cancer cells.

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    Rebeka Sultana

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3 Related (ATR protein kinase is a key sensor of single-stranded DNA associated with stalled replication forks and repair intermediates generated during DNA repair. XRCC1 is a critical enzyme in single strand break repair and base excision repair. XRCC1-LIG3 complex is also an important contributor to the ligation step of the nucleotide excision repair response. METHODS: In the current study, we investigated synthetic lethality in XRCC1 deficient and XRCC1 proficient Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO and human ovarian cancer cells using ATR inhibitors (NU6027. In addition, we also investigated the ability of ATR inhibitors to potentiate cisplatin cytotoxicity in XRCC1 deficient and XRCC1 proficient CHO and human cancer cells. Clonogenic assays, alkaline COMET assays, γH2AX immunocytochemistry, FACS for cell cycle as well as FITC-annexin V flow cytometric analysis were performed. RESULTS: ATR inhibition is synthetically lethal in XRCC1 deficient cells as evidenced by increased cytotoxicity, accumulation of double strand DNA breaks, G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased apoptosis. Compared to cisplatin alone, combination of cisplatin and ATR inhibitor results in enhanced cytotoxicity in XRCC1 deficient cells compared to XRCC1 proficient cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provides evidence that ATR inhibition is suitable for synthetic lethality application and cisplatin chemopotentiation in XRCC1 deficient ovarian cancer cells.

  19. In a model of Batten disease, palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 deficiency is associated with brown adipose tissue and thermoregulation abnormalities.

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    Alfia Khaibullina

    Full Text Available Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a deficiency of palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1. We have previously shown that children with INCL have increased risk of hypothermia during anesthesia and that PPT1-deficiency in mice is associated with disruption of adaptive energy metabolism, downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we hypothesized that Ppt1-knockout mice, a well-studied model of INCL that shows many of the neurologic manifestations of the disease, would recapitulate the thermoregulation impairment observed in children with INCL. We also hypothesized that when exposed to cold, Ppt1-knockout mice would be unable to maintain body temperature as in mice thermogenesis requires upregulation of Pgc-1α and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp-1 in brown adipose tissue. We found that the Ppt1-KO mice had lower basal body temperature as they aged and developed hypothermia during cold exposure. Surprisingly, this inability to maintain body temperature during cold exposure in Ppt1-KO mice was associated with an adequate upregulation of Pgc-1α and Ucp-1 but with lower levels of sympathetic neurotransmitters in brown adipose tissue. In addition, during baseline conditions, brown adipose tissue of Ppt1-KO mice had less vacuolization (lipid droplets compared to wild-type animals. After cold stress, wild-type animals had significant decreases whereas Ppt1-KO had insignificant changes in lipid droplets compared with baseline measurements, thus suggesting that Ppt1-KO had less lipolysis in response to cold stress. These results uncover a previously unknown phenotype associated with PPT1 deficiency, that of altered thermoregulation, which is associated with impaired lipolysis and neurotransmitter release to brown adipose tissue during cold exposure. These findings suggest that INCL should be added to the list of

  20. Pannexin-1 Deficient Mice Have an Increased Susceptibility for Atrial Fibrillation and Show a QT-Prolongation Phenotype

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    Stella Petric

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Pannexin-1 (Panx1 is an ATP release channel that is ubiquitously expressed and coupled to several ligand-gated receptors. In isolated cardiac myocytes, Panx1 forms large conductance channels that can be activated by Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Here we characterized the electrophysiological function of these channels in the heart in vivo, taking recourse to mice with Panx1 ablation. Methods: Cardiac phenotyping of Panx1 knock-out mice (Panx1-/- was performed by employing a molecular, cellular and functional approach, including echocardiography, surface and telemetric ECG recordings with QT analysis, physical stress testing and quantification of heart rate variability. In addition, an in vivo electrophysiological study entailed programmed electrical stimulation using an intracardiac octapolar catheter. Results: Panx1 deficiency results in a higher incidence of AV-block, delayed ventricular depolarisation, significant prolongation of QT- and rate corrected QT-interval and a higher incidence of atrial fibrillation after intraatrial burst stimulation. Conclusion: Panx1 seems to play an important role in murine cardiac electrophysiology and warrants further consideration in the context of hereditary forms of atrial fibrillation.

  1. CX3CR1 deficiency alters hippocampal-dependent plasticity phenomena blunting the effects of enriched environment

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    Laura eMaggi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years several evidence demonstrated that some features of hippocampal biology, like neurogenesis, synaptic transmission, learning and memory performances are deeply modulated by social, motor and sensorial experiences. Fractalkine/CX3CL1 is a transmembrane chemokine abundantly expressed in the brain by neurons, where it modulates glutamatergic transmission and long-term plasticity processes regulating the intercellular communication between glia and neurons, being its specific receptor CX3CR1 expressed by microglia. In this paper we investigated the role of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling on experience-dependent hippocampal plasticity processes. At this aim wt and CX3CR1GFP/GFP mice were exposed to long-lasting-enriched environment (EE and the effects on hippocampal functions were studied by electrophysiological recordings of long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic activity, behavioral tests of learning and memory in the Morris water maze paradigm and analysis of neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG.We found that CX3CR1 deficiency increases hippocampal plasticity and spatial memory blunting the potentiating effects of EE. In contrast, exposure to EE increased the number and migration of neural progenitors in the DG of both wt and CX3CR1GFP/GFP mice. These data indicate that CX3CL1/CX3CR1-mediated signaling is crucial for a normal experience-dependent modulation of hippocampal functions.

  2. Brain microvasculature defects and Glut1 deficiency syndrome averted by early repletion of the glucose transporter-1 protein.

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    Tang, Maoxue; Gao, Guangping; Rueda, Carlos B; Yu, Hang; Thibodeaux, David N; Awano, Tomoyuki; Engelstad, Kristin M; Sanchez-Quintero, Maria-Jose; Yang, Hong; Li, Fanghua; Li, Huapeng; Su, Qin; Shetler, Kara E; Jones, Lynne; Seo, Ryan; McConathy, Jonathan; Hillman, Elizabeth M; Noebels, Jeffrey L; De Vivo, Darryl C; Monani, Umrao R

    2017-01-20

    Haploinsufficiency of the SLC2A1 gene and paucity of its translated product, the glucose transporter-1 (Glut1) protein, disrupt brain function and cause the neurodevelopmental disorder, Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS). There is little to suggest how reduced Glut1 causes cognitive dysfunction and no optimal treatment for Glut1 DS. We used model mice to demonstrate that low Glut1 protein arrests cerebral angiogenesis, resulting in a profound diminution of the brain microvasculature without compromising the blood-brain barrier. Studies to define the temporal requirements for Glut1 reveal that pre-symptomatic, AAV9-mediated repletion of the protein averts brain microvasculature defects and prevents disease, whereas augmenting the protein late, during adulthood, is devoid of benefit. Still, treatment following symptom onset can be effective; Glut1 repletion in early-symptomatic mutants that have experienced sustained periods of low brain glucose nevertheless restores the cerebral microvasculature and ameliorates disease. Timely Glut1 repletion may thus constitute an effective treatment for Glut1 DS.

  3. Impaired differentiation of macrophage lineage cells attenuates bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis in Ndrg1 deficient mice.

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    Watari, Kosuke; Shibata, Tomohiro; Nabeshima, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Ai; Fukunaga, Yuichi; Kawahara, Akihiko; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Fukushi, Jun-Ichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi

    2016-01-18

    N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a responsible gene for a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D). This is the first study aiming to assess the contribution of NDRG1 to differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, which has important implications for bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. Ndrg1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal curvature of the spine, high trabecular bone mass, and reduced number of osteoclasts. We observed that serum levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and macrophage-related cytokines were markedly decreased in KO mice. Differentiation of bone marrow (BM) cells into osteoclasts, M1/M2-type macrophages and dendritic cells was all impaired. Furthermore, KO mice also showed reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis by cancer cells, accompanied by decreased infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages. The transfer of BM-derived macrophages from KO mice into BM-eradicated wild type (WT) mice induced much less tumor angiogenesis than observed in WT mice. Angiogenesis in corneas in response to inflammatory stimuli was also suppressed with decreased infiltration of macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that NDRG1 deficiency attenuates the differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, suppressing bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. This study strongly suggests the crucial role of NDRG1 in differentiation process for macrophages.

  4. Melatonin-receptor-1-deficiency affects neurogenic differentiation factor immunoreaction in pancreatic islets and enteroendocrine cells of mice.

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    Shalabi, Andree; Fischer, Claudia; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2013-09-01

    Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is a transcription factor involved in the differentiation of neurons and in the control of energy balance and metabolism. It plays a key role in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Melatonin is an important rhythmic endocrine signal within the circadian system of mammals and modulates insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. In the mouse pars tuberalis, NeuroD mRNA levels show day/night variation, which is independent of the molecular clock gene mPER1 but depends on the functional melatonin receptor 1 (MT1). So far, little is known about the effect of melatonin on NeuroD synthesis in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, NeuroD protein levels and cellular localization were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in pancreatic islets and duodenal enteroendocrine cells of MT1- and mPER1-deficienct mice. In addition, the localization of NeuroD-positive cells was analyzed by double-immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy. In duodenal enteroendocrine cells and pancreatic islets of WT and PER1-deficient mice, NeuroD immunoreaction showed a peak during the early subjective night. In contrast, this peak was absent in MT1-deficent mice. These data suggest that melatonin, by acting on MT1 receptors, affects NeuroD expression in the gastrointestinal tract and thus might contribute to circadian regulation in metabolic functions.

  5. Collagen peptide and vitamin C additively attenuate age-related skin atrophy in Sod1-deficient mice.

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    Shibuya, Shuichi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Toda, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Kenji; Tometsuka, Chisa; Ogura, Takayuki; Koyama, Yoh-ichi; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2014-01-01

    Age-related skin thinning is correlated with a decrease in the content of collagen in the skin. Accumulating evidence suggests that collagen peptide (CP) and vitamin C (VC) transcriptionally upregulate type I collagen in vivo. However, the additive effects of CP and VC on age-related skin changes remain unclear. We herein demonstrate that CP and a VC derivative additively corrected age-related skin thinning via reduced oxidative damage in superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1)-deficient mice. Co-treatment with these compounds significantly normalized the altered gene expression of Col1a1, Has2, and Ci1, a proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter, in Sod1(-/-) skin. The in vitro analyses further revealed that collagen oligopeptide, a digestive product of ingested CP, significantly promoted the bioactivity of the VC derivative with respect to the migration and proliferation of Sod1(-/-) fibroblasts. These findings suggest that combined treatment with CP and VC is effective in cases of age-related skin pathology.

  6. Dysfunction of the heme recycling system in heme oxygenase 1-deficient mice: effects on macrophage viability and tissue iron distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Eckhaus, Michael A; Ghosh, Manik C; Ollivierre-Wilson, Hayden; Rouault, Tracey A

    2010-12-23

    To better understand the tissue iron overload and anemia previously reported in a human patient and mice that lack heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), we studied iron distribution and pathology in HO-1(Hmox1)(-/-) mice. We found that resident splenic and liver macrophages were mostly absent in HO-1(-/-) mice. Erythrophagocytosis caused the death of HO-1(-/-) macrophages in in vitro experiments, supporting the hypothesis that HO-1(-/-) macrophages died of exposure to heme released on erythrophagocytosis. Rupture of HO-1(-/-) macrophages in vivo and release of nonmetabolized heme probably caused tissue inflammation. In the spleen, initial splenic enlargement progressed to red pulp fibrosis, atrophy, and functional hyposplenism in older mice, recapitulating the asplenia of an HO-1-deficient patient. We postulate that the failure of tissue macrophages to remove senescent erythrocytes led to intravascular hemolysis and increased expression of the heme and hemoglobin scavenger proteins, hemopexin and haptoglobin. Lack of macrophages expressing the haptoglobin receptor, CD163, diminished the ability of haptoglobin to neutralize circulating hemoglobin, and iron overload occurred in kidney proximal tubules, which were able to catabolize heme with HO-2. Thus, in HO-1(-/-) mammals, the reduced function and viability of erythrophagocytosing macrophages are the main causes of tissue damage and iron redistribution.

  7. A Protein Kinase C Phosphorylation Motif in GLUT1 Affects Glucose Transport and is Mutated in GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunice E; Ma, Jing; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Mi, Wentao; Salato, Valerie K; Nguyen, Nam; Jiang, Youxing; Pascual, Juan M; North, Paula E; Shaul, Philip W; Mettlen, Marcel; Wang, Richard C

    2015-06-04

    Protein kinase C has been implicated in the phosphorylation of the erythrocyte/brain glucose transporter, GLUT1, without a clear understanding of the site(s) of phosphorylation and the possible effects on glucose transport. Through in vitro kinase assays, mass spectrometry, and phosphospecific antibodies, we identify serine 226 in GLUT1 as a PKC phosphorylation site. Phosphorylation of S226 is required for the rapid increase in glucose uptake and enhanced cell surface localization of GLUT1 induced by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Endogenous GLUT1 is phosphorylated on S226 in primary endothelial cells in response to TPA or VEGF. Several naturally occurring, pathogenic mutations that cause GLUT1 deficiency syndrome disrupt this PKC phosphomotif, impair the phosphorylation of S226 in vitro, and block TPA-mediated increases in glucose uptake. We demonstrate that the phosphorylation of GLUT1 on S226 regulates glucose transport and propose that this modification is important in the physiological regulation of glucose transport.

  8. Successful Gene Therapy in the RPGRIP1-deficient Dog: a Large Model of Cone–Rod Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhériteau, Elsa; Petit, Lolita; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Guihal, Caroline; François, Achille; Guyon, Richard; Provost, Nathalie; Lemoine, Françoise; Papal, Samantha; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    For the development of new therapies, proof-of-concept studies in large animal models that share clinical features with their human counterparts represent a pivotal step. For inherited retinal dystrophies primarily involving photoreceptor cells, the efficacy of gene therapy has been demonstrated in canine models of stationary cone dystrophies and progressive rod–cone dystrophies but not in large models of progressive cone–rod dystrophies, another important cause of blindness. To address the last issue, we evaluated gene therapy in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1)-deficient dog, a model exhibiting a severe cone–rod dystrophy similar to that seen in humans. Subretinal injection of AAV5 (n = 5) or AAV8 (n = 2) encoding the canine Rpgrip1 improved photoreceptor survival in transduced areas of treated retinas. Cone function was significantly and stably rescued in all treated eyes (18–72% of those recorded in normal eyes) up to 24 months postinjection. Rod function was also preserved (22–29% of baseline function) in four of the five treated dogs up to 24 months postinjection. No detectable rod function remained in untreated contralateral eyes. More importantly, treatment preserved bright- and dim-light vision. Efficacy of gene therapy in this large animal model of cone–rod dystrophy provides great promise for human treatment. PMID:24091916

  9. T-bet regulates differentiation of forkhead box protein 3+ regulatory T cells in programmed cell death-1-deficient mice

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    Tahara, M; Kondo, Y; Yokosawa, M; Tsuboi, H; Takahashi, S; Shibayama, S; Matsumoto, I; Sumida, T

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) plays an important role in peripheral T cell tolerance, but whether or not it affects the differentiation of helper T cell subsets remains elusive. Here we describe the importance of PD-1 in the control of T helper type 1 (Th1) cell activation and development of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). PD-1-deficient T cell-specific T-bet transgenic (P/T) mice showed growth retardation, and the majority died within 10 weeks. P/T mice showed T-bet over-expression, increased interferon (IFN)-γ production by CD4+ T cells and significantly low FoxP3+ Treg cell percentage. P/T mice developed systemic inflammation, which was probably induced by augmented Th1 response and low FoxP3+ Treg count. The study identified a unique, previously undescribed role for PD-1 in Th1 and Treg differentiation, with potential implication in the development of Th1 cell-targeted therapy. PMID:25219397

  10. Development of a New Reporter Gene System-dsRed/Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase-Xanthine for Molecular Imaging of Processes Behind the Intact Blood-Brain Barrier

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    Mikhail Doubrovin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of a novel dual-modality fusion reporter gene system consisting of Escherichia coli xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRT for nuclear imaging with radiolabeled xanthine and Discosoma red fluorescent protein for optical fluorescent imaging applications. The dsRed/XPRT fusion gene was successfully created and stably transduced into RG2 glioma cells, and both reporters were shown to be functional. The level of dsRed fluorescence directly correlated with XPRT enzymatic activity as measured by ribophosphorylation of [14C]-xanthine was in vitro (Ki = 0.124 ± 0.008 vs. 0.00031 ± 0.00005 mL/min/g in parental cell line, and [*]-xanthine octanol/water partition coefficient was 0.20 at pH = 7.4 (logP = 0.69, meeting requirements for the blood-brain barrier (BBB penetrating tracer. In the in vivo experiment, the concentration of [* C]-xanthine in the normal brain varied from 0.20 to 0.16 + 0.05% dose/g under 0.87 + 0.24% dose/g plasma radiotracer concentration. The accumulation in vivo in the transfected flank tumor was to 2.4 ± 0.3% dose/g, compared to 0.78 ± 0.02% dose/g and 0.64 ± 0.05% dose/g in the control flank tumors and intact muscle, respectively. [14C]-Xanthine appeared to be capable of specific accumulation in the transfected infiltrative brain tumor (RG2-dsRed/XPRT, which corresponded to the 585 nm fluorescent signal obtained from the adjacent cryosections. The images of endogenous gene expression with the “sensory system” have to be normalized for the transfection efficiency based on the “beacon system” image data. Such an approach requires two different “reporter genes” and two different “reporter substrates.” Therefore, the novel dsRed/XPRT fusion gene can be used as a multimodality reporter system in the biological applications requiring two independent reporter genes, including the cells located behind the BBB.

  11. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase/pre-B-cell colony enhancing factor/visfatin plasma levels and clinical outcome in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

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    Bobbert, Peter; Kühl, Uwe; Poller, Wolfgang; Rauch, Ursula; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Skurk, Carsten

    2015-04-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is an enzyme involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis. Nampt functions as gatekeeper of energy status and survival in cardiac myocytes in animal models of ischemia-reperfusion and might regulate inflammatory processes. Therefore, we performed for the 1st time a clinical study to determine the effects of Nampt on cardiac function in patients with nonischemic dilated (DCM) and inflammatory (DCMi) cardiomyopathy. A total of 113 patients were enrolled in the study and classified into control (n = 25), DCM (n = 38), and DCMi (n = 50) groups. Cardiac functional and inflammatory parameters as well as plasma Nampt and cardiac mRNA and protein Nampt expression were determined at baseline and follow-up after 6 months. Patients with DCM (1.04 ± 0.8 ng/mL; P < .001) and DCMi (1.07 ± 0.7 ng/mL; P < .001) showed significantly increased Nampt plasma concentrations at baseline compared with the control group (0.57 ± 0.5 ng/mL). Patients with higher Nampt concentrations in both heart failure groups showed significant better improvement of cardiac functional parameters (correlation between Nampt plasma levels and the change of left ventricular ejection fraction after 6 months: DCM: r = 0.698, P < .001; DCMi: r = 0.503, P < .001). Moreover, cardiac inflammation did not influence Nampt expression, and Nampt concentrations did not modulate cardiac inflammation in DCMi. A multivariate linear regression model revealed high plasma Nampt expression to contribute to better improvement of cardiac function in patients of both heart failure groups. Moreover, heart failure patients with high plasma Nampt levels showed suppressed cardiac TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expression after 6 months' follow-up as well as lower B-type natriuretic peptide levels compared with heart failure patients with low Nampt plasma concentrations. High Nampt expression in patients with nonischemic DCM and DCMi is associated with a favorable outcome and

  12. Chronic mild stress impairs latent inhibition and induces region-specific neural activation in CHL1-deficient mice, a mouse model of schizophrenia.

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    Buhusi, Mona; Obray, Daniel; Guercio, Bret; Bartlett, Mitchell J; Buhusi, Catalin V

    2017-08-30

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal processing of information and attentional deficits. Schizophrenia has a high genetic component but is precipitated by environmental factors, as proposed by the 'two-hit' theory of schizophrenia. Here we compared latent inhibition as a measure of learning and attention, in CHL1-deficient mice, an animal model of schizophrenia, and their wild-type littermates, under no-stress and chronic mild stress conditions. All unstressed mice as well as the stressed wild-type mice showed latent inhibition. In contrast, CHL1-deficient mice did not show latent inhibition after exposure to chronic stress. Differences in neuronal activation (c-Fos-positive cell counts) were noted in brain regions associated with latent inhibition: Neuronal activation in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortices and the nucleus accumbens shell was affected solely by stress. Neuronal activation in basolateral amygdala and ventral hippocampus was affected independently by stress and genotype. Most importantly, neural activation in nucleus accumbens core was affected by the interaction between stress and genotype. These results provide strong support for a 'two-hit' (genes x environment) effect on latent inhibition in CHL1-deficient mice, and identify CHL1-deficient mice as a model of schizophrenia-like learning and attention impairments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Seizure control and acceptance of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome: a 2- to 5-year follow-up of 15 children enrolled prospectively.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Scheffer, H.; Leiendecker, B.; Gertsen, E.; Binder, S.; Leferink, M.; Hertzberg, C.; Nake, A.; Voit, T.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is caused by impaired glucose transport into the brain resulting in an epileptic encephalopathy, developmental delay, and a complex motor disorder. A ketogenic diet provides an alternative fuel to the brain and effectively restores brain energy metabolism.

  14. Seizure control and acceptance of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome: a 2- to 5-year follow-up of 15 children enrolled prospectively.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Scheffer, H.; Leiendecker, B.; Gertsen, E.; Binder, S.; Leferink, M.; Hertzberg, C.; Nake, A.; Voit, T.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is caused by impaired glucose transport into the brain resulting in an epileptic encephalopathy, developmental delay, and a complex motor disorder. A ketogenic diet provides an alternative fuel to the brain and effectively restores brain energy metabolism. METHO

  15. Seizure control and acceptance of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome: a 2- to 5-year follow-up of 15 children enrolled prospectively.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Scheffer, H.; Leiendecker, B.; Gertsen, E.; Binder, S.; Leferink, M.; Hertzberg, C.; Nake, A.; Voit, T.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is caused by impaired glucose transport into the brain resulting in an epileptic encephalopathy, developmental delay, and a complex motor disorder. A ketogenic diet provides an alternative fuel to the brain and effectively restores brain energy metabolism. METHO

  16. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-deficiency impairs the expression of IL-6, IL-1β and G-CSF after transient focal ischemia in mice.

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    Jan-Kolja Strecker

    Full Text Available Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, a chemokine secreted by neurons and astrocytes following stroke is known to aggravate ischemia-related damage. Previous studies revealed that MCP-1-deficient mice develop smaller infarcts and have an improved neurological outcome, whereas mice overexpressing MCP-1 show worsened brain damage and impaired neurological function. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the molecular background of the enhanced recovery in MCP-1-deficient mice after stroke. For this purpose, we (1 performed expression analyses on crucial post-stroke related inflammatory genes in MCP-1-deficient mice compared to wildtype controls, (2 analyzed a possible impact of MCP-1 on astrocyte activation (3 investigated the cellular origin of respective inflammatory cytokines and (4 analyzed the impact of MCP-1 secretion on the migration of both neutrophil granulocytes and T-cells. Here we report that MCP-1-deficiency leads to a shift towards a less inflammatory state following experimental occlusion of the middle cerebral artery including an impaired induction of interleukin-6, interleukin-1β and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor expression as well as a subsequent diminished influx of hematogenous cells. Additionally, MCP-1-deficient mice developed smaller infarcts 36 hours after experimental stroke. Investigations revealed no differences in transcription of tumor necrosis factor-α and astrogliosis 12 and 36 hours after onset of ischemia. These novel results help to understand post ischemic, inflammatory mechanisms and might give further arguments towards therapeutical interventions by modulation of MCP-1 expression in post stroke inflammation.

  17. Notch1 deficiency in postnatal neural progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus leads to emotional and cognitive impairment.

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    Feng, Shufang; Shi, Tianyao; Qiu, Jiangxia; Yang, Haihong; Wu, Yan; Zhou, Wenxia; Wang, Wei; Wu, Haitao

    2017-10-01

    It is well known that Notch1 signaling plays a crucial role in embryonic neural development and adult neurogenesis. The latest evidence shows that Notch1 also plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity in mature hippocampal neurons. So far, deeper insights into the function of Notch1 signaling during the different steps of adult neurogenesis are still lacking, and the mechanisms by which Notch1 dysfunction is associated with brain disorders are also poorly understood. In the current study, we found that Notch1 was highly expressed in the adult-born immature neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Using a genetic approach to selectively ablate Notch1 signaling in late immature precursors in the postnatal hippocampus by cross-breeding doublecortin (DCX)(+) neuron-specific proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-α Cre mice with floxed Notch1 mice, we demonstrated a previously unreported pivotal role of Notch1 signaling in survival and function of adult newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus. Moreover, behavioral and functional studies demonstrated that POMC-Notch1(-/-) mutant mice showed anxiety and depressive-like behavior with impaired synaptic transmission properties in the dentate gyrus. Finally, our mechanistic study showed significantly compromised phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in Notch1 mutants, suggesting that the dysfunction of Notch1 mutants is associated with the disrupted pCREB signaling in postnatally generated immature neurons in the dentate gyrus.-Feng, S., Shi, T., Qiu, J., Yang, H., Wu, Y., Zhou, W., Wang, W., Wu, H. Notch1 deficiency in postnatal neural progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus leads to emotional and cognitive impairment. © FASEB.

  18. A 23 years follow-up study identifies GLUT1 deficiency syndrome initially diagnosed as complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia.

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    Diomedi, Marina; Gan-Or, Ziv; Placidi, Fabio; Dion, Patrick A; Szuto, Anna; Bengala, Mario; Rouleau, Guy A; Gigli, Gian Luigi

    2016-11-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) was initially described in the early 90s as a sporadic clinical condition, characterized by seizures, motor and intellectual impairment with variable clinical presentation, and without a known genetic cause. Although causative mutations in SLC2A1 were later identified and much more is known about the disease, it still remains largely underdiagnosed. In the current study, a previously described Italian family was re-analyzed using whole exome sequencing and clinically re-evaluated. Affected individuals presented with spastic paraplegia as a predominant symptom, with epilepsy and intellectual disability, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with variable clinical presentation. While a novel variant of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) was initially hypothesized in this family, previous linkage studies of known HSP genes did not identify the genetic cause. Exome-sequencing study identified a p.Arg126Cys mutation in the SLC2A1 gene, encoding GLUT1, which segregated with the affected members of the family. The diagnosis of GLUT1DS was further confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and treatment was started with good initial response. The description of this large family provides further clinical information on this rare disease. It also offers an example of how GLUT1DS can be challenging to diagnose, and emphasizes the importance of lumbar puncture in the workflow of similar syndromes. Finally, it suggests that analysis of SLC2A1 should be considered in the diagnostic work up of HSP, especially if it is associated with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Ketone Bodies as a Possible Adjuvant to Ketogenic Diet in PDHc Deficiency but Not in GLUT1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habarou, F; Bahi-Buisson, N; Lebigot, E; Pontoizeau, C; Abi-Warde, M T; Brassier, A; Le Quan Sang, K H; Broissand, C; Vuillaumier-Barrot, S; Roubertie, A; Boutron, A; Ottolenghi, C; de Lonlay, P

    2017-05-17

    Ketogenic diet is the first line therapy for neurological symptoms associated with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDHD) and intractable seizures in a number of disorders, including GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS). Because high-fat diet raises serious compliance issues, we investigated if oral L,D-3-hydroxybutyrate administration could be as effective as ketogenic diet in PDHD and GLUT1-DS. We designed a partial or total progressive substitution of KD with L,D-3-hydroxybutyrate in three GLUT1-DS and two PDHD patients. In GLUT1-DS patients, we observed clinical deterioration including increased frequency of seizures and myoclonus. In parallel, ketone bodies in CSF decreased after introducing 3-hydroxybutyrate. By contrast, two patients with PDHD showed clinical improvement as dystonic crises and fatigability decreased under basal metabolic conditions. In one of the two PDHD children, 3-hydroxybutyrate has largely replaced the ketogenic diet, with the latter that is mostly resumed only during febrile illness. Positive direct effects on energy metabolism in PDHD patients were suggested by negative correlation between ketonemia and lactatemia (r (2) = 0.59). Moreover, in cultured PDHc-deficient fibroblasts, the increase of CO2 production after (14)C-labeled 3-hydroxybutyrate supplementation was consistent with improved Krebs cycle activity. However, except in one patient, ketonemia tended to be lower with 3-hydroxybutyrate administration compared to ketogenic diet. 3-hydroxybutyrate may be an adjuvant treatment to ketogenic diet in PDHD but not in GLUT1-DS under basal metabolic conditions. Nevertheless, ketogenic diet is still necessary in PDHD patients during febrile illness.

  20. Nogo-receptor 1 deficiency has no influence on immune cell repertoire or function during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

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    Sara A Litwak

    Full Text Available The potential role of Nogo-66 Receptor 1 (NgR1 on immune cell phenotypes and their activation during neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, is unclear. To further understand the function of this receptor on haematopoietically-derived cells, phenotypic and functional analyses were performed using NgR1-deficient (ngr1-/- animals. Flow cytometry-based phenotypic analyses performed on blood, spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, bone marrow and central nervous-system (CNS-infiltrating blood cells revealed no immunological defects in naïve ngr1-/- animals versus wild-type littermate (WTLM controls. EAE was induced by either recombinant myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (rMOG, a model in which B cells are considered to contribute pathogenically, or by MOG35-55 peptide, a B cell-independent model. We have demonstrated that in ngr1-/- mice injected with MOG35-55, a significant reduction in the severity of EAE correlated with reduced axonal damage present in the spinal cord when compared to their WTLM controls. However, despite a reduction in axonal damage observed in the CNS of ngr1-/- mice at the chronic stage of disease, no clinical differences could be attributed to a specific genotype when rMOG was used as the encephalitogen. Following MOG35-55-induction of EAE, we could not derive any major changes to the immune cell populations analyzed between ngr1-/- and WTLM mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that NgR1 has little if any effects on the repertoire of immune cells, their activation and trafficking to the CNS.

  1. SF-1 deficiency causes lipid accumulation in Leydig cells via suppression of STAR and CYP11A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Megumi; Migita, Toshiro; Ohishi, Tomokazu; Shima, Yuichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Morohashi, Ken-Ichirou; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2016-11-01

    Genetic mutations of steroidogenic factor 1 (also known as Ad4BP or Nr5a1) have increasingly been reported in patients with 46,XY disorders of sex development (46,XY disorders of sex development). However, because the phenotype of 46,XY disorders of sex development with a steroidogenic factor 1 mutation is wide-ranging, its precise diagnosis remains a clinical problem. We previously reported the frequent occurrence of lipid accumulation in Leydig cells among patients with 46,XY disorders of sex development with a steroidogenic factor 1 mutation, an observation also reported by other authors. To address the mechanism of lipid accumulation in this disease, we examined the effects of steroidogenic factor 1 deficiency on downstream targets of steroidogenic factor 1 in in vitro and in vivo. We found that lipid accumulation in Leydig cells was enhanced after puberty in heterozygous steroidogenic factor 1 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice, and was accompanied by a significant decrease in steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and CYP11A1 expression. In mouse Leydig cell lines, steroidogenic factor 1 knockdown induced a remarkable accumulation of neutral lipids and cholesterol with reduced androgen levels. Steroidogenic factor 1 knockdown reduced the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and CYP11A1, both of which are transcriptional targets of steroidogenic factor 1 and key molecules for steroidogenesis from cholesterol in the mitochondria. Knockdown of either steroidogenic acute regulatory protein or CYP11A1 also induced lipid accumulation, and knockdown of both had an additive effect. Our data suggested that lipid accumulation in the Leydig cells of the 46,XY disorders of sex development phenotype with a steroidogenic factor 1 mutation is due, at least in part, to the suppression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and CYP11A1, and a resulting increase in unmetabolized cholesterol.

  2. SMARCB1/INI1-deficient sinonasal carcinoma shows methylation of RASSF1 gene: A clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and molecular genetic study of a recently described entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laco, Jan; Chmelařová, Marcela; Vošmiková, Hana; Sieglová, Kateřina; Bubancová, Ivana; Dundr, Pavel; Němejcová, Kristýna; Michálek, Jaroslav; Čelakovský, Petr; Mottl, Radovan; Sirák, Igor; Vošmik, Milan; Ryška, Aleš

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was detailed clinicopathological investigation of SMARCB1/INI1-deficient sinonasal carcinomas, including molecular genetic analysis of mutational status and DNA methylation of selected protooncogenes and tumor suppressor genes by means of next generation sequencing (NGS) and methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA). A total of 4/56 (7%) cases of SMARCB1/INI1-deficient carcinomas were detected among 56 sinonasal carcinomas diagnosed over a 19year period using immunohistochemical screening. The series comprised 3 males and 1 female, aged 27-76 years (median 64 years). All tumors arose in the nasal cavity. Three neoplasms were diagnosed in advanced stage pT4. During the follow-up period (range 14-111 months (median 72 months)), three tumors recurred locally, but none of the patients developed regional or distant metastases. Ultimately, two patients died due to the tumor. Microscopically, all tumors consisted of infiltrating nests of polygonal basaloid cells with a variable component of rhabdoid cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, there was almost diffuse expression of cytokeratins (CK), p16, p40 and p63 in all cases, while expression of CK5/6, CK7 and vimentin was only focal or absent. The detection of NUT gave negative results. In three cases, the absence of SMARCB1/INI1 expression was due to deletion of SMARCB1/INI1 gene. Methylation of SMARCB1/INI1 gene was not found. One tumor harbored HPV18 E6/E7 mRNA. All 12 genes (BRAF, BRCA1, BRCA2, KIT, EGFR, KRAS, NRAS, PDGFRA, PIK3CA, PTEN, RET, and ROS1) tested for mutations using NGS were wild-type. Regarding DNA methylation, all four SMARCB1/INI1-deficient tumors showed methylation of RASSF1 gene by means of MS-MLPA. There was a statistically significant difference in RASSF1 gene methylation between SMARCB1/INI1-deficient and SMARCB1/INI1-positive tumors (p=0.0095). All other examined genes (ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, CADM1, CASP8, CD44, CDKN1B

  3. Cellular model of neuronal atrophy induced by DYNC1I1 deficiency reveals protective roles of RAS-RAF-MEK signaling

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    Zhi-Dong Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuronal atrophy is a common pathological feature occurred in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. A variety of abnormalities including motor protein malfunction and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the loss of neuronal architecture; however, less is known about the intracellular signaling pathways that can protect against or delay this pathogenic process. Here, we show that the DYNC1I1 deficiency, a neuron-specific dynein intermediate chain, causes neuronal atrophy in primary hippocampal neurons. With this cellular model, we are able to find that activation of RAS-RAF-MEK signaling protects against neuronal atrophy induced by DYNC1I1 deficiency, which relies on MEK-dependent autophagy in neuron. Moreover, we further reveal that BRAF also protects against neuronal atrophy induced by mitochondrial impairment. These findings demonstrate protective roles of the RAS-RAF-MEK axis against neuronal atrophy, and imply a new therapeutic target for clinical intervention.

  4. 4PS/insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, M E; Sun, X J; Bruening, J C; Araki, E; Lipes, M A; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1995-10-20

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is the major cytoplasmic substrate of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptors. Transgenic mice lacking IRS-1 are resistant to insulin and IGF-1, but exhibit significant residual insulin action which corresponds to the presence of an alternative high molecular weight substrate in liver and muscle. Recently, Sun et al. (Sun, X.-J., Wang, L.-M., Zhang, Y., Yenush, L. P., Myers, M. G., Jr., Glasheen, E., Lane, W.S., Pierce, J. H., and White, M. F. (1995) Nature 377, 173-177) purified and cloned 4PS, the major substrate of the IL-4 receptor-associated tyrosine kinase in myeloid cells, which has significant structural similarity to IRS-1. To determine if 4PS is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice, we performed immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase assays using specific antibodies to 4PS. Following insulin stimulation, 4PS is rapidly phosphorylated in liver and muscle, binds to the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, and activates the enzyme. Insulin stimulation also results in the association of 4PS with Grb 2 in both liver and muscle. In IRS-1-deficient mice, both the phosphorylation of 4PS and associated PI 3-kinase activity are enhanced, without an increase in protein expression. Immunodepletion of 4PS from liver and muscle homogenates removes most of the phosphotyrosine-associated PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1-deficient mice. Thus, 4PS is the primary alternative substrate, i.e. IRS-2, which plays a major role in physiologic insulin signal transduction via both PI 3-kinase activation and Grb 2/Sos association. In IRS-1-deficient mice, 4PS/IRS-2 provides signal transduction to these two major pathways of insulin signaling.

  5. Wfs1-deficient animals have brain-region-specific changes of Na+, K+-ATPase activity and mRNA expression of α1 and β1 subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütt, S; Altpere, A; Reimets, R; Visnapuu, T; Loomets, M; Raud, S; Salum, T; Mahlapuu, R; Kairane, C; Zilmer, M; Vasar, E

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in the WFS1 gene, which encodes the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glycoprotein, cause Wolfram syndrome, a disease characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and different psychiatric abnormalities. Loss of neuronal cells and pancreatic β-cells in Wolfram syndrome patients is probably related to the dysfunction of ER stress regulation, which leads to cell apoptosis. The present study shows that Wfs1-deficient mice have brain-region-specific changes in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and in the expression of the α1 and β1 subunits. We found a significant (1.6-fold) increase of Na-pump activity and β1 subunit mRNA expression in mice lacking the Wfs1 gene in the temporal lobe compared with their wild-type littermates. By contrast, exposure of mice to the elevated plus maze (EPM) model of anxiety decreased Na-pump activity 1.3-fold in the midbrain and dorsal striatum and 2.0-fold in the ventral striatum of homozygous animals compared with the nonexposed group. Na-pump α1 -subunit mRNA was significantly decreased in the dorsal striatum and midbrain of Wfs1-deficient homozygous animals compared with wild-type littermates. In the temporal lobe, an increase in the activity of the Na-pump is probably related to increased anxiety established in Wfs1-deficient mice, whereas the blunted dopamine function in the forebrain of Wfs1-deficient mice may be associated with a decrease of Na-pump activity in the dorsal and ventral striatum and in the midbrain after exposure to the EPM.

  6. ILDR1 deficiency causes degeneration of cochlear outer hair cells and disrupts the structure of the organ of Corti: a mouse model for human DFNB42

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    Qing Sang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1 is a poorly characterized gene that was first identified in lymphoma cells. Mutations in ILDR1 are responsible for DFNB42, but the pathogenesis of hearing loss caused by ILDR1 mutations remains to be elucidated. To explore the role of ILDR1 in hearing, we created Ildr1 knockout mice. In heterozygous mice, ILDR1 expression was found in outer hair cells (OHCs and inner hair cells (IHCs of the organ of Corti. ILDR1-deficient mice are profoundly deaf by postnatal day 21 (P21. No significant difference was observed in the supporting cells and IHCs of ILDR1-deficient mice, but progressive degeneration of OHCs occurred at P15 and disruption of the tunnel running through the organ of Corti was noticeable at P21. By P28, there were no OHCs visible in any of the turns of the organ of Corti, and the tunnel of the organ of Corti was entirely destroyed. ILDR1 deficiency affects expression of tricellulin in vivo, and this provides a possible explanation to hearing loss. To further elucidate the mechanism of deafness related to ILDR1 deficiency, we pursued a differential proteomic approach to comprehensively assess differential protein expression in the cochleae of Ildr1+/− and Ildr1−/− mice at P21. Altogether, 708 proteins were up-regulated (fold change >1.5 and 114 proteins were down-regulated (fold change <0.5 in the Ildr1−/− mice compared with Ildr1+/− mice. Gene ontology classification indicated that a number of differentially expressed proteins are involved in cell adhesion, protein and vesicle-mediated transport, cell death, membrane organization, and cellular homeostasis. A few of these proteins are closely related to hearing development. Taken together, our data suggest that ILDR1 is important for the survival of OHCs and provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of human deafness DFNB42 deafness.

  7. Signaling from Mus81-Eme2-Dependent DNA Damage Elicited by Chk1 Deficiency Modulates Replication Fork Speed and Origin Usage

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    Hervé Técher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian cells deficient in ATR or Chk1 display moderate replication fork slowing and increased initiation density, but the underlying mechanisms have remained unclear. We show that exogenous deoxyribonucleosides suppress both replication phenotypes in Chk1-deficient, but not ATR-deficient, cells. Thus, in the absence of exogenous stress, depletion of either protein impacts the replication dynamics through different mechanisms. In addition, Chk1 deficiency, but not ATR deficiency, triggers nuclease-dependent DNA damage. Avoiding damage formation through invalidation of Mus81-Eme2 and Mre11, or preventing damage signaling by turning off the ATM pathway, suppresses the replication phenotypes of Chk1-deficient cells. Damage and resulting DDR activation are therefore the cause, not the consequence, of replication dynamics modulation in these cells. Together, we identify moderate reduction of precursors available for replication as an additional outcome of DDR activation. We propose that resulting fork slowing, and subsequent firing of backup origins, helps replication to proceed along damaged templates.

  8. Chemokine-like receptor 1 deficiency does not affect the development of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

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    Nanda Gruben

    Full Text Available The adipokine chemerin and its receptor, chemokine-like receptor 1 (Cmklr1, are associated with insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which covers a broad spectrum of liver diseases, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. It is possible that chemerin and/or Cmklr1 exert their effects on these disorders through inflammation, but so far the data have been controversial. To gain further insight into this matter, we studied the effect of whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency on insulin resistance and NAFLD. In view of the primary role of macrophages in hepatic inflammation, we also transplanted bone marrow from Cmklr1 knock-out (Cmklr1-/- mice and wild type (WT mice into low-density lipoprotein receptor knock-out (Ldlr-/- mice, a mouse model for NASH. All mice were fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet containing 21% fat from milk butter and 0.2% cholesterol for 12 weeks. Insulin resistance was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, an insulin tolerance test, and by measurement of plasma glucose and insulin levels. Liver pathology was determined by measuring hepatic inflammation, fibrosis, lipid accumulation and the NAFLD activity score (NAS. Whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency did not affect body weight gain or food intake. In addition, we observed no differences between WT and Cmklr1-/- mice for hepatic inflammatory and fibrotic gene expression, immune cell infiltration, lipid accumulation or NAS. In line with this, we detected no differences in insulin resistance. In concordance with whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency, the absence of Cmklr1 in bone marrow-derived cells in Ldlr-/- mice did not affect their insulin resistance or liver pathology. Our results indicate that Cmklr1 is not involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance or NAFLD. Thus, we recommend that the associations reported between Cmklr1 and insulin resistance or NAFLD should be interpreted with caution.

  9. Effects of a high-fat diet on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient and wild-type mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yan

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of a high-fat diet on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient (PAI-1-/- and wild-type mice. The high-fat diet increased the number of pulmonary metastases by 60% (p<0.01, tumor cross-sectional area by 82% (p<0.05 and tumor volume by 130% (p<0.05 compared to the AIN93G diet. Deficiency in PAI-1 reduced the number of metastases by 35% (p<0.01 compared to wild-type mice. In mice fed the high-fat diet, PAI-1 deficiency reduced tumor cross-sectional area by 52% (p<0.05 and tumor volume by 61% (p<0.05 compared to their wild-type counterparts; however, PAI-1 deficiency affected neither area nor volume in mice fed the AIN93G diet. Adipose and plasma concentrations of PAI-1 were significantly higher in high-fat fed wild-type mice than in their AIN93G-fed counterparts. Adipose and plasma PAI-1 were not detectable in PAI-1-/- mice regardless of the diet. Mice deficient in PAI-1 showed significantly greater plasma concentrations of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, leptin, vascular endothelial growth factor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and insulin compared to wild-type mice, indicating a compensatory overproduction of inflammatory cytokines, angiogenic factors and insulin in the absence of PAI-1. We conclude that PAI-1 produced by the host, including that by adipose tissue, promotes high-fat enhanced metastasis of LLC.

  10. Inflammatory mediator TAK1 regulates hair follicle morphogenesis and anagen induction shown by using keratinocyte-specific TAK1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sayama

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 is a member of the NF-kappaB pathway and regulates inflammatory responses. We previously showed that TAK1 also regulates keratinocyte growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether TAK1 has any role in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. To examine this possibility, we studied the role of TAK1 in mouse hair follicle development and cycling as an instructive model system. By comparing keratinocyte-specific TAK1-deficient mice (Map3k7(fl/flK5-Cre with control mice, we found that the number of hair germs (hair follicles precursors in Map3k7(fl/flK5-Cre mice was significantly reduced at E15.5, and that subsequent hair follicle morphogenesis was retarded. Next, we analyzed the role of TAK1 in the cyclic remodeling in follicles by analyzing hair cycle progression in mice with a tamoxifen-inducible keratinocyte-specific TAK1 deficiency (Map3k7(fl/flK14-Cre-ER(T2. After active hair growth (anagen was induced by depilation, TAK1 was deleted by topical tamoxifen application. This resulted in significantly retarded anagen development in TAK1-deficient mice. Deletion of TAK1 in hair follicles that were already in anagen induced premature, apoptosis-driven hair follicle regression, along with hair follicle damage. These studies provide the first evidence that the inflammatory mediator TAK1 regulates hair follicle induction and morphogenesis, and is required for anagen induction and anagen maintenance.

  11. Repin1 deficiency improves insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in db/db mice by reducing adipose tissue mass and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Anne; Hesselbarth, Nico; Gericke, Martin; Kern, Matthias; Dommel, Sebastian; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Klöting, Nora

    2016-09-09

    Replication initiator 1 (Repin1) is a zinc finger protein playing a role in insulin sensitivity, body fat mass and lipid metabolism by regulating the expression key genes of glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we tested the hypothesis that introgression of a Repin1 deletion into db/db mice improves glucose metabolism in vivo. We generated a whole body Repin1 deficient db/db double knockout mouse (Rep1(-/-)x db/db) and systematically characterized the consequences of Repin1 deficiency on insulin sensitivity, glucose and lipid metabolism parameters and fat mass. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies revealed significantly improved insulin sensitivity in Rep1(-/-)x db/db mice, which are also characterized by lower HbA1c, lower body fat mass and reduced adipose tissue (AT) inflammation area. Our study provides evidence that loss of Repin1 in db/db mice improves insulin sensitivity and reduces chronic hyperglycemia most likely by reducing fat mass and AT inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multifocal Recurrent Osteomyelitis and Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Boy with Partial Dominant IFN-γR1 Deficiency: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidé Tamara Staines-Boone

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the genes coding for cytokines, receptors, second messengers, and transcription factors of interferon gamma (IFN-γ immunity cause Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD. We report the case of a 7-year-old male patient with partial dominant (PD IFN-γ receptor 1 deficiency who had suffered from multifocal osteomyelitis attributable to bacille Calmette–Guérin vaccination since the age of 18 months. He developed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH, a hyper-inflammatory complication, and died with multiorgan dysfunction, despite having been diagnosed and treated relatively early. Patients with PD IFN-γR1 deficiency usually have good prognosis and might respond to human recombinant subcutaneous IFN-γ. Several monogenic congenital defects have been linked to HLH, a catastrophic “cytokine storm” that is usually ascribed to lymphocyte dysfunction and thought to be triggered by interferon gamma. This is the sixth patient with both MSMD and HLH of whom we are aware. The fact that patients with macrophages that cannot respond to IFN-γ still develop HLH, bring these assumptions into question.

  13. Mice with DNA repair gene Ercc1 deficiency in a neural crest lineage are a model for late-onset Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selfridge, Jim; Song, Liang; Brownstein, David G; Melton, David W

    2010-06-04

    The Ercc1 gene is essential for nucleotide excision repair and is also important in recombination repair and the repair of interstrand crosslinks. We have previously used a floxed Ercc1 allele with a keratinocyte-specific Cre recombinase transgene to inactivate Ercc1 in the epidermal layer of the skin and so generate a mouse model for UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Now, in an attempt to generate a model for UV-induced melanoma, we have used the floxed Ercc1 allele in combination with a Cre transgene under the control of the tyrosinase gene promoter to produce mice with Ercc1-deficient melanocytes that are hypersensitive to UV irradiation. These animals developed normally, but died when 4-6 months old with severe colonic obstruction. Melanocytes are derived from the neural crest and the tyrosinase promoter is also expressed in additional neural crest-derived lineages, including the progenitors of the parasympathetic nervous system that innervates the gastrointestinal tract and controls gut peristalsis. A functional enteric nervous system developed in floxed Ercc1 mice with the tyrosinase Cre transgene, but was found to have degenerated in the colons of affected mice. We suggest that accumulating unrepaired endogenous DNA damage in the Ercc1-deficient colonic parasympathetic ganglia leads to the degeneration of this network and results in a colonic obstructive disorder that resembles late-onset Hirschsprung disease in man.

  14. Meiotic failure in cyclin A1-deficient mouse spermatocytes triggers apoptosis through intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways and 14-3-3 proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Sunil K.; Manterola, Marcia; Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2017-01-01

    Cyclin A1 (Ccna1), a member of the mammalian A type cyclins, is most abundantly expressed in spermatocytes and is essential for spermatogenesis in the mouse. Ccna1- deficient spermatocytes arrest at late meiotic prophase and undergo apoptosis. To further delineate the mechanisms and key factors involved in this process, we have examined changes in expression of genes involved in both intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways that trigger apoptosis in the mutant spermatocytes. Our results show that both pathways are involved, and that the factors involved in the intrinsic pathway were expressed earlier than those involved in the extrinsic pathway. We have also begun to identify in vivo Ccna1-interacting proteins, using an unbiased biochemical approach, and identified 14-3-3, a key regulator of apoptosis, as a Ccna1-interacting protein. Expression levels of 14-3-3 proteins remain unchanged between wild type and mutant testes but there were differences in the subcellular distribution. In wild type control, 14-3-3 is detected in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions whereas it is restricted to the cytoplasm in mutant testes. This differential distribution of 14-3-3 may contribute to the induction of apoptosis in Ccna1-deficient spermatocytes. These results provide insight into the apoptotic mechanisms and pathways that are triggered when progression through the meiotic cell cycle is defective in male gametogenesis. PMID:28301569

  15. Programmed cell death-1 deficiency exacerbates T cell activation and atherogenesis despite expansion of regulatory T cells in atherosclerosis-prone mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Cochain

    Full Text Available T cell activation represents a double-edged sword in atherogenesis, as it promotes both pro-inflammatory T cell activation and atheroprotective Foxp3(+ regulatory T cell (Treg responses. Here, we investigated the role of the co-inhibitory receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 in T cell activation and CD4(+ T cell polarization towards pro-atherogenic or atheroprotective responses in mice. Mice deficient for both low density lipoprotein receptor and PD-1 (Ldlr(-/-Pd1(-/- displayed striking increases in systemic CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell activation after 9 weeks of high fat diet feeding, associated with an expansion of both pro-atherogenic IFNγ-secreting T helper 1 cells and atheroprotective Foxp3+ Tregs. Importantly, PD-1 deficiency did not affect Treg suppressive function in vitro. Notably, PD-1 deficiency exacerbated atherosclerotic lesion growth and entailed a massive infiltration of T cells in atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, aggravated hypercholesterolemia was observed in Ldlr(-/-Pd1(-/- mice. In conclusion, we here demonstrate that although disruption of PD-1 signaling enhances both pro- and anti-atherogenic T cell responses in Ldlr(-/- mice, pro-inflammatory T cell activation prevails and enhances dyslipidemia, vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  16. Aberrant autolysosomal regulation is linked to the induction of embryonic senescence: differential roles of Beclin 1 and p53 in vertebrate Spns1 deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Sasaki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinster (Spin in Drosophila or Spinster homolog 1 (Spns1 in vertebrates is a putative lysosomal H+-carbohydrate transporter, which functions at a late stage of autophagy. The Spin/Spns1 defect induces aberrant autolysosome formation that leads to embryonic senescence and accelerated aging symptoms, but little is known about the mechanisms leading to the pathogenesis in vivo. Beclin 1 and p53 are two pivotal tumor suppressors that are critically involved in the autophagic process and its regulation. Using zebrafish as a genetic model, we show that Beclin 1 suppression ameliorates Spns1 loss-mediated senescence as well as autophagic impairment, whereas unexpectedly p53 deficit exacerbates both of these characteristics. We demonstrate that 'basal p53' activity plays a certain protective role(s against the Spns1 defect-induced senescence via suppressing autophagy, lysosomal biogenesis, and subsequent autolysosomal formation and maturation, and that p53 loss can counteract the effect of Beclin 1 suppression to rescue the Spns1 defect. By contrast, in response to DNA damage, 'activated p53' showed an apparent enhancement of the Spns1-deficient phenotype, by inducing both autophagy and apoptosis. Moreover, we found that a chemical and genetic blockage of lysosomal acidification and biogenesis mediated by the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase, as well as of subsequent autophagosome-lysosome fusion, prevents the appearance of the hallmarks caused by the Spns1 deficiency, irrespective of the basal p53 state. Thus, these results provide evidence that Spns1 operates during autophagy and senescence differentially with Beclin 1 and p53.

  17. 日本血吸虫中国株次黄嘌呤鸟嘌呤磷酸核糖转移酶的克隆、表达及其免疫保护性研究%Cloning, Expression and Immunization of The Hypoxanthine-guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase for Schistosoma japonicum Chinese Strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余俊龙; 吕志跃; 彭先楚; 周松华; 刘雪琴; 汪世平; 何卓; 戴橄; 李文凯; 姜孝新; 曾少华; 肖小芹; 徐绍锐

    2006-01-01

    A 1 270 bp full-length cDNA fragment was obtained from the Schistosoma japonicum (Chinese strain) adult cDNA library after the '3' and 5' ends of the incomplete expression sequence tag (EST) of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase of Schistosoma japonicum (SjHGPRT) were amplified by the anchored PCR with 2 pairs of primer that were designed according to the published incomplete SjHGPRT EST and the sequence of multiclone sites of library λgt1 1 vector. Sequence analysis indicated that this fragment, with an identity of 82% to hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase ofSchistosoma mansoni (SmHGPRT), contained a complete open reading frame(ORF). The deduced amino acid sequence showed 83% identity to that of SmHGPRT. This fragment was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pQE30, and subsequently sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. SDS-PAGE revealed that M of the recombinant protein was about 28 ku. Western-blot analysis showed that the recombinant protein was recognized by the polyclonal antisera from rabbits immunized with Schistosoma japonicum adult worm antigen. Mice vaccinated with recombinant protein revealed significant worm burden, liver eggs per gram (LEPG), fecal eggs per gram (FEPG) and intrauterine eggs of the female worms reduction percentage, compared with the controls. Taken together, the SjHGPRT full-length cDNA can be cloned and expressed in E. coli as a recombinant protein that elicited immunity against the challenge infection with Schistosoma japonicum, indicating its potential as a partia1 protection vaccine candidate.%根据基因库中日本血吸虫次黄嘌呤鸟嘌呤磷酸核糖转移酶(HGPRT)EST(BU803192)以及日本血吸虫成虫cDNA文库载体λgt11多克隆位点邻近核苷酸序列设计引物,以日本血吸虫成虫cDNA文库为模板,采用锚式PCR对SjHGPRT基因不完整的3'端和5'端进行扩增、测序,用电子软件拼接,获得SjHGPRT全长cDNA(1 270 bp),经序列分析,推断该片段

  18. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  19. NF1 deficiency causes Bcl-xL upregulation in Schwann cells derived from neurofibromatosis type 1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ho-Jin; Lee, Su-Jin; Sohn, Young Bae; Jin, Hyun-Seok; Han, Jae-Ho; Kim, Young-Bae; Yim, Hyunee; Jeong, Seon-Yong

    2013-02-01

    Since the bi-allelic inactivation of both neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene alleles (NF1(-/-)) in Schwann cells (SCs) is common in both benign plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), other genetic alterations in SCs may be required for tumor progression of PNs to MPNSTs. We found that the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL protein is upregulated in MPNST tissues compared to PN tissues from patients with NF1 by immunohistological staining. In addition, we investigated whether Bcl-xL is upregulated in SCs derived from MPNSTs and found a significantly higher Bcl-xL expression level in sNF96.2 MPNST-derived SCs compared to normal human SCs (HSCs). We also discovered that the increased Bcl-xL expression caused an increase in drug resistance to doxorubicin in MPNST-derived SCs. Manipulation of NF1 gene expression levels by treatment with small interfering RNA (siRNA) and overexpression of the neurofibromin GAP-related domain (NF1-GRD) demonstrated that upregulated Bcl-xL expression in MPNST-derived SCs was caused by NF1 deficiency. Treatment with the Erk1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, resulted in a slight increase in Bcl-xL levels in neurofibromin-depleted normal HSCs, indicating that Bcl-xL upregulation in MPNST-derived SCs is mediated by activated Erk1/2, which is a Ras downstream protein regulated by neurofibromin. As the reduction of Bcl-xL expression restored sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in sNF96.2 cells, we examined the effect of the small molecule Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 on sNF96.2 cells. A very low dose of ABT-737 combined with doxorubicin synergistically enhanced sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in sNF96.2 cells, suggesting that ABT-737 and doxorubicin may be a good combination to effectively treat NF1-associated MPNSTs with minimal side-effects. Collectively, our results suggest that upregulation of Bcl-xL in MPNST-derived SCs may be caused by the NF1 deficiency

  20. Short-term impact of a classical ketogenic diet on gut microbiota in GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome: A 3-month prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabue, Anna; Ferraris, Cinzia; Uggeri, Francesca; Trentani, Claudia; Bertoli, Simona; de Giorgis, Valentina; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Elli, Marina

    2017-02-01

    The classical ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat, very low-carbohydrate normocaloric diet used for drug-resistant epilepsy and Glucose Transporter 1 Deficiency Syndrome (GLUT1 DS). In animal models, high fat diet induces large alterations in microbiota producing deleterious effects on gut health. We carried out a pilot study on patients treated with KD comparing their microbiota composition before and after three months on the diet. Six patients affected by GLUT1 DS were asked to collect fecal samples before and after three months on the diet. RT - PCR analysis was performed in order to quantify Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., Clostridium perfringens, Enterobacteriaceae, Clostridium cluster XIV, Desulfovibrio spp. and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Compared with baseline, there were no statistically significant differences at 3 months in Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. However fecal microbial profiles revealed a statistically significant increase in Desulfovibrio spp. (p = 0.025), a bacterial group supposed to be involved in the exacerbation of the inflammatory condition of the gut mucosa associated to the consumption of fats of animal origin. A future prospective study on the changes in gut microbiota of all children with epilepsy started on a KD is warranted. In patients with dysbiosis demonstrated by fecal samples, it my be reasonable to consider an empiric trial of pre or probiotics to potentially restore the «ecological balance» of intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Profile of mecasermin for the long-term treatment of growth failure in children and adolescents with severe primary IGF-1 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Fintini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Danilo Fintini, Claudia Brufani, Marco CappaEndocrinology Unit, “Bambino Gesù” Children’s Hospital-IRCCS, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHI or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 deficiency (IGFD is characterized by deficit of IGF-1 production due to alteration of response of growth hormone (GH receptor to GH. This syndrome is due to mutation of GH receptor or IGF-1 gene and patients affected showed no response to GH therapy. The only treatment is recombinant IGF-1 (mecasermin, which has been available since 1986, but approved in the United States by the US Food and Drug Administration only in 2005 and in Europe by the European Medicines Agency in 2007. To date, few studies are available on long-term treatment with mecasermin in IGFD patients and some of them have a very small number of subjects. In this review we discuss briefly clinical features of severe primary IGFD, laboratory findings, and indications for treatment. Results of long-term therapy with rhIGF1 (mecasermin in patients affected by severe primary IGFD and possible side effects are explained.Keywords: mecasermin, therapy, Laron syndrome, IGF-1

  2. Restoration of human B-cell differentiation into NOD-SCID mice engrafted with gene-corrected CD34+ cells isolated from Artemis or RAG1-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Benjelloun, Fatine; Hue, Christophe; Andre-Schmutz, Isabelle; Bonhomme, Delphine; Forveille, Monique; Beldjord, Kheira; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Charneau, Pierre; Durandy, Anne; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2008-02-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by mutation of the recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) or Artemis gene lead to the absence of B- and T-cell differentiation. The only curative treatment is allogeneic bone marrow (BM) transplantation, which displays a high survival rate when an HLA compatible donor is available but has a poorer prognosis when the donor is partially compatible. Consequently, gene therapy may be a promising alternative strategy for these diseases. Here, we report that lentiviral gene-corrected BM CD34(+) cells (isolated from Artemis- or RAG1-deficient patients) sustain human B-cell differentiation following injection into non-obese diabetic/SCID (NOD-SCID) mice previously infused with anti-interleukin-2 receptor beta chain monoclonal antibody. In most of the mice BM, engrafted with Artemis-transduced cells, human B-cell differentiation occurred until the mature stage. The B cells were functional as human immunoglobulin M (IgM) was present in the serum. Following injection with RAG1-transduced cells, human engraftment occurred in vivo but B-cell differentiation until the mature stage was less frequent. However, when it occurred, it was always associated with human IgM production. This overall approach represents a useful tool for evaluating gene transfer efficiency in human SCID forms affecting B-cell development (such as Artemis deficiency) and for testing new vectors for improving in vivo RAG1 complementation.

  3. Presenilin 2 deficiency causes a mild pulmonary phenotype and no changes in amyloid precursor protein processing but enhances the embryonic lethal phenotype of presenilin 1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreman, A; Hartmann, D; Annaert, W; Saftig, P; Craessaerts, K; Serneels, L; Umans, L; Schrijvers, V; Checler, F; Vanderstichele, H; Baekelandt, V; Dressel, R; Cupers, P; Huylebroeck, D; Zwijsen, A; Van Leuven, F; De Strooper, B

    1999-10-12

    Mutations in the homologous presenilin 1 (PS1) and presenilin 2 (PS2) genes cause the most common and aggressive form of familial Alzheimer's disease. Although PS1 function and dysfunction have been extensively studied, little is known about the function of PS2 in vivo. To delineate the relationships of PS2 and PS1 activities and whether PS2 mutations involve gain or loss of function, we generated PS2 homozygous deficient (-/-) and PS1/PS2 double homozygous deficient mice. In contrast to PS1(-/-) mice, PS2(-/-) mice are viable and fertile and develop only mild pulmonary fibrosis and hemorrhage with age. Absence of PS2 does not detectably alter processing of amyloid precursor protein and has little or no effect on physiologically important apoptotic processes, indicating that Alzheimer's disease-causing mutations in PS2, as in PS1, result in gain of function. Although PS1(+/-) PS2( -/-) mice survive in relatively good health, complete deletion of both PS2 and PS1 genes causes a phenotype closely resembling full Notch-1 deficiency. These results demonstrate in vivo that PS1 and PS2 have partially overlapping functions and that PS1 is essential and PS2 is redundant for normal Notch signaling during mammalian embryological development.

  4. Different molecular mechanisms involved in spontaneous and oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial fragmentation in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP-1)-deficient fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beersel, Guillaume; Tihon, Eliane; Demine, Stéphane; Hamer, Isabelle; Jadot, Michel; Arnould, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    NCLs (neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses) form a group of eight inherited autosomal recessive diseases characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of autofluorescent pigments, called ceroids. Recent data suggest that the pathogenesis of NCL is associated with the appearance of fragmented mitochondria with altered functions. However, even if an impairement in the autophagic pathway has often been evoked, the molecular mechanisms leading to mitochondrial fragmentation in response to a lysosomal dysfunction are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that fibroblasts that are deficient for the TPP-1 (tripeptidyl peptidase-1), a lysosomal hydrolase encoded by the gene mutated in the LINCL (late infantile NCL, CLN2 form) also exhibit a fragmented mitochondrial network. This morphological alteration is accompanied by an increase in the expression of the protein BNIP3 (Bcl2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein 3) as well as a decrease in the abundance of mitofusins 1 and 2, two proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion. Using RNAi (RNA interference) and quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial morphology, we show that the inhibition of BNIP3 expression does not result in an increase in the reticulation of the mitochondrial population in LINCL cells. However, this protein seems to play a key role in cell response to mitochondrial oxidative stress as it sensitizes mitochondria to antimycin A-induced fragmentation. To our knowledge, our results bring the first evidence of a mechanism that links TPP-1 deficiency and oxidative stress-induced changes in mitochondrial morphology. PMID:23249249

  5. CCR2(+) monocytes infiltrate atrophic lesions in age-related macular disease and mediate photoreceptor degeneration in experimental subretinal inflammation in Cx3cr1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennlaub, Florian; Auvynet, Constance; Calippe, Bertrand; Lavalette, Sophie; Poupel, Lucie; Hu, Shulong J; Dominguez, Elisa; Camelo, Serge; Levy, Olivier; Guyon, Elodie; Saederup, Noah; Charo, Israel F; Rooijen, Nico Van; Nandrot, Emeline; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Raoul, William; Combadiere, Christophe

    2013-11-01

    Atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with the subretinal accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs). Their role in promoting or inhibiting retinal degeneration is unknown. We here show that atrophic AMD is associated with increased intraocular CCL2 levels and subretinal CCR2(+) inflammatory monocyte infiltration in patients. Using age- and light-induced subretinal inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration in Cx3cr1 knockout mice, we show that subretinal Cx3cr1 deficient MPs overexpress CCL2 and that both the genetic deletion of CCL2 or CCR2 and the pharmacological inhibition of CCR2 prevent inflammatory monocyte recruitment, MP accumulation and photoreceptor degeneration in vivo. Our study shows that contrary to CCR2 and CCL2, CX3CR1 is constitutively expressed in the retina where it represses the expression of CCL2 and the recruitment of neurotoxic inflammatory CCR2(+) monocytes. CCL2/CCR2 inhibition might represent a powerful tool for controlling inflammation and neurodegeneration in AMD.

  6. CCR2+ monocytes infiltrate atrophic lesions in age-related macular disease and mediate photoreceptor degeneration in experimental subretinal inflammation in Cx3cr1 deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennlaub, Florian; Auvynet, Constance; Calippe, Bertrand; Lavalette, Sophie; Poupel, Lucie; Hu, Shulong J; Dominguez, Elisa; Camelo, Serge; Levy, Olivier; Guyon, Elodie; Saederup, Noah; Charo, Israel F; Van Rooijen, Nico; Nandrot, Emeline; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Raoul, William; Combadiere, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with the subretinal accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs). Their role in promoting or inhibiting retinal degeneration is unknown. We here show that atrophic AMD is associated with increased intraocular CCL2 levels and subretinal CCR2+ inflammatory monocyte infiltration in patients. Using age- and light-induced subretinal inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration in Cx3cr1 knockout mice, we show that subretinal Cx3cr1 deficient MPs overexpress CCL2 and that both the genetic deletion of CCL2 or CCR2 and the pharmacological inhibition of CCR2 prevent inflammatory monocyte recruitment, MP accumulation and photoreceptor degeneration in vivo. Our study shows that contrary to CCR2 and CCL2, CX3CR1 is constitutively expressed in the retina where it represses the expression of CCL2 and the recruitment of neurotoxic inflammatory CCR2+ monocytes. CCL2/CCR2 inhibition might represent a powerful tool for controlling inflammation and neurodegeneration in AMD. PMID:24142887

  7. MD-1 deficiency attenuates dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis through modulating the function of colonic lamina propria dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huaqin; Zhang, Guqin; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Wei; Shang, Jian; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhao, Qiu; Li, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Available evidence suggests that both dysregulated innate and adaptive immune pathways contribute to the aberrant intestinal inflammatory response in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Myeloid Differentiation 1 (MD-1), also known as Lymphocyte Antigen 86 (Ly86), a secreted protein interacting with radioprotective 105 (RP105), plays an important role in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway. Previous studies showed that MD-1 may be involved in the (patho) physiological regulation of the innate immune system and inflammation. In this study, we reported for the first time that MD-1 mRNA expression was up-regulated in both human IBD patients and DSS-treated WT mice. We showed that MD-1(-/-) mice were less susceptible to the development of colitis than WT controls as demonstrated by significantly reduced weight loss, disease activity index, colon histological scores, cellular infiltration and expression of inflammatory mediators. In addition, mucosal barrier function seemed to be intact in response to the loss of MD-1. Finally, lamina propria dendritic cells (LPDCs) from the colon of MD-1(-/-) mice after DSS exposure not only decreased in number but also significantly down-regulated the expression of surface maturation co-stimulatory molecules MHC-II, CD40 and CD86 compared with those from WT mice. Taken together, our results reveal that MD-1 deficiency is of critical importance in down-regulating induction and progression of DSS colitis, thereby suggesting that MD-1 might be a target for future interventional therapies of IBD.

  8. [Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) disease and interleukin 12 receptor β1 deficiency: clinical experience of two familial and one sporadic case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Alexis; Pérez, Amir; Risco, Migdy; Gallo, Silvanna

    2014-08-01

    BCG disease has been reported in primary and secondary immunodeficiency and as Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Diseases (MSMD). Investigation of this syndrome has led to the identifications of a series of genetic, inherited defects in the IL-12/IFN-γ axis. MSMD-causing mutations have been found in seven autosomal and two X-linked genes. In these patients, local or disseminated vaccine BCG infections are common. We report a clinical series including two infants with left axillary adenitis ipsilateral to the site of neonatal BCG immunization; one of them member of a family with two previously reported cases and a single sporadic case. All of them were diagnosed sequentially in Puerto Montt, Chile. The aim of this report is to notify the first Chilean disseminated BCG patients without previous immunodeficiency, in whom it was possible to identify an underlying immunodeficiency, although specific tests for IL-12/IFN-γ axis was no performed in our country. Clinical suspicion and international collaboration permitted to confirm IL12-Rβ1 deficiency in 2 of 3 familial cases and a sporadic case.

  9. ALMS1-deficient fibroblasts over-express extra-cellular matrix components, display cell cycle delay and are resistant to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Zulato

    Full Text Available Alström Syndrome (ALMS is a rare genetic disorder (483 living cases, characterized by many clinical manifestations, including blindness, obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiomyopathy. ALMS is caused by mutations in the ALMS1 gene, encoding for a large protein with implicated roles in ciliary function, cellular quiescence and intracellular transport. Patients with ALMS have extensive fibrosis in nearly all tissues resulting in a progressive organ failure which is often the ultimate cause of death. To focus on the role of ALMS1 mutations in the generation and maintenance of this pathological fibrosis, we performed gene expression analysis, ultrastructural characterization and functional assays in 4 dermal fibroblast cultures from ALMS patients. Using a genome-wide gene expression analysis we found alterations in genes belonging to specific categories (cell cycle, extracellular matrix (ECM and fibrosis, cellular architecture/motility and apoptosis. ALMS fibroblasts display cytoskeleton abnormalities and migration impairment, up-regulate the expression and production of collagens and despite the increase in the cell cycle length are more resistant to apoptosis. Therefore ALMS1-deficient fibroblasts showed a constitutively activated myofibroblast phenotype even if they do not derive from a fibrotic lesion. Our results support a genetic basis for the fibrosis observed in ALMS and show that both an excessive ECM production and a failure to eliminate myofibroblasts are key mechanisms. Furthermore, our findings suggest new roles for ALMS1 in both intra- and extra-cellular events which are essential not only for the normal cellular function but also for cell-cell and ECM-cell interactions.

  10. Differential effects of IGF-1 deficiency during the life span on structural and biomechanical properties in the tibia of aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpole, Nicole M; Herron, Jacquelyn C; Estep, Patrick N; Logan, Sreemathi; Hodges, Erik L; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Sonntag, William E

    2016-04-01

    Advanced aging is associated with the loss of structural and biomechanical properties in bones, which increases the risk for bone fracture. Aging is also associated with reductions in circulating levels of the anabolic signaling hormone, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1. While the role of IGF-1 in bone development has been well characterized, the impact of the age-related loss of IGF-1 on bone aging remains controversial. Here, we describe the effects of reducing IGF-1 at multiple time points in the mouse life span--early in postnatal development, early adulthood, or late adulthood on tibia bone aging in both male and female igf (f/f) mice. Bone structure was analyzed at 27 months of age using microCT. We find that age-related reductions in cortical bone fraction, cortical thickness, and tissue mineral density were more pronounced when IGF-1 was reduced early in life and not in late adulthood. Three-point bone bending assays revealed that IGF-1 deficiency early in life resulted in reduced maximum force, maximum bending moment, and bone stiffness in aged males and females. The effects of IGF-1 on bone aging are microenvironment specific, as early-life loss of IGF-1 resulted in decreased cortical bone structure and strength along the diaphysis while significantly increasing trabecular bone fraction and trabecular number at the proximal metaphysis. The increases in trabecular bone were limited to males, as early-life loss of IGF-1 did not alter bone fraction or number in females. Together, our data suggest that the age-related loss of IGF-1 influences tibia bone aging in a sex-specific, microenvironment-specific, and time-dependent manner.

  11. Mild stress induces brain region-specific alterations of selective ER stress markers' mRNA expression in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altperery, A; Raud, S; Sütt, S; Reimets, R; Visnapuu, T; Toots, M; Vasar, E

    2017-09-26

    In this work, the effect of mild stress (elevated plus maze test, EPM) on the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers in different brain areas of wild type (WT) and Wfs1-deficient (Wfs1KO) mice was investigated. The following ER stress markers were studied: activating transcription factor 6α (Atf6α), protein kinase-like ER kinase (Perk), X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1) and its spliced form (Xbp1s), 78-kilodalton glucose regulated protein (Grp78), 94-kilodalton glucose regulated protein (Grp94), C/EBP homologous protein (Chop). Wfs1KO and WT mice, not exposed to EPM, had similar patterns of ER stress markers in the studied brain areas. The exploratory activity of Wfs1KO mice in the EPM was inhibited compared to WT mice, probably reflecting increased anxiety in genetically modified mice. In response to the EPM, activation of inositol-requiring transmembrane kinase and endonuclease 1α (Ire1α) ER stress pathway was seen in both genotypes, but in different brain areas. Such a brain region-specific Ire1α activation was linked with dominant behavioural trends in these mice as more anxious, neophobic Wfs1KO mice had increased ER stress markers expression in the temporal lobe, the brain region related to anxiety, and more curious WT mice had ER stress markers increased in the ventral striatum which is related to the exploratory drive. The molecular mechanism triggering respective changes in ER stress markers in these brain regions is likely related to altered levels of monoamine neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine) in Wfs1KO mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. CXC-chemokine regulation and neutrophil trafficking in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in P-selectin/ICAM-1 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crockett Elahé T

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophil adhesion and migration are critical in hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury (I/R. P-selectin and the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 can mediate neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions, neutrophil migration, and the interactions of neutrophils with hepatocytes in the liver. Despite very strong preclinical data, recent clinical trials failed to show a protective effect of anti-adhesion therapy in reperfusion injury, indicating that the length of injury might be a critical factor in neutrophil infiltration. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the role of P-selectin and ICAM-1 in neutrophil infiltration and liver injury during early and late phases of liver I/R. Methods Adult male wild-type and P-selectin/ICAM-1-deficient (P/I null mice underwent 90 minutes of partial liver ischemia followed by various periods of reperfusion (6, 15 h, and a survival study. Liver injury was assessed by plasma level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT and histopathology. The plasma cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6, MIP-2 and KC, were measured by ELISA. Results Reperfusion caused significant hepatocellular injury in both wild-type and P/I null mice as was determined by plasma ALT levels and liver histopathology. The injury was associated with a marked neutrophil infiltration into the ischemic livers of both wild-type and P/I null mice. Although the levels of ALT and neutrophil infiltration were slightly lower in the P/I null mice compared with the wild-type mice the differences were not statistically significant. The plasma cytokine data of TNF-α and IL-6 followed a similar pattern to ALT data, and no significant difference was found between the wild-type and P/I null groups. In contrast, a significant difference in KC and MIP-2 chemokine levels was observed between the wild-type and P/I null mice. Additionally, the survival study showed a trend towards increased survival in the P/I null group. Conclusion While ICAM-1 and P

  13. BRCA1 deficient embryonic stem cells display a decreased homologous recombination frequency and an increased frequency of non-homologous recombination that is corrected by expression of a brca1 transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snouwaert, J N; Gowen, L C; Latour, A M; Mohn, A R; Xiao, A; DiBiase, L; Koller, B H

    1999-12-20

    BRCA1 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that has been classified as a tumor suppressor based on the fact that women carrying a mutated copy of the BRCA1 gene are at increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. The association of BRCA1 with RAD51 has led to the hypothesis that BRCA1 is involved in DNA repair. We describe here the generation and analysis of murine embryonic stem (ES) cell lines in which both copies of the murine homologue of the human BRCA1 gene have been disrupted by gene targeting. We show that exogenous DNA introduced into these BRCA1 deficient cells by electroporation is randomly integrated into the genome at a significantly higher rate than in wild type ES cells. In contrast, integration of exogenous DNA by homologous recombination occurs in BRCA1 deficient cells at a significantly lower rate than in wild type controls. When BRCA1 expression is re-established at 5-10% of normal levels by introduction of a Brca1 transgene into BRCA1 deficient ES cells, the frequency of random integration is reduced to wild type levels, although the frequency of homologous recombination is not significantly improved. These results suggest that BRCA1 plays a role in determining the response of cells to double stranded DNA breaks.

  14. [Construction and fermentation control of reductive TCA pathway for malic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Daojiang; Wang, Caixia; Zhou, Jiemin; Liu, Yilan; Yang, Maohua; Xing, Jianmin

    2013-10-01

    Malic acid is widely used in food, and chemical industries. Through overexpressing pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase in pdc1-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae, malic acid was successfully produced through the reductive TCA pathway. No malic acid was detected in wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, however, 45 mmol/L malic acid was produced in engineered strain, and the concentration of byproduct ethanol also reduced by 18%. The production of malic acid enhanced 6% by increasing the concentration of Ca2+. In addition, the final concentration reached 52.5 mmol/L malic acid by addition of biotin. The increasing is almost 16% higher than that of the original strain.

  15. Specific gamma-hydroxybutyrate-binding sites but loss of pharmacological effects of gamma-hydroxybutyrate in GABA-B1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaupmann, Klemens; Cryan, John F; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2003-01-01

    gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. gamma-Hydroxybutyrate and its prodrug, gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), recently received increased public attention as they emerged as popular drugs of abuse...

  16. Uric acid, an important screening tool to detect inborn errors of metabolism: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinge, Eresha; Kularatnam, Grace Angeline Malarnangai; Dilanthi, Hewa Warawitage; Vidanapathirana, Dinesha Maduri; Jayasena, Kandana Liyanage Subhashinie Priyadarshika Kapilani Menike; Chandrasiri, Nambage Dona Priyani Dhammika; Indika, Neluwa Liyanage Ruwan; Ratnayake, Pyara Dilani; Gunasekara, Vindya Nandani; Fairbanks, Lynette Dianne; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2017-09-06

    Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism in humans. Altered serum and urine uric acid level (both above and below the reference ranges) is an indispensable marker in detecting rare inborn errors of metabolism. We describe different case scenarios of 4 Sri Lankan patients related to abnormal uric acid levels in blood and urine. CASE 1: A one-and-half-year-old boy was investigated for haematuria and a calculus in the bladder. Xanthine crystals were seen in microscopic examination of urine sediment. Low uric acid concentrations in serum and low urinary fractional excretion of uric acid associated with high urinary excretion of xanthine and hypoxanthine were compatible with xanthine oxidase deficiency. CASE 2: An 8-month-old boy presented with intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, screaming episodes, microcephaly, facial dysmorphism and severe neuro developmental delay. Low uric acid level in serum, low fractional excretion of uric acid and radiological findings were consistent with possible molybdenum cofactor deficiency. Diagnosis was confirmed by elevated levels of xanthine, hypoxanthine and sulfocysteine levels in urine. CASE 3: A 3-year-10-month-old boy presented with global developmental delay, failure to thrive, dystonia and self-destructive behaviour. High uric acid levels in serum, increased fractional excretion of uric acid and absent hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme level confirmed the diagnosis of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. CASE 4: A 9-year-old boy was investigated for lower abdominal pain, gross haematuria and right renal calculus. Low uric acid level in serum and increased fractional excretion of uric acid pointed towards hereditary renal hypouricaemia which was confirmed by genetic studies. Abnormal uric acid level in blood and urine is a valuable tool in screening for clinical conditions related to derangement of the nucleic acid metabolic pathway.

  17. Disease: H00195 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00195 Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency; 2,8-Dihydroxyadenine urolithiasis... Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of purine metabolism and causes urolithiasis...transferase gene in patients with 2,8-dihydroxyadenine urolithiasis. Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids 2...denine phosphoribosyltransferase and its relation to DHA-urolithiasis. Biochemist...,8-Dihydroxyadenine urolithiasis in a patient with considerable residual adenine phosphoribosyltransferase a

  18. LC-MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1 Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depuydt, Geert G.; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smolders, Arne; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2014-02-20

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity and metabolism in C. elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2); daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the up-regulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complex I, II, III and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative for spatio-temporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. This restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves, possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways, in order to sustain longevity.

  19. LC–MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1-Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depuydt, Geert; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smolders, Arne; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2014-04-04

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity, and metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including the expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS)-based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2);daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the upregulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complexes I, II, III, and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative of spatiotemporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. Finally, this restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves and possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways to sustain longevity.

  20. Growth hormone (GH)-transgenic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1)-deficient mice allow dissociation of excess GH and IGF1 effects on glomerular and tubular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blutke, Andreas; Schneider, Marlon R; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger

    2016-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-transgenic mice with permanently elevated systemic levels of GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) reproducibly develop renal and glomerular hypertrophy and subsequent progressive glomerulosclerosis, finally leading to terminal renal failure. To dissociate IGF1-dependent and -independent effects of GH excess on renal growth and lesion development in vivo, the kidneys of 75 days old IGF1-deficient (I(-/-)) and of IGF1-deficient GH-transgenic mice (I(-/-)/G), as well as of GH-transgenic (G) and nontransgenic wild-type control mice (I(+/+)) were examined by quantitative stereological and functional analyses. Both G and I(-/-)/G mice developed glomerular hypertrophy, hyperplasia of glomerular mesangial and endothelial cells, podocyte hypertrophy and foot process effacement, albuminuria, and glomerulosclerosis. However, I(-/-)/G mice exhibited less severe glomerular alterations, as compared to G mice. Compared to I(+/+) mice, G mice exhibited renal hypertrophy with a significant increase in the number without a change in the size of proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells. In contrast, I(-/-)/G mice did not display significant PTE cell hyperplasia, as compared to I(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that GH excess stimulates glomerular growth and induces lesions progressing to glomerulosclerosis in the absence of IGF1. In contrast, IGF1 represents an important mediator of GH-dependent proximal tubular growth in GH-transgenic mice.

  1. Candida albicans erythroascorbate peroxidase regulates intracellular methylglyoxal and reactive oxygen species independently of D-erythroascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Song, Sung-Hyun; Ku, MyungHee; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2015-07-08

    Candida albicans D-erythroascorbate peroxidase (EAPX1), which can catalyze the oxidation of D-erythroascorbic acid (EASC) to water, was observed to be inducible in EAPX1-deficient and EAPX1-overexpressing cells via activity staining. EAPX1-deficient cells have remarkably increased intracellular reactive oxygen species and methylglyoxal independent of the intracellular EASC content. The increased methylglyoxal caused EAPX1-deficient cells to activate catalase-peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase, which led to defects in cell growth, viability, mitochondrial respiration, filamentation and virulence. These findings indicate that EAPX1 mediates cell differentiation and virulence by regulating intracellular methylglyoxal along with oxidative stresses, regardless of endogenous EASC biosynthesis or alternative oxidase expression.

  2. rhIGF-1 Therapy for Growth Failure and IGF-1 Deficiency in Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Ia (PMM2 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley S. Miller MD, PhD

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG are a group of rare disorders in which glycosylation required for proper protein-protein interactions and protein stability is disrupted, manifesting clinically with multiple system involvement and growth failure. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF system plays an important role in childhood growth and has been shown to be dysfunctional with low IGF-1 levels in children with CDG type Ia (PMM2 deficiency. Case report. A 3-year-old Caucasian male with failure to thrive was diagnosed with PMM2-CDG at 5 months of age. Initially, his length and weight were less than −2 standard deviation score, IGF-1 <25 ng/mL (normal 55-327 ng/mL, IGFBP-3 1.0 µg/mL (normal 0.7-3.6 ng/mL, and acid-labile subunit 1.3 mg/L (normal 0.7-7.9 mg/L. Despite aggressive feeding, he continued to show poor linear growth and weight gain. At 17 months, he underwent an IGF-1 generation test with growth hormone (0.1 mg/kg/d for 7 days; baseline IGF-1of 27 ng/mL (normal 55-327 ng/mL stimulated to only 33 ng/mL. Recombinant human IGF-1 (rhIGF-1 therapy (up to 130 µg/kg/dose twice daily was initiated at 21 months of age resulting in an excellent linear growth response with height increasing from −2.73 to −1.39 standard deviation score over 22 months. IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels also increased. Conclusion. This is the first case report of rhIGF-1 therapy in a patient with PMM2-CDG. The child had an excellent linear growth response. These results provide additional in vivo evidence for IGF dysfunction in PMM2-CDG and suggest that rhIGF-1 may be a novel treatment for growth failure in PMM2-CDG.

  3. Caveolin-1 is necessary for hepatic oxidative lipid metabolism: evidence for crosstalk between caveolin-1 and bile acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rojo, Manuel A; Gongora, Milena; Fitzsimmons, Rebecca L; Martel, Nick; Martin, Sheree D; Nixon, Susan J; Brooks, Andrew J; Ikonomopoulou, Maria P; Martin, Sally; Lo, Harriet P; Myers, Stephen A; Restall, Christina; Ferguson, Charles; Pilch, Paul F; McGee, Sean L; Anderson, Robin L; Waters, Michael J; Hancock, John F; Grimmond, Sean M; Muscat, George E O; Parton, Robert G

    2013-07-25

    Caveolae and caveolin-1 (CAV1) have been linked to several cellular functions. However, a model explaining their roles in mammalian tissues in vivo is lacking. Unbiased expression profiling in several tissues and cell types identified lipid metabolism as the main target affected by CAV1 deficiency. CAV1-/- mice exhibited impaired hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-dependent oxidative fatty acid metabolism and ketogenesis. Similar results were recapitulated in CAV1-deficient AML12 hepatocytes, suggesting at least a partial cell-autonomous role of hepatocyte CAV1 in metabolic adaptation to fasting. Finally, our experiments suggest that the hepatic phenotypes observed in CAV1-/- mice involve impaired PPARα ligand signaling and attenuated bile acid and FXRα signaling. These results demonstrate the significance of CAV1 in (1) hepatic lipid homeostasis and (2) nuclear hormone receptor (PPARα, FXRα, and SHP) and bile acid signaling.

  4. Caveolin-1 Is Necessary for Hepatic Oxidative Lipid Metabolism: Evidence for Crosstalk between Caveolin-1 and Bile Acid Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. Fernández-Rojo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Caveolae and caveolin-1 (CAV1 have been linked to several cellular functions. However, a model explaining their roles in mammalian tissues in vivo is lacking. Unbiased expression profiling in several tissues and cell types identified lipid metabolism as the main target affected by CAV1 deficiency. CAV1−/− mice exhibited impaired hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα-dependent oxidative fatty acid metabolism and ketogenesis. Similar results were recapitulated in CAV1-deficient AML12 hepatocytes, suggesting at least a partial cell-autonomous role of hepatocyte CAV1 in metabolic adaptation to fasting. Finally, our experiments suggest that the hepatic phenotypes observed in CAV1−/− mice involve impaired PPARα ligand signaling and attenuated bile acid and FXRα signaling. These results demonstrate the significance of CAV1 in (1 hepatic lipid homeostasis and (2 nuclear hormone receptor (PPARα, FXRα, and SHP and bile acid signaling.

  5. Chromosome Missegregation Associated with RUVBL1 Deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gentili

    Full Text Available RUVBL1 (RuvB-like1 and RUVBL2 (RuvB-like 2 are integral components of multisubunit protein complexes involved in processes ranging from cellular metabolism, transcription and chromatin remodeling to DNA repair. Here, we show that although RUVBL1 and RUVBL2 are known to form heterodimeric complexes in which they stabilize each other, the subunits separate during cytokinesis. In anaphase-to-telophase transition, RUVBL1 localizes to structures of the mitotic spindle apparatus, where it partially co-localizes with polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1. The ability of PLK1 to phosphorylate RUVBL1-but not RUVBL2-in vitro and their physical association in vivo suggest that this kinase differentially regulates the function of the RuvB-like proteins during mitosis. We further show that siRNA-mediated knock-down of RuvB-like proteins causes severe defects in chromosome alignment and segregation. In addition, we show that the ATPase activity of RUVBL1 is indispensable for cell proliferation. Our data thus demonstrate that RUVBL1 is essential for efficient mitosis and proliferation.

  6. FOXN1 deficient nude severe combined immunodeficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Rota, Ioanna A.; Dhalla, Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Nude severe combined immunodeficiency is a rare inherited disease caused by autosomal recessive loss-of-function mutations in FOXN1. This gene encodes a transcription factor essential for the development of the thymus, the primary lymphoid organ that supports T-cell development and selection. To date nine cases have been reported presenting with the clinical triad of absent thymus resulting in severe T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia universalis and nail dystrophy. Diagnosis relies...

  7. Identification of BRCA1-deficient ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Anne-Bine; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Rasmussen, Anders Aamann;

    2011-01-01

    Objective. It is believed that 24 - 40% of ovarian cancers have dysfunction in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCAness) genes, either due to inherited or somatic mutations or due to epigenetic inactivation. Demonstration of ovarian cancers with BRCAness is becoming important both due to the possibility...... of offering genetic counseling and due to beneficial effects of PARP inhibitor treatment in this group. Since DNA sequencing is expensive and time-consuming efforts have been devoted to develop more indirect methods for BRCA screening that can improve the selection of patients for sequence-based BRCA testing....... Design. BRCA1-immunohistochemistry (IHC), fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and methylation analyses were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded ovarian cancer tissue. Sample: 54 ovarian cancers; 15 BRCA1 cancers, 4 BRCA2 cancers, 10 cancers from patients with a family history...

  8. Acidic deposition ("acid rain")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, R. Kent; LaRoe, Edward T.; Farris, Gaye S.; Puckett, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.; Mac, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Acidic deposition, or "acid rain," describes any form of precipitation, including rain, snow, and fog, with a pH of 5.5 or below (Note: pH values below 7 are acidic; vinegar has a pH of 3). It often results when the acidity of normal precipitation is increased by sulfates and nitrates that are emitted into the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. This form of airborne contamination is considered harmful, both directly and indirectly, to a host of plant and animal species.Although acid rain can fall virtually anywhere, ecological damages in environmentally sensitive areas downwind of industrial and urban emissions are a major concern. This includes areas that have a reduced capacity to neutralize acid inputs because of low alkalinity soils and areas that contain species with a low tolerance to acid conditions. To determine the distribution of acidic deposition and evaluate its biological effects, research and monitoring are being conducted by the federal government with support from states, universities, and private industry.            The national extent of the acid rain problem has been estimated by sampling water from 3,000 lakes and 500 streams (Irving 1991), representing more than 28,000 lakes and 56,000 stream reaches with a total of 200,000 km (125,000 mi). Some particularly sensitive areas, such as the Adirondack Mountain region, have been more intensively sampled and the biota examined in detail for effects from acidity.         To identify trends in aquatic ecosystems, present and historical survey data on water chemistry and associated biota are compared. In lakes, the chemical and biological history and pH trends may be inferred or reconstructed in some cases by examining assemblages of fossil diatoms and aquatic invertebrates in the sediment layers. In terrestrial ecosystems, vegetation damage is surveyed and effects of acidic deposition to plants and animals are determined from laboratory and field exposure experiments. Natural

  9. Severity of DSS-induced colitis is reduced in Ido1-deficient mice with down-regulation of TLR-MyD88-NF-kB transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Woo-Jeong; Lee, Young-Kwan; Shin, Ji Hee; Choi, Eun Young; Shin, Dong-Mi

    2015-11-27

    Indoleamine 2,3 -dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) catalyzes L-tryptophan to kynurenine in the first and rate-limiting step of tryptophan metabolism. IDO1 is expressed widely throughout the body, with especially high expression in colonic intestinal tissues. To examine the role of IDO1 in the colon, transcriptome analysis was performed in both Ido1(-/-) and Ido1(+/+) mice. Gene set enrichment analysis identified the Inflammatory Response as the most significant category modulated by the absence of IDO1. This observation prompted us to further investigate the function of IDO1 in the development of tissue inflammation. By using DSS-induced experimental colitis mice models, we found that the disease in Ido1(-/-) mice was less severe than in Ido1(+/+) mice. Pharmacological inhibition of IDO1 by L-1MT attenuated the severity of DSS-colitis as well. Transcriptome analyses revealed that pathways involving TLR and NF-kB signaling were significantly down-regulated by the absence of IDO1. Furthermore, dramatic changes in TLR and NF-kB signaling resulted in substantial changes in the expression of many inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Numbers of inflammatory cells in colon and peripheral blood were reduced in IDO1 deficiency. These findings suggest that IDO1 plays important roles in producing inflammatory responses and modulating transcriptional networks during the development of colitis.

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana phytochelatin synthase 2 is constitutively active in vivo and can rescue the growth defect of the PCS1-deficient cad1-3 mutant on Cd-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnlenz, Tanja; Schmidt, Holger; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Clemens, Stephan

    2014-08-01

    Phytochelatins play a key role in the detoxification of metals in plants and many other eukaryotes. Their formation is catalysed by phytochelatin synthases (PCS) in the presence of metal excess. It appears to be common among higher plants to possess two PCS genes, even though in Arabidopsis thaliana only AtPCS1 has been demonstrated to confer metal tolerance. Employing a highly sensitive quantification method based on ultraperformance electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we detected AtPCS2-dependent phytochelatin formation. Overexpression of AtPCS2 resulted in constitutive phytochelatin accumulation, i.e. in the absence of metal excess, both in planta and in a heterologous system. This indicates distinct enzymatic differences between AtPCS1 and AtPCS2. Furthermore, AtPCS2 was able to partially rescue the Cd hypersensitivity of the AtPCS1-deficient cad1-3 mutant in a liquid seedling assay, and, more importantly, when plants were grown on soil spiked with Cd to a level that is close to what can be found in agricultural soils. No rescue was found in vertical-plate assays, the most commonly used method to assess metal tolerance. Constitutive AtPCS2-dependent phytochelatin synthesis suggests a physiological role of AtPCS2 other than metal detoxification. The differences observed between wild-type plants and cad1-3 on Cd soil demonstrated: (i) the essentiality of phytochelatin synthesis for tolerating levels of Cd contamination that can naturally be encountered by plants outside of metal-rich habitats, and (ii) a contribution to Cd accumulation under these conditions.

  11. 1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征一例报告及文献复习%To report one case of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶小飞; 赵忠礼; 杨斌

    2012-01-01

    目的 总结1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征的临床特点、实验室检查、分子遗传学诊断及生酮饮食治疗疗效.方法 报告1例以痫样发作为首发的1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征病例.检索国内外相关文献,共检索出明确诊断的1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征32例,进行文献复习.结果 包括作者报告1例患者,共33例,男19例,女14例.临床特点:27/33例有痫样发作,发作年龄2个月至35岁之间.大多发作年龄在6个月以内.25/33例有共济失调,大多数轻中度共济失调,少部分患者共济失调影响行走及日常生活.24/33例肌张力障碍.14/33例有小头畸形.实验室检查:30/33例患者进行了脑脊液糖检查,23 - 56mg/dl之间,平均34.2±4.7mg/dl.脑脊液糖/血糖0.24 -0.57之间,平均0.38±0.07.21/33例患者进行了红细胞摄取3-0-甲基-D-葡萄糖的能力检查,结果显示红细胞摄取3-O-甲基-D-葡萄糖的能力较正常对照下降约50%左右.29/33例进行了脑电图检查,发现痫样放电25例,表现为多灶性棘波、棘慢波.32/33例患者进行了GLUT1 - DS基因SLC2A1筛查,发现12例错义突变,2例无义突变,2例插入突变,16例缺失或剪切住点突变.治疗:所有癫痫患者均进行了抗癫痫药物治疗,痫样发作均难以控制.28/33例患者(25例癫痫患者和3例发作性运动障碍)进行了生酮饮食治疗.24例癫痫患者的痫样发作完全控制,1例痫样发作明显缓解.3例发作性运动障碍明显改善.结论 1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征临床以难治性痫样发作、语言智能发育落后、脑脊液糖/血糖明显降低为特点,常规抗癫痫药物难以控制痫样发作,生酮饮食能够控制痫样发作,并对语言、认知、运动障碍均有改善作用.%Objective: To summary the clinical characteristics, laboratory examination, molecular genetics diagnose and effects of ketogenic diet in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1 -DS

  12. E2f1-deficient NOD/SCID mice have dry mouth due to a change of acinar/duct structure and the down-regulation of AQP5 in the salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Keitaro; Narita, Takanori; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Okabayashi, Ken; Ito, Tatsuro; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice have been used as a model for dry mouth. NOD mice lacking the gene encoding E2f1, a transcription factor, develop hyposalivation more rapidly progressively than control NOD mice. However, the model mice are associated with an underlying disease such as diabetes. We have now established E2f1-deficient NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency disease (NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-)) mice to avoid the development of diabetes (Matsui-Inohara et al., Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 234(12):1525-1536, 2009). In this study, we investigated the pathophysiological features of dry mouth using NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. In NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice, the volume of secreted saliva stimulated with pilocarpine is about one third that of control NOD/SCID mice. In behavioral analysis, NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice drank plenty of water when they ate dry food, and the frequency and time of water intake were almost double compared with control NOD/SCID mice. Histological analysis of submandibular glands with hematoxylin-eosin stain revealed that NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice have more ducts than NOD/SCID mice. In western blot analysis, the expression of aquaporin 5 (AQP5), a marker of acinar cells, in parotid and in submandibular glands of NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice was lower than in NOD/SCID mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of parotid and submandibular acini revealed that the localization of AQP5 in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice differs from that in NOD/SCID mice; AQP5 was leaky and diffusively localized from the apical membrane to the cytosol in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. The ubiquitination of AQP5 was detected in submandibular glands of NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. These findings suggest that the change of acinar/duct structure and the down-regulation of AQP5 in the salivary gland cause the pathogenesis of hyposalivation in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice.

  13. Sepse por Salmonella associada à deficiência do receptor da Interleucina-12 (IL-12Rbeta1 Samonella septicemia associated with interleukin 12 receptor b1 (IL-12Rbeta1 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Tavares Costa Carvalho

    2003-06-01

    absence of IL-12 and the IFN-gamma post stimulation using BCG. COMMENTS: a severe infection by Salmonella enteritidis is strongly suggestive of an immune system dysfunction. Laboratory tests for humoral, cellular and innate immunity were performed. Interleukin 12 receptor beta1 (IL-12 Rbeta1 deficiency was confirmed after specific laboratory evaluation. The use of INF-gamma is recommended in severe cases.

  14. Phenylalanine-induced leucopenia in genetic and dichloroacetic acid generated deficiency of glutathione transferase Zeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoratos, Angelo; Tu, Wen Juan; Cappello, Jean; Blackburn, Anneke C; Matthaei, Klaus; Board, Philip G

    2009-04-15

    Glutathione transferase Zeta (GSTZ1-1) is identical to maleylacetoacetate isomerase and catalyses a significant step in the catabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine. Exposure of GSTZ1-1 deficient mice to high dietary phenylalanine causes a rapid loss of circulating white blood cells (WBCs). The loss was significant (P<0.05) after 2 days and total WBCs were reduced by 60% after 6 days. The rapid loss of WBCs was attributed to the accumulation of the catabolic intermediates maleylacetoacetate or maleylacetone (MA) in the circulation. Serum from GSTZ1-1 deficient mice treated with phenylalanine was cytotoxic to splenocytes from normal BALB/c mice and direct incubation of normal splenocytes with MA caused a rapid loss of viability. Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) has been used therapeutically to treat lactic acidosis and is potentially of use in cancer chemotherapy. Since DCA can inactivate GSTZ1-1 there is a possibility that long-term treatment of patients with DCA could cause GSTZ1-1 deficiency and susceptibility to oxidative stress and phenylalanine/tyrosine-induced WBC loss. However, although we found that DCA at 200mg/(kg day) causes a severe loss of hepatic GSTZ1-1 activity in BALB/c mice, it did not induce WBC cytotoxicity when combined with high dietary phenylalanine.

  15. Clinical and genetic characteristics of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome%葡萄糖转运子1缺乏综合征的临床特点与基因突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕燕; 包新华; 王爽; 符娜; 刘晓燕; 宋福英; 杨艳玲; 吴晔; 张月华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical and SLC2A1 gene mutation characteristics of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome.Method The detailed clinical manifestations of six cases were recorded.The laboratory tests including EEG,MRI,blood chemistry,and lumbar puncture were performed.SLC2A1 gene mutations were analyzed by PCR,DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA).Result Patient 1,2 and 3 had classical clinical symptoms including infantile onset seizures,development delay.Patient 4,5 and 6 had non-classical clinical symptoms including paroxysmal behavior disturbance,weakness,ataxia,lethargy,especially after fasting or exercise,without severe seizures.The plasma glucose levels were normal.The CSF glucose levels decreased in all the six cases,ranged from 1.10 mmol/L to 2.45 mmol/L,the mean level was 1.68 mmol/L.The CSF glucose/plasma glucose ratios decreased,ranged from 0.16 to 0.51,the mean ratio was 0.34.Four patients had normal EEG.Two patients had focal and diffuse epileptiform discharge,and one of them also had paroxysmal occipital or generalized high-amplitude slow waves during awake and sleep time.MRI abnormalities were found in three patients,patient 1 with mild brain atrophy,patient 3 with bilateral ventricle plump,and patient 4 with high signals in T2 in the frontal and occipital white matter,interpreted as hypomyelination.SLC2A1 gene mutations were found in six cases.Patient 1 has large scale deletion in exon 2.In patient 2 to 6,the mutations were c.741 G>A (E247K),599delA,761delA,c.1148 C >A (P383H),c.1198 C >T (R400C) respectively.Two patients were treated with ketogenic diet.The seizures disappeared and development became normal.Three patients responded to frequent meals with snacks.One patient refused any treatments,the symptoms continued to exist.Conclusion The clinical manifestations of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome are varied.The common symptoms included infantile onset seizures and various

  16. Valproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by increasing the amount of a ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as valproic acid to treat various conditions ...

  17. Amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  18. Obeticholic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  19. Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  20. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  1. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  2. Ethacrynic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  3. Aminocaproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  4. Aspartic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: avocado, asparagus, and molasses. Animal sources of aspartic acid include: ...

  5. Silencing of acidic pathogenesis-related PR-1 genes increases extracellular beta-(1 -> 3)-glucanase activity at the onset of tobacco defence reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riviere, M.P.; Marais, A.; Ponchet, M.

    2008-01-01

    silenced. Plants lacking extracellular PR-1s were more susceptible than wild-type plants to the oomycete Phytophthora parasitica but displayed unaffected systemic acquired resistance and developmental resistance to this pathogen. Treatment with salicylic acid up-regulates the PR-1g gene, encoding a basic...... protein of the PR-1 family, in PR-1-deficient tobacco, indicating that PR-1 expression may repress that of PR-1g. This shows that acidic PR-1s are dispensable for expression of salicylic acid-dependent acquired resistances against P. parasitica and may reveal a functional overlap in tobacco defence...

  6. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  7. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress the inflammatory responses of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse microglia by activating SIRT1 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Masuda, Shinya; Ohue-Kitano, Ryuji; Yamakage, Hajime; Muranaka, Kazuya; Wada, Hiromichi; Kusakabe, Toru; Shimatsu, Akira; Hasegawa, Koji; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko

    2017-05-01

    Obesity and diabetes are known risk factors for dementia, and it is speculated that chronic neuroinflammation contributes to this increased risk. Microglia are brain-resident immune cells modulating the neuroinflammatory state. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of fish oil, exhibit various effects, which include shifting microglia to the anti-inflammatory phenotype. To identify the molecular mechanisms involved, we examined the impact of EPA, DHA, and EPA+DHA on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine profiles and the associated signaling pathways in the mouse microglial line MG6. Both EPA and DHA suppressed the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 by LPS-stimulated MG6 cells, and this was also observed in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells, the other microglial line. Moreover, the EPA+DHA mixture activated SIRT1 signaling by enhancing mRNA level of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), cellular NAD(+) level, SIRT1 protein deacetylase activity, and SIRT1 mRNA levels in LPS-stimulated MG6. EPA+DHA also inhibited phosphorylation of the stress-associated transcription factor NF-κB subunit p65 at Ser536, which is known to enhance NF-κB nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity, including cytokine gene activation. Further, EPA+DHA increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, an indicator of autophagy. Suppression of TNF-α and IL-6 production, inhibition of p65 phosphorylation, and autophagy induction were abrogated by a SIRT1 inhibitor. On the other hand, NAMPT inhibition reversed TNF-α suppression but not IL-6 suppression. Accordingly, these ω-3 PUFAs may suppress neuroinflammation through SIRT1-mediated inhibition of the microglial NF-κB stress response and ensue pro-inflammatory cytokine release, which is implicated in NAMPT-related and -unrelated pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damage. 10 Do I need folic acid after menopause? Yes. Women who have gone through menopause still need 400 micrograms of folic acid every ... United States: 2003–2006 . American Journal of Clinical Nutrition; 91(1): 231–237. Hamner, H.C., Cogswell, ...

  9. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2016-06-06

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Folic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taking a specific nutritional supplement, containing vitamin B3 (nicotinamide), a compound isolated from grains (azelaic acid), zinc, ... lung cancer in most people. A type of skin cancer called melanoma. Limited research suggests that taking ...

  11. Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... B-complex vitamin needed by the body to manufacture red blood cells. A deficiency of this vitamin ... prepared from dried yeast, fruit, and fresh leafy green vegetables to increase the folic acid in your ...

  12. Ibotenic acid and thioibotenic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    with the conformations preferred by the ligands upon docking to mGlu1 and models of the other mGlu subtypes, we propose that unlike other subtypes, group III mGlu receptor binding sites require a ligand conformation at an energy level which is prohibitively expensive for ibotenic acid, but not for thioibotenic acid....... These studies demonstrate how subtle differences in chemical structures can result in profound differences in pharmacological activity....

  13. Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  14. Perfluorooctanoic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogt, P.; Wexler, P.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, 335-67-1) is used in fluoropolymer production and firefighting foams and persists in the environment. Human exposure to PFOA is mostly through the diet. PFOA primarily affects the liver and can cause developmental and reproductive toxic effects in test animals.

  15. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  16. Impaired nutrient signaling and body weight control in a Na+ neutral amino acid cotransporter (Slc6a19)-deficient mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröer, Angelika; Juelich, Torsten; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M; Tietze, Nadine; Solomon, Peter S; Holst, Jeff; Bailey, Charles G; Rasko, John E J; Bröer, Stefan

    2011-07-29

    Amino acid uptake in the intestine and kidney is mediated by a variety of amino acid transporters. To understand the role of epithelial neutral amino acid uptake in whole body homeostasis, we analyzed mice lacking the apical broad-spectrum neutral (0) amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (Slc6a19). A general neutral aminoaciduria was observed similar to human Hartnup disorder which is caused by mutations in SLC6A19. Na(+)-dependent uptake of neutral amino acids into the intestine and renal brush-border membrane vesicles was abolished. No compensatory increase of peptide transport or other neutral amino acid transporters was detected. Mice lacking B(0)AT1 showed a reduced body weight. When adapted to a standard 20% protein diet, B(0)AT1-deficient mice lost body weight rapidly on diets containing 6 or 40% protein. Secretion of insulin in response to food ingestion after fasting was blunted. In the intestine, amino acid signaling to the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was reduced, whereas the GCN2/ATF4 stress response pathway was activated, indicating amino acid deprivation in epithelial cells. The results demonstrate that epithelial amino acid uptake is essential for optimal growth and body weight regulation.

  17. Impaired Nutrient Signaling and Body Weight Control in a Na+ Neutral Amino Acid Cotransporter (Slc6a19)-deficient Mouse*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröer, Angelika; Juelich, Torsten; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M.; Tietze, Nadine; Solomon, Peter S.; Holst, Jeff; Bailey, Charles G.; Rasko, John E. J.; Bröer, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in the intestine and kidney is mediated by a variety of amino acid transporters. To understand the role of epithelial neutral amino acid uptake in whole body homeostasis, we analyzed mice lacking the apical broad-spectrum neutral (0) amino acid transporter B0AT1 (Slc6a19). A general neutral aminoaciduria was observed similar to human Hartnup disorder which is caused by mutations in SLC6A19. Na+-dependent uptake of neutral amino acids into the intestine and renal brush-border membrane vesicles was abolished. No compensatory increase of peptide transport or other neutral amino acid transporters was detected. Mice lacking B0AT1 showed a reduced body weight. When adapted to a standard 20% protein diet, B0AT1-deficient mice lost body weight rapidly on diets containing 6 or 40% protein. Secretion of insulin in response to food ingestion after fasting was blunted. In the intestine, amino acid signaling to the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was reduced, whereas the GCN2/ATF4 stress response pathway was activated, indicating amino acid deprivation in epithelial cells. The results demonstrate that epithelial amino acid uptake is essential for optimal growth and body weight regulation. PMID:21636576

  18. Observation on the Effect of Early Puncture Drainage in the Treatment of Patients with Intracranial Hemorrhage Caused by Delayed Vitamin K1 Deficiency%早期穿刺引流在迟发维生素K1缺乏致颅内出血中的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾劲; 杨皎莹

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察早期穿刺引流在迟发维生素K1缺乏致颅内出血中的疗效。方法:选取2010年1月-2013年4月于本院进行常规治疗的27例迟发维生素K1缺乏致颅内出血患儿为对照组,27例进行早期穿刺引流治疗的患儿为观察组,然后将两组患儿的治疗总有效率、出血停止时间、住院时间、并发症发生率及不同时间的NABA评分进行比较。结果:观察组患儿的治疗总有效率高于对照组,出血停止时间及住院时间均短于对照组,并发症发生率低于对照组,不同时间的NABA评分均优于对照组,差异均有统计学意义( P<0.05)。结论:早期穿刺引流在迟发维生素K1缺乏致颅内出血中的疗效较好,可有效改善患儿的预后。%Objective:To observe the effect of early puncture drainage in the treatment of patients with intracranial hemorrhage caused by delayed vitamin K1 deficiency.Method:27 newborns with intracranial hemorrhage caused by delayed vitamin K1 deficiency who were treated with routine treatment in our hospital from January 2010 to April 2013 were the control group,27 cases who were treated with early puncture drainage were the observation group,then the total effective rate,stopping time of bleeding,hospitalization time,rate of complications and NABA score at different time of two groups were compared.Result:The total effective rate of observation group was higher than that of control group,stopping time of bleeding and hospitalization time were shorter than those of control group,rate of complications was lower than that of control group,ABA score at different time were better than those of control group,there were all significant differences(P<0.05).Conclusion:The effect of early puncture drainage in the treatment of patients with intracranial hemorrhage caused by delayed vitamin K1 deficiency is better,and it can effectively improve the prognosis of newborns.

  19. Attenuation of Cerebral Ischemic Injury in Smad1 Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie K Wong

    Full Text Available Stroke results in brain tissue damage from ischemia and oxidative stress. Molecular regulators of the protective versus deleterious cellular responses after cerebral ischemia remain to be identified. Here, we show that deletion of Smad1, a conserved transcription factor that mediates canonical bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling, results in neuroprotection in an ischemia-reperfusion (I/R stroke model. Uninjured mice with conditional deletion of Smad1 in the CNS (Smad1 cKO displayed upregulation of the reactive astrocyte marker GFAP and hypertrophic morphological changes in astrocytes compared to littermate controls. Additionally, cultured Smad1(-/- astrocytes exhibited an enhanced antioxidant capacity. When subjected to I/R injury by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO, Smad1 cKO mice showed enhanced neuronal survival and improved neurological recovery at 7 days post-stroke. This neuroprotective phenotype is associated with attenuated reactive astrocytosis and neuroinflammation, along with reductions in oxidative stress, p53 induction, and apoptosis. Our data suggest that Smad1-mediated signaling pathway is involved in stroke pathophysiology and may present a new potential target for stroke therapy.

  20. Altered pupillary light reflex in PACAP receptor 1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelund, Anna; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Harrison, Adrian; Luuk, Hendrik; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-05-01

    The pupillary light reflex (PLR) is regulated by the classical photoreceptors, rods and cones, and by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin. IpRGCs receive input from rods and cones and project to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN), which is the primary visual center involved in PLR. Mice lacking either the classical photoreceptors or melanopsin exhibit some changes in PLR, whereas the reflex is completely lost in mice deficient of all three photoreceptors. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is co-stored with melanopsin in ipRGCs and mediates light signaling to the brain via the specific PACAP receptor 1 (PAC1R). Here, we examined the occurrence of PACAP and PAC1R in the mouse OPN, and studied if lack of PAC1R affected the PLR. PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibers were shown in the mouse OPN, and by in situ hybridization histochemistry, we demonstrated the presence of PAC1R mRNA. Mice lacking PAC1R exhibited a significantly attenuated PLR compared to wild type mice upon light stimulation, and the difference became more pronounced as light intensity was increased. Our findings accord well with observations of the PLR in the melanopsin-deficient mouse. We conclude that PACAP/PAC1R signaling is involved in the sustained phase of the PLR at high irradiances.

  1. Runx1 deficiency predisposes mice to T-lymphoblastic lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mondira; Compton, Sheila; Garrett-Beal, Lisa; Stacy, Terryl; Starost, Matthew F.; Eckhaus, Michael; Speck, Nancy A.; Liu, P. Paul

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements affecting RUNX1 and CBFB are common in acute leukemias. These mutations result in the expression of fusion proteins that act dominant-negatively to suppress the normal function of the Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX)/core binding factor β (CBFβ) complexes. In addition, loss-of-function mutations in Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) have been identified in sporadic cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and in association with the familial platelet disorder with propensity to develop AML (FPD/AML). In order to examine the hypothesis that decreased gene dosage of RUNX1 may be a critical event in the development of leukemia, we treated chimeric mice generated from Runx1lacZ/lacZ embryonic stem (ES) cells that have homozygous disruption of the Runx1 gene with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). We observed an increased incidence of T-lymphoblastic lymphoma in Runx1lacZ/lacZ compared with wild-type chimeras and confirmed that the tumors were of ES-cell origin. Our results therefore suggest that deficiency of Runx1 can indeed predispose mice to hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:16051740

  2. Arap1 Deficiency Causes Photoreceptor Degeneration in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Ala; Humpal, Devin; Leonard, Brian C.; Imai, Denise M.; Tham, Addy; Bower, Lynette; Clary, Dave; Glaser, Thomas M.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs) regulate membrane traffic and actin reorganization under the control of GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Arap1 is an Arf-directed GAP that inhibits the trafficking of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to the early endosome, but the diversity of its functions is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to determine the role of Arap1 in the mammalian retina. Methods Genetically engineered Arap1 knockout mice were screened for ocular abnormalities in the National Institutes of Health Knockout Mouse Production and Phenotyping (KOMP2) Project. Arap1 knockout and wild-type eyes were imaged using optical coherence tomography and fundus photography, and analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results Arap1−/− mice develop a normal appearing retina, but undergo photoreceptor degeneration starting at 4 weeks postnatal age. The fundus appearance of mutants is notable for pigmentary changes, optic nerve pallor, vascular attenuation, and outer retinal thinning, reminiscent of retinitis pigmentosa in humans. Immunohistochemical studies suggest the cell death is predominantly in the outer nuclear layer. Functional evaluation of the retina by electroretinography reveals amplitudes are reduced. Arap1 is detected most notably in Müller glia, and not in photoreceptors, implicating a role for Müller glia in photoreceptor survival. Conclusions Arap1 is necessary for normal photoreceptor survival in mice, and may be a novel gene relevant to human retinal degenerative processes, although its mechanism is unknown. Further studies in this mouse model of retinal degeneration will give insights into the cellular functions and signaling pathways in which Arap1 participates. PMID:28324111

  3. Consequences of SOS1 deficiency: Intracellular physiology and transcription

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, OhDong

    2010-06-01

    As much as there is known about the function of the sodium/proton antiporter SOS1 in plants, recent studies point towards a more general role for this protein. The crucial involvement in salt stress protection is clearly one of its functions –confined to the N-terminus, but the modular structure of the protein includes a segment with several domains that are functionally not studied but comprise more than half of the protein’s length. Additional functions of the protein appear to be an influence on vesicle trafficking, vacuolar pH and general ion homeostasis during salt stress. Eliminating SOS1 leads to the expression of genes that are not strictly salinity stress related. Functions that are regulated in sos1 mutants included pathogen responses, and effects on circadian rhythm.

  4. CEACAM1 deficiency delays important wound healing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Sarah; Arabzadeh, Azadeh; Benlolo, Samantha; Breton, Valérie; Turbide, Claire; Beauchemin, Nicole; Nouvion, Anne-Laure

    2011-11-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process that requires the coordination of many cell types to achieve proper tissue repair. Four major overlapping processes have been identified in wound healing: hemostasis, inflammation, reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is a glycoprotein expressed in epithelial, endothelial, lymphoid, and myeloid cells. Given its known roles in angiogenesis, cell migration, and immune functions, we hypothesized that CEACAM1 might also be involved in cutaneous wound healing and that a number of relevant CEACAM1-positive cell types might contribute to wound healing. To evaluate the role of CEACAM1 in these processes, 6-mm-diameter skin wounds were inflicted on Ceacam1(-/-) and wild-type mice. Herein, we demonstrate that CEACAM1 deletion indeed affects wound healing in three key ways. Infiltration of F4/80(+) macrophages was decreased in Ceacam1(-/-) wounds, altering inflammatory processes. Reepithelialization in Ceacam1(-/-) wounds was delayed. Furthermore, the vascular density of the granulation tissue in Ceacam1(-/-) wounds was significantly diminished. These results confirm CEACAM1's role as an important regulator of key processes in cutaneous wound healing, although whether this works via a specific cell type or alterations in the functioning of multiple processes remains to be determined.

  5. Reduced hepatic tumor incidence in cyclin G1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Rugaard; Factor, Valentina M; Fantozzi, Anna

    2003-01-01

    Cyclin G1 is a transcriptional target of the tumor suppressor p53, and its expression is increased after DNA damage. Recent data show that cyclin G1 can regulate the levels of p53 by a mechanism that involves dephosphorylation of Mdm2 by protein phosphatase 2A. To understand the biologic role of ...

  6. Targeting Redox Homeostasis in LKB1-deficient NSCLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    induction of BH3-only BIM protein or activation of caspase 3 (19, 20). In these studies, erlotinib treatment was associated with loss of mitochondrial...phenformin, H358 and Calu-6 cells expressing shLKB1 exhibited enhanced dissipation of Δψm compared to control cells (red to green ratio of JC-1...Cai D, Shapiro GI, et al. Proapoptotic BH3- Only BCL-2 Family Protein BIM Connects Death Signaling from Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibition

  7. PINK1 deficiency enhances autophagy and mitophagy induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Yakhine-Diop, Sokhna M S; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Rodríguez-Arribas, Mario; Climent, Vicente; Martin-Cano, Francisco E; González-Soltero, María E; Tandon, Anurag; Fuentes, José M; González-Polo, Rosa A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with poorly understood etiology. Increasing evidence suggests that age-dependent compromise of the maintenance of mitochondrial function is a key risk factor. Several proteins encoded by PD-related genes are associated with mitochondria

  8. PINK1 deficiency enhances autophagy and mitophagy induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Yakhine-Diop, Sokhna M S; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Rodríguez-Arribas, Mario; Climent, Vicente; Martin-Cano, Francisco E; González-Soltero, María E; Tandon, Anurag; Fuentes, José M; González-Polo, Rosa A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with poorly understood etiology. Increasing evidence suggests that age-dependent compromise of the maintenance of mitochondrial function is a key risk factor. Several proteins encoded by PD-related genes are associated with mitochondria includ

  9. MAN1B1 deficiency: an unexpected CDG-II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Rymen

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG are a group of rare metabolic diseases, due to impaired protein and lipid glycosylation. In the present study, exome sequencing was used to identify MAN1B1 as the culprit gene in an unsolved CDG-II patient. Subsequently, 6 additional cases with MAN1B1-CDG were found. All individuals presented slight facial dysmorphism, psychomotor retardation and truncal obesity. Generally, MAN1B1 is believed to be an ER resident alpha-1,2-mannosidase acting as a key factor in glycoprotein quality control by targeting misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD. However, recent studies indicated a Golgi localization of the endogenous MAN1B1, suggesting a more complex role for MAN1B1 in quality control. We were able to confirm that MAN1B1 is indeed localized to the Golgi complex instead of the ER. Furthermore, we observed an altered Golgi morphology in all patients' cells, with marked dilatation and fragmentation. We hypothesize that part of the phenotype is associated to this Golgi disruption. In conclusion, we linked mutations in MAN1B1 to a Golgi glycosylation disorder. Additionally, our results support the recent findings on MAN1B1 localization. However, more work is needed to pinpoint the exact function of MAN1B1 in glycoprotein quality control, and to understand the pathophysiology of its deficiency.

  10. Increased adiposity in annexin A1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rand T Akasheh

    Full Text Available Production of Annexin A1 (ANXA1, a protein that mediates the anti-inflammatory action of glucocorticoids, is altered in obesity, but its role in modulation of adiposity has not yet been investigated. The objective of this study was to investigate modulation of ANXA1 in adipose tissue in murine models of obesity and to study the involvement of ANXA1 in diet-induced obesity in mice. Significant induction of ANXA1 mRNA was observed in adipose tissue of both C57BL6 and Balb/c mice with high fat diet (HFD-induced obesity versus mice on chow diet. Upregulation of ANXA1 mRNA was independent of leptin or IL-6, as demonstrated by use of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and IL-6 KO mice. Compared to WT mice, female Balb/c ANXA1 KO mice on HFD had increased adiposity, as indicated by significantly elevated body weight, fat mass, leptin levels, and adipocyte size. Whereas Balb/c WT mice upregulated expression of enzymes involved in the lipolytic pathway in response to HFD, this response was absent in ANXA1 KO mice. A significant increase in fasting glucose and insulin levels as well as development of insulin resistance was observed in ANXA1 KO mice on HFD compared to WT mice. Elevated plasma corticosterone levels and blunted downregulation of 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in adipose tissue was observed in ANXA1 KO mice compared to diet-matched WT mice. However, no differences between WT and KO mice on either chow or HFD were observed in expression of markers of adipose tissue inflammation. These data indicate that ANXA1 is an important modulator of adiposity in mice, with female ANXA1 KO mice on Balb/c background being more susceptible to weight gain and diet-induced insulin resistance compared to WT mice, without significant changes in inflammation.

  11. Quantitative proteomics suggests metabolic reprogramming during ETHE1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahebekhtiari, Navid; Thomsen, Michelle M.; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase (ETHE1) causes the severe metabolic disorder ethylmalonic encephalopathy, which is characterized by early-onset encephalopathy and defective cytochrome C oxidase because of hydrogen sulfide accumulation. Although the severe systemic consequences...

  12. BACE1 deficiency causes altered neuronal activity and neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiangyou; Zhou, Xiangdong; He, Wanxia; Yang, Jun; Xiong, Wenchen; Wong, Philip; Wilson, Christopher G.; Yan, Riqiang

    2010-01-01

    BACE1 is required for the release of β–amyloid (Aβ) in vivo, and inhibition of BACE1 activity is targeted for reducing Aβ generation in Alzheimer's patients. In order to further our understanding of the safe use of BACE1 inhibitors in human patients, we aimed to study the physiological functions of BACE1 by characterizing BACE1–null mice. Here we report the finding of spontaneous behavioral seizures in BACE1–null mice. Electroencephalographic recordings revealed abnormal spike-wave discharges...

  13. Rescue of cyclin D1 deficiency by knockin cyclin E

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geng, Y.; Whoriskey, W.; Park, M.Y.; Bronson, R.T.; Medema, R.H.; Li, T.; Weinberg, R.A.; Sicinski, P.

    1999-01-01

    D-type cyclins and cyclin E represent two very distinct classes of mammalian G1 cyclins. We have generated a mouse strain in which the coding sequences of the cyclin D1 gene (Ccnd1) have been deleted and replaced by those of human cyclin E (CCNE). In the tissues and cells of these mice, the expressi

  14. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluorhydric acid ... stomach, or intestine have holes (perforations) from the acid. ... Hydrofluoric acid is especially dangerous. The most common accidents involving hydrofluoric acid cause severe burns on the skin ...

  15. Dehydroabietic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ping Rao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound [systematic name: (1R,4aS,10aR-7-isopropyl-1,4a-dimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydrophenanthrene-1-carboxylic acid], C20H28O2, has been isolated from disproportionated rosin which is obtained by isomerizing gum rosin with a Pd-C catalyst.. Two crystallographically independent molecules exist in the asymmetric unit. In each molecule, there are three six-membered rings, which adopt planar, half-chair and chair conformations. The two cyclohexane rings form a trans ring junction with the two methyl groups in axial positions. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and build up under the skin and cause gouty arthritis (arthritis caused by an accumulation of uric acid ... hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency hypoxanthine ... mental retardation syndrome juvenile hyperuricemia syndrome Lesch- ...

  17. Delineation of the motor disorder of Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinnah, H.A.; Visser, J.E.; Harris, J.C.; Verdu, A.; Larovere, L.; Ceballos-Picot, I.; Gonzalez-Alegre, P.; Neychev, V.; Torres, R.J.; Dulac, O.; Desguerre, I.; Schretlen, D.J.; Robey, K.L.; Barabas, G.; Bloem, B.R.; Nyhan, W.L.; Kremer, R.; Eddey, G.E.; Puig, J.G.; Reich, S.G.

    2006-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is caused by deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). Affected individuals exhibit over-production of uric acid, along with a characteristic neurobehavioural syndrome that includes mental retardation, recurrent

  18. Amino acids in the sedimentary humic and fulvic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.

    to the coastal sedimentary humic acids implying higher association of amino acids with the carbonaceous and fine grained sedimentary humic acids. Both the humic and fulvic acids are composed of neutral, acidic, basic, aromatic and sulphur containing amino acids....

  19. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  20. Plasma amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  1. Uric acid test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  2. POLYELEOSTEARIC ACID VESICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zichen; XIE Ximng; FAN Qinghua; FANG Yifei

    1992-01-01

    α-Eleostearic acid and β-eleostearic acid formed vesicles in aqueous medium when an ethanol solutionofeleostearic acid was injected rapidly into a vigorously vortexed aqueous phase. Formation of the vesicles was demonstrated by electron microscopic observation and bromothymol blue encapsulation experiments. Polymerizations of the eleostearic acids in the formed vesicles carried out by UV irradiation produced poly-α-eleostearic acid and poly-β-eleostearic acid vesicles.

  3. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  4. Gas-phase Acidities of Aspartic Acid, Glutamic Acid, and their Amino Acid Amides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H; Velazquez, Hector A; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2007-02-14

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or ΔGacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage’s importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3–4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  5. Liver acid sphingomyelinase inhibits growth of metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Yosuke; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Yasuda, Ichiro; Saibara, Toshiji; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Seishima, Mitsuru; Kozawa, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) regulates the homeostasis of sphingolipids, including ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). These sphingolipids regulate carcinogenesis and proliferation, survival, and apoptosis of cancer cells. However, the role of ASM in host defense against liver metastasis remains unclear. In this study, the involvement of ASM in liver metastasis of colon cancer was examined using Asm-/- and Asm+/+ mice that were inoculated with SL4 colon cancer cells to produce metastatic liver tumors. Asm-/- mice demonstrated enhanced tumor growth and reduced macrophage accumulation in the tumor, accompanied by decreased numbers of hepatic myofibroblasts (hMFs), which express tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), around the tumor margin. Tumor growth was increased by macrophage depletion or by Timp1 deficiency, but was decreased by hepatocyte-specific ASM overexpression, which was associated with increased S1P production. S1P stimulated macrophage migration and TIMP1 expression in hMFs in vitro. These findings indicate that ASM in the liver inhibits tumor growth through cytotoxic macrophage accumulation and TIMP1 production by hMFs in response to S1P. Targeting ASM may represent a new therapeutic strategy for treating liver metastasis of colon cancer.

  6. Gas-phase acidities of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and their amino acid amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H.; Velazquez, Hector Adam; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2007-09-01

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or [Delta]Gacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage's importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3-4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  7. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  8. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  9. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of ...

  11. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant ...

  12. Lactic acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  13. Catalytic Synthesis Lactobionic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Borodina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles are obtained, characterized and deposited on the carrier. Conducted catalytic synthesis of lactobionic acid from lactose. Received lactobionic acid identify on the IR spectrum.

  14. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  15. Facts about Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Partners About Us Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English (US) Español ( ... a woman needs 400 micrograms (mcg) every day. Facts About Folic Acid Download and print this fact ...

  16. Azelaic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  17. Folic Acid Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Information For… Media Policy Makers Folic Acid Quiz Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... button beside the question. Good Luck! 1. Folic acid is: A a B vitamin B a form ...

  18. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  19. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  20. Stomach acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour (mEq/ ...

  1. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Acid Lipase Disease Information Page What research is being ... research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency. Additional research studies hope to identify ...

  2. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  3. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  4. Demospongic Acids Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Barnathan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The well-known fatty acids with a D5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C16–C32 and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C18–C19. Finally, the D5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs. This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between D5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs.

  5. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  6. [Biosynthesis of adipic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li; Chen, Wujiu; Yuan, Fei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-10-01

    Adipic acid is a six-carbon dicarboxylic acid, mainly for the production of polymers such as nylon, chemical fiber and engineering plastics. Its annual demand is close to 3 million tons worldwide. Currently, the industrial production of adipic acid is based on the oxidation of aromatics from non-renewable petroleum resources by chemo-catalytic processes. It is heavily polluted and unsustainable, and the possible alternative method for adipic acid production should be developed. In the past years, with the development of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, green and clean biotechnological methods for adipic acid production attracted more attention. In this study, the research advances of adipic acid and its precursor production are reviewed, followed by addressing the perspective of the possible new pathways for adipic acid production.

  7. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  8. Acid-Base Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S

    2015-12-07

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3(-) and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3(-) is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys.

  9. Glycolic Acid 15% Plus Salicylic Acid 2%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Blanco, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial flat warts are a contagious viral disease that can cause disturbing cosmetic problems. Topical glycolic acid has been reported to be effective in dermatological treatment depending on the exfoliant capacity, but has not often been reported to be effective in the treatment of facial flat warts. Objective: The aim of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of glycolic acid 15% topical gel plus salicylic acid 2% in the treatment of recalcitrant facial flat warts. Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients 7 to 16 years of age with recalcitrant facial flat warts were enrolled in this study. Patients having warts by the eye and lip regions were excluded from the study. A fine layer of face gel was applied to the treatment area once daily. Most of the participants had tried different treatments with no success. Assessments for the response and the occurrence of side effects were performed every two weeks at Weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8. Results: All the patients were clinically cured within eight weeks. Seven patients cleared in four weeks, and 13 patients cleared in eight weeks. No noticeable adverse events were related to the skin. Conclusion: Topical gel of glycolic acid 15% plus salicylic acid 2% is safe and effective when applied to facial flat warts once daily until clearance and may be considered as first-line treatment. PMID:21938272

  10. Nitrogen Lewis Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoreltsev, Alla; Tulchinsky, Yuri; Fridman, Natalia; Gandelman, Mark

    2017-03-22

    Being a major conception of chemistry, Lewis acids have found countless applications throughout chemical enterprise. Although many chemical elements can serve as the central atom of Lewis acids, nitrogen is usually associated with Lewis bases. Here, we report on the first example of robust and modifiable Lewis acids centered on the nitrogen atom, which provide stable and well-characterized adducts with various Lewis bases. On the basis of the reactivity of nitrogen Lewis acids, we prepared, for the first time, cyclic triazanes, a class of cyclic organic compounds sequentially bearing three all-saturated nitrogen atoms (N-N-N motif). Reactivity abilities of these N-Lewis acids were explained by theoretical calculations. Properties and future applications of nitrogen Lewis acids are intriguing.

  11. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  12. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  13. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness. PMID:28287411

  14. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  15. Diterpenoid acids from Grindelia nana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, A A; Ahmed, A A; Tanaka, T; Iinuma, M

    2000-03-01

    Two new norditerpenoid acids of the labdane-type (norgrindelic acids), 4,5-dehydro-6-oxo-18-norgrindelic acid (1) and 4beta-hydroxy-6-oxo-19-norgrindelic acid (2), as well as a new grindelic acid derivative, 18-hydroxy-6-oxogrindelic acid (3), were isolated from the aerial parts of Grindelia nana. In addition, the known compounds, 6-oxogrindelic acid, grindelic acid, methyl grindeloate, 7alpha,8alpha-epoxygrindelic acid, and 4alpha-carboxygrindelic acid were also isolated. The structures of the new compounds were characterized on the basis of spectroscopic analysis.

  16. Nucleic Acid Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G

    2017-01-01

    Organisms throughout biology need to maintain the integrity of their genome. From bacteria to vertebrates, life has established sophisticated mechanisms to detect and eliminate foreign genetic material or to restrict its function and replication. Tremendous progress has been made in the understanding of these mechanisms which keep foreign or unwanted nucleic acids from viruses or phages in check. Mechanisms reach from restriction-modification systems and CRISPR/Cas in bacteria and archaea to RNA interference and immune sensing of nucleic acids, altogether integral parts of a system which is now appreciated as nucleic acid immunity. With inherited receptors and acquired sequence information, nucleic acid immunity comprises innate and adaptive components. Effector functions include diverse nuclease systems, intrinsic activities to directly restrict the function of foreign nucleic acids (e.g., PKR, ADAR1, IFIT1), and extrinsic pathways to alert the immune system and to elicit cytotoxic immune responses. These effects act in concert to restrict viral replication and to eliminate virus-infected cells. The principles of nucleic acid immunity are highly relevant for human disease. Besides its essential contribution to antiviral defense and restriction of endogenous retroelements, dysregulation of nucleic acid immunity can also lead to erroneous detection and response to self nucleic acids then causing sterile inflammation and autoimmunity. Even mechanisms of nucleic acid immunity which are not established in vertebrates are relevant for human disease when they are present in pathogens such as bacteria, parasites, or helminths or in pathogen-transmitting organisms such as insects. This review aims to provide an overview of the diverse mechanisms of nucleic acid immunity which mostly have been looked at separately in the past and to integrate them under the framework nucleic acid immunity as a basic principle of life, the understanding of which has great potential to

  17. A novel methyltransferase from the intracellular pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae methylates salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Jülke, Sabine; Geiß, Kathleen; Richter, Franziska; Mithöfer, Axel; Šola, Ivana; Rusak, Gordana; Keenan, Sandi; Bulman, Simon

    2015-05-01

    The obligate biotrophic pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae causes clubroot disease in Arabidopsis thaliana, which is characterized by large root galls. Salicylic acid (SA) production is a defence response in plants, and its methyl ester is involved in systemic signalling. Plasmodiophora brassicae seems to suppress plant defence reactions, but information on how this is achieved is scarce. Here, we profile the changes in SA metabolism during Arabidopsis clubroot disease. The accumulation of SA and the emission of methylated SA (methyl salicylate, MeSA) were observed in P. brassicae-infected Arabidopsis 28 days after inoculation. There is evidence that MeSA is transported from infected roots to the upper plant. Analysis of the mutant Atbsmt1, deficient in the methylation of SA, indicated that the Arabidopsis SA methyltransferase was not responsible for alterations in clubroot symptoms. We found that P. brassicae possesses a methyltransferase (PbBSMT) with homology to plant methyltransferases. The PbBSMT gene is maximally transcribed when SA production is highest. By heterologous expression and enzymatic analyses, we showed that PbBSMT can methylate SA, benzoic and anthranilic acids.

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  19. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  20. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  1. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  2. Carbolic acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you to. If the person swallowed the carbolic acid, give them water or milk right away, if a provider tells ... well someone does depends on how much carbolic acid they swallowed and how quickly they receive treatment. The faster medical help is given, the better ...

  3. Uric acid - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High levels of uric acid can sometimes cause gout or kidney disease. You may have this test if you have had or are about to have certain types of chemotherapy. Rapid weight loss, which may occur with such treatments, can increase the amount of uric acid in ...

  4. Neurotoxicity of Folic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amsterdam van JGC; Jansen EHJM; A Opperhuizen; TOX

    2004-01-01

    The present review summarises the neurotoxicological effects of folic acid. Some studies in animals have shown that folic acid is neurotoxic and epileptogenic when applied directly to the brain. One poorly controlled and not further reproduced study from 1970 reported neurotoxic symptoms like

  5. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  6. Fats and fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The absolute fat requirement of the human species is the amount of essential fatty acids needed to maintain optimal fatty acid composition of all tissues and normal eicosanoid synthesis. At most, this requirement is no more than about 5% of an adequate energy intake. However, fat accounts for appro...

  7. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  8. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the absorption of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in humans are lacking. We determined the absorption of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in a cross-over study with 4 female and 3 male healthy ileo...

  9. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, M.R.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Katan, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the

  10. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, M.R.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Katan, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the

  11. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Wesén, Clas; Sundin, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids have been found to be major contributors to organohalogen compounds in fish, bivalves, jellyfish, and lobster, and they have been indicated to contribute considerably to organohalogens in marine mammals. Brominated fatty acids have been found in marine sponges. Also......, chlorinated lipids have been found in meat exposed to hypochlorite disinfected water, and in chlorine-treated flour and in products made from such flour. Following exposure to chlorine bleached pulp mill effluents, aquatic organisms may have elevated concentrations of chlorinated fatty acids in their lipids....... However, a natural production of halogenated fatty acids is also possible. In this paper we summarize the present knowledge of the occurrence of halogenated fatty acids in lipids and suggested ways of their formation. In Part II (Trends Anal. Chem. 16 (1997) 274) we deal with methods...

  12. Phenolic acids enzymatic lipophilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Espinoza, Maria-Cruz; Villeneuve, Pierre

    2005-04-20

    Lipophilization is the esterification of a lipophilic moiety (fatty acid or fatty alcohol) on different substrates (phenolic acid, sugar, protein, ...), resulting in new molecules with modified hydrophilic/lipophilic balance. This reaction can be obtained chemically or enzymatically using different enzymes. Phenolic acids possess interesting biological properties (antioxidant, chelator, free radical scavenger, UV filter, antimicrobial, ...), but because of their relatively low solubility in aprotic media, their application in oil-based products is limited. Therefore, the esterification of their carboxylic acid function with a fatty alcohol enhances their hydrophobicity and results in a multifunctional amphiphilic molecule. Enzymatic lipophilization of phenolic acids is nowadays studied for potential industrial applications. Different systems have been proposed to perform the reaction yield [free or immobilized enzymes (lipase, feruloyl esterase, tannase, etc.), free or added organic solvent, addition of surfactant, microemulsion system, etc.]. Some of the functional properties of these esters have been demonstrated. This review presents a panorama of the advances in this field.

  13. 2-Methylaspartic acid monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray J. Butcher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C5H9NO4·H2O, is an isomer of the α-amino acid glutamic acid that crystallizes from water in its zwitterionic form as a monohydrate. It is not one of the 20 proteinogenic α-amino acids that are used in living systems and differs from the natural amino acids in that it has an α-methyl group rather than an α-H atom. In the crystal, an O—H...O hydrogen bond is present between the acid and water molecules while extensive N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds link the components into a three-dimensional array.

  14. Composition of amino acids, fatty acids and dietary fibre monomers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Composition of amino acids, fatty acids and dietary fibre monomers in kernels of ... Nuts are rich in protein and essential amino acids, and have a high energy value ... of protein, especially when combined with foods with high lysine content.

  15. Amino acids analysis during lactic acid fermentation by single strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... of the three LAB strains to utilize amino acids for growth and lactic acid production were employed to ... Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which are used for the ..... and characterization of potential probiotic lactobacilli from pig feces.

  16. Trans Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  17. Gluconic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiadis, Savas; Morgunov, Igor G

    2007-01-01

    Gluconic acid, the oxidation product of glucose, is a mild neither caustic nor corrosive, non toxic and readily biodegradable organic acid of great interest for many applications. As a multifunctional carbonic acid belonging to the bulk chemicals and due to its physiological and chemical characteristics, gluconic acid itself, its salts (e.g. alkali metal salts, in especially sodium gluconate) and the gluconolactone form have found extensively versatile uses in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, construction and other industries. Present review article presents the comprehensive information of patent bibliography for the production of gluconic acid and compares the advantages and disadvantages of known processes. Numerous manufacturing processes are described in the international bibliography and patent literature of the last 100 years for the production of gluconic acid from glucose, including chemical and electrochemical catalysis, enzymatic biocatalysis by free or immobilized enzymes in specialized enzyme bioreactors as well as discontinuous and continuous fermentation processes using free growing or immobilized cells of various microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast-like fungi and fungi. Alternatively, new superior fermentation processes have been developed and extensively described for the continuous and discontinuous production of gluconic acid by isolated strains of yeast-like mold Aureobasidium pullulans, offering numerous advantages over the traditional discontinuous fungi processes.

  18. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain. This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks. Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  19. Fusidic acid in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöfer, Helmut; Simonsen, Lene

    1995-01-01

    efficacy and tolerability. Similarly, plain fusidic acid cream or ointment used two or three times daily in SSTIs such as impetigo are clinically and bacteriologically effective, with minimal adverse events. Combination formulations of fusidic acid with 1% hydrocortisone or 0.1% betamethasone achieve...... excellent results in infected eczema by addressing both inflammation and infection. A new lipid-rich combination formulation provides an extra moisturizing effect. Development of resistance to fusidic acid has remained generally low or short-lived and can be minimized by restricting therapy to no more than...

  20. Kir1.1 (ROMK) and Kv7.1 (KCNQ1/KvLQT1) are essential for normal gastric acid secretion: importance of functional Kir1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Esad; Alfadda, Tariq; MacGregor, Gordon G; Dong, Ke; Wang, Tong; Geibel, John P

    2015-07-01

    Potassium channels comprise the apical leak pathway supplying extracellular K(+) for exchange with protons by the gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase and provide potential therapeutic targets for inhibiting gastric acid secretion. The Kir1.1 (ROMK) potassium channel mediates the high capacity K(+) recycling necessary for NaCl reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the kidney, and this channel exhibits functional and regulatory characteristic well suited for K(+) recycling by gastric parietal cells. We report here that Kir1.1 channels are required for gastric acid secretion and that this channel participates with Kv7.1 (KCNQ1/KvLQT1) in the potassium recycling process. We show that Kir1.1 colocalizes with the β-subunit of H(+), K(+)-ATPase in gastric parietal cells of Kir1.1 wild-type mice. In Kir1.1-deficient mice, gastric mucosal morphology, as well as parietal cell number, proliferation index, and ultrastructure were normal but secretagogue-stimulated gastric acid secretion in whole stomach and perfused gastric glands was absent. Luminal application of potassium-restored acid secretion in perfused gastric glands from Kir1.1-deficient as well as barium-blocked wild-type mice. In wild-type mice, both luminal Tertiapin-Q, an inhibitor of Kir1.1, as well as XE991, an inhibitor of Kv7.1, reduced proton secretion. We propose that Kir1.1 and Kv7.1 channels collaborate in potassium and current recycling across the apical pole of parietal cells.

  1. Acid rain: An overview

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of the effects of acid rain and related processes, sources, issues, corrective actions, research, current law, potential solutions, political solutions,...

  2. Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid oxidation disorders are tested for in newborn screening? The March of Dimes recommends that all babies ... in behavior Diarrhea, nausea (feeling sick to your stomach) and throwing up Drowsiness Fever Fussiness Little appetite ...

  3. Synthesis of aminoaldonic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christel Thea

    With the aim of synthesising aminoaldonic acids, two 2-acetamido-2-deoxyaldonolactones with D-galacto (6) and D-arabino (11) configuration were prepared from acetylated sugar formazans in analogy with a known procedure. Empolying the same procedure to acetylated sugar phenylhydrazones gave mixtures....... The aziridino amides 43 and 51 were reductively cleaved with hydrazine to give 3-amino-2,3-dideoxyhexonhydrazides 83 and 85, which were easily converted into the corresponding lactone 84 and acid 86. The aziridine ring of 43 and 51 was also opened with acetic acid to give the 3-amino-3-deoxyhexonic acids 79...... and 82, respectively. The aminolactone 84 was converted into the corresponding amino sugar 89.With the aim of synthesising substrates for the Pictet-Spengler reaction three 4-aldehydo acetamidodideoxytetronolactones 92, 97 and 103 were prepared by periodate cleavage of the corresponding hexonolactones...

  4. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated.

  5. Azetidinic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Bunch, Lennart; Chopin, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    A set of ten azetidinic amino acids, that can be envisioned as C-4 alkyl substituted analogues of trans-2-carboxyazetidine-3-acetic acid (t-CAA) and/or conformationally constrained analogues of (R)- or (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) have been synthesized in a diastereo- and enantiomerically pure form from...... of two diastereoisomers that were easily separated and converted in two steps into azetidinic amino acids. Azetidines 35-44 were characterized in binding studies on native ionotropic Glu receptors and in functional assays at cloned metabotropic receptors mGluR1, 2 and 4, representing group I, II and III...... beta-amino alcohols through a straightforward five step sequence. The key step of this synthesis is an original anionic 4-exo-tet ring closure that forms the azetidine ring upon an intramolecular Michael addition. This reaction was proven to be reversible and to lead to a thermodynamic distribution...

  6. Amino acid racemisation dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray-Wallace, C.V. [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). School of Geosciences

    1999-11-01

    The potential of the time-dependent amino acid racemisation reaction as a method of age assessment was first reported by Hare and Abelson (1968). They noted that in specimens of the bivalve mollusc Mercenaria sp., greater concentrations of amino acids in the D-configuration with increasing fossil age. Hare and Abelson (1968) also reported negligible racemisation in a modern specimen of Mecanaria sp. On this basis they suggested that the extent of amino acid racemisation (epimerisation in the case of isoleucine) may be used to assess the age of materials within and beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. For the past thirty years amino acid racemisation has been extensively applied in Quaternary research as a method of relative and numeric dating, and a particularly large literature has emerged on the subject 12 refs.

  7. Folic acid - test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... folic acid before and during pregnancy helps prevent neural tube defects, such as spina bifida. Women who are ... take more if they have a history of neural tube defects in earlier pregnancies. Ask your provider how ...

  8. Amino Acids and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  9. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a chelating agent can bind to metals via four carboxylate and two amine groups. It is a polyamino carboxylic acid and a colorless, water-soluble solid, which is widely used to dissolve lime scale. It is produced as several salts, notably disodium EDTA and calcium disodium EDTA. EDTA reacts with the calcium ions in dentine and forms soluble calcium chelates. A review of the literature and a discussion of the different indications and considerations for...

  10. Bile acid sequestrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid an......-lowering effect in patients with type 2 diabetes remain unclear. This article offers a review of the mechanisms behind the glucose-lowering effect of BASs, and the efficacy of BASs in the treatment of type 2 diabetes....... of the enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...... and glucose metabolism, and possibly energy homeostasis, through activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) constitute a class of drugs that bind bile acids in the intestine to form a nonabsorbable complex resulting in interruption...

  11. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Dils, R.

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid...... synthetase complex was isolated free from acetyl-CoA. It was rapidly hydrolysed at 30°C, but hydrolysis was greatly diminished at o°C and triacetic lactone synthesis occurred. In the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH, all the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase was incorporated into long-chain fatty acids....... Hydrolysis of bound acetate and incorporation of bound acetate into fatty acids were inhibited to the same extent by guanidine hydrochloride. # 3. 3. Acetate was also covalently bound to fatty acid synthetase by chemical acetylation with [I-14C]acetic anhydride in the absence of CoASH. A total of 60 moles...

  12. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination.

  13. Performance Comparison of New Combinations of Acids with Mud Acid in Sandstone Acidizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Umer Shafiq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to find the best suitable acid to acidize undamaged low permeable sandstone formation Stimulation of sandstone formations is a challenging task, which involves several chemicals and physical interactions of the acid with the formation. Mud acid has been successfully used to stimulate sandstone reservoirs for a number of years. Matrix acidizing may also be used to increase formation permeability in undamaged wells. The change may be up to 50 to 100% with the mud acid. For any acidizing process, the selection of acid (Formulation and Concentration and the design (Pre-flush, Main Acid, After-flush is very important. Different researchers are using different combinations of acids with different concentrations to get the best results for acidization. Mainly the common practice is combination of Hydrochloric Acid- Hydrofluoric with Concentration (3% HF-12% HCl. This study presents the results of a laboratory investigation of Orthophosphoric acid instead of hydrochloric acid in one combination and the second combination is Fluoboric and formic acid and the third one is formic and hydrofluoric acid. The results are compared with the mud acid and the results analyzed are porosity, permeability, strength, color change and FESEM Analysis. All of these new combinations shows that these have the potential to be used as acidizing acids on sandstone formations.

  14. Acidification and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  15. Inhibitory effect of ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo; Wan, Wei; Wang, Jianlong [Laboratory of Environmental Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-12-15

    The inhibitory effect of added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production by mixed cultures was investigated in batch tests using glucose as substrate. The experimental results showed that, at 35 C and initial pH 7.0, during the fermentative hydrogen production, the substrate degradation efficiency, hydrogen production potential, hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate all trended to decrease with increasing added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid concentration from 0 to 300 mmol/L. The inhibitory effect of added ethanol on fermentative hydrogen production was smaller than those of added acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid. The modified Han-Levenspiel model could describe the inhibitory effects of added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production rate in this study successfully. The modified Logistic model could describe the progress of cumulative hydrogen production. (author)

  16. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of novel bicyclic acidic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; De Amici, Marco; Joppolo Di Ventimiglia, Samuele

    2003-01-01

    Bicyclic acidic amino acids (+/-)-6 and (+/-)-7, which are conformationally constrained homologues of glutamic acid, were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The new amino acids were tested toward ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes; both of them...

  17. Hepatic gene expression in multiparous Holstein cows treated with bovine somatotropin and fed n-3 fatty acids in early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriquiry, M; Weber, W J; Fahrenkrug, S C; Crooker, B A

    2009-10-01

    Multiparous cows were fed supplemental dietary fat and treated with bST to assess effects of n-3 fatty acid supply, bovine somatotropin (bST), and stage of lactation on hepatic gene expression. Cows were blocked by expected calving date and previous milk yield and assigned randomly to treatment. Supplemental dietary fat was provided from calving as either whole high-oil sunflower seeds (SS; 10% of dietary dry matter; n-6/n-3 ratio of 4.6) as a source of linoleic acid or a mixture of Alifet-High Energy and Alifet-Repro (AF; 3.5 and 1.5% of dietary dry matter, respectively; n-6/n-3 ratio of 2.6) as a source of protected n-3 fatty acids. Cows were treated with 0 (SSN, AFN) or 500 (SSY, AFY) mg of bST every 10 d from 12 to 70 d in milk (DIM) and at 14-d intervals thereafter. Liver biopsies were collected on -12, 10, 24, and 136 DIM for gene expression analysis. Growth hormone receptor (GHR), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP3), hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha), fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) were the target genes and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) was used as an endogenous control gene. Expression was measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analyses of 4 samples from each of 32 cows (8 complete blocks). Amounts of hepatic HPRT mRNA were not affected by bST or diet but were increased by approximately 3.8% in early lactation (3.42, 3.52, 3.54, and 3.41 x 10(4) message copies for -12, 10, 24, and 136 DIM, respectively). This small change had little detectable impact on the ability of HPRT to serve as an internal control gene. Amounts of hepatic GHR, IGF-I, and IGFBP3 mRNA were reduced by 1.5 to 2-fold after calving. Expression of GHR and IGF-I increased and IGFBP3 tended to increase within 12 d (by 24 DIM) of bST administration. These effects of bST persisted through 136 DIM. Hepatic HNF4alpha mRNA was not altered by DIM or

  18. EFFECT OF ACIDITY ON ACID-SENSITIVE UV CURING SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-dao Chen; Bing Wu; Xiao-yin Hong

    1999-01-01

    By using diphenyliodonium salts with different counterions as photo acid generators (PAGs), the effect of acidity on ring-opening polymerization of epoxy monomers and polycondensation of polyol with hexamethoxymethyl melamine (HMMM) was studied. The result shows that the rate of ring-opening polymerization is evidently dependent on the acidity of the acid and strong photo-generated acid is required.However, there is a leveling effect in the polycondensation system; if the photo-generated acid is stronger than protonated HMMM, the acidity does not obviously affect the polycondensation rate.

  19. Determination of Sialic Acids by Acidic Ninhydrin Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao,Kenzabroh

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available A new acidic ninhydrin method for determining free sialic acids is described. The method is based on the reaction of sialic acids with Gaitonde's acid ninhydrin reagent 2 which yields a stable color with an absorption maximum at 470 nm. The standard curve is linear in the range of 5 to 500 nmol of N-acetylneuraminic acid per 0.9 ml of reaction mixture. The reaction was specific only for sialic acids among the various sugars and sugar derivatives examined. Some interference of this method by cysteine, cystine and tryptophan was noted, although their absorption maxima differed from that of sialic acids. The interference by these amino acids was eliminated with the use of a small column of cation-exchange resin. The acidic ninhydrin method provides a simple and rapid method for the determination of free sialic acids in biological materials.

  20. Efficient production of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch by using a genetically modified L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient and alpha-amylase-secreting Lactobacillus plantarum strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 alpha-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only D-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch.